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Sample records for localized hole energy-level

  1. Perovskite Solar Cells Employing Dopant-Free Organic Hole Transport Materials with Tunable Energy Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsheng; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Qi; Chen, Huajun; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Yang, Yang Michael; Song, Tze-Bin; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-20

    Conjugated small-molecule hole-transport materials (HTMs) with tunable energy levels are designed and synthesized for efficient perovskite solar cells. A champion device with efficiency of 16.2% is demonstrated using a dopant-free DERDTS-TBDT HTM, while the DORDTS-DFBT-HTM-based device shows an inferior performance of 6.2% due to its low hole mobility and unmatched HOMO level with the valence band of perovskite film. PMID:26588665

  2. Energy level alignment of electrically doped hole transport layers with transparent and conductive indium tin oxide and polymer anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehse, Karsten; Olthof, Selina; Walzer, Karsten; Leo, Karl; Johnson, Robert L.; Glowatzki, Hendrik; Bröker, Benjamin; Koch, Norbert

    2007-10-01

    Using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, we investigated the energy level alignment at the interfaces of typical anodes used in organic electronics, indium tin oxide (ITO) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), with the oligomeric hole transport material N ,N,N',N'-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)-benzidine (MeO-TPD), and studied the influence of electrical interface doping by the strong electron acceptor tetrafluoro tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ). The fundamentally different anode materials with work functions of 4.40eV (ITO) and 4.85eV (PEDOT:PSS) show different hole injection barriers, which also depend on the thickness of the F4-TCNQ interface dopant layer. PEDOT:PSS anodes exhibit a consistently lower hole injection barrier to MeO-TPD compared to ITO by 0.1eV. We attribute this low hole injection barrier to additional charge transfer reactions at the PEDOT:PSS/MeO-TPD interface. In contrast, the deposition of the electron acceptor at the interface helps significantly to lower the hole injection barrier for ITO anodes.

  3. Local temperature for dynamical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Sean A.; di Criscienzo, R.; Nadalini, M.; Vanzo, L.; Zerbini, S.

    2009-05-01

    A local Hawking temperature was recently derived for any future outer trapping horizon in spherical symmetry, using a Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method, and is given by a dynamical surface gravity as defined geometrically. Descriptions are given of the operational meaning of the temperature, in terms of what observers measure, and its relation to the usual Hawking temperature for static black holes. Implications for the final fate of an evaporating black hole are discussed.

  4. Black holes and local dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegyi, D. J.; Kolb, E. W.; Olive, K. A.

    1986-01-01

    Two independent constraints are placed on the amount of dark matter in black holes contained in the galactic disk. First, gas accretion by black holes leads to X-ray emission which cannot exceed the observed soft X-ray background. Second, metals produced in stellar processes that lead to black hole formation cannot exceed the observed disk metal abundance. Based on these constraints, it appears unlikely that the missing disk mass could be contained in black holes. A consequence of this conclusion is that at least two different types of dark matter are needed to solve the various missing mass problems.

  5. Local Operators in the Eternal Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2015-11-01

    In the AdS /CFT correspondence, states obtained by Hamiltonian evolution of the thermofield doubled state are also dual to an eternal black-hole geometry, which is glued to the boundary with a time shift generated by a large diffeomorphism. We describe gauge-invariant relational observables that probe the black hole interior in these states and constrain their properties using effective field theory. By adapting recent versions of the information paradox we show that these observables are necessarily described by state-dependent bulk-boundary maps, which we construct explicitly.

  6. Local Operators in the Eternal Black Hole.

    PubMed

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2015-11-20

    In the AdS/CFT correspondence, states obtained by Hamiltonian evolution of the thermofield doubled state are also dual to an eternal black-hole geometry, which is glued to the boundary with a time shift generated by a large diffeomorphism. We describe gauge-invariant relational observables that probe the black hole interior in these states and constrain their properties using effective field theory. By adapting recent versions of the information paradox we show that these observables are necessarily described by state-dependent bulk-boundary maps, which we construct explicitly. PMID:26636843

  7. Slant-hole collimator, dual mode sterotactic localization method

    DOEpatents

    Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2002-01-01

    The use of a slant-hole collimator in the gamma camera of dual mode stereotactic localization apparatus allows the acquisition of a stereo pair of scintimammographic images without repositioning of the gamma camera between image acquisitions.

  8. Black supernovae and black holes in non-local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Malafarina, Daniele; Modesto, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    In a previous paper, we studied the interior solution of a collapsing body in a non-local theory of gravity super-renormalizable at the quantum level. We found that the classical singularity is replaced by a bounce, after which the body starts expanding. A black hole, strictly speaking, never forms. The gravitational collapse does not create an event horizon but only an apparent one for a finite time. In this paper, we solve the equations of motion assuming that the exterior solution is static. With such an assumption, we are able to reconstruct the solution in the whole spacetime, namely in both the exterior and interior regions. Now the gravitational collapse creates an event horizon in a finite comoving time, but the central singularity is approached in an infinite time. We argue that these black holes should be unstable, providing a link between the scenarios with and without black holes. Indeed, we find a non catastrophic ghost-instability of the metric in the exterior region. Interestingly, under certain conditions, the lifetime of our black holes exactly scales as the Hawking evaporation time.

  9. Ligand-hole localization in oxides with unusual valence Fe

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Tin; Saito, Takashi; Hayashi, Naoaki; Takano, Mikio; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Unusual high-valence states of iron are stabilized in a few oxides. A-site-ordered perovskite-structure oxides contain such iron cations and exhibit distinct electronic behaviors at low temperatures, e.g. charge disproportionation (4Fe4+ → 2Fe3+ + 2Fe5+) in CaCu3Fe4O12 and intersite charge transfer (3Cu2+ + 4Fe3.75+ → 3Cu3+ + 4Fe3+) in LaCu3Fe4O12. Here we report the synthesis of solid solutions of CaCu3Fe4O12 and LaCu3Fe4O12 and explain how the instabilities of their unusual valence states of iron are relieved. Although these behaviors look completely different from each other in simple ionic models, they can both be explained by the localization of ligand holes, which are produced by the strong hybridization of iron d and oxygen p orbitals in oxides. The localization behavior in the charge disproportionation of CaCu3Fe4O12 is regarded as charge ordering of the ligand holes, and that in the intersite charge transfer of LaCu3Fe4O12 is regarded as a Mott transition of the ligand holes. PMID:22690318

  10. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Local Hawking temperature for dynamical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, S. A.; Di Criscienzo, R.; Nadalini, M.; Vanzo, L.; Zerbini, S.

    2009-03-01

    A local Hawking temperature is derived for any future outer trapping horizon in spherical symmetry, using a Hamilton Jacobi variant of the Parikh Wilczek tunneling method. It is given by a dynamical surface gravity as defined geometrically. The operational meaning of the temperature is that Kodama observers just outside the horizon measure an invariantly redshifted temperature, diverging at the horizon itself. In static, asymptotically flat cases, the Hawking temperature as usually defined by the Killing vector agrees in standard cases, but generally differs by a relative redshift factor between the horizon and infinity, this being the temperature measured by static observers at infinity. Likewise, the geometrical surface gravity reduces to the Newtonian surface gravity in the Newtonian limit, while the Killing definition instead reflects measurements at infinity. This may resolve a long-standing puzzle concerning the Hawking temperature for the extremal limit of the charged stringy black hole, namely that it is the local temperature which vanishes. In general, this confirms the quasi-stationary picture of black-hole evaporation in early stages. However, the geometrical surface gravity is generally not the surface gravity of a static black hole with the same parameters.

  11. Hole localization, water dissociation mechanisms, and band alignment at aqueous-titania interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, John L.

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising method for generating clean energy, but materials that can efficiently act as photocatalysts are scarce. This is in part due to the fact that exposure to water can strongly alter semiconductor surfaces and therefore photocatalyst performance. Many materials are not stable in aqueous environments; in other cases, local changes in structure may occur, affecting energy-level alignment. Even in the simplest case, dynamic fluctuations modify the organization of interface water. Accounting for such effects requires knowledge of the dominant local structural motifs and also accurate semiconductor band-edge positions, making quantitative prediction of energy-level alignments computationally challenging. Here we employ a combined theoretical approach to study the structure, energy alignment, and hole localization at aqueous-titania interfaces. We calculate the explicit aqueous-semiconductor interface using ab initio molecular dynamics, which provides the fluctuating atomic structure, the extent of water dissociation, and the resulting electrostatic potential. For both anatase and rutile TiO2 we observe spontaneous water dissociation and re-association events that occur via distinct mechanisms. We also find a higher-density water layer occurring on anatase. In both cases, we find that the second monolayer of water plays a crucial role in controlling the extent of water dissociation. Using hybrid functional calculations, we then investigate the propensity for dissociated waters to stabilize photo-excited carriers, and compare the results of rutile and anatase aqueous interfaces. Finally, we use the GW approach from many-body perturbation theory to obtain the position of semiconductor band edges relative to the occupied 1b1 level and thus the redox levels of water, and examine how local structural modifications affect these offsets. This work was performed in collaboration with N. Kharche, M. Z. Ertem, J. T. Muckerman, and M. S

  12. The galaxy luminosity function and the Local Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbourn, J. R.; Shanks, T.

    2016-06-01

    In a previous study Whitbourn & Shanks have reported evidence for a local void underdense by ≈15 per cent extending to 150-300 h-1 Mpc around our position in the Southern Galactic Cap (SGC). Assuming a local luminosity function they modelled K- and r-limited number counts and redshift distributions in the 6dFGS/2MASS and SDSS redshift surveys and derived normalized n(z) ratios relative to the standard homogeneous cosmological model. Here we test further these results using maximum likelihood techniques that solve for the galaxy density distributions and the galaxy luminosity function simultaneously. We confirm the results from the previous analysis in terms of the number density distributions, indicating that our detection of the `Local Hole' in the SGC is robust to the assumption of either our previous, or newly estimated, luminosity functions. However, there are discrepancies with previously published K- and r-band luminosity functions. In particular the r-band luminosity function has a steeper faint end slope than the r0.1 results of Blanton et al. but is consistent with the r0.1 results of Montero-Dorta & Prada and Loveday et al.

  13. Gauge/ gravity correspondence, bulk locality and quantum black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Debajyoti

    The aim of this dissertation is threefold. We begin by the study of two parallel ideal cosmic strings in the presence of non-minimal scalar fields and spin- 1 gauge fields. We show that the contributions of the non-minimal term on the interaction energy between the strings are similar to that of the gauge field for a particular value of non-minimal coupling parameter. In this context we clarify some of the issues that arise when comparing the renormalization of black hole entropy and entanglement entropy using the replica trick. In the second part of the dissertation we study the process of bound state formation in clusters of Dp- brane collision and Dp shell/ Membrane collapse processes. We consider two mechanisms for bound state formation. The first, operative at weak coupling in the worldvolume gauge theory, is creation of W-bosons. The second, operative at strong coupling, corresponds to formation of a black hole in the dual supergravity. These two processes agree qualitatively at intermediate coupling, in accord with the correspondence principle of Horowitz and Polchinski. We show that the size of the bound state and timescale for formation of a bound state agree at the correspondence point, along with other relevant thermodynamic quantities. The timescale involves matching a parametric resonance in the gauge theory to a quasinormal mode in supergravity. Finally we study construction of local operators in AdS using the generalized AdS/ CFT correspondence. After briefly sketching previous works on this topic which involve massless and massive scalar fields, we present similar construction for spin- 1 and spin- 2 gauge fields. Working in holographic gauge in the bulk, at leading order in 1/N bulk gauge fields are obtained by smearing boundary currents over a sphere on the complexified boundary, while linearized metric fluctuations are obtained by smearing the boundary stress tensor over a ball. This representation respects AdS covariance up to a compensating

  14. The black hole mass function derived from local spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Hartley, Matthew T.

    2014-07-10

    We present our determination of the nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass function for spiral galaxies in the local universe, established from a volume-limited sample consisting of a statistically complete collection of the brightest spiral galaxies in the southern (δ < 0°) hemisphere. Our SMBH mass function agrees well at the high-mass end with previous values given in the literature. At the low-mass end, inconsistencies exist in previous works that still need to be resolved, but our work is more in line with expectations based on modeling of black hole evolution. This low-mass end of the spectrum is critical to our understanding of the mass function and evolution of black holes since the epoch of maximum quasar activity. The sample is defined by a limiting luminosity (redshift-independent) distance, D{sub L} = 25.4 Mpc (z = 0.00572) and a limiting absolute B-band magnitude, M{sub B}=−19.12. These limits define a sample of 140 spiral galaxies, with 128 measurable pitch angles to establish the pitch angle distribution for this sample. This pitch-angle distribution function may be useful in the study of the morphology of late-type galaxies. We then use an established relationship between the logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle and the mass of the central SMBH in a host galaxy in order to estimate the mass of the 128 respective SMBHs in this volume-limited sample. This result effectively gives us the distribution of mass for SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies over a lookback time, t{sub L} ≤ 82.1 h{sub 67.77}{sup −1} Myr and contained within a comoving volume, V{sub C} = 3.37 × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup −3} Mpc{sup 3}. We estimate that the density of SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies in the local universe is ρ=5.54{sub −2.73}{sup +6.55} × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup 3} M{sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3}. Thus, our derived cosmological SMBH mass density for spiral galaxies is Ω{sub BH}=4.35{sub −2.15}{sup +5.14} × 10{sup –7} h{sub 67.77}. Assuming that

  15. Localized hole effects in inner-shell excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T.N.; Orel, A.E.

    1983-10-14

    Ab initio calculations of valence shell ionization potentials have shown that orbital relaxation and correlation differences usually make contributions of comparable magnitude. In marked contrast to this observation is the situation for deep core ionization, where correlation differences (approx. 1 eV) play a relatively minor role compared to orbital relaxation (approx. 20 eV). Theoretical calculations have shown that this relaxation is most easily described if the 1s-vacancy created by a K-shell excitation is allowed to localize on one of the atomic centers. For molecules possessing a center of inversion, this means that the molecular orbitals that best describe the final state do not transform as any irreducible representation of the molecular point group. Recent experimental work by Shaw, King, Read and Cvejanovic and by Stefani and coworkers has prompted us to carry out further calculations on N/sub 2/, as well as analogous investigations of 1s/sub N/ ..-->.. ..pi..* excitation in NO and N/sub 2/O. The generalized oscillator strengths display a striking similarity and point to the essential correctness of the localized hole picture for N/sub 2/. The theoretical calculations are briefly described, followed by a summary of the results and comparison to experiment, followed by a short discussion.

  16. Magnetizm Localization and Hole Localization in Fermionic Atoms Loaded on Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Masahiko; Yamada, Susumu; Taniguchi, Nobuhiko; Machida, Masahiko

    2009-03-01

    In order to study an interplay of disorder, correlation, and spin imbalance on antiferromagnetism, we systematically explore the ground state of one-dimensional spin-imbalanced Fermionic atoms loaded on an optical lattice by using the density-matrix renormalization group method [1]. We find that disorders localize the antiferromagnetic spin density wave induced by imbalanced fermions and the increase of the disorder magnitude shrinks the areas of the localized antiferromagnetized regions. Moreover, the antiferromagnetism finally disappears above a large disorder. We also study hole doped cases [2]. Concentrating on the doped-hole density profile, we find in a large U/t regime that the clean system exhibits a simple fluid-like behavior whereas finite disorders create locally Mott regions which expand their area with increasing the disorder strength contrary to the conventional sense. References [1] M. Okumura, S. Yamada, N. Taniguchi, and M. Machida, arXiv:0810:3953. [2] M. Okumura, S. Yamada, N. Taniguchi, and M. Machida, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 016407 (2008).

  17. Direct observation of the hole protonation state and hole localization site in DNA-oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Khanduri, Deepti; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, it is shown that the incorporation of an 8-deuteroguanine (G*) moiety in DNA-oligomers allows for direct determination at 77 K of (i) the location of holes (i.e., the radical site) within dsDNA at specific base sites, even within stacks of G, as well as (ii) the protonation state of the hole at that site. These findings are based on our work and demonstrate that selective deuteration at C-8 on guanine moiety in dGuo results in an ESR signal from the guanine cation radical (G*•+) which is easily distinguishable from that of the undeuterated guanine cation radical (G•+). G*•+ is also found to be easily distinguishable from its conjugate base, the N1-deprotonated radical, G*(−H)•. Our ESR results clearly establish that at 77 K (i) one-electron oxidized guanine in double stranded DNA-oligomers exists as the deprotonated neutral radical G(−H)• as a result of facile proton transfer to the hydrogen bonded cytosine, and (ii) the hole is preferentially located at the 5′-end in several ds DNA-oligomers with a GGG sequence. PMID:19469533

  18. Local invariants vanishing on stationary horizons: a diagnostic for locating black holes.

    PubMed

    Page, Don N; Shoom, Andrey A

    2015-04-10

    Inspired by the example of Abdelqader and Lake for the Kerr metric, we construct local scalar polynomial curvature invariants that vanish on the horizon of any stationary black hole: the squared norms of the wedge products of n linearly independent gradients of scalar polynomial curvature invariants, where n is the local cohomogeneity of the spacetime. PMID:25910105

  19. The coevolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes: a local perspective.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy M; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2011-07-01

    One of the most fascinating discoveries in the past decade was that galaxies typically contain a centrally located black hole with a mass that is millions or even billions of times that of the Sun. There is now compelling evidence that we cannot understand how galaxies formed and evolved without understanding the life cycles of these supermassive black holes (and vice versa). We summarize the current understanding of this coevolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes (based largely on observations of the local, present-day universe) and describe prospects for the future. PMID:21737734

  20. Structural phase-dependent hole localization and transport in bismuth vanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Kyoung E.; Hwang, Gyeong S.

    2013-05-01

    We present theoretical evidence for the phase dependence of hole localization and transport in bismuth vanadate (BiVO4). Our hybrid density-functional theory calculations predict that, in the tetragonal phase [tetragonal scheelite BiVO4 (ts-BiVO4)], an excess hole tends to localize around a BiO8 polyhedron with strong lattice distortion, whereas, in the monoclinic phase [monoclinic scheelite BiVO4 (ms-BiVO4)], it spreads over many lattice sites. The phase-dependent behavior is likely related to the higher structural stability of ms-BiVO4 than ts-BiVO4, which may suppress hole-induced lattice distortions. Our study also demonstrates that the relatively weakly localized hole in ms-BiVO4 undergoes faster diffusion compared to the case of ts-BiVO4, irrespective of the fact that the degrees of localization and mobility vary depending on the choice of exchange-correlation functional. The mobility difference may provide an explanation for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of ms-BiVO4 over ts-BiVO4 for water oxidation, considering that the increased mobility would lead to an increase in the hole current to the catalyst surface.

  1. Local free-fall temperature of modified Schwarzschild black hole in rainbow spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Park, Young-Jai

    2016-06-01

    We obtain a (5+1)-dimensional global flat embedding of modified Schwarzschild black hole in rainbow gravity. We show that local free-fall temperature in rainbow gravity, which depends on different energy ω of a test particle, is finite at the event horizon for a freely falling observer, while local temperature is divergent at the event horizon for a fiducial observer. Moreover, these temperatures in rainbow gravity satisfy similar relations to those of the Schwarzschild black hole except the overall factor g(ω), which plays a key role of rainbow functions in this embedding approach.

  2. Heavy holes localization, metal-insulator transition and superconductivity of HTSC oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A.I.; Anshukova, N.V.; Ivanova, L.I.; Maljuchkov, O.T.; Rusakov, A.P.

    1996-12-31

    On the basis of experimental studies of specific heat, magnetic properties and thermal expansion it was shown that dielectric-metal phase transition was the consequence of delocalization of heavy holes located on metal-apical oxygen bonds in the high-temperature superconducting (HTSC) oxide systems. The dielectric gaps in electronic spectrum of the oxide systems appear owing to the charge density waves (CDW) of the ordered arrays of such localized (heavy) holes. The CDW is the microscopic reason of the negative thermal expansion observed in dielectric phases of some HTSC systems. The free carriers introduced in the oxide systems by doping can couple through excitations of these localized holes (local bosons). Such free carriers pairing leads to the high-temperature superconductivity with small coherence length and anomalous (with positive curvature) temperature dependence of H{sub c2}(T). The suggested localized holes on the metal-apical oxygen bonds and local bosons in addition to the usual phonons are the basis for the explanation of the experimental data presented in this report.

  3. A local characterization for static charged black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Guillermo A.; Vera, Raül

    2011-01-01

    We obtain a purely local characterization that singles out the Majumdar-Papapetrou class, the near-horizon Bertotti-Robinson geometry and the Reissner-Nordström exterior solution, together with its plane and hyperbolic counterparts, among the static electrovacuum spacetimes. These five classes are found to form the whole set of static Einstein-Maxwell fields without sources and conformally flat space of orbits, that is, the conformastat electrovacuum spacetimes. The main part of the proof consists in showing that a functional relationship between the gravitational and electromagnetic potentials must always exist. The classification procedure also provides an improved characterization of Majumdar-Papapetrou, by only requiring a conformally flat space of orbits with a vanishing Ricci scalar of the usual conveniently rescaled 3-metric. A simple global consideration allows us to state that the asymptotically flat subset of the Majumdar-Papapetrou class and the Reissner-Nordström exterior solution are the only asymptotically flat conformastat electrovacuum spacetimes.

  4. Black hole complementarity with local horizons and Horowitz-Maldacena's proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungwook E.; Hwang, Dong-il; Yeom, Dong-han; Zoe, Heeseung

    2008-12-01

    To implement the consistent black hole complementarity principle, we need two assumptions: first, there exists a singularity near the center, and second, global horizons are the same as local horizons. However, these assumptions are not true in general. In this paper, the authors study a charged black hole in which the second assumption may not hold. From the previous simulations, we have argued that the event horizon is quite close to the outer horizon, and it seems not harmful to black hole complementarity; however, the Cauchy horizon can be different from the inner horizon, and a violation of complementarity will be possible. To maintain complementarity, we need to assume a selection principle between the singularity and the Hawking radiation generating surface; we suggest that Horowitz-Maldacena's proposal can be useful for this purpose. Finally, we discussed some conditions under which the selection principle may not work.

  5. Dynamic screening of a localized hole during photoemission from a metal cluster

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in attosecond spectroscopy techniques have fueled the interest in the theoretical description of electronic processes taking place in the subfemtosecond time scale. Here we study the coupled dynamic screening of a localized hole and a photoelectron emitted from a metal cluster using a semi-classical model. Electron density dynamics in the cluster is calculated with time-dependent density functional theory, and the motion of the photoemitted electron is described classically. We show that the dynamic screening of the hole by the cluster electrons affects the motion of the photoemitted electron. At the very beginning of its trajectory, the photoemitted electron interacts with the cluster electrons that pile up to screen the hole. Within our model, this gives rise to a significant reduction of the energy lost by the photoelectron. Thus, this is a velocity-dependent effect that should be accounted for when calculating the average losses suffered by photoemitted electrons in metals. PMID:22873820

  6. Horizon wave function for single localized particles: GUP and quantum black-hole decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto; Scardigli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    A localized particle in Quantum Mechanics is described by a wave packet in position space, regardless of its energy. However, from the point of view of General Relativity, if the particle's energy density exceeds a certain threshold, it should be a black hole. To combine these two pictures, we introduce a horizon wave function determined by the particle wave function in position space, which eventually yields the probability that the particle is a black hole. The existence of a minimum mass for black holes naturally follows, albeit not in the form of a sharp value around the Planck scale, but rather like a vanishing probability that a particle much lighter than the Planck mass may be a black hole. We also show that our construction entails an effective generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), simply obtained by adding the uncertainties coming from the two wave functions associated with a particle. Finally, the decay of microscopic (quantum) black holes is also described in agreement with what the GUP predicts.

  7. Dynamics of localized Kaluza-Klein black holes in a collapsing universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastor, David; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Traschen, Jennie

    2012-03-01

    The Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914 prohibits corporate mergers that would result in certain highly undesired end states. We study an exact solution of the Einstein equations describing localized, charged Kaluza-Klein black holes in a collapsing de Sitter universe and seek to demonstrate that a similar effect holds, preventing a potentially catastrophic black hole merger. As the collapse proceeds, it is natural to expect that the black hole undergoes a topological transition, wrapping around the shrinking compact dimension to merge with itself and form a black string. However, the putative uniform charged black string end state is singular and such a transition would violate (a reasonable notion of) cosmic censorship. We present analytic and numerical evidence that strongly suggests the absence of such a transition. Based on this evidence, we expect that the Kaluza-Klein black hole horizon stays localized, despite the increasingly constraining size of the compact dimension. On the other hand, the de Sitter horizon does change between spherical and cylindrical topologies in a simple way.

  8. Effects of local electric surface potential on holes charging process in uncapped germanium nanocrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Marchand, Aude; El Hdiy, Abdelillah

    2015-04-21

    The charging kinetics of holes are investigated in an uncapped Ge nanocrystal by the use of the nano-electron beam induced current technique. The charging process is studied under zero volt or under an appropriate electric field. The investigation is repeated many times on the same nanocrystal and on others in the same sample to attest of the reproducibility of the results. At 0 V, the cycles of charging kinetics are superimposed and are in a steady state, but an instantaneous local and negative surface potential, established in the nanocrystal at the beginning of the kinetics, slows down the holes charging process. Under an external field, the energy band bending accentuation affects the holes charging time constants. As a result, the holes charging cycles weakly affect the electrical performance of the thin oxide as is indicated by the value of the measured local resistivity of 6 × 10{sup 10}–10{sup 11} Ω cm, which is relatively lower than that of the thick thermal oxide.

  9. On the localization of four-dimensional brane-world black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanti, P.; Pappas, N.; Zuleta, K.

    2013-12-01

    In the context of brane-world models, we pursue the question of the existence of five-dimensional solutions describing regular black holes localized close to the brane. Employing a perturbed Vaidya-type line-element embedded in a warped fifth dimension, we attempt to localize the extended black-string singularity, and to restore the regularity of the AdS spacetime at a finite distance from the brane by introducing an appropriate bulk energy-momentum tensor. As a source for this bulk matter, we are considering a variety of non-ordinary field-theory models of scalar fields either minimally coupled to gravity, but including non-canonical kinetic terms, mixing terms, derivative interactions and ghosts, or non-minimally coupled to gravity through a general coupling to the Ricci scalar. In all models considered, even in those characterized by a high degree of flexibility, a negative result was reached. Our analysis demonstrates how difficult the analytic construction of a localized brane-world black hole may be in the context of a well-defined field-theory model. Finally, with regard to the question of the existence or not of a static classical black-hole solution on the brane, our analysis suggests that such solutions could in principle exist; however, the associated field configuration itself has to be dynamic.

  10. Ground state of the holes localized in II-VI quantum dots with Gaussian potential profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semina, M. A.; Golovatenko, A. A.; Rodina, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the hole states in II-IV quantum dots of spherical and ellipsoidal shapes, described by smooth potential confinement profiles that can be modeled by Gaussian functions in all three dimensions. The universal dependencies of the hole energy, g factor, and localization length on the quantum dot barrier height, as well as the ratio of effective masses of the light and heavy holes are presented for the spherical quantum dots. The splitting of the fourfold degenerate ground state into two doublets is derived for anisotropic (oblate or prolate) quantum dots. Variational calculations are combined with numerical ones in the framework of the Luttinger Hamiltonian. Constructed trial functions are optimized by comparison with the numerical results. The effective hole g factor is found to be independent of the quantum dot size and barrier height and is approximated by a simple universal expression depending only on the effective mass parameters. The results can be used for interpreting and analyzing experimental spectra measured in various structures with quantum dots of different semiconductor materials.

  11. Detailed measurements of local heat transfer coefficient in the entrance to normal and inclined film cooling holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, D.R.H.; Byerley, A.R.; Ireland, P.T.; Wang, Z.; Jones, T.V.; Kohler, S.T.

    1996-04-01

    The local heat transfer inside the entrance to large-scale models of film cooling holes has been measured using the transient heat transfer technique. The method employs temperature-sensitive liquid crystals to measure the surface temperature of large-scale perspex models. Full distributions of local Nusselt number were calculated based on the cooling passage centerline gas temperature ahead of the cooling hole. The circumferentially averaged Nusselt number was also calculated based on the local mixed bulk driving gas temperature to aid interpretation of the results, and to broaden the potential application of the data. Data are presented for a single film cooling hole inclined at 90 and 150 deg to the coolant duct wall. Both holes exhibited entry length heat transfer levels that were significantly lower than those predicted by entry length data in the presence of crossflow. The reasons for the comparative reduction are discussed in terms of the interpreted flow field.

  12. Surface structure and hole localization in bismuth vanadate: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Kyoung E.; Hwang, Gyeong S.

    2013-09-01

    The monoclinic and tetragonal phases of bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) have been found to exhibit significantly different photocatalytic activities for water splitting. To assess a possible surface effect on the phase-dependent behavior, we calculate and compare the geometries and electronic structures of the monoclinic and tetragonal BiVO4 (001) surfaces using hybrid density functional theory. The relaxed atomic configurations of these two surfaces are found to be nearly identical, while an excess hole shows a relatively stronger tendency to localize at the surface than the bulk in both phases. Possible factors for the phase-dependent photocatalytic activity of BiVO4 are discussed.

  13. Effects of hole localization on limiting p-type conductivity in oxide and nitride semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J. L.; Janotti, A.; Van de Walle, C. G.

    2014-01-07

    We examine how hole localization limits the effectiveness of substitutional acceptors in oxide and nitride semiconductors and explain why p-type doping of these materials has proven so difficult. Using hybrid density functional calculations, we find that anion-site substitutional impurities in AlN, GaN, InN, and ZnO lead to atomic-like states that localize on the impurity atom itself. Substitution with cation-site impurities, on the other hand, triggers the formation of polarons that become trapped on nearest-neighbor anions, generally leading to large ionization energies for these acceptors. Unlike shallow effective-mass acceptors, these two types of deep acceptors couple strongly with the lattice, significantly affecting the optical properties and severely limiting prospects for achieving p-type conductivity in these wide-band-gap materials.

  14. Particle-hole symmetry, many-body localization, and topological edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Friedman, Aaron J.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Potter, Andrew C.

    We study the excited states of interacting fermions in one dimension with particle-hole symmetric disorder (equivalently, random-bond XXZ chains) using a combination of renormalization group methods and exact diagonalization. Absent interactions, the entire many-body spectrum exhibits infinite-randomness quantum critical behavior with highly degenerate excited states. We show that though interactions are an irrelevant perturbation in the ground state, they drastically affect the structure of excited states: even arbitrarily weak interactions split the degeneracies in favor of thermalization (weak disorder) or spontaneously broken particle-hole symmetry, driving the system into a many-body localized spin glass phase (strong disorder). In both cases, the quantum critical properties of the non-interacting model are destroyed, either by thermal decoherence or spontaneous symmetry breaking. This system then has the interesting and counterintuitive property that edges of the many-body spectrum are less localized than the center of the spectrum. We argue that our results rule out the existence of certain excited state symmetry-protected topological orders. Supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative (Grant GBMF4307 (ACP), the Quantum Materials Program at LBNL (RV), NSF Grant DMR-1455366 and UCOP Research Catalyst Award No. CA-15-327861 (SAP).

  15. Particle-hole symmetry, many-body localization, and topological edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Friedman, Aaron J.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Potter, Andrew C.

    2016-04-01

    We study the excited states of interacting fermions in one dimension with particle-hole symmetric disorder (equivalently, random-bond XXZ chains) using a combination of renormalization group methods and exact diagonalization. Absent interactions, the entire many-body spectrum exhibits infinite-randomness quantum critical behavior with highly degenerate excited states. We show that though interactions are an irrelevant perturbation in the ground state, they drastically affect the structure of excited states: Even arbitrarily weak interactions split the degeneracies in favor of thermalization (weak disorder) or spontaneously broken particle-hole symmetry, driving the system into a many-body localized spin glass phase (strong disorder). In both cases, the quantum critical properties of the noninteracting model are destroyed, either by thermal decoherence or spontaneous symmetry breaking. This system then has the interesting and counterintuitive property that edges of the many-body spectrum are less localized than the center of the spectrum. We argue that our results rule out the existence of certain excited state symmetry-protected topological orders.

  16. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Co-evolution of Black Hole Growth and Star Formation Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang, Yiping; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 × 107 M ⊙ using [Ne III] 15.56 μm and optical [O III] λ5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ~1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  17. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang Yiping; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-10

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} using [Ne III] 15.56 {mu}m and optical [O III] {lambda}5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear {approx}1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 {mu}m PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  18. Sky Localization of Complete Inspiral-Merger-Ringdown Signals for Nonspinning Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Lang, Ryan N.; Baker, John G.; Thorpe, James Ira

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the capability of LISA to measure the sky position of equal-mass, nonspinning black hole binaries, including for the first time the entire inspiral-merger-ringdown signal, the effect of the LISA orbits, and the complete three-channel LISA response. For an ensemble of systems near the peak of LISA's sensitivity band, with total rest mass of 2 x l0(exp 6) Stellar Mass at a redshift of z = 1 with random orientations and sky positions, we find median sky localization errors of approximately approx. 3 arcminutes. This is comparable to the field of view of powerful electromagnetic telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope, that could be used to search for electromagnetic signals associated with merging black holes. We investigate the way in which parameter errors decrease with measurement time, focusing specifically on the additional information provided during the merger-ringdown segment of the signal. We find that this information improves all parameter estimates directly, rather than through diminishing correlations with any subset of well-determined parameters.

  19. Magnetic field dependence of energy levels in biased bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, D. R.; Zarenia, M.; Chaves, Andrey; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-02-01

    Using the tight-binding approach, we study the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field on the energy levels of hexagonal, triangular, and circular bilayer graphene (BLG) quantum dots (QDs) with zigzag and armchair edges. We obtain the energy levels for AB (Bernal)-stacked BLG QDs in both the absence and the presence of a perpendicular electric field (i.e., biased BLG QDs). We find different regions in the spectrum of biased QDs with respect to the crossing point between the lowest-electron and -hole Landau levels of a biased BLG sheet. Those different regions correspond to electron states that are localized at the center, edge, or corner of the BLG QD. Quantum Hall corner states are found to be absent in circular BLG QDs. The spatial symmetry of the carrier density distribution is related to the symmetry of the confinement potential, the position of zigzag edges, and the presence or absence of interlayer inversion symmetry.

  20. Surface structure and hole localization in bismuth vanadate: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Kyoung E.; Hwang, Gyeong S.

    2013-09-23

    The monoclinic and tetragonal phases of bismuth vanadate (BiVO{sub 4}) have been found to exhibit significantly different photocatalytic activities for water splitting. To assess a possible surface effect on the phase-dependent behavior, we calculate and compare the geometries and electronic structures of the monoclinic and tetragonal BiVO{sub 4} (001) surfaces using hybrid density functional theory. The relaxed atomic configurations of these two surfaces are found to be nearly identical, while an excess hole shows a relatively stronger tendency to localize at the surface than the bulk in both phases. Possible factors for the phase-dependent photocatalytic activity of BiVO{sub 4} are discussed.

  1. Asymptotically locally flat spacetimes and dynamical nonspherically-symmetric black holes in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnich, Glenn; Troessaert, Cédric; Tempo, David; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    The theory of massive gravity proposed by Bergshoeff, Hohm and Townsend is considered in the special case of the pure irreducibly fourth-order quadratic Lagrangian. It is shown that the asymptotically locally flat black holes of this theory can be consistently deformed to "black flowers" that are no longer spherically symmetric. Moreover, we construct radiating spacetimes settling down to these black flowers in the far future. The generic case can be shown to fit within a relaxed set of asymptotic conditions as compared to the ones of general relativity at null infinity, while the asymptotic symmetries remain the same. Conserved charges as surface integrals at null infinity are constructed following a covariant approach, and their algebra represents BMS3 , but without central extensions. For solutions possessing an event horizon, we derive the first law of thermodynamics from these surface integrals.

  2. Effect of black holes in local dwarf spheroidal galaxies on gamma-ray constraints on dark matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2014-11-01

    Recent discoveries of optical signatures of black holes in dwarf galaxies indicates that low-mass galaxies can indeed host intermediate massive black holes. This motivates the assessment of the resulting effect on the host dark matter density profile, and the consequences for the constraints on the plane of the dark matter annihilation cross section versus mass, stemming from the nonobservation of gamma rays from local dwarf spheroidals with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We compute the density profile using three different prescriptions for the black hole mass associated with a given spheroidal galaxy, and taking into account the cutoff to the density from dark matter pair-annihilation. We find that the limits on the dark matter annihilation rate from observations of individual dwarfs are enhanced by factors of a few up to 1 06 , depending on the specific galaxy, on the black hole mass prescription, and on the dark matter particle mass. We estimate limits from combined observations of a sample of 15 dwarfs, for a variety of assumptions on the dwarf black hole mass and on the dark matter density profile prior to adiabatic contraction. We find that if black holes are indeed present in local dwarf spheroidals, then, independent of assumptions, (i) the dark matter interpretation of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess would be conclusively ruled out, (ii) wino dark matter would be excluded up to masses of about 3 TeV, and (iii) vanilla thermal relic weakly interacting massive particles must be heavier than 100 GeV.

  3. Focused Impedance Method (FIM) and Pigeon Hole Imaging (PHI) for localized measurements - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique-e Rabbani, K.

    2010-04-01

    This paper summarises up to date development in Focused Impedance Method (FIM) initiated by us. It basically involves taking the sum of two orthogonal tetra-polar impedance measurements around a common central region, giving a localized enhanced sensitivity. Although the basic idea requires 8 electrodes, versions with 6- and 4-electrodes were subsequently conceived and developed. The focusing effect has been verified in 2D and 3D phantoms and through numerical analysis. Dynamic stomach emptying, and ventilation of localized lung regions have been studied successfully suggesting further applications in monitoring of gastric acid secretion, artificial respiration, bladder emptying, etc. Multi-frequency FIM may help identify some diseases and disorders including certain cancers. FIM, being much simpler and having less number of electrodes, appears to have the potential to replace EIT for applications involving large and shallow organs. An enhancement of 6-electrode FIM led to Pigeon Hole Imaging (PHI) in a square matrix through backprojection in two orthogonal directions, good for localising of one or two well separated objects.

  4. Evidence for Black Hole Growth in Local Analogs to Lyman Break Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew; Heckman, Timothy M.; Overzier, Roderik A.; Hornschemeier, Ann; LaMassa, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used XMM-Newton to observe six Lyman break analogs (LBAs): members of the rare population of local galaxies that have properties that are very similar to distant Lyman break galaxies. Our six targets were specifically selected because they have optical emission-line properties that are intermediate between starbursts and Type 2 (obscured) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our new X-ray data provide an important diagnostic of the presence of an AGN. We find X-ray luminosities of order 10(sup 42) erg per second and ratios of X-ray to far-IR lummositles that are higher than values in pure starburst galaxies by factors ranging from approximately 3 to 30. This strongly suggests the presence of an AGN in at least some of the galaxies. The ratios of the luminosities of the hard (2-10 keV) X-ray to [O III] emission line are low by about an order of magnitude compared with Type 1 AGN, but are consistent with the broad range seen in Type 2 AGN. Either the AGN hard X-rays are significantly obscured or the [O III] emission is dominated by the starburst. We searched for an iron emission line at approximately 6.4 ke V, which is a key feature of obscured AGNs, but only detected emission at the approximately 2sigma level. Finally, we find that the ratios of the mid-infrared (24 micrometer) continuum to [O III]lambda 5007 luminosities in these LBAs are higher than the values for Type 2 AGN by an average of 0.8 dex. Combining all these clues, we conclude that an AGN is likely to be present, but that the bolometric luminosity is produced primarily by an intense starburst. If these black holes are radiating at the Eddington limit, their masses would lie in the range of 10(sup 5) - 10(sup 6) solar mass. These objects may offer ideal local laboratories to investigate the processes by which black holes grew in the early universe.

  5. Holes localized in nanostructures in an external magnetic field: g-factor and mixing of states

    SciTech Connect

    Semina, M. A.; Suris, R. A.

    2015-06-15

    The energy spectrum and wave functions of holes in the valence band in semiconductor nanosystems, including quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots, in an external magnetic field are theoretically investigated. The dependence of Zeeman splitting of the hole ground state upon variation in the size-quantization parameters with regard to the complex structure of the valence band and magnetic field-induced mixing of hole states is traced. Analytical formulas for describing the Zeeman effect in the valence band in the limiting cases of a quantum disk, spherically symmetric quantum dot, and quantum wire are presented. It is demonstrated that the g-factor of a hole is extremely sensitive to the hole-state composition (heavy or light hole) and, consequently, to the geometry of the size-quantization potential.

  6. Localization of a hole on an adenine-thymine radical cation in B-form DNA in water.

    PubMed

    Kravec, S M; Kinz-Thompson, C D; Conwell, E M

    2011-05-19

    A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been carried out using CP2K for a hole introduced into a B-form DNA molecule consisting of 10 adenine-thymine (A/T) pairs in water. At the beginning of the simulation, the hole wave function is extended over several adenines. Within 20-25 fs, the hole wave function contracts so that it is localized on a single A. At 300 K, it stays on this A for the length of the simulation, several hundred fs, with the wave function little changed. In a range of temperatures below 300 K, proton transfer from A to T is seen to take place within the A/T occupied by the hole; it is completed by ∼40 fs after the contraction. We show that the contraction is due to polarization of the water by the hole. This polarization also plays a role in the proton transfer. Implications for transport are considered. PMID:21491917

  7. Black hole microstates in AdS4 from supersymmetric localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benini, Francesco; Hristov, Kiril; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    This paper addresses a long standing problem, the counting of the microstates of supersymmetric asymptotically AdS black holes in terms of a holographically dual field theory. We focus on a class of asymptotically AdS4 static black holes preserving two real supercharges which are dual to a topologically twisted deformation of the ABJM theory. We evaluate in the large N limit the topologically twisted index of the ABJM theory and we show that it correctly reproduces the entropy of the AdS4 black holes. An extremization of the index with respect to a set of chemical potentials is required. We interpret it as the selection of the exact R-symmetry of the superconformal quantum mechanics describing the horizon of the black hole.

  8. Automated drawing system of quantum energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampoultzis, M.; Sinatkas, J.; Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to derive an automated system that provides advantageous drawings of energy spectra for quantum systems (nuclei, atoms, molecules, etc.) required in various physical sciences. The automation involves the development of appropriate computational code and graphical imaging system based on raw data insertion, theoretical calculations and experimental or bibliographic data insertion. The system determines the appropriate scale to depict graphically with the best possible way in the available space. The presently developed code operates locally and the results are displayed on the screen and can be exported to a PostScript file. We note its main features to arrange and visualize in the available space the energy levels with their identity, taking care the existence in the final diagram the least auxiliary deviations. Future improvements can be the use of Java and the availability on the Internet. The work involves the automated plotting of energy levels in molecules, atoms, nuclei and other types of quantized energy spectra. The automation involves the development of an appropriate computational code and graphical imaging system.

  9. Local bulk operators in AdS/CFT correspondence: A holographic description of the black hole interior

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Alex; Kabat, Daniel; Lifschytz, Gilad; Lowe, David A.

    2007-05-15

    To gain insight into how bulk locality emerges from the holographic conformal field theory (CFT), we reformulate the bulk-to-boundary map in as local a way as possible. In previous work, we carried out this program for Lorentzian anti-de Sitter (AdS), and showed the support on the boundary could always be reduced to a compact region spacelike separated from the bulk point. In the present work the idea is extended to a complexified boundary, where spatial coordinates are continued to imaginary values. This continuation enables us to represent a local bulk operator as a CFT operator with support on a finite disc on the complexified boundary. We treat general AdS in Poincare coordinates and AdS{sub 3} in Rindler coordinates. We represent bulk operators inside the horizon of a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole and we verify that the correct bulk two-point functions are reproduced, including the divergence when one point hits the BTZ singularity. We comment on the holographic description of black holes formed by collapse and discuss locality and holographic entropy counting at finite N.

  10. Communication: Hole localization in Al-doped quartz SiO{sub 2} within ab initio hybrid-functional DFT

    SciTech Connect

    Gerosa, Matteo; Bottani, Carlo Enrico

    2015-09-21

    We investigate the long-standing problem of hole localization at the Al impurity in quartz SiO{sub 2}, using a relatively recent DFT hybrid-functional method in which the exchange fraction is obtained ab initio, based on an analogy with the static many-body COHSEX approximation to the electron self-energy. As the amount of the admixed exact exchange in hybrid functionals has been shown to be determinant for properly capturing the hole localization, this problem constitutes a prototypical benchmark for the accuracy of the method, allowing one to assess to what extent self-interaction effects are avoided. We obtain good results in terms of description of the charge localization and structural distortion around the Al center, improving with respect to the more popular B3LYP hybrid-functional approach. We also discuss the accuracy of computed hyperfine parameters, by comparison with previous calculations based on other self-interaction-free methods, as well as experimental values. We discuss and rationalize the limitations of our approach in computing defect-related excitation energies in low-dielectric-constant insulators.

  11. Ultrasonic inspection of multiple-rivet-hole lap joint cracks using global analysis with local finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, Yeasin; Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of multiple-rivet-hole lap joint cracks has been introduced using combined analytical and finite element approach (CAFA). Finite element analyses have been performed on local damage area in spite of the whole large structure and transfer function based analytical model is used to analyze the full structure. "Scattered cube" of complex valued wave damage interaction coefficient (WDIC) that involves scattering and mode conversion of Lamb waves around the damage is used as coupling between analytical and FEM simulation. WDIC is captured for multiple angles of incident Lamb mode (S0 and A0) over the frequency domain to analyze the cracks of multiple-rivet-hole lap joint. By analyzing the scattered cube of WDICs over the frequency domain and azimuthal angles the optimum parameters can be determined for each angle of incidence and the most sensitive signals are obtained using WaveformRevealer2D (WFR2D). These sensitive signals confirm the detection of the butterfly cracks in rivet holes through the installment of the transmitting and sensing PWASs in the proper locations and selecting the right frequency of excitation.

  12. Local free-fall temperature of Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Choi, Jaedong; Park, Young-Jai

    2014-02-01

    We obtain a (5+1)-dimensional global flat embedding of the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger spacetime in the Einstein frame and a (5+2)-dimensional global flat embedding in the string frame. We show that the local free-fall temperatures for freely falling observers in each frame are finite at the event horizons, while the local temperatures for fiducial observers are divergent. We also observe that the local free-fall temperatures differ between the two frames.

  13. X-RAY CONSTRAINTS ON THE LOCAL SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE OCCUPATION FRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Baldassare, Vivienne; Greene, Jenny E.; Kelly, Brandon C.; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2015-01-20

    Distinct seed formation mechanisms are imprinted upon the fraction of dwarf galaxies currently containing a central supermassive black hole. Seeding by Population III remnants is expected to produce a higher occupation fraction than is generated with direct gas collapse precursors. Chandra observations of nearby early-type galaxies can directly detect even low-level supermassive black hole activity, and the active fraction immediately provides a firm lower limit to the occupation fraction. Here, we use the volume-limited AMUSE surveys of ∼200 optically selected early-type galaxies to characterize simultaneously, for the first time, the occupation fraction and the scaling of L {sub X} with M {sub star}, accounting for intrinsic scatter, measurement uncertainties, and X-ray limits. For early-type galaxies with M {sub star} < 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, we obtain a lower limit to the occupation fraction of >20% (at 95% confidence), but full occupation cannot be excluded. The preferred dependence of log L {sub X} upon log M {sub star} has a slope of ∼0.7-0.8, consistent with the ''downsizing'' trend previously identified from the AMUSE data set, and a uniform Eddington efficiency is disfavored at ∼2σ. We provide guidelines for the future precision with which these parameters may be refined with larger or more sensitive samples.

  14. Star formation and black hole accretion activity in rich local clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Matteo; Marleau, Francine R.; Fadda, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Context. We present a study of star formation and central black hole accretion activity of galaxies that are hosted in the two nearby (z ~ 0.2) rich galaxy clusters Abell 983 and 1731. Aims: We aim to quantify both the obscured and unobscured star formation rates, as well as the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of the environment in which the galaxy is located. Methods: We targeted the clusters with unprecedented deep infrared Spitzer observations (0.2 mJy at 24 micron), near-IR Palomar imaging and optical WIYN spectroscopy. The extent of our observations (~3 virial radii) covers the vast range of possible environments, from the very dense cluster centre to the very rarefied cluster outskirts and accretion regions. Results: The star-forming members of the two clusters present star formation rates that are comparable with those measured in coeval field galaxies. Analysis of the spatial arrangement of the spectroscopically confirmed members reveals an elongated distribution for A1731 with respect to the more uniform distribution of A983. The emerging picture is compatible with A983 being a fully evolved cluster, in contrast with the still actively accreting A1731. Conclusions: Analysis of the specific star formation rate reveals evidence of ongoing galaxy pre-processing along A1731's filament-like structure. Furthermore, the decrease in the number of star-forming galaxies and AGN towards the cluster cores suggests that the cluster environment is accelerating the ageing process of the galaxies and blocking further accretion of the cold gas that fuels both star formation and black hole accretion activity. The catalogue and the reduced images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A105

  15. Localization, lattice distortion, charge transition levels, and magnetism of small-polaronic hole- and electron-states in wide-gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lany, Stephan

    2010-03-01

    The formation of a small polaron, i.e. of a localized (electron or hole) quasi-particle state that is stabilized by a lattice distortion, is a problem in solid state physics that has eluded a quantitative description by first principles Hamiltonians for a long time. Specifically, conventional density functional theory calculations typically predict a much too delocalized state and usually fail to correctly predict the lattice distortions of localized hole-states in semiconductors and insulators. While this problem has been studied in detail for some prototypical cases like the Al impurity in SiO2, it has at the same time precluded an extensive theoretical literature on the phenomenology of systems with localized hole states, despite the potentially dramatic effect of hole localization on such timely research topics as p-type doping of oxides or that of diluted magnetic semiconductors. Indeed, many predictions for hole-introducing defects and impurities that were based on local density approximations have led to a qualitatively wrong physical picture about the lattice distortion, the energies of the hole-bearing acceptor levels in the gap, and about ferro-magnetic interactions between defects. In order to stabilize the polaronic localized states in the gap, we define a parameterized hole- (or electron-) state potential which increases the energy splitting between occupied and unoccupied orbitals, where we further require that a fundamental physical condition is satisfied, i.e., the piecewise linearity of the energy as a function of the occupation number. This requirement takes the form of a generalized Koopmans conditions, which uniquely determines the one free parameter of the hole- (electron-) state potential. Applying this method to the anion-p orbitals within the II-VI series of ZnO, ZnS, ZnSe, and ZnTe, we demonstrate electronic correlation effects remove the partial band occupation and the metallic band-structure character that is predicted by local density

  16. Individual electron and hole localization in submonolayer InN quantum sheets embedded in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feix, F.; Flissikowski, T.; Chèze, C.; Calarco, R.; Grahn, H. T.; Brandt, O.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate sub-monolayer InN quantum sheets embedded in GaN(0001) by temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy under both continuous-wave and pulsed excitation. Both the peak energy and the linewidth of the emission band associated with the quantum sheets exhibit an anomalous dependence on temperature indicative of carrier localization. Photoluminescence transients reveal a power law decay at low temperatures reflecting that the recombining electrons and holes occupy spatially separate, individual potential minima reminiscent of conventional (In,Ga)N(0001) quantum wells exhibiting the characteristic disorder of a random alloy. At elevated temperatures, carrier delocalization sets in and is accompanied by a thermally activated quenching of the emission. We ascribe the strong nonradiative recombination to extended states in the GaN barriers and confirm our assumption by a simple rate-equation model.

  17. Estimation Using an Enhancement Factor on Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Behavior of High-lying Energy Levels of Neutral Atom in Argon Radio-Frequency Inductively-Coupled Plasma.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Satoh, Kozue

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a plasma-diagnostic method using an enhancement factor on the Boltzmann distribution among emission lines of iron atom in an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP). It indicated that Boltzmann plots of the atomic lines having lower excitation energies (3.4 to 4.8 eV) were well fitted on a straight line while those having more than 5.5 eV deviated upwards from a linear relationship. This observation could be explained by the fact that ICP is not in a complete thermodynamic equilibrium between direct excitation to energy levels of iron atom, ionization of iron atom, and radiative decay processes to the ground state. Especially, the recombination of iron ion with captured electron should accompany cascade de-excitations between closely-spaced excited levels just below the ionization limit, the rates of which become slower as a whole; as a result, these high-lying levels might be more populated than the low-lying levels as if a different LTE condition coexists on the high energy side. This overpopulation could be quantitatively estimated using an enhancement factor (EF), which was a ratio of the observed intensity to the expected value extrapolated from the normal distribution on the low energy side. The EFs were generally small (less than 3); therefore, the cascade de-excitation process would slightly contribute to the population of these excited levels. It could be considered from variations of the EF that the overpopulation proceeded to a larger extent at lower radio-frequency forward powers, at higher flow rates of the carrier gas, or at higher observation heights. The reason for this is that the kinetic energy of energetic particles, such as electrons, becomes reduced under all of these plasma conditions, thus enabling the high-lying levels to be more populated by cascade de-excitation processes from iron ion rather than by collisional excitation processes with the energetic particles. A similar Boltzmann analysis using the EF

  18. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 142 Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  19. The effects of density dependence and immigration on local adaptation and niche evolution in a black-hole sink environment.

    PubMed

    Gomulkiewicz, R; Holt, R D; Barfield, M

    1999-06-01

    We examine the effects of density dependence and immigration on local adaptation in a "black-hole sink" habitat, i.e., a habitat in which isolated populations of a species would tend to extinction but where a population is demographically maintained by recurrent one-way migration from a separate source habitat in which the species persists. Using a diploid, one-locus model of a discrete-generation sink population maintained by immigration from a fixed source population, we show that a locally favored allele will spread when rare in the sink if the absolute fitness (or, in some cases, the geometric-mean absolute fitness) of heterozygotes with the favored allele is above one in the sink habitat. With density dependence, the criterion for spread can depend on the rate of immigration, because immigration affects local densities and, hence, absolute fitness. Given the successful establishment of a locally favored allele, it will be maintained by a migration-selection balance and the resulting polymorphic population will be sustained deterministically with either stable or unstable dynamics. The densities of stable polymorphic populations tend to exceed densities that would be maintained in the absence of the favored allele. With strong density regulation, spread of the favored allele may destabilize population dynamics. Our analyses show that polymorphic populations which form subsequent to the establishment of favorable alleles have the capacity to persist deterministically without immigration. Finally, we examined the probabilistic rate at which new favored alleles arise and become established in a sink population. Our results suggest that favored alleles are established most readily at intermediate levels of immigration. PMID:10366553

  20. Cross-ply laminates with holes in compression - Straight free-edge stresses determined by two- to three-dimensional global/local finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Danniella Muheim; Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.; Vidussoni, Marco A.

    1990-01-01

    A practical example of applying two- to three-dimensional (2- to 3-D) global/local finite element analysis to laminated composites is presented. Cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates of 0.1-in. (0.254-cm) thickness with central circular holes ranging from 1 to 6 in. (2.54 to 15.2 cm) in diameter, subjected to in-plane compression were analyzed. Guidelines for full three-dimensional finite element analysis and two- to three-dimensional global/local analysis of interlaminar stresses at straight free edges of laminated composites are included. The larger holes were found to reduce substantially the interlaminar stresses at the straight free-edge in proximity to the hole. Three-dimensional stress results were obtained for thin laminates which require prohibitive computer resources for full three-dimensional analyses of comparative accuracy.

  1. An unambiguous signature in molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions of core hole localization in fluorine K-edge photoionization of CF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.; Trevisan, C. S.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular Frame Photoelectron Angular Distributions (MFPADs) are calculated using the Complex Kohn variational method for core-hole ionization of the carbon and fluorines in CF4 at photoelectron energies below 15 eV. The angular distributions for localized versus delocalized core-hole creation on the four equivalent fluorines are radically different. A strong propensity for the dissociation to take place via the mechanism hν +CF4 -->CF 4 + +e- -->CF 3 + +F(1s-1) -->CF 3 + +F+ + 2e- in which a core excited neutral fluorine atom ionizes during or after dissociation creates the conditions for experimental observation of core hole localization. Comparison with recent unpublished experiments at the Advanced Light Source that measured the Recoil Frame Photoelectron Angular Distributions (averaged over CF3 rotations around the recoil axis) for fluorine K-edge ionization gives unambiguous evidence that these experiments directly observed the creation of an almost completely localized core hole on the dissociating fluorine atom when the molecule was initially photoionized. Work supported by USDOE, OBES Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  2. PARSEC-SCALE LOCALIZATION OF THE QUASAR SDSS J1536+0441A, A CANDIDATE BINARY BLACK HOLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J. M.; Laor, A. E-mail: laor@physics.technion.ac.i

    2010-05-10

    The radio-quiet quasar (RQQ) SDSS J1536+0441A shows two broad-line emission systems, recently interpreted as a binary black hole (BBH) system with a subparsec separation; as a double-peaked emitter; or as both types of systems. The NRAO Very Long Baseline Array was used to search for 8.4 GHz emission from SDSS J1536+0441A, focusing on the optical localization region for the broad-line emission, of area 5400 mas{sup 2} (0.15 kpc{sup 2}). One source was detected, with a diameter of less than 1.63 mas (8.5 pc) and a brightness temperature T{sub b} >1.2 x 10{sup 7} K. New NRAO Very Large Array photometry at 22.5 GHz, and earlier photometry at 8.5 GHz, gives a rising spectral slope of {alpha} = 0.35 {+-} 0.08. The slope implies an optically thick synchrotron source, with a radius of about 0.04 pc, and thus T{sub b} {approx} 5 x 10{sup 10} K. The implied radio sphere at the rest frequency 31.2 GHz has a radius of 800 gravitational radii, just below the size of the broad-line region in this object. Observations at higher frequencies can probe whether or not the radio sphere is as compact as expected from the coronal framework for the radio emission of RQQs.

  3. Energy levels for F-16 (Fluorine-16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of Subvolume C `Tables of Excitations of Proton- and Neutron-rich Unstable Nuclei' of Volume 19 `Nuclear States from Charged Particle Reactions' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides energy levels for atomic nuclei of the isotope F-16 (fluorine, atomic number Z = 9, mass number A = 16).

  4. Energy level control: toward an efficient hot electron transport

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao; Li, Qinghua; Li, Yue; Chen, Zihan; Wei, Tai-Huei; He, Xingdao; Sun, Weifu

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient hot electron transport represents one of the most important properties required for applications in photovoltaic devices. Whereas the fabrication of efficient hot electron capture and lost-cost devices remains a technological challenge, regulating the energy level of acceptor-donor system through the incorporation of foreign ions using the solution-processed technique is one of the most promising strategies to overcome this obstacle. Here we present a versatile acceptor-donor system by incorporating MoO3:Eu nanophosphors, which reduces both the ‘excess' energy offset between the conduction band of acceptor and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of donor, and that between the valence band and highest occupied molecular orbital. Strikingly, the hot electron transfer time has been shortened. This work demonstrates that suitable energy level alignment can be tuned to gain the higher hot electron/hole transport efficiency in a simple approach without the need for complicated architectures. This work builds up the foundation of engineering building blocks for third-generation solar cells. PMID:25099864

  5. A Local Baseline of the Black Hole Mass Scaling Relations for Active Galaxies. III.The MBH– Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennert, Vardha N.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Cosens, Maren; Park, Daeseong; Rosen, Rebecca; Harris, Chelsea E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2015-08-01

    We create a baseline of the black hole (BH) mass ({M}{BH})—stellar-velocity dispersion (σ) relation for active galaxies, using a sample of 66 local (0.02\\lt z\\lt 0.09) Seyfert-1 galaxies, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Analysis of SDSS images yields AGN luminosities free of host-galaxy contamination, and morphological classification. 51/66 galaxies have spiral morphology. Out of these, 28 bulges have Sérsic index n\\lt 2 and are considered candidate pseudo-bulges, with eight being definite pseudo-bulges based on multiple classification criteria met. Only 4/66 galaxies show signs of interaction/merging. High signal-to-noise ratio Keck spectra provide the width of the broad Hβ emission line free of Fe ii emission and stellar absorption. AGN luminosity and Hβ line widths are used to estimate {M}{BH}. The Keck-based spatially resolved kinematics is used to determine stellar-velocity dispersion within the spheroid effective radius ({σ }{spat,{reff}}). We find that σ can vary on average by up to 40% across definitions commonly used in the literature, emphasizing the importance of using self-consistent definitions in comparisons and evolutionary studies. The {M}{BH}–σ relation for our Seyfert-1 galaxy sample has the same intercept and scatter as that of reverberation-mapped AGNs as well as that of quiescent galaxies, consistent with the hypothesis that our single epoch {M}{BH} estimator and sample selection function do not introduce significant biases. Barred galaxies, merging galaxies, and those hosting pseudo-bulges do not represent outliers in the {M}{BH}–σ relation. This is in contrast with previous work, although no firm conclusion can be drawn on this matter due to the small sample size and limited resolution of the SDSS images.

  6. Energy-level alignment at organic heterointerfaces

    PubMed Central

    Oehzelt, Martin; Akaike, Kouki; Koch, Norbert; Heimel, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Today’s champion organic (opto-)electronic devices comprise an ever-increasing number of different organic-semiconductor layers. The functionality of these complex heterostructures largely derives from the relative alignment of the frontier molecular-orbital energies in each layer with respect to those in all others. Despite the technological relevance of the energy-level alignment at organic heterointerfaces, and despite continued scientific interest, a reliable model that can quantitatively predict the full range of phenomena observed at such interfaces is notably absent. We identify the limitations of previous attempts to formulate such a model and highlight inconsistencies in the interpretation of the experimental data they were based on. We then develop a theoretical framework, which we demonstrate to accurately reproduce experiment. Applying this theory, a comprehensive overview of all possible energy-level alignment scenarios that can be encountered at organic heterojunctions is finally given. These results will help focus future efforts on developing functional organic interfaces for superior device performance. PMID:26702447

  7. Energy levels of double triangular graphene quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, F. X.; Jiang, Z. T. Zhang, H. Y.; Li, S.; Lv, Z. T.

    2014-09-28

    We investigate theoretically the energy levels of the coupled double triangular graphene quantum dots (GQDs) based on the tight-binding Hamiltonian model. The double GQDs including the ZZ-type, ZA-type, and AA-type GQDs with the two GQDs having the zigzag or armchair boundaries can be coupled together via different interdot connections, such as the direct coupling, the chains of benzene rings, and those of carbon atoms. It is shown that the energy spectrum of the coupled double GQDs is the amalgamation of those spectra of the corresponding two isolated GQDs with the modification triggered by the interdot connections. The interdot connection is inclined to lift up the degeneracies of the energy levels in different degree, and as the connection changes from the direct coupling to the long chains, the removal of energy degeneracies is suppressed in ZZ-type and AA-type double GQDs, which indicates that the two coupled GQDs are inclined to become decoupled. Then we consider the influences on the spectra of the coupled double GQDs induced by the electric fields applied on the GQDs or the connection, which manifests as the global spectrum redistribution or the local energy level shift. Finally, we study the symmetrical and asymmetrical energy spectra of the double GQDs caused by the substrates supporting the two GQDs, clearly demonstrating how the substrates affect the double GQDs' spectrum. This research elucidates the energy spectra of the coupled double GQDs, as well as the mechanics of manipulating them by the electric field and the substrates, which would be a significant reference for designing GQD-based devices.

  8. Four energy levels device for skin punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savastru, D.; Ristici, Esofina; Mustata, Marina; Miclos, S.; Rusu, M. I.; Radu, C.; Savu, V.

    2007-03-01

    Generally, the beam distribution in the tissue in interaction with a pulsed laser is defined by optical properties (effective scattering and absorption coefficient). In 2900 nm range, the effective scattering coefficient is much smaller than the absorption coefficient. An Er:YAG skin puncher is presented. Thermal action of a laser beam can be described as one of three types: hyperthermia, coagulation and volatilization, depending on the degree and the duration of tissue heating. We are interested in the volatilization process that means a loss of material. The various constituents of the tissue disappear in smoke at above 100 0C in a relatively short time of around one tenth of a second. At the edges of the volatilization zone there is a region of coagulation necrosis. In presented case of an Er:YAG laser operating in a free generation mode, the mechanical effects can result from explosive vaporization. When the exposure time of the laser is lower than the characteristic time of the thermal diffusion in the tissue, it produces a thermal containment with an accumulation of heat without diffusion and an explosive vaporization of the target. The Er:YAG laser device has the pulse length of about 160 microseconds and four emitted energy levels. This device is used to punch the skin for blood sampling for different kinds of analysis. The front panel of the device has four keys to select the desired energy according to the skin type.

  9. Rotation vibration energy level clustering in the XB1 ground electronic state of PH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, S. N.; Thiel, W.; Jensen, Per; Bunker, P. R.

    2006-10-01

    We use previously determined potential energy surfaces for the Renner-coupled XB1 and AA1 electronic states of the phosphino (PH 2) free radical in a calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of highly excited rotational and vibrational energy levels of the X˜ state. We show how spin-orbit coupling, the Renner effect, rotational excitation, and vibrational excitation affect the clustered energy level patterns that occur. We consider both 4-fold rotational energy level clustering caused by centrifugal distortion, and vibrational energy level pairing caused by local mode behaviour. We also calculate ab initio dipole moment surfaces for the X˜ and A˜ states, and the X˜-A˜ transition moment surface, in order to obtain spectral intensities.

  10. Localized surface plasmon induced enhancement of electron-hole generation with silver metal island at n-Al:ZnO/p-Cu{sub 2}O heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gurpreet Yadav, K. L.; Mitra, Anirban

    2015-08-03

    Localized surface plasmon induced generation of electron-hole pairs with inclusion of metal islands of noble metal like Ag can enhance the photocurrent. A heterostructure of n-Al:ZnO/p-Cu{sub 2}O with inclusion of Ag metalislands at the junction has been fabricated. I-V characteristic curve of these heterostructures shows a significant enhancement of photocurrent under the illumination (1.5 AMU). This enhancement of photocurrent is attributed to the supply of hot electrons generated in silver metal nanoislands. It has also been shown that inclusion of metal islands increases the absorption of solar spectrum in visible region at 500 nm. Enhancement of photocurrent may also be due to the direct resonance energy transfer from Localized Surface Plasmons of metal islands to Cu{sub 2}O.

  11. Localized surface plasmon induced enhancement of electron-hole generation with silver metal island at n-Al:ZnO/p-Cu2O heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Yadav, K. L.; Mitra, Anirban

    2015-08-01

    Localized surface plasmon induced generation of electron-hole pairs with inclusion of metal islands of noble metal like Ag can enhance the photocurrent. A heterostructure of n-Al:ZnO/p-Cu2O with inclusion of Ag metalislands at the junction has been fabricated. I-V characteristic curve of these heterostructures shows a significant enhancement of photocurrent under the illumination (1.5 AMU). This enhancement of photocurrent is attributed to the supply of hot electrons generated in silver metal nanoislands. It has also been shown that inclusion of metal islands increases the absorption of solar spectrum in visible region at 500 nm. Enhancement of photocurrent may also be due to the direct resonance energy transfer from Localized Surface Plasmons of metal islands to Cu2O.

  12. Charge-compensation in 3d-transition-metal-oxide intercalation cathodes through the generation of localized electron holes on oxygen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Roberts, Matthew R; Hao, Rong; Guerrini, Niccoló; Pickup, David M; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Edström, Kristina; Guo, Jinghua; Chadwick, Alan V; Duda, Laurent C; Bruce, Peter G

    2016-07-01

    During the charging and discharging of lithium-ion-battery cathodes through the de- and reintercalation of lithium ions, electroneutrality is maintained by transition-metal redox chemistry, which limits the charge that can be stored. However, for some transition-metal oxides this limit can be broken and oxygen loss and/or oxygen redox reactions have been proposed to explain the phenomenon. We present operando mass spectrometry of (18)O-labelled Li1.2[Ni0.13(2+)Co0.13(3+)Mn0.54(4+)]O2, which demonstrates that oxygen is extracted from the lattice on charging a Li1.2[Ni0.13(2+)Co0.13(3+)Mn0.54(4+)]O2 cathode, although we detected no O2 evolution. Combined soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy demonstrates that, in addition to oxygen loss, Li(+) removal is charge compensated by the formation of localized electron holes on O atoms coordinated by Mn(4+) and Li(+) ions, which serve to promote the localization, and not the formation, of true O2(2-) (peroxide, O-O ~1.45 Å) species. The quantity of charge compensated by oxygen removal and by the formation of electron holes on the O atoms is estimated, and for the case described here the latter dominates. PMID:27325095

  13. Origin of hole and electron traps in graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.; Orlov, O. M.; Smagulova, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Charge-carrier capture/emission processes proceeding with the participation of localized states in graphene oxide (GO) in test structures of Au/SiO2/GO/SiO2/Si were examined by charge deep-level transient spectroscopy (Q-DLTS). Two groups of traps capable of capturing both electrons and holes in GO were detected. The energy levels of these groups with reference to the electronic band structure of Si were found to be at EV + 0.75 eV (EC ‑ 0.37 eV) and EV + 0.55 eV (EC ‑ 0.55 eV). Such levels are proposed to be inherent to graphene islands in which charge carriers are emitted from energy levels in the vicinity of the Dirac point. Two groups of levels are suggested to be attributed to graphene islands, with and without p-doping with oxygen.

  14. Energy levels of a heavy ion moving in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hongwei; Chen, Wencong; Zhao, Yongtao; Li, Fuli; Dong, Chenzhong

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the potential of a slowly moving test particle moving in collisional dense plasmas is studied. It is composed of the Debye-shielding potential, wake potential, and collision term. The Ritz variational-perturbational method is developed for calculating relativistic binding energy levels of a heavy ion moving in dense plasmas. Binding energy levels of a heavy ion moving in plasmas are calculated. The results show that both non-relativistic energy levels and relativistic energy levels become more negative as the temperature becomes high. They also become more negative as the number density decreasing. Relativistic correction is important for calculating binding energy levels. Both relativistic energy levels and non-relativistic energy levels vary minutely as the speed of heavy ion varies.

  15. Interfacial energy level alignments between low-band-gap polymer PTB7 and indium zinc oxide anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongguen; Lee, Jeihyun; Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Seo, Ki-Won; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Kim, Han-Ki; Choi, Min-Jun; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Yi, Yeonjin

    2015-09-01

    The interfacial energy level alignments between poly(thieno[3,4-b]-thiophene)-co-benzodithiophene (PTB7) and indium zinc oxide (IZO) were investigated. In situ ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements were conducted with the step-by-step deposition of PTB7 on IZO substrate. All spectral changes were analyzed between each deposition step, and interfacial energy level alignments were estimated. The hole barrier of standard ultraviolet-ozone treated IZO is 0.58 eV, which is lower than the value of 1.09 eV obtained for bare IZO. The effect of barrier reduction on the hole transport was also confirmed with electrical measurements of hole-dominated devices.

  16. Emergence of Space-Time Localization and Cosmic Decoherence:. More on Irreversible Time, Dark Energy, Anti-Matter and Black-Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnon, Anne

    2005-04-01

    anticipated by black-hole event horizons, cosmic censors able to shelter causal geometry). In analogy with black-hole singularities, the Big-Bang can be viewed as a geometric hint that a transition from incoherence to (causal space-time) localization and related coherence (comprehensibility), is taking place (space-time demolition, a reverse process towards incoherence or information recycling, is expected in the vicinity of singularities, as hinted by black-holes and related "time-machines"). A theory of the emergence of perception (and life?), in connection with observability and the function of partition (able to screen totality), is on its way [interface incoherence-coherence, sleeping and awaking states of localization, horizons of perception etc, are anticipated by black-hole event horizons, beyond which a non causal, dimensionless incoherent regime or memorization process, presents itself with the loss of localization, suggesting a unifying regime (ultimate energies?) hidden in cosmic potentialities]. The decoherence process presented here, suggests an ultimate interaction, expression of the logical relation of subsystems to totality, and to be identified to the flow of information or its recycling through cosmic jump (this is anticipated by the dissipation of distance or hierarchies on null-cones, themselves recycled with information and events). The geometric projection of this unified irreversible dynamics is expressed by unified Yang-Mills field equations (coupled to Einsteinian gravity). An ultimate form of action ("set"-volumes of information) presents itself, whose extrema can be achieved through extremal transfer of information and related partition of cells of information (thus anticipating the mitosis of living cells, possibly triggered at the non localizable level, as imposed by the logical regime of cosmic decoherence: participating subsystems ?). The matching of the objective and subjective facets of (information and) decoherences is perceived as contact

  17. Black holes

    PubMed Central

    Brügmann, B.; Ghez, A. M.; Greiner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries. PMID:11553801

  18. Evidence for a Parsec-scale Jet from the Galactic Center Black Hole: Interaction with Local Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Morris, Mark R.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2013-12-01

    Despite strong physical reasons that they should exist and decades of searching, jets from the Galactic center black hole, Sgr A*, have not yet been convincingly detected. Based on high-resolution Very Large Array images and ultra-deep imaging-spectroscopic data produced by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we report new evidence for the existence of a parsec-scale jet from Sgr A*, by associating a linear feature G359.944-0.052, previously identified in X-ray images of the Galactic center, with a radio shock front on the Eastern Arm of the Sgr A West H II region. We show that the shock front can be explained in terms of the impact of a jet having a sharp momentum peak along the Galaxy's rotation axis, whereas G359.944-0.052, a quasi-steady feature with a power-law spectrum, can be understood as synchrotron radiation from shock-induced ultra-relativistic electrons cooling in a finite post-shock region downstream along the jet path. Several interesting implications of the jet properties are discussed.

  19. Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2011-02-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Anton Koekemoer; 1. Black holes, entropy, and information G. T. Horowitz; 2. Gravitational waves from black-hole mergers J. G. Baker, W. D. Boggs, J. M. Centrella, B. J. Kelley, S. T. McWilliams and J. R. van Meter; 3. Out-of-this-world physics: black holes at future colliders G. Landsberg; 4. Black holes in globular clusters S. L. W. McMillan; 5. Evolution of massive black holes M. Volonteri; 6. Supermassive black holes in deep multiwavelength surveys C. M. Urry and E. Treister; 7. Black-hole masses from reverberation mapping B. M. Peterson and M. C. Bentz; 8. Black-hole masses from gas dynamics F. D. Macchetto; 9. Evolution of supermassive black holes A. Müller and G. Hasinger; 10. Black-hole masses of distant quasars M. Vestergaard; 11. The accretion history of supermassive black holes K. Brand and the NDWFS Boötes Survey Teams; 12. Strong field gravity and spin of black holes from broad iron lines A. C. Fabian; 13. Birth of massive black-hole binaries M. Colpi, M. Dotti, L. Mayer and S. Kazantzidis; 14. Dynamics around supermassive black holes A. Gualandris and D. Merritt; 15. Black-hole formation and growth: simulations in general relativity S. L. Shapiro; 16. Estimating the spins of stellar-mass black holes J. E. McClintock, R. Narayan and R. Shafee; 17. Stellar relaxation processes near the Galactic massive black hole T. Alexander; 18. Tidal disruptions of stars by supermassive black holes S. Gezari; 19. Where to look for radiatively inefficient accretion flows in low-luminosity AGN M. Chiaberge; 20. Making black holes visible: accretion, radiation, and jets J. H. Krolik.

  20. Energy level alignment at the methylammonium lead iodide/copper phthalocyanine interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shi; Goh, Teck Wee; Sum, Tze Chien E-mail: Tzechien@ntu.edu.sg; Sabba, Dharani; Chua, Julianto; Mathews, Nripan; Huan, Cheng Hon Alfred E-mail: Tzechien@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-08-01

    The energy level alignment at the CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) interface is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). XPS reveal a 0.3 eV downward band bending in the CuPc film. UPS validate this finding and further reveal negligible interfacial dipole formation – verifying the viability of vacuum level alignment. The highest occupied molecular orbital of CuPc is found to be closer to the Fermi level than the valance band maximum of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}, facilitating hole transfer from CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} to CuPc. However, subsequent hole extraction from CuPc may be impeded by the downward band bending in the CuPc layer.

  1. Energy level alignment at the methylammonium lead iodide/copper phthalocyanine interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi; Goh, Teck Wee; Sabba, Dharani; Chua, Julianto; Mathews, Nripan; Huan, Cheng Hon Alfred; Sum, Tze Chien

    2014-08-01

    The energy level alignment at the CH3NH3PbI3/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) interface is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). XPS reveal a 0.3 eV downward band bending in the CuPc film. UPS validate this finding and further reveal negligible interfacial dipole formation - verifying the viability of vacuum level alignment. The highest occupied molecular orbital of CuPc is found to be closer to the Fermi level than the valance band maximum of CH3NH3PbI3, facilitating hole transfer from CH3NH3PbI3 to CuPc. However, subsequent hole extraction from CuPc may be impeded by the downward band bending in the CuPc layer.

  2. Quantum phase transition in trigonal triple quantum dots: The case of quantum dots deviated from particle-hole symmetric point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Hyok; Kang, Chol-Jin; Kim, Yon-Il; Kim, Kwang-Hyon

    2015-05-01

    We consider a triple quantum dot system in a triangular geometry with one of the dots connected to metallic leads. We investigate quantum phase transition between local moment phase and Kondo screened strong coupling phase in triple quantum dots where energy levels of dots are deviated from the particle-hole symmetric point. The effect of on-site energy of dots on quantum phase transition between local moment phase and Kondo screened strong coupling phase in triple quantum dots is studied based on the analytical arguments and the numerical renormalization group method. The results show that the critical value of tunnel coupling between side dots decreases when the energy level of embedded dot rises up from the symmetric point to the Fermi level and the critical value increases when the energy levels of two side dots rise up. The study of the influence of on-site-energy changes on the quantum phase transitions in triple quantum dots has the importance for clarifying the mechanism of Kondo screening in triple quantum dots where energy levels of dots are deviated from the particle-hole symmetric point.

  3. Exploring Black Hole Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hyeyoun

    2015-10-01

    This thesis explores the evolution of different types of black holes, and the ways in which black hole dynamics can be used to answer questions about other physical systems. We first investigate the differences in observable gravitational effects between a four-dimensional Randall-Sundrum (RS) braneworld universe compared to a universe without the extra dimension, by considering a black hole solution to the braneworld model that is localized on the brane. When the brane has a negative cosmological constant, then for a certain range of parameters for the black hole, the intersection of the black hole with the brane approximates a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole on the brane with corrections that fall off exponentially outside the horizon. We compute the quasinormal modes of the braneworld black hole, and compare them to the known quasinormal modes of the three-dimensional BTZ black hole. We find that there are two distinct regions for the braneworld black hole solutions that are reflected in the dependence of the quasinormal modes on the black hole mass. The imaginary parts of the quasinormal modes display phenomenological similarities to the quasinormal modes of the three-dimensional BTZ black hole, indicating that nonlinear gravitational effects may not be enough to distinguish between a lower-dimensional theory and a theory derived from a higher-dimensional braneworld. Secondly, we consider the evolution of non-extremal black holes in N=4, d=2 supergravity, and investigate how such black holes might evolve over time if perturbed away from extremality. We study this problem in the probe limit by finding tunneling amplitudes for a Dirac field in a single-centered background, which gives the decay rates for the emission of charged probe black holes from the central black hole. We find that there is no minimum to the potential for the probe particles at a finite distance from the central black hole, so any probes that are emitted escape to infinity. If

  4. Tracing black hole accretion with SED decomposition and IR lines: from local galaxies to the high-z Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppioni, C.; Berta, S.; Spinoglio, L.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Pozzi, F.; Andreani, P.; Bonato, M.; De Zotti, G.; Malkan, M.; Negrello, M.; Vallini, L.; Vignali, C.

    2016-06-01

    We present new estimates of AGN accretion and star formation (SF) luminosity in galaxies obtained for the local 12 μm sample of Seyfert galaxies (12MGS), by performing a detailed broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) decomposition including the emission of stars, dust heated by SF and a possible AGN dusty torus. Thanks to the availability of data from the X-rays to the sub-millimetre, we constrain and test the contribution of the stellar, AGN and SF components to the SEDs. The availability of Spitzer-InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) low-resolution mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra is crucial to constrain the dusty torus component at its peak wavelengths. The results of SED fitting are also tested against the available information in other bands: the reconstructed AGN bolometric luminosity is compared to those derived from X-rays and from the high excitation IR lines tracing AGN activity like [Ne V] and [O IV]. The IR luminosity due to SF and the intrinsic AGN bolometric luminosity are shown to be strongly related to the IR line luminosity. Variations of these relations with different AGN fractions are investigated, showing that the relation dispersions are mainly due to different AGN relative contribution within the galaxy. Extrapolating these local relations between line and SF or AGN luminosities to higher redshifts, by means of recent Herschel galaxy evolution results, we then obtain mid- and far-IR line luminosity functions useful to estimate how many star-forming galaxies and AGN we expect to detect in the different lines at different redshifts and luminosities with future IR facilities (e.g. JWST, SPICA).

  5. Theory of Energy Level Tuning in Quantum Dots by Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Wang, Lin-Wang; Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    Besides quantum confinement that provides control of the quantum dot (QD) band gap, surface ligands allow control of the absolute energy levels. We theoretically investigate energy level tuning in PbS QD by surfactant exchange. We perform direct calculations of real-size QD with various surfactants within the frame of the density functional theory and explicitly analyze the influence of the surfactants on the electronic properties of the QD. This work provides a hint for predictable control of the absolute energy levels and their fine tuning within 3 eV range by modification of big and small surfactants that simultaneously passivate the QD surface.

  6. Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    1992-09-01

    Foreword to the French edition; Foreword to the English edition; Acknowledgements; Part I. Gravitation and Light: 1. First fruits; 2. Relativity; 3. Curved space-time; Part II. Exquisite Corpses: 4. Chronicle of the twilight years; 5. Ashes and diamonds; 6. Supernovae; 7. Pulsars; 8. Gravitation triumphant; Part III. Light Assassinated: 9. The far horizon; 10. Illuminations; 11. A descent into the maelstrom; 12. Map games; 13. The black hole machine; 14. The quantum black hole; Part IV. Light Regained: 15. Primordial black holes; 16. The zoo of X-ray stars; 17. Giant black holes; 18. Gravitational light; 19. The black hole Universe; Appendices; Bibliography; Name index; Subject index.

  7. "Piekara's Chair": Mechanical Model for Atomic Energy Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golab-Meyer, Zofia

    1991-01-01

    Uses the teaching method of models or analogies, specifically the model called "Piekara's chair," to show how teaching classical mechanics can familiarize students with the notion of energy levels in atomic physics. (MDH)

  8. Housing Electrons: Relating Quantum Numbers, Energy Levels, and Electron Configurations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalo, Anthony

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that combines the concepts of quantum numbers and probability locations, energy levels, and electron configurations in a concrete, hands-on way. Uses model houses constructed out of foam board and colored beads to represent electrons. (JRH)

  9. Revised energy levels and hyperfine structure constants of Ta II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windholz, Laurentius; Arcimowicz, Bronislaw; Uddin, Zaheer

    2016-06-01

    Using a wave number calibrated Fourier transform spectrum, we determined the energy levels of the first ion of tantalum with high accuracy. To get the correct center of gravity wave numbers of the observed spectral lines, the knowledge of the hyperfine constants of the involved levels was necessary. From the observed values we deduced the energy levels in a global fit. A comparison between our results and all available literature values is presented.

  10. Calculation of Rydberg energy levels for the francium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shi-Zhong; Chu, Jin-Min

    2010-06-01

    Based on the weakest bound electron potential model theory, the Rydberg energy levels and quantum defects of the np2Po1/2 (n = 7-50) and np2Po3/2 (n = 7-50) spectrum series for the francium atom are calculated. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with the 48 measured levels, and 40 energy levels for highly excited states are predicted.

  11. Energy level realignment in weakly interacting donor-acceptor binary molecular networks.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Qin, Xinming; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Yang, Jinlong; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-25

    Understanding the effect of intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions on molecular electronic states is key to revealing the energy level alignment mechanism at organic-organic heterojunctions or organic-inorganic interfaces. In this paper, we investigate the energy level alignment mechanism in weakly interacting donor-acceptor binary molecular superstructures, comprising copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc) intermixed with copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), or manganese phthalocynine (MnPc) on graphite. The molecular electronic structures have been systematically studied by in situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (LT-STM/STS) experiments and corroborated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. As demonstrated by the UPS and LT-STM/STS measurements, the observed unusual energy level realignment (i.e., a large downward shift in donor HOMO level and a corresponding small upward shift in acceptor HOMO level) in the CuPc-F16CuPc binary superstructures originates from the balance between intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions. The enhanced intermolecular interactions through the hydrogen bonding between neighboring CuPc and F16CuPc can stabilize the binary superstructures and modify the local molecular electronic states. The obvious molecular energy level shift was explained by gap-state-mediated interfacial charge transfer. PMID:24433044

  12. Calibration of Electric Field Induced Energy Level Shifts in Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebner, Greg

    1999-10-01

    Argon is a commonly used gas in a number of discharges. As such it is an ideal candidate for spectroscopic based electric field measurements within the sheath and bulk discharge regions. Recently, measurements demonstrated the use of the Stark induced shifts of high lying energy levels in Argon to make spatially and temporally resolved electric field measurements [1]. However, that method relied on the cross calibration of known and calculable shifts in helium discharges to calibrate, in-situ, the energy level shifts in Argon. This poster shows the use of an atomic beam system to calibrate the electric field induced shift of high lying energy levels directly. In addition, data on very high lying argon levels, up to the 20 F manifold, were obtained. Comparison of our electric field induced energy level shift calibration curves with previous work will be shown. The possibility of using this system to calibrate energy level shifts in other gases of technological interest to the microelectronics and lighting industry will be discussed. [1]. J. B. Kim, K. Kawamura, Y. W. Choi, M. D. Bowden, K. Muraoka and V. Helbig, IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 26(5), 1556 (1998). This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories and supported by the United States Department of Energy (DE-AC04-94AL85000).

  13. Bumpy black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Figueras, Pau; Martínez, Marina

    2014-12-01

    We study six-dimensional rotating black holes with bumpy horizons: these are topologically spherical, but the sizes of symmetric cycles on the horizon vary nonmonotonically with the polar angle. We construct them numerically for the first three bumpy families, and follow them in solution space until they approach critical solutions with localized singularities on the horizon. We find strong evidence of the conical structures that have been conjectured to mediate the transitions to black rings, to black Saturns, and to a novel class of bumpy black rings. For a different, recently identified class of bumpy black holes, we find evidence that this family ends in solutions with a localized singularity that exhibits apparently universal properties, and which does not seem to allow for transitions to any known class of black holes.

  14. Electronic energy levels of intermediates in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, I. A.; Horlick, G.

    1980-12-01

    Using the multiple scattering X-alpha method, electronic energy levels have been found self-consistently for the intermediates Ni(CO)(n), n = 1,2,3 in the formation of nickel tetracarbonyl via the Ni-CO surface reaction. Linear geometries have been assumed for NiCO and Ni(CO)2, and a trigonal planar conformation for Ni(CO)3, in accordance with previously published IR spectra. The intermediates were assumed to be in the gas phase, free of surface interaction. From the energy level structure found, all three of the intermediates were determined to be diamagnetic, as Ni(CO)4 is known to be.

  15. Electronic energy levels of intermediates in the nickel carbonylation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, I. A.; Pratt, G. W.; Johnson, K. H.; Dresselhaus, G.

    1981-03-01

    Using the multiple scattering Xa method, electronic energy levels have been found self-consistently for the intermediates Ni(CO)n, n = 1,2,3 in the formation of nickel tetracarbonyl via the Ni-CO surface reaction. Linear geometries have been assumed for NiCO and Ni(CO)2, and a trigonal planar conformation for Ni(CO)3, in accordance with previously published IR spectra. The intermediates were assumed to be in the gas phase, free of surface interaction. From the energy level structure found, all three of the intermediates were determined to be diamagnetic, as Ni(CO)4 is known to be.

  16. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Saidi, Wissam A.; Scudiero, Louis E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  17. Spatially indirect intersubband transitions of localized electrons and holes at the staggered band lineup In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As/InP interface

    SciTech Connect

    Boehrer, J.; Krost, A.; Bimberg, D.

    1993-07-01

    The electronic and crystallographic properties of InAlAs/InP interface grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition are studied using double-crystal x-ray diffraction, calorimetric absorption spectroscopy (CAS), steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL), and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) experiments. A high crystalline quality of the interfaces is suggested by the observation of Pendelloesung oscillations in the x-ray rocking curves. A two-dimensional electron gas with n{sub s}{approximately}6 X 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} is formed at the InP side of the interface by carrier transfer from the unintentionally doped InAlAs and is directly observed by SdH. Localized hole levels are formed at the InAlAs side of the interface. Spatially indirect optical intersubband transitions between localized electron and hole levels up to n=4 are observed in CAS. The PL and CAS experiments yield an electronic subband structure which is in perfect agreement with results of self-consistent band structure calculations. The 6 K luminescence between localized electrons and holes in their respective n=1 states decays with a time constant of 3.8 ns, considerably larger than what is usually observed at type I quantum wells. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Real-space localization and quantification of hole distribution in chain-ladder Sr3Ca11Cu24O41 superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Bugnet, Matthieu; Löffler, Stefan; Hawthorn, David; Dabkowska, Hanna A.; Luke, Graeme M.; Schattschneider, Peter; Sawatzky, George A.; Radtke, Guillaume; Botton, Gianluigi A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the physical properties of the chain-ladder Sr3Ca11Cu24O41 hole-doped superconductor has been precluded by the unknown hole distribution among chains and ladders. We use electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) at atomic resolution to directly separate the contributions of chains and ladders and to unravel the hole distribution from the atomic scale variations of the O-K near-edge structures. The experimental data unambiguously demonstrate that most of the holes lie within the chain layers. A quantitative interpretation supported by inelastic scattering calculations shows that about two holes are located in the ladders, and about four holes in the chains, shedding light on the electronic structure of Sr3Ca11Cu24O41. Combined atomic resolution STEM-EELS and inelastic scattering calculations is demonstrated as a powerful approach toward a quantitative understanding of the electronic structure of cuprate superconductors, offering new possibilities for elucidating their physical properties. PMID:27051872

  19. Real-space localization and quantification of hole distribution in chain-ladder Sr3Ca11Cu24O41 superconductor.

    PubMed

    Bugnet, Matthieu; Löffler, Stefan; Hawthorn, David; Dabkowska, Hanna A; Luke, Graeme M; Schattschneider, Peter; Sawatzky, George A; Radtke, Guillaume; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the physical properties of the chain-ladder Sr3Ca11Cu24O41 hole-doped superconductor has been precluded by the unknown hole distribution among chains and ladders. We use electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) at atomic resolution to directly separate the contributions of chains and ladders and to unravel the hole distribution from the atomic scale variations of the O-K near-edge structures. The experimental data unambiguously demonstrate that most of the holes lie within the chain layers. A quantitative interpretation supported by inelastic scattering calculations shows that about two holes are located in the ladders, and about four holes in the chains, shedding light on the electronic structure of Sr3Ca11Cu24O41. Combined atomic resolution STEM-EELS and inelastic scattering calculations is demonstrated as a powerful approach toward a quantitative understanding of the electronic structure of cuprate superconductors, offering new possibilities for elucidating their physical properties. PMID:27051872

  20. Degeneracy of energy levels of pseudo-Gaussian oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Iacob, Theodor-Felix; Iacob, Felix; Lute, Marina

    2015-12-07

    We study the main features of the isotropic radial pseudo-Gaussian oscillators spectral properties. This study is made upon the energy levels degeneracy with respect to orbital angular momentum quantum number. In a previous work [6] we have shown that the pseudo-Gaussian oscillators belong to the class of quasi-exactly solvable models and an exact solution has been found.

  1. Efficiencies of thermodynamics when temperature-dependent energy levels exist.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Takuya

    2016-03-14

    Based on a generalized form of the second law of thermodynamics, in which the temperature-dependent energy levels of a system are appropriately included in entropy generation, we show that the effect reasonably appears in efficiencies of thermodynamic processes. PMID:26890276

  2. Calculation of energy levels, {ital E}1 transition amplitudes, and parity violation in francium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V.A.; Flambaum, V.V.; Sushkov, O.P.

    1995-05-01

    Many-body perturbation theory in the screened Coulomb interaction was used to calculate energy levels, {ital E}1 trransition amplitudes, and the parity-nonconserving (PNC) {ital E}1 amplitude of the 7{ital s}-8{ital s} transition in francium. The method takes into account the core-polarization effect, the second-order correlations, and the three dominating sequences of higher-order correlation diagrams: screening of the electron-electron interaction, particle-hole interaction, and the iterations of the self-energy operator. The result for the PNC amplitude for {sup 223}Fr is {ital E}1(7{ital s}-8{ital s})=(1.59{plus_minus}{similar_to}1%){times}10{sup {minus}10}{ital iea}{sub {ital B}}({minus}{ital Q}{sub {ital W}}/{ital N}), where {ital Q}{sub {ital W}} is the weak charge of the nucleus, {ital N}=136 is the number of neutrons, {ital e}={vert_bar}{ital e}{vert_bar} is the elementary charge, and {ital a}{sub {ital B}} is the Bohr radius. Our prediction for the position of the 8{ital s} energy level of Fr, which has not been measured yet, is 13 110 cm{sup {minus}1} below the limit of the continuous spectrum. The accuracy of the calculations was controlled by comparison with available experimental data and analogous calculations for cesium. It is estimated to be {similar_to}0.1% for the energy levels and {similar_to}1% for the transition amplitudes.

  3. Spin polarization and magnetic dichroism in photoemission from core and valence states in localized magnetic systems. IV. Core-hole polarization in resonant photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, Gerrit; Thole, B. T.

    1995-12-01

    A simple theory is presented for core-hole polarization probed by resonant photoemission in a two-steps approximation. After excitation from a core level to the valence shell, the core hole decays into two shallower core holes under emission of an electron. The nonspherical core hole and the final state selected cause a specific angle and spin distribution of the emitted electron. The experiment is characterized by the ground-state moments, the polarization of the light, and the spin and angular distribution of the emitted electron. The intensity is a sum over ground-state expectation values of tensor operators times the probability to create a polarized core hole using polarized light, times the probability for decay of such a core hole into the final state. We give general expressions for the angle- and spin-dependent intensities in various regimes of Coulomb and spin-orbit interaction: LS, LSJ, and jjJ coupling. The core-polarization analysis, which generalizes the use of sum rules in x-ray absorption spectroscopy where the integrated peak intensities give ground-state expectation values of the spin and orbital moment operators, makes it possible to measure different linear combinations of these operators. As an application the 2p3/23p3p decay in ferromagnetic nickel is calculated using Hartree-Fock values for the radial matrix elements and phase factors, and compared with experiment, the dichroism is smaller in the 3P final state but stronger in the 1D, 1S peak.

  4. Energy levels of hybrid monolayer-bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; Ketabi, S. A.; da Costa, D. R.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-04-01

    Often real samples of graphene consist of islands of both monolayer and bilayer graphene. Bound states in such hybrid quantum dots are investigated for (i) a circular single-layer graphene quantum dot surrounded by an infinite bilayer graphene sheet and (ii) a circular bilayer graphene quantum dot surrounded by an infinite single-layer graphene. Using the continuum model and applying zigzag boundary conditions at the single-layer-bilayer graphene interface, we obtain analytical results for the energy levels and the corresponding wave spinors. Their dependence on perpendicular magnetic and electric fields are studied for both types of quantum dots. The energy levels exhibit characteristics of interface states, and we find anticrossings and closing of the energy gap in the presence of a bias potential.

  5. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyaev, Yurii V.; Chertova, Nadezhda V.; Psakhie, Sergei G.

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  6. Energy levels scheme simulation of divalent cobalt doped bismuth germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Andreici, Emiliana-Laura; Petkova, Petya; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2015-12-07

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the energy levels scheme for Bismuth Germanate (BGO) doped with divalent cobalt, in order to give a reliable explanation for spectral experimental data. In the semiempirical crystal field theory we first modeled the Crystal Field Parameters (CFPs) of BGO:Cr{sup 2+} system, in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM), with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions after doping. The values of CFPs depend on the geometry of doped host matrix and by parameter G of ECM. First, we optimized the geometry of undoped BGO host matrix and afterwards, that of doped BGO with divalent cobalt. The charges effect of ligands and covalence bonding between cobalt cations and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the CFPs we simulate the energy levels scheme of cobalt ions, by diagonalizing the matrix of the doped crystal Hamiltonian. Obviously, energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison of obtained results with experimental data shows quite satisfactory, which justify the model and simulation schemes used for the title system.

  7. Energy levels, lifetimes and radiative data of Ba XXVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Goyal, Arun; Khatri, Indu; Aggarwal, Sunny; Sharma, Rinku; Mohan, Man

    2016-05-01

    We report an extensive and an elaborate theoretical study of atomic data for Ba XXVI by considering Singlet, Doublet and Triplet (SDT) electron excitations within N-shell and single excitations from N-shell to O-shell. We have calculated energy levels and lifetimes for lowest 110 fine structure levels by using Multi-configuration Dirac-Fock method (MCDF). We have also considered Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) and Breit corrections in our calculations. We have presented the radiative data for electric and magnetic dipole (E1, M1) and quadrupole (E2, M2) transitions among lowest 110 levels. We have made comparisons of our calculated excitation energies and EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet) transition wavelengths with experimentally observed energy levels and wavelengths and achieved good agreement. We have also computed energy levels by performing similar relativistic distorted wave calculations using Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Additionally, we have provided new atomic data for Ba XXVI which are not published elsewhere in the literature. We believe that our results may be beneficial in fusion plasma research and astrophysical investigations and applications.

  8. S-matrix calculations of energy levels of alkalilike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapirstein, Jonathan; Cheng, K. T.

    2013-05-01

    A recent S-matrix based QED calculation of energy levels of the lithium isoelectronic sequence is extended to the general case of a valence electron outside an arbitrary filled core. Formulas are presented that allow calculation of the energy levels of valence ns , np1 / 2 , np3 / 2 , nd3 / 2 , and nd5 / 2 states. Emphasis is placed on modifications of the lithiumlike formulas required because more than one core state is present, and a discussion of an unusual feature of the two-photon exchange contribution involving autoiononizing states is given. The method is illustrated with a calculation of energy levels of the sodium isoelectronic sequence, with results for 3s1 / 2 , 3p1 / 2 , and 3p3 / 2 energies tabulated for the range Z = 20 - 100 . A detailed breakdown of the calculation is given for Z = 74 . Comparison with experiment and other calculations is given, and prospects for extension of the method to ions with more complex electronic structure discussed. The work of JS was supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHY-1068065. The work of KTC was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. New Fe ii energy levels from stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, F.; Kurucz, R. L.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: The spectra of B-type and early A-type stars show numerous unidentified lines in the whole optical range, especially in the 5100-5400 Å interval. Because Fe ii transitions to high energy levels should be observed in this region, we used semiempirical predicted wavelengths and gf-values of Fe ii to identify unknown lines. Methods: Semiempirical line data for Fe ii computed by Kurucz are used to synthesize the spectrum of the slow-rotating, Fe-overabundant CP star HR 6000. Results: We determined a total of 109 new 4f levels for Fe ii with energies ranging from 122 324 cm-1 to 128 110 cm-1. They belong to the Fe ii subconfigurations 3d6(3P)4f (10 levels), 3d6(3H)4f (36 levels), 3d6(3F)4f (37 levels), and 3d6(3G)4f (26 levels). We also found 14 even levels from 4d (3 levels), 5d (7 levels), and 6d (4 levels) configurations. The new levels have allowed us to identify more than 50% of the previously unidentified lines of HR 6000 in the wavelength region 3800-8000 Å. Tables listing the new energy levels are given in the paper; tables listing the spectral lines with log gf ≥ -1.5 that are transitions to the 4f energy levels are given in the Online Material. These new levels produce 18 000 lines throughout the spectrum from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Tables 6-9 are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A57

  10. Energy level alignment in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehati, P.; Braun, S.; Fahlman, M.

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is used to investigate the energy level alignment and molecular orientation at the interfaces in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks. We deduced a standing orientation for pentacene grown on Au while we conclude a flat lying geometry for PTCDA grown onto pentacene. We propose that the rough surface of polycrystalline Au induces the standing geometry in pentacene. It is further shown that in situ deposition of PTCDA on pentacene can influence the orientation of the surface pentacene layer, flipping part of the surface pentacene molecules into a flat lying geometry, maximizing the orbital interaction across the pentacene-PTCDA heterojunction.

  11. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  12. Energy level modeling of lanthanide materials: review and uncertainty analysis.

    PubMed

    Joos, Jonas J; Poelman, Dirk; Smet, Philippe F

    2015-07-15

    Energy level schemes are an essential tool for the description and interpretation of atomic spectra. During the last 40 years, several empirical methods and relationships were devised for constructing energy level schemes of lanthanide defects in wide band gap solids, culminating in the chemical shift model by Thiel and Dorenbos. This model allows us to calculate the electronic and optical properties of the considered materials. However, an unbiased assessment of the accuracy of the obtained values of the calculated parameters is still lacking to a large extent. In this paper, error margins for calculated electronic and optical properties are deduced. It is found that optical transitions can be predicted within an acceptable error margin, while the description of phenomena involving conduction band states is limited to qualitative interpretation due to the large error margins for physical observables such as thermal quenching temperature, corresponding to standard deviations in the range 0.3-0.5 eV for the relevant energy differences. As an example, the electronic structure of lanthanide doped calcium thiogallate (CaGa2S4) is determined, taking the experimental spectra of CaGa2S4:Ln(Q+) (Ln(Q+) = Ce(3+), Eu(2+), Tm(3+)) as input. Two different approaches to obtain the shape of the zig-zag curves connecting the 4f levels of the different lanthanides are explored and compared. PMID:26129935

  13. Holes in the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Holes in the Heart? Holes in the heart are simple congenital (kon-JEN- ... the heart. However, some babies are born with holes in the upper or lower septum. A hole ...

  14. Energy levels and radiative transition rates for Ba XLVIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Indu; Goyal, Arun; Aggarwal, Sunny; Singh, A. K.; Mohan, Man

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in F-like Ba XLVIII. Configuration interaction has been included among 27 configurations (generating 431 levels) over a wide energy range up to 618 Rydbergs, and the fully relativistic multi-configurational Dirac-Fock method adopted for the calculations. To assess the accuracy, calculations have also been performed with the flexible atomic code, FAC. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for all electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic quadrupole transitions from the lowest 3 levels, although calculations have been performed for a much larger number of levels. We have made comparisons of our results with existing available results and a good agreement has been achieved. Additionally, lifetimes for all 431 levels are listed.

  15. Electron Energy Levels in the 1D-2D Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Michael; Sanjeev, Kumar; Thomas, Kalarikad; Creeth, Graham; English, David; Ritchie, David; Griffiths, Jonathan; Farrer, Ian; Jones, Geraint

    Using GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructures we have investigated the behaviour of electron energy levels with relaxation of the potential confining a 2D electron gas into a 1D configuration. In the ballistic regime of transport, when the conductance shows quantized plateaux, different types of behaviour are found according to the spins of interacting levels, whether a magnetic field is applied and lifting of the momentum degeneracy with a source-drain voltage. We have observed both crossing and anti-crossing of levels and have investigated the manner in which they can be mutually converted. In the presence of a magnetic field levels can cross and lock together as the confinement is altered in a way which is characteristic of parallel channels. The overall behaviour is discussed in terms of electron interactions and the wavefunction flexibility allowed by the increasing two dimensionality of the electron distribution as the confinement is weakened. Work supported by UK EPSRC.

  16. Energy level offset analysis of lead atom in laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. M.; Chen, C. S.; Man, B. Y.; Guo, J.; Wang, J.

    2009-08-01

    The optical emission spectra of the plasma generated by a 1064 nm laser irradiation of lead target in air were recorded and analyzed. Temporal evolvement trait of spectral lines was investigated. The Stark width and line shift were measured at different delay time and laser energies. The electron densities were determined using Stark-broadening parameters of spectral lines. The atomic energy level offset in plasma surroundings was explored by analyzing the line shift. The experimental data of Stark widths and line shifts were analyzed using the regularity of the Stark parameters’ dependence on effective ionization potential. However an inverse experimental result was found compared with the theoretical calculation. In addition, the change of the Stark widths and line shifts with the delay time and laser energies was discussed.

  17. Superconducting electron and hole lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheraghchi, H.; Esmailzadeh, H.; Moghaddam, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    We show how a superconducting region (S), sandwiched between two normal leads (N), in the presence of barriers, can act as a lens for propagating electron and hole waves by virtue of the so-called crossed Andreev reflection (CAR). The CAR process, which is equivalent to Cooper pair splitting into two N electrodes, provides a unique possibility of constructing entangled electrons in solid state systems. When electrons are locally injected from an N lead, due to the CAR and normal reflection of quasiparticles by the insulating barriers at the interfaces, sequences of electron and hole focuses are established inside another N electrode. This behavior originates from the change of momentum during electron-hole conversion beside the successive normal reflections of electrons and holes due to the barriers. The focusing phenomena studied here are fundamentally different from the electron focusing in other systems, such as graphene p-n junctions. In particular, due to the electron-hole symmetry of the superconducting state, the focusing of electrons and holes is robust against thermal excitations. Furthermore, the effects of the superconducting layer width, the injection point position, and barrier strength are investigated on the focusing behavior of the junction. Very intriguingly, it is shown that by varying the barrier strength, one can separately control the density of electrons or holes at the focuses.

  18. Optically switchable transistor via energy-level phototuning in a bicomponent organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgiu, Emanuele; Crivillers, Núria; Herder, Martin; Grubert, Lutz; Pätzel, Michael; Frisch, Johannes; Pavlica, Egon; Duong, Duc T.; Bratina, Gvido; Salleo, Alberto; Koch, Norbert; Hecht, Stefan; Samorì, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    Organic semiconductors are suitable candidates for printable, flexible and large-area electronics. Alongside attaining an improved device performance, to confer a multifunctional nature to the employed materials is key for organic-based logic applications. Here we report on the engineering of an electronic structure in a semiconducting film by blending two molecular components, a photochromic diarylethene derivative and a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) matrix, to attain phototunable and bistable energy levels for the P3HT's hole transport. As a proof-of-concept we exploited this blend as a semiconducting material in organic thin-film transistors. The device illumination at defined wavelengths enabled reversible tuning of the diarylethene's electronic states in the blend, which resulted in modulation of the output current. The device photoresponse was found to be in the microsecond range, and thus on a technologically relevant timescale. This modular blending approach allows for the convenient incorporation of various molecular components, which opens up perspectives on multifunctional devices and logic circuits.

  19. News and Views: Keith Mason moves to UK Space Agency; Pristine gas from dawn of time; Discovering local dark skies; Planet collisions may generate black hole dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    Keith Mason stepped down from his role as CEO of STFC on 1 November in order to take up a post at the UK Space Agency until 31 March 2012, advising on steps needed to leverage the research base to maximize the economic growth of the space sector. He is succeeded at STFC by John Womersley. Diffuse gas clouds composed of hydrogen and deuterium have been detected in deep space-potential reservoirs of pristine material left over from the Big Bang. Finding places where skies are dark enough to see stars and planets will be easier thanks to a national initiative funded by the Big Lottery Fund and led by the STFC. Clouds of dust around the centres of galaxies where supermassive black holes lurk may come from collisions between planets and asteroids-much as zodiacal dust in the solar system comes from comet and asteroid collisions.

  20. Rovibrational bound states of neon trimer: quantum dynamical calculation of all eigenstate energy levels and wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Benhui; Chen, Wenwu; Poirier, Bill

    2011-09-01

    Exact quantum dynamics calculations of the eigenstate energy levels and wavefunctions for all bound rovibrational states of the Ne(3) trimer (J = 0-18) have been performed using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. These codes employ a combination of highly efficient methods, including phase-space optimized discrete variable representation, optimal separable basis, and preconditioned inexact spectral transform methods, together with an effective massive parallelization scheme. The Ne(3) energy levels and wavefunctions were computed using a pair-wise Lennard-Jones potential. Jacobi coordinates were used for the calculations, but to identify just those states belonging to the totally symmetric irreducible representation of the G(12) complete nuclear permutation-inversion group, wavefunctions were plotted in hyperspherical coordinates. "Horseshoe" states were observed above the isomerization barrier, but the horseshoe localization effect is weaker than in Ar(3). The rigid rotor model is found to be applicable for only the ground and first excited vibrational states at low J; fitted rotational constant values are presented. PMID:21913762

  1. Correlation between the energy level structure of cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet and luminescent behavior at varying temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen; Liu, Xiaolang; He, Lizhu; Liu, Q. L.

    2016-05-01

    Luminescent spectra of cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet are measured at varying temperatures. It is found that the two excitation peaks demonstrate a reverse trend as the temperature rises, and the breadth of the high-energy emission peak experiences an abrupt widening. These effects could be directly linked to the energy level scheme of Ce3+ under the crystal field of local symmetry. Moreover, an alternative fitting function is provided which could effectively resolve the emission curve.

  2. Energy levels and transition probability matrix elements of ruby for maser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berwin, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Program computes fine structure energy levels of ruby as a function of magnetic field. Included in program is matrix formulation, each row of which contains a magnetic field and four corresponding energy levels.

  3. Interaction Determined Electron Energy Levels in One-Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Michael; Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, Kalarikad; Smith, Luke; Creeth, Graham; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David; Jones, Geraint; Jonathan, Griffiths; UCL Collaboration; Cavendish Laboratory Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated electron transport in a quasi-one dimensional electron gas in the GaAs-AlGaAs heterostructure designed so that the confinement potential can be progressively weakened. This causes the energy levels to decrease in energy relative to each other, however this decrease occurs at different rates, a feature attributed to the energy being determined by both confinement and the electron-electron repulsion which varies with the shape of the wavefunction. It is found that the initial ground state crosses the higher levels so resulting in missing plateaux of quantised conductance. A change in the nature of the ground state to a more extended form causes an increase in the capacitance between the confining gates and the electrons. Both crossings and anti-crossings of the levels are found and these will be discussed along with other consequences of the form of the level interactions. The effects of level crossing on the spin dependent 0.7 structure will be presented. Supported by EPSRC (UK).

  4. Noncommutative black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, C.; Bertolami, O.; Dias, N. C.; Prata, J. N.

    2010-04-01

    One considers phase-space noncommutativity in the context of a Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model to study the interior of a Schwarzschild black hole. It is shown that the potential function of the corresponding quantum cosmology problem has a local minimum. One deduces the thermodynamics and show that the Hawking temperature and entropy exhibit an explicit dependence on the momentum noncommutativity parameter, η. Furthermore, the t = r = 0 singularity is analysed in the noncommutative regime and it is shown that the wave function vanishes in this limit.

  5. On the Thermal Property of Arbitrarily Accelerating Charged Black Hole with a New Tortoise Coordinate Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenfeng, Niu; Wenbiao, Liu

    2006-07-01

    After a new tortoise coordinate transformation is adopted, the entropy and non-thermal radiation of an arbitrarily accelerating charged black hole are discussed as an example of non-stationary black holes. The same cut-off relation is chosen as static case, which is independent of space-time, and then the entropy of the non-stationary black hole is also proportional to the area of its event horizon. Meanwhile, the crossing of the particle energy levels near the event horizon is studied, the representative of the maximum value of the crossing energy levels is the same as the usual tortoise coordinate transformation.

  6. Fast radio bursts and white hole signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrau, Aurélien; Rovelli, Carlo; Vidotto, Francesca

    2014-12-01

    Quantum gravity effects could make a black hole explode in a time shorter than the Hawking radiation time, via local tunneling through a white hole solution. Here we estimate the size of a primordial black hole exploding today via this process, using a simple generic model. Fast radio bursts, strong signals with millisecond duration, which are probably of extragalactic origin and have an unknown source, have wavelengths not far from the expected size of the exploding hole. We also discuss the high-energy component of the signal. These results suggest a new window for quantum gravity phenomenology.

  7. Interfacial energy level shifts in few-molecule clusters of the organic semiconductor PTCDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Sarah; Cochrane, Katherine; Schiffrin, Agustin; Roussy, Tanya

    2014-03-01

    Detailed knowledge of the local electronic structure of organic semiconductors near interfaces is crucial for the understanding of a variety of electronic and optoelectronic applications of these emerging materials. However, organic molecules are highly sensitive to the local environment, which abruptly changes at an interface. Here, we present a study on the prototypical organic semiconductor PTCDA by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopic mapping. Nanoscale clusters of varying size and geometry were probed on a bilayer NaCl film on Ag(111). The molecular states, while decoupled from the underlying metal surface, are relatively delocalized within these monolayer islands. Depending on the size of the cluster and arrangement of molecules within the cluster, edge molecules exhibit varying energy level shifts relative to the central molecules, both of which differ from the isolated molecule. For well ordered islands, this leads to a type-1 heterojunction, with a larger band gap at the edge of the cluster differing by as much as 0.5eV. In considering nanoscale structures within multicomponent device architectures, such internal heterostructures established by differences in the local environment are an important consideration, and could even be exploited.

  8. Hole spins in an InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecule subject to lateral electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiangyu; Bryant, Garnett W.; Doty, Matthew F.

    2016-06-01

    There has been tremendous progress in manipulating electron and hole-spin states in quantum dots or quantum dot molecules (QDMs) with growth-direction (vertical) electric fields and optical excitations. However, the response of carriers in QDMs to an in-plane (lateral) electric field remains largely unexplored. We computationally explore spin-mixing interactions in the molecular states of single holes confined in vertically stacked InAs/GaAs QDMs using atomistic tight-binding simulations. We systematically investigate QDMs with different geometric structure parameters and local piezoelectric fields. We observe both a relatively large Stark shift and a change in the Zeeman splitting as the magnitude of the lateral electric field increases. Most importantly, we observe that lateral electric fields induce hole-spin mixing with a magnitude that increases with increasing lateral electric field over a moderate range. These results suggest that applied lateral electric fields could be used to fine tune and manipulate, in situ, the energy levels and spin properties of single holes confined in QDMs.

  9. The Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    The ozone hole is a massive loss of ozone that annually occurs over Antarctica during the Austral spring (August-November). Man-made chlorine and bromine compounds cause the ozone hole. As opposed to local urban pollution, the hole illustrates how man-made chemicals can affect the atmosphere over enormous regions remote from their release point. These chlorine and bromine gases have long lifetimes in the atmosphere; hence, the ozone hole will slowly recover into the next few decades. In this talk I will briefly cover some of the history of the Antarctic ozone hole and the theory behind the phenomena. I will then discuss the recovery of ozone over Antarctica. State-of-the-art computer models project the recovery of the ozone hole to 1980 levels by about 2050. However, this recovery may be affected by greenhouse warming.

  10. Rotating black holes at future colliders. III. Determination of black hole evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, Daisuke; Oda, Kin-ya; Park, Seong Chan

    2006-06-15

    TeV scale gravity scenario predicts that the black hole production dominates over all other interactions above the scale and that the Large Hadron Collider will be a black hole factory. Such higher-dimensional black holes mainly decay into the standard model fields via the Hawking radiation whose spectrum can be computed from the greybody factor. Here we complete the series of our work by showing the greybody factors and the resultant spectra for the brane-localized spinor and vector field emissions for arbitrary frequencies. Combining these results with the previous works, we determine the complete radiation spectra and the subsequent time evolution of the black hole. We find that, for a typical event, well more than half a black hole mass is emitted when the hole is still highly rotating, confirming our previous claim that it is important to take into account the angular momentum of black holes.

  11. Dialkylthio Substitution: An Effective Method to Modulate the Molecular Energy Levels of 2D-BDT Photovoltaic Polymers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huifeng; Zhang, Hao; Ye, Long; Zhao, Wenchao; Zhang, Shaoqing; Hou, Jianhui

    2016-02-17

    Dialkylthio-substituted thienyl-benzodithiophene (BDT-DST) was designed and synthesized as a building block to modulate the molecular levels of the conjugated polymers, and three copolymers named PDST-BDD, PDST-TT and PDST-DPP were prepared and applied in polymer solar cells (PSCs). Theoretical calculations and electrochemical cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement suggested that the dialkylthio group could decrease the molecular energy levels of the resulting polymers distinctly. The open-circuit voltage (VOC) of PSC devices based on PDST-BDD, PDST-TT, and PDST-DPP are as high as 1.0, 0.98, and 0.88 V, respectively, which are ∼0.15 V higher than those of the corresponding alky-substituted analogues. Moreover, the influence of the dialkylthio group on the absorption spectra, crystalline properties, hole mobilities, and blend morphologies of the polymers was also investigated. The results indicate that the dialkythio substitution is an effective method to modulate the molecular energy levels and that the BDT-DST unit has potential for constructing high-efficiency photovoltaic polymers. PMID:26359953

  12. Thermodynamic phase transition in the rainbow Schwarzschild black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae E-mail: wtkim@sogang.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We study the thermodynamic phase transition in the rainbow Schwarzschild black hole where the metric depends on the energy of the test particle. Identifying the black hole temperature with the energy from the modified dispersion relation, we obtain the modified entropy and thermodynamic energy along with the modified local temperature in the cavity to provide well defined black hole states. It is found that apart from the conventional critical temperature related to Hawking-Page phase transition there appears an additional critical temperature which is of relevance to the existence of a locally stable tiny black hole; however, the off-shell free energy tells us that this black hole should eventually tunnel into the stable large black hole. Finally, we discuss the reason why the temperature near the horizon is finite in the rainbow black hole by employing the running gravitational coupling constant, whereas it is divergent near the horizon in the ordinary Schwarzschild black hole.

  13. Deburring small intersecting holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  14. Energy levels and the de Broglie relationship for high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianino, Concetto

    2008-07-01

    In this article, four examples of possible lessons on energy levels for high school are described: a particle in a box, a finite square well, the hydrogen atom and a harmonic oscillator. The energy levels are deduced through the use of the steady-state condition and the de Broglie relationship. In particular, the harmonic oscillator energy levels are deduced using correspondence with circular uniform motion.

  15. Energy levels of isoelectronic impurities by large scale LDA calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingbo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2002-11-22

    Isoelectronic impurity states are localized states induced by stoichiometric single atom substitution in bulk semiconductor. Photoluminescence spectra indicate deep impurity levels of 0.5 to 0.9eV above the top of valence band for systems like: GaN:As, GaN:P, CdS:Te, ZnS:Te. Previous calculations based on small supercells seemingly confirmed these experimental results. However, the current ab initio calculations based on thousand atom supercells indicate that the impurity levels of the above systems are actually much shallower(0.04 to 0.23 eV), and these impurity levels should be compared with photoluminescence excitation spectra, not photoluminescence spectra.

  16. Hologram of a pure state black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shubho R.; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we extend the Hamilton-Kabat-Lifschytz-Lowe (HKLL) holographic smearing function method to reconstruct (quasi)local anti-de Sitter bulk scalar observables in the background of a large anti-de Sitter black hole formed by null shell collapse (a "pure state" black hole), from the dual conformal field theory which is undergoing a sudden quench. In particular, we probe the near horizon and subhorizon bulk locality. First, we construct local bulk operators from the conformal field theory in the leading semiclassical limit, N →∞ . Then, we look at effects due to the finiteness of N , where we propose a suitable coarse-graining prescription involving early and late time cutoffs to define semiclassical bulk observables which are approximately local, their departure from locality being nonperturbatively small in N . Our results have important implications on the black hole information problem.

  17. Bore hole navigator

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, G.J.

    1987-09-29

    A bore hole navigator is described comprising a two axis platform for lowering down a bore hole on a cable with its longitudinal axis parallel to the local bore hole direction. The two axis platform has an outer gimbal, bearing supported on the outer gimbal axis for rotation about the longitudinal axis of the platform, and an inner gimbal axis orthogonal the the outer gimbal axis. The inner gimbal axis has multiple axis segments spaced along the longitudinal axis of the platform and each bearing supported on the outer gimbal. The inner gimbal axis segment has a two axis gyro mounted thereon with its spin axis orthogonal to the respective inner gimbal axis segment, a first gyro sensitive axis parallel to the respective inner gimbal axis segment and a second gyro sensitive axis orthogonal to the spin axis. The second inner gimbal axis segment has a pitch torquer thereon operative to provide a controllable torque about the respective inner gimbal axis segment. The third inner gimbal axis segment has a pitch resolver thereon operative to measure rotation of the respective inner gimbal axis segment with respect to the outer gimbal. The first, second and third inner gimbal axis segments are coupled to rotate together. The outer gimbal has a yaw torquer thereon to provide a controllable torque about the outer gimbal axis, and a yaw resolver thereon to measure rotation of the outer gimbal about the outer gimbal axis. The outer gimbal also has a single axis accelerometer therein having its sensitive axis orthogonal to the outer gimbal axis and the inner gimbal axis segments.

  18. Method and apparatus of assessing down-hole drilling conditions

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Johnson, Monte L.; Bartholomew, David B.; Fox, Joe

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for use in assessing down-hole drilling conditions are disclosed. The apparatus includes a drill string, a plurality of sensors, a computing device, and a down-hole network. The sensors are distributed along the length of the drill string and are capable of sensing localized down-hole conditions while drilling. The computing device is coupled to at least one sensor of the plurality of sensors. The data is transmitted from the sensors to the computing device over the down-hole network. The computing device analyzes data output by the sensors and representative of the sensed localized conditions to assess the down-hole drilling conditions. The method includes sensing localized drilling conditions at a plurality of points distributed along the length of a drill string during drilling operations; transmitting data representative of the sensed localized conditions to a predetermined location; and analyzing the transmitted data to assess the down-hole drilling conditions.

  19. Energy Levels and the de Broglie Relationship for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gianino, Concetto

    2008-01-01

    In this article, four examples of possible lessons on energy levels for high school are described: a particle in a box, a finite square well, the hydrogen atom and a harmonic oscillator. The energy levels are deduced through the use of the steady-state condition and the de Broglie relationship. In particular, the harmonic oscillator energy levels…

  20. Black Hole Syndrome 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-08-01

    A black hole falling into the Earth would syndrome toward the center, while it would shine through mass accretion. The author has re-examined the dynamics of such a black hole in the Earth. In the case of a non-radiating black hole, the timescale of the syndrome is inversely proportional to the initial mass of the black hole. In the case of a radiating black hole, on the other hand, the syndrome time is of the order of the Eddington time. The radiating black hole in the Earth would act as a strong heat source.

  1. Energy levels and spectral lines of tungsten, W III through W LXXIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, A. E.; Shirai, T.

    2009-05-01

    The energy levels and spectral lines of multiply ionized tungsten atoms, W 2+ through W 73+, have been compiled. Experimental data on spectral lines and energy levels exist for the spectra of W III through W VII, W XXVIII through W LI, W LIII, and W LV through LXV. For W VIII, the four lowest energy levels were derived from the series limits of W VII. For W LXIV (Na-like) and W LVI (K-like), we supplement experimental data on energy levels and wavelengths with predicted values found by accurate interpolations and extrapolations along the isoelectronic sequences. For W LXXIII (He-like) and W LXXIV (H-like), theoretical data on energy levels and line wavelengths are compiled. For W III, we include experimentally determined radiative transition probabilities where available. The ground state configurations and terms were determined for all stages of ionization. A value of ionization energy is included for each ion.

  2. MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN STELLAR SYSTEMS: 'QUIESCENT' ACCRETION AND LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Volonteri, M.; Campbell, D.; Mateo, M.; Dotti, M.

    2011-04-01

    Only a small fraction of local galaxies harbor an accreting black hole, classified as an active galactic nucleus. However, many stellar systems are plausibly expected to host black holes, from globular clusters to nuclear star clusters, to massive galaxies. The mere presence of stars in the vicinity of a black hole provides a source of fuel via mass loss of evolved stars. In this paper, we assess the expected luminosities of black holes embedded in stellar systems of different sizes and properties, spanning a large range of masses. We model the distribution of stars and derive the amount of gas available to a central black hole through a geometrical model. We estimate the luminosity of the black holes under simple, but physically grounded, assumptions on the accretion flow. Finally, we discuss the detectability of 'quiescent' black holes in the local universe.

  3. Forest Management Intensity Affects Aquatic Communities in Artificial Tree Holes

    PubMed Central

    Petermann, Jana S.; Rohland, Anja; Sichardt, Nora; Lade, Peggy; Guidetti, Brenda; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Gossner, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    Forest management could potentially affect organisms in all forest habitats. However, aquatic communities in water-filled tree-holes may be especially sensitive because of small population sizes, the risk of drought and potential dispersal limitation. We set up artificial tree holes in forest stands subject to different management intensities in two regions in Germany and assessed the influence of local environmental properties (tree-hole opening type, tree diameter, water volume and water temperature) as well as regional drivers (forest management intensity, tree-hole density) on tree-hole insect communities (not considering other organisms such as nematodes or rotifers), detritus content, oxygen and nutrient concentrations. In addition, we compared data from artificial tree holes with data from natural tree holes in the same area to evaluate the methodological approach of using tree-hole analogues. We found that forest management had strong effects on communities in artificial tree holes in both regions and across the season. Abundance and species richness declined, community composition shifted and detritus content declined with increasing forest management intensity. Environmental variables, such as tree-hole density and tree diameter partly explained these changes. However, dispersal limitation, indicated by effects of tree-hole density, generally showed rather weak impacts on communities. Artificial tree holes had higher water temperatures (on average 2°C higher) and oxygen concentrations (on average 25% higher) than natural tree holes. The abundance of organisms was higher but species richness was lower in artificial tree holes. Community composition differed between artificial and natural tree holes. Negative management effects were detectable in both tree-hole systems, despite their abiotic and biotic differences. Our results indicate that forest management has substantial and pervasive effects on tree-hole communities and may alter their structure and

  4. Forest Management Intensity Affects Aquatic Communities in Artificial Tree Holes.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Jana S; Rohland, Anja; Sichardt, Nora; Lade, Peggy; Guidetti, Brenda; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Gossner, Martin M

    2016-01-01

    Forest management could potentially affect organisms in all forest habitats. However, aquatic communities in water-filled tree-holes may be especially sensitive because of small population sizes, the risk of drought and potential dispersal limitation. We set up artificial tree holes in forest stands subject to different management intensities in two regions in Germany and assessed the influence of local environmental properties (tree-hole opening type, tree diameter, water volume and water temperature) as well as regional drivers (forest management intensity, tree-hole density) on tree-hole insect communities (not considering other organisms such as nematodes or rotifers), detritus content, oxygen and nutrient concentrations. In addition, we compared data from artificial tree holes with data from natural tree holes in the same area to evaluate the methodological approach of using tree-hole analogues. We found that forest management had strong effects on communities in artificial tree holes in both regions and across the season. Abundance and species richness declined, community composition shifted and detritus content declined with increasing forest management intensity. Environmental variables, such as tree-hole density and tree diameter partly explained these changes. However, dispersal limitation, indicated by effects of tree-hole density, generally showed rather weak impacts on communities. Artificial tree holes had higher water temperatures (on average 2°C higher) and oxygen concentrations (on average 25% higher) than natural tree holes. The abundance of organisms was higher but species richness was lower in artificial tree holes. Community composition differed between artificial and natural tree holes. Negative management effects were detectable in both tree-hole systems, despite their abiotic and biotic differences. Our results indicate that forest management has substantial and pervasive effects on tree-hole communities and may alter their structure and

  5. Black Hole Safari: Tracking Populations and Hunting Big Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, N. J.

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the physical connection, or lack thereof, between the growth of galaxies and supermassive black holes is a key challenge in extragalactic astronomy. Dynamical studies of nearby galaxies are building a census of black hole masses across a broad range of galaxy types and uncovering statistical correlations between galaxy bulge properties and black hole masses. These local correlations provide a baseline for studying galaxies and black holes at higher redshifts. Recent measurements have probed the extremes of the supermassive black hole population and introduced surprises that challenge simple models of black hole and galaxy co-evolution. Future advances in the quality and quantity of dynamical black hole mass measurements will shed light upon the growth of massive galaxies and black holes in different cosmic environments.

  6. NASA Now: Black Holes

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now episode, Dr. Daniel Patnaude talks about how his team discovered a baby black hole, why this is important and how black holes create tidal forces. Throughout his discussion, Patnau...

  7. Treatment of Electronic Energy Level Transition and Ionization Following the Particle-Based Chemistry Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A new method of treating electronic energy level transitions as well as linking ionization to electronic energy levels is proposed following the particle-based chemistry model of Bird. Although the use of electronic energy levels and ionization reactions in DSMC are not new ideas, the current method of selecting what level to transition to, how to reproduce transition rates, and the linking of the electronic energy levels to ionization are, to the author s knowledge, novel concepts. The resulting equilibrium temperatures are shown to remain constant, and the electronic energy level distributions are shown to reproduce the Boltzmann distribution. The electronic energy level transition rates and ionization rates due to electron impacts are shown to reproduce theoretical and measured rates. The rates due to heavy particle impacts, while not as favorable as the electron impact rates, compare favorably to values from the literature. Thus, these new extensions to the particle-based chemistry model of Bird provide an accurate method for predicting electronic energy level transition and ionization rates in gases.

  8. Black Hole Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Janna; D'Orazio, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Black holes are dark dead stars. Neutron stars are giant magnets. As the neutron star orbits the black hole, an electronic circuit forms that generates a blast of power just before the black hole absorbs the neutron star whole. The black hole battery conceivably would be observable at cosmological distances. Possible channels for luminosity include synchro-curvature radiation, a blazing fireball, or even an unstable, short-lived black hole pulsar. As suggested by Mingarelli, Levin, and Lazio, some fraction of the battery power could also be reprocessed into coherent radio emission to populate a subclass of fast radio bursts.

  9. A Simple Approach for the Calculation of Energy Levels of Light Atoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodyard, Jack R., Sr.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a method for direct calculation of energy levels by using elementary techniques. Describes the limitations of the approach but also claims that with a minimum amount of labor a student can get greater understanding of atomic physics problems. (PS)

  10. ENERGY LEVELS AND SPECTRAL LINES OF SINGLY IONIZED MANGANESE (Mn II)

    SciTech Connect

    Kramida, Alexander; Sansonetti, Jean E.

    2013-04-01

    This compilation revises the previously recommended list of energy levels of singly ionized manganese (Mn II) and provides a comprehensive list of observed spectral lines and transition probabilities in this spectrum. The new level optimization takes into account critically assessed uncertainties of measured wavelengths and includes about a hundred high-precision wavelengths determined by laser spectroscopy and Fourier transform techniques. Uncertainties of 63% of energy levels and 74% of Ritz wavelengths are reduced by a factor of three on average.

  11. Effective theory of black holes in the 1/D expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole is strongly localized near its horizon when the number of dimensions D is very large. In this limit, we can effectively replace the black hole with a surface in a background geometry (e.g. Minkowski or Anti-deSitter space). The Einstein equations determine the effective equations that this `black hole surface' (or membrane) must satisfy. We obtain them up to next-to-leading order in 1/ D for static black holes of the Einstein-(A)dS theory. To leading order, and also to next order in Minkowski backgrounds, the equations of the effective theory are the same as soap-film equations, possibly up to a redshift factor. In particular, the Schwarzschild black hole is recovered as a spherical soap bubble. Less trivially, we find solutions for `black droplets', i.e. black holes localized at the boundary of AdS, and for non-uniform black strings.

  12. Superextremal spinning black holes via accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo; Matzner, Richard

    2011-09-01

    A Kerr black hole with mass M and angular momentum J satisfies the extremality inequality |J|≤M2. In the presence of matter and/or gravitational radiation, this bound needs to be reformulated in terms of local measurements of the mass and the angular momentum directly associated with the black hole. The isolated and dynamical horizon framework provides such quasilocal characterization of black hole mass and angular momentum. With this framework, it is possible in axisymmetry to reformulate the extremality limit as |J|≤2MH2, with MH the irreducible mass of the black hole computed from its apparent horizon area and J obtained using a rotational Killing vector field on the apparent horizon. The |J|≤2MH2 condition is also equivalent to requiring a non-negative black hole surface gravity. We present numerical experiments of an accreting black hole that temporarily violates this extremality inequality. The initial configuration consists of a single, rotating black hole surrounded by a thick, shell cloud of negative energy density. For these numerical experiments, we introduce a new matter-without-matter evolution method.

  13. CPT-hole closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noce, T.E.; Holzer, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    The long-term stability of deep holes 1.75 inches. (4.4 cm) in diameter by 98.4 feet (30 m) created by cone penetration testing (CPT) was monitored at a site in California underlain by Holocene and Pleistocene age alluvial fan deposits. Portions of the holes remained open both below and above the 28.6-foot (8.7 m)-deep water table for approximately three years, when the experiment was terminated. Hole closure appears to be a very slow process that may take decades in the stiff soils studied here. Other experience suggests holes in softer soils may also remain open. Thus, despite their small diameter, CPT holes may remain open for years and provide paths for rapid migration of contaminants. The observations confirm the need to grout holes created by CPT soundings as well as other direct-push techniques in areas where protection of shallow ground water is important.

  14. Quantization of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    We show that black holes can be quantized in an intuitive and elegant way with results in agreement with conventional knowledge of black holes by using Bohr's idea of quantizing the motion of an electron inside the atom in quantum mechanics. We find that properties of black holes can also be derived from an ansatz of quantized entropy Δ S = 4π k Δ R/{{-{λ }}}, which was suggested in a previous work to unify the black hole entropy formula and Verlinde's conjecture to explain gravity as an entropic force. Such an Ansatz also explains gravity as an entropic force from quantum effect. This suggests a way to unify gravity with quantum theory. Several interesting and surprising results of black holes are given from which we predict the existence of primordial black holes ranging from Planck scale both in size and energy to big ones in size but with low energy behaviors.

  15. Black hole explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciama, D. W.

    A physical account of the processes of black hole explosions is presented. Black holes form when the degeneracy pressure in a neutron star can no longer balance gravitational forces because the mass of the star is too large. Although black holes absorb surrounding matter through the action of a gravitational field, quantum fluctuations have been theoretically demonstrated to occur in the vacuum, and feature a thermal character. The temperature field decreases outwards, in accordance with the nonuniformity of the gravitational field, but does allow thermal radiation, i.e., Hawking radiation, to escape the black hole. The time scale for the radiation shortens as the mass of the black hole decreases, until a time scale is reached which is short enough for the process to be called an explosion. Observations of electron-positron Hawking radiation are suggested to offer proof of a black hole explosion.

  16. Structure and energy level alignment at the dye-electrode interface in p-type DSSCs: new hints on the role of anchoring modes from ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Ana B; Pavone, Michele

    2015-05-14

    p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) represent the complementary photocathodes to the well-studied n-type DSSCs (Grätzel cells), but their low performances have hindered the development of convenient tandem solar cells based on cost-effective n- and p-type DSSCs. Because of their low efficiencies, experimental investigations highlighted the role of hole-electron transport processes at the dye-electrode interface. However, the effects of the dye anchoring groups on interfacial electronic features are still unclear. We report here a first principles study of a benchmark p-type DSSC model, namely the widely used Coumarin-based dye C343 adsorbed on the p-NiO surface. Together with the original carboxylic acid, we test the alternative phosphonic acid as the anchoring group. We investigate binding energies, structural features and electronic energy level alignments: our results highlight that these properties are highly sensitive to the binding modes. In particular, both the chemical nature of the anchoring group and the binding mode strongly affect the thermodynamic driving force for the dye-electrode hole injection process. From analysis of the electronic densities, we find that favorable driving forces are correlated with small values of the interfacial electrostatic dipole that is formed upon dye adsorption. From our results, we derive new hints for improving open circuit potential and the hole injection process in p-type DSSCs based on NiO electrodes. PMID:25892559

  17. Evidence for black holes.

    PubMed

    Begelman, Mitchell C

    2003-06-20

    Black holes are common objects in the universe. Each galaxy contains large numbers-perhaps millions-of stellar-mass black holes, each the remnant of a massive star. In addition, nearly every galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its center, with a mass ranging from millions to billions of solar masses. This review discusses the demographics of black holes, the ways in which they interact with their environment, factors that may regulate their formation and growth, and progress toward determining whether these objects really warp spacetime as predicted by the general theory of relativity. PMID:12817138

  18. Generalized gradient approximation to the angle- and system-averaged exchange hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias; Perdew, John P.

    1998-09-01

    A simple analytic model is proposed for the angle- and system-averaged exchange hole of a many-electron system. The model hole depends on the local density and density gradient. It recovers a nonoscillatory local-spin density (LSD) approximation to the exchange hole for a vanishing density gradient. The model hole reproduces the exchange energy density of the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for exchange, and facilitates a detailed understanding of the PBE GGA. The hole model is applied to atoms and molecules, and a comparison is made to exact and LSD angle- and system-averaged exchange holes. We find that the GGA hole model significantly improves upon the LSD model. Furthermore, the GGA hole model accurately describes the change in the exchange hole upon the formation of single bonds, but is less accurate for the formation of multiple bonds, where it misses the appearance of a long-range tail.

  19. Vibronic interactions in hole-transporting molecules: An interplay with electron-hole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tohru; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Uegaito, Keisuke; Iwahara, Naoya; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Kaji, Hironori

    2011-04-01

    Vibronic coupling constants of hole-transporting molecules, TPF and CBP, are estimated. Despite the planar structure of TPF, the calculated vibronic coupling constants are close to those of nonplanar TPD. The origin of the vibronic couplings in TPF is investigated employing the vibronic coupling density analysis. Based on a Hubbard Hamiltonian, electron-hole interactions are found to be crucial in the vibronic couplings. A large difference of on-site Coulomb interactions, or electron-hole interactions gives rise to a localization of the electron-density difference on a site which can lead to small vibronic couplings.

  20. Effect of temperature-dependent energy-level shifts on a semiconductor's Peltier heat

    SciTech Connect

    Emin, D.

    1984-11-15

    The Peltier heat of a charge carrier in a semiconductor is calculated for the situation in which the electronic energy levels are temperature dependent. The temperature dependences of the electronic energy levels, generally observed optically, arise from their dependences on the vibrational energy of the lattice (e.g., as caused by thermal expansion). It has been suggested that these temperature dependences will typically have a major effect on the Peltier heat. The Peltier heat associated with a given energy level is a thermodynamic quantity; it is the product of the temperature and the change of the entropy of the system when a carrier is added in that level. As such, the energy levels cannot be treated as explicitly temperature dependent. The electron-lattice interaction causing the temperature dependence must be expressly considered. It is found that the carrier's interaction with the atomic vibrations lowers its electronic energy. However, the interaction of the carrier with the atomic vibrations also causes an infinitesimal lowering (approx.1/N) of each of the N vibrational frequencies. As a result, there is a finite carrier-induced increase in the average vibrational energy. Above the Debye temperature, this cancels the lowering of the carrier's electronic energy. Thus, the standard Peltier-heat formula, whose derivation generally ignores the temperature dependence of the electronic energy levels, is regained. This explains the apparent success of the standard formula in numerous analyses of electronic transport experiments.

  1. Sequence of hole resonances in complex oxide heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Smadici, S; Logvenov, G; Bozovic, I; Abbamonte, P

    2014-04-16

    Resonant soft x-ray scattering measurements at the O K edge on Sr2CuO4-ν/La2NiO4+δ (SCO/LNO) complex oxide superlattices show resonances for holes in the two constituent layers, in a sequence of energy levels. The observation of well defined resonances, on a superlattice with layers one unit cell thick, indicates that the resonance energy is largely unaffected by atoms outside a cluster extending half a unit cell along the c axis, consistent with calculations for bulk materials. Comparison to measurements on related superlattices confirms that the order of resonances at the O K edge reflects the order of hole ground-state energies in the heterostructure buried layers. For the SCO/LNO superlattices, the measurements show that the ground-state energies remain different in very thin SCO and LNO layers, which is a contributing factor when considering electronic reconstruction at interfaces, in addition to the areal density of ionic charges in the atomic planes. Different hole energy levels in the SCO/LNO superlattice also imply that holes do not spread into SCO from LNO layers. PMID:24675566

  2. Optical Energy Levels Scheme for Co2+ doped in K(Mg,Zn)F3 Fluoroperovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barb, A. M.; Gruia, A. S.; Avram, C. N.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the crystal field parameters and simulate the fine structure of optical energy levels scheme of Co2+:K(Mg,Zn)F3 systems. The crystal field parameters were modeled in the frame of an Exchange Charge Model of the crystal field theory, taking into account the effects of the covalent bond formation between the Co2+ and F- ions. The obtained parameters were used for simulating the fine structure of the system energy levels scheme, by diagonalization of the full Hamiltonian matrix, in the base of 100 wave functions of Co2+ ion. For resolving some discrepancies, the electron-phonon interaction in 4T2g excited state is investigated in the frame of the Ham theory, with the Jahn-Teller stabilization energy calculation. The comparison of the calculated energy levels with experimental data gives a good agreement, which confirms the model and used method.

  3. Correspondence between energy levels and evolution curves of fixed points in nonlinear Landau-Zener model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan-Zuo; Tian, Dong-Ping; Chong, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Liu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90(17), 170404 (2003)] proved that the characters of transition probabilities in the adiabatic limit should be entirely determined by the topology of energy levels and the stability of fixed points in the classical Hamiltonian system, according to the adiabatic theorem. In the special case of nonlinear Landau-Zener model, we simplify their results to be that the properties of transition probabilities in the adiabatic limit should just be determined by the attributes of fixed points. It is because the topology of energy levels is governed by the behavior and symmetries of fixed points, and intuitively this fact is represented as a correspondence between energy levels and evolution curves of the fixed points which can be quantitatively described as the same complexity numbers.

  4. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-07-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions.

  5. Impact behaviour of Napier/polyester composites under different energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, I.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Afendi, M.; Haslan, M.; Helmi E., A.; M. Haameem J., A.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of different energy levels on the impact behaviour of Napier fibre/polyester reinforced composites were investigated. Napier fibre was extracted using traditional water retting process to be utilized as reinforcing materials in polyester composite laminates. 25% fibre loading composite laminates were prepared and impacted at three different energy levels; 2.5,5 and 7.5 J using an instrumented drop weight impact testing machine (IMATEK IM10). The outcomes show that peak force and contact time increase with increased impact load. The energy absorption was then calculated from the force displacement curve. The results indicated that the energy absorption decreases with increasing energy levels of the impact. Impacted specimens were observed visually for fragmentation fracture using an optical camera to identify the failure mechanisms. Fracture fragmentation pattern from permanent dent to perforation with radial and circumferential was observed.

  6. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions. PMID:27456200

  7. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-01-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions. PMID:27456200

  8. Accretion disks around black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramowicz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The physics of accretion flow very close to a black hole is dominated by several general relativistic effects. It cannot be described by the standard Shakura Sunyaev model or by its relativistic version developed by Novikov and Thome. The most important of these effects is a dynamical mass loss from the inner edge of the disk (Roche lobe overflow). The relativistic Roche lobe overflow induces a strong advective cooling, which is sufficient to stabilize local, axially symmetric thermal and viscous modes. It also stabilizes the non-axially-symmetric global modes discovered by Papaloizou and Pringle. The Roche lobe overflow, however, destabilizes sufficiently self-gravitating accretion disks with respect to a catastrophic runaway of mass due to minute changes of the gravitational field induced by the changes in the mass and angular momentum of the central black hole. One of the two acoustic modes may become trapped near the inner edge of the disk. All these effects, absent in the standard model, have dramatic implications for time-dependent behavior of the accretion disks around black holes.

  9. Soft Hair on Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen W.; Perry, Malcolm J.; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units.

  10. Soft Hair on Black Holes.

    PubMed

    Hawking, Stephen W; Perry, Malcolm J; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-10

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units. PMID:27341223

  11. Experimental Energy Levels and Partition Function of the 12C2 Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Szabó, István; Császár, Attila G.; Bernath, Peter F.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    The carbon dimer, the 12C2 molecule, is ubiquitous in astronomical environments. Experimental-quality rovibronic energy levels are reported for 12C2, based on rovibronic transitions measured for and among its singlet, triplet, and quintet electronic states, reported in 42 publications. The determination utilizes the Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels (MARVEL) technique. The 23,343 transitions measured experimentally and validated within this study determine 5699 rovibronic energy levels, 1325, 4309, and 65 levels for the singlet, triplet, and quintet states investigated, respectively. The MARVEL analysis provides rovibronic energies for six singlet, six triplet, and two quintet electronic states. For example, the lowest measurable energy level of the {{a}}{}3{{{\\Pi }}}{{u}} state, corresponding to the J = 2 total angular momentum quantum number and the F 1 spin-multiplet component, is 603.817(5) cm‑1. This well-determined energy difference should facilitate observations of singlet–triplet intercombination lines, which are thought to occur in the interstellar medium and comets. The large number of highly accurate and clearly labeled transitions that can be derived by combining MARVEL energy levels with computed temperature-dependent intensities should help a number of astrophysical observations as well as corresponding laboratory measurements. The experimental rovibronic energy levels, augmented, where needed, with ab initio variational ones based on empirically adjusted and spin–orbit coupled potential energy curves obtained using the Duo code, are used to obtain a highly accurate partition function, and related thermodynamic data, for 12C2 up to 4000 K.

  12. WAVELENGTHS, ENERGY LEVELS, LIFETIMES, AND WEIGHTED OSCILLATOR STRENGTHS FOR THE S VIII SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Pagan, C. J. B.; Cavalcanti, G. H.; Trigueiros, A. G.; Jupen, C.

    2011-10-01

    The weighted oscillator strengths (gf) and lifetimes for S VIII presented in this work were obtained by a multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock relativistic approach. In this calculation, the electrostatic energy parameters were optimized by a least-squares procedure in order to improve the adjustment to experimental energy levels. The values for gf and lifetimes were then calculated on the basis of these adjusted parameters. New classifications are proposed for energy levels belonging to the 4s and 4d configurations and lines related to them.

  13. Energy levels of odd-even nuclei using broken pair model

    SciTech Connect

    Hamammu, I. M.; Haq, S.; Eldahomi, J. M.

    2012-09-06

    A method to calculate energy levels and wave functions of odd-even nuclei, in the frame work of the broken pair model have been developed. The accuracy of the model has been tested by comparing the shell model results of limiting cases in which the broken pair model exactly coincides with the shell model, where there are two-proton/neutron + one-neutron/proton in the valence levels. The model is then applied to calculate the energy levels of some nuclei in the Zirconium region. The model results compare reasonably well with the shell model as well as with the experimental data.

  14. Calculating splittings between energy levels of different symmetry using path-integral methods.

    PubMed

    Mátyus, Edit; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-03-21

    It is well known that path-integral methods can be used to calculate the energy splitting between the ground and the first excited state. Here we show that this approach can be generalized to give the splitting patterns between all the lowest energy levels from different symmetry blocks that lie below the first-excited totally symmetric state. We demonstrate this property numerically for some two-dimensional models. The approach is likely to be useful for computing rovibrational energy levels and tunnelling splittings in floppy molecules and gas-phase clusters. PMID:27004864

  15. Energy Levels and Half-Lives of Gallium Isotopes Obtained by Photo-Nuclear Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulger, F.; Akkoyun, S.; Bayram, T.; Dapo, H.; Boztosun, I.

    2015-04-01

    We have run an experiment to determine the energy levels and half-lives of Gallium nucleus by using the photonuclear reactions with end-point energy of 18 MeV bremsstrahlung photons, produced by a clinical linear accelerator. As a result of 71Ga(y,n)70Ga and 69Ga(Y,n)68Ga photonuclear reactions, the energy levels and half-lives of 70Ga and 68Ga nuclei have been determined. The results are in good agreement with the literature values.

  16. Energy levels of odd-even nuclei using broken pair model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamammu, I. M.; Haq, S.; Eldahomi, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    A method to calculate energy levels and wave functions of odd-even nuclei, in the frame work of the broken pair model have been developed. The accuracy of the model has been tested by comparing the shell model results of limiting cases in which the broken pair model exactly coincides with the shell model, where there are two-proton/neutron + one-neutron/proton in the valence levels. The model is then applied to calculate the energy levels of some nuclei in the Zirconium region. The model results compare reasonably well with the shell model as well as with the experimental data.

  17. Noncommutative Singular Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid Mehdipour, S.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, applying the method of coordinate coherent states to describe a noncommutative model of Vaidya black holes leads to an exact (t — r) dependence of solution in terms of the noncommutative parameter σ. In this setup, there is no black hole remnant at long times.

  18. Black holes in inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, R.; Hawking, S. W.

    1997-08-01

    We summarise recent work on the quantum production of black holes in the inflationary era. We describe, in simple terms, the Euclidean approach used, and the results obtained both for the pair creation rate and for the evolution of the black holes.

  19. Newborn Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite say they have found newborn black holes, just seconds old, in a confused state of existence. The holes are consuming material falling into them while somehow propelling other material away at great speeds. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of x-rays. The energies involved are much…

  20. Fluctuating black hole horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jianwei

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we treat the black hole horizon as a physical boundary to the spacetime and study its dynamics following from the Gibbons-Hawking-York boundary term. Using the Kerr black hole as an example we derive an effective action that describes, in the large wave number limit, a massless Klein-Gordon field living on the average location of the boundary. Complete solutions can be found in the small rotation limit of the black hole. The formulation suggests that the boundary can be treated in the same way as any other matter contributions. In particular, the angular momentum of the boundary matches exactly with that of the black hole, suggesting an interesting possibility that all charges (including the entropy) of the black hole are carried by the boundary. Using this as input, we derive predictions on the Planck scale properties of the boundary.

  1. Spectrum of electron-hole states of the Si/Ge structure with Ge quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Talochkin, A. B. Chistokhin, I. B.

    2011-09-15

    The lateral photoconductivity spectra of Si/Ge multilayer structures with Ge quantum dots of various sizes are investigated. We observed optical transition lines between the hole levels of quantum dots and electronic states of Si. This enabled us to construct a detailed energy level diagram of the electron-hole spectrum of the Si/Ge structures. It is shown that the hole levels of Ge quantum dots are successfully described by the 'quantum box' model using the actual sizes of Ge islands. It I found that the position of the longwavelength photosensitivity boundary of Si/Ge structures with Ge quantum dots can be controlled by changing the growth parameters.

  2. Excluding black hole firewalls with extreme cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Don N.

    2014-06-01

    The AMPS argument for black hole firewalls seems to arise not only from the assumption of local effective field theory outside the stretched horizon but also from an overcounting of internal black hole states that include states that are singular in the past. Here I propose to exclude such singular states by Extreme Cosmic Censorship (the conjectured principle that the universe is entirely nonsingular, except for transient singularities inside black and/or white holes). I argue that the remaining set of nonsingular realistic states do not have firewalls but yet preserve information in Hawking radiation from black holes that form from nonsingular initial states.

  3. Comparison of Open-Hole Compression Strength and Compression After Impact Strength on Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Laminates for the Ares I Composite Interstage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Nettles, Alan T.; Jackson, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    Notched (open hole) composite laminates were tested in compression. The effect on strength of various sizes of through holes was examined. Results were compared to the average stress criterion model. Additionally, laminated sandwich structures were damaged from low-velocity impact with various impact energy levels and different impactor geometries. The compression strength relative to damage size was compared to the notched compression result strength. Open-hole compression strength was found to provide a reasonable bound on compression after impact.

  4. Extreme black hole holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Thomas Edward

    The connection between black holes in four dimensions and conformal field theories (CFTs) in two dimensions is explored, focusing on zero temperature (extreme) black holes and their low-temperature cousins. It is shown that extreme black holes in a theory of quantum gravity are holographically dual to field theories living in two dimensions without gravity, and that the field theory reproduces a variety of black hole phenomena in detail. The extreme black hole/CFT correspondence is derived from a symmetry analysis near the horizon of a Kerr black hole with mass M and maximal angular momentum J=M 2. The asymptotic symmetry generators form one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge c=12J, which implies that the near-horizon quantum states are identical to those of a two-dimensional CFT. We discuss extensions of this result to near-extreme black holes and cosmological horizons. Astrophysical black holes are never exactly extremal, but the black hole GRS1915+105 observed through X-ray and radio telescopy is likely within 1% of the extremal spin, suggesting that this extraordinary and well studied object is approximately dual to a two-dimensional CFT with c˜1079. As evidence for the correspondence, microstate counting in the CFT is used to derive the Bekenstein-Hawking area law for the Kerr entropy, S=Horizon area/4. Furthermore, the correlators in the dual CFT are shown to reproduce the scattering amplitudes of a charged scalar or spin-½ field by a near-extreme Kerr-Newman black hole, and a neutral spin-1 or spin-2 field by a near-extreme Kerr black hole. Scattering amplitudes probe the vacuum of fields living on the black hole background. For scalars, bound superradiant modes lead to an instability, while for fermions, it is shown that the bound superradiant modes condense and form a Fermi sea which extends well outside the ergosphere. Assuming no further instabilities, the low energy effective theory near the black hole is described by ripples in the

  5. 230 s room-temperature storage time and 1.14 eV hole localization energy in In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As quantum dots on a GaAs interlayer in GaP with an AlP barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Bonato, Leo Sala, Elisa M.; Stracke, Gernot; Nowozin, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Ajour, Mohammed Nasser; Daqrouq, Khaled; Bimberg, Dieter

    2015-01-26

    A GaP n{sup +}p-diode containing In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As quantum dots (QDs) and an AlP barrier is characterized electrically, together with two reference samples: a simple n{sup +}p-diode and an n{sup +}p-diode with AlP barrier. Localization energy, capture cross-section, and storage time for holes in the QDs are determined using deep-level transient spectroscopy. The localization energy is 1.14(±0.04) eV, yielding a storage time at room temperature of 230(±60) s, which marks an improvement of 2 orders of magnitude compared to the former record value in QDs. Alternative material systems are proposed for still higher localization energies and longer storage times.

  6. Energy Levels in Helium and Neon Atoms by an Electron-Impact Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, N.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Electronic energy levels in noble gas atoms may be determined with a simple teaching apparatus incorporating a resonance potentials tube in which the electron beam intensity is held constant. The resulting spectra are little inferior to those obtained by more elaborate electron-impact methods and complement optical emission spectra. (Author/SK)

  7. Improved Experimental and Theoretical Energy Levels of Carbon I from Solar Infrared Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Edward S.; Geller, Murray

    1997-01-01

    We have improved the energy levels in neutral carbon using high resolution infrared solar spectra. The main source is the ATMOS spectrum measured by the Fourier transaform spectroscopy technique from 600 to 4800 cm-1, supplemented by the MARK IV balloon data, covering from 4700 to 5700 cm-1.

  8. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  9. Theoretical Study of Energy Levels and Transition Probabilities of Boron Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian Yi, Zhang; Neng Wu, Zheng

    2009-08-01

    Full Text PDF Though the electrons configuration for boron atom is simple and boron atom has long been of interest for many researchers, the theoretical studies for properties of BI are not systematic, there are only few results reported on energy levels of high excited states of boron, and transition measurements are generally restricted to transitions involving ground states and low excited states without considering fine structure effects, provided only multiplet results, values for transitions between high excited states are seldom performed. In this article, by using the scheme of the weakest bound electron potential model theory calculations for energy levels of five series are performed and with the same method we give the transition probabilities between excited states with considering fine structure effects. The comprehensive set of calculations attempted in this paper could be of some value to workers in the field because of the lack of published calculations for the BI systems. The perturbations coming from foreign perturbers are taken into account in studying the energy levels. Good agreement between our results and the accepted values taken from NIST has been obtained. We also reported some values of energy levels and transition probabilities not existing on the NIST data bases.

  10. Probing Energy Levels of Large Array Quantum Dot Superlattice by Electronic Transport Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisri, S. Z.; Degoli, E.; Spallanzani, N.; Krishnan, G.; Kooi, B.; Ghica, C.; Yarema, M.; Protesescu, L.; Heiss, W.; Kovalenko, M.; Pulci, O.; Ossicini, S.; Iwasa, Y.; Loi, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal quantum dot superlattice (CQDS) emerges as new type of hybrid solids allowing easy fabrication of devices that exploits the quantum confinement properties of individual QD. This materials displays peculiar characters, making investigation of their transport properties nontrivial. Besides the bandgap variations, 0D nature of QD lead to the formation of discrete energy subbands. These subbands are crucial for multiple exciton generation (for efficient solar cell), thermoelectric material and multistate transistor. Full understanding of the CQDS energy level structure is vital to use them in complex devices. Here we show a powerful method to determine the CQDS electronic energy levels from their intrinsic charge transport characteristics. Via the use of ambipolar transistors with CQDS as active materials and gated using highly capacitive ionic liquid gating, Fermi energy can be largely tuned. It can access energy levels beyond QD's HOMO & LUMO. Ability to probe not only the bandgap, but also the discrete energy level from large assembly of QD at room temperature suggests the formation of energy minibands in this system.

  11. Energy level modification in lead sulfide quantum dot thin films through ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick R; Kim, Donghun; Lunt, Richard R; Zhao, Ni; Bawendi, Moungi G; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Bulović, Vladimir

    2014-06-24

    The electronic properties of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are critically dependent on both QD size and surface chemistry. Modification of quantum confinement provides control of the QD bandgap, while ligand-induced surface dipoles present a hitherto underutilized means of control over the absolute energy levels of QDs within electronic devices. Here, we show that the energy levels of lead sulfide QDs, measured by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, shift by up to 0.9 eV between different chemical ligand treatments. The directions of these energy shifts match the results of atomistic density functional theory simulations and scale with the ligand dipole moment. Trends in the performance of photovoltaic devices employing ligand-modified QD films are consistent with the measured energy level shifts. These results identify surface-chemistry-mediated energy level shifts as a means of predictably controlling the electronic properties of colloidal QD films and as a versatile adjustable parameter in the performance optimization of QD optoelectronic devices. PMID:24824726

  12. ULTRAMASSIVE BLACK HOLE COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Berczik, Peter E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2015-01-10

    Although supermassive black holes (SMBHs) correlate well with their host galaxies, there is an emerging view that outliers exist. Henize 2-10, NGC 4889, and NGC 1277 are examples of SMBHs at least an order of magnitude more massive than their host galaxy suggests. The dynamical effects of such ultramassive central black holes is unclear. Here, we perform direct N-body simulations of mergers of galactic nuclei where one black hole is ultramassive to study the evolution of the remnant and the black hole dynamics in this extreme regime. We find that the merger remnant is axisymmetric near the center, while near the large SMBH influence radius, the galaxy is triaxial. The SMBH separation shrinks rapidly due to dynamical friction, and quickly forms a binary black hole; if we scale our model to the most massive estimate for the NGC 1277 black hole, for example, the timescale for the SMBH separation to shrink from nearly a kiloparsec to less than a parsec is roughly 10 Myr. By the time the SMBHs form a hard binary, gravitational wave emission dominates, and the black holes coalesce in a mere few Myr. Curiously, these extremely massive binaries appear to nearly bypass the three-body scattering evolutionary phase. Our study suggests that in this extreme case, SMBH coalescence is governed by dynamical friction followed nearly directly by gravitational wave emission, resulting in a rapid and efficient SMBH coalescence timescale. We discuss the implications for gravitational wave event rates and hypervelocity star production.

  13. Entropy of quasiblack holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2010-03-15

    We trace the origin of the black hole entropy S, replacing a black hole by a quasiblack hole. Let the boundary of a static body approach its own gravitational radius, in such a way that a quasihorizon forms. We show that if the body is thermal with the temperature taking the Hawking value at the quasihorizon limit, it follows, in the nonextremal case, from the first law of thermodynamics that the entropy approaches the Bekenstein-Hawking value S=A/4. In this setup, the key role is played by the surface stresses on the quasihorizon and one finds that the entropy comes from the quasihorizon surface. Any distribution of matter inside the surface leads to the same universal value for the entropy in the quasihorizon limit. This can be of some help in the understanding of black hole entropy. Other similarities between black holes and quasiblack holes such as the mass formulas for both objects had been found previously. We also discuss the entropy for extremal quasiblack holes, a more subtle issue.

  14. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  15. Measuring Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    1999-09-01

    WE PROPOSE TO CARRY OUT A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION SPECTRAL FEATURES THAT ARE OFTEN SEEN IN X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLE BINARIES. THE EXCELLENT SENSITIVITY AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF THE ACIS/HETG COMBINATION WILL NOT ONLY HELP RESOLVE AMBIGUITIES IN INTERPRETING THESE FEATURES, BUT MAY ALLOW MODELLING OF THE EMISSION LINE PROFILES IN DETAIL. THE PROFILES MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION ON SUCH FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES AS THE SPIN OF BLACK HOLES. THEREFORE, THIS STUDY COULD LEAD TO A MEASUREMENT OF BLACK HOLE SPIN FOR SELECTED SOURCES. THE RESULT CAN THEN BE DIRECTLY COMPARED WITH THOSE FROM PREVIOUS STUDIES BASED ON INDEPENDENT METHODS.

  16. Introducing the Black Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffini, Remo; Wheeler, John A.

    1971-01-01

    discusses the cosmology theory of a black hole, a region where an object loses its identity, but mass, charge, and momentum are conserved. Include are three possible formation processes, theorized properties, and three way they might eventually be detected. (DS)

  17. Illuminating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Ian A.; Bull, Anne; O’Brien, Eileen; Drillsma-Milgrom, Katy A.; Milgrom, Lionel R.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional shadows formed by illuminating vortices are shown to be visually analogous to the gravitational action of black holes on light and surrounding matter. They could be useful teaching aids demonstrating some of the consequences of general relativity.

  18. Black holes and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2012-11-15

    The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The information paradox is a serious problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To solve it we need to find 'hair' on black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In string theory we find 'hair' by the fuzzball construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuzzballs help to resolve many other issues in gravity.

  19. Charged Galileon black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  20. Searching for Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M.

    1998-01-01

    Our UV/VIS work concentrates on black hole X-ray nova. These objects consist of two stars in close orbit, one of which we believe is a black hole - our goal is to SHOW that one is a black hole. In order to reach this goal we carry out observations in the Optical, UV, IR and X-ray bands, and compare the observations to theoretical models. In the past year, our UV/VIS grant has provided partial support (mainly travel funds and page charges) for work we have done on X-ray nova containing black holes and neutron stars. We have been very successful in obtaining telescope time to support our project - we have completed approximately a dozen separate observing runs averaging 3 days each, using the MMT (5M), Lick 3M, KPNO 2.1M, CTIO 4M, CTIO 1.5M, and the SAO/WO 1.2M telescopes. These observations have allowed the identification of one new black hole (Nova Oph 1977), and allowed the mass of another to be measured (GS2000+25). Perhaps our most exciting new result is the evidence we have gathered for the existence of 'event horizons' in black hole X-ray nova.

  1. Resonating Behaviour of Nanomachined Holed Microcantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Giancarlo; Ricci, Alessandro; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Ferrante, Ivan; Mura, Andrea; Marasso, Simone Luigi; Ricciardi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The nanofabrication of a nanomachined holed structure localized on the free end of a microcantilever is here presented, as a new tool to design micro-resonators with enhanced mass sensitivity. The proposed method allows both for the reduction of the sensor oscillating mass and the increment of the resonance frequency, without decreasing the active surface of the device. A theoretical analysis based on the Rayleigh method was developed to predict resonance frequency, effective mass, and effective stiffness of nanomachined holed microresonators. Analytical results were checked by Finite Element simulations, confirming an increase of the theoretical mass sensitivity up to 250%, without altering other figures of merit. The nanomachined holed resonators were vibrationally characterized, and their Q-factor resulted comparable with solid microcantilevers with same planar dimensions. PMID:26643936

  2. Resonating Behaviour of Nanomachined Holed Microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Canavese, Giancarlo; Ricci, Alessandro; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Ferrante, Ivan; Mura, Andrea; Marasso, Simone Luigi; Ricciardi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The nanofabrication of a nanomachined holed structure localized on the free end of a microcantilever is here presented, as a new tool to design micro-resonators with enhanced mass sensitivity. The proposed method allows both for the reduction of the sensor oscillating mass and the increment of the resonance frequency, without decreasing the active surface of the device. A theoretical analysis based on the Rayleigh method was developed to predict resonance frequency, effective mass, and effective stiffness of nanomachined holed microresonators. Analytical results were checked by Finite Element simulations, confirming an increase of the theoretical mass sensitivity up to 250%, without altering other figures of merit. The nanomachined holed resonators were vibrationally characterized, and their Q-factor resulted comparable with solid microcantilevers with same planar dimensions. PMID:26643936

  3. A system for measuring thermal activation energy levels in silicon by thermally stimulated capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrum, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    One method being used to determine energy level(s) and electrical activity of impurities in silicon is described. The method is called capacitance transient spectroscopy (CTS). It can be classified into three basic categories: the thermally stimulated capacitance method, the voltage-stimulated capacitance method, and the light-stimulated capacitance method; the first two categories are discussed. From the total change in capacitance and the time constant of the capacitance response, emission rates, energy levels, and trap concentrations can be determined. A major advantage of using CTS is its ability to detect the presence of electrically active impurities that are invisible to other techniques, such as Zeeman effect atomic absorption, and the ability to detect more than one electrically active impurity in a sample. Examples of detection of majority and minority carrier traps from gold donor and acceptor centers in silicon using the capacitance transient spectrometer are given to illustrate the method and its sensitivity.

  4. Variational Calculations of Ro-Vibrational Energy Levels and Transition Intensities for Tetratomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A description is given of an algorithm for computing ro-vibrational energy levels for tetratomic molecules. The expressions required for evaluating transition intensities are also given. The variational principle is used to determine the energy levels and the kinetic energy operator is simple and evaluated exactly. The computational procedure is split up into the determination of one dimensional radial basis functions, the computation of a contracted rotational-bending basis, followed by a final variational step coupling all degrees of freedom. An angular basis is proposed whereby the rotational-bending contraction takes place in three steps. Angular matrix elements of the potential are evaluated by expansion in terms of a suitable basis and the angular integrals are given in a factorized form which simplifies their evaluation. The basis functions in the final variational step have the full permutation symmetries of the identical particles. Sample results are given for HCCH and BH3.

  5. Two-wavelength holographic recording in photopolymer using four-energy-level system: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Hua; Cho, Sheng-Lung; Lin, Shiuan-Huei; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Ken-Yuh

    2014-11-01

    We investigate a two-wavelength method for recording a persistent hologram in a doped photopolymer. The recording method is based on two separated optical excitations of the four-energy-level system of the doped element, one at λ=325 nm as the sensitizing wavelength and the other at λ=647 nm as the writing wavelength, allowing for an experimental demonstration of nondestructive readout in phenanthrenequinone-doped poly(methyl methacrylate). Further, a four-energy-level rate equations model is proposed for describing the dynamics of hologram recording. The model successfully explains our experimental finding and further provides a general method to investigate such a two-wavelength holographic recording in photopolymer.

  6. First-principles approach to calculating energy level alignment at aqueous semiconductor interfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kharche, Neerav; Muckerman, James T.; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2014-10-21

    A first-principles approach is demonstrated for calculating the relationship between an aqueous semiconductor interface structure and energy level alignment. The physical interface structure is sampled using density functional theory based molecular dynamics, yielding the interface electrostatic dipole. The GW approach from many-body perturbation theory is used to place the electronic band edge energies of the semiconductor relative to the occupied 1b₁ energy level in water. The application to the specific cases of nonpolar (101¯0 ) facets of GaN and ZnO reveals a significant role for the structural motifs at the interface, including the degree of interface water dissociation and themore » dynamical fluctuations in the interface Zn-O and O-H bond orientations. As a result, these effects contribute up to 0.5 eV.« less

  7. Critically Evaluated Energy Levels and Spectral Lines of Singly Ionized Indium (In II)

    PubMed Central

    Kramida, A

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive list of the best measured wavelengths in the In II spectrum has been compiled. Uncertainties of the wavelength measurements have been analyzed, and existing inconsistencies have been resolved. An optimized set of fine-structure energy levels that fits all observed wavelengths has been derived. Uncertainties of the energy level values have been reduced by an order of magnitude. An improved value of the ionization limit of In II has been determined by fitting quantum-defect and polarization formulas for several series of levels. Intensities of lines observed by different authors have been analyzed and converted to a uniform scale. A set of recommended values of radiative transition rates has been critically compiled, and uncertainties of these rates have been estimated. The hyperfine structure interval in the 5s 2S ground state of In III has been determined from the measurements of the 5sng and 5snh series in In II. PMID:26401424

  8. First-principles approach to calculating energy level alignment at aqueous semiconductor interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kharche, Neerav; Muckerman, James T.; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2014-10-21

    A first-principles approach is demonstrated for calculating the relationship between an aqueous semiconductor interface structure and energy level alignment. The physical interface structure is sampled using density functional theory based molecular dynamics, yielding the interface electrostatic dipole. The GW approach from many-body perturbation theory is used to place the electronic band edge energies of the semiconductor relative to the occupied 1benergy level in water. The application to the specific cases of nonpolar (101¯0 ) facets of GaN and ZnO reveals a significant role for the structural motifs at the interface, including the degree of interface water dissociation and the dynamical fluctuations in the interface Zn-O and O-H bond orientations. As a result, these effects contribute up to 0.5 eV.

  9. Defect energy levels in p-type GaAsBi and GaAs grown by MBE at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, P. M.; Tarun, M. C.; Bahrami-Yekta, V.; Tiedje, T.; Lewis, R. B.; Masnadi-Shirazi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Deep level defects in p-type GaAs1‑x Bi x (x < 1%) and GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy at substrate temperatures of 330 °C and 370 °C have been characterized by deep level transient spectroscopy. We find that incorporating Bi into GaAs at 330 °C does not affect the total concentration of hole traps, which is ∼4 × 1016 cm‑3, comparable to the concentration of electron traps observed in Si-doped GaAsBi having a similar alloy composition. Increasing the growth temperature of the p-type GaAsBi (x = 0.8%) layer from 330 °C to 370 °C reduces the hole trap concentration by an order of magnitude. Moreover, the defects having near mid-gap energy levels that are the most efficient non-radiative recombination centers are present only in GaAsBi layers grown at the lower temperature. These new results are discussed in the context of previous measurements of n-type GaAs and GaAsBi layers grown under similar conditions.

  10. Hybrid variational-perturbation method for calculating ro-vibrational energy levels of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuchko, A. I.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    A procedure for calculation of rotational-vibrational states of medium-sized molecules is presented. It combines the advantages of variational calculations and perturbation theory. The vibrational problem is solved by diagonalising a Hamiltonian matrix, which is partitioned into two sub-blocks. The first, smaller sub-block includes matrix elements with the largest contribution to the energy levels targeted in the calculations. The second, larger sub-block comprises those basis states which have little effect on these energy levels. Numerical perturbation theory, implemented as a Jacobi rotation, is used to compute the contributions from the matrix elements of the second sub-block. Only the first sub-block needs to be stored in memory and diagonalised. Calculations of the vibrational-rotational energy levels also employ a partitioning of the Hamiltonian matrix into sub-blocks, each of which corresponds either to a single vibrational state or a set of resonating vibrational states, with all associated rotational levels. Physically, this partitioning is efficient when the Coriolis coupling between different vibrational states is small. Numerical perturbation theory is used to include the cross-contributions from different vibrational states. Separate individual sub-blocks are then diagonalised, replacing the diagonalisation of a large Hamiltonian matrix with a number of small matrix diagonalisations. Numerical examples show that the proposed hybrid variational-perturbation method greatly speeds up the variational procedure without significant loss of precision for both vibrational-rotational energy levels and transition intensities. The hybrid scheme can be used for accurate nuclear motion calculations on molecules with up to 15 atoms on currently available computers.

  11. Interfacial energy level bending in a crystalline p/p-type organic heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Feng; Grobosch, Mandy; Treske, Uwe; Knupfer, Martin; Huang Lizhen; Ji Shiliang; Yan Donghang

    2011-05-16

    A conduction channel was observed at the heterointerface of the crystalline p-type organic films copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl) bithiophene (BP2T). Energy level bending at the interface is confirmed by photoemission spectroscopy, which verifies a charge transfer between CuPc and BP2T. This provides a further route to utilize interfacial electronic properties in functional devices and also documents the importance of reconsidering the interfacial electronic structure of organic heterostructures.

  12. Effect of a metallic gate on the energy levels of a shallow donor

    SciTech Connect

    Slachmuylders, A. F.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.; Magnus, W.

    2008-02-25

    We have investigated the effect of a metallic gate on the bound states of a shallow donor located near the gate. We calculate the energy spectrum as a function of the distance between the metallic gate and the donor and find an anticrossing behavior in the energy levels for certain distances. We show how a transverse electric field can tune the average position of the electron with respect to the metallic gate and the impurity.

  13. Model for describing non-equilibrium helium plasma energy level population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavyrshin, D. I.; Chinnov, V. F.; Ageev, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    A new method for calculating the population of excited levels of helium atoms and ions is suggested. The method is based on direct solution of a system of balance equations for all energy levels for which it was possible to obtain process speed constants. The equations include terms for the processes of particle loss and income by excitation and deexcitation, ionization and recombination as well as losses due to diffusion and radiation. The challenge of solution of such large system is also discussed.

  14. Resonance lines and energy levels of Cs III, Ba IV, and La V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, G. L.; Reader, J.

    1976-01-01

    Spectra of Cs III, Ba IV, and La V were photographed in a low-voltage sliding spark on a 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph. These ions are isoelectronic with neutral iodine and display a halogen-like energy level structure. Detailed isoelectronic comparisons, level transition diagrams, and tabular data on the transitions of the ions and percentage compositions of Cs III configurations are presented.

  15. Calculations of energy levels and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2006-03-15

    We use the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory to perform accurate calculations of energy levels, transition amplitudes, and lifetimes of low-lying states of barium and radium. Calculations for radium are needed for the planning of measurements of parity- and time-invariance-violating effects which are strongly enhanced in this atom. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy of the calculations.

  16. Enhanced cardiovascular function and energy level by a novel chromium (III)-supplement.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukkarasu, Mahesh; Penumathsa, Sureshvarma; Juhasz, Bela; Zhan, Lijun; Bagchi, Manashi; Yasmin, Taharat; Shara, Michael A; Thatte, Hemant S; Bagchi, Debasis; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2006-01-01

    The impetus for the novel Energy Formula (EF) which combines the niacin-bound chromium (III) (0.45%) (NBC), standardized extract of Withania somnifera extracts (10.71%), caffeine (22.76%), D-ribose (10.71%) and selected amino acids such as phenylalanine, taurine and glutamine (55.37%) was based on the knowledge of the cardioprotective potentials of the Withania somnifera extract, caffeine and D-ribose as well as their abilities to increase energy levels and the abilities of amino acids to increase the muscle mass and energy levels. The effect of oral supplementation of EF on the safety, myocardial energy levels and cardioprotective ability were investigated in an ischemic-reperfused myocardium model in both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats over 90 days trial period. At the completion of 90 days, the EF-treated male and female rats gained 9.4% and 3.1% less body weights, respectively, as compared to their corresponding control groups. No significant difference was found in the levels of lipid peroxidation and activities of hepatic Aspartate transaminase, Alanine transaminase and Alkaline phosphatase in EF treatment when compared with control animals. The male and female rat hearts were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion at 30 and 90 days of EF treatment. Cardiovascular functions including heart rate, coronary flow, aortic flow, dp/dt(max), left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and infarct size were monitored. The levels of myocardial adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CP), phospho-adenosine monophosphate kinase (p-AMPK) levels, were analyzed at the end of 30 and 90 days of treatment. Significant improvement was observed in all parameters in the EF treatment groups as compared to their corresponding controls. Thus the niacin-bound chromium (III) based energy formula is safe and effective supplement to boost energy levels and cardioprotection. PMID:17012764

  17. Energy levels in helium and neon atoms by an electron-impact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N.; Bartle, K. D.; Mills, D.; Beard, D. S.

    1981-03-01

    Electronic energy levels in noble gas atoms may be determined with a simple teaching apparatus incorporating a resonance potentials tube in which the electron beam intensity is held constant. The resulting spectra are little inferior to those obtained by more elaborate electron-impact methods and complement optical emission spectra. Singlet-triplet energy differences may be resolved, and the spectra of helium and neon may be used to illustrate the applicability of Russell-Saunders and other, ''intermediate,'' coupling schemes.

  18. A detailed analysis of the energy levels configuration existing in the band gap of supersaturated silicon with titanium for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, E.; Dueñas, S.; Castán, H.; García, H.; Bailón, L.; Montero, D.; García-Hernansanz, R.; García-Hemme, E.; Olea, J.; González-Díaz, G.

    2015-12-01

    The energy levels created in supersaturated n-type silicon substrates with titanium implantation in the attempt to create an intermediate band in their band-gap are studied in detail. Two titanium ion implantation doses (1013 cm-2 and 1014 cm-2) are studied in this work by conductance transient technique and admittance spectroscopy. Conductance transients have been measured at temperatures of around 100 K. The particular shape of these transients is due to the formation of energy barriers in the conduction band, as a consequence of the band-gap narrowing induced by the high titanium concentration. Moreover, stationary admittance spectroscopy results suggest the existence of different energy level configuration, depending on the local titanium concentration. A continuum energy level band is formed when titanium concentration is over the Mott limit. On the other hand, when titanium concentration is lower than the Mott limit, but much higher than the donor impurity density, a quasi-continuum energy level distribution appears. Finally, a single deep center appears for low titanium concentration. At the n-type substrate, the experimental results obtained by means of thermal admittance spectroscopy at high reverse bias reveal the presence of single levels located at around Ec-425 and Ec-275 meV for implantation doses of 1013 cm-2 and 1014 cm-2, respectively. At low reverse bias voltage, quasi-continuously distributed energy levels between the minimum of the conduction bands, Ec and Ec-450 meV, are obtained for both doses. Conductance transients detected at low temperatures reveal that the high impurity concentration induces a band gap narrowing which leads to the formation of a barrier in the conduction band. Besides, the relationship between the activation energy and the capture cross section values of all the energy levels fits very well to the Meyer-Neldel rule. As it is known, the Meyer-Neldel rule typically appears in processes involving multiple excitations, like

  19. A detailed analysis of the energy levels configuration existing in the band gap of supersaturated silicon with titanium for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, E.; Dueñas, S.; Castán, H.; García, H.; Bailón, L.; Montero, D.; García-Hernansanz, R.; García-Hemme, E.; González-Díaz, G.; Olea, J.

    2015-12-28

    The energy levels created in supersaturated n-type silicon substrates with titanium implantation in the attempt to create an intermediate band in their band-gap are studied in detail. Two titanium ion implantation doses (10{sup 13 }cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 14 }cm{sup -2}) are studied in this work by conductance transient technique and admittance spectroscopy. Conductance transients have been measured at temperatures of around 100 K. The particular shape of these transients is due to the formation of energy barriers in the conduction band, as a consequence of the band-gap narrowing induced by the high titanium concentration. Moreover, stationary admittance spectroscopy results suggest the existence of different energy level configuration, depending on the local titanium concentration. A continuum energy level band is formed when titanium concentration is over the Mott limit. On the other hand, when titanium concentration is lower than the Mott limit, but much higher than the donor impurity density, a quasi-continuum energy level distribution appears. Finally, a single deep center appears for low titanium concentration. At the n-type substrate, the experimental results obtained by means of thermal admittance spectroscopy at high reverse bias reveal the presence of single levels located at around E{sub c}-425 and E{sub c}-275 meV for implantation doses of 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} and 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, respectively. At low reverse bias voltage, quasi-continuously distributed energy levels between the minimum of the conduction bands, E{sub c} and E{sub c}-450 meV, are obtained for both doses. Conductance transients detected at low temperatures reveal that the high impurity concentration induces a band gap narrowing which leads to the formation of a barrier in the conduction band. Besides, the relationship between the activation energy and the capture cross section values of all the energy levels fits very well to the Meyer-Neldel rule. As it is known

  20. Crystal field parameters and energy levels scheme of trivalent chromium doped BSO

    SciTech Connect

    Petkova, P.; Andreici, E.-L.; Avram, N. M.

    2014-11-24

    The aim of this paper is to give an analysis of crystal field parameters and energy levels schemes for the above doped material, in order to give a reliable explanation for experimental data. The crystal field parameters have been modeled in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM) of the crystal field theory, taken into account the geometry of systems, with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions. The effect of the charges of the ligands and covalence bonding between chromium cation and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the crystal field parameters we simulated the scheme of energy levels of chromium ions by diagonalizing the matrix of the Hamiltonian of the doped crystal. The obtained energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison with experiment shows that the results are quite satisfactory which justify the model and simulation scheme used for the title system.

  1. Energy-level structure of the hydrogen atom confined by a penetrable cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Méndez-Fragoso, R.; Cruz, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The bound-state energy spectrum and its evolution for a hydrogen atom located along the axis of a standard cylindrical confining cavity with either impenetrable or penetrable confining boundaries are obtained by solving the stationary Schrödinger equation using a finite differences approach. New results are first presented for a nuclear-centered position for the penetrable case as the barrier height and cavity size change. Special attention is then given to the energy-level dependence on the nuclear position along the cylinder axis, where proper identification for the evolution of states from the nuclear-centered position (centered states) up to the cylinder cap (cap states) is proposed, while the corresponding state evolution for intermediate nuclear positions (intermediate states) remains consistent with node conservation and symmetry. It is found that in general the energy levels evolve with an increasing value as the nuclear position is shifted from the central position up to a cylinder cap. As the barrier height (and cavity size) are reduced, a progressive extinction of bound states appears in the order cap states, intermediate states and centered states. Finally, a predominance of cavity-size over barrier-height effects on the energy level shift is found.

  2. Effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye extracted from Curcuma longa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustia, Yuda Virgantara; Suyitno, Arifin, Zainal; Sutanto, Bayu

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye. The natural dye, curcumin, was synthesized from Curcuma longa L. using a simple extraction technique. The purification of curcumin dye was conducted in a column of chromatography and its characteristics were studied. Next, the purified curcumin dye was added by benzoic acids until various acidities of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0. The absorbance spectra and the functionality groups found in the dyes were detected by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Meanwhile, the energy level of the dyes, EHOMO and ELUMO was measured by cyclic voltammetry. The best energy level of curcumin dye was achieved at pH 3.5 where Ered = -0.37V, ELUMO = -4.28 eV, Eox = 1.15V, EHOMO = -5.83 eV, and Eband gap = 1.55 eV. Therefore, the purified curcumin dye added by benzoic acid was promising for sensitizing the dye-sensitized solar cells.

  3. by ligand exchange: utilizing energy level alignment for efficiently reducing carrier rec ombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xia; Kou, Dong-Xing; Zhou, Wen-Hui; Zhou, Zheng-Ji; Wu, Si-Xin; Cao, Xuan

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we employed a convenient one-step synthesis method for synthesizing Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) nanocrystals (NCs) in an excess selenium environment. This excess selenium situation enhanced the reaction of metal acetylacetonates with selenium, resulting in the burst nucleation of NCs at relatively low temperatures. The phase morphology and surface and optoelectronic properties of NCs before and after ligand exchange were discussed in depth. It was found that pure tetragonal-phase structure CZTSe NCs with approximately 1.7-eV bandgap could be synthesized. The removal of large organic molecules on CZTSe NCs after ligand exchange by S2- decreased the resistivity. The bandgap of the films after ligand exchange by 550°C selenization was also decreased due to better crystallinity. For potential application in CZTSe solar cells, we constructed an energy level diagram to explain the mutual effect between the absorption layer and CdS layer. Using cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement, we found that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels of CZTSe films shifted down after ligand exchange. After energy level alignment at the CdS/CZTSe interface, a type I band alignment structure was more conveniently formed after ligand exchange. This structure acted as the barrier against injection electrons from ZnO to the CZTSe layer, and recombination would subsequently be depressed.

  4. Pronounced polarization-induced energy level shifts at boundaries of organic semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, K A; Schiffrin, A; Roussy, T S; Capsoni, M; Burke, S A

    2015-01-01

    Organic semiconductor devices rely on the movement of charge at and near interfaces, making an understanding of energy level alignment at these boundaries an essential element of optimizing materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Here we employ low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate a model system: two-dimensional nanostructures of the prototypical organic semiconductor, PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) adsorbed on NaCl (2 ML)/Ag(111). Pixel-by-pixel scanning tunneling spectroscopy allows mapping of occupied and unoccupied electronic states across these nanoislands with sub-molecular spatial resolution, revealing strong electronic differences between molecules at the edges and those in the centre, with energy level shifts of up to 400 meV. We attribute this to the change in electrostatic environment at the boundaries of clusters, namely via polarization of neighbouring molecules. The observation of these strong shifts illustrates a crucial issue: interfacial energy level alignment can differ substantially from the bulk electronic structure in organic materials. PMID:26440933

  5. Pronounced polarization-induced energy level shifts at boundaries of organic semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, K. A.; Schiffrin, A.; Roussy, T. S.; Capsoni, M.; Burke, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    Organic semiconductor devices rely on the movement of charge at and near interfaces, making an understanding of energy level alignment at these boundaries an essential element of optimizing materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Here we employ low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate a model system: two-dimensional nanostructures of the prototypical organic semiconductor, PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) adsorbed on NaCl (2 ML)/Ag(111). Pixel-by-pixel scanning tunneling spectroscopy allows mapping of occupied and unoccupied electronic states across these nanoislands with sub-molecular spatial resolution, revealing strong electronic differences between molecules at the edges and those in the centre, with energy level shifts of up to 400 meV. We attribute this to the change in electrostatic environment at the boundaries of clusters, namely via polarization of neighbouring molecules. The observation of these strong shifts illustrates a crucial issue: interfacial energy level alignment can differ substantially from the bulk electronic structure in organic materials.

  6. Pronounced polarization-induced energy level shifts at boundaries of organic semiconductor nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, K. A.; Schiffrin, A.; Roussy, T. S.; Capsoni, M.; Burke, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Organic semiconductor devices rely on the movement of charge at and near interfaces, making an understanding of energy level alignment at these boundaries an essential element of optimizing materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Here we employ low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate a model system: two-dimensional nanostructures of the prototypical organic semiconductor, PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) adsorbed on NaCl (2 ML)/Ag(111). Pixel-by-pixel scanning tunneling spectroscopy allows mapping of occupied and unoccupied electronic states across these nanoislands with sub-molecular spatial resolution, revealing strong electronic differences between molecules at the edges and those in the centre, with energy level shifts of up to 400 meV. We attribute this to the change in electrostatic environment at the boundaries of clusters, namely via polarization of neighbouring molecules. The observation of these strong shifts illustrates a crucial issue: interfacial energy level alignment can differ substantially from the bulk electronic structure in organic materials. PMID:26440933

  7. Crystal field parameters and energy levels scheme of trivalent chromium doped BSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, P.; Andreici, E.-L.; Avram, N. M.

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an analysis of crystal field parameters and energy levels schemes for the above doped material, in order to give a reliable explanation for experimental data. The crystal field parameters have been modeled in the frame of Exchange Charge Model (ECM) of the crystal field theory, taken into account the geometry of systems, with actually site symmetry of the impurity ions. The effect of the charges of the ligands and covalence bonding between chromium cation and oxygen anions, in the cluster approach, also were taken into account. With the obtained values of the crystal field parameters we simulated the scheme of energy levels of chromium ions by diagonalizing the matrix of the Hamiltonian of the doped crystal. The obtained energy levels and estimated Racah parameters B and C were compared with the experimental spectroscopic data and discussed. Comparison with experiment shows that the results are quite satisfactory which justify the model and simulation scheme used for the title system.

  8. Energy Level Alignment at Aqueous GaN and ZnO Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybertsen, Mark S.; Kharche, Neerav; Muckerman, James T.

    2014-03-01

    Electronic energy level alignment at semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces is fundamental to electrochemical activity. Motivated in particular by the search for new materials that can be more efficient for photocatalysis, we develop a first principles method to calculate this alignment at aqueous interfaces and demonstrate it for the specific case of non-polar GaN and ZnO interfaces with water. In the first step, density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics is used to sample the physical interface structure and to evaluate the electrostatic potential step at the interface. In the second step, the GW approach is used to evaluate the reference electronic energy level separately in the bulk semiconductor (valence band edge energy) and in bulk water (the 1b1 energy level), relative to the internal electrostatic energy reference. Use of the GW approach naturally corrects for errors inherent in the use of Kohn-Sham energy eigenvalues to approximate the electronic excitation energies in each material. With this predicted interface alignment, specific redox levels in water, with potentials known relative to the 1b1 level, can then be compared to the semiconductor band edge positions. Our results will be discussed in the context of experiments in which photoexcited GaN and ZnO drive the hydrogen evolution reaction. Research carried out at Brookhaven National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Energy transfer and energy level decay processes of Er3+ in water-free tellurite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Laercio; Rhonehouse, Daniel; Nguyen, Dan T.; Zong, Jie; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2015-12-01

    This report details the fundamental spectroscopic properties of a new class of water-free tellurite glasses studied for future applications in mid-infrared light generation. The fundamental excited state decay processes relating to the 4I11/2 → 4I13/2 transition in singly Er3+-doped Tellurium Zinc Lanthanum glass have been investigated using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The excited state dynamics was analyzed for Er2O3 concentrations between 0.5 mol% and 4 mol%. Selective laser excitation of the 4I11/2 energy level at 972 nm and selective laser excitation of the 4I13/2 energy level at 1485 nm has established that in a similar way to other Er3+-doped glasses, a strong energy-transfer upconversion by way of a dipole-dipole interaction between two excited erbium ions in the 4I13/2 level populates the 4I11/2 upper laser level of the 3 μm transition. The 4I13/2 and 4I11/2 energy levels emitted luminescence with peaks located at 1532 nm and 2734 nm respectively with luminescence efficiencies of 100% and 8% for the higher (4 mol.%) concentration sample. Results from numerical simulations showed that a population inversion is reached at a threshold pumping intensity of ∼57 kW cm-2 for a CW laser pump at 976 nm for [Er2O3] = 2 mol.%.

  10. Variational calculation of highly excited rovibrational energy levels of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Polyansky, Oleg L; Kozin, Igor N; Ovsyannikov, Roman I; Małyszek, Paweł; Koput, Jacek; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N

    2013-08-15

    Results are presented for highly accurate ab initio variational calculation of the rotation-vibration energy levels of H2O2 in its electronic ground state. These results use a recently computed potential energy surface and the variational nuclear-motion programs WARV4, which uses an exact kinetic energy operator, and TROVE, which uses a numerical expansion for the kinetic energy. The TROVE calculations are performed for levels with high values of rotational excitation, J up to 35. The purely ab initio calculations of the rovibrational energy levels reproduce the observed levels with a standard deviation of about 1 cm(-1), similar to that of the J = 0 calculation, because the discrepancy between theory and experiment for rotational energies within a given vibrational state is substantially determined by the error in the vibrational band origin. Minor adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry and to the height of the torsional barrier. Using these and correcting the band origins using the error in J = 0 states lowers the standard deviation of the observed-calculated energies to only 0.002 cm(-1) for levels up to J = 10 and 0.02 cm(-1) for all experimentally known energy levels, which extend up to J = 35. PMID:23611762

  11. Mass inflation inside black holes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokuchaev, Vyacheslav I.

    2014-03-01

    The mass inflation phenomenon implies that black hole interiors are unstable due to a back-reaction divergence of the perturbed black hole mass function at the Cauchy horizon. The mass inflation was initially derived by using the generalized Dray-’t Hooft-Redmount (DTR) relation in the linear approximation of the Einstein equations near the perturbed Cauchy horizon of the Reissner-Nordström black hole. However, this linear approximation for the DTR relation is improper for the highly nonlinear behavior of back-reaction perturbations at the black hole horizons. An additional weak point in the standard mass inflation calculations is in a fallacious using of the global Cauchy horizon as a place for the maximal growth of the back-reaction perturbations instead of the local inner apparent horizon. It is derived the new spherically symmetric back-reaction solution for two counter-streaming light-like fluxes near the inner apparent horizon of the charged black hole by taking into account its separation from the Cauchy horizon. In this solution the back-reaction perturbations of the background metric are truly the largest at the inner apparent horizon, but, nevertheless, remain small. The back reaction, additionally, removes the infinite blue-shift singularity at the inner apparent horizon and at the Cauchy horizon.

  12. Electron holes appear to trigger cancer-implicated mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John; Villagran, Martha

    Malignant tumors are caused by mutations, which also affect their subsequent growth and evolution. We use a novel approach, computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)], to compute spectra of enhanced hole probability based on actual sequence data. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. Peaks in the hole spectrum depict sites where holes tend to localize and potentially trigger a base pair mismatch during replication. Our studies of reveal a correlation between hole spectrum peaks and spikes in human mutation frequencies. Importantly, we also find that hole peak positions that do not coincide with large variant frequencies often coincide with cancer-implicated mutations and/or (for coding DNA) encoded conserved amino acids. This enables combining hole spectra with variant data to identify critical base pairs and potential cancer `driver' mutations. Such integration of DNA hole and variance spectra could also prove invaluable for pinpointing critical regions, and sites of driver mutations, in the vast non-protein-coding genome. Supported by the State of Texas through the Texas Ctr. for Superconductivity.

  13. The program LOPT for least-squares optimization of energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, A. E.

    2011-02-01

    The article describes a program that solves the least-squares optimization problem for finding the energy levels of a quantum-mechanical system based on a set of measured energy separations or wavelengths of transitions between those energy levels, as well as determining the Ritz wavelengths of transitions and their uncertainties. The energy levels are determined by solving the matrix equation of the problem, and the uncertainties of the Ritz wavenumbers are determined from the covariance matrix of the problem. Program summaryProgram title: LOPT Catalogue identifier: AEHM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19 254 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 427 839 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Perl v.5 Computer: PC, Mac, Unix workstations Operating system: MS Windows (XP, Vista, 7), Mac OS X, Linux, Unix (AIX) RAM: 3 Mwords or more Word size: 32 or 64 Classification: 2.2 Nature of problem: The least-squares energy-level optimization problem, i.e., finding a set of energy level values that best fits the given set of transition intervals. Solution method: The solution of the least-squares problem is found by solving the corresponding linear matrix equation, where the matrix is constructed using a new method with variable substitution. Restrictions: A practical limitation on the size of the problem N is imposed by the execution time, which scales as N and depends on the computer. Unusual features: Properly rounds the resulting data and formats the output in a format suitable for viewing with spreadsheet editing software. Estimates numerical errors resulting from the limited machine precision. Running time: 1 s for N=100, or 60 s for N=400 on a typical PC.

  14. Black Hole Boldly Goes Where No Black Hole Has Gone Before

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    centres of galaxies. It is perhaps possible for a stellar-mass black hole to gain enough mass through merging with other stellar-mass black holes or accreting star gas to stay locked in a cluster. About 100 solar masses would do. Once entrenched, the black hole has the opportunity to merge with other black holes or accrete gas from a local neighbourhood rife with star-stuff. In this way, they could grow into IMBHs. "If a black hole is massive enough, there's a good chance it can survive the pressures of living in a globular cluster, since it will be too heavy to be kicked out," said Arunav Kundu of Michigan State University, a co-author on the Nature report. "That's what is intriguing about this discovery. We may be seeing how a black hole can grow considerably, become more entrenched in the cluster, and then grow some more. "On the other hand," continued Kundu, "there are a variety of ways to make ULXs without requiring intermediate mass black holes. In particular, if the light goes out in a different direction than the one from which the gas comes in, it doesn't put any force on the gas. Also, if the light can be 'focused' towards us by reflecting off the gas in the same way that light from a flashlight bulb bounces off the little mirror in the flashlight, making the object appear brighter than it really is." Ongoing work will help to determine whether this object is a stellar-mass black hole showing an unusual manner of sucking in gas, allowing it to be extra bright, or an IMBH. The team, which also includes Steve Zepf from Michigan State University, and Katherine Rhode from Wesleyan University, has data for thousands of other globular clusters, which they are now analyzing in an effort to determine just how common this phenomenon is. Note for editors The findings appear on line in the 4 January issue of the journal Nature, in the article titled: "A black hole in a globular cluster", by Thomas J. Maccarone, Arunav Kundu, Stephen E. Zepf and Katherine L. Rhode.

  15. Virtual black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    1996-03-01

    One would expect spacetime to have a foamlike structure on the Planck scale with a very high topology. If spacetime is simply connected (which is assumed in this paper), the nontrivial homology occurs in dimension two, and spacetime can be regarded as being essentially the topological sum of S2×S2 and K3 bubbles. Comparison with the instantons for pair creation of black holes shows that the S2×S2 bubbles can be interpreted as closed loops of virtual black holes. It is shown that scattering in such topological fluctuations leads to loss of quantum coherence, or in other words, to a superscattering matrix S/ that does not factorize into an S matrix and its adjoint. This loss of quantum coherence is very small at low energies for everything except scalar fields, leading to the prediction that we may never observe the Higgs particle. Another possible observational consequence may be that the θ angle of QCD is zero without having to invoke the problematical existence of a light axion. The picture of virtual black holes given here also suggests that macroscopic black holes will evaporate down to the Planck size and then disappear in the sea of virtual black holes.

  16. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-05-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  17. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, John

    2009-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  18. Ozone Hole Over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) show the progressive depletion of ozone over Antarctica from 1979 to 1999. This 'ozone hole' has extended to cover an area as large as 10.5 million square miles in September 1998. The previous record of 10.0 million square miles was set in 1996. The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year between late August and early October. Regions with higher levels of ozone are shown in red. NASA and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Ozone holes of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form during the next few years, scientists hope to see a reduction in ozone loss as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are gradually reduced. Credit: Images by Greg Shirah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  19. Janus black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gutperle, Michael; Janik, Romuald A.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper Janus black holes in A dS 3 are considered. These are static solutions of an Einstein-scalar system with broken translation symmetry along the horizon. These solutions are dual to interface conformal field theories at finite temperature. An approximate solution is first constructed using perturbation theory around a planar BTZ blackhole. Numerical and exact solutions valid for all sets of parameters are then found and compared. Using the exact solution the thermodynamics of the system is analyzed. The entropy associated with the Janus black hole is calculated and it is found that the entropy of the black Janus is the sum of the undeformed black hole entropy and the entanglement entropy associated with the defect.

  20. Turbulent Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability—which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold—akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies—a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2 +1 )-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  1. Interplanetary magnetic holes: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic holes in the interplanetary medium are explained as stationary, non-propagating, equilibrium structures in which there are field-aligned enhancements of the plasma density and/or temperature. Magnetic anti-holes are considered to be associated with depressions in the plasma pressure. In this model, the observed changes in the magnetic field intensity and direction are due to diamagnetic currents that are carried by ions which drift in a sheath as the result of gradients in the magnetic field and in the plasma pressure within the sheath. The thickness of the sheaths considered is approximately a few ion Larmor radii. An electric field is normal to the magnetic field in the sheath. Solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equations are presented which account for several types of magnetic holes, including null-sheets, that were observed.

  2. Black-hole astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, P.; Bloom, E.; Cominsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  3. Black Hole Bose Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Cenalo; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2013-12-01

    General consensus on the nature of the degrees of freedom responsible for the black hole entropy remains elusive despite decades of effort dedicated to the problem. Different approaches to quantum gravity disagree in their description of the microstates and, more significantly, in the statistics used to count them. In some approaches (string theory, AdS/CFT) the elementary degrees of freedom are indistinguishable, whereas they must be treated as distinguishable in other approaches to quantum gravity (eg., LQG) in order to recover the Bekenstein-Hawking area-entropy law. However, different statistics will imply different behaviors of the black hole outside the thermodynamic limit. We illustrate this point by quantizing the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole, for which we argue that Bose condensation will occur leading to a "cold", stable remnant.

  4. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as future. space-based detectors. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on.the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics

  5. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as the space-based LISA. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on the resulting gold rush of new results that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wove detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  6. Turbulent black holes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids. PMID:25768746

  7. Energy Levels--An Important Factor in Identifying and Facilitating the Development of Giftedness in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Jerry

    1979-01-01

    Research shows that there is a positive relationship between high energy levels and creativity and giftedness. To provide for the high energy levels, these children need to be kept busy at beneficial activities such as independent study, individualized programs, and/or enrichment classes. (Author/PHR)

  8. Slowly balding black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-15

    The 'no-hair' theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively ''frozen in'' the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes N{sub B}=e{Phi}{sub {infinity}}/({pi}c({h_bar}/2{pi})), where {Phi}{sub {infinity}}{approx_equal}2{pi}{sup 2}B{sub NS}R{sub NS}{sup 3}/(P{sub NS}c) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole's magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  9. The formation of the first black holes in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2012-07-01

    Black holes are the most enigmatic objects in the Universe, although it appears now that they are ubiquitous and inhabit the centers of most galaxies in the Universe. In fact, the observed local demography of black holes in galactic nuclei suggests that they are supermassive. The first black holes are expected to have formed from the remnants of the first stars at very early times. However, the discovery of supermassive black holes that power quasars as early as 2 Gyrs after the Big Bang requires alternate channels to form more massive seed black holes. We proposed a new mechanism that involves the direct collapse of massive pre-galactic gas disks and thereby makes massive early seeds to alleviate this problem. I will present the latest results from the theoretical investigation of these models including state of the art numerical simulations of the formation process and outline the new tantalizing observational evidence that appears to support such a mechanism.

  10. Charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Toshiharu; Ishihara, Hideki; Matsuno, Ken; Tomizawa, Shinya

    2008-02-15

    We construct a new charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black hole solution in the five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory with a Chern-Simon term. The features of the solutions are also investigated. The spacetime is asymptotically locally flat, i.e., it asymptotes to a twisted S{sup 1} bundle over the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. The solution describe a non-BPS black hole rotating in the direction of the extra dimension. The solutions have the limits to the supersymmetric black hole solutions, a new extreme non-BPS black hole solution and a new rotating non-BPS black hole solution with a constant twisted S{sup 1} fiber.

  11. Noncommutative solitonic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Young, Ee; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Lee, Daeho; Lee, Youngone

    2012-05-01

    We investigate solitonic black hole solutions in three-dimensional noncommutative spacetime. We do this in gravity with a negative cosmological constant coupled to a scalar field. Noncommutativity is realized with the Moyal product which is expanded up to first order in the noncommutativity parameter in two spatial directions. With numerical simulation we study the effect of noncommutativity by increasing the value of the noncommutativity parameter starting from commutative solutions. We find that even a regular soliton solution in the commutative case becomes a black hole solution when the noncommutativity parameter reaches a certain value.

  12. Chemical hole diving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greber, T.

    1994-05-01

    The non-adiabatic reaction leading to the emission of exoelectrons during the adsorption of oxygen on lithium is exploited to estimate the time that elapses during the dissociation of the molecule. With a three-step model the exoemission probability is calculated. A comparison with experimentally observed probabilities predicts the reaction time to be 75±25 O2p hole lifetimes at the final O2p binding energy. The width of the exoelectron energy distribution reflects this hole lifetime. The absence of visible light emission ( < 10 -10 photons/O 2) is shown to be compatible with the model.

  13. A Hole in 'Tennessee'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took the images that make up this mosaic with its microscopic imager on sol 139 (June 14, 2004). The target is a rock called 'Tennessee,' which was drilled into by the rover's rock abrasion tool. This particular grind is the deepest performed so far during the mission. The hole is 8.12 millimeters (0.32 inches) deep and took two hours and four minutes to create. The previous record was a 7.23-millimeter-deep (0.28-inch-deep) hole dug on sol 86 (April 21, 2004) on the feature dubbed 'Pilbara,' located in Meridiani's 'Fram Crater.'

  14. Euclidean black hole vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowker, Fay; Gregory, Ruth; Traschen, Jennie

    1991-01-01

    We argue the existence of solutions of the Euclidean Einstein equations that correspond to a vortex sitting at the horizon of a black hole. We find the asymptotic behaviors, at the horizon and at infinity, of vortex solutions for the gauge and scalar fields in an abelian Higgs model on a Euclidean Schwarzschild background and interpolate between them by integrating the equations numerically. Calculating the backreaction shows that the effect of the vortex is to cut a slice out of the Schwarzschild geometry. Consequences of these solutions for black hole thermodynamics are discussed.

  15. Characterizing Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John; Boggs, William Darian; Kelly, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are a promising source of gravitational waves for interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Recent advances in numerical relativity have revealed the predictions of General Relativity for the strong burst of radiation generated in the final moments of binary coalescence. We explore features in the merger radiation which characterize the final moments of merger and ringdown. Interpreting the waveforms in terms of an rotating implicit radiation source allows a unified phenomenological description of the system from inspiral through ringdown. Common features in the waveforms allow quantitative description of the merger signal which may provide insights for observations large-mass black hole binaries.

  16. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.; vanMeter, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Black-hole mergers take place in regions of very strong and dynamical gravitational fields, and are among the strongest sources of gravitational radiation. Probing these mergers requires solving the full set of Einstein's equations of general relativity numerically. For more than 40 years, progress towards this goal has been very slow, as numerical relativists encountered a host of difficult problems. Recently, several breakthroughs have led to dramatic progress, enabling stable and accurate calculations of black-hole mergers. This article presents an overview of this field, including impacts on astrophysics and applications in gravitational wave data analysis.

  17. Spherically Symmetric Trapping Horizons, the Misner-Sharp Mass and Black Hole Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Alex B.; Yeom, Dong-Han

    We discuss some of the issues relating to information loss and black hole thermodynamics in the light of recent work on local black hole horizons. Understood in terms of pure states evolving into mixed states, the possibility of information loss in black holes is closely related to the global causal structure of space-time, as is the existence of event horizons. However, black holes need not be defined by event horizons, and in fact we argue that in order to have a fully unitary evolution for black holes, they should be defined in terms of something else, such as a trapping horizon. The Misner-Sharp mass in spherical symmetry shows very simply how trapping horizons can give rise to black hole thermodynamics, Hawking radiation and singularities. We show how the Misner-Sharp mass can also be used to give insights into the process of collapse and evaporation of locally defined black holes.

  18. Experimental Energy Levels of HD18O and D_218O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Tashkun, S. A.; Liu, A.-W.; Hu, S.-M.

    2010-06-01

    Extended sets of experimental energy levels of HD18O and D_218O have been obtained as the result of the analysis of recent high-resolution spectra and previously reported data. Spectra of the enriched by deuterium and oxygen-18 water samples were recorded with a Bruker IFS 120HR spectrometer at room temperature in the 1000 - 9200 cm-1 range a,b for this purpose. The RITZ code h was used for analysis of the rotation-vibration transitions and the energy levels determination. New energy levels as well as comparison with previous experimental and theoretical studies will be presented. This work was supported by Grant nos. 06-03-39014 and 10-05-91176 of RFBR (Russia) and by Grant nos. 20903085 and 10574124 of NSFC (China). Work of SNM and SAT was also partly supported by CRDF (USA) Grant RUG1-2954-TO-09 and by RFBR. Grant 09-05-92508. A.-W. Liu et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 237, 149-162 (2006). H.-Y. Ni et al., Mol. Phys. 106, 1793-1801 (2008). J. Bellet et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 47, 388-402 (1973). J.W.C. Johns, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B2, 1340-1354 (1985). R.A. Toth, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 162, 41-54 (1993). W.F. Wang et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 176, 226-228 (1996). R.A. Toth, J. Mol. Structure, 742, 49-68 (2005). S.N. Mikhailenko et al., JQSRT, 110, 597-608 (2009). A. Liu et al., JQSRT, 110, 1781-1800 (2009). O.V. Naumenko et al., JQSRT, 111, 36-44 (2010).

  19. A New Way To Weigh Giant Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    How do you weigh the biggest black holes in the universe? One answer now comes from a completely new and independent technique that astronomers have developed using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By measuring a peak in the temperature of hot gas in the center of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4649, scientists have determined the mass of the galaxy’s supermassive black hole. The method, applied for the first time, gives results that are consistent with a traditional technique. Astronomers have been seeking out different, independent ways of precisely weighing the largest supermassive black holes, that is, those that are billions of times more massive than the Sun. Until now, methods based on observations of the motions of stars or of gas in a disk near such large black holes had been used. "This is tremendously important work since black holes can be elusive, and there are only a couple of ways to weigh them accurately," said Philip Humphrey of the University of California at Irvine, who led the study. "It's reassuring that two very different ways to measure the mass of a big black hole give such similar answers." AnimationChandra X-ray Image NGC 4649 is now one of only a handful of galaxies for which the mass of a supermassive black hole has been measured with two different methods. In addition, this new X-ray technique confirms that the supermassive black hole in NGC 4649 is one of the largest in the local universe with a mass about 3.4 billion times that of the Sun, about a thousand times bigger than the black hole at the center of our galaxy. The new technique takes advantage of the gravitational influence the black hole has on the hot gas near the center of the galaxy. As gas slowly settles towards the black hole, it gets compressed and heated. This causes a peak in the temperature of the gas right near the center of the galaxy. The more massive the black hole, the bigger the temperature peak detected by Chandra. People Who Read This Also Read

  20. Tunnelling from black holes and tunnelling into white holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Bhramar; Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2008-03-01

    Hawking radiation is nowadays being understood as tunnelling through black hole horizons. Here, the extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to tunnelling for non-rotating and rotating black holes in different non-singular coordinate systems not only confirms this quantum emission from black holes but also reveals the new phenomenon of absorption into white holes by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The rôle of a boundary condition of total absorption or emission is also clarified.

  1. Energy Levels and Transition Rates for GA-Like Ions (Xe XXIV-Pr XXIX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, F.

    2015-07-01

    Energy levels, wavelengths, transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, and line strengths have been calculated for allowed electric dipole 4s 2 4p-4s4p 2 and 4s 2 4p-4s 2 4d transitions of Gallium-like ions from Z = 54 to 59, Xe XXIV, Cs XXV, Ba XXVI, La XXVII, Ce XXVIII, and Pr XXIX. The fully relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method, taking into account both correlations within the n = 4 complex and the quantum electrodynamic effects, has been used in the calculations. The results have been compared with the available experimental and other theoretical results.

  2. Effects of Dietary Energy Levels on the Physiological Parameters and Reproductive Performance of Gestating Gilts

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S. S.; Jung, S. W.; Jang, J. C.; Chung, W. L.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary energy levels on the physiological parameters and reproductive performance of gestating first parity sows. A total of 52 F1 gilts (Yorkshire×Landrace) were allocated to 4 dietary treatments using a completely randomized design. Each treatment contained diets with 3,100, 3,200, 3,300, or 3,400 kcal of metabolizable energy (ME)/kg, and the daily energy intake of the gestating gilts in each treatment were 6,200, 6,400, 6,600, and 6,800 kcal of ME, respectively. During gestation, the body weight (p = 0.04) and weight gain (p = 0.01) of gilts linearly increased with increasing dietary energy levels. Backfat thickness was not affected at d110 of gestation by dietary treatments, but increased linearly (p = 0.05) from breeding to d 110 of gestation. There were no significant differences on the litter size or litter birth weight. During lactation, the voluntary feed intake of sows tended to decrease when the dietary energy levels increased (p = 0.08). No difference was observed in backfat thickness of the sows within treatments; increasing energy levels linearly decreased the body weight of sows (p<0.05) at d 21 of lactation and body weight gain during lactation (p<0.01). No significant differences were observed in the chemical compositions of colostrum and milk. Therefore, these results indicated that high-energy diets influenced the bodyweight and backfat thickness of sows during gestation and lactation. NRC (2012) suggested that the energy requirement of the gestation gilt should be between 6,678 and 7,932 kcal of ME/d. Similarly, our results suggested that 3,100 kcal of ME/kg is not enough to maintain the reproductive performance for gilts during gestation with 2 kg feed daily. Gilts in the treatment 3,400 kcal of ME/kg have a higher weaning number of piglets, but bodyweight and backfat loss were higher than other treatments during lactation. But bodyweight and backfat loss were higher than other

  3. Energy level alignment at the interfaces in a multilayer organic light-emitting diode structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olthof, S.; Meerheim, R.; Schober, M.; Leo, K.

    2009-06-01

    We use photoelectron spectroscopy to study the electronic structure and energy level alignment throughout an organic light-emitting diode. The structure under investigation is a state-of-the-art long-living red phosphorescent device composed of doped charge-injection layers, charge-blocking layers, and an emission layer. By consecutively building up the whole device, the key parameters of every interface are measured. Our results show that the doped layers have a significant influence on the device energetics, especially in controlling the built-in potential, and that there are mostly only small dipoles present at the interfaces of the intrinsic organic layers.

  4. COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Kerber, Florian

    2012-10-15

    We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

  5. Effects of Dietary Energy Levels on the Physiological Parameters and Reproductive Performance of Gestating Gilts.

    PubMed

    Jin, S S; Jung, S W; Jang, J C; Chung, W L; Jeong, J H; Kim, Y Y

    2016-07-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary energy levels on the physiological parameters and reproductive performance of gestating first parity sows. A total of 52 F1 gilts (Yorkshire×Landrace) were allocated to 4 dietary treatments using a completely randomized design. Each treatment contained diets with 3,100, 3,200, 3,300, or 3,400 kcal of metabolizable energy (ME)/kg, and the daily energy intake of the gestating gilts in each treatment were 6,200, 6,400, 6,600, and 6,800 kcal of ME, respectively. During gestation, the body weight (p = 0.04) and weight gain (p = 0.01) of gilts linearly increased with increasing dietary energy levels. Backfat thickness was not affected at d110 of gestation by dietary treatments, but increased linearly (p = 0.05) from breeding to d 110 of gestation. There were no significant differences on the litter size or litter birth weight. During lactation, the voluntary feed intake of sows tended to decrease when the dietary energy levels increased (p = 0.08). No difference was observed in backfat thickness of the sows within treatments; increasing energy levels linearly decreased the body weight of sows (p<0.05) at d 21 of lactation and body weight gain during lactation (p<0.01). No significant differences were observed in the chemical compositions of colostrum and milk. Therefore, these results indicated that high-energy diets influenced the bodyweight and backfat thickness of sows during gestation and lactation. NRC (2012) suggested that the energy requirement of the gestation gilt should be between 6,678 and 7,932 kcal of ME/d. Similarly, our results suggested that 3,100 kcal of ME/kg is not enough to maintain the reproductive performance for gilts during gestation with 2 kg feed daily. Gilts in the treatment 3,400 kcal of ME/kg have a higher weaning number of piglets, but bodyweight and backfat loss were higher than other treatments during lactation. But bodyweight and backfat loss were higher than other

  6. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  7. Super-Extremal Spinning Black Holes via Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna, Pablo; Bode, Tanja; Matzner, Richard

    2011-04-01

    A Kerr black hole with mass M and angular momentum J satisfies the extremality inequality J <=M2 . In the presence of matter and/or gravitational radiation, the bound needs to be reformulated in terms of local measurements of M and J directly associated with the black hole. The isolated and dynamical horizons framework provides such natural quasi-local characterization of M and J, making possible in axi-symmetry to reformulate the extremality limit as J <= 2M2 , with M the irreducible mass computed from the apparent horizon area and J obtained using approximate rotational Killing vectors on the apparent horizon. This condition is also equivalent to requiring a non-negative black hole surface gravity. We present numerical experiments of an accreting black hole that temporarily violates this extremality inequality.

  8. Hole localization and spin coupling in [pi]-mono- and [pi]-dications of [mu]-oxoporphyrin dimers, relevance to structure of oxidized [open quotes]special pair[close quotes] in photosynthetic reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Binstead, R.A.; Hush, N.S. )

    1993-12-16

    The antiferromagnetically coupled cofacial [mu]-oxoiron(III) dimers of octaethylporphyrin (OEP) and [alpha],[beta],[gamma],[Delta]-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) can be oxidized in two one-electron steps to yield [pi]-monocations and [pi]-dications. Hitherto unreported absorption bands are observed in the mid-infrared region in the spectra of the monocations. These are identified as intervalence transitions of dynamically trapped holes. The electron-phonon coupling energies (CH[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] solution, 295 K) are 0.31 [+-] 0.04 eV, and the inter-ring, predominantly through-space, electronic coupling constants J are 0.07 and 0.03 eV, respectively. The small values of J are a consequence of the large mean plane separation of the porphyrin rings (4.53 A). Since it is impossible that the electron-phonon coupling energies will vary greatly between cofacial porphyrin dimers, it is suggested that absorption hands around 1 eV in the [pi]-monocations of [open quotes]sandwich[close quotes] compounds such as M[sup III]P[sub 2] or M[sup IV]P[sub 2][sup +], where P is a porphyrin and M are lanthanide, actinide, or transition metals (3-12) observed under similar conditions will have electronic ground states that are delocalized on at least the vibrational time scale, with frequency maxima equal to 2J in the tight-binding approximation. The thermal inter-ring hole-transfer times in the [mu]-oxo dimer monocations are estimated to be approximately 1 ps. The relevance of these results to the problem of the structure of the oxidized [open quotes]special pair[close quotes] in the photosynthetic reaction center is briefly discussed. 52 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Black hole magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanail, Antonios; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-06-20

    We investigate the structure of the steady-state force-free magnetosphere around a Kerr black hole in various astrophysical settings. The solution Ψ(r, θ) depends on the distributions of the magnetic field line angular velocity ω(Ψ) and the poloidal electric current I(Ψ). These are obtained self-consistently as eigenfunctions that allow the solution to smoothly cross the two singular surfaces of the problem, the inner light surface inside the ergosphere, and the outer light surface, which is the generalization of the pulsar light cylinder. Magnetic field configurations that cross both singular surfaces (e.g., monopole, paraboloidal) are uniquely determined. Configurations that cross only one light surface (e.g., the artificial case of a rotating black hole embedded in a vertical magnetic field) are degenerate. We show that, similar to pulsars, black hole magnetospheres naturally develop an electric current sheet that potentially plays a very important role in the dissipation of black hole rotational energy and in the emission of high-energy radiation.

  10. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  11. Moulting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Chowdhury, Borun D.; de Boer, Jan; El-Showk, Sheer; Shigemori, Masaki

    2012-03-01

    We find a family of novel supersymmetric phases of the D1-D5 CFT, which in certain ranges of charges have more entropy than all known ensembles. We also find bulk BPS configurations that exist in the same range of parameters as these phases, and have more entropy than a BMPV black hole; they can be thought of as coming from a BMPV black hole shedding a "hair" condensate outside of the horizon. The entropy of the bulk configurations is smaller than that of the CFT phases, which indicates that some of the CFT states are lifted at strong coupling. Neither the bulk nor the boundary phases are captured by the elliptic genus, which makes the coincidence of the phase boundaries particularly remarkable. Our configurations are supersymmetric, have non-Cardy-like entropy, and are the first instance of a black hole entropy enigma with a controlled CFT dual. Furthermore, contrary to common lore, these objects exist in a region of parameter space (between the "cosmic censorship bound" and the "unitarity bound") where no black holes were thought to exist.

  12. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  13. "Holes": Folklore Redux.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascia, Elizabeth G.

    2001-01-01

    Demonstrates that a careful reading of the book for young adults, "Holes" by Louis Sachar, reveals how this contemporary story is grounded in folklore, and that it is this debt to folk literature that allows readers to accept an improbable plot. Shows how the story weaves together elements from traditional folk literature and stretches them across…

  14. When Black Holes Collide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  15. Drilling Square Holes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Scott G.

    1993-01-01

    A Reuleaux triangle is constructed by drawing an arc connecting each pair of vertices of an equilateral triangle with radius equal to the side of the triangle. Investigates the application of drilling a square hole using a drill bit in the shape of a Reuleaux triangle. (MDH)

  16. Aspects of hairy black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru

    2015-03-26

    We review the existence of exact hairy black holes in asymptotically flat, anti-de Sitter and de Sitter space-times. We briefly discuss the issue of stability and the charging of the black holes with a Maxwell field.

  17. Black hole phase transitions in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Qiaojun; Chen Yixin; Shao Kainan

    2011-03-15

    We study black hole phase transitions in (deformed) Horava-Lifshitz (H-L) gravity, including the charged/uncharged topological black holes and KS black hole. Stability analysis and state space geometry are both used. We find interesting phase structures in these black holes, some of the properties are never observed in Einstein gravity. Particularly, the stability properties of black holes in H-L gravity with small radius change dramatically, which can be considered as a leak of information about the small scale behavior of spacetime. A new black hole local phase transition in H-L gravity which cannot be revealed by thermodynamical metrics has been found. There is an infinite discontinuity at the specific heat curve for charged black hole in H-L gravity with hyperbolic event horizon. However, this discontinuity does not have a corresponding curvature singularity of thermodynamical metrics. Our results may provide new insights towards a better understanding of the H-L gravity, as well as black hole thermodynamics.

  18. A RAPIDLY SPINNING BLACK HOLE POWERS THE EINSTEIN CROSS

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Miller, Jon M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Walton, Dominic J.

    2014-09-01

    Observations over the past 20 yr have revealed a strong relationship between the properties of the supermassive black hole lying at the center of a galaxy and the host galaxy itself. The magnitude of the spin of the black hole will play a key role in determining the nature of this relationship. To date, direct estimates of black hole spin have been restricted to the local universe. Herein, we present the results of an analysis of ∼0.5 Ms of archival Chandra observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar Q 2237+305 (aka the {sup E}instein-cross{sup )}, lying at a redshift of z = 1.695. The boost in flux provided by the gravitational lens allows constraints to be placed on the spin of a black hole at such high redshift for the first time. Utilizing state of the art relativistic disk reflection models, the black hole is found to have a spin of a{sub ∗}=0.74{sub −0.03}{sup +0.06} at the 90% confidence level. Placing a lower limit on the spin, we find a {sub *} ≥ 0.65 (4σ). The high value of the spin for the ∼10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} black hole in Q 2237+305 lends further support to the coherent accretion scenario for black hole growth. This is the most distant black hole for which the spin has been directly constrained to date.

  19. Slowly balding black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-01

    The “no-hair” theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively “frozen in” the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes NB=eΦ∞/(πcℏ), where Φ∞≈2π2BNSRNS3/(PNSc) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole’s magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  20. Weighing supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Alireza

    We calculate the black hole masses for a sample of 27728 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3 (DR3). To ensure a high signal-to-noise ratio, we reconstruct quasar spectra for this large sample of quasars using the eigenspectra method (Yip et al., 2004). This method reduces the uncertainty of the measurements for even noisy original spectra, making almost all the SDSS quasar spectra usable for our study. A few applications for black hole mass estimates are presented here. Wang et al. (2006) estimated an average radiative efficiency of 30%-35% for quasars at moderate redshift, which implies that most supermassive black holes are rotating very rapidly. Using our black hole mass estimates, we have found that their method is not independent of quasar lifetimes and thus that quasars do not necessarily have such high efficiencies. As a second application, we have investigated a claim by Steinhardt and Elvis (2009) that there exists a sub-Eddington boundary in the quasar mass-luminosity plane using the Shen et al. (2008) mass estimates. We re-calibrate the mass-scaling relations following Wang et al. (2009) with the most up-to-date reverberation estimates of black hole masses. We compare results from the original data sets with the new re-calibrated estimates of the mass-luminosity plane. We conclude that the presence of the sub-Eddington boundary in the original data of Shen et al. (2008) is likely due to biases in the mass-scaling relation and not to any physical process.

  1. Spectra, energy levels, and energy transition of lanthanide complexes with cinnamic acid and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kaining; Feng, Zhongshan; Shen, Jun; Wu, Bing; Luo, Xiaobing; Jiang, Sha; Li, Li; Zhou, Xianju

    2016-04-01

    High resolution spectra and luminescent lifetimes of 6 europium(III)-cinnamic acid complex {[Eu2L6(DMF)(H2O)]·nDMF·H2O}m (L=cinnamic acid I, 4-methyl-cinnamic acid II, 4-chloro-cinnamic acid III, 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid IV, 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid V, 4-nitro-cinnamic acid VI; DMF=N, N-dimethylformamide, C3H7NO) were recorded from 8 K to room temperature. The energy levels of Eu(3+) in these 6 complexes are obtained from the spectra analysis. It is found that the energy levels of the central Eu(3+) ions are influenced by the nephelauxetic effect, while the triplet state of ligand is lowered by the p-π conjugation effect of the para-substituted functional groups. The best energy matching between the ligand triplet state and the central ion excited state is found in complex I. While the other complexes show poorer matching because the gap of (5)D0 and triplet state contracts. PMID:26802538

  2. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, R.; Bianchi, F.; Blumstengel, S.; Christodoulou, C.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kobin, B.; Moudgil, K.; Barlow, S.; Hecht, S.; Marder, S.R.; Henneberger, F.; Koch, N.

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach. PMID:25872919

  3. K-shell energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Si ix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. G.; Shi, J. R.; Wang, F. L.; Zhong, J. Y.; Liang, G. Y.; Zhao, G.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Accurate atomic data are needed to analyze the Si ix K-shell features in astrophysical X-ray spectra. Relative large discrepancies in the existing atomic data have impeded this progress. Aims: We present the accurate Si ix K-shell transition data, including K-shell energy levels, wavelengths, radiative rates, and oscillator strengths. Methods: The flexible atomic code (FAC), which is a fully relativistic atomic code with configuration interaction (CI) included, was employed to calculate these data. To investigate the CI effects, calculations with different configurations included were carried out. Results: The K-shell atomic data of Si ix transitions between 1s22s22p2, 1s22s2p3, 1s22p4, 1s2s22p3, 1s2s2p4, and 1s2p5 are reported. The accuracy of our data is demonstrated by comparing them with the available experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. The energy levels are accurate to 3.5 eV, the wavelengths to within 15 mÅ. For most transitions, the radiative rates an accuracy of 20%. The effects of CI from high-energy configurations were investigated as well. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/566/A105

  4. Calculation of energy levels, lifetimes and radiative data for La XXIX to Sm XXXIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Arun; Khatri, Indu; Aggarwal, Sunny; Singh, A. K.; Mohan, Man

    2016-01-01

    We present the most comprehensive atomic data for La XXIX to Sm XXXIV with single electron excitation from M-shell to N-shell and N-shell to higher shells. We have presented energy levels, lifetimes and radiative data using Multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method for the lowest 27 states belonging to the configuration 3d104l (l = 0 , 1 , 2 , 3), 3d105l (l = 0 , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4), 3d106l (l = 0 , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4) and 3d94s2. We have also considered relativistic effects by incorporating quantum electrodynamics (QED) and Breit corrections. We have made comparisons of our presented results with available theoretical as well as experimental results and a good agreement is achieved. Further, we have also reported energy levels by performing distorted wave calculations with fully relativistic flexible atomic code (FAC). The calculations match well with MCDF results. Additionally, we have investigated the effect of nuclear charge on transition wavelength and radiative rates for strong Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) transitions from n = 4 → 4. We believe that our reported data in this work may be useful in various applications of lanthanide ions related to broad area of research such as applied physics, laser physics and astrophysics etc.

  5. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W LVIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-11-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Cl-like W LVIII. Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 44 configurations (generating 4978 levels) over a wide energy range up to 363 Ryd, and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP) adopted for the calculations. Since no other results of comparable complexity are available, calculations have also been performed with the flexible atomic code (FAC), which help in assessing the accuracy of our results. Energies are listed for the lowest 400 levels (with energies up to ˜98 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 3s23p5, 3s3p6, 3s23p43d, 3s23p33d2, 3s3p43d2, 3s23p23d3, and 3p63d configurations, and radiative rates are provided for four types of transitions, i.e. E1, E2, M1, and M2. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 0.5%, whereas radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.

  6. Lorentz and CPT violating corrections to hydrogen energy levels at order 2̂

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Gregory; Yoder, Theodore

    2012-03-01

    The standard model extension (SME) is an effective field theory for physics beyond the SM that contains non-SM effects such as Lorentz and CPT violation. The SME effective Lagrangian contains a number of coefficients that describe new interactions. These as-yet-unobserved coefficients must be small. One approach for the detection of the SME coefficients is to calculate their effect on observable physical quantities, particularly those measureable to high precision. We have calculated the effect of the SME interactions on the energy levels of hydrogen. Starting from the field theory effective Lagrangian we have obtained the Hamiltonian of an SME-extended Dirac equation and have applied a Foldy-Wouthuysen expansion to obtain a non-relativistic effective Hamiltonian correct through terms quadratic in the momentum 3-vector. This Hamiltonian, at the order of interest, has the form H'=(Ai j+Bi j kσk)p^i p^j where Ai j and Bi j k are linear combinations of the SME parameters. We have evaluated the energy level corrections due to H', which are of order 2̂ times the SME coefficients. Constraints on the combinations of SME coefficients found in Ai j and Bi j k can be obtained by comparison with experimental results.

  7. Spectrum and energy levels of five-times ionized zirconium (Zr VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph; Lindsay, Mark D.

    2016-02-01

    We carried out a new analysis of the spectrum of five-times-ionized zirconium Zr VI. For this we used sliding-spark discharges together with normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs to observe the spectrum from 160 to 2000 Å. These observations showed that the analysis of this spectrum by Khan et al (1985 Phys. Scr. 31 837) contained a significant number of incorrect energy levels. We have now classified ˜420 lines as transitions between 23 even-parity levels 73 odd-parity levels. The 4s24p5, 4s4p6, 4s24p44d, 5s, 5d, 6s configurations are now complete, although a few levels of 4s24p45d are tentative. We determined Ritz-type wavelengths for ˜135 lines from the optimized energy levels. The uncertainties range from 0.0003 to 0.0020 Å. Hartree-Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels were used to interpret the observed configurations. Oscillator strengths for all classified lines were calculated with the fitted parameters. The results are compared with values for the level energies, percentage compositions, and transition probabilities from recent ab initio theoretical calculations. The ionization energy was revised to 777 380 ± 300 cm-1 (96.38 ± 0.04 eV).

  8. Spectra, energy levels, and energy transition of lanthanide complexes with cinnamic acid and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kaining; Feng, Zhongshan; Shen, Jun; Wu, Bing; Luo, Xiaobing; Jiang, Sha; Li, Li; Zhou, Xianju

    2016-04-01

    High resolution spectra and luminescent lifetimes of 6 europium(III)-cinnamic acid complex {[Eu2L6(DMF)(H2O)]·nDMF·H2O}m (L = cinnamic acid I, 4-methyl-cinnamic acid II, 4-chloro-cinnamic acid III, 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid IV, 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid V, 4-nitro-cinnamic acid VI; DMF = N, N-dimethylformamide, C3H7NO) were recorded from 8 K to room temperature. The energy levels of Eu3 + in these 6 complexes are obtained from the spectra analysis. It is found that the energy levels of the central Eu3 + ions are influenced by the nephelauxetic effect, while the triplet state of ligand is lowered by the p-π conjugation effect of the para-substituted functional groups. The best energy matching between the ligand triplet state and the central ion excited state is found in complex I. While the other complexes show poorer matching because the gap of 5D0 and triplet state contracts.

  9. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W LVIII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Kanti M. Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-11-15

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Cl-like W LVIII. Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 44 configurations (generating 4978 levels) over a wide energy range up to 363 Ryd, and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP) adopted for the calculations. Since no other results of comparable complexity are available, calculations have also been performed with the flexible atomic code (FAC), which help in assessing the accuracy of our results. Energies are listed for the lowest 400 levels (with energies up to ∼98 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}, 3s3p{sup 6}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}3d{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 4}3d{sup 2}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}3d{sup 3}, and 3p{sup 6}3d configurations, and radiative rates are provided for four types of transitions, i.e. E1, E2, M1, and M2. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 0.5%, whereas radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.

  10. A spectral-Lagrangian Boltzmann solver for a multi-energy level gas

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, Alessandro; Haack, Jeffrey R.; Gamba, Irene M.; Magin, Thierry E.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a spectral-Lagrangian method is proposed for the full, non-linear Boltzmann equation for a multi-energy level gas typical of a hypersonic re-entry flow. Internal energy levels are treated as separate species and inelastic collisions (leading to internal energy excitation and relaxation) are accounted for. The formulation developed can also be used for the case of a gas mixture made of monatomic gases without internal energy (where only elastic collisions occur). The advantage of the spectral-Lagrangian method lies in the generality of the algorithm in use for the evaluation of the elastic and inelastic collision operators, as well as the conservation of mass, momentum and energy during collisions. The latter is realized through the solution of constrained optimization problems. The computational procedure is based on the Fourier transform of the partial elastic and inelastic collision operators and exploits the fact that these can be written as weighted convolutions in Fourier space with no restriction on the cross-section model. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated through numerical examples for both space homogeneous and in-homogeneous problems. Computational results are compared with those obtained by means of the DSMC method in order to assess the accuracy of the proposed spectral-Lagrangian method.

  11. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, R.; Bianchi, F.; Blumstengel, S.; Christodoulou, C.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kobin, B.; Moudgil, K.; Barlow, S.; Hecht, S.; Marder, S. R.; Henneberger, F.; Koch, N.

    2015-04-01

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach.

  12. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in C III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2015-06-01

    We report energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes for the astrophysically important Be-like ion C III. For the calculations, 166 levels belonging to the n ≤ 5 configurations are considered and the GRASP (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) is adopted. Einstein A-coefficients are provided for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions, while lifetimes are compared with available measurements as well as theoretical results, and no large discrepancies noted. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1 per cent for a majority of levels, and A-values to better than 20 per cent for most transitions. Collision strengths are also calculated, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC) is used. A wide energy range, up to 21 Ryd, is considered and resonances resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. The collision strengths are subsequently averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 8.0 × 105 K, sufficient for most astrophysical applications. Our data are compared with the recent R-matrix calculations of Fernández-Menchero et al., and significant differences (up to over an order of magnitude) are noted for several transitions over the complete temperature range of the results.

  13. A new classification of the amino acid side chains based on doublet acceptor energy levels.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, S F; Morgan, R S; Brooks, C L

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new classification of the amino acid side chains based on the potential energy level at which each will accept an extra (doublet) electron. The doublet acceptor energy level, and the doublet acceptor orbital were calculated using semiempirical INDO/2-UHF molecular orbital theory. The results of these calculations show that the side chains fall into four groups. We have termed these groups repulsive, insulating, semiconducting, and attractive in accordance with where each lies on the relative energy scale. We use this classification to examine the role of residues between the donor and acceptor in modulating the rate and mechanism of electron transfer in proteins. With the calculated acceptor levels, we construct a potential barrier for those residues between the donor and acceptor. It is the area beneath this barrier that determines the decay of electronic coupling between donor and acceptor, and thus the transfer rate. We have used this schematic approach to characterize the four electron transfer pathways in myoglobin recently studied by Mayo et al. (Mayo, S.L., W.R. Ellis, R.J. Crutchley, and H.B. Gray. 1986. Science [Wash. DC]. 233:948-952). PMID:3342271

  14. THE SPECTRUM OF THORIUM FROM 250 nm TO 5500 nm: RITZ WAVELENGTHS AND OPTIMIZED ENERGY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm{sup –1} to 1800 cm{sup –1}). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer and Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis and Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  15. Hole-Center Locating Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senter, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tool alines center of new hold with existing hole. Tool marks center of new hole drilled while workpiece is in place. Secured with bolts while hole center marked with punch. Used for field installations where reference points unavailable or work area cramped and not easily accessible with conventional tools.

  16. Electron and hole transport in ambipolar, thin film pentacene transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Saudari, Sangameshwar R.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2015-01-21

    Solution-processed, ambipolar, thin-film pentacene field-effect transistors were employed to study both electron and hole transport simultaneously in a single, organic solid-state device. Electron and hole mobilities were extracted from the respective unipolar saturation regimes and show thermally activated behavior and gate voltage dependence. We fit the gate voltage dependent saturation mobility to a power law to extract the characteristic Meyer-Neldel (MN) energy, a measure of the width of the exponential distribution of localized states extending into the energy gap of the organic semiconductor. The MN energy is ∼78 and ∼28 meV for electrons and holes, respectively, which reflects a greater density of localized tail states for electrons than holes. This is consistent with the lower measured electron than hole mobility. For holes, the well-behaved linear regime allows for four-point probe measurement of the contact resistance independent mobility and separate characterization of the width of the localized density of states, yielding a consistent MN energy of 28 meV.

  17. Fast magnetoacoustic wave trains in coronal holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kupriyanova, E. G.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances recently discovered in the solar corona are interpreted in terms of guided fast magnetoacoustic waves. Fast magnetoacoustic waves experience geometric dispersion in waveguides, which causes localised, impulsive perturbations to develop into quasi-periodic wave trains. Aims: We consider the formation of fast wave trains in a super-radially expanding coronal hole modelled by a magnetic funnel with a field-aligned density profile that is rarefied in comparison to the surrounding plasma. This kind of structure is typical of coronal holes, and it forms a fast magnetoacoustic anti-waveguide as a local maximum in the Alfvén speed. Methods: We performed 2D MHD numerical simulations for impulsively generated perturbations to the system. Both sausage and kink perturbations are considered and the role of the density contrast ratio investigated. Results: The anti-waveguide funnel geometry refracts wave energy away from the structure. However, in this geometry the quasi-periodic fast wave trains are found to appear, too, and so can be associated with the observed rapidly propagating coronal EUV disturbances. The wave trains propagate along the external edge of the coronal hole. The fast wave trains generated in coronal holes exhibit less dispersive evolution than in the case of a dense waveguide. Conclusions: We conclude that an impulsive energy release localised in a coronal plasma inhomogeneity develops into a fast wave train for both kink and sausage disturbances and for both waveguide and anti-waveguide transverse plasma profiles.

  18. Hole-to-surface resistivity measurements at Gibson Dome (drill hole GD-1) Paradox basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Hole-to-surface resistivity measurements were made in a deep drill hole (GD-1), in San Juan County, Utah, which penetrated a sequence of sandstone, shale, and evaporite. These measurements were made as part of a larger investigation to study the suitability of an area centered around the Gibson Dome structure for nuclear waste disposal. The magnitude and direction of the total electric field resulting from a current source placed in a drill hole is calculated from potential difference measurements for a grid of closely-spaced stations. A contour map of these data provides a detailed map of the distribution of the electric field away from the drill hole. Computation of the apparent resistivity from the total electric field helps to interpret the data with respect to the ideal situation of a layered earth. Repeating the surface measurements for different source depths gives an indication of variations in the geoelectric section with depth. The quantitative interpretation of the field data at Gibson Dome was hindered by the pressure of a conductive borehole fluid. However, a qualitative interpretation of the field data indicates the geoelectric section around drill hole GD-1 is not perfectly layered. The geoelectric section appears to dip to the northwest, and contains anomalies in the resistivity distribution that may be representative of localized thickening or folding of the salt layers.

  19. Black Hole Hunters Set New Distance Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have detected, in another galaxy, a stellar-mass black hole much farther away than any other previously known. With a mass above fifteen times that of the Sun, this is also the second most massive stellar-mass black hole ever found. It is entwined with a star that will soon become a black hole itself. The stellar-mass black holes [1] found in the Milky Way weigh up to ten times the mass of the Sun and are certainly not be taken lightly, but, outside our own galaxy, they may just be minor-league players, since astronomers have found another black hole with a mass over fifteen times the mass of the Sun. This is one of only three such objects found so far. The newly announced black hole lies in a spiral galaxy called NGC 300, six million light-years from Earth. "This is the most distant stellar-mass black hole ever weighed, and it's the first one we've seen outside our own galactic neighbourhood, the Local Group," says Paul Crowther, Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Sheffield and lead author of the paper reporting the study. The black hole's curious partner is a Wolf-Rayet star, which also has a mass of about twenty times as much as the Sun. Wolf-Rayet stars are near the end of their lives and expel most of their outer layers into their surroundings before exploding as supernovae, with their cores imploding to form black holes. In 2007, an X-ray instrument aboard NASA's Swift observatory scrutinised the surroundings of the brightest X-ray source in NGC 300 discovered earlier with the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory. "We recorded periodic, extremely intense X-ray emission, a clue that a black hole might be lurking in the area," explains team member Stefania Carpano from ESA. Thanks to new observations performed with the FORS2 instrument mounted on ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have confirmed their earlier hunch. The new data show that the black hole and the Wolf-Rayet star dance

  20. Effects of cosmic acceleration on black hole thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    Direct local impacts of cosmic acceleration upon a black hole are matters of interest. Babichev et. al. had published before that the Friedmann equations which are prevailing the part of fluid filled up in the universe to lead (or to be very specific, `dominate') the other constituents of universe and are forcing the universe to undergo present-day accelerating phase (or to lead to violate the strong energy condition and latter the week energy condition), will themselves tell that the rate of change of mass of the central black hole due to such exotic fluid's accretion will essentially shrink the mass of the black hole. But this is a global impact indeed. The local changes in the space time geometry next to the black hole can be analysed from a modified metric governing the surrounding space time of a black hole. A charged deSitter black hole solution encircled by quintessence field is chosen for this purpose. Different thermodynamic parameters are analysed for different values of quintessence equation of state parameter, ω_q. Specific jumps in the nature of the thermodynamic space near to the quintessence or phantom barrier are noted and physically interpreted as far as possible. Nature of phase transitions and the situations at which these transitions are taking place are also explored. It is determined that before quintessence starts to work (ω_q=-0.33>-1/3) it was preferable to have a small unstable black hole followed by a large stable one. But in quintessence (-1/3>ω_q>-1), black holes are destined to be unstable large ones pre-quelled by stable/ unstable small/ intermediate mass black holes.

  1. Deformations of anti-de Sitter black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Stephane

    2006-11-01

    This PhD thesis mainly deals with deformations of locally anti-de Sitter black holes, focusing in particular on BTZ black holes. We first study the generic rotating and (extended) non-rotating BTZ black holes within a pseudo-Riemannian symmetric spaces framework, emphasize on the role played by solvable subgroups of SL(2,R) in the black hole structure and derive their global geometry in a group-theoretical way. We analyse how these observations are transposed in the case of higher-dimensional locally AdS black holes. We then show that there exists, in SL(2,R), a family of twisted conjugacy classes which give rise to winding symmetric WZW D1-branes in a BTZ black hole background. The term "deformation" is then considered in two distinct ways. On the one hand, we deform the algebra of functions on the branes in the sense of (strict) deformation quantization, giving rise to a "noncommutative black hole". In the same context, we investigate the question of invariant deformations of the hyperbolic plane and present explicit formulae. On the other hand, we explore the moduli space of the (orbifolded) SL(2,R) WZW model by studying its marginal deformations, yielding namely a new class of exact black string solutions in string theory. These deformations also allow us to relate the D1-branes in BTZ black holes to D0-branes in the 2D black hole. A fair proportion of this thesis consists of (hopefully) pedagogical short introductions to various subjects: deformation quantization, string theory, WZW models, symmetric spaces, symplectic and Poisson geometry.

  2. Strong correlation induced charge localization in antiferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Qi, Yang; Tian, Chushun; Weng, Zheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The fate of a hole injected in an antiferromagnet is an outstanding issue of strongly correlated physics. It provides important insights into doped Mott insulators closely related to high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we report a systematic numerical study of t-J ladder systems based on the density matrix renormalization group. It reveals a surprising result for the single hole's motion in an otherwise well-understood undoped system. Specifically, we find that the common belief of quasiparticle picture is invalidated by the self-localization of the doped hole. In contrast to Anderson localization caused by disorders, the charge localization discovered here is an entirely new phenomenon purely of strong correlation origin. It results from destructive quantum interference of novel signs picked up by the hole, and since the same effect is of a generic feature of doped Mott physics, our findings unveil a new paradigm which may go beyond the single hole doped system. PMID:24002668

  3. The Antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Because the effects are so serious, many investigators have been racing to determine the causes of the hole which develops each southern spring within the polar vortex, an isolated air mass that circulates around the South Pole during a large part of the year. This paper reviews two of the foremost theories for this ozone hole. Mechanisms of the pollution theory, which proposes that the cause is chlorofluorocarbons and nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere, are reviewed. The second theory proposes a natural shift in the air movements that transport ozone-rich air into the polar stratosphere during the southern spring as the cause. Current data suggest both theories are correct, but data are considered inconclusive.

  4. Rotating black hole and quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss spherically symmetric exact solutions of the Einstein equations for quintessential matter surrounding a black hole, which has an additional parameter (ω ) due to the quintessential matter, apart from the mass ( M). In turn, we employ the Newman-Janis complex transformation to this spherical quintessence black hole solution and present a rotating counterpart that is identified, for α =-e^2 ne 0 and ω =1/3, exactly as the Kerr-Newman black hole, and as the Kerr black hole when α =0. Interestingly, for a given value of parameter ω , there exists a critical rotation parameter (a=aE), which corresponds to an extremal black hole with degenerate horizons, while for ahole with Cauchy and event horizons, and no black hole for a>aE. We find that the extremal value a_E is also influenced by the parameter ω and so is the ergoregion.

  5. Prisons of light : black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Kitty

    What is a black hole? Could we survive a visit to one -- perhaps even venture inside? Have we yet discovered any real black holes? And what do black holes teach us about the mysteries of our Universe? These are just a few of the tantalizing questions examined in this tour-de-force, jargon-free review of one of the most fascinating topics in modern science. In search of the answers, we trace a star from its birth to its death throes, take a hypothetical journey to the border of a black hole and beyond, spend time with some of the world's leading theoretical physicists and astronomers, and take a whimsical look at some of the wild ideas black holes have inspired. Prisons of Light - Black Holes is comprehensive and detailed. Yet Kitty Ferguson's lightness of touch and down-to-earth analogies set this book apart from all others on black holes and make it a wonderfully stimulating and entertaining read.

  6. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Processes that may be responsible for the thinning in the ozone layer above the South Pole are described. The chlorine catalytic cycle which destroys ozone is described, as are the major types of reactions that are believed to interfere with this cycle by forming chlorine reservoirs. The suspected contributions of polar stratospheric clouds to these processes are examined. Finally, the possibility that the ozone hole may be due more to a shift in atmospheric dynamics than to chemical destruction is addressed.

  7. A Hole in Humphrey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a hole drilled by the rover in the rock dubbed 'Humphrey.' Spirit ground into the rock with the rock abrasion tool located on its robotic arm on the 60th martian day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are investigating the freshly exposed rock with the rover's suite of scientific instruments, also located on the rover's arm. Spirit is on its way to a large crater nicknamed 'Bonneville.'

  8. Enzymatic versus inorganic oxygen reduction catalysts: comparison of the energy levels in a free-energy scheme.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Christian H; Rossmeisl, Jan; Nørskov, Jens K

    2010-04-19

    In this paper, we present a method to directly compare the energy levels of intermediates in enzymatic and inorganic oxygen reduction catalysts. We initially describe how the energy levels of a Pt(111) catalyst, operating at pH = 0, are obtained. By a simple procedure, we then convert the energy levels of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) models obtained at physiological pH = 7 to the energy levels at pH = 0, which allows for comparison. Furthermore, we illustrate how different bias voltages will affect the free-energy landscapes of the catalysts. This allows us to determine the so-called theoretical overpotential of each system, which is shown to be significantly lower for the enzymatic catalysts compared to the inorganic Pt(111) catalyst. Finally, we construct theoretical polarization curves for the CcO models, in order to illustrate the effect of the low overpotentials on turnover rates per site. PMID:20380458

  9. SPECTRUM AND ENERGY LEVELS OF Pr{sup 3+} IN ThBr{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J. G.; Krupa, J. C.; Delamoye, P.; Genet, M.

    1980-06-01

    The strong features in the absorption spectrum and the laser excited fluorescence spectrum have been interpreted as arising from levels of Pr{sup 3+} in the D{sub 2d} symmetry site of ThBr{sub 4} . 43 energy levels have been fitted to the parameters with an RMS deviation of 61 cm{sup -1}. The values of the crystal field parameters are. B{sub 0}{sup 2} = 260.0 cm {sup -1}, B{sub 0}{sup 4} = - 644.2 cm{sup -1}, B{sub 4}{sup 4} = 929.2 cm{sup -1}, B{sub 0}{sup 6} = 1089.0 cm{sup -1} and B{sub 4}{sup 6} = 240.6 cm{sup -1}. The presence of other crystal symmetry sites is observed.

  10. Impurity effects on energy levels and far-infrared spectra of nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Pan; Jia-Lin, Zhu

    2003-11-01

    The effects of a positively charged impurity on the energy levels and far-infrared spectra of one and two electrons in semiconductor nanorings under magnetic fields are studied. The effects of the nanoring size and the impurity position are also discussed. It is shown that the electron-electron interaction and electron-impurity one in nanorings are strongly dependent on the nanoring size and the impurity position. Based on the studies of the impurity and field effects, the impurity-induced Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of the far-infrared spectra are found. The results predict a possibility of observing phenomena related to electron-impurity interaction in a nanoring in the future.

  11. Determination of energy level alignment at metal/molecule interfaces by in-device electrical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, M.; Pietrobon, L.; Atxabal, A.; Bedoya-Pinto, A.; Sun, X.; Golmar, F.; Llopis, R.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2014-06-01

    The energetics of metal/molecular semiconductor interfaces plays a fundamental role in organic electronics, determining the performance of very diverse devices. So far, information about the energy level alignment has been most commonly gained by spectroscopy techniques that typically require experimental conditions far from the real device operation. Here we demonstrate that a simple three-terminal device allows the acquisition of spectroscopic information about the metal/molecule energy alignment in real operative condition. As a proof of principle, we employ the proposed device to measure the energy barrier height between different clean metals and C60 molecules and we recover typical results from photoemission spectroscopy. The device is designed to inject a hot electron current directly into the molecular level devoted to charge transport, disentangling the contributions of both the interface and the bulk to the device total resistance, with important implications for spintronics and low-temperature physics.

  12. Wave energy level and geographic setting correlate with Florida beach water quality.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhixuan; Reniers, Ad; Haus, Brian K; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Kelly, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-15

    Many recreational beaches suffer from elevated levels of microorganisms, resulting in beach advisories and closures due to lack of compliance with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. We conducted the first statewide beach water quality assessment by analyzing decadal records of fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci and fecal coliform) levels at 262 Florida beaches. The objectives were to depict synoptic patterns of beach water quality exceedance along the entire Florida shoreline and to evaluate their relationships with wave condition and geographic location. Percent exceedances based on enterococci and fecal coliform were negatively correlated with both long-term mean wave energy and beach slope. Also, Gulf of Mexico beaches exceeded the thresholds significantly more than Atlantic Ocean ones, perhaps partially due to the lower wave energy. A possible linkage between wave energy level and water quality is beach sand, a pervasive nonpoint source that tends to harbor more bacteria in the low-wave-energy environment. PMID:26892203

  13. Charge separation at nanoscale interfaces: Energy-level alignment including two-quasiparticle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huashan; Lin, Zhibin; Lusk, Mark T. Wu, Zhigang

    2014-10-21

    The universal and fundamental criteria for charge separation at interfaces involving nanoscale materials are investigated. In addition to the single-quasiparticle excitation, all the two-quasiparticle effects including exciton binding, Coulomb stabilization, and exciton transfer are considered, which play critical roles on nanoscale interfaces for optoelectronic applications. We propose a scheme allowing adding these two-quasiparticle interactions on top of the single-quasiparticle energy level alignment for determining and illuminating charge separation at nanoscale interfaces. Employing the many-body perturbation theory based on Green's functions, we quantitatively demonstrate that neglecting or simplifying these crucial two-quasiparticle interactions using less accurate methods is likely to predict qualitatively incorrect charge separation behaviors at nanoscale interfaces where quantum confinement dominates.

  14. Accuracy of analytic energy level formulas applied to hadronic spectroscopy of heavy mesons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Forooz F.; Norbury, John W.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    Linear and harmonic potential models are used in the nonrelativistic Schroedinger equation to obtain article mass spectra for mesons as bound states of quarks. The main emphasis is on the linear potential where exact solutions of the S-state eigenvalues and eigenfunctions and the asymptotic solution for the higher order partial wave are obtained. A study of the accuracy of two analytical energy level formulas as applied to heavy mesons is also included. Cornwall's formula is found to be particularly accurate and useful as a predictor of heavy quarkonium states. Exact solution for all partial waves of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for a harmonic potential is also obtained and compared with the calculated discrete spectra of the linear potential. Detailed derivations of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the linear and harmonic potentials are presented in appendixes.

  15. Organic semiconductor density of states controls the energy level alignment at electrode interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Oehzelt, Martin; Koch, Norbert; Heimel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing charge carrier injection barriers and extraction losses at interfaces between organic semiconductors and metallic electrodes is critical for optimizing the performance of organic (opto-) electronic devices. Here, we implement a detailed electrostatic model, capable of reproducing the alignment between the electrode Fermi energy and the transport states in the organic semiconductor both qualitatively and quantitatively. Covering the full phenomenological range of interfacial energy level alignment regimes within a single, consistent framework and continuously connecting the limiting cases described by previously proposed models allows us to resolve conflicting views in the literature. Our results highlight the density of states in the organic semiconductor as a key factor. Its shape and, in particular, the energy distribution of electronic states tailing into the fundamental gap is found to determine both the minimum value of practically achievable injection barriers as well as their spatial profile, ranging from abrupt interface dipoles to extended band-bending regions. PMID:24938867

  16. Determination of energy level alignment at metal/molecule interfaces by in-device electrical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, M; Pietrobon, L; Atxabal, A; Bedoya-Pinto, A; Sun, X; Golmar, F; Llopis, R; Casanova, F; Hueso, L E

    2014-01-01

    The energetics of metal/molecular semiconductor interfaces plays a fundamental role in organic electronics, determining the performance of very diverse devices. So far, information about the energy level alignment has been most commonly gained by spectroscopy techniques that typically require experimental conditions far from the real device operation. Here we demonstrate that a simple three-terminal device allows the acquisition of spectroscopic information about the metal/molecule energy alignment in real operative condition. As a proof of principle, we employ the proposed device to measure the energy barrier height between different clean metals and C60 molecules and we recover typical results from photoemission spectroscopy. The device is designed to inject a hot electron current directly into the molecular level devoted to charge transport, disentangling the contributions of both the interface and the bulk to the device total resistance, with important implications for spintronics and low-temperature physics. PMID:24946715

  17. Energy levels and spectral lines in the X-ray spectra of highly charged W XLIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang-Huan; Kang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    The multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method is employed to calculate the fine-structure energy levels, wavelengths, transition probabilities, and oscillator strengths for electric dipole allowed (E1) and forbidden (M1, E2, M2) lines for the 4 s 24 p and 4 s4 p 2 configurations of W XLIV. The valence-valence and core-valence correlation effects are accounted for in a systematic way. Breit interactions and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects are estimated in subsequent relativistic configuration interaction (CI) calculations. The present results are in good agreement with other available theoretical and experimental values, and we predict new data for several levels where no other theoretical and/or experimental results are available, precise measurements are clearly needed here.

  18. Multiphoton transitions between energy levels in a current-biased Josephson tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Wallraff, A; Duty, T; Lukashenko, A; Ustinov, A V

    2003-01-24

    The escape of a current-biased Josephson tunnel junction from the zero-voltage state in the presence of weak microwave radiation is investigated experimentally at low temperatures. The measurements of the junction switching current distribution indicate the macroscopic quantum tunneling of the phase below a crossover temperature of T small star, filled approximately 280 mK. At temperatures below T small star, filled we observe both single-photon and multiphoton transitions between the junction energy levels by applying microwave radiation in the frequency range between 10 and 38 GHz to the junction. These observations reflect the anharmonicity of the junction potential containing only a small number of levels. PMID:12570519

  19. Spectrum and energy levels of the sodiumlike ion Sr/sup 27+/

    SciTech Connect

    Reader, J.

    1986-06-01

    The spectrum of Sr/sup 27+/ was observed with a laser-produced plasma and a 2.2-m grazing-incidence spectrograph in the region 12--160 A-circle. From the identification of 37 lines, a system of 27 energy levels of the type 2p-italic/sup 6/n-italicl-italic was determined. The level system includes the configurations n-italics-italic(n-italic = 3-5), n-italicp-italic(n-italic = 3-6), n-italicd-italic(n-italic = 3-7), n-italicf-italic(n-italic = 4-6), and 5g-italic. The ionization energy is determined as 11 188200 +- 1000 cm/sup -1/ (1387.16 +- 0.12 eV).

  20. Energy levels and radiative rates for Cr-like Cu VI and Zn VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Bogdanovich, P.; Keenan, F. P.; Kisielius, R.

    2016-09-01

    Energy levels and radiative rates (A-values) for transitions in Cr-like Cu VI and Zn VII are reported. These data are determined in the quasi-relativistic approach (QR), by employing a very large configuration interaction (CI) expansion which is highly important for these ions. No radiative rates are available in the literature to compare with our results, but our calculated energies are in close agreement with those compiled by NIST and other available theoretical data, for a majority of the levels. The A-values (and resultant lifetimes) are listed for all significantly contributing E1, E2 and M1 radiative transitions among the energetically lowest 322 levels of each ion.

  1. S-matrix Calculations of Energy Levels of the Lithium Isoelectronic Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2010-11-02

    A QED approach to the calculation of the spectra of the lithium isoelectronic sequence is implemented. A modified Furry representation based on the Kohn-Sham potential is used to evaluate all one- and two-photon diagrams with the exception of the two-loop Lamb shift. Three-photon diagrams are estimated with Hamiltonian methods. After incorporating recent calculations of the two-loop Lamb shift and recoil corrections a comprehensive tabulation of the 2s, 2p{sub 1/2} and 2p{sub 3/2} energy levels as well as the 2s - 2p{sub 1/2} and 2s - 2p{sub 3/2} transition energies for Z = 10 - 100 is presented.

  2. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in Cr-like Co IV and Ni V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Bogdanovich, P.; Karpuškienė, R.; Keenan, F. P.; Kisielius, R.; Stancalie, V.

    2016-01-01

    We report calculations of energy levels and radiative rates (A-values) for transitions in Cr-like Co IV and Ni V. The quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock (QRHF) code is adopted for calculating the data although GRASP (general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package) and flexible atomic code (FAC) have also been employed for comparison purposes. No radiative rates are available in the literature to compare with our results, but our calculated energies are in close agreement with those compiled by NIST for a majority of the levels. However, there are discrepancies for a few levels of up to 3%. The A-values are listed for all significantly contributing E1, E2 and M1 transitions, and the corresponding lifetimes reported, although unfortunately no previous theoretical or experimental results exist to compare with our data.

  3. Calculation of energy levels and transition amplitudes for barium and radium.

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Physics; Univ. of New South Wales

    2007-01-01

    The radium atom is a promising system for studying parity and time invariance violating weak interactions. However, available experimental spectroscopic data for radium are insufficient for designing an optimal experimental setup. We calculate the energy levels and transition amplitudes for radium states of significant interest. Forty states corresponding to all possible configurations consisting of the 7s, 7p and 6d single-electron states as well as the states of the 7s8s, 7s8p and 7s7d configurations have been calculated. The energies of ten of these states corresponding to the 6d{sup 2}, 7s8s, 7p{sup 2} and 6d7p configurations are not known from experiment. Calculations for barium are used to control the accuracy.

  4. Energy levels and radiative transition rates for Ge XXXI, As XXXII, and Se XXXIII

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Sunny Singh, J.; Jha, A.K.S.; Mohan, Man

    2014-07-15

    Fine-structure energies of the 67 levels belonging to the 1s{sup 2}, 1s 2l, 1s3l, 1s4l, 1s5l, and 1s6l configurations of Ge XXXI, As XXXII, and Se XXXIII have been calculated using the General-Purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package. In addition, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, transition wavelengths, and line strengths have been calculated for all electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic quadrupole transitions among these levels. Lifetimes are also presented for all excited levels of these three ions. We have compared our results with the results available in the literature and the accuracy of the data is assessed. We predict new energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities where no other theoretical or experimental results are available, which will form the basis for future experimental work.

  5. Accretion onto the first stellar mass black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom

    2009-08-05

    The first stars, forming at redshifts z > 15 in minihalos with M {approx} 10{sup 5-6} M{sub {circle_dot}} may leave behind remnant black holes, which could conceivably have been the 'seeds' for the supermassive black holes observed at z {approx}< 7. We study remnant black hole growth through accretion, including for the first time the radiation emitted due to accretion, with adaptive mesh refinement cosmological radiation-hydrodynamical simulations. The effects of photo-ionization and heating dramatically affect the large-scale inflow, resulting in negligible mass growth. We compare cases with accretion luminosity included and neglected to show that accretion radiation drastically changes the environment within 100 pc of the black hole, increasing gas temperatures by an order of magnitude. Gas densities are reduced and further star formation in the same minihalo is prevented for the two hundred million years we followed. Without radiative feedback included most seed black holes do not gain mass as efficiently as has been hoped for in previous theories, implying that black hole remnants of Pop III stars in minihalos are not likely to be miniquasars. Most importantly, however, our calculations demonstrate that if these black holes are indeed accreting close to the Bondi-Hoyle rate with ten percent radiative efficiency they have a dramatic local effect in regulating star formation in the first galaxies. This suggests a novel mechanism for massive black hole formation - stellar-mass black holes may have suppressed fragmentation and star formation after falling into halos with virial temperatures {approx} 10{sup 4} K, facilitating intermediate mass black hole formation at their centers.

  6. BLACK HOLE AURORA POWERED BY A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Masaaki; Takahashi, Rohta

    2010-05-15

    We present a model for high-energy emission sources generated by a standing magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) shock in a black hole magnetosphere. The black hole magnetosphere would be constructed around a black hole with an accretion disk, where a global magnetic field could be originated by currents in the accretion disk and its corona. Such a black hole magnetosphere may be considered as a model for the central engine of active galactic nuclei, some compact X-ray sources, and gamma-ray bursts. The energy sources of the emission from the magnetosphere are the gravitational and electromagnetic energies of magnetized accreting matters and the rotational energy of a rotating black hole. When the MHD shock generates in MHD accretion flows onto the black hole, the plasma's kinetic energy and the black hole's rotational energy can convert to radiative energy. In this Letter, we demonstrate the huge energy output at the shock front by showing negative energy postshock accreting MHD flows for a rapidly rotating black hole. This means that the extracted energy from the black hole can convert to the radiative energy at the MHD shock front. When an axisymmetric shock front is formed, we expect a ring-shaped region with very hot plasma near the black hole; this would look like an 'aurora'. The high-energy radiation generated from there would carry to us the information for the curved spacetime due to the strong gravity.

  7. Thermal corpuscular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto; Giugno, Andrea; Orlandi, Alessio

    2015-06-01

    We study the corpuscular model of an evaporating black hole consisting of a specific quantum state for a large number N of self-confined bosons. The single-particle spectrum contains a discrete ground state of energy m (corresponding to toy gravitons forming the black hole), and a gapless continuous spectrum (to accommodate for the Hawking radiation with energy ω >m ). Each constituent is in a superposition of the ground state and a Planckian distribution at the expected Hawking temperature in the continuum. We first find that, assuming the Hawking radiation is the leading effect of the internal scatterings, the corresponding N -particle state can be collectively described by a single-particle wave function given by a superposition of a total ground state with energy M =N m and a Planckian distribution for E >M at the same Hawking temperature. From this collective state, we compute the partition function and obtain an entropy which reproduces the usual area law with a logarithmic correction precisely related with the Hawking component. By means of the horizon wave function for the system, we finally show the backreaction of modes with ω >m reduces the Hawking flux. Both corrections, to the entropy and to the Hawking flux, suggest the evaporation properly stops for vanishing mass, if the black hole is in this particular quantum state.

  8. Perspectives: Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When asked to discuss Cyg XR-1, E. E. Salpeter once concluded, 'A black hole in Cyg X(R)-1 is the most conservative hypothesis.' Recent observations now make it likely that a black hole in Cyg XR-1 is the only hypothesis tenable. Chandrasekhar first showed that compact stars - those with the inward force of gravity on their outer layers balanced by the pressure generated by the Pauli exclusion principle acting on its electrons (in white dwarfs) or nucleons (in neutron stars) - have a maximum mass. Equilibrium is achieved at a minimum of the total energy of the star, which is the sum of the positive Fermi energy and the negative gravitational energy. The maximum mass attainable in equilibrium is found by setting E = 0: M(max) = 1.5 M(Sun). If the mass of the star is larger than this, then E can be decreased without bound by decreasing the star's radius and increasing its (negative) gravitational energy. No equilibrium value of the radius exist, and general relativity predicts that gravitational collapse to a point occurs. This point singularity is a black hole.

  9. Black hole jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contopoulos, I.

    2013-09-01

    We revisit the Blandford & Znajek (1977) process and solve the fundamental equation that governs the structure of the steady-state force-free magnetosphere around a Kerr black hole. The solution depends on the distributions of the magnetic field angular velocity and the poloidal electric current I. These are not arbitrary. They are determined self-consistently by requiring that magnetic field lines cross smoothly the two singular surfaces of the problem, the inner `light surface' located inside the ergosphere, and the outer `light surface' which is the generalization of the pulsar light cylinder. We obtain the rate of electromagnetic extraction of energy and confirm the results of Blanford & Znajek. Unless the black hole is surrounded by a thick disk and/or extended disk outflows, the asymptotic solution is very similar to the asymptotic pulsar magnetosphere which has no collimation and no significant plasma acceleration. We discuss the role of the surrounding disk and of pair production in the generation of black hole jets.

  10. Oxidative Chemical Vapor Deposition of Neutral Hole Transporting Polymer for Enhanced Solar Cell Efficiency and Lifetime.

    PubMed

    Jo, Won Jun; Nelson, Justin T; Chang, Sehoon; Bulović, Vladimir; Gradečak, Silvija; Strano, Michael S; Gleason, Karen K

    2016-08-01

    The concept of a neutral hole-transporting polymer is realized for the first time, by integrating patterned Cl(-) -doped poly(3,4-dimethoxythiophene) thin films into organic solar cells through a vacuum-based polymer vapor printing technique. Due to this novel polymer's neutrality, high transparency, good conductivity, and appropriate energy levels, the solar-cell efficiency and lifetime are significantly enhanced. PMID:27167214

  11. Energy levels and transition rates for helium-like ions with Z = 10-36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, R.; Guo, X. L.; Wang, K.; Li, S.; Yan, J.; Chen, C. Y.; Brage, T.; Zou, Y. M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: Helium-like ions provide an important X-ray spectral diagnostics in astrophysical and high-temperature fusion plasmas. An interpretation of the observed spectra provides information on temperature, density, and chemical compositions of the plasma. Such an analysis requires information for a wide range of atomic parameters, including energy levels and transition rates. Our aim is to provide a set of accurate energy levels and transition rates for helium-like ions with Z = 10-36. Methods: The second-order many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) was adopted in this paper. To support our MBPT results, we performed an independent calculation using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method. Results: We provide accurate energies for the lowest singly excited 70 levels among 1snl(n ≤ 6,l ≤ (n-1)) configurations and the lowest doubly excited 250 levels arising from the K-vacancy 2ln'l'(n' ≤ 6,l' ≤ (n'-1)) configurations of helium-like ions with Z = 10-36. Wavelengths, transition rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are calculated for the E1, M1, E2, and M2 transitions among these levels. The radiative lifetimes are reported for all the calculated levels. Conclusions: Our MBPT results for singly excited n ≤ 2 levels show excellent agreement with other elaborate calculations, while those for singly excited n ≥ 3 and doubly excited levels show significant improvements over previous theoretical results. Our results will be very helpful for astrophysical line identification and plasma diagnostics. Full Tables 1 and 2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A141

  12. First-Principles Approach to Energy Level Alignment at Aqueous Semiconductor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybertsen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a first principles method to calculate the energy level alignment between semiconductor band edges and reference energy levels at aqueous interfaces. This alignment is fundamental to understand the electrochemical characteristics of any semiconductor electrode in general and the potential for photocatalytic activity in particular. For example, in the search for new photo-catalytic materials, viable candidates must demonstrate both efficient absorption of the solar spectrum and an appropriate alignment of the band edge levels in the semiconductor to the redox levels for the target reactions. In our approach, the interface-specific contribution to the electrostatic step across the interface is evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics to sample the physical interface structure and the corresponding change in the electrostatic potential at the interface. The reference electronic levels in the semiconductor and in the water are calculated using the GW approach, which naturally corrects for errors inherent in the use of Kohn-Sham energy eigenvalues to approximate the electronic excitation energies in each material. Taken together, our calculations provide the alignment of the semiconductor valence band edge to the centroid of the highest occupied 1b1 level in water. The known relationship of the 1b1 level to the normal hydrogen electrode completes the connection to electrochemical levels. We discuss specific results for GaN, ZnO, and TiO2. The effect of interface structural motifs, such as different degrees of water dissociation, and of dynamical characteristics, will be presented together with available experimental data. Work supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  13. Energy levels, radiative rates, and lifetimes for transitions in W XL

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Kanti M. Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-11-15

    Energy levels and radiative rates are reported for transitions in Br-like tungsten, W XL, calculated with the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP). Configuration interaction (CI) has been included among 46 configurations (generating 4215 levels) over a wide energy range up to 213 Ryd. However, for conciseness results are only listed for the lowest 360 levels (with energies up to ∼43 Ryd), which mainly belong to the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 5},4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}4d,4s{sup 2}4p{sup 4}4f,4s4p{sup 6},4p{sup 6}4d,4s4p{sup 5}4d,4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3}4d{sup 2}, and 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3}4d4f configurations, and provided for four types of transitions, E1, E2, M1, and M2. Comparisons are made with existing (but limited) results. However, to fully assess the accuracy of our data, analogous calculations have been performed with the flexible atomic code, including an even larger CI than in GRASP. Our energy levels are estimated to be accurate to better than 0.02 Ryd, whereas results for radiative rates (and lifetimes) should be accurate to better than 20% for a majority of the strong transitions.

  14. Energy levels and transition rates for the boron isoelectronic sequence: Si X, Ti XVIII - Cu XXV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, P.; Ekman, J.; Gustafsson, S.; Hartman, H.; Karlsson, L. B.; du Rietz, R.; Gaigalas, G.; Godefroid, M. R.; Froese Fischer, C.

    2013-11-01

    Relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) calculations are performed for 291 states belonging to the configurations 1s22s22p, 1s22s2p2, 1s22p3, 1s22s23l, 1s22s2p3l, 1s22p23l, 1s22s24l', 1s22s2p4l', and 1s22p24l' (l = 0,1,2 and l' = 0,1,2,3) in boron-like ions Si X and Ti XVIII to Cu XXV. Electron correlation effects are represented in the wave functions by large configuration state function (CSF) expansions. States are transformed from jj-coupling to LS-coupling, and the LS-percentage compositions are used for labeling the levels. Radiative electric dipole transition rates are given for all ions, leading to massive data sets. Calculated energy levels are compared with other theoretical predictions and crosschecked against the Chianti database, NIST recommended values, and other observations. The accuracy of the calculations are high enough to facilitate the identification of observed spectral lines. Research supported in part by the Swedish Research council and the Swedish Institute. Part of this work was supported by the Communauté française of Belgium, the Belgian National Fund for Scientific Research (FRFC/IISN Convention) and by the IUAP-Belgian State Science Policy (BriX network P7/12).Tables of energy levels and transition rates (Tables 3-19) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/559/A100

  15. Reliable Energy Level Alignment at Physisorbed Molecule–Metal Interfaces from Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A key quantity for molecule–metal interfaces is the energy level alignment of molecular electronic states with the metallic Fermi level. We develop and apply an efficient theoretical method, based on density functional theory (DFT) that can yield quantitatively accurate energy level alignment information for physisorbed metal–molecule interfaces. The method builds on the “DFT+Σ” approach, grounded in many-body perturbation theory, which introduces an approximate electron self-energy that corrects the level alignment obtained from conventional DFT for missing exchange and correlation effects associated with the gas-phase molecule and substrate polarization. Here, we extend the DFT+Σ approach in two important ways: first, we employ optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functionals to compute the gas-phase term, rather than rely on GW or total energy differences as in prior work; second, we use a nonclassical DFT-determined image-charge plane of the metallic surface to compute the substrate polarization term, rather than the classical DFT-derived image plane used previously. We validate this new approach by a detailed comparison with experimental and theoretical reference data for several prototypical molecule–metal interfaces, where excellent agreement with experiment is achieved: benzene on graphite (0001), and 1,4-benzenediamine, Cu-phthalocyanine, and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride on Au(111). In particular, we show that the method correctly captures level alignment trends across chemical systems and that it retains its accuracy even for molecules for which conventional DFT suffers from severe self-interaction errors. PMID:25741626

  16. Black Hole Unitarity and Antipodal Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2016-05-01

    Hawking particles emitted by a black hole are usually found to have thermal spectra, if not exactly, then by a very good approximation. Here, we argue differently. It was discovered that spherical partial waves of in-going and out-going matter can be described by unitary evolution operators independently, which allows for studies of space-time properties that were not possible before. Unitarity dictates space-time, as seen by a distant observer, to be topologically non-trivial. Consequently, Hawking particles are only locally thermal, but globally not: we explain why Hawking particles emerging from one hemisphere of a black hole must be 100 % entangled with the Hawking particles emerging from the other hemisphere. This produces exclusively pure quantum states evolving in a unitary manner, and removes the interior region for the outside observer, while it still completely agrees locally with the laws of general relativity. Unitarity is a starting point; no other assumptions are made. Region I and the diametrically opposite region II of the Penrose diagram represent antipodal points in a PT or CPT relation, as was suggested before. On the horizon itself, antipodal points are identified. A candidate instanton is proposed to describe the formation and evaporation of virtual black holes of the type described here.

  17. Black Hole Unitarity and Antipodal Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2016-09-01

    Hawking particles emitted by a black hole are usually found to have thermal spectra, if not exactly, then by a very good approximation. Here, we argue differently. It was discovered that spherical partial waves of in-going and out-going matter can be described by unitary evolution operators independently, which allows for studies of space-time properties that were not possible before. Unitarity dictates space-time, as seen by a distant observer, to be topologically non-trivial. Consequently, Hawking particles are only locally thermal, but globally not: we explain why Hawking particles emerging from one hemisphere of a black hole must be 100 % entangled with the Hawking particles emerging from the other hemisphere. This produces exclusively pure quantum states evolving in a unitary manner, and removes the interior region for the outside observer, while it still completely agrees locally with the laws of general relativity. Unitarity is a starting point; no other assumptions are made. Region I and the diametrically opposite region II of the Penrose diagram represent antipodal points in a PT or CPT relation, as was suggested before. On the horizon itself, antipodal points are identified. A candidate instanton is proposed to describe the formation and evaporation of virtual black holes of the type described here.

  18. Optical probing of MgZnO/ZnO heterointerface confinement potential energy levels

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyev, V. V.; Van'kov, A. B.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Falson, J.; Kozuka, Y.; Zhang, D.; Smet, J. H.; Maryenko, D.; Tsukazaki, A.; Kawasaki, M.

    2015-02-23

    Low-temperature photoluminescence and reflectance measurements were employed to study the optical transitions present in two-dimensional electron systems confined at Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1–x}O/ZnO heterojunctions. Transitions involving A- and B-holes and electrons from the two lowest subbands formed within the confinement potential are detected. In the studied density range of 2.0–6.5 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}, the inter-subband splitting is measured and the first excited electron subband is shown to be empty of electrons.

  19. Band-Tail Transport of CuSCN: Origin of Hole Extraction Enhancement in Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minju; Park, Soohyung; Jeong, Junkyeong; Shin, Dongguen; Kim, Jimin; Ryu, Sae Hee; Kim, Keun Su; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    2016-07-21

    Copper thiocyanate (CuSCN) is known as a promising hole transport layer in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) due to its good hole conduction and exciton blocking abilities with high transparency. Despite its successful device applications, the origin of its hole extraction enhancement in OPVs has not yet been understood. Here, we investigated the electronic structure of CuSCN and the energy level alignment at the poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)/CuSCN/ITO interfaces using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The band-tail states of CuSCN close to the Fermi level (EF) were observed at 0.25 eV below the EF, leading to good hole transport. The CuSCN interlayer significantly reduces the hole transport barrier between ITO and P3HT due to its high work function and band-tail states. The barrier reduction leads to enhanced current density-voltage characteristics of hole-dominated devices. These results provide the origin of hole-extraction enhancement by CuSCN and insights for further application. PMID:27396718

  20. Semiclassical geons as solitonic black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.; Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D. E-mail: gonzalo.olmo@csic.es

    2013-07-01

    We find that the end state of black hole evaporation could be represented by non-singular and without event horizon stable solitonic remnants with masses of the order the Planck scale and up to ∼ 16 units of charge. Though these objects are locally indistinguishable from spherically symmetric, massive electric (or magnetic) charges, they turn out to be sourceless geons containing a wormhole generated by the electromagnetic field. Our results are obtained by interpreting semiclassical corrections to Einstein's theory in the first-order (Palatini) formalism, which yields second-order equations and avoids the instabilities of the usual (metric) formulation of quadratic gravity. We also discuss the potential relevance of these solutions for primordial black holes and the dark matter problem.

  1. Formation and evaporation of nonsingular black holes.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Sean A

    2006-01-27

    Regular (nonsingular) space-times are given that describe the formation of a (locally defined) black hole from an initial vacuum region, its quiescence as a static region, and its subsequent evaporation to a vacuum region. The static region is Bardeen-like, supported by finite density and pressures, vanishing rapidly at large radius and behaving as a cosmological constant at small radius. The dynamic regions are Vaidya-like, with ingoing radiation of positive-energy flux during collapse and negative-energy flux during evaporation, the latter balanced by outgoing radiation of positive-energy flux and a surface pressure at a pair creation surface. The black hole consists of a compact space-time region of trapped surfaces, with inner and outer boundaries that join circularly as a single smooth trapping horizon. PMID:16486679

  2. Black hole evaporation with separated fermions.

    PubMed

    Han, Tao; Kribs, Graham D; McElrath, Bob

    2003-01-24

    In models with a low quantum gravity scale, fast proton decay can be avoided by localizing quarks and leptons to separated positions in an extra 1/TeV sized dimension with gauge and Higgs fields living throughout. Black holes with masses of the order of the quantum gravity scale are therefore expected to evaporate nonuniversally, preferentially radiating directly into quarks or leptons but not both. Should black holes be copiously produced at a future hadron collider, we find the ratio of final state jets to charged leptons to photons is 113:8:1, which differs from previous analyses that assumed all standard model fields live at the same point in the extra dimensional space. PMID:12570482

  3. Probing the Galactic Binary Black Hole Spin with Photon Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2007-01-01

    It is generally considered that the X-ray emission in AGN and Galactic Black Hole Candidates is produced by flares above the surface of a geometrically thin optically thick accretion disk, which extends down to the Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) of the black hole. We consider the influence of the black hole geometry on the light curves of these flares. To this end we follow a large number of photon orbits emitted impulsively in a locally isotropic fashion, at any phase of the disk orbit and examine their arrival times at infinity by an observer near the plane of the disk. We find out that the presence of the black hole spin induces a certain delay in the photon arrivals, as prograde photon orbits reach the observer on shorter (on the average) times than the retrograde ones. We form a histogram of the differences in photon time arrivals and we find that it exhibits several well defined peaks depending on the flare position and the black hole spin separated by $\\Delta t \\simeq 30 M$, where M is the black hole mass. The peaks disappear as the spin parameter goes to zero, implying that one could in principle measure the value of the black hole spin with timing measurements of sufficiently high signal to noise ratio.

  4. Probing the Galactic Binary Black Hole Spin with Photon Timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2007-01-01

    It is generally considered that the X-ray emission in AGN and Galactic Black Hole Candidates is produced by flares above the surface of a geometrically thin optically thick accretion disk, which extends down to the Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) of the black hole. We consider the influence of the black hole geometry on the light curves of these flares. To this end we follow a large number of photon orbits emitted impulsively in a locally isotropic fashion, at any phase of the disk orbit and examine their arrival times at infinity by an observer near the plane of the disk. We find out that the presence of the black hole spin induces a certain delay in the photon arrivals, as prograde photon orbits reach the observer on shorter (on the average) times than the retrograde ones. We form a histogram of the differences in photon time arrivals and we find that it exhibits several well defined peaks depending on the flare position and the black hole spin separated by $\\Delta t\\slmeq 30 M$, where M is the black hole mass. The peaks disappear as the spin parameter goes to zero, implying that one could in principle measure the value of the black hole spin with timing measurements of sufficiently high signal to noise ratio.

  5. Acoustic black holes: recent developments in the theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Victor

    2014-08-01

    Acoustic black holes are relatively new physical objects that have been introduced and investigated mainly during the last decade. They can absorb almost 100% of the incident wave energy, and this makes them very attractive for such traditional engineering applications as vibration damping in different engineering structures and sound absorption in gases and liquids. They also could be useful for some ultrasonic devices using Lamb wave propagation to provide anechoic termination for such waves. So far, acoustic black holes have been investigated mainly for flexural waves in thin plates, for which the required gradual changes in local wave velocity with distance can be easily achieved by changing the plates' local thickness. The present paper provides a brief review of the theory of acoustic black holes, including their comparison with optic black holes introduced about five years ago. Review is also given of the recent experimental work carried out at Loughborough University on damping structural vibrations using the acoustic black hole effect. This is followed by the discussion on potential applications of the acoustic black hole effect for sound absorption in air. PMID:25073137

  6. Black Holes, Worm Holes, and Future Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    2000-01-01

    NASA has begun examining the technologies needed for an Interstellar Mission. In 1998, a NASA Interstellar Mission Workshop was held at the California Institute of Technology to examine the technologies required. Since then, a spectrum of research efforts to support such a mission has been underway, including many advanced and futuristic space propulsion concepts which are being explored. The study of black holes and wormholes may provide some of the breakthrough physics needed to travel to the stars. The first black hole, CYGXI, was discovered in 1972 in the constellation Cygnus X-1. In 1993, a black hole was found in the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. In 1994, the black hole GRO J1655-40 was discovered by the NASA Marshall Space Flight center using the Gamma Ray Observatory. Today, we believe we have found evidence to support the existence of 19 black holes, but our universe may contain several thousands. This paper discusses the dead star states - - both stable and unstable, white dwarfs, neutron stars, pulsars, quasars, the basic features and types of black holes: nonspinning, nonspinning with charge, spinning, and Hawking's mini black holes. The search for black holes, gravitational waves, and Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) are reviewed. Finally, concepts of black hole powered space vehicles and wormhole concepts for rapid interstellar travel are discussed in relation to the NASA Interstellar Mission.

  7. Alignment of energy levels at the Alq3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 interface for organic spintronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Y. Q.; Bergenti, I.; Hueso, L. E.; Dediu, V.; de Jong, M. P.; Li, Z. S.

    2007-07-01

    The electronic structure of the interface between tris(8-hydroxyquinolino)-aluminum (Alq3) and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) manganite was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. As demonstrated recently, this interface is characterized by efficient spin injection in organic spintronic devices. We detected a strong interface dipole of about 0.9eV that shifts down the whole energy diagram of the Alq3 with respect to the vacuum level. This modifies the height of the barrier for the injection into highest occupied molecular orbital level to 1.7eV , indicating more difficult hole injection at this interface than expected for the undistorted energy level diagram. We believe that the interface dipole is due to the intrinsic dipole moment of the Alq3 layer. The presented data lead to significant progress in understanding the electronic structure of LSMO/Alq3 interface and represent a step toward the description of spin transport in organic spin valves.

  8. Magnetic holes in the solar wind. [(interplanetary magnetic fields)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. M.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is presented of high resolution interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the magnetometer on Explorer 43 which showed that low magnetic field intensities in the solar wind at 1 AU occur as distinct depressions or 'holes'. These magnetic holes are new kinetic-scale phenomena, having a characteristic dimension on the order of 20,000 km. They occurred at a rate of 1.5/day in the 18-day time span (March 18 to April 6, 1971) that was analyzed. Most of the magnetic holes are characterized by both a depression in the absolute value of the magnetic field, and a change in the magnetic field direction; some of these are possibly the result of magnetic merging. However, in other cases the magnetic field direction does not change; such holes are not due to magnetic merging, but might be a diamagnetic effect due to localized plasma inhomogeneities.

  9. Deep bore hole instrumentation along San Francisco Bay Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bakun, W.; Bowman, J.; Clymer, R.; Foxall, W.; Hipley, P.; Hollfelder, J.; Hutchings, L.; Jarpe, S.; Kasameyer, P.; McEvilly, T.; Mualchin, L.; Palmer, M.

    1998-10-01

    The Bay Bridges down hole network consists of sensors in bore holes that are drilled 100 ft. into bedrock around and in the San Francisco Bay. Between 2 and 8 instruments have been spaced along the Dumbarton, San Mateo, Bay, and San Rafael bridges. The instruments will provide multiple use data that is important to geotechnical, structural engineering, and seismological studies. The holes are between 100 and 1000 ft deep and were drilled by Caltrans. There are twenty- one sensor packages at fifteen sites. Extensive financial support is being contributed by Caltrans, UCB, LBL, LLNL-LDRD, U.C. Campus/Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) program, and USGS. The down hole instrument package contains a three component HS-1 seismometer and three orthogonal Wilcox 73 1 accelerometers, and is capable of recording a micro g from local M = 1.0 earthquakes to 0.5 g strong ground motion form large Bay Area earthquakes.

  10. Phase transitions of black holes in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Sharmanthie

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have studied thermodynamics of a black hole in massive gravity in the canonical ensemble. The massive gravity theory in consideration here has a massive graviton due to Lorentz symmetry breaking. The black hole studied here has a scalar charge due to the massive graviton and is asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS). We have computed various thermodynamical quantities such as temperature, specific heat and free energy. Both the local and global stability of the black hole are studied by observing the behavior of the specific heat and the free energy. We have observed that there is a first-order phase transition between small (SBH) and large black hole (LBH) for a certain range of the scalar charge. This phase transition is similar to the liquid/gas phase transition at constant temperature for a van der Waals fluid. The coexistence curves for the SBH and LBH branches are also discussed in detail.

  11. Film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer with injection through holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, V. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the local film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer downstream of injection of air through discrete holes into a turbulent boundary layer of air on a flat plate is reported. Secondary air is injected through a single hole normal to the main flow and through both a single hole and a row of holes spaced at three diameter intervals with an injection angle of 35 deg to the main flow. Two values of the mainstream Reynolds number are used; the blowing rate is varied from 0.1 to 2.0. Photographs of a carbon dioxide-water fog injected into the main flow at an angle of 90 deg are also presented to show interaction between the jet and mainstream.

  12. Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filloux, Charline; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.; Durier, Fabrice; Silk, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    Cosmological simulations describing both the evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies were performed by using the tree PM-SPH code GADGET-2 (Springel 2005). Physical mechanisms affecting the dynamics and the physical conditions of the gas (ionization and cooling processes, local heating by stars, injection of mechanical energy by supernovae, chemical enrichment) were introduced in the present version of the code (Filloux 2009). Black holes in a state of accretion (AGNs) also inject mechanical energy in the surrounding medium, contributing for quenching the star formation activity. In all simulations a ΛCDM cosmology was adopted (h = 0.7, ΩΛ=0.7, Ωm=0.3, Ωb=0.046 and σ8=0.9). Simulations were performed in a volume with a side of 50h-1 Mpc, starting at z = 50 and through the present time (z = 0). For low and intermediate resolution runs, the initial gas mass particles are respectively 5.35× 108 M⊙ and 3.09×108 M⊙. Black holes (BHs) are represented by collisionless particles and seeds of 100 M⊙ were introduced in density peaks at z = 15, growing either by accretion or coalescence. The accretion rate from the “disk mode” is based on a turbulent viscous thin disk model whereas in the “spherical mode” the rate is given by the Bondi-Hoyle formula. When accreting matter, jets, modeled by conical regions perpendicular to the disk plane, inject kinetic energy into the surrounding medium. Two models were tested: in the first, the injected energy rate is about 10% of the gravitational energy rate released in the accretion process while in the second, the injected energy rate is based on the Blandford & Znajek (1977) mechanism. All simulations give, at z = 0, similar black hole mass function but they overestimate slightly the BH density for masses above ~ 108 M⊙. The resulting BH density in this mass range is affected by feedback processes since they control the amount of gas available for accretion. The present simulations are not

  13. Fuzzy spaces topology change as a possible solution to the black hole information loss paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. A. S.

    2009-06-01

    The black hole information loss paradox is one of the most intricate problems in modern theoretical physics. A proposal to solve this is one related with topology change. However it has found some obstacles related to unitarity and cluster decomposition (locality). In this Letter we argue that modelling the black hole's event horizon as a noncommutative manifold - the fuzzy sphere - we can solve the problems with topology change, getting a possible solution to the black hole information loss paradox.

  14. Energy levels, wavelengths, and transition rates of multipole transitions (E1, E2, M1, M2) in Au{sup 67+} and Au{sup 66+} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamasha, Safeia

    2013-11-15

    The fully relativistic configuration interaction method of the FAC code is used to calculate atomic data for multipole transitions in Mg-like Au (Au{sup 67+}) and Al-like Au (Au{sup 66+}) ions. Generated atomic data are important in the modeling of M-shell spectra for heavy Au ions and Au plasma diagnostics. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition rates are calculated for electric-dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) for transitions between excited and ground states 3l−nl{sup ′}, such that n=4,5,6,7. The local central potential is derived using the Dirac–Fock–Slater method. Correlation effects to all orders are considered by the configuration interaction expansion. All relativistic effects are included in the calculations. Calculated energy levels are compared against published values that were calculated using the multi-reference many body perturbation theory, which includes higher order QED effects. Favorable agreement was observed, with less than 0.15% difference.

  15. Stirring vortices with vorticity holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    A vorticity hole is a region with, in absolute value, significantly lower vorticity than its surroundings. Here we discuss the dynamics of a Rankine vortex with two equal circular holes. If a symmetric initial condition is assumed, the evolution depends on three parameters: the vorticity drop, the hole size and the distance between the holes. We computed the evolution with a contour-dynamics model and quantified the stirring of fluid particles using finite-time Lyapunov exponents and Melnikov's method. The vorticity holes evolve similarly to a pair of vortices in an otherwise quiescent fluid, although they are additionally affected by their interaction with the boundary of the Rankine vortex. The strongest stirring occurs when the holes interact elastically and then always in the center of the vortex. This result contradicts the generally accepted notion that vortices are regions of null to weak stirring.

  16. Black Holes in Higher Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Gary T.

    2012-04-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Black holes in four dimensions Gary Horowitz; Part II. Five Dimensional Kaluza-Klein Theory: 2. The Gregory-Laflamme instability Ruth Gregory; 3. Final state of Gregory-Laflamme instability Luis Lehner and Frans Pretorius; 4. General black holes in Kaluza-Klein theory Gary Horowitz and Toby Wiseman; Part III. Higher Dimensional Solutions: 5. Myers-Perry black holes Rob Myers; 6. Black rings Roberto Emparan and Harvey Reall; Part IV. General Properties: 7. Constraints on the topology of higher dimensional black holes Greg Galloway; 8. Blackfolds Roberto Emparan; 9. Algebraically special solutions in higher dimensions Harvey Reall; 10. Numerical construction of static and stationary black holes Toby Wiseman; Part V. Advanced Topics: 11. Black holes and branes in supergravity Don Marolf; 12. The gauge/gravity duality Juan Maldacena; 13. The fluid/gravity correspondence Veronika Hubeny, Mukund Rangamani and Shiraz Minwalla; 14. Horizons, holography and condensed matter Sean Hartnoll; Index.

  17. Thermal BEC Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto; Giugno, Andrea; Micu, Octavian; Orlandi, Alessio

    2015-10-01

    We review some features of BEC models of black holes obtained by means of the HWF formalism. We consider the KG equation for a toy graviton field coupled to a static matter current in spherical symmetry. The classical field reproduces the Newtonian potential generated by the matter source, while the corresponding quantum state is given by a coherent superposition of scalar modes with continuous occupation number. An attractive self-interaction is needed for bound states to form, so that (approximately) one mode is allowed, and the system of N bosons can be self-confined in a volume of the size of the Schwarzschild radius. The HWF is then used to show that the radius of such a system corresponds to a proper horizon. The uncertainty in the size of the horizon is related to the typical energy of Hawking modes: it decreases with the increasing of the black hole mass (larger number of gravitons), in agreement with semiclassical calculations and different from a single very massive particle. The spectrum contains a discrete ground state of energy $m$ (the bosons forming the black hole), and a continuous spectrum with energy $\\omega > m$ (representing the Hawking radiation and modelled with a Planckian distribution at the expected Hawking temperature). The $N$-particle state can be collectively described by a single-particle wave-function given by a superposition of a total ground state with energy $M = N m$ and a Planckian distribution for $E > M$ at the same Hawking temperature. The partition function is then found to yield the usual area law for the entropy, with a logarithmic correction related with the Hawking component. The backreaction of modes with $\\omega > m$ is also shown to reduce the Hawking flux and the evaporation properly stops for vanishing mass.

  18. Wavelengths, energy levels and hyperfine structure of Mn II and Sc II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Townley-Smith, Keeley I. M.; Hala, .

    2015-08-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Imperial College London (ICL) have measured atomic data of astronomical interest. Our spectrometers include Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at NIST and ICL covering the region 1350 Å to 5.5 μm and a 10.7-m grating spectrometer at NIST covering wavelengths from 300 - 5000 Å. Sources for these spectra include high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) lamps, Penning discharges, and sliding spark discharges. Recent work has focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants for iron-group elements. The analysis of FT spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn II is being led by ICL and is described in a companion poster [1]. Current work being led by NIST includes the analysis of HFS in Mn II, analysis of Mn II in the vacuum ultraviolet, and a comprehensive analysis of Sc II.Comprehensive HFS constants for Mn II are needed for the interpretation of stellar spectra and incorrect abundances may be obtained when HFS is omitted. Holt et al. [2] have measured HFS constants for 59 levels of Mn II using laser spectroscopy. We used FT spectra of Mn/Ni and Mn/Cu HCLs covering wavelength ranges from 1350 Å to 5.4 μm to confirm 26 of the A constants of Holt et al. and obtain values for roughly 40 additional levels. We aim to obtain HFS constants for the majority of lines showing significant HFS that are observed in chemically-peculiar stars.Spectra of Sc HCLs have been recorded from 1800 - 6700 Å using a vacuum ultraviolet FT spectrometer at NIST. Additional measurements to cover wavelengths above 6700 Å and below 1800 Å are in progress. The spectra are being analyzed by NIST and Alighar Muslim University, India in order to derive improved wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters.This work was partially supported by NASA, the STFC and PPARC (UK), the Royal Society of the UK

  19. Colored black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Bizon, P. )

    1990-06-11

    We analyze the static spherically symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills equations with SU(2) gauge group and show numerically that the equations possess asymptotically flat solutions with regular event horizon and nontrivial Yang-Mills (YM) connection. The solutions have zero global YM charges and asymptotically approximate the Schwarzschild solution with quantized values of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass. Our result questions the validity of the no-hair'' conjecture for YM black holes. This work complements the recent study of Bartnik and McKinnon on static spherically symmetric Einstein-Yang-Mills soliton solutions.

  20. Surfing a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    Star Orbiting Massive Milky Way Centre Approaches to within 17 Light-Hours [1] Summary An international team of astronomers [2], lead by researchers at the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) , has directly observed an otherwise normal star orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. Ten years of painstaking measurements have been crowned by a series of unique images obtained by the Adaptive Optics (AO) NAOS-CONICA (NACO) instrument [3] on the 8.2-m VLT YEPUN telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. It turns out that earlier this year the star approached the central Black Hole to within 17 light-hours - only three times the distance between the Sun and planet Pluto - while travelling at no less than 5000 km/sec . Previous measurements of the velocities of stars near the center of the Milky Way and variable X-ray emission from this area have provided the strongest evidence so far of the existence of a central Black Hole in our home galaxy and, implicitly, that the dark mass concentrations seen in many nuclei of other galaxies probably are also supermassive black holes. However, it has not yet been possible to exclude several alternative configurations. In a break-through paper appearing in the research journal Nature on October 17th, 2002, the present team reports their exciting results, including high-resolution images that allow tracing two-thirds of the orbit of a star designated "S2" . It is currently the closest observable star to the compact radio source and massive black hole candidate "SgrA*" ("Sagittarius A") at the very center of the Milky Way. The orbital period is just over 15 years. The new measurements exclude with high confidence that the central dark mass consists of a cluster of unusual stars or elementary particles, and leave little doubt of the presence of a supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy in which we live . PR Photo 23a/02 : NACO image of the central region of the Milky Way

  1. A Hole In Humphrey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Humphrey' and the hole drilled into the rock by the rover. Spirit ground into the rock with the rock abrasion tool located on its robotic arm on the 60th martian day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are investigating the freshly exposed rock with the scientific instruments on the arm. Spirit is about halfway to a large crater nicknamed 'Bonneville.' This image was made by combining data from the camera's different wavelength filters. The particular filters used were chosen to enhance features of scientific interest.

  2. Brane-world black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamblin, A.; Hawking, S. W.; Reall, H. S.

    2000-03-01

    Gravitational collapse of matter trapped on a brane will produce a black hole on the brane. We discuss such black holes in the models of Randall and Sundrum where our universe is viewed as a domain wall in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. We present evidence that a non-rotating uncharged black hole on the domain wall is described by a ``black cigar'' solution in five dimensions.

  3. Punching Holes in Thin Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Richard; Foster, Derrell; Miranda, Valentino

    1987-01-01

    Simple punching tool used to make holes in thin metal sheets, without burrs and edge deformations. Tool used on such materials as stainless steel, nickel alloys, beryllium, copper, and aluminum, in thicknesses of 0.002 to 0.010 in. With new punch, hole size held to tolerance of 0.025 mm. Includes rubber punch extruding into hole in top plate, pushing out exposed portion of clamped metal sheet.

  4. Menus for Feeding Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsis, Bence; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-09-01

    Black holes are the ultimate prisons of the Universe, regions of spacetime where the enormous gravity prohibits matter or even light to escape to infinity. Yet, matter falling toward the black holes may shine spectacularly, generating the strongest source of radiation. These sources provide us with astrophysical laboratories of extreme physical conditions that cannot be realized on Earth. This chapter offers a review of the basic menus for feeding matter onto black holes and discusses their observational implications.

  5. Acceleration of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Frederick, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Zhang slightly modified the standard big bang theory and developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain all observations of the universe. Previous studies accounted for the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This paper investigates acceleration of the black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the redshift and luminosity distance measurements of type Ia supernovae. The results indicate that the black hole universe accelerates its expansion when it accretes the ambient matter in an increasing rate. In other words, i.e., when the second-order derivative of the mass of the black hole universe with respect to the time is positive . For a constant deceleration parameter , we can perfectly explain the type Ia supernova measurements with the reduced chi-square to be very close to unity, χ red˜1.0012. The expansion and acceleration of black hole universe are driven by external energy.

  6. Black holes and the multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Vacuum bubbles may nucleate and expand during the inflationary epoch in the early universe. After inflation ends, the bubbles quickly dissipate their kinetic energy; they come to rest with respect to the Hubble flow and eventually form black holes. The fate of the bubble itself depends on the resulting black hole mass. If the mass is smaller than a certain critical value, the bubble collapses to a singularity. Otherwise, the bubble interior inflates, forming a baby universe, which is connected to the exterior FRW region by a wormhole. A similar black hole formation mechanism operates for spherical domain walls nucleating during inflation. As an illustrative example, we studied the black hole mass spectrum in the domain wall scenario, assuming that domain walls interact with matter only gravitationally. Our results indicate that, depending on the model parameters, black holes produced in this scenario can have significant astrophysical effects and can even serve as dark matter or as seeds for supermassive black holes. The mechanism of black hole formation described in this paper is very generic and has important implications for the global structure of the universe. Baby universes inside super-critical black holes inflate eternally and nucleate bubbles of all vacua allowed by the underlying particle physics. The resulting multiverse has a very non-trivial spacetime structure, with a multitude of eternally inflating regions connected by wormholes. If a black hole population with the predicted mass spectrum is discovered, it could be regarded as evidence for inflation and for the existence of a multiverse.

  7. Black holes as antimatter factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Dolgov, Alexander D.; Petrov, Alexey A.

    2009-09-01

    We consider accretion of matter onto a low mass black hole surrounded by ionized medium. We show that, because of the higher mobility of protons than electrons, the black hole would acquire positive electric charge. If the black hole's mass is about or below 1020 g, the electric field at the horizon can reach the critical value which leads to vacuum instability and electron-positron pair production by the Schwinger mechanism. Since the positrons are ejected by the emergent electric field, while electrons are back-captured, the black hole operates as an antimatter factory which effectively converts protons into positrons.

  8. How black holes saved relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda

    2016-02-01

    While there have been many popular-science books on the historical and scientific legacy of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, a gap exists in the literature for a definitive, accessible history of the theory's most famous offshoot: black holes. In Black Hole, the science writer Marcia Bartusiak aims for a discursive middle ground, writing solely about black holes at a level suitable for both high-school students and more mature readers while also giving some broader scientific context for black-hole research.

  9. Experimental Evidence of the Origin of Nanophase Separation in Low Hole-Doped Colossal Magnetoresistant Manganites.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gil, Raquel; Ruiz-González, M Luisa; González-Merchante, Daniel; Alonso, José M; Hernando, Antonio; Trasobares, Susana; Vallet-Regí, María; Rojo, Juan M; González-Calbet, José M

    2016-01-13

    While being key to understanding their intriguing physical properties, the origin of nanophase separation in manganites and other strongly correlated materials is still unclear. Here, experimental evidence is offered for the origin of the controverted phase separation mechanism in the representative La1-xCaxMnO3 system. For low hole densities, direct evidence of Mn(4+) holes localization around Ca(2+) ions is experimentally provided by means of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy. These localized holes give rise to the segregated nanoclusters, within which double exchange hopping between Mn(3+) and Mn(4+) remains restricted, accounting for the insulating character of perovskites with low hole density. This localization is explained in terms of a simple model in which Mn(4+) holes are bound to substitutional divalent Ca(2+) ions. PMID:26683223

  10. Spoof surface plasmon polaritons in terahertz transmission through subwavelength hole arrays analyzed by coupled oscillator model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shan; Lu, Xinchao; Xu, Ningning; Wang, Shuang; E., Yiwen; Pan, Xuecong; Xu, Xinlong; Liu, Hongyao; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Weili; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Both the localized resonance and excitation of spoof surface plasmon polaritons are observed in the terahertz transmission spectra of periodic subwavelength hole arrays. Analyzing with the coupled oscillator model, we find that the terahertz transmission is actually facilitated by three successive processes: the incident terahertz field first initiates the localized oscillation around each hole, and then the spoof surface plasmon polaritons are excited by the localized resonance, and finally the two resonances couple and contribute to the transmission. Tailoring the localized resonance by hole size, the coupling strength between spoof surface plasmon polaritons and localized resonances is quantitatively extracted. The hole size dependent transmittance and the coupling mechanism are further confirmed by fitting the measured spectra to a modified multi-order Fano model. PMID:26548493

  11. Energy levels, transition probabilities, and electron impact excitations for La XXX

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, J.Y. . E-mail: jyzhong@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2006-09-15

    energy levels, spontaneous radiative decay rates, and electron impact collision strengths are calculated for La XXX. The data refer to 107 fine-structure levels belonging to the configurations (1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6})3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 9}4l, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}3d{sup 10}4l, and 3s3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4l (l = s, p, d, f). The collision strengths are calculated with a 20-collision-energy grid in terms of the energy of the scattered electron between 10 and 10,000 eV by using the distorted-wave approximation. Effective collision strengths are obtained at seven electron temperatures: T {sub e} (eV) = 10, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 by integrating the collision strengths over a Maxwellian electron distribution. Coupled with these atomic data, a hydrodynamic code MED103 can be used to simulate the Ni-like La X-ray laser at 8.8 nm.

  12. Energy levels fitting and crystal-field calculations of Nd3+ doped in GYSGG crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinyun; Zhang, Qingli; Sun, Dunlu; Luo, Jianqiao; Liu, Wenpeng; Yin, Shaotang

    2012-10-01

    The single crystal Nd3+-doped in GdY2Sc2Ga3O12 (Nd3+:GYSGG) was grown by Czochralski method successfully, and its absorption spectra was analyzed in a wider spectral wavelength range at 7.6 K and 300 K, respectively. The free-ions and crystal-field parameters were fitted to the experimental energy levels at 7.6 K and 300 K with the root mean square deviation of 11.25 and 12.48 cm-1, respectively. According to the crystal-field calculations, 116 levels of Nd3+ at 7.6 K and 114 levels of Nd3+ at 300 K were assigned. The fitting results of free-ions and crystal-field parameters were compared with those already reported of Nd3+:GSGG and Nd3+:YSAG. The results indicated that the free-ions parameters are similar to those of the Nd3+ in GYSGG, GSGG and YSAG crystals, and the crystal-field interaction of GSGG and YSAG is stronger than that of GYSGG, which results in the dual-wavelength properties of Nd3+:GYSGG crystal.

  13. Hysteresis in Carbon Nanotube Transistors: Measurement and Analysis of Trap Density, Energy Level, and Spatial Distribution.

    PubMed

    Park, Rebecca Sejung; Shulaker, Max Marcel; Hills, Gage; Suriyasena Liyanage, Luckshitha; Lee, Seunghyun; Tang, Alvin; Mitra, Subhasish; Wong, H-S Philip

    2016-04-26

    We present a measurement technique, which we call the Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement, for characterizing hysteresis in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, and demonstrate its applicability for a broad range of 1D and 2D nanomaterials beyond carbon nanotubes. The Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement enables the quantification (density, energy level, and spatial distribution) of charged traps responsible for hysteresis. A physics-based model of the charge trapping process for a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor is presented and experimentally validated using the Pulsed Time-Domain Measurement. Leveraging this model, we discover a source of traps (surface traps) unique to devices with low-dimensional channels such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires (beyond interface traps which exist in today's silicon field-effect transistors). The different charge trapping mechanisms for interface traps and surface traps are studied based on their temperature dependencies. Through these advances, we are able to quantify the interface trap density for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (∼3 × 10(13) cm(-2) eV(-1) near midgap), and compare this against a range of previously studied dielectric/semiconductor interfaces. PMID:27002483

  14. Energy levels distribution in supersaturated silicon with titanium for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, E. Castán, H.; García, H.; Dueñas, S.; Bailón, L.; Montero, D.; García-Hernansanz, R.; García-Hemme, E.; González-Díaz, G.; Olea, J.

    2015-01-12

    In the attempt to form an intermediate band in the bandgap of silicon substrates to give it the capability to absorb infrared radiation, we studied the deep levels in supersaturated silicon with titanium. The technique used to characterize the energy levels was the thermal admittance spectroscopy. Our experimental results showed that in samples with titanium concentration just under Mott limit there was a relationship among the activation energy value and the capture cross section value. This relationship obeys to the well known Meyer-Neldel rule, which typically appears in processes involving multiple excitations, like carrier capture/emission in deep levels, and it is generally observed in disordered systems. The obtained characteristic Meyer-Neldel parameters were Tmn = 176 K and kTmn = 15 meV. The energy value could be associated to the typical energy of the phonons in the substrate. The almost perfect adjust of all experimental data to the same straight line provides further evidence of the validity of the Meyer Neldel rule, and may contribute to obtain a deeper insight on the ultimate meaning of this phenomenon.

  15. Intranasal Insulin Suppresses Food Intake via Enhancement of Brain Energy Levels in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Friedrich, Alexia; Rezmer, Magdalena; Melchert, Uwe H.; G. Scholand-Engler, Harald; Hallschmid, Manfred; Oltmanns, Kerstin M.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral insulin exerts anorexic effects in humans and animals. The underlying mechanisms, however, are not clear. Because insulin physiologically facilitates glucose uptake by most tissues of the body and thereby fosters intracellular energy supply, we hypothesized that intranasal insulin reduces food consumption via enhancement of the neuroenergetic level. In a double-blind, placebo–controlled, within-subject comparison, 15 healthy men (BMI 22.2 ± 0.37 kg/m2) aged 22–28 years were intranasally administered insulin (40 IU) or placebo after an overnight fast. Cerebral energy metabolism was assessed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At 100 min after spray administration, participants consumed ad libitum from a test buffet. Our data show that intranasal insulin increases brain energy (i.e., adenosine triphosphate and phosphocreatine levels). Cerebral energy content correlates inversely with subsequent calorie intake in the control condition. Moreover, the neuroenergetic rise upon insulin administration correlates with the consecutive reduction in free-choice calorie consumption. Brain energy levels may therefore constitute a predictive value for food intake. Given that the brain synchronizes food intake behavior in dependence of its current energetic status, a future challenge in obesity treatment may be to therapeutically influence cerebral energy homeostasis. Intranasal insulin, after optimizing its application schema, seems a promising option in this regard. PMID:22586589

  16. Electromagnetic Shifts of Energy Levels of a Hydrogen Atom in Idealized Cavities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzan, Dragisa

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Energy level shifts are evaluated for the 2p-2s transition for a hydrogen atom in various confining geometries with idealized perfectly conducting metallic boundaries in all cases. The minimal coupling Hamiltonian formalism is employed in the non-relativistic approximation in the Coulomb gauge to calculate the level shifts. Bethe's work for the Lamb shift in free space for the hydrogen atom is used as the model for working out the transverse level shifts in the various confining geometries. The Stark effect arising from the interaction of an atom with its image in the metal is used to evaluate the longitudinal level shift. The analysis is carried out by first quantizing the electro-magnetic field in a general cavity after a discussion is presented in the introduction of the relation of this work to that of other authors on related topics. The theory is then developed in detail in the various special confining geometries starting with case of the parallelopiped and its limiting cases of two plates and one plate respectively. The confining geometries of a finite and infinite cylinder are considered next followed by that of sphere. Detailed numerical results are presented in each of the various special cases with graphs and tables after extensive computation. The conclusions of the thesis are summarized separately.

  17. Black Hole Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian

    This chapter compares and contrasts winds and jets driven by the two distinct components of the black magnetosphere: the event horizon magnetosphere (the large scale magnetic field lines that thread the event horizon) and the ergospheric disk magnetosphere associated with poloidal magnetic flux threading plasma near the equatorial plane of the ergosphere. The power of jets from the two components as predicted from single-fluid, perfect MHD numerical simulations are compared. The decomposition of the magnetosphere into these two components depends on the distribution of large scale poloidal magnetic flux in the ergosphere. However, the final distribution of magnetic flux in a black hole magnetosphere depends on physics beyond these simple single-fluid treatments, non-ideal MHD (eg, the dynamics of magnetic field reconnection and radiation effects) and two-fluid effects (eg, ion coupled waves and instabilities in the inner accretion flow). In this chapter, it is emphasized that magnetic field line reconnection is the most important of these physical elements. Unfortunately, in single-fluid perfect MHD simulations, reconnection is a mathematical artifact of numerical diffusion and is not determined by physical processes. Consequently, considerable calculational progress is required before we can reliably assess the role of each of these components of black hole magnetospheres in astrophysical systems.

  18. The IUPAC Database of Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels and Transitions of Water Isotopologues from Experiment and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Császár, Attila G.; Furtenbacher, T.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Bernath, Peter F.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Daumont, Ludovic; Gamache, Robert R.; Hodges, Joseph T.; Naumenko, Olga V.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Zobov, Nikolai F.

    2014-06-01

    The results of an IUPAC Task Group formed in 2004 on "A Database of Water Transitions from Experiment and Theory" (Project No. 2004-035-1-100) are presented. Energy levels and recommended labels involving exact and approximate quantum numbers for the main isotopologues of water in the gas phase, H216O, H218O, H217O, HD16O, HD18O, HD17O, D216O, D218O, and D217O, are determined from measured transition wavenumbers. The transition wavenumbers and energy levels are validated using the MARVEL (measured active rotational-vibrational energy levels) approach and first-principles nuclear motion computations. The extensive data, e.g., more than 200,000 transitions have been handled for H216O, including lines and levels that are required for analysis and synthesis of spectra, thermochemical applications, the construction of theoretical models, and the removal of spectral contamination by ubiquitous water lines. These datasets can also be used to assess where measurements are lacking for each isotopologue and to provide accurate frequencies for many yet-to-be measured transitions. The lack of high-quality frequency calibration standards in the near infrared is identified as an issue that has hindered the determination of high-accuracy energy levels at higher frequencies. The generation of spectra using the MARVEL energy levels combined with transition intensities computed using high accuracy ab initio dipole moment surfaces are discussed.

  19. 30 CFR 57.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 57.7055 Section 57.7055... Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7055 Intersecting holes. Holes shall not be drilled where there is a danger of intersecting a misfired hole or a hole containing explosives, blasting...

  20. 30 CFR 56.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 56.7055 Section 56.7055... Piercing Drilling § 56.7055 Intersecting holes. Holes shall not be drilled where there is a danger of intersecting a misfired hole or a hole containing explosives blasting agents, or detonators....

  1. Unmanned Ground Vehicle Navigation and Coverage Hole Patching in Wireless Sensor Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guyu

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents a study of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) navigation and coverage hole patching in coordinate-free and localization-free Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). Navigation and coverage maintenance are related problems since coverage hole patching requires effective navigation in the sensor network environment. A…

  2. Particle-hole duality, integrability, and Russian doll BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, L. V.; Pogosov, W. V.

    2015-08-01

    We address a generalized Richardson model (Russian doll BCS model), which is characterized by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. This model is known to be exactly solvable and integrable. We point out that the Russian doll BCS model, on the level of Hamiltonian, is also particle-hole symmetric. This implies that the same state can be expressed both in the particle and hole representations with two different sets of Bethe roots. We then derive exact relations between Bethe roots in the two representations, which can hardly be obtained staying on the level of Bethe equations. In a quasi-classical limit, similar identities for usual Richardson model, known from literature, are recovered from our results. We also show that these relations for Richardson roots take a remarkably simple form at half-filling and for a symmetric with respect to the middle of the interaction band distribution of one-body energy levels, since, in this special case, the rapidities in the particle and hole representations up to the translation satisfy the same system of equations.

  3. The influence of triplet energy levels of bridging ligands on energy transfer processes in Ir(III)/Eu(III) dyads.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weili; Lou, Bin; Wang, Jianqiang; Lv, Hongbin; Bian, Zuqiang; Huang, Chunhui

    2011-11-21

    A series of N^N,O^O-bridging ligands based on substituted 1-(pyridin-2-yl)-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone and their corresponding heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes as well as Ir-Eu bimetallic complexes were synthesized and fully characterized. The influence of the triplet energy levels of the bridging ligands on the energy transfer (ET) process from the Ir(III) complexes to Eu(III) ions in solution was investigated at 77 K in Ir(III)/Eu(III) dyads. Photophysical experiment results show the bridging ligands play an important role in the ET process. Only when the triplet energy level of the bridging ligand was lower than the triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer ((3)MLCT) energy level of the Ir moiety, was pure emission from the Eu(III) ion observed, implying complete ET took place from the Ir moiety to the Eu(III) ion. PMID:21931913

  4. Charge-changing particle-hole excitation of 16N and 16F nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taqi Al-Bayati, Ali H.; Darwesh, Sarah S.

    2013-12-01

    The nuclear structure of 16N (closed shell + ν - π) and 16F (closed shell + π - ν) nuclei is studied using particle-hole proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff Approximation pn TDA and particle-hole proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation pn RPA. The particle-hole Hamiltonian of PSD model space is to be diagonalized in the presence of the PSDMWKPN interaction: for P-space the Cohen-Kurath interaction, for SD-space the Wildenthal Interaction, for the coupling matrix elements between P- and SD-spaces the Millener-Kurath interaction is used, spurious components were eliminated with CM contribution. The results containing energy level schemes and electromagnetic transition strength are compared with the available experimental data.

  5. Charge-changing particle-hole excitation of {sup 16}N and {sup 16}F nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Taqi Al-Bayati, Ali H.; Darwesh, Sarah S.

    2013-12-16

    The nuclear structure of {sup 16}N (closed shell + ν − π) and {sup 16}F (closed shell + π − ν) nuclei is studied using particle-hole proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff Approximation pn TDA and particle-hole proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation pn RPA. The particle-hole Hamiltonian of PSD model space is to be diagonalized in the presence of the PSDMWKPN interaction: for P-space the Cohen-Kurath interaction, for SD-space the Wildenthal Interaction, for the coupling matrix elements between P- and SD-spaces the Millener-Kurath interaction is used, spurious components were eliminated with CM contribution. The results containing energy level schemes and electromagnetic transition strength are compared with the available experimental data.

  6. Tool For Making Curved Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Robert; Calve, Andrew; Pastreck, Edwin; Padden, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Tool for use in electrical-discharge machining (EDM) guides EDM electrode in making curved holes. Guide rod fits in slot in arm, which moves through arc. Motion drives electrode into workpiece along desired curved path. Electrode burns into workpiece while arm rotates on spindle. Discharge cuts hole of same radius of curvature.

  7. Rovibrational energy levels of hydrogen peroxide, studied by MULTIMODE with a reaction path Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    Carter, S; Handy, N C

    2004-07-01

    Recently, Carter and Handy [J. Chem. Phys. 113 (2000) 987] have introduced the theory of the reaction path Hamiltonian (RPH) [J. Chem. Phys. 72 (1980) 99] into the variational scheme MULTIMODE, for the calculation of the J=0 vibrational levels of polyatomic molecules, which have a single large-amplitude motion. In this theory the reaction path coordinate s becomes the fourth dimension of the moment-of-inertia tensor, and must be treated separately from the remaining 3N-7 normal coordinates in the MULTIMODE program. In the modified program, complete integration is performed over s, and the M-mode MULTIMODE coupling approximation for the evaluation of the matrix elements applies only to the 3N-7 normal coordinates. In this paper the new algorithm is extended to the calculation of rotational-vibration energy levels (i.e. J>0) with the RPH, following from our analogous implementation for rigid molecules [Theoret. Chem. Acc. 100 (1998) 191]. The full theory is given, and all extra terms have been included to give the exact kinetic energy operator. In order to validate the new code, we report studies on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), where the reaction path is equivalent to torsional motion. H2O2 has previously been studied variationally using a valence coordinate Hamiltonian; complete agreement for calculated rovibrational levels is obtained between the previous results and those from the new code, using the identical potential surface. MULTIMODE is now able to calculate rovibrational levels for polyatomic molecules which have one large-amplitude motion. PMID:15248993

  8. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in Si II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, Francis P.

    2014-07-01

    Energies for the lowest 56 levels, belonging to the 3s2 3p, 3s 3p2, 3p3, 3s2 3d, 3s 3p 3d, 3s2 4ℓ and 3s2 5ℓ configurations of Si II, are calculated using the General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package (GRASP) code. Analogous calculations have also been performed (for up to 175 levels) using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Furthermore, radiative rates are calculated for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions. Extensive comparisons are made with available theoretical and experimental energy levels, and the accuracy of the present results is assessed to be better than 0.1 Ryd. Similarly, the accuracy for radiative rates (and subsequently lifetimes) is estimated to be better than 20 per cent for most of the (strong) transitions. Electron impact excitation collision strengths are also calculated, with the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC), over a wide energy range up to 13 Ryd. Finally, to determine effective collision strengths, resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. These collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution and results listed over a wide range of temperatures, up to 105.5 K. Our data are compared with earlier R-matrix calculations and differences noted, up to a factor of 2, for several transitions. Although scope remains for improvement, the accuracy for our results of collision strengths and effective collision strengths is assessed to be about 20 per cent for a majority of transitions.

  9. Energy transfer and energy level decay processes in Tm{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glass

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Laercio; Lousteau, Joris; Milanese, Daniel; Scarpignato, Gerardo C.; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2012-03-15

    The primary excited state decay and energy transfer processes in singly Tm{sup 3+}-doped TeO{sub 2}:ZnO:Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}:GeO{sub 2} (TZBG) glass relating to the {sup 3}F{sub 4}{yields}{sup 3}H{sub 6}{approx}1.85 {mu}m laser transition have been investigated in detail using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Selective laser excitation of the {sup 3}H{sub 4} manifold at 794 nm, the {sup 3}H{sub 5} manifold at 1220 nm, and {sup 3}F{sub 4} manifold at 1760 nm has established that the {sup 3}H{sub 5} manifold is entirely quenched by multiphonon relaxation in tellurite glass. The luminescence from the {sup 3}H{sub 4} manifold with an emission peak at 1465 nm suffers strong suppression due to cross relaxation that populates the {sup 3}F{sub 4} level with a near quadratic dependence on the Tm{sup 3+} concentration. The {sup 3}F{sub 4} lifetime becomes longer as the Tm{sup 3+} concentration increases due to energy migration and decreases to 2.92 ms when [Tm{sup 3+}] = 4 mol. % as a result of quasi-resonant energy transfer to free OH{sup -} radicals present in the glass at concentrations between 1 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and 2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. Judd-Ofelt theory in conjunction with absorption measurements were used to obtain the radiative lifetimes and branching ratios of the energy levels located below 25 000 cm{sup -1}. The spectroscopic parameters, the cross relaxation and Tm{sup 3+}({sup 3}F{sub 4}) {yields} OH{sup -} energy transfer rates were used in a numerical model for laser transitions emitting at 2335 nm and 1865 nm.

  10. Relativistic Electron Acceleration during High Intensity Auroral Activities: Maximum Energy Level Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajra, Rajkumar; Tsurutani, Bruce; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Radiation belt relativistic (E > 0.6, > 2.0, and > 4.0 MeV) electron acceleration at geosynchronous orbit is studied for solar cycle 23 (1995-2008). High-intensity, long-duration, continuous AE activity (HILDCAA) events are considered as the basis of the analyses. Cluster-4 passes were examined for electromagnetic chorus waves in the 5 < L < 10 and 0 < MLT < 12 region. All the HILDCAA events under study were found to be characterized by enhanced whistler-mode chorus waves and flux enhancements of magnetospheric relativistic electrons of all three energies compared to the pre-event flux levels. The response of the energetic electrons to HILDCAAs was found to vary with solar cycle phase. The initial electron fluxes were lower for events occurring during the ascending and solar maximum (AMAX) phases than for events occurring during the descending and solar minimum (DMIN) phases. The flux increases for the DMIN-phase events were > 50% larger than for the AMAX-phase events. It is concluded that electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies most often and most efficiently during the DMIN-phases of the solar cycle. We propose two possible solar UV-related mechanisms to explain this solar cycle effect. Enhanced E > 0.6 MeV electron fluxes at geosynchronous orbit were first detected ~1 day after the statistical onset of HILDCAAs, E > 2.0 MeV electrons after ~1.5 days, and E > 4.0 MeV electrons after ~2.5 days. We estimated acceleration and decay rates and timescales for the three energy levels, which will be provided for wave-particle investigators to attempt to match their models to empirically derived values.

  11. Optimal Monochromatic Energy Levels in Spectral CT Pulmonary Angiography for the Evaluation of Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huawei; Zhang, Qing; Hua, Jia; Hua, Xiaolan; Xu, Jianrong

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the optimal monochromatic spectral CT pulmonary angiography (sCTPA) levels to obtain the highest image quality and diagnostic confidence for pulmonary embolism detection. Methods The Institutional Review Board of the Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine approved this study, and written informed consent was obtained from all participating patients. Seventy-two patients with pulmonary embolism were scanned with spectral CT mode in the arterial phase. One hundred and one sets of virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images were generated ranging from 40 keV to 140 keV. Image noise, clot diameter and clot to artery contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from seven sets of VMS images at selected monochromatic levels in sCTPA were measured and compared. Subjective image quality and diagnostic confidence for these images were also assessed and compared. Data were analyzed by paired t test and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results The lowest noise and the highest image quality score for the VMS images were obtained at 65 keV. The VMS images at 65 keV also had the second highest CNR value behind that of 50 keV VMS images. There was no difference in the mean noise and CNR between the 65 keV and 70 keV VMS images. The apparent clot diameter correlated with the keV levels. Conclusions The optimal energy level for detecting pulmonary embolism using dual-energy spectral CT pulmonary angiography was 65–70 keV. Virtual monochromatic spectral images at approximately 65–70 keV yielded the lowest image noise, high CNR and highest diagnostic confidence for the detection of pulmonary embolism. PMID:23667583

  12. Energy level alignment in polymer organic solar cells at donor-acceptor planar junction formed by electrospray vacuum deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hong, Jong-Am; Kwon, Dae-Gyeon; Seo, Jaewon; Park, Yongsup

    2014-04-21

    Using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), we have measured the energy level offset at the planar interface between poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and C{sub 61}-butyric acid methylester (PCBM). Gradual deposition of PCBM onto spin-coated P3HT in high vacuum was made possible by using electrospray vacuum deposition (EVD). The UPS measurement of EVD-prepared planar interface resulted in the energy level offset of 0.91 eV between P3HT HOMO and PCBM LUMO, which is considered as the upper limit of V{sub oc} of the organic photovoltaic cells.

  13. Energy levels and zero field splitting parameter for Fe{sup 2+} doped in ZnS

    SciTech Connect

    Ivaşcu, Simona

    2013-11-13

    The aim of present paper is to report the results on the modeling of the crystal field parameters of Fe{sup 2+} doped in host matrix ZnS, simulate the energy levels scheme and calculate the zero field splitting parameter D of such system. The crystal field parameters were modeled in the frame of the superposition model of crystal field and the simulation of the energy levels scheme and calculation of the zero field splitting parameters done by diagonalization the Hamiltonian of Fe{sup 2+}:ZnS system. The obtained results were disscused and compared with experimental data. Satisfactory agreement have been obtained.

  14. Effect of residual gases in high vacuum on the energy-level alignment at noble metal/organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, M. G.; Wang, Z. B.; Lu, Z. H.

    2011-10-31

    The energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces has traditionally been studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). However, since most devices are fabricated in high vacuum (HV), these studies do not accurately reflect the interfaces in real devices. We demonstrate, using UPS measurements of samples prepared in HV and UHV and current-voltage measurements of devices prepared in HV, that the small amounts of residual gases that are adsorbed on the surface of clean Cu, Ag, and Au (i.e., the noble metals) in HV can significantly alter the energy-level alignment at metal/organic interfaces.

  15. Electron-phonon interaction effect on the energy levels and diamagnetic susceptibility of quantum wires: Parallelogram and triangle cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Khordad, R. Bahramiyan, H.

    2014-03-28

    In this paper, optical phonon modes are studied within the framework of dielectric continuum approach for parallelogram and triangular quantum wires, including the derivation of the electron-phonon interaction Hamiltonian and a discussion on the effects of this interaction on the electronic energy levels. The polaronic energy shift is calculated for both ground-state and excited-state electron energy levels by applying the perturbative approach. The effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the expectation value of r{sup 2} and diamagnetic susceptibility for both quantum wires are discussed.

  16. The energy-level crossing behavior and quantum Fisher information in a quantum well with spin-orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. H.; Zheng, Q.; Wang, Xiaoguang; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We study the energy-level crossing behavior in a two-dimensional quantum well with the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings (SOCs). By mapping the SOC Hamiltonian onto an anisotropic Rabi model, we obtain the approximate ground state and its quantum Fisher information (QFI) via performing a unitary transformation. We find that the energy-level crossing can occur in the quantum well system within the available parameters rather than in cavity and circuit quantum eletrodynamics systems. Furthermore, the influence of two kinds of SOCs on the QFI is investigated and an intuitive explanation from the viewpoint of the stationary perturbation theory is given. PMID:26931762

  17. A Critical Compilation of Energy Levels, Spectral Lines, and Transition Probabilities of Singly Ionized Silver, Ag II

    PubMed Central

    Kramida, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    All available experimental measurements of the spectrum of the Ag+ ion are critically reviewed. Systematic shifts are removed from the measured wavelengths. The compiled list of critically evaluated wavelengths is used to derive a comprehensive list of energy levels with well-defined uncertainties. Eigenvector compositions and level designations are found in two alternate coupling schemes. Some of the older work is found to be incorrect. A revised value of the ionization energy, 173283(7) cm−1, equivalent to 21.4844(8) eV, is derived from the new energy levels. A set of critically evaluated transition probabilities is given. PMID:26401429

  18. Black hole final state conspiracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2009-01-01

    The principle that unitarity must be preserved in all processes, no matter how exotic, has led to deep insights into boundary conditions in cosmology and black hole theory. In the case of black hole evaporation, Horowitz and Maldacena were led to propose that unitarity preservation can be understood in terms of a restriction imposed on the wave function at the singularity. Gottesman and Preskill showed that this natural idea only works if one postulates the presence of “conspiracies” between systems just inside the event horizon and states at much later times, near the singularity. We argue that some AdS black holes have unusual internal thermodynamics, and that this may permit the required “conspiracies” if real black holes are described by some kind of sum over all AdS black holes having the same entropy.

  19. Prisons of Light - Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Kitty

    1998-05-01

    In this jargon-free review of one of the most fascinating topics in modern science, acclaimed science writer Kitty Ferguson examines the discovery of black holes, their nature, and what they can teach us about the mysteries of the universe. In search of the answers, we trace a star from its birth to its death throes, take a hypothetical journey to the border of a black hole and beyond, spend time with some of the world's leading theoretical physicists and astronomers, and take a whimsical look at some of the wild ideas black holes have inspired. Prisons of Light--Black Holes is comprehensive and detailed. Yet Kitty Ferguson's lightness of touch and down-to-earth analogies set this book apart from all others on black holes and make it a wonderfully stimulating and entertaining read.

  20. When Charged Black Holes Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Most theoretical models assume that black holes arent charged. But a new study shows that mergers of charged black holes could explain a variety of astrophysical phenomena, from fast radio bursts to gamma-ray bursts.No HairThe black hole no hair theorem states that all black holes can be described by just three things: their mass, their spin, and their charge. Masses and spins have been observed and measured, but weve never measured the charge of a black hole and its widely believed that real black holes dont actually have any charge.That said, weve also never shown that black holes dont have charge, or set any upper limits on the charge that they might have. So lets suppose, for a moment, that its possible for a black hole to be charged. How might that affect what we know about the merger of two black holes? A recent theoretical study by Bing Zhang (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) examines this question.Intensity profile of a fast radio burst, a sudden burst of radio emission that lasts only a few milliseconds. [Swinburne Astronomy Productions]Driving TransientsZhangs work envisions a pair of black holes in a binary system. He argues that if just one of the black holes carries charge possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere then it may be possible for the system to produce an electromagnetic signal that could accompany gravitational waves, such as a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst!In Zhangs model, the inspiral of the two black holes generates a global magnetic dipole thats perpendicular to the plane of the binarys orbit. The magnetic flux increases rapidly as the separation between the black holes decreases, generating an increasingly powerful magnetic wind. This wind, in turn, can give rise to a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst, depending on the value of the black holes charge.Artists illustration of a short gamma-ray burst, thought to be caused by the merger of two compact objects. [ESO/A. Roquette]Zhang calculates lower limits on the charge

  1. Growing hair on black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, S. ); Preskill, J. ); Wilczek, F. )

    1991-10-07

    A black hole can carry quantum numbers that are {ital not} associated with massless gauge fields, contrary to the spirit of the no-hair'' theorems. In the Higgs phase of a gauge theory, electric charge on a black hole generates a nonzero electric field outside the event horizon. This field is nonperturbative in {h bar} and is exponentially screened far from the hole. It arises from the cloud of virtual cosmic strings that surround the black hole. In the confinement phase, a magnetic charge on a black hole generates a {ital classical} field that is screened at long range by nonperturbative effects. Despite the sharp difference in their formal descriptions, the electric and magnetic cases are closely similar physically.

  2. Black-Hole Feedback in Quasars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how black-hole feedback works in quasars. Dense gas and dust in the center simultaneously fuels the black hole and shrouds it from view. The black-hole wind propels large...

  3. Slicing black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Bittencourt, Eduardo; Geralico, Andrea; Jantzen, Robert T.

    2015-04-01

    A general framework is developed to investigate the properties of useful choices of stationary spacelike slicings of stationary spacetimes whose congruences of timelike orthogonal trajectories are interpreted as the world lines of an associated family of observers, the kinematical properties of which in turn may be used to geometrically characterize the original slicings. On the other hand, properties of the slicings themselves can directly characterize their utility motivated instead by other considerations like the initial value and evolution problems in the 3-plus-1 approach to general relativity. An attempt is made to categorize the various slicing conditions or "time gauges" used in the literature for the most familiar stationary spacetimes: black holes and their flat spacetime limit.

  4. Fear of holes.

    PubMed

    Cole, Geoff G; Wilkins, Arnold J

    2013-10-01

    Phobias are usually described as irrational and persistent fears of certain objects or situations, and causes of such fears are difficult to identify. We describe an unusual but common phobia (trypophobia), hitherto unreported in the scientific literature, in which sufferers are averse to images of holes. We performed a spectral analysis on a variety of images that induce trypophobia and found that the stimuli had a spectral composition typically associated with uncomfortable visual images, namely, high-contrast energy at midrange spatial frequencies. Critically, we found that a range of potentially dangerous animals also possess this spectral characteristic. We argue that although sufferers are not conscious of the association, the phobia arises in part because the inducing stimuli share basic visual characteristics with dangerous organisms, characteristics that are low level and easily computed, and therefore facilitate a rapid nonconscious response. PMID:23982244

  5. Digesting the doughnut hole.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Geoffrey F; Zissimopoulos, Julie; Goldman, Dana P

    2013-12-01

    Despite its success, Medicare Part D has been widely criticized for the gap in coverage, the so-called "doughnut hole". We compare the use of prescription drugs among beneficiaries subject to the coverage gap with usage among beneficiaries who are not exposed to it. We find that the coverage gap does, indeed, disrupt the use of prescription drugs among seniors with diabetes. But the declines in usage are modest and concentrated among higher cost, brand-name medications. Demand for high cost medications such as antipsychotics, antiasthmatics, and drugs of the central nervous system decline by 8-18% in the coverage gap, while use of lower cost medications with high generic penetration such as beta blockers, ACE inhibitors and antidepressants decline by 3-5% after reaching the gap. More importantly, lower adherence to medications is not associated with increases in medical service use. PMID:24308883

  6. Investigation on Machining Accuracy of Micro-Holes with Ultrasound Disturbed Electrolyte in Electrochemical Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Yuanzhe; Wang, Yesheng

    In the paper micro-holes are machined in electrochemical machining (ECM) with the passivating electrolyte disturbed by ultrasound. Based on the Faraday's law, theoretical model of the inter-electrode gap and the mechanism of ultrasonic effect are investigated. Moreover experiments on comparison of ECM micro-holes and ultrasonic assisted ECM micro-holes are carried out, and results show that the distribution of the inter-electrode gap and the localization of anodic dissolution are improved with the passivating electrolyte disturbed by ultrasound. Finally precision micro-holes have been obtained successfully.

  7. Microscopic black holes and cosmic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghigh, Ramin Ghasemzadeh

    In the first part of this thesis the relativistic viscous fluid equations describing the outflow of high temperature matter created via Hawking radiation from microscopic black holes are solved numerically for a realistic equation of state. We focus on black holes with initial temperatures greater than 100 GeV and lifetimes less than 6 days. The spectra of direct photons and photons from π0 decay are calculated for energies greater than 1 GeV. We calculate the diffuse gamma ray spectrum from black holes distributed in our galactic halo. However, the most promising route for their observation is to search for point sources emitting gamma rays of ever-increasing energy. We also calculate the spectra of all three flavors of neutrinos arising from direct emission from the fluid at the neutrino- sphere and from the decay of pions and muons from their decoupling at much larger radii and smaller temperatures for neutrino energies between 1 GeV and the Planck energy. The results for neutrino spectra may be applicable for the last few hours and minutes of the lifetime of a microscopic black hole. In the second part of this thesis the combined field equations of gravity and a scalar field are studied. When a potential for a scalar field has two local minima there arise spherical shell-type solutions of the classical field equations due to gravitational attraction. We establish such solutions numerically in a space which is asymptotically de Sitter. It generically arises when the energy scale characterizing the scalar field potential is much less than the Planck scale. It is shown that the mirror image of the shell appears in the other half of the Penrose diagram. The configuration is smooth everywhere with no physical singularity.* *This dissertation is a compound document (contains both a paper copy and a CD as part of the dissertation).

  8. Hole-states of 55Ni from (p,d) transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Betty; Sanetullaev, Alisher; Lynch, William; Lee, Jenny; Bazin, Daniel; Chan, K. P.; Coupland, Daniel; Henzl, Vlad; Henzlova, Daniela; Kilburn, Micha; Rogers, Andrew; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, Michael; Charity, Robert; Sobotka, Lee; Famiano, Michael; Hudan, Sylvie; Shapira, Daniel; Peters, W. A.; Barbieri, C.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Horoi, M.; Otsuka, T.; Suzuki, T.; Utsuno, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of 55Ni. Using the 1H(56Ni,d)55Ni transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f7/2, p3/2 and the s1/2 hole-states of 55Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. Most shell models describe the ground state and the first p3/2 excited state very well. However, most models have difficulties describing the deep hole state in the sd orbits. In this talk, we will compare the experimental energy levels and spectroscopic factors to state of the art shell model calculations. Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of 55Ni. Using the 1H(56Ni,d)55Ni transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f7/2, p3/2 and the s1/2 hole-states of 55Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. Most shell models describe the ground state and the first p3/2 excited state very well. However, most models have difficulties describing the deep hole state in the sd orbits. In this talk, we will compare the experimental energy levels and spectroscopic factors to state of the art shell model calculations. PHY-1102511.

  9. Interior dynamics of neutral and charged black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun-Qi; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we explore the interior dynamics of neutral and charged black holes. Scalar collapses in flat, Schwarzschild, and Reissner-Nordström background geometries are simulated. We examine the dynamics in the vicinities of the central singularity of a Schwarzschild black hole and of the inner horizon of a Reissner-Nordström black hole. In simulating scalar collapses in Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström geometries, Kruskal and Kruskal-like coordinates are used, respectively, with the presence of a scalar field being taken into account. It is found that, besides near the inner horizons of Reissner-Nordström and Kerr black holes, mass inflation also takes place near the central singularity in neutral scalar collapse. Approximate analytic expressions for different types of mass inflation are partially obtained via a close interplay between numerical and analytical approaches and an examination of the connections between Schwarzschild black holes, Reissner-Nordström black holes, neutral collapse, and charge scattering. We argue that the mass inflations near the central singularity and the inner horizon are related to the localness of the dynamics in strong gravity regions. This is in accord with the Belinskii, Khalatnikov, and Lifshitz conjecture.

  10. Investigation of hole injection enhancement by MoO{sub 3} buffer layer in organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Haitao, Xu; Xiang, Zhou

    2013-12-28

    An MoO{sub 3} buffer layer prepared by thermal evaporation as hole injection layer was investigated in organic light emitting diodes. The MoO{sub 3} film inserted between the anode and hole transport layer decreased the operating voltage and enhanced power efficiency. Introduction of 1 nm MoO{sub 3} film, which was found to be the optimum layer thickness, resulted in 45% increase in efficiency compared with traditional ITO anode. Results from atomic force microscopy and photoemission spectroscopy showed that smooth surface morphology and suitable energy level alignment of ITO/MoO{sub 3} interface facilitated hole injection and transport. The hole injection and transport mechanism at the ITO/MoO{sub 3} interface in thin and thick buffer layers were analyzed.

  11. Investigation of Spiral and Sweeping Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Philip; Ameri, Ali; Culley, Dennis; Raghu, Surya; Shyam, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Surface infrared thermography, hotwire anemometry, and thermocouple surveys were performed on two new film cooling hole geometries: spiral/rifled holes and fluidic sweeping holes. The spiral holes attempt to induce large-scale vorticity to the film cooling jet as it exits the hole to prevent the formation of the kidney shaped vortices commonly associated with film cooling jets. The fluidic sweeping hole uses a passive in-hole geometry to induce jet sweeping at frequencies that scale with blowing ratios. The spiral hole performance is compared to that of round holes with and without compound angles. The fluidic hole is of the diffusion class of holes and is therefore compared to a 777 hole and Square holes. A patent-pending spiral hole design showed the highest potential of the non-diffusion type hole configurations. Velocity contours and flow temperature were acquired at discreet cross-sections of the downstream flow field. The passive fluidic sweeping hole shows the most uniform cooling distribution but suffers from low span-averaged effectiveness levels due to enhanced mixing. The data was taken at a Reynolds number of 11,000 based on hole diameter and freestream velocity. Infrared thermography was taken for blowing rations of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 at a density ration of 1.05. The flow inside the fluidic sweeping hole was studied using 3D unsteady RANS.

  12. Dancing around the Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    , however, and will soon disrupt. At some moment, many of those young stars may get too close to the monster in the centre and suffer an unhappy fate... PR Photo 25a/01 : The active galaxy NGC 1097 (R-band image) PR Photo 25b/01 : The active galaxy NGC 1808 (H-band image) PR Photo 25c/01 : The active galaxy NGC 5728 (K-band image) PR Photo 25d/01 : Schematic drawing of the various structural components mentioned in the text. PR Photo 25e/01 : ISAAC spectrum (2.3 µm) of the central region of NGC 1808 PR Photo 25f/01 : Stellar motions at the centre of NGC 1808 Central black holes in galaxies ESO PR Photo 25a/01 ESO PR Photo 25a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 489 pix - 39k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 977 pix - 296k] ESO PR Photo 25b/01 ESO PR Photo 25b/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 499 pix - 40k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 997 pix - 168k] ESO PR Photo 25c/01 ESO PR Photo 25c/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 488 pix - 47k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 975 pix - 384k] Caption : Photos of three active galaxies that were observed with ISAAC during the present programme. They show NGC 1097 (R-band; Photo 25a/01) and the central areas of NGC 1808 (H-band; Photo 25b/01) and NGC 5728 (K-band; Photo 25c/01). The bar-like structures and the luminous centres where the Black Holes are located are well visible - they are discussed in the text. The distances to these galaxies are approximately 55, 35 and 120 million light-years, respectively; the local scales are indicated in the photos. Technical information about these photos is available below. Recent research with space- and ground-based astronomical telescopes indicate that there are very heavy Black Holes at the centres of most galaxies. There is also general agreement among scientists that many of the closest neighbours of our own Milky Way Galaxy, for example the large spiral Andromeda Galaxy and the peculiar Centaurus A galaxy (cf. ESO PR 04/01 ), do contain central black holes with masses from millions to billions of solar masses [2]. Black Holes have an

  13. Gate control of low-temperature spin dynamics in two-dimensional hole systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugler, M.; Andlauer, T.; Korn, T.; Wagner, A.; Fehringer, S.; Schulz, R.; Kubová, M.; Gerl, C.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.; Vogl, P.; Schüller, C.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated spin and carrier dynamics of resident holes in high-mobility two-dimensional hole systems in GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As single-quantum wells at temperatures down to 400 mK. Time-resolved Faraday and Kerr rotation as well as time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy are utilized in our study. We observe long-lived hole-spin dynamics that are strongly temperature dependent, indicating that in-plane localization is crucial for hole-spin coherence. By applying a gate voltage, we are able to tune the observed hole g factor by more than 50%. Calculations of the hole g tensor as a function of the applied bias show excellent agreement with our experimental findings.

  14. Analytical Calculation of Energy levels of mono- and bilayer Graphene Quantum Dots Used as Light Absorber in Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamandani, Shahryar; Darvish, Ghafar; Faez, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper by solving Dirac equation, we present an analytical solution to calculate energy levels and wave functions of mono- and bilayer graphene quantum dots. By supposing circular quantum dots, we solve Dirac equation and obtain energy levels and band gap with relations in a new closed and practical form. The energy levels are correlated with a radial quantum number and radius of quantum dots. In addition to monolayer quantum dots, AA- and AB-stacked bilayer quantum dots are investigated and their energy levels and band gap are calculated as well. Also, we analyze the influence of the quantum dots size on their energy spectrum. It can be observed that the band gap decreases as quantum dots' radius increases. On the other hand, increase in the band gap is more in AB-stacked bilayer quantum dots. Using the obtained relations, the band gap is obtained in each state. Comparing the energy spectra obtained from the tight-binding approximation with those of our obtained relations shows that the behavior of the energies as function of the dot size is qualitatively similar, but in some cases, quantitative differences can be seen. As quantum dots radius increases, the analytical results approach to the tight-binding method results.

  15. Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for sulfur-like iron, Fe XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Allam, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the 14 LS states belonging to configurations of sulfur-like iron, Fe XI, have been calculated. These states are represented by configuration interaction wavefunctions and have configurations 3s23p4, 3s3p5, 3s23p33d, 3s23p34s, 3s23p34p, and 3s23p34d, which give rise to 123 fine-structure energy levels. Extensive configuration interaction calculations using the CIV3 code have been performed. To assess the importance of relativistic effects, the intermediate coupling scheme by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian terms, such as the one-body mass correction and Darwin term, and spin-orbit, spin-other-orbit, and spin-spin corrections, are incorporated within the code. These incorporations adjusted the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to the available experimental data. Comparisons between the present calculated energy levels as well as oscillator strengths and both experimental and theoretical data have been performed. Our results show good agreement with earlier works, and they might be useful in thermonuclear fusion research and astrophysical applications.

  16. Response of chicks to two diets of differing energy levels under conditions of brooding with or without supplemental heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkoh, A.; Kese, A. G.

    1987-12-01

    A 2×2 factorial experiment was conducted to determine the performance and certain physiological parameters of 200 day-old chicks fed diets containing either 2600 or 3000 kcal metabolizable energy (ME) per kilogram for a period of 28 days under conditions of brooding with or without supplemental heat in a hot humid tropical area. The results indicated that within each dietary energy level, there was no significant difference in growth rates of chicks brooded with or without supplemental heat, however, the high energy diet significantly (P<0.01) promoted greater weight gains than the low energy diet. Brooding chicks with supplemental heat and with the high energy diet, decreased feed intake and improved feed conversion efficiency. Chicks brooded without supplemental heat consumed significantly (P<0.01) less water than those brooded with heat, irrespective of the dietary energy level. Mortality and blood glucose levels were not affected by the heat and dietary energy treatments. Thyroid weight expressed as percentage of body weight, haemoglobin and hematocrit values were significantly (P<0.01) higher for chicks brooded without supplemental heat. On the other hand, dietary energy levels did not exert any effect on these physiological parameters. No significant heat and dietary energy level interaction effects were noted on all the parameters considered under this trial.

  17. MVPACK: a package to calculate energy levels and magnetic properties of high nuclearity mixed valence clusters.

    PubMed

    Borrás-Almenar, J J; Cardona-Serra, S; Clemente-Juan, J M; Coronado, E; Palii, A V; Tsukerblat, B S

    2010-04-30

    We present a FORTRAN code based on a new powerful and efficient computational approach to solve the double exchange problem for high-nuclearity MV clusters containing arbitrary number of localized spins and itinerant electrons. We also report some examples in order to show the possibilities of the program. PMID:20044799

  18. Acceleration of Black Hole Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2012-05-01

    An alternative cosmological model called black hole universe has been recently proposed by the author. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole to the present state by accreting ambient materials and merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with an infinite number of layers hierarchically. The innermost three layers are the universe that we live, the outside space called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer has an infinite radius and limits to zero for both the mass density and absolute temperature. All layers or universes are governed by the same physics, the Einstein general theory of relativity with the Robertson-Walker metric of space-time, and tend to expand outward physically. The evolution of the space structure is iterative. When one universe expands out, a new similar universe grows up from its inside. In this study. we will analyze the acceleration of black hole universe that accretes its ambient matter in an increasing rate. We will also compare the result obtained from the black hole universe model with the measurement of type Ia supernova and the result from the big bang cosmology.

  19. A nonsingular rotating black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2015-11-01

    The spacetime singularities in classical general relativity are inevitable, as predicated by the celebrated singularity theorems. However, it is a general belief that singularities do not exist in Nature and that they are the limitations of the general relativity. In the absence of a well-defined quantum gravity, models of regular black holes have been studied. We employ a probability distribution inspired mass function m( r) to replace the Kerr black hole mass M to represent a nonsingular rotating black hole that is identified asymptotically (r ≫ k, k>0 constant) exactly as the Kerr-Newman black hole, and as the Kerr black hole when k=0. The radiating counterpart renders a nonsingular generalization of Carmeli's spacetime as well as Vaidya's spacetime, in the appropriate limits. The exponential correction factor changing the geometry of the classical black hole to remove the curvature singularity can also be motivated by quantum arguments. The regular rotating spacetime can also be understood as a black hole of general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics.

  20. Black Hole Grabs Starry Snack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This artist's concept shows a supermassive black hole at the center of a remote galaxy digesting the remnants of a star. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer had a 'ringside' seat for this feeding frenzy, using its ultraviolet eyes to study the process from beginning to end.

    The artist's concept chronicles the star being ripped apart and swallowed by the cosmic beast over time. First, the intact sun-like star (left) ventures too close to the black hole, and its own self-gravity is overwhelmed by the black hole's gravity. The star then stretches apart (middle yellow blob) and eventually breaks into stellar crumbs, some of which swirl into the black hole (cloudy ring at right). This doomed material heats up and radiates light, including ultraviolet light, before disappearing forever into the black hole. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer was able to watch this process unfold by observing changes in ultraviolet light.

    The area around the black hole appears warped because the gravity of the black hole acts like a lens, twisting and distorting light.

  1. More Hidden Black Hole Dangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Black holes such as GRO J1655-40 form from collapsed stars. When stars at least eight times more massive than our Sun exhaust their fuel supply, they no longer have the energy to support their tremendous bulk. These stars explode as supernovae, blasting their outer envelopes into space. If the core is more than three times the mass of the Sun, it will collapse into a singularity, a single point of infinite density.Although light cannot escape black holes, astronomers can see black holes by virtue of the hot, glowing gas often stolen from a neighboring star that orbits these objects. From our vantage point, the light seems to flicker. The Rossi Explorer has recorded this flickering (called quasiperiodic oscillations, or QPOs) around many black holes. QPOs are produced by gas very near the innermost stable orbit the closest orbit a blob of gas can maintain before falling pell-mell into the black hole. As gas whips around the black hole at near light speed, gravity pulls the gas in one direction, then another, adding to the flickering. The QPO is related to the speed and size of this orbit and the mass of the black hole.

  2. Supermassive black holes do not correlate with galaxy disks or pseudobulges.

    PubMed

    Kormendy, John; Bender, R; Cornell, M E

    2011-01-20

    The masses of supermassive black holes are known to correlate with the properties of the bulge components of their host galaxies. In contrast, they seem not to correlate with galaxy disks. Disk-grown 'pseudobulges' are intermediate in properties between bulges and disks; it has been unclear whether they do or do not correlate with black holes in the same way that bulges do. At stake in this issue are conclusions about which parts of galaxies coevolve with black holes, possibly by being regulated by energy feedback from black holes. Here we report pseudobulge classifications for galaxies with dynamically detected black holes and combine them with recent measurements of velocity dispersions in the biggest bulgeless galaxies. These data confirm that black holes do not correlate with disks and show that they correlate little or not at all with pseudobulges. We suggest that there are two different modes of black-hole feeding. Black holes in bulges grow rapidly to high masses when mergers drive gas infall that feeds quasar-like events. In contrast, small black holes in bulgeless galaxies and in galaxies with pseudobulges grow as low-level Seyfert galaxies. Growth of the former is driven by global processes, so the biggest black holes coevolve with bulges, but growth of the latter is driven locally and stochastically, and they do not coevolve with disks and pseudobulges. PMID:21248845

  3. Discrete-hole film cooling characteristics over concave and convex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Shao-Yen; Yao, Yong-Qing; Xia, Bin; Tsou, Fu-Kang

    The local film-cooling effectiveness and local pressure distribution for single-row discrete holes were measured over the whole areas of concave and convex surfaces, using a plexiglass test section with curvature radii of 140 mm and 70 mm for the concave and the convex surfaces and film-cooling holes (34 on the convex surface and 22 on the concave surface) 8 mm in diameter. The results indicate that the concave surface has the widest film-cooling coverage area in the z-direction (perpendicular to the x-flow direction), while the highest film-cooling effectiveness of the convex surface is near the ejection hole. High blowing ratios at holes have an adverse effect on film cooling. The weakest cooling region is near the center line between holes; such a poorly cooled region is larger on convex surfaces than on the concave ones. Optimal design characteristics for turbine blades surfaces are discussed.

  4. Measurement of heavy-hole spin dephasing in (InGa)As quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahbashi, R.; Hübner, J.; Berski, F.; Wiegand, J.; Marie, X.; Pierz, K.; Schumacher, H. W.; Oestreich, M.

    2012-01-01

    We measure the spin dephasing of holes localized in self-assembled (InGa)As quantum dots by spin noise spectroscopy. The localized holes show a distinct hyperfine interaction with the nuclear spin bath despite the p-type symmetry of the valence band states. The experiments reveal a short spin relaxation time τfasthh of 27 ns and a second, long spin relaxation time τslowhh which exceeds the latter by more than one order of magnitude. The two times are attributed to heavy-hole spins aligned perpendicular and parallel to the stochastic nuclear magnetic field. Intensity dependent measurements and numerical simulations reveal that the long relaxation time is still obscured by light absorption, despite low laser intensity and large detuning. Off-resonant light absorption causes a suppression of the spin noise signal due to the creation of a second hole entailing a vanishing hole spin polarization.

  5. Black Holes and Quasiblack Holes in Einstein-Maxwell Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinel, Reinhard; Breithaupt, Martin; Liu, Yu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Continuous sequences of asymptotically flat solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell equations describing regular equilibrium configurations of ordinary matter can reach a black hole limit. For a distant observer, the spacetime becomes more and more indistinguishable from the metric of an extreme Kerr-Newman black hole outside the horizon when approaching the limit. From an internal perspective, a still regular but non-asymptotically flat spacetime with the extreme Kerr-Newman near-horizon geometry at spatial infinity forms at the limit. Interesting special cases are sequences of Papapetrou-Majumdar distributions of electrically counterpoised dust leading to extreme Reissner-Nordström black holes and sequences of rotating uncharged fluid bodies leading to extreme Kerr black holes.

  6. Simultaneous integrated boost to intraprostatic lesions using different energy levels of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sonmez, S; Erbay, G; Guler, O C; Arslan, G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the dosimetry of volumetric-arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a dynamic multileaf collimator using the Monte Carlo algorithm in the treatment of prostate cancer with and without simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) at different energy levels. Methods: The data of 15 biopsy-proven prostate cancer patients were evaluated. The prescribed dose was 78 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV78) including the prostate and seminal vesicles and 86 Gy (PTV86) in 39 fractions to the intraprostatic lesion, which was delineated by MRI or MR-spectroscopy. Results: PTV dose homogeneity was better for IMRT than VMAT at all energy levels for both PTV78 and PTV86. Lower rectum doses (V30–V50) were significantly higher with SIB compared with PTV78 plans in both IMRT and VMAT plans at all energy levels. The bladder doses at high dose level (V60–V80) were significantly higher in IMRT plans with SIB at all energy levels compared with PTV78 plans, but no significant difference was observed in VMAT plans. VMAT plans resulted in a significant decrease in the mean monitor units (MUs) for 6, 10, and 15 MV energy levels both in plans with and those without SIB. Conclusion: Dose escalation to intraprostatic lesions with 86 Gy is safe without causing serious increase in organs at risk (OARs) doses. VMAT is advantageous in sparing OARs and requiring less MU than IMRT. Advances in knowledge: VMAT with SIB to intraprostatic lesion is a feasible method in treating prostate cancer. Additionally, no dosimetric advantage of higher energy is observed. PMID:24319009

  7. Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for sulfur-like iron, Fe XI

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Allam, S.H.

    2014-05-15

    Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the 14 LS states belonging to configurations of sulfur-like iron, Fe XI, have been calculated. These states are represented by configuration interaction wavefunctions and have configurations 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}, 3s3p{sup 5}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4s, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4p, and 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4d, which give rise to 123 fine-structure energy levels. Extensive configuration interaction calculations using the CIV3 code have been performed. To assess the importance of relativistic effects, the intermediate coupling scheme by means of the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian terms, such as the one-body mass correction and Darwin term, and spin–orbit, spin–other-orbit, and spin–spin corrections, are incorporated within the code. These incorporations adjusted the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to the available experimental data. Comparisons between the present calculated energy levels as well as oscillator strengths and both experimental and theoretical data have been performed. Our results show good agreement with earlier works, and they might be useful in thermonuclear fusion research and astrophysical applications. -- Highlights: •Accurate atomic data of iron ions are needed for identification of solar corona. •Extensive configuration interaction wavefunctions including 123 fine-structure levels have been calculated. •The relativistic effects by means of the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian terms are incorporated. •This incorporation adjusts the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to experimental values.

  8. Thermodynamics of Lifshitz black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devecioǧlu, Deniz Olgu; Sarıoǧlu, Özgür

    2011-06-01

    We apply the recently extended conserved Killing charge definition of Abbott-Deser-Tekin formalism to compute, for the first time, the energies of analytic Lifshitz black holes in higher dimensions. We then calculate the temperature and the entropy of this large family of solutions, and study and discuss the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Along the way we also identify the possible critical points of the relevant quadratic curvature gravity theories. Separately, we also apply the generalized Killing charge definition to compute the energy and the angular momentum of the warped AdS3 black hole solution of the three-dimensional new massive gravity theory.

  9. Black Holes: A Traveler's Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1998-03-01

    BLACK HOLES A TRAVELER'S GUIDE Clifford Pickover's inventive and entertaining excursion beyond the curves of space and time. "I've enjoyed Clifford Pickover's earlier books . . . now he has ventured into the exploration of black holes. All would-be tourists are strongly advised to read his traveler's guide." -Arthur C. Clarke. "Many books have been written about black holes, but none surpass this one in arousing emotions of awe and wonder towards the mysterious structure of the universe." -Martin Gardner. "Bucky Fuller thought big. Arthur C. Clarke thinks big, but Cliff Pickover outdoes them both." -Wired. "The book is fun, zany, in-your-face, and refreshingly addictive." -Times Higher Education Supplement.

  10. Quantum mechanics of black holes.

    PubMed

    Witten, Edward

    2012-08-01

    The popular conception of black holes reflects the behavior of the massive black holes found by astronomers and described by classical general relativity. These objects swallow up whatever comes near and emit nothing. Physicists who have tried to understand the behavior of black holes from a quantum mechanical point of view, however, have arrived at quite a different picture. The difference is analogous to the difference between thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. The thermodynamic description is a good approximation for a macroscopic system, but statistical mechanics describes what one will see if one looks more closely. PMID:22859480

  11. Gravitational polarizability of black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Lecian, Orchidea Maria

    2009-08-15

    The gravitational polarizability properties of black holes are compared and contrasted with their electromagnetic polarizability properties. The 'shape' or 'height' multipolar Love numbers h{sub l} of a black hole are defined and computed. They are then compared to their electromagnetic analogs h{sub l}{sup EM}. The Love numbers h{sub l} give the height of the lth multipolar 'tidal bulge' raised on the horizon of a black hole by faraway masses. We also discuss the shape of the tidal bulge raised by a test-mass m, in the limit where m gets very close to the horizon.

  12. Dynamics of Charged Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilhão, Miguel; Cardoso, Vitor; Herdeiro, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We report on numerical simulations of charged-black-hole collisions.We focus on head-on collisions of non-spinning black holes, starting from rest and with the same charge to mass ratio. The addition of charge to black holes introduces a new interesting channel of radiation and dynamics. The amount of gravitational-wave energy generated throughout the collision decreases by about three orders of magnitude as the charge-to-mass ratio is increased from 0 to 0.98. This is a consequence of the smaller accelerations present for larger values of the charge.

  13. Evaporation of primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    The usual explanation of the isotropy of the universe is that inflation would have smoothed out any inhomogeneities. However, if the universe was initially fractal or in a foam like state, an overall inflation would have left it in the same state. I suggest that the universe did indeed begin with a tangled web of wormholes connecting pairs of black holes but that the inflationary expansion was unstable: wormholes that are slightly smaller correspond to black holes that are hotter than the cosmological background and evaporate away. This picture is supported by calculations with Raphael Bousso of the evaporation of primordial black holes in the s-wave and large N approximations.

  14. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    PubMed

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here. PMID:25768747

  15. The Geometric Spreading of Coronal Plumes and Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Wang, A. - H.; Wu, S. T.; Cuseri, I.

    1997-01-01

    The geometric spreading in plumes and in the interplume region in coronal holes is calculated, using analytic and numerical theoretical models, between 1.0 and 5.0 solar radius. We apply two scale approximation that permits the rapid local spreading at the base of plumes to be evaluated separately from the global spreading imposed by coronal hole geometry. We show that fl can be computed from a potential field model and fg can be computed from global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal structure. The approximations are valid when the plasma beta is small with respect to unity and for a plume separation small with respect to a solar radius.

  16. Electron-hole dynamics in CdTe tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Malkmus, Stephan; Kudera, Stefan; Manna, Liberato; Parak, Wolfgang J; Braun, Markus

    2006-09-01

    We present transient absorption studies with femtosecond time resolution on the electron-hole dynamics in CdTe tetrapod nanostructures. Electron-hole pairs are generated by optical excitation in the visible spectral range, and an immediate bleach and induced absorption signal are observed. The relaxation dynamics to the lowest excitonic state is completed in about 6 ps. Experiments with polarized excitation pulses give information about the localization of the excited-state wave functions. The influence of the nanocrystal shape on the optical properties of CdTe nanoparticles is discussed. PMID:16942067

  17. Lamb shift for static atoms outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wenting; Yu Hongwei

    2010-11-15

    We study, by separately calculating the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction to the atomic energy level shift, the Lamb shift of a static two-level atom interacting with real massless scalar fields in the Boulware, Unruh, and Hartle-Hawking vacuums outside a Schwarzschild black hole. We find that in the Boulware vacuum, the Lamb shift gets a correction arising as a result of the backscattering of vacuum field modes off the space-time curvature, which is reminiscent of the correction to the Lamb shift induced by the presence of cavities. However, when the Unruh and Hartle-Hawking vacua are concerned, our results show that the Lamb shift behaves as if the atom were irradiated by a thermal radiation or immersed in a thermal bath at the Hawking temperature, depending on whether the scalar field is in the Unruh or the Hartle-Hawking vacuum. Remarkably, the thermal radiation is always backscattered by the space-time geometry.

  18. Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have made a major advance in explaining how a special class of black holes may shut off the high-speed jets they produce. These results suggest that these black holes have a mechanism for regulating the rate at which they grow. Black holes come in many sizes: the supermassive ones, including those in quasars, which weigh in at millions to billions of times the mass of the Sun, and the much smaller stellar-mass black holes which have measured masses in the range of about 7 to 25 times the Sun's mass. Some stellar-mass black holes launch powerful jets of particles and radiation, like seen in quasars, and are called "micro-quasars". The new study looks at a famous micro-quasar in our own Galaxy, and regions close to its event horizon, or point of no return. This system, GRS 1915+105 (GRS 1915 for short), contains a black hole about 14 times the mass of the Sun that is feeding off material from a nearby companion star. As the material swirls toward the black hole, an accretion disk forms. This system shows remarkably unpredictable and complicated variability ranging from timescales of seconds to months, including 14 different patterns of variation. These variations are caused by a poorly understood connection between the disk and the radio jet seen in GRS 1915. Chandra, with its spectrograph, has observed GRS 1915 eleven times since its launch in 1999. These studies reveal that the jet in GRS 1915 may be periodically choked off when a hot wind, seen in X-rays, is driven off the accretion disk around the black hole. The wind is believed to shut down the jet by depriving it of matter that would have otherwise fueled it. Conversely, once the wind dies down, the jet can re-emerge. "We think the jet and wind around this black hole are in a sort of tug of war," said Joseph Neilsen, Harvard graduate student and lead author of the paper appearing in the journal Nature. "Sometimes one is winning and then, for reasons we don

  19. On the study of the vibrational energy levels of Arsine molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzharov, N. A.; Leroy, C.; Ulenikov, O. N.; Bekhtereva, E. S.

    2008-01-01

    We compare two formalisms applied to the vibrational modes of the molecule of AsH3 of C3 v molecular symmetry group. Indeed, the close stretching modes of this molecule may be considered as those of a three-dimensional oscillator whereas the bending modes may be considered either as a one-dimensional oscillator of symmetry A1 and a two-dimensional oscillator of symmetry E or as an approximate three-dimensional oscillator. So, we have applied the U( p + 1) formalism to the both stretching and bending modes and introduced coupling terms acting on an appropriate coupled vibrational basis through a local mode formalism. We have then compared the result of our fitting with those obtained with the coupling of a local mode formalism adapted to the stretching vibrations with a normal mode formalism for the bending ones. Finally we compare our results with other methods recently proposed in the literature.

  20. Flame hole dynamics simulation of Sandia Flame F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaus, Robert; Hewson, John; Domino, Stefan; Pantano, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    The Sandia Flame ``F'' is a piloted methane/air diffusion flame containing high levels of local extinction. These regions of local extinction reduce the efficiency of combustion and can increase the production of certain pollutants (e.g. carbon monoxide) as well as limit the overall stability of the flame. We present a flame hole dynamics model describing evolution of local extinction zones (flame holes) in a turbulent diffusion flame and apply it to perform a direct numerical simulation of the Sandia Flame F using Sandia's ``SIERRA low Mach Module, Nalu.'' The flame hole dynamics model is a phase-field model that describes the state of the flame (burning or extinguished) through a surface partial differential equation modeling extinction, reignition and advection of the flame state on the moving stoichiometric surface using edge flame properties. The solution of the surface equation is then extended away from the surface and used for state evaluations using a flamelet library with steady flamelets in the burning region and a transient solution in the quenched regions. The flame hole dynamics approach allows tracking extinction and reignition in turbulent diffusion flames without using the computationally costly detailed chemistry explicitly.

  1. Black hole meiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Herck, Walter; Wyder, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    The enumeration of BPS bound states in string theory needs refinement. Studying partition functions of particles made from D-branes wrapped on algebraic Calabi-Yau 3-folds, and classifying states using split attractor flow trees, we extend the method for computing a refined BPS index, [1]. For certain D-particles, a finite number of microstates, namely polar states, exclusively realized as bound states, determine an entire partition function (elliptic genus). This underlines their crucial importance: one might call them the ‘chromosomes’ of a D-particle or a black hole. As polar states also can be affected by our refinement, previous predictions on elliptic genera are modified. This can be metaphorically interpreted as ‘crossing-over in the meiosis of a D-particle’. Our results improve on [2], provide non-trivial evidence for a strong split attractor flow tree conjecture, and thus suggest that we indeed exhaust the BPS spectrum. In the D-brane description of a bound state, the necessity for refinement results from the fact that tachyonic strings split up constituent states into ‘generic’ and ‘special’ states. These are enumerated separately by topological invariants, which turn out to be partitions of Donaldson-Thomas invariants. As modular predictions provide a check on many of our results, we have compelling evidence that our computations are correct.

  2. Photodetachment of gaseous multiply charged anions, copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate tetraanion: Tuning molecular electronic energy levels by charging and negative electron binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.B.; Ferris, K.; Wang, L.S.

    2000-01-13

    The authors report photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) of gaseous copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) tetrasulfonate quadruply charged anions, [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup 4{minus}}, and its monoprotonated and -sodiumated triply charged anions, [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}H]{sup 3{minus}} and [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}Na]{sup 3{minus}}. The [CuPc(SO{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup 4{minus}} tetraanion was found to possess a negative electron binding energy of {minus}0.9 eV, whereas the trianions have binding energies of 1.0 and 1.2 eV for the sodiumated and protonated species, respectively. The PES spectral features of the three multiply charged anions were observed to be similar to that of the parent CuPc neutral molecule, except that the anions have lower binding energies due to the presence of the negative charges ({minus}SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}). The data thus suggested a stepwise tuning of the molecular electronic energy levels of the CuPc molecule through charging, wherein the molecular orbital energies of the parent molecule were systematically pushed up by the negative charges. The authors further carried out semiempirical calculations, which provided insight into the nature of the localized charges on the peripheral {minus}SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} groups and the intramolecular electrostatic interactions in the multiply charged anions and confirmed the interpretation of the stepwise tuning of molecular energy levels by charging. Photon energy-dependent studies revealed the effects of the repulsive Coulomb barriers on the photodetachment PES spectra of the multiply charged anions. The barrier heights were estimated to be about 3.5 and 2.5 eV for the tetra- and trianions, respectively. The authors also observed excited states for the multiply charged anions and resonant tunneling through the repulsive Coulomb barriers via the excited states.

  3. Black holes and Newtonian physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    1992-03-01

    It is argued that one-way passage is inconsistent with Newtonian physics and thus the dark bodies as thought of by Michell and Laplace cannot be considered as exact analogues of relativistic black holes.

  4. Black hole accretion disc impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihajoki, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analytic model for computing the luminosity and spectral evolution of flares caused by a supermassive black hole impacting the accretion disc of another supermassive black hole. Our model includes photon diffusion, emission from optically thin regions and relativistic corrections to the observed spectrum and time-scales. We test the observability of the impact scenario with a simulated population of quasars hosting supermassive black hole binaries. The results indicate that for a moderate binary mass ratio of 0.3, and impact distances of 100 primary Schwarzschild radii, the accretion disc impacts can be expected to equal or exceed the host quasar in brightness at observed wavelength λ = 510 nm up to z = 0.6. We conclude that accretion disc impacts may function as an independent probe for supermassive black hole binaries. We release the code used for computing the model light curves to the community.

  5. Summary of Magnetic Holes Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Holes in the solar wind are anomalous decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field as measured at a particular spacecraft. Such signatures have been observed in durations of several hours all the way down to the time resolution of the fastest magnetometer instruments, and with magnetic field decreases anywhere from a few percent to nearly full annihilation. It has been an objective of this study to implement a general strategy for detecting magnetic holes on all scales at which they can be found. Investigations into the properties of magnetic holes began with collections of events appearing distinct to the naked eye, perhaps biased by morphological characteristics or suggestive density and temperature fluctuations. More recent studies have taken the simple approach of cataloging any time period wherein the magnetic field is reduced by more than half. This investigation takes a statistical approach to the problem of identifying real magnetic hole events at all available scales.

  6. The Black Hole Universe Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2014-06-01

    The black hole universe model is a multiverse model of cosmology recently developed by the speaker. According to this new model, our universe is a fully grown extremely supermassive black hole, which originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up from a supermassive black hole with million to billion solar masses to the present state with trillion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient matter or merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers or universes hierarchically. The innermost three layers include the universe that we live, the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes, and the outside space called mother universe. The outermost layer is infinite in mass, radius, and entropy without an edge and limits to zero for both the matter density and absolute temperature. All layers are governed by the same physics and tend to expand physically in one direction (outward or the direction of increasing entropy). The expansion of a black hole universe decreases its density and temperature but does not alter the laws of physics. The black hole universe evolves iteratively and endlessly without a beginning. When one universe expands out, a new similar one is formed from inside star-like and supermassive black holes. In each of iterations, elements are resynthesized, matter is reconfigurated, and the universe is renewed rather than a simple repeat. The black hole universe is consistent with the Mach principle, observations, and Einsteinian general relativity. It has only one postulate but is able to explain all phenomena occurred in the universe with well-developed physics. The black hole universe does not need dark energy for acceleration and an inflation epoch for flatness, and thus has a devastating impact on the big bang model. In this talk, I will present how this new cosmological model explains the various aspects of the universe, including the origin

  7. The self-consistent calculation of pseudo-molecule energy levels, construction of energy level correlation diagrams and an automated computation system for SCF-X(Alpha)-SW calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, H.

    1981-01-01

    The self consistent calculation of the electronic energy levels of noble gas pseudomolecules formed when a metal surface is bombarded by noble gas ions is discussed along with the construction of energy level correlation diagrams as a function of interatomic spacing. The self consistent field x alpha scattered wave (SCF-Xalpha-SW) method is utilized. Preliminary results on the Ne-Mg system are given. An interactive x alpha programming system, implemented on the LeRC IBM 370 computer, is described in detail. This automated system makes use of special PROCDEFS (procedure definitions) to minimize the data to be entered manually at a remote terminal. Listings of the special PROCDEFS and of typical input data are given.

  8. Charged rotating noncommutative black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Nicolini, Piero

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we complete the program of the noncomutative geometry inspired black holes, providing the richest possible solution, endowed with mass, charge and angular momentum. After providing a prescription for employing the Newman-Janis algorithm in the case of nonvanishing stress tensors, we find regular axisymmetric charged black holes in the presence of a minimal length. We study also the new thermodynamics and we determine the corresponding higher-dimensional solutions. As a conclusion we make some consideration about possible applications.

  9. Probability for primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, R.; Hawking, S. W.

    1995-11-01

    We consider two quantum cosmological models with a massive scalar field: an ordinary Friedmann universe and a universe containing primordial black holes. For both models we discuss the complex solutions to the Euclidean Einstein equations. Using the probability measure obtained from the Hartle-Hawking no-boundary proposal we find that the only unsuppressed black holes start at the Planck size but can grow with the horizon scale during the roll down of the scalar field to the minimum.

  10. Charged rotating noncommutative black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto, Leonardo; Nicolini, Piero

    2010-11-15

    In this paper we complete the program of the noncomutative geometry inspired black holes, providing the richest possible solution, endowed with mass, charge and angular momentum. After providing a prescription for employing the Newman-Janis algorithm in the case of nonvanishing stress tensors, we find regular axisymmetric charged black holes in the presence of a minimal length. We study also the new thermodynamics and we determine the corresponding higher-dimensional solutions. As a conclusion we make some consideration about possible applications.

  11. Sputtering Holes with Ion Beamlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, D. C.; Banks, B. A.

    1974-01-01

    Ion beamlets of predetermined configurations are formed by shaped apertures in the screen grid of an ion thruster having a double grid accelerator system. A plate is placed downstream from the screen grid holes and attached to the accelerator grid. When the ion thruster is operated holes having the configuration of the beamlets formed by the screen grid are sputtered through the plate at the accelerator grid.

  12. 30 CFR 77.1010 - Collaring holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Collaring holes. 77.1010 Section 77.1010... Control § 77.1010 Collaring holes. (a) Starter steels shall be used when collaring holes with hand-held drills. (b) Men shall not hold the drill steel while collaring holes, or rest their hands on the chuck...

  13. The 2002 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Nash, E. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million km2. This area is most strongly controlled by levels of inorganic chlorine and bromine oncentrations. In addition, dynamical variations modulate the size of the ozone hole by either cooling or warming the polar vortex collar region. We will review the size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. Using a simple trajectory model, we will demonstrate the sensitivity of the ozone hole to dynamical forcing, and we will use these observations to discuss the size of the ozone hole during the 2002 Austral spring. We will further show how the Cly decreases in the stratosphere will cause the ozone hole to decrease by 1-1.5% per year. We will also show results from a 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) that has been continuously run since 1999. These CTM results directly show how strong dynamics acts to reduce the size of the ozone hole.

  14. Black holes in an ultraviolet complete quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Moffat, John W.; Nicolini, Piero

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter we derive the gravity field equations by varying the action for an ultraviolet complete quantum gravity. Then we consider the case of a static source term and we determine an exact black hole solution. As a result we find a regular spacetime geometry: in place of the conventional curvature singularity extreme energy fluctuations of the gravitational field at small length scales provide an effective cosmological constant in a region locally described in terms of a de Sitter space. We show that the new metric coincides with the noncommutative geometry inspired Schwarzschild black hole. Indeed, we show that the ultraviolet complete quantum gravity, generated by ordinary matter is the dual theory of ordinary Einstein gravity coupled to a noncommutative smeared matter. In other words we obtain further insights about that quantum gravity mechanism which improves Einstein gravity in the vicinity of curvature singularities. This corroborates all the existing literature in the physics and phenomenology of noncommutative black holes.

  15. Low hole polaron migration barrier in lithium peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Shyue Ping; Mo, Yifei; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2012-02-01

    We present computational evidence of polaronic hole trapping and migration in lithium peroxide (Li2O2), a material of interest in lithium-air batteries. We find that the hole forms in the π* antibonding molecular orbitals of the peroxide (O22-) anion, and that this trapped hole induces significant local lattice distortion, forming a polaron. Our study finds migration barriers for the free polaron to be between 68 and 152 meV, depending on the hopping direction. This low barrier suggests that this material might not be as insulating as previously assumed, provided that the formation of carriers can be achieved. One transport limitation may arise from lithium vacancies, which we find to strongly bind to the polaron. This result, in combination with previous experimental results, suggests that electronic conductivity in this material is likely to be determined by vacancy diffusion.

  16. Numerical Relativity Simulations for Black Hole Merger Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Massive black hole mergers are perhaps the most energetic astronomical events, establishing their importance as gravitational wave sources for LISA, and also possibly leading to observable influences on their local environments. Advances in numerical relativity over the last five years have fueled the development of a rich physical understanding of general relativity's predictions for these events. Z will overview the understanding of these event emerging from numerical simulation studies. These simulations elucidate the pre-merger dynamics of the black hole binaries, the consequent gravitational waveform signatures ' and the resulting state, including its kick velocity, for the final black hole produced by the merger. Scenarios are now being considered for observing each of these aspects of the merger, involving both gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy.

  17. Close encounters of three black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Manuela; Lousto, Carlos O.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2008-05-15

    We present the first fully relativistic long-term numerical evolutions of three equal-mass black holes in a system consisting of a third black hole in a close orbit about a black-hole binary. These close-three-black-hole systems have very different merger dynamics from black-hole binaries; displaying complex trajectories, a redistribution of energy that can impart substantial kicks to one of the holes, distinctive waveforms, and suppression of the emitted gravitational radiation. In one configuration the binary is quickly disrupted and the individual holes follow complicated trajectories and merge with the third hole in rapid succession, while in another, the binary completes a half-orbit before the initial merger of one of the members with the third black hole, and the resulting two-black-hole system forms a highly elliptical, well separated binary that shows no significant inspiral for (at least) the first t{approx}1000M of evolution.

  18. Quantum state of the black hole interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.

    2015-08-01

    If a black hole (BH) is initially in an approximately pure state and it evaporates by a unitary process, then the emitted radiation will be in a highly quantum state. As the purifier of this radiation, the state of the BH interior must also be in some highly quantum state. So that, within the interior region, the mean-field approximation cannot be valid and the state of the BH cannot be described by some semiclassical metric. On this basis, we model the state of the BH interior as a collection of a large number of excitations that are packed into closely spaced but single-occupancy energy levels; a sort-of "Fermi sea" of all light-enough particles. This highly quantum state is surrounded by a semiclassical region that lies close to the horizon and has a non-vanishing energy density. It is shown that such a state looks like a BH from the outside and decays via gravitational pair production in the near-horizon region at a rate that agrees with the Hawking rate. We also consider the fate of a classical object that has passed through to the BH interior and show that, once it has crossed over the near-horizon threshold, the object meets its demise extremely fast. This result cannot be attributed to a "firewall", as the trauma to the in-falling object only begins after it has passed through the near-horizon region and enters a region where semiclassical spacetime ends but the energy density is still parametrically smaller than Planckian.

  19. Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have made a major advance in explaining how a special class of black holes may shut off the high-speed jets they produce. These results suggest that these black holes have a mechanism for regulating the rate at which they grow. Black holes come in many sizes: the supermassive ones, including those in quasars, which weigh in at millions to billions of times the mass of the Sun, and the much smaller stellar-mass black holes which have measured masses in the range of about 7 to 25 times the Sun's mass. Some stellar-mass black holes launch powerful jets of particles and radiation, like seen in quasars, and are called "micro-quasars". The new study looks at a famous micro-quasar in our own Galaxy, and regions close to its event horizon, or point of no return. This system, GRS 1915+105 (GRS 1915 for short), contains a black hole about 14 times the mass of the Sun that is feeding off material from a nearby companion star. As the material swirls toward the black hole, an accretion disk forms. This system shows remarkably unpredictable and complicated variability ranging from timescales of seconds to months, including 14 different patterns of variation. These variations are caused by a poorly understood connection between the disk and the radio jet seen in GRS 1915. Chandra, with its spectrograph, has observed GRS 1915 eleven times since its launch in 1999. These studies reveal that the jet in GRS 1915 may be periodically choked off when a hot wind, seen in X-rays, is driven off the accretion disk around the black hole. The wind is believed to shut down the jet by depriving it of matter that would have otherwise fueled it. Conversely, once the wind dies down, the jet can re-emerge. "We think the jet and wind around this black hole are in a sort of tug of war," said Joseph Neilsen, Harvard graduate student and lead author of the paper appearing in the journal Nature. "Sometimes one is winning and then, for reasons we don

  20. Calculation of Electrochemical Energy Levels in Water Using the Random Phase Approximation and a Double Hybrid Functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jun; VandeVondele, Joost

    2016-02-01

    Understanding charge transfer at electrochemical interfaces requires consistent treatment of electronic energy levels in solids and in water at the same level of the electronic structure theory. Using density-functional-theory-based molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration, the free energy levels of six redox couples in water are calculated at the level of the random phase approximation and a double hybrid density functional. The redox levels, together with the water band positions, are aligned against a computational standard hydrogen electrode, allowing for critical analysis of errors compared to the experiment. It is encouraging that both methods offer a good description of the electronic structures of the solutes and water, showing promise for a full treatment of electrochemical interfaces.

  1. Calculation of Electrochemical Energy Levels in Water Using the Random Phase Approximation and a Double Hybrid Functional.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; VandeVondele, Joost

    2016-02-26

    Understanding charge transfer at electrochemical interfaces requires consistent treatment of electronic energy levels in solids and in water at the same level of the electronic structure theory. Using density-functional-theory-based molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration, the free energy levels of six redox couples in water are calculated at the level of the random phase approximation and a double hybrid density functional. The redox levels, together with the water band positions, are aligned against a computational standard hydrogen electrode, allowing for critical analysis of errors compared to the experiment. It is encouraging that both methods offer a good description of the electronic structures of the solutes and water, showing promise for a full treatment of electrochemical interfaces. PMID:26967430

  2. Effect of dt{mu} quasinucleus structure on energy levels of the (dt{mu})Xee exotic molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Kartavtsev, O.I.; Malykh, A.V.; Permyakov, V.P.

    2004-08-01

    Precise energies of rovibrational states of the exotic hydrogen-like molecule (dt{mu})Xee are of importance for dt{mu} resonant formation, which is a key process in the muon-catalyzed fusion cycle. The effect of the internal structure and rotation of the dt{mu} quasi-nucleus on energy levels is studied using the three-body description of the (dt{mu})Xee molecule based on the hierarchy of scales and corresponding energies of its constituent subsystems. For a number of rovibrational states of (dt{mu})dee and (dt{mu})tee, the shifts and splittings of energy levels are calculated in the second order of the perturbation theory.

  3. Black holes with gravitational hair in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Canfora, Fabrizio; Giacomini, Alex; Oliva, Julio

    2011-10-01

    A new class of vacuum black holes for the most general gravity theory leading to second order field equations in the metric in even dimensions is presented. These space-times are locally anti-de Sitter in the asymptotic region, and are characterized by a continuous parameter that does not enter in the conserve charges, nor it can be reabsorbed by a coordinate transformation: it is therefore a purely gravitational hair. The black holes are constructed as a warped product of a two-dimensional space-time, which resembles the r-t plane of the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, times a warp factor multiplying the metric of a D-2-dimensional Euclidean base manifold, which is restricted by a scalar equation. It is shown that all the Noether charges vanish. Furthermore, this is consistent with the Euclidean action approach: even though the black hole has a finite temperature, both the entropy and the mass vanish. Interesting examples of base manifolds are given in eight dimensions which are products of Thurston geometries, giving then a nontrivial topology to the black hole horizon. The possibility of introducing a torsional hair for these solutions is also discussed.

  4. Stress Wave Interaction Between Two Adjacent Blast Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Changping; Johansson, Daniel; Nyberg, Ulf; Beyglou, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Rock fragmentation by blasting is determined by the level and state of stress in the rock mass subjected to blasting. With the application of electronic detonators, some researchers stated that it is possible to achieve improved fragmentation through stress wave superposition with very short delay times. This hypothesis was studied through theoretical analysis in the paper. First, the stress in rock mass induced by a single-hole shot was analyzed with the assumptions of infinite velocity of detonation and infinite charge length. Based on the stress analysis of a single-hole shot, the stress history and tensile stress distribution between two adjacent holes were presented for cases of simultaneous initiation and 1 ms delayed initiation via stress superposition. The results indicated that the stress wave interaction is local around the collision point. Then, the tensile stress distribution at the extended line of two adjacent blast holes was analyzed for a case of 2 ms delay. The analytical results showed that the tensile stress on the extended line increases due to the stress wave superposition under the assumption that the influence of neighboring blast hole on the stress wave propagation can be neglected. However, the numerical results indicated that this assumption is unreasonable and yields contrary results. The feasibility of improving fragmentation via stress wave interaction with precise initiation was also discussed. The analysis in this paper does not support that the interaction of stress waves improves the fragmentation.

  5. The formation of rare massive black holes at redshift 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu; Li, M.

    2014-01-01

    How supermassive black holes with billions of solar masses formed before redshift 7, when the Universe was less than 800 million years old, remains a theoretical puzzle. One hypothesis is that they grew from ~10^5 Msol black holes formed in the direct collapse of pristine, atomic-cooling (>8000 K) gas. A major uncertainty for this scenario is how the gas can be kept metal free, as dark matter haloes begin forming stars at a virial temperature of ~1000 K. We propose that baryonic streaming, the relative motion of baryons against dark matter at cosmological recombination, is a natural mechanism for delaying star formation and keeping the gas pristine until the halo potential can support conditions for direct collapse. In rare regions where the local streaming velocities are more than twice the rms value, direct-collapse black holes can form as early as 30. This scenario can explain the most massive and earliest known quasar black holes, even if only 1% of pristine atomic-cooling haloes form direct-collapse massive black holes.

  6. Black holes with gravitational hair in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Anabalon, Andres; Canfora, Fabrizio; Giacomini, Alex; Oliva, Julio

    2011-10-15

    A new class of vacuum black holes for the most general gravity theory leading to second order field equations in the metric in even dimensions is presented. These space-times are locally anti-de Sitter in the asymptotic region, and are characterized by a continuous parameter that does not enter in the conserve charges, nor it can be reabsorbed by a coordinate transformation: it is therefore a purely gravitational hair. The black holes are constructed as a warped product of a two-dimensional space-time, which resembles the r-t plane of the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, times a warp factor multiplying the metric of a D-2-dimensional Euclidean base manifold, which is restricted by a scalar equation. It is shown that all the Noether charges vanish. Furthermore, this is consistent with the Euclidean action approach: even though the black hole has a finite temperature, both the entropy and the mass vanish. Interesting examples of base manifolds are given in eight dimensions which are products of Thurston geometries, giving then a nontrivial topology to the black hole horizon. The possibility of introducing a torsional hair for these solutions is also discussed.

  7. Ab initio potential energy surface and vibration-rotation energy levels of silicon dicarbide, SiC2.

    PubMed

    Koput, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    The accurate ground-state potential energy surface of silicon dicarbide, SiC2 , has been determined from ab initio calculations using the coupled-cluster approach. Results obtained with the conventional and explicitly correlated coupled-cluster methods were compared. The core-electron correlation, higher-order valence-electron correlation, and scalar relativistic effects were taken into account. The potential energy barrier to the linear SiCC configuration was predicted to be 1782 cm(-1) . The vibration-rotation energy levels of the SiC2 , (29) SiC2 , (30) SiC2 , and SiC(13) C isotopologues were calculated using a variational method. The experimental vibration-rotation energy levels of the main isotopologue were reproduced to high accuracy. In particular, the experimental energy levels of the highly anharmonic vibrational ν3 mode of SiC2 were reproduced to within 6.7 cm(-1) , up to as high as the v3  = 16 state. PMID:27481562

  8. Position-dependent energy-level shifts of an accelerated atom in the presence of a boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Zhiying; Yu Hongwei

    2010-10-15

    We consider a uniformly accelerated atom interacting with a vacuum electromagnetic field in the presence of an infinite conducting plane boundary and calculate separately the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction to the atomic energy-level shift. We analyze in detail the behavior of the total energy shift in three different regimes of the distance in both the low-acceleration and high-acceleration limits. Our results show that, in general, an accelerated atom does not behave as if immersed in a thermal bath at the Unruh temperature in terms of the atomic energy-level shifts, and the effect of the acceleration on the atomic energy-level shifts may in principle become appreciable in certain circumstances, although it may not be realistic for actual experimental measurements. We also examine the effects of the acceleration on the level shifts when the acceleration is of the order of the transition frequency of the atom and we find some features which differ from what was obtained in the existing literature.

  9. Probing the energy levels of perovskite solar cells via Kelvin probe and UV ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harwell, J R; Baikie, T K; Baikie, I D; Payne, J L; Ni, C; Irvine, J T S; Turnbull, G A; Samuel, I D W

    2016-07-20

    The field of organo-lead halide perovskite solar cells has been rapidly growing since their discovery in 2009. State of the art devices are now achieving efficiencies comparable to much older technologies like silicon, while utilising simple manufacturing processes and starting materials. A key parameter to consider when optimising solar cell devices or when designing new materials is the position and effects of the energy levels in the materials. We present here a comprehensive study of the energy levels present in a common structure of perovskite solar cell using an advanced macroscopic Kelvin probe and UV air photoemission setup. By constructing a detailed map of the energy levels in the system we are able to predict the importance of each layer to the open circuit voltage of the solar cell, which we then back up through measurements of the surface photovoltage of the cell under white illumination. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of air photoemission and Kelvin probe contact potential difference measurements as a method of identifying the factors contributing to the open circuit voltage in a solar cell, as well as being an excellent way of probing the physics of new materials. PMID:27384817

  10. Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative rates for Si-like Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2014-01-15

    The energy levels, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p and 3s{sup 2}3p4d configurations of silicon-like ions (Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX) have been calculated using the configuration-interaction code CIV3. The calculations have been carried out in the intermediate coupling scheme using the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian. The present calculations have been compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels have also been calculated. -- Highlights: •We have calculated the fine-structure energy levels of Si-like Zn, Ga, Ge and As. •The calculations are performed using the configuration interaction method (CIV3). •We have calculated the oscillator strengths, line strengths and transition rates. •The wavelengths of the transitions are listed in this article. •We also have made comparisons between our data and other calculations.

  11. Black Hole Caught Zapping Galaxy into Existence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    equivalent to about 350 Suns per year, one hundred times more than rates for typical galaxies in the local Universe. Earlier observations had shown that the companion galaxy is, in fact, under fire: the quasar is spewing a jet of highly energetic particles towards its companion, accompanied by a stream of fast-moving gas. The injection of matter and energy into the galaxy indicates that the quasar itself might be inducing the formation of stars and thereby creating its own host galaxy; in such a scenario, galaxies would have evolved from clouds of gas hit by the energetic jets emerging from quasars. "The two objects are bound to merge in the future: the quasar is moving at a speed of only a few tens of thousands of km/h with respect to the companion galaxy and their separation is only about 22 000 light-years," says Elbaz. "Although the quasar is still 'naked', it will eventually be 'dressed' when it merges with its star-rich companion. It will then finally reside inside a host galaxy like all other quasars." Hence, the team have identified black hole jets as a possible driver of galaxy formation, which may also represent the long-sought missing link to understanding why the mass of black holes is larger in galaxies that contain more stars [3]. "A natural extension of our work is to search for similar objects in other systems," says Jahnke. Future instruments, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, the European Extremely Large Telescope and the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope will be able to search for such objects at even larger distances from us, probing the connection between black holes and the formation of galaxies in the more distant Universe. Notes [1] Supermassive black holes are found in the cores of most large galaxies; unlike the inactive and starving one sitting at the centre of the Milky Way, a fraction of them are said to be active, as they eat up enormous amounts of material. These frantic actions produce a copious release of energy

  12. Scintillation Hole Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih Ping; Yenq Liu, Jann; Krishnanunni Rajesh, Panthalingal

    2013-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillations can significantly disturb satellite positioning, navigation, and communication. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC provides the first 3-D global observation by solo instrument (radio occultation experiment, GOX). The GPS L-band amplitude fluctuation from 50Hz signal is received and recorded by F3/C GOX to calculate S4-index from 50-800km altitude. The global F3/C S4 index are subdivided and examined in various latitudes, longitudes, altitudes, and seasons during 2007-2012. The F-region scintillations in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere start around post-sunset period and often persist till post-midnight hours (0300 MLT, magnetic local time) during the March and September equinox as well as December Solstice seasons. The E-region scintillations reveal a clear solar zenith effect and yield pronounced intensities in mid-latitudes during the Summer Solstice seasons, which are well correlated with occurrences of the sporadic E-layer. It is interesting to find there is no scintillation, which is termed "scintillation hole", in the E region ranging from 80 to 130km altitude over the South Africa region, and become the most pronounced in November-January (December Solstice seasons or summer months). Other space-borne and ground based observations are use to confirm the existence of the scintillation hole.

  13. The lamppost model of accreting black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, A.

    2016-06-01

    Niedzwiecki, Zdziarski & Szanecki (2016, ApJL, submitted) have studied the lamppost model, in which the X-ray source in accreting black-hole systems is located on the rotation axis close to the horizon. We point out a number of inconsistencies in the widely used lamppost model relxilllp. They appear to invalidate those model fitting results for which the source distances from the horizon are within several gravitational radii. Furthermore, we note that if those results were correct, most of the photons produced in the lamppost would be trapped by the black hole, and the source luminosity as measured at infinity would be much larger than that observed. This appears to be in conflict with the observed smooth state transitions between the hard and soft states of X-ray binaries. The required increase of the accretion rate and the associated efficiency reduction present also a problem for AGNs. Then, those models imply the luminosity measured in the local frame much higher than the dissipated power due to time dilation and redshift, and the electron temperature significantly higher than that observed. We show that these conditions imply that the fitted sources would be out of the pair equilibrium.

  14. Devils Hole, Nevada--A Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landwehr, Jurate M.; Winograd, Isaac J.

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes the multifaceted research of the U.S. Geological Survey—published in diverse outlets—that focuses on the subaqueous cavern Devils Hole in Nevada. Questions addressed in the fact sheet are: What is Devils Hole? Why is Devils Hole of interest to paleoclimatologists? How was the isotopic record from the Devils Hole vein calcite dated? What paleoclimate phenomena are recorded by the Devils Hole stable isotopic time series? Where can one find the isotopic records? What contributions has Devils Hole research made to the field of paleoclimatology, paleohydrology, and geochemistry? What does Devils Hole reveal about how long we can expect the present interglaciation to last? What are some practical applications of the Devils Hole findings? Why is Devils Hole of interest to zoologists?

  15. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  16. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  17. Low-mass black holes as the remnants of primordial black hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Jenny E.

    2012-12-01

    Bridging the gap between the approximately ten solar mass `stellar mass' black holes and the `supermassive' black holes of millions to billions of solar masses are the elusive `intermediate-mass' black holes. Their discovery is key to understanding whether supermassive black holes can grow from stellar-mass black holes or whether a more exotic process accelerated their growth soon after the Big Bang. Currently, tentative evidence suggests that the progenitors of supermassive black holes were formed as ~104-105Msolar black holes via the direct collapse of gas. Ongoing searches for intermediate-mass black holes at galaxy centres will help shed light on this formation mechanism.

  18. Quantum Criticality and Black Holes

    ScienceCinema

    Sachdev, Subir [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2009-09-01

    I will describe the behavior of a variety of condensed matter systems in the vicinity of zero temperature quantum phase transitions. There is a remarkable analogy between the hydrodynamics of such systems and the quantum theory of black holes. I will show how insights from this analogy have shed light on recent experiments on the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Studies of new materials and trapped ultracold atoms are yielding new quantum phases, with novel forms of quantum entanglement. Some materials are of technological importance: e.g. high temperature superconductors. Exact solutions via black hole mapping have yielded first exact results for transport coefficients in interacting many-body systems, and were valuable in determining general structure of hydrodynamics. Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and big-bang physics.

  19. Scrambling with matrix black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Lucas; Sahakian, Vatche

    2013-08-01

    If black holes are not to be dreaded sinks of information but rather fully described by unitary evolution, they must scramble in-falling data and eventually leak it through Hawking radiation. Sekino and Susskind have conjectured that black holes are fast scramblers; they generate entanglement at a remarkably efficient rate, with the characteristic time scaling logarithmically with the entropy. In this work, we focus on Matrix theory—M-theory in the light-cone frame—and directly probe the conjecture. We develop a concrete test bed for quantum gravity using the fermionic variables of Matrix theory and show that the problem becomes that of chains of qubits with an intricate network of interactions. We demonstrate that the black hole system evolves much like a Brownian quantum circuit, with strong indications that it is indeed a fast scrambler. We also analyze the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase model and reach the same tentative conclusion.

  20. Quantum Criticality and Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sachdev, Subir

    2007-08-22

    I will describe the behavior of a variety of condensed matter systems in the vicinity of zero temperature quantum phase transitions. There is a remarkable analogy between the hydrodynamics of such systems and the quantum theory of black holes. I will show how insights from this analogy have shed light on recent experiments on the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Studies of new materials and trapped ultracold atoms are yielding new quantum phases, with novel forms of quantum entanglement. Some materials are of technological importance: e.g. high temperature superconductors. Exact solutions via black hole mapping have yielded first exact results for transport coefficients in interacting many-body systems, and were valuable in determining general structure of hydrodynamics. Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and big-bang physics.

  1. Liouvillian perturbations of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. E.; Holder, C. L.

    2007-10-01

    We apply the well-known Kovacic algorithm to find closed form, i.e., Liouvillian solutions, to the differential equations governing perturbations of black holes. Our analysis includes the full gravitational perturbations of Schwarzschild and Kerr, the full gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations of Reissner-Nordstrom, and specialized perturbations of the Kerr-Newman geometry. We also include the extreme geometries. We find all frequencies ω, in terms of black hole parameters and an integer n, which allow Liouvillian perturbations. We display many classes of black hole parameter values and their corresponding Liouvillian perturbations, including new closed-form perturbations of Kerr and Reissner-Nordstrom. We also prove that the only type 1 Liouvillian perturbations of Schwarzschild are the known algebraically special ones and that type 2 Liouvillian solutions do not exist for extreme geometries. In cases where we do not prove the existence or nonexistence of Liouvillian perturbations we obtain sequences of Diophantine equations on which decidability rests.

  2. Tomograms of spinning black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan

    2009-12-01

    The classical internal structure of spinning black holes is vastly different from that of static black holes. We consider spinning Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes, and probe their interior from the gauge theory. Utilizing the simplicity of the geometry and reverse engineering from the geodesics, we propose a thermal correlator construction which can be interpreted as arising from two entangled conformal field theories. By analytic continuation of these correlators, we can probe the Cauchy horizon. Correlators that capture the Cauchy horizon in our work have a structure closely related to those that capture the singularity in a nonrotating Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli. As expected, the regions beyond the Cauchy horizon are not probed in this picture, protecting cosmic censorship.

  3. Electric Properties of Obsidian: Evidence for Positive Hole Charge Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordvik, R.; Freund, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    The blackness of obsidian is due to the presence of oxygen anions in the valence state 1-, creating broad energy levels at the upper edge of the valence band, which absorb visible light over a wide spectral range. These energy states are associated with defect electrons in the oxygen anion sublattice, well-known from "smoky quartz", where Al substituting for Si captures a defect electron in the oxygen anion sublattice for charge compensation [1]. Such defect electrons, also known as positive holes, are responsible for the increase in electrical conductivity in igneous rocks when uniaxial stresses are applied, causing the break-up of pre-existing peroxy defects, Si-OO-Si [2]. Peroxy defects in obsidian cannot be so easily activated by mechanical stress because the glassy matrix will break before sufficiently high stress levels can be reached. If peroxy defects do exist, however, they can be studied by activating them thermally [3]. We describe experiments with rectangular slabs of obsidian with Au electrodes at both ends. Upon heating one end, we observe (i) a thermopotential and (ii) a thermocurrent developing at distinct temperatures around 250°C and 450°C, marking the 2-step break-up of peroxy bonds. [1] Schnadt, R., and Schneider, J.: The electronic structure of the trapped-hole center in smoky quartz, Zeitschrift Physik B Condensed Matter 11, 19-42, 1970. [2] Freund, F. T., Takeuchi, A., and Lau, B. W.: Electric currents streaming out of stressed igneous rocks - A step towards understanding pre-earthquake low frequency EM emissions, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 31, 389-396, 2006. [3] Freund, F., and Masuda, M. M.: Highly mobile oxygen hole-type charge carriers in fused silica, Journal Material Research, 8, 1619-1622, 1991.

  4. Modelling the evaporation of nonsingular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taves, Tim; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2014-12-01

    We present a model for studying the formation and evaporation of nonsingular (quantum corrected) black holes. The model is based on a generalized form of the dimensionally reduced, spherically symmetric Einstein-Hilbert action and includes a suitably generalized Polyakov action to provide a mechanism for radiation backreaction. The equations of motion describing self-gravitating scalar field collapse are derived in local form both in null co-ordinates and in Painleve-Gullstrand (flat slice) co-ordinates. They provide the starting point for numerical studies of complete spacetimes containing dynamical horizons that bound a compact trapped region. Such spacetimes have been proposed in the past as solutions to the information loss problem because they possess neither an event horizon nor a singularity. Since the equations of motion in our model are derived from a diffeomorphism invariant action they preserve the constraint algebra and the resulting energy momentum tensor is manifestly conserved.

  5. Distorted five-dimensional electrically charged black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolrahimi, Shohreh; Shoom, Andrey A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study distorted, five-dimensional, electrically charged (nonextremal) black holes on the example of a static and "axisymmetric" black hole distorted by external, electrically neutral matter. Such a black hole is represented by the solution derived here of the Einstein-Maxwell equations which admits an R1×U(1)×U(1) isometry group. The external matter, which is "located" at the asymptotic infinity, is not included in the solution. The space-time singularities are located behind the black hole's inner (Cauchy) horizon, provided that the sources of the distortion satisfy the strong energy condition. The inner (Cauchy) horizon remains regular if the distortion fields are finite and smooth at the outer horizon. The solution has some remarkable properties. There exists a certain duality transformation between the inner and the outer horizon surfaces which links surface gravity, electrostatic potential, and space-time curvature invariants calculated at the black hole horizons. The product of the inner and outer horizon areas depends only on the black hole's electric charge, and the geometric mean of the areas is the upper (lower) limit for the inner (outer) horizon area. The electromagnetic field invariant calculated at the horizons is proportional to the squared surface gravity of the horizons. The horizon areas, electrostatic potential, and surface gravity satisfy the Smarr formula. We formulated the zeroth and the first laws of mechanics and thermodynamics of the distorted black hole and found a correspondence between the global and local forms of the first law. To illustrate the effect of distortion, we consider the dipole-monopole and quadrupole-quadrupole distortion fields. The relative change in the Kretschmann scalar due to the distortion is greater at the outer horizon than at the inner one. By calculating the maximal proper time of free fall from the outer to the inner horizons, we show that the distortion can noticeably change the black hole

  6. Building Black Holes: Supercomputer Cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1988-07-01

    A new computer code can solve Einstein's equations of general relativity for the dynamical evolution of a relativistic star cluster. The cluster may contain a large number of stars that move in a strong gravitational field at speeds approaching the speed of light. Unstable star clusters undergo catastrophic collapse to black holes. The collapse of an unstable cluster to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy may explain the origin of quasars and active galactic nuclei. By means of a supercomputer simulation and color graphics, the whole process can be viewed in real time on a movie screen.

  7. Information loss in black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    2005-10-01

    The question of whether information is lost in black holes is investigated using Euclidean path integrals. The formation and evaporation of black holes is regarded as a scattering problem with all measurements being made at infinity. This seems to be well formulated only in asymptotically AdS spacetimes. The path integral over metrics with trivial topology is unitary and information preserving. On the other hand, the path integral over metrics with nontrivial topologies leads to correlation functions that decay to zero. Thus at late times only the unitary information preserving path integrals over trivial topologies will contribute. Elementary quantum gravity interactions do not lose information or quantum coherence.

  8. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  9. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  10. A toy model of black hole complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Souvik; Bryan, Jan-Willem; Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2016-05-01

    We consider the algebra of simple operators defined in a time band in a CFT with a holographic dual. When the band is smaller than the light crossing time of AdS, an entire causal diamond in the center of AdS is separated from the band by a horizon. We show that this algebra obeys a version of the Reeh-Schlieder theorem: the action of the algebra on the CFT vacuum can approximate any low energy state in the CFT arbitrarily well, but no operator within the algebra can exactly annihilate the vacuum. We show how to relate local excitations in the complement of the central diamond to simple operators in the band. Local excitations within the diamond are invisible to the algebra of simple operators in the band by causality, but can be related to complicated operators called "precursors". We use the Reeh-Schlieder theorem to write down a simple and explicit formula for these precursors on the boundary. We comment on the implications of our results for black hole complementarity and the emergence of bulk locality from the boundary.

  11. Optical and magneto-optical properties of the electron-doped and hole-doped C82 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostampour, E.; Koohi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The optical and magnetic properties of the doped C82 crystal have been investigated by Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model, which is based on the Ewald method. When the C82 molecule is doped with one electron (or hole), a single electron is remained in the energy level that affects the optical and magnetic properties of the C82 crystal. The lattice and electronic structures of C82 changed with doping electron (or hole) in the molecule of C82. Therefore, polarons are predicted in doped fullerenes. The obtained results showed that the dielectric tensor of the C82 crystal increased with doping electron (or hole) in the molecule of C82. The spectral shapes of the dielectric tensor, circular dichroism and birefringence coefficient of the C82 crystal turn out to be determined mainly by the geometrical distributions of the pentagons in the fullerene structures.

  12. High-Time-Resolution Study of Magnetic Holes in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarus, Alan; Kasper, Justin; Stevens, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to determine the internal plasma structure of kinetic-scale and larger scale magnetic holes, and to determine their stability, their source mechanism(s), and their spatial extent. It is also of importance to determine the relationship between kinetic-scale holes and long-duration holes. As smaller and smaller magnetic depressions are investigated in order to make this a complete study, a robust criterion is necessary for distinguishing magnetic holes from random or unresolvable fluctuations in the interplanetary magnetic field. In order to resolve this ambiguity, we obtained from the MFI experiments magnetic field measurements from the WIND spacecraft at a time resolution of 46 to 184 ms over certain periods. We have also devised a measure of certainty for magnetic hole detections. The certainty factor, q, is defined as the difference between the mean magnetic field in the hole and the local magnetic field, in units of the local standard deviation of the field strength. For fullest generality, it is necessary to calculate this q over the range of available scales of interest, from 60 ms up to 300 s. This technique establishes a two dimensional matrix of relative probabilities that a hole of some duration (d) might exist in the data set at a given time (t). In identifying q-peaks in time and duration, we also come upon a natural method for distinguishing holes with internal structure from multiple holes in close proximity or holes nested inside of others. If two q-peaks are more than a half-width apart, they are simply said to be separate events.

  13. Improved black hole fireworks: Asymmetric black-hole-to-white-hole tunneling scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, Tommaso; Perez, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    A new scenario for gravitational collapse has been recently proposed by Haggard and Rovelli. Presenting the model under the name of black hole fireworks, they claim that the accumulation of quantum gravitational effects outside the horizon can cause the tunneling of geometry from a black hole to a white hole, allowing a bounce of the collapsing star which can eventually go back to infinity. In this paper, we discuss the instabilities of this model and propose a simple minimal modification which eliminates them, as well as other related instabilities discussed in the literature. The new scenario is a time-asymmetric version of the original model with a time scale for the final explosion that is shorter than m log m in Planck units. Our analysis highlights the importance of irreversibility in gravitational collapse which, in turn, uncovers important issues that cannot be addressed in detail without a full quantum gravity treatment.

  14. A new approach to the symmetric rectangular quantum well: Analytic determination of well width from energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouillant, C.; Alibert, C.

    1994-06-01

    Many articles on the determination of the energy levels of a symmetric rectangular quantum well (SRQW) have been published in this Journal over the past 20 years. Standard textbooks of quantum mechanics as well as research papers offer graphical solutions. Exercises on quantum well (QW) remain rather difficult for students, because transcendental equations must be solved with boundaries at which the solution will be discontinuous. Numerical solutions generally determine the energy (En), assuming that the thickness is known, for each level number n. In this note, we show that the width L of an SRQW can be expressed directly as a function of the energy En for n=0,1,2,3,... .

  15. Positronium energy levels at order m α7 : Product contributions in the two-photon-annihilation channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Gregory S.; Tran, Lam M.; Wang, Ruihan

    2016-05-01

    Ongoing improvements in the measurement of positronium transition intervals motivate the calculation of the O (m α7) corrections to these intervals. In this work we focus on corrections to the spin-singlet parapositronium energies involving virtual annihilation to two photons in an intermediate state. We have evaluated all contributions to the positronium S -state energy levels that can be written as the product of a one-loop correction on one side of the annihilation event and another one-loop correction on the other side. These effects contribute Δ E =-0.561971 (25 ) m α7/π3 to the parapositronium ground-state energy.

  16. Considerations for fine hole patterning for the 7nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaegashi, Hidetami; Oyama, Kenichi; Hara, Arisa; Natori, Sakurako; Yamauchi, Shohei; Yamato, Masatoshi; Koike, Kyohei

    2016-03-01

    One of the practical candidates to produce 7nm node logic devices is to use the multiple patterning with 193-immersion exposure. For the multiple patterning, it is important to evaluate the relation between the number of mask layer and the minimum pitch systematically to judge the device manufacturability. Although the number of the time of patterning, namely LE(Litho-Etch) ^ x-time, and overlay steps have to be reduced, there are some challenges in miniaturization of hole size below 20nm. Various process fluctuations on contact hole have a direct impact on device performance. According to the technical trend, 12nm diameter hole on 30nm-pitch hole will be needed on 7nm node. Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) and Directed self-assembly (DSA) are attracting considerable attention to obtain small feature size pattern, however, 193-immersion still has the potential to extend optical lithography cost-effectively for sub-7nm node. The objective of this work is to study the process variation challenges and resolution in post-processing for the CD-bias control to meet sub-20nm diameter contact hole. Another pattern modulation is also demonstrated during post-processing step for hole shrink. With the realization that pattern fidelity and pattern placement management will limit scaling long before devices and interconnects fail to perform intrinsically, the talk will also outline how circle edge roughness (CER) and Local-CD uniformity can correct efficiency. On the other hand, 1D Gridded-Design-Rules layout (1D layout) has simple rectangular shapes. Also, we have demonstrated CD-bias modification on short trench pattern to cut grating line for its fabrication.

  17. Altering the interfacial morphology of polymer light-emitting diodes using polymer interlayers: effect on hole injection and device performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, M. James; Poplavskyy, Dmitry; Choong-En, Vi; So, Franky; Campbell, Alasdair J.

    2006-08-01

    We report preliminary studies of the nature of hole injection from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/polystyrenesulphonic acid (PEDOT:PSS) into three commercial conjugated light emitting polymers (LEPs). Sumation's LUMATION Green 1300, LUMATION Blue, and Merck's SuperYellow LEPs are studied in combination with interlayers of poly(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene-co-N-(4-butylphenyl)-diphenylamine) (TFB), and poly[9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-(bis-N,N'-(3-carboxyphenyl)-bis-N,N'-phenylbenzidine)] (BFA). Despite the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) of the interlayers being close to that of PEDOT:PSS and the LEP, different interlayers have different effects on hole injection and OLED device performance. We use dark injection transient current method to show that interfacial morphology changes results in modulation of hole trap densities that in turn affect hole injection. Depending on the interlayer/LEP combination partial penetration of interlayer into the LEP layer may also occur resulting in additional changes in the bulk transport properties of the LEP. Our results show that it is not the interfacial energy level alignment but the physical morphology changes at the interface which are important for varying hole injection into the device. A combination of either improved or reduced hole injection due to variations in physical contact, intermixing and trapping at the interlayer/LEP boundary dominate device performance.

  18. Probing Hole Spins in an InAs/GaAs Quantum Dot Molecule subject to Lateral Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiangyu; Bryant, Garnett; Doty, Matthew

    Quantum dot molecules (QDMs) are structures in which coherent interactions between two or more adjacent quantum dots (QDs) can lead to unique, tunable electronic and spin properties. We explore computationally spin-mixing interactions in the molecular states of single holes confined in vertically-stacked InAs/GaAs self-assembled QDMs. We consider the spin properties of the hole states subject to electric fields that have components both parallel and perpendicular to the molecular stacking axis. We compute the energies of the QDM hole states under various electric and magnetic fields with a combination of full tight binding atomistic calculations and approximate atomistic results using eigenstates found at particular fields as a basis to extrapolate to other fields. We observe a relatively large Stark shift in hole states with the application of lateral electric fields, as well as a quenching of the Zeeman splitting. Most importantly, we observe that lateral electric fields induce hole spin mixing with a magnitude that increases with increasing lateral electric field over a moderate range. These results suggest that applied lateral electric fields provide an opportunity to fine-tune and manipulate, in situ, the energy levels and spin properties of single holes confined in QDMs.

  19. Deep electron and hole polarons and bipolarons in amorphous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviani, Moloud; Strand, Jack; Afanas'ev, Valery V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous (a)-HfO2 is a prototype high dielectric constant insulator with wide technological applications. Using ab initio calculations we show that excess electrons and holes can trap in a-HfO2 in energetically much deeper polaron states than in the crystalline monoclinic phase. The electrons and holes localize at precursor sites, such as elongated Hf-O bonds or undercoordinated Hf and O atoms, and the polaronic relaxation is amplified by the local disorder of amorphous network. Single electron polarons produce states in the gap at ˜2 eV below the bottom of the conduction band with average trapping energies of 1.0 eV. Two electrons can form even deeper bipolaron states on the same site. Holes are typically localized on undercoordinated O ions with average trapping energies of 1.4 eV. These results advance our general understanding of charge trapping in amorphous oxides by demonstrating that deep polaron states are inherent and do not require any bond rupture to form precursor sites.

  20. EDDINGTON-LIMITED ACCRETION AND THE BLACK HOLE MASS FUNCTION AT REDSHIFT 6

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Albert, Loic; Arzoumanian, Doris; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; Delorme, Philippe; Reyle, Celine

    2010-08-15

    We present discovery observations of a quasar in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) at redshift z = 6.44. We also use near-infrared spectroscopy of nine CFHQS quasars at z {approx} 6 to determine black hole masses. These are compared with similar estimates for more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars to investigate the relationship between black hole mass and quasar luminosity. We find a strong correlation between Mg II FWHM and UV luminosity and that most quasars at this early epoch are accreting close to the Eddington limit. Thus, these quasars appear to be in an early stage of their life cycle where they are building up their black hole mass exponentially. Combining these results with the quasar luminosity function, we derive the black hole mass function at z = 6. Our black hole mass function is {approx}10{sup 4} times lower than at z = 0 and substantially below estimates from previous studies. The main uncertainties which could increase the black hole mass function are a larger population of obscured quasars at high redshift than is observed at low redshift and/or a low quasar duty cycle at z = 6. In comparison, the global stellar mass function is only {approx}10{sup 2} times lower at z = 6 than at z = 0. The difference between the black hole and stellar mass function evolution is due to either rapid early star formation which is not limited by radiation pressure as is the case for black hole growth or inefficient black hole seeding. Our work predicts that the black hole mass-stellar mass relation for a volume-limited sample of galaxies declines rapidly at very high redshift. This is in contrast to the observed increase at 4 < z < 6 from the local relation if one just studies the most massive black holes.