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Sample records for locally constant functions

  1. Screening of Cosmological Constant in Non-Local Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Li; Sasaki, Misao

    We consider a model of non-local gravity with a large bare cosmological constant, Λ, and study its cosmological solutions. The model is characterized by a function f(ψ) = f0eαψ, where ψ = □-1R and α is a real dimensionless parameter. In the absence of matter, we find an expanding universe solution a ∝ tn with n < 1, that is, a universe with decelerated expansion without any fine-tuning of the parameter. Thus the effect of the cosmological constant is effectively shielded in this solution. It has been known that solutions in non-local gravity often suffer from the existence of ghost modes. In the present case, we find the solution is ghost-free if α > αcr ≈ 0.17. This is quite a weak condition. We argue that the solution is stable against the inclusion of matter fields. Thus our solution opens up new possibilities for solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  2. Methodology for extracting local constants from petroleum cracking flows

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shen-Lin; Lottes, Steven A.; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2000-01-01

    A methodology provides for the extraction of local chemical kinetic model constants for use in a reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code with chemical kinetic computations to optimize the operating conditions or design of the system, including retrofit design improvements to existing systems. The coupled CFD and kinetic computer code are used in combination with data obtained from a matrix of experimental tests to extract the kinetic constants. Local fluid dynamic effects are implicitly included in the extracted local kinetic constants for each particular application system to which the methodology is applied. The extracted local kinetic model constants work well over a fairly broad range of operating conditions for specific and complex reaction sets in specific and complex reactor systems. While disclosed in terms of use in a Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) riser, the inventive methodology has application in virtually any reaction set to extract constants for any particular application and reaction set formulation. The methodology includes the step of: (1) selecting the test data sets for various conditions; (2) establishing the general trend of the parametric effect on the measured product yields; (3) calculating product yields for the selected test conditions using coupled computational fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics; (4) adjusting the local kinetic constants to match calculated product yields with experimental data; and (5) validating the determined set of local kinetic constants by comparing the calculated results with experimental data from additional test runs at different operating conditions.

  3. Tuning sum rules with window functions for optical constant evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis V.; Méndez, José A.; Larruquert, Juan I.

    2016-07-01

    Sum rules are a useful tool to evaluate the global consistency of a set of optical constants. We present a procedure to spectrally tune sum rules to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants. It enables enhancing the weight of a desired spectral range within the sum-rule integral. The procedure consists in multiplying the complex refractive index with an adapted function, which is named window function. Window functions are constructed through integration of Lorentz oscillators. The asymptotic decay of these window functions enables the derivation of a multiplicity of sum rules akin to the inertial sum rule, along with one modified version of f-sum rule. This multiplicity of sum rules combined with the free selection of the photon energy range provides a double way to tune the spectral contribution within the sum rule. Window functions were applied to reported data of SrF2 and of Al films in order to check data consistency over the spectrum. The use of window functions shows that the optical constants of SrF2 are consistent in a broad spectrum. Regarding Al, some spectral ranges are seen to present a lower consistency, even though the standard sum rules with no window function did not detect inconsistencies. Hence window functions are expected to be a helpful tool to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants.

  4. Fast Fourier Transforms of Piecewise Constant Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorets, Eugene

    1995-02-01

    We present an algorithm for the evaluation of the Fourier transform of piecewise constant functions of two variables. The algorithm overcomes the accuracy problems associated with computing the Fourier transform of discontinuous functions; in fact, its time complexity is O (N2 logN + NP log2 (1/ε) + V log3 (1/ε)), where ε is the accuracy, N is the size of the problem, P is the perimeter of the set of discontinuities, and V is its number of vertices. The algorithm is based on the Lagrange interpolation formula and the Green's theorem, which are used to preprocess the data before applying the fast Fourier transform. It readily generalizes to higher dimensions and to piecewise smooth functions.

  5. Scene-based nonuniformity correction using local constant statistics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Wenyi

    2008-06-01

    In scene-based nonuniformity correction, the statistical approach assumes all possible values of the true-scene pixel are seen at each pixel location. This global-constant-statistics assumption does not distinguish fixed pattern noise from spatial variations in the average image. This often causes the "ghosting" artifacts in the corrected images since the existing spatial variations are treated as noises. We introduce a new statistical method to reduce the ghosting artifacts. Our method proposes a local-constant statistics that assumes that the temporal signal distribution is not constant at each pixel but is locally true. This considers statistically a constant distribution in a local region around each pixel but uneven distribution in a larger scale. Under the assumption that the fixed pattern noise concentrates in a higher spatial-frequency domain than the distribution variation, we apply a wavelet method to the gain and offset image of the noise and separate out the pattern noise from the spatial variations in the temporal distribution of the scene. We compare the results to the global-constant-statistics method using a clean sequence with large artificial pattern noises. We also apply the method to a challenging CCD video sequence and a LWIR sequence to show how effective it is in reducing noise and the ghosting artifacts. PMID:18516156

  6. Measurement of Local Peltier Constant at a Microcontact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyano, Mikio; Akashi, Naoya

    2009-07-01

    Our novel apparatus measures the local Peltier constant at a thermoelectric material microregion. A narrow metal needle probe contacts a sample mounted into a small adiabatic vacuum chamber with a pressure of about 10-4 Pa. A␣stepping-motor-type nano-actuator controls the probe’s contact pressure. We measured DC and AC I- V characteristics at the microcontact to determine thermoelectric properties. We measured I- V characteristics between the probe and a commercial (Bi,Sb)2Te3 surface. Measured values of local Peltier constants are of the same order as the bulk Peltier constant π: ca. 55 mV. They increase with increased contact resistance, suggesting that contact size affects thermoelectricity.

  7. Semi-local cosmic strings and the cosmological constant problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, José D.

    1997-02-01

    We study the cosmological constant problem in a three-dimensional N = 2 supergravity theory with gauge group SU(2) global × U(1) local. The model we consider is known to admit string-like configurations, the so-called semi-local cosmic strings. We show that the stability of these solitonic solutions is provided by supersymmetry through the existence of a lower bound for the energy, even though the manifold of the Higgs vacuum does not contain non-contractible loops. Charged Killing spinors do exist over configurations that saturate the Bogomol'nyi bound, as a consequence of an Aharonov-Bohmlike effect. Nevertheless, there are no physical fermionic zero modes on these backgrounds. The exact vanishing of the cosmological constant does not imply, then, Bose-Fermi degeneracy. This provides a non-trivial example of the recent claim made by Witten on the vanishing of the cosmological constant in three dimensions without unphysical degeneracies.

  8. Localization of functions defined on cantor group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivoshein, Aleksander V.; Lebedeva, Elena A.

    2013-10-01

    We introduce a notion of localization for dyadic functions, i. e. functions defined on Cantor group. Both non-periodic and periodic cases are discussed. Localization is characterized by functionals UCd and UCdp similar to the Heisenberg (the Breitenberger) uncertainty constants used for real-line (periodic) functions. We are looking for dyadic analogs of uncertainty principles. To justify definition we use some test functions including dyadic scaling and wavelet functions.

  9. Grothendieck's constant and local models for noisy entangled quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Acin, Antonio; Gisin, Nicolas; Toner, Benjamin

    2006-06-15

    We relate the nonlocal properties of noisy entangled states to Grothendieck's constant, a mathematical constant appearing in Banach space theory. For two-qubit Werner states {rho}{sub p}{sup W}=p|{psi}{sup -}><{psi}{sup -}|+(1-p)1/4, we show that there is a local model for projective measurements if and only if p{<=}1/K{sub G}(3), where K{sub G}(3) is Grothendieck's constant of order 3. Known bounds on K{sub G}(3) prove the existence of this model at least for p < or approx. 0.66, quite close to the current region of Bell violation, p{approx}0.71. We generalize this result to arbitrary quantum states.

  10. Distribution of local elastic constants in nanofilms of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Dong-Yuan; Lin, Ping; Yan, Xue-Song; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2012-07-01

    The distribution of local elastic constants of nanofilms was studied by the stress-fluctuation approach. The Lennard-Jones (L-J) and the second-moment approximation of tight-binding (TB-SMA) potential are used as models to investigate the differences between the pair-wise and many-body atomic interaction. Firstly the configurations of the nanofilm are obtained by the simulations, and then with the configurations, elastic constants are calculated. The behaviors of C11(n) and C12(n) are different for L-J films. Inner layers have larger C11(n) and smaller C12(n). For TB-SMA films, the distributions are different from L-J films'. The outmost layers have the smallest value, while the secondary outer layers have the largest and the behaviors of C11(n) and C12(n) are similar. This distribution can be explained by the competition between electron redistribution and lower coordination near the free surfaces. Compared to L-J model TB-SMA is better to describe the system. Furthermore, as the temperature increases, the elastic constants get larger while the distributions of the local elastic constants almost remain the same.

  11. On the local variation of the Hubble constant

    SciTech Connect

    Odderskov, Io; Hannestad, Steen; Haugbølle, Troels E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2014-10-01

    We have carefully studied how local measurements of the Hubble constant, H{sub 0}, can be influenced by a variety of different parameters related to survey depth, size, and fraction of the sky observed, as well as observer position in space. Our study is based on N-body simulations of structure in the standard ΛCDM model and our conclusion is that the expected variance in measurements of H{sub 0} is far too small to explain the current discrepancy between the low value of H{sub 0} inferred from measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Planck collaboration and the value measured directly in the local universe by use of Type Ia supernovae. This conclusion is very robust and does not change with different assumptions about effective sky coverage and depth of the survey or observer position in space.

  12. The local Hurwitz constant and Diophantine approximation on Hecke groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, J.

    1990-10-01

    Define the Hecke group by {G_q} = < {( {begin{array}{*{20}{c}} 1 & {{⪉mb... ...{array}{*{20}{c}} 0 & { - 1} 1 & 0 } )} rangle , {λ _q} = 2cos π /q , q = 3,4, ldots . We call {G_q}(∞ ) the {G_q} -rationals, and R - {G_q}(∞ ) the {G_q} -irrationals. The problem we treat here is the approximation of {G_q} -irrationals by {G_q} -rationals. Let M(α ) be the upper bound of numbers c for which \\vertα - k/m\\vert < 1/c{m^2} for all {G_q} -irrationals and infinitely many k/m in {G_q}(∞ ) . Set h_q'= {inf _α }M(α ) . We call h_q' the Hurwitz constant for {G_q} . It is known that h_q'= 2 , q even; h_q'= 2{(1 + {(1 - {λ _q}/2)^2})^{1/2}} , q odd. In this paper we prove this result by using {λ _q} -continued fractions, as developed previously by D. Rosen. Write α - frac{{{P_{n - 1}}}}{{{Q_{n - 1}}}} = frac{{{{( - 1)}^{... ...}{\\varepsilon _2} \\cdots {\\varepsilon _n}}}{{{m_{n - 1}}(α )Q_{n - 1}^2}}, where {\\varepsilon _i} = ± 1 and {P_i}/{Q_i} are the convergents of the {λ _q} -continued fraction for α . Then M(α ) = {overline {lim } _n}{m_n}(α ) . We call {m_n}(α ) the local Hurwitz constant. In the final section we prove some results on the local Hurwitz constant. For example (Theorem 4), it is shown that if q is odd and {\\varepsilon _{n + 1}} = {\\varepsilon _{n + 2}} = + 1 , then {m_i} ≥ {(λ _q^2 + 4)^{1/2}} > h_q' for at least one of i = n - 1,n,n + 1 .

  13. Homogeneous Thermal Cloak with Constant Conductivity and Tunable Heat Localization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tiancheng; Yuan, Tao; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Invisible cloak has long captivated the popular conjecture and attracted intensive research in various communities of wave dynamics, e.g., optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, etc. However, their inhomogeneous and extreme parameters imposed by transformation-optic method will usually require challenging realization with metamaterials, resulting in narrow bandwidth, loss, polarization-dependence, etc. In this paper, we demonstrate that thermodynamic cloak can be achieved with homogeneous and finite conductivity only employing naturally available materials. It is demonstrated that the thermal localization inside the coating layer can be tuned and controlled robustly by anisotropy, which enables an incomplete cloak to function perfectly. Practical realization of such homogeneous thermal cloak has been suggested by using two naturally occurring conductive materials, which provides an unprecedentedly plausible way to flexibly realize thermal cloak and manipulate heat flow with phonons. PMID:23549139

  14. Homogeneous thermal cloak with constant conductivity and tunable heat localization.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Yuan, Tao; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Invisible cloak has long captivated the popular conjecture and attracted intensive research in various communities of wave dynamics, e.g., optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, etc. However, their inhomogeneous and extreme parameters imposed by transformation-optic method will usually require challenging realization with metamaterials, resulting in narrow bandwidth, loss, polarization-dependence, etc. In this paper, we demonstrate that thermodynamic cloak can be achieved with homogeneous and finite conductivity only employing naturally available materials. It is demonstrated that the thermal localization inside the coating layer can be tuned and controlled robustly by anisotropy, which enables an incomplete cloak to function perfectly. Practical realization of such homogeneous thermal cloak has been suggested by using two naturally occurring conductive materials, which provides an unprecedentedly plausible way to flexibly realize thermal cloak and manipulate heat flow with phonons. PMID:23549139

  15. The Not so Constant Gravitational "Constant" G as a Function of Quantum Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxmilian Caligiuri, Luigi

    Gravitation is still the less understood among the fundamental forces of Nature. The ultimate physical origin of its ruling constant G could give key insights in this understanding. According to the Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, a massive body determines a gravitational potential that alters the speed of light, the clock's rate and the particle size as a function of the distance from its own center. On the other hand, it has been shown that the presence of mass determines a modification of Zero-Point Field (ZPF) energy density within its volume and in the space surrounding it. All these considerations strongly suggest that also the constant G could be expressed as a function of quantum vacuum energy density somehow depending on the distance from the mass whose presence modifies the ZPF energy structure. In this paper, starting from a constitutive medium-based picture of space, it has been formulated a model of gravitational constant G as a function of Planck's time and Quantum Vacuum energy density in turn depending on the radial distance from center of the mass originating the gravitational field, supposed as spherically symmetric. According to this model, in which gravity arises from the unbalanced physical vacuum pressure, gravitational "constant" G is not truly unchanging but slightly varying as a function of the distance from the mass source of gravitational potential itself. An approximate analytical form of such dependence has been discussed. The proposed model, apart from potentially having deep theoretical consequences on the commonly accepted picture of physical reality (from cosmology to matter stability), could also give the theoretical basis for unthinkable applications related, for example, to the field of gravity control and space propulsion.

  16. Formalism for the calculation of local elastic constants at grain boundaries by means of atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, M. D.; Wolf, D.; Lutsko, J. F.; Phillpot, S. R.

    1990-03-01

    A new formalism for use in atomistic simulations to calculate the full local elastic-constant tensor in terms of local stresses and strains is presented. Results of simulations on a high-angle (001) twist grain boundary are illustrated, using both a Lennard-Jones potential for Cu and an embedded-atom potential for Au. The two conceptionally rather different potentials show similar anomalies in all elastic constants, confined to within a few lattice planes of the grain boundary, with an especially dramatic reduction in the resistance to shear parallel to the grain-boundary plane. It is found that the primary cause of the anomalies is the atomic disorder near the grain boundary, as evidenced by the slice-by-slice radial distribution functions for the inhomogeneous interface system.

  17. Localized functionalization of single nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, J; Lee, J I; Ratto, T V; Letant, S E

    2005-09-12

    We demonstrate the localization of chemical functionality at the entrance of single nanopores for the first time by using the controlled growth of an oxide ring. Nanopores were fabricated by Focused Ion Beam machining on silicon platforms, locally derivatized by ion beam assisted oxide deposition, and further functionalized with DNA probes via silane chemistry. Ionic current recorded through single nanopores at various stages of the fabrication process demonstrated that the apertures can be locally functionalized with DNA probes. Future applications for this functional platform include the selective detection of biological organisms and molecules by ionic current blockade measurements.

  18. Improved ground-state electronic structure and optical dielectric constants with a semilocal exchange functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlček, Vojtěch; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd; Leppert, Linn; Armiento, Rickard; Kümmel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    A recently published generalized gradient approximation functional within density functional theory (DFT) has shown, in a few paradigm tests, an improved KS orbital description over standard (semi)local approximations. The characteristic feature of this functional is an enhancement factor that diverges like s ln(s ) for large reduced density gradients s which leads to unusual properties. We explore the improved orbital description of this functional more thoroughly by computing the electronic band structure, band gaps, and the optical dielectric constants in semiconductors, Mott insulators, and ionic crystals. Compared to standard semilocal functionals, we observe improvement in both the band gaps and the optical dielectric constants. In particular, the results are similar to those obtained with orbital functionals or by perturbation theory methods in that it opens band gaps in systems described as metallic by standard (semi)local density functionals, e.g., Ge, α -Sn, and CdO.

  19. Localized RNAs and their functions.

    PubMed

    Ding, D; Lipshitz, H D

    1993-10-01

    The eukaryotic cell is partitioned by membranes into spatially and functionally discrete subcellular organelles. In addition, the cytoplasm itself is partitioned into discrete subregions that carry out specific functions. Such compartmentation can be achieved by localizing proteins and RNAs to different subcellular regions. This review will focus on localized RNAs, with a particular emphasis on RNA localization mechanisms and on the possible biological functions of localization of these RNAs. In recent years, an increasing number of localized RNAs have been identified in a variety of cell types among many animal species. Emphasis here will be on localized RNAs in the most intensively studied systems-Drosophila and Xenopus eggs and early embryos. PMID:7506023

  20. Local Elastic Constants for Epoxy-Nanotube Composites from Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2007-01-01

    A method from molecular dynamics simulation is developed for determining local elastic constants of an epoxy/nanotube composite. The local values of C11, C33, K12, and K13 elastic constants are calculated for an epoxy/nanotube composite as a function of radial distance from the nanotube. While the results possess a significant amount of statistical uncertainty resulting from both the numerical analysis and the molecular fluctuations during the simulation, the following observations can be made. If the size of the region around the nanotube is increased from shells of 1 to 6 in thickness, then the scatter in the data reduces enough to observe trends. All the elastic constants determined are at a minimum 20 from the center of the nanotube. The C11, C33, and K12 follow similar trends as a function of radial distance from the nanotube. The K13 decreases greater distances from the nanotube and becomes negative which may be a symptom of the statistical averaging.

  1. On the accuracy of commonly used density functional approximations in determining the elastic constants of insulators and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Râsander, M.; Moram, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    We have performed density functional calculations using a range of local and semi-local as well as hybrid density functional approximations of the structure and elastic constants of 18 semiconductors and insulators. We find that most of the approximations have a very small error in the lattice constants, of the order of 1%, while the errors in the elastic constants and bulk modulus are much larger, at about 10% or better. When comparing experimental and theoretical lattice constants and bulk modulus we have included zero-point phonon effects. These effects make the experimental reference lattice constants 0.019 Å smaller on average while making the bulk modulus 4.3 GPa stiffer on average. According to our study, the overall best performing density functional approximations for determining the structure and elastic properties are the PBEsol functional, the two hybrid density functionals PBE0 and HSE (Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof), as well as the AM05 functional.

  2. Ig Constant Region Effects on Variable Region Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Janda, Alena; Bowen, Anthony; Greenspan, Neil S; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive humoral immune response is responsible for the generation of antimicrobial proteins known as immunoglobulin molecules or antibodies. Immunoglobulins provide a defense system against pathogenic microbes and toxins by targeting them for removal and/or destruction. Historically, antibodies have been thought to be composed of distinct structural domains known as the variable and constant regions that are responsible for antigen binding and mediating effector functions such as opsonization and complement activation, respectively. These domains were thought to be structurally and functionally independent. Recent work has revealed however, that in some families of antibodies, the two regions can influence each other. We will discuss the body of work that led to these observations, as well as the mechanisms that have been proposed to explain how these two different antibody regions may interact in the function of antigen binding. PMID:26870003

  3. Ig Constant Region Effects on Variable Region Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Alena; Bowen, Anthony; Greenspan, Neil S.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive humoral immune response is responsible for the generation of antimicrobial proteins known as immunoglobulin molecules or antibodies. Immunoglobulins provide a defense system against pathogenic microbes and toxins by targeting them for removal and/or destruction. Historically, antibodies have been thought to be composed of distinct structural domains known as the variable and constant regions that are responsible for antigen binding and mediating effector functions such as opsonization and complement activation, respectively. These domains were thought to be structurally and functionally independent. Recent work has revealed however, that in some families of antibodies, the two regions can influence each other. We will discuss the body of work that led to these observations, as well as the mechanisms that have been proposed to explain how these two different antibody regions may interact in the function of antigen binding. PMID:26870003

  4. Local elastic constants of LacI and implications for allostery.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Andre A S T; Ortiz, Vanessa

    2015-04-01

    Allostery connects subtle changes in a protein's potential energy surface, induced by perturbations like ligand-binding, to significant changes in its function. Understanding this phenomenon and predicting its occurrence are major goals of current research in biophysics and molecular biology. In this paper we introduce a novel approach for studying complex structural transformations such as those typical for allostery. We show that the calculation and analysis of atomic elastic constants of a known allosterically regulated protein, lac repressor, highlights regions that are particularly prone to suffer structural deformation and are experimentally linked to allosteric function. The calculations are based on a high resolution, all-atom description of the protein. We also show that, for the present system, modifying the description of the system from an all-atom forcefield to an elastic network model yields qualitatively different results, indicating the importance of adequately describing the local environment surrounding the different parts of the protein. PMID:25700189

  5. Functions with constant Laplacian satisfying homogeneous Robin boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keady, Grant; McNabb, Alex

    1993-01-01

    The authors study properties of real-valued functions u defined over {Omega}, a simply-connected domain in RN for which the Laplacian of u is constant in {Omega}, and which satisfy, on the boundary of {Omega}, the Robin boundary condition u+{beta}({partial}u/{partial}n)=0. Here n is the outward normal and {beta}[≥]0. When N=2 and {beta}=0, this is the classical St Venant torsion problem, but the concern in this paper is with N[≥]2 and {beta}[≥]0. Results concerning the magnitude um and location zm of the maximum value of u, and estimates for the functional S{beta}={int}{Omega}u, and the maxima pm and qm of |{nabla}u| and |{partial}u/{partial}n|, respectively, are established using comparison theorems and variational arguments.

  6. A trace of inflation in the local behavior of cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, E.; Feoli, A.; Pizza, L.

    2015-12-01

    Assuming the existence of a cosmological constant depending on time, we study the evolution of this field in a local region of spacetime. Solving the standard equations of Einstein Relativity in the weak field approximation we find two asymptotes in the behavior of the cosmological constant. Their meaning is the existence of an inflationary era both in the far past and in the future. A trace of the initial acceleration of the Universe can be found also in the local behavior of cosmological constant.

  7. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0 to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.

  8. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0more » to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.« less

  9. Predicting stability constants for uranyl complexes using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S

    2015-04-20

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl/ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM) to compute aqueous stability constants for UO2(2+) complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root-mean-square deviation from experiment <1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0 to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono- and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelating capability to uranyl. PMID:25835578

  10. Density functional theory calculations of nuclear quadrupole coupling constants with calibrated 14N quadrupole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia, E.; de Luca, G.; Chiodo, S.; Russo, N.; Calaminici, P.; Koster, A. M.; Jug, K.

    Density functional calculations of the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus in 13 test molecules, containing 14 nitrogen sites, have been performed using the linear combination of Gaussian-type orbital Kohn-Sham density functional theory (LCGTO-KSDFT) approach. Local and gradient corrected functionals were used for all-electron calculations. All the molecular structures were optimized at their respective levels of theory with extended basis sets. Calibrated 14N nuclear quadrupole moments were obtained through a fitting procedure between calculated electric field gradients and experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of the test set of molecules for each basis set and functional considered. With these calibrated 14N nuclear quadrupole moments, the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of the following selected systems were determined: fluoromethylisonitrile, pyridine, pyrrole, imadazole, pyrazole, 1,8-bis(dimethyl-amino)naphthalene, cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine, cocaine and heroin.

  11. Calculation of trajectories using constant and slowly varying functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culpepper, B. K.

    1971-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating trajectories for the restricted problem of three bodies which utilizes conic propagation of the state vector with frequency correction of position and velocity by means of a constant or slowly varying function. This method of calculating trajectories was applied to the planar circular restricted three body problem, the planar elliptic restricted problem, and the ephemeral restricted problem. Two methods (the refined method and the straight forward method) of determining the direction of the position correction are presented for the circular restricted problem and the elliptic restricted problem of three bodies. Only the straight forward method was used with the ephemeral restricted problem. The earth, the moon, and a space vehicle comprise the restricted three body model that is used.

  12. Local measurements of the diffusion constant in multiple scattering media: Application to human trabecular bone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, Alexandre; Derode, Arnaud; Padilla, Frédéric

    2008-03-01

    We present local measurements of the diffusion constant for ultrasonic waves undergoing multiple scattering. The experimental setup uses a coherent array of programmable transducers. By achieving Gaussian beamforming at emission and reception, an array of virtual sources and receivers located in the near field is constructed. A matrix treatment is proposed to separate the incoherent intensity from the coherent backscattering peak. Local measurements of the diffusion constant D are then achieved. This technique is applied to a real case: a sample of human trabecular bone for which the ultrasonic characterization of multiple scattering is an issue.

  13. De Sitter brane-world, localization of gravity, and the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Ishwaree P.

    2011-04-01

    Cosmological models with a de Sitter 3-brane embedded in a 5-dimensional de Sitter spacetime (dS5) give rise to a finite 4D Planck mass similar to that in Randall-Sundrum (RS) brane-world models in anti-de Sitter 5-dimensional spacetime(AdS5). Yet, there arise a few important differences as compared to the results with a flat 3-brane or 4D Minkowski spacetime. For example, the mass reduction formula (MRF) MPl2=M(5)3ℓAdS as well as the relationship MPl2=MPl(4+n)n+2Ln (with L being the average size or the radius of the n extra dimensions) expected in models of product-space (or Kaluza-Klein) compactifications get modified in cosmological backgrounds. In an expanding universe, a physically relevant MRF encodes information upon the 4-dimensional Hubble expansion parameter, in addition to the length and mass parameters L, MPl, and MPl(4+n). If a bulk cosmological constant is present in the solution, then the reduction formula is further modified. With these new insights, we show that the localization of a massless 4D graviton as well as the mass hierarchy between MPl and MPl(4+n) can be explained in cosmological brane-world models. A notable advantage of having a 5D de Sitter bulk is that in this case the zero-mass wave function is normalizable, which is not necessarily the case if the bulk spacetime is anti-de Sitter. In spacetime dimensions D≥7, however, the bulk cosmological constant Λb can take either sign (Λb<0, =0, or >0). The D=6 case is rather inconclusive, in which case Λb may be introduced together with 2-form gauge field (or flux). We obtain some interesting classical gravity solutions that compactify higher-dimensional spacetime to produce a Robertson-Walker universe with de Sitter-type expansion plus one extra noncompact direction. We also show that such models can admit both an effective 4-dimensional Newton constant that remains finite and a normalizable zero-mode graviton wave function.

  14. Performance of the M11-L density functional for bandgaps and lattice constants of unary and binary semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Peverati, Roberto; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed SOGGA11 and M11-L density functionals have been tested for the prediction of bandgaps and lattice constants by comparing to databases containing 31 bandgaps and 34 lattice constants. To make a comparative assessment we also test several other density functionals against the same databases; in particular, we test the local spin density approximation, PBE, PBEsol, SOGGA, TPSS, revTPSS, and M06-L local density functionals and the HSE screened-exchange hybrid nonlocal density functional; and for a subset of 13 lattice constants we also compare the mean errors to those of the AM05 and WC local density functionals and the HISS and HSEsol nonlocal density functionals. The tests show that, of the ten functionals tested against all 65 data, the SOGGA, PBEsol, and HSE functionals are the most accurate for lattice constants, whereas the HSE, M11-L, and M06-L density functionals are the most accurate for bandgaps. However, the SOGGA11 density functional is the most accurate generalized gradient approximation for bandgaps. PMID:22482577

  15. The effect of interacting dark energy on local measurements of the Hubble constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odderskov, Io; Baldi, Marco; Amendola, Luca

    2016-05-01

    In the current state of cosmology, where cosmological parameters are being measured to percent accuracy, it is essential to understand all sources of error to high precision. In this paper we present the results of a study of the local variations in the Hubble constant measured at the distance scale of the Coma Cluster, and test the validity of correcting for the peculiar velocities predicted by gravitational instability theory. The study is based on N-body simulations, and includes models featuring a coupling between dark energy and dark matter, as well as two ΛCDM simulations with different values of σ8. It is found that the variance in the local flows is significantly larger in the coupled models, which increases the uncertainty in the local measurements of the Hubble constant in these scenarios. By comparing the results from the different simulations, it is found that most of the effect is caused by the higher value of σ8 in the coupled cosmologies, though this cannot account for all of the additional variance. Given the discrepancy between different estimates of the Hubble constant in the universe today, cosmological models causing a greater cosmic variance is something that we should be aware of.

  16. Viscoelastic Timoshenko Beams with Occasionally Constant Relaxation Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Nasser-eddine

    2012-08-15

    For a prescribed desirable arbitrary decay suitable viscoelastic materials are determined through their relaxation functions. It is shown that if we wish to have a decay of order {gamma}(t) then the kernels should be of the same order. That is their product with this function should be summable.

  17. Functional Localization of Genetic Network Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shinji; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu

    According to the knowledge of brain science, it is suggested that there exists cerebral functional localization, which means that a specific part of the cerebrum is activated depending on various kinds of information human receives. The aim of this paper is to build an artificial model to realize functional localization based on Genetic Network Programming (GNP), a new evolutionary computation method recently developed. GNP has a directed graph structure suitable for realizing functional localization. We studied the basic characteristics of the proposed system by making GNP work in a functionally localized way.

  18. Local renormalization group functions from quantum renormalization group and holographic bulk locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2015-06-01

    The bulk locality in the constructive holographic renormalization group requires miraculous cancellations among various local renormalization group functions. The cancellation is not only from the properties of the spectrum but from more detailed aspects of operator product expansions in relation to conformal anomaly. It is remarkable that one-loop computation of the universal local renormalization group functions in the weakly coupled limit of the super Yang-Mills theory fulfils the necessary condition for the cancellation in the strongly coupled limit in its SL(2, Z) duality invariant form. From the consistency between the quantum renormalization group and the holographic renormalization group, we determine some unexplored local renormalization group functions (e.g. diffusive term in the beta function for the gauge coupling constant) in the strongly coupled limit of the planar super Yang-Mills theory.

  19. Finite-temperature elastic constants of paramagnetic materials within the disordered local moment picture from ab initio molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozafari, E.; Shulumba, N.; Steneteg, P.; Alling, B.; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a theoretical scheme to calculate the elastic constants of magnetic materials in the high-temperature paramagnetic state. Our approach is based on a combination of disordered local moments picture and ab initio molecular dynamics (DLM-MD). Moreover, we investigate a possibility to enhance the efficiency of the simulations of elastic properties using the recently introduced method: symmetry imposed force constant temperature-dependent effective potential (SIFC-TDEP). We have chosen cubic paramagnetic CrN as a model system. This is done due to its technological importance and its demonstrated strong coupling between magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom. We have studied the temperature-dependent single-crystal and polycrystalline elastic constants of paramagentic CrN up to 1200 K. The obtained results at T = 300 K agree well with the experimental values of polycrystalline elastic constants as well as the Poisson ratio at room temperature. We observe that the Young's modulus is strongly dependent on temperature, decreasing by ˜14 % from T = 300 K to 1200 K. In addition we have studied the elastic anisotropy of CrN as a function of temperature and we observe that CrN becomes substantially more isotropic as the temperature increases. We demonstrate that the use of Birch law may lead to substantial errors for calculations of temperature induced changes of elastic moduli. The proposed methodology can be used for accurate predictions of mechanical properties of magnetic materials at temperatures above their magnetic order-disorder phase transition.

  20. Potential Representation - Global vs. Local Trial Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Many systems of trial functions are available for representing potential fields on the sphere or parts of the sphere. We distinguish global trial functions (such as spherical harmonics) from localized trial functions (such as spline basis functions, scaling functions, wavelets, and Slepian functions). All these systems have their own pros and cons. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of several selected systems of trial functions and propose criteria for their applicability. Moreover, we present an algorithm which is able to combine different types of trial functions. This yields a sparser solution which combines the features of the different basis systems which are used.

  1. Locality of correlation in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Kieron; Cancio, Antonio; Gould, Tim; Pittalis, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The Hohenberg-Kohn density functional was long ago shown to reduce to the Thomas-Fermi (TF) approximation in the non-relativistic semiclassical (or large-Z) limit for all matter, i.e., the kinetic energy becomes local. Exchange also becomes local in this limit. Numerical data on the correlation energy of atoms support the conjecture that this is also true for correlation, but much less relevant to atoms. We illustrate how expansions around a large particle number are equivalent to local density approximations and their strong relevance to density functional approximations. Analyzing highly accurate atomic correlation energies, we show that EC → -AC ZlnZ + BCZ as Z → ∞, where Z is the atomic number, AC is known, and we estimate BC to be about 37 mhartree. The local density approximation yields AC exactly, but a very incorrect value for BC, showing that the local approximation is less relevant for the correlation alone. This limit is a benchmark for the non-empirical construction of density functional approximations. We conjecture that, beyond atoms, the leading correction to the local density approximation in the large-Z limit generally takes this form, but with BC a functional of the TF density for the system. The implications for the construction of approximate density functionals are discussed.

  2. Locality of correlation in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kieron; Cancio, Antonio; Gould, Tim; Pittalis, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    The Hohenberg-Kohn density functional was long ago shown to reduce to the Thomas-Fermi (TF) approximation in the non-relativistic semiclassical (or large-Z) limit for all matter, i.e., the kinetic energy becomes local. Exchange also becomes local in this limit. Numerical data on the correlation energy of atoms support the conjecture that this is also true for correlation, but much less relevant to atoms. We illustrate how expansions around a large particle number are equivalent to local density approximations and their strong relevance to density functional approximations. Analyzing highly accurate atomic correlation energies, we show that EC → -AC ZlnZ + BCZ as Z → ∞, where Z is the atomic number, AC is known, and we estimate BC to be about 37 mhartree. The local density approximation yields AC exactly, but a very incorrect value for BC, showing that the local approximation is less relevant for the correlation alone. This limit is a benchmark for the non-empirical construction of density functional approximations. We conjecture that, beyond atoms, the leading correction to the local density approximation in the large-Z limit generally takes this form, but with BC a functional of the TF density for the system. The implications for the construction of approximate density functionals are discussed. PMID:27497544

  3. Constant illumination reduces circulating melatonin and impairs immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, Ellie B.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha; Tull, Dedreia; Green, Mark P.; Jones, Therésa M.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to constant light has a range of negative effects on behaviour and physiology, including reduced immune function in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is proposed that the associated suppression of melatonin (a ubiquitous hormone and powerful antioxidant) in response to the presence of light at night could be an underlying mechanistic link driving the changes to immune function. Here, we investigated the relationship between constant illumination, melatonin and immune function, using a model invertebrate species, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Crickets were reared under either a 12 h light: 12 h dark regimen or a constant 24 h light regimen. Circulating melatonin concentration and immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity and phenoloxidase (PO) activity) were assessed in individual adult crickets through the analysis of haemolymph. Constant illumination reduced melatonin and had a negative impact on haemocyte concentrations and lytic activity, but its effect on PO activity was less apparent. Our data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a link between exposure to constant illumination and variation in haemocyte concentration in an invertebrate model, while also highlighting the potential complexity of the immune response following exposure to constant illumination. This study provides insight into the possible negative effect of artificial night-time lighting on the physiology of invertebrates, but whether lower and potentially more ecologically relevant levels of light at night produce comparable results, as has been reported in several vertebrate taxa, remains to be tested. PMID:26339535

  4. Constant illumination reduces circulating melatonin and impairs immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Joanna; Michaelides, Ellie B; Rupasinghe, Thusitha; Tull, Dedreia; Green, Mark P; Jones, Therésa M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to constant light has a range of negative effects on behaviour and physiology, including reduced immune function in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is proposed that the associated suppression of melatonin (a ubiquitous hormone and powerful antioxidant) in response to the presence of light at night could be an underlying mechanistic link driving the changes to immune function. Here, we investigated the relationship between constant illumination, melatonin and immune function, using a model invertebrate species, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Crickets were reared under either a 12 h light: 12 h dark regimen or a constant 24 h light regimen. Circulating melatonin concentration and immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity and phenoloxidase (PO) activity) were assessed in individual adult crickets through the analysis of haemolymph. Constant illumination reduced melatonin and had a negative impact on haemocyte concentrations and lytic activity, but its effect on PO activity was less apparent. Our data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a link between exposure to constant illumination and variation in haemocyte concentration in an invertebrate model, while also highlighting the potential complexity of the immune response following exposure to constant illumination. This study provides insight into the possible negative effect of artificial night-time lighting on the physiology of invertebrates, but whether lower and potentially more ecologically relevant levels of light at night produce comparable results, as has been reported in several vertebrate taxa, remains to be tested. PMID:26339535

  5. Direct determination of the local Hamaker constant of inorganic surfaces based on scanning force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krajina, Brad A.; Kocherlakota, Lakshmi S.; Overney, René M.

    2014-10-28

    The energetics involved in the bonding fluctuations between nanometer-sized silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) probes and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) could be quantified directly and locally on the submicron scale via a time-temperature superposition analysis of the lateral forces between scanning force microscopy silicon dioxide probes and inorganic sample surfaces. The so-called “intrinsic friction analysis” (IFA) provided direct access to the Hamaker constants for HOPG and MoS{sub 2}, as well as the control sample, calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The use of scanning probe enables nanoscopic analysis of bonding fluctuations, thereby overcoming challenges associated with larger scale inhomogeneity and surface roughness common to conventional techniques used to determine surface free energies and dielectric properties. A complementary numerical analysis based on optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy and the Lifshitz quantum electrodynamic theory of van der Waals interactions is provided and confirms quantitatively the IFA results.

  6. Vector meson masses from a hidden local symmetry in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Mamiya; Matsuzaki, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the magnetic responses of vector meson masses based on the hidden local symmetry (HLS) model in a constant magnetic field, described by the lightest two-flavor system including the pion, rho and omega mesons in the spectrum. The effective masses influenced under the magnetic field are evaluated according to the derivative or chiral expansion established in the HLS model. At the leading order O (p2), the g factor of the charged rho meson is fixed to be 2, implying that the rho meson at this order is treated just like a pointlike spin-1 particle. Beyond the leading order, one finds anomalous magnetic interactions of the charged rho meson, involving the anomalous magnetic moment, which give corrections to the effective mass. It is then suggested that up to O (p4) the charged rho meson tends to become massless. Of interest is that nontrivial magnetic dependence of neutral mesons emerges to give rise to the significant mixing among neutral mesons. Consequently, it leads to the dramatic enhancement of the omega meson mass, which is testable in future lattice simulations. Corrections from terms beyond O (p4) are also addressed.

  7. The uniform continuity of characteristic function from convoluted exponential distribution with stabilizer constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devianto, Dodi

    2016-02-01

    It is constructed convolution of generated random variable from independent and identically exponential distribution with stabilizer constant. The characteristic function of this distribution is obtained by using Laplace-Stieltjes transform. The uniform continuity property of characteristic function from this convolution is obtained by using analytical methods as basic properties.

  8. [Localization of language function in the brain].

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L

    2011-12-01

    Since the first report of an aphasic patient by Paul Broca, the localization of brain function has been disputed for 150 years. In lesion studies, double dissociation has been a key concept to show the localization of particular cognitive functions. The advancement of non-invasive brain imaging methods enables us to investigate the brain activities under well-controlled conditions, further promoting the studies on the localization of the cognitive functions, including language function. Brain imaging studies, together with subtraction and correlation analyses, have accumulated evidence that syntax, phonology, and sentence comprehension are separately processed by modules in different cortical regions. More specifically, it has been clarified that the module for syntax localizes in the left lateral premotor cortex and the opercular/triangular parts of the left inferior frontal gyrus. This modular structure further suggests that aphasia is interpreted as deficits in either syntactic or phonological processing. Therefore, the classical model of contrasting speech production and comprehension should be updated. According to theoretical linguistics, on the other hand, the recursive computation of syntactic structures is an essential feature of human language faculty. One direction of research would be to contrast human beings and animals for the abilities of processing symbolic sequences. Another direction is to clarify that the human brain is indeed specialized in language processing, which can be revealed by well-controlled language tasks and functional imaging techniques. Here we will review recent studies that demonstrate the existence of grammar center in the left frontal cortex. The future studies in the neuroscience of language will eventually elucidate the cortical localization of language function in a more precise way, i.e., what is really computed in the human brain. PMID:22147453

  9. Challenges and implications of global modeling approaches that are alternatives to using constant plant functional types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodegom, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years a number of approaches have been developed to provide alternatives to the use of plant functional types (PFTs) with constant vegetation characteristics for simulating vegetation responses to climate changes. In this presentation, an overview of those approaches and their challenges is given. Some new approaches aim at removing PFTs altogether by determining the combination of vegetation characteristics that would fit local conditions best. Others describe the variation in traits within PFTs as a function of environmental drivers, based on community assembly principles. In the first approach, after an equilibrium has been established, vegetation composition and its functional attributes can change by allowing the emergence of a new type that is more fit. In the latter case, changes in vegetation attributes in space and time as assumed to be the result intraspecific variation, genetic adaptation and species turnover, without quantifying their respective importance. Hence, it is assumed that -by whatever mechanism- the community as a whole responds without major time lags to changes in environmental drivers. Recently, we showed that intraspecific variation is highly species- and trait-specific and that none of the current hypotheses on drivers of this variation seems to hold. Also genetic adaptation varies considerably among species and it is uncertain whether it will be fast enough to cope with climate change. Species turnover within a community is especially fast in herbaceous communities, but much slower in forest communities. Hence, it seems that assumptions made may not hold for forested ecosystems, but solutions to deal with this do not yet exist. Even despite the fact that responsiveness of vegetation to environmental change may be overestimated, we showed that -upon implementation of trait-environment relationships- major changes in global vegetation distribution are projected, to similar extents as to those without such responsiveness.

  10. A 2.4% Determination of the Local Value of the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam G.; Macri, Lucas M.; Hoffmann, Samantha L.; Scolnic, Dan; Casertano, Stefano; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Tucker, Brad E.; Reid, Mark J.; Jones, David O.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Chornock, Ryan; Challis, Peter; Yuan, Wenlong; Brown, Peter J.; Foley, Ryan J.

    2016-07-01

    We use the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to reduce the uncertainty in the local value of the Hubble constant from 3.3% to 2.4%. The bulk of this improvement comes from new near-infrared (NIR) observations of Cepheid variables in 11 host galaxies of recent type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), more than doubling the sample of reliable SNe Ia having a Cepheid-calibrated distance to a total of 19; these in turn leverage the magnitude-redshift relation based on ∼300 SNe Ia at z < 0.15. All 19 hosts as well as the megamaser system NGC 4258 have been observed with WFC3 in the optical and NIR, thus nullifying cross-instrument zeropoint errors in the relative distance estimates from Cepheids. Other noteworthy improvements include a 33% reduction in the systematic uncertainty in the maser distance to NGC 4258, a larger sample of Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a more robust distance to the LMC based on late-type detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs), HST observations of Cepheids in M31, and new HST-based trigonometric parallaxes for Milky Way (MW) Cepheids. We consider four geometric distance calibrations of Cepheids: (i) megamasers in NGC 4258, (ii) 8 DEBs in the LMC, (iii) 15 MW Cepheids with parallaxes measured with HST/FGS, HST/WFC3 spatial scanning and/or Hipparcos, and (iv) 2 DEBs in M31. The Hubble constant from each is 72.25 ± 2.51, 72.04 ± 2.67, 76.18 ± 2.37, and 74.50 ± 3.27 km s‑1 Mpc‑1, respectively. Our best estimate of H 0 = 73.24 ± 1.74 km s‑1 Mpc‑1 combines the anchors NGC 4258, MW, and LMC, yielding a 2.4% determination (all quoted uncertainties include fully propagated statistical and systematic components). This value is 3.4σ higher than 66.93 ± 0.62 km s‑1 Mpc‑1 predicted by ΛCDM with 3 neutrino flavors having a mass of 0.06 eV and the new Planck data, but the discrepancy reduces to 2.1σ relative to the prediction of 69.3 ± 0.7 km s‑1 Mpc‑1 based on the comparably precise combination of WMAP

  11. A 2.4% Determination of the Local Value of the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam G.; Macri, Lucas M.; Hoffmann, Samantha L.; Scolnic, Dan; Casertano, Stefano; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Tucker, Brad E.; Reid, Mark J.; Jones, David O.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Chornock, Ryan; Challis, Peter; Yuan, Wenlong; Brown, Peter J.; Foley, Ryan J.

    2016-07-01

    We use the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to reduce the uncertainty in the local value of the Hubble constant from 3.3% to 2.4%. The bulk of this improvement comes from new near-infrared (NIR) observations of Cepheid variables in 11 host galaxies of recent type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), more than doubling the sample of reliable SNe Ia having a Cepheid-calibrated distance to a total of 19; these in turn leverage the magnitude-redshift relation based on ˜300 SNe Ia at z < 0.15. All 19 hosts as well as the megamaser system NGC 4258 have been observed with WFC3 in the optical and NIR, thus nullifying cross-instrument zeropoint errors in the relative distance estimates from Cepheids. Other noteworthy improvements include a 33% reduction in the systematic uncertainty in the maser distance to NGC 4258, a larger sample of Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a more robust distance to the LMC based on late-type detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs), HST observations of Cepheids in M31, and new HST-based trigonometric parallaxes for Milky Way (MW) Cepheids. We consider four geometric distance calibrations of Cepheids: (i) megamasers in NGC 4258, (ii) 8 DEBs in the LMC, (iii) 15 MW Cepheids with parallaxes measured with HST/FGS, HST/WFC3 spatial scanning and/or Hipparcos, and (iv) 2 DEBs in M31. The Hubble constant from each is 72.25 ± 2.51, 72.04 ± 2.67, 76.18 ± 2.37, and 74.50 ± 3.27 km s‑1 Mpc‑1, respectively. Our best estimate of H 0 = 73.24 ± 1.74 km s‑1 Mpc‑1 combines the anchors NGC 4258, MW, and LMC, yielding a 2.4% determination (all quoted uncertainties include fully propagated statistical and systematic components). This value is 3.4σ higher than 66.93 ± 0.62 km s‑1 Mpc‑1 predicted by ΛCDM with 3 neutrino flavors having a mass of 0.06 eV and the new Planck data, but the discrepancy reduces to 2.1σ relative to the prediction of 69.3 ± 0.7 km s‑1 Mpc‑1 based on the comparably precise combination of WMAP

  12. Constant-current control method of multi-function electromagnetic transmitter.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kaichang; Zhou, Fengdao; Wang, Shuang; Lin, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the requirements of controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric, DC resistivity, and induced polarization, a constant-current control method is proposed. Using the required current waveforms in prospecting as a standard, the causes of current waveform distortion and current waveform distortion's effects on prospecting are analyzed. A cascaded topology is adopted to achieve 40 kW constant-current transmitter. The responsive speed and precision are analyzed. According to the power circuit of the transmitting system, the circuit structure of the pulse width modulation (PWM) constant-current controller is designed. After establishing the power circuit model of the transmitting system and the PWM constant-current controller model, analyzing the influence of ripple current, and designing an open-loop transfer function according to the amplitude-frequency characteristic curves, the parameters of the PWM constant-current controller are determined. The open-loop transfer function indicates that the loop gain is no less than 28 dB below 160 Hz, which assures the responsive speed of the transmitting system; the phase margin is 45°, which assures the stabilization of the transmitting system. Experimental results verify that the proposed constant-current control method can keep the control error below 4% and can effectively suppress load change caused by the capacitance of earth load. PMID:25725863

  13. Constant-current control method of multi-function electromagnetic transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kaichang; Zhou, Fengdao; Wang, Shuang; Lin, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the requirements of controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric, DC resistivity, and induced polarization, a constant-current control method is proposed. Using the required current waveforms in prospecting as a standard, the causes of current waveform distortion and current waveform distortion's effects on prospecting are analyzed. A cascaded topology is adopted to achieve 40 kW constant-current transmitter. The responsive speed and precision are analyzed. According to the power circuit of the transmitting system, the circuit structure of the pulse width modulation (PWM) constant-current controller is designed. After establishing the power circuit model of the transmitting system and the PWM constant-current controller model, analyzing the influence of ripple current, and designing an open-loop transfer function according to the amplitude-frequency characteristic curves, the parameters of the PWM constant-current controller are determined. The open-loop transfer function indicates that the loop gain is no less than 28 dB below 160 Hz, which assures the responsive speed of the transmitting system; the phase margin is 45°, which assures the stabilization of the transmitting system. Experimental results verify that the proposed constant-current control method can keep the control error below 4% and can effectively suppress load change caused by the capacitance of earth load.

  14. Breathers and localized solitons for the Hirota–Maxwell–Bloch system on constant backgrounds in erbium doped fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Rui Hao, Hui-Qin

    2014-05-15

    In nonlinear erbium doped fibers, the Hirota–Maxwell–Bloch system with higher order effects usually governs the propagation of ultrashort pulses. New soliton solutions for this system are constructed on the constant backgrounds including one and two breathers and first and higher order localized soliton solutions. Considering the influence of higher order effects, propagation properties of those soliton solutions are discussed. -- Highlights: •The AB and Ma-breathers are derived on the constant backgrounds. •Dynamic features of two-breathers are discussed. •Localized solutions are generated from two different ways.

  15. The Einstein-Hilbert action with cosmological constant as a functional of generic form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolksdorf, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The geometrical underpinnings of a specific class of Dirac operators are discussed. It is demonstrated how this class of Dirac operators allows to relate various geometrical functionals like the Yang-Mills action and the functional of non-linear σ - models (i.e., of (Dirac) harmonic maps). These functionals are shown to be similar to the Einstein-Hilbert action with cosmological constant (EHC). The EHC may thus be regarded as a "generic functional." As a byproduct, the geometrical setup presented also allows to avoid the issue of "fermion doubling" as usually encountered, for instance, in the geometrical discussion of the Standard Model in terms of Dirac operators. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how the geometrical setup presented allows to derive the cosmological constant term of the EHC from the Einstein-Hilbert functional and the action of a purely gauge coupling Higgs field.

  16. [Local, central and regional functions. Obsolete concepts?].

    PubMed

    Stene-Larsen, G; Bjørnstad, E; Bergesen, O; Nordhaug, B; Abildgaard, U

    1990-11-30

    As a consequence of the regionalization of the health services in Norway hospitals were given either local, central or regional responsibility. This system was intended to improve the availability of expertise and costly equipment, and at the same time reduce the growth of expenditures on health care. In the last few years, however, many of the smaller hospitals have improved their technical and medical skills to such an extent that this classification system has become less meaningful. Aker hospital in Oslo carries out local, central and regional functions. In a prospective study at this hospital we found that 88% of 980 consecutive medical admissions could be classified as local hospital admissions. Only 5% of the patients needed service at the central level, and 5% at the regional level. In our opinion it would suffice to have two types of hospital ("treatment levels"), standard hospitals and referral hospitals. PMID:2274952

  17. H0, q0 and the local velocity field. [Hubble and deceleration constants in Big Bang expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandage, A.; Tammann, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to find a systematic deviation from linearity for distances that are under the control of the Virgo cluster, and to determine the value of the mean random motion about the systematic flow, in order to improve the measurement of the Hubble and the deceleration constants. The velocity-distance relation for large and intermediate distances is studied, and type I supernovae are calibrated relatively as distance indicators and absolutely to obtain a new value for the Hubble constant. Methods of determining the deceleration constant are assessed, including determination from direct measurement, mean luminosity density, virgocentric motion, and the time scale test. The very local velocity field is investigated, and a solution is preferred with a random peculiar radial velocity of very nearby field galaxies of 90-100 km/s, and a Virgocentric motion of the local group of 220 km/s, leading to an underlying expansion rate of 55, in satisfactory agreement with the global value.

  18. Local cosmic strings in Brans-Dicke theory with a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Delice, Oezguer

    2006-09-15

    It is known that Vilenkin's phenomenological equation of state for static straight cosmic strings is inconsistent with Brans-Dicke theory. We will prove that, in the presence of a cosmological constant, this equation of state is consistent with Brans-Dicke theory. The general solution of the full nonlinear field equations, representing the interior of a cosmic string with a cosmological constant, is also presented.

  19. Local spin analyses using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Bayileyegn; Peralta, Juan

    Local spin analysis is a valuable technique in computational investigations magnetic interactions on mono- and polynuclear transition metal complexes, which play vital roles in catalysis, molecular magnetism, artificial photosynthesis, and several other commercially important materials. The relative size and complex electronic structure of transition metal complexes often prohibits the use of multi-determinant approaches, and hence, practical calculations are often limited to single-determinant methods. Density functional theory (DFT) has become one of the most successful and widely used computational tools for the electronic structure study of complex chemical systems; transition metal complexes in particular. Within the DFT formalism, a more flexible and complete theoretical modeling of transition metal complexes can be achieved by considering noncollinear spins, in which the spin density is 'allowed to' adopt noncollinear structures in stead of being constrained to align parallel/antiparallel to a universal axis of magnetization. In this meeting, I will present local spin analyses results obtained using different DFT functionals. Local projection operators are used to decompose the expectation value of the total spin operator; first introduced by Clark and Davidson.

  20. Measurement of the dielectric function spectra of low dielectric constant using the spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Masahiro; Postava, Kamil; Yamaguchi, Tomuo; Akashika, Kumiko; Hayashi, Hideki; Kitamura, Fujikazu

    2003-05-01

    The dielectric function spectra of low dielectric constants (low-k) materials have been determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry, normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry, and Fourier transform infrared transmission spectrometry over a wide spectral range from 0.03 to 5.4 eV (230nm to 40.5um wavelength region). The electric and ionic contributions to the overall static dielectric constants were determined for representative materials used in the semiconductor industry for interlayer dielectrics: (1) FLARE - organic spin-on polymer, (2) HOSP - spin-on hybrid organic-siloxane polymer from the Honeywell Electric Materials Company, and (3) SiLK- organic dielectric resin from the Dow Chemical Company. The main contributions to the static dielectric constant of the low-k materials studied were found to be the electric and ionic absorption.

  1. An AC constant-response method for electrophysiological measurements of spectral sensitivity functions.

    PubMed

    de Souza, J M; DeVoe, R D; Schoeps, C; Ventura, D F

    1996-10-01

    A number of methods have been used in the past to measure spectral sensitivity (S(lambda)) functions of electric responses in the visual system. We present here a microcomputer based, AC, constant-response method for automatic on-line measurement of S(lambda) in cells with or without a sustained tonic response. It is based on feedback adjustment of light intensity to obtain constant peak-to-peak amplitudes of response to a flickering stimulus as the spectrum is scanned between 300 and 700 nm in 4 nm steps. It combines the advantages of: (1) on-line presentation of S(lambda) curves; (2) constant light adaptation; (3) sampling of many points; and (4) fast data collection time. The system can be applied to sensitivity or threshold (e.g., S(lambda), dark adaptation, receptive field) measurements of any electrically recorded visual response. PMID:8912193

  2. Generalized local-spin-density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yufei; Whitehead, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    An alternative density-functional theory, the generalized local-spin-density-functional (G-LSD) theory, is proposed based on the boundary conditions and sum rule of the Fermi-correlation factor in the Hartree-Fock (HF) limit. It avoids the physical restrictions to the boundary conditions and the sum rule used in the generalized exchange local-spin-density-functional (GX-LSD) theory completely, the homogeneous electron-density approximation in the Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) theory and in the Gáspár-Kohn-Sham (GKS) theory partly, and the time-consuming step to search for the optimal exchange parameter for each atom or ion in the Xα and Ξa theories. The alternative G-LSD theory generates the GX-LSD, HFS, GKS, Xα, and Ξa theories, when additional approximations or certain Fermi-hole shapes or high electron-density limit in a system are used. Theoretically, the G-LSD theory is more rigorous than the GX-LSD, HFS, GKS, and Ξa theories. Numerically, the statistical total energies for atoms in the G-LSD theory are in excellent agreement with the HF results, when the Gopinathan, Whitehead, and Bogdanovic [Phys. Rev. A 14, 1 (1976)] Fermi-hole parameters are used.

  3. THE ONSET OF ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN DUST LAYERS: II. EFFECTIVE DIELECTRIC CONSTANT AND LOCAL FIELD ENHANCEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Part 1 of the work has shown that electrical breakdown in dust layers obeys Paschen's Law, but occurs at applied field values which appear too small to initiate the breakdown. In this paper the authors show how an effective dielectric constant characterizing the dust layer can be...

  4. Beyond localization: from hodology to function

    PubMed Central

    ffytche, Dominic H; Catani, Marco

    2005-01-01

    A century on, Campbell's largely forgotten 1905 monograph on the localization of cerebral function has a distinctly contemporary feel. Although his map of cortical fields has been eclipsed by Brodmann's later contribution, Campbell's project went beyond cytoarchitectonic cartography, attempting to integrate clinical, anatomical and physiological evidence to provide a guide to function. A key component of Campbell's integrative, functional anatomical approach was hodology—the pattern of white matter connections between cortical areas—foreshadowing a recently developed functional anatomical technique: diffusion tensor tractography. Here, we revisit Campbell's model of the human visual system using tractography to illustrate prominent white matter connections within the occipital lobe and from occipital to frontal, parietal and temporal regions. Campbell used his integrative approach to support the view that vision consisted of a ‘visuo-sensory’ and a ‘visuo-psychic’ stage, combining hodological, cytoarchitectonic, physiological and clinicopathological evidence to locate the former within the calcarine cortex and the latter within the cortical field surrounding it. Speaking directly to contemporary debates surrounding the neurobiology of conscious vision and providing a framework with which to shape future developments in tractography, Campbell's integrative functional anatomical approach is as relevant today as it was 100 years ago. PMID:15937011

  5. Global network influences on local functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Adam C.; Morais, Michael J.; Willis, Cory M.; Smith, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    A central neuroscientific pursuit is understanding neuronal interactions that support computations underlying cognition and behavior. Although neurons interact across disparate scales – from cortical columns to whole-brain networks – research has been restricted to one scale at a time. We measured local interactions through multi-neuronal recordings while accessing global networks using scalp EEG in rhesus macaques. We measured spike count correlation, an index of functional connectivity with computational relevance, and EEG oscillations, which have been linked to various cognitive functions. We found a surprising non-monotonic relationship between EEG oscillation amplitude and spike count correlation, contrary to the intuitive expectation of a direct relationship. With a widely-used network model we replicated these findings by incorporating a private signal targeting inhibitory neurons, a common mechanism proposed for gain modulation. Finally, we report that spike count correlation explains nonlinearities in the relationship between EEG oscillations and response time in a spatial selective attention task. PMID:25799040

  6. Implementing functional languages to exploit locality

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, R.; Feo, J.; Cann, D.

    1991-01-01

    In the quest for high performance, no obstacle has been as persistent or unyielding as memory latency. It was hoped that dataflow's fine-grain asynchronous model of execution might defeat the memory latency problem. Unable to realize efficient fine-grain systems, the dataflow community is now studying medium-grain and coarse-grain implementations which, like conventional execution models, suffer the effects of memory latency. In this paper, we describe a functional language implementation that automatically exploits locality on cache-coherent multiprocessors. Our system achieves performance improvements reaching 20% for some programs. This study lends further support to the superiority of the functional paradigm for parallel processing. 11 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Constants of the motion, universal time and the Hamilton-Jacobi function in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Paul

    2013-04-01

    In most text books of mechanics, Newton's laws or Hamilton's equations of motion are first written down and then solved based on initial conditions to determine the constants of the motions and to describe the trajectories of the particles. In this essay, we take a different starting point. We begin with the metrics of general relativity and show how they can be used to construct by inspection constants of motion, which can then be used to write down the equations of the trajectories. This will be achieved by deriving a Hamiltonian-Jacobi function from the metric and showing that its existence requires all of the above mentioned properties. The article concludes by showing that a consistent theory of such functions also requires the need for a universal measure of time which can be identified with the "worldtime" parameter, first introduced by Steuckelberg and later developed by Horwitz and Piron.

  8. Spatially resolved dielectric constant of confined water and its connection to the non-local nature of bulk water.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Christian; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-08-28

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to compute the spatially resolved static dielectric constant of water in cylindrical and spherical nanopores as occurring, e.g., in protein water pockets or carbon nanotubes. For this, we derive a linear-response formalism which correctly takes into account the dielectric boundary conditions in the considered geometries. We find that in cylindrical confinement, the axial component behaves similar as the local density akin to what is known near planar interfaces. The radial dielectric constant shows some oscillatory features when approaching the surface if their radius is larger than about 2 nm. Most importantly, however, the radial component exhibits pronounced oscillations at the center of the cavity. These surprising features are traced back quantitatively to the non-local dielectric nature of bulk water. PMID:27586940

  9. Localization and possible functions of Drosophila septins.

    PubMed Central

    Fares, H; Peifer, M; Pringle, J R

    1995-01-01

    The septins are a family of homologous proteins that were originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where they are associated with the "neck filaments" and are involved in cytokinesis and other aspects of the organization of the cell surface. We report here the identification of Sep1, a Drosophila melanogaster septin, based on its homology to the yeast septins. The predicted Sep1 amino acid sequence is 35-42% identical to the known S. cerevisiae septins; 52% identical to Pnut, a second D. melanogaster septin; and 53-73% identical to the known mammalian septins. Sep1-specific antibodies have been used to characterize its expression and localization. The protein is concentrated at the leading edge of the cleavage furrows of dividing cells and cellularizing embryos, suggesting a role in furrow formation. Other aspects of Sep1 localization suggest roles not directly related to cytokinesis. For example, Sep1 exhibits orderly, cell-cycle-coordinated rearrangements within the cortex of syncytial blastoderm embryos and in the cells of post-gastrulation embryos; Sep1 is also concentrated at the leading edge of the epithelium during dorsal closure in the embryo, in the neurons of the embryonic nervous system, and at the baso-lateral surfaces of ovarian follicle cells. The distribution of Sep1 typically overlaps, but is distinct from, that of actin. Both immunolocalization and biochemical experiments show that Sep1 is intimately associated with Pnut, suggesting that the Drosophila septins, like those in yeast, function as part of a complex. Images PMID:8590810

  10. Analysis of constant phase contours of evaporation duct mode functions for waveguide mode propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Jen-Peng

    1992-09-01

    The M-Layer program tracks the constant phase lines Im(D(q)) = 0 and looks for their intersections with the lines Re(D(q)) = 0 for the locations of the zeros of the mode function D(q). These two types of constant phase lines are tracked and plotted over a search region which contains modes having a range attenuation rate of no more than 5 dB per km. Several new parameters for use in mode search are deduced from the results and some old ones are verified. Future studies is waveguide mode propagation theory pertaining to atmospheric ducts may benefit from this work. An improved mode search strategy is also proposed.

  11. Resonant interaction between a localized fast wave and a slow wave with constant asymptotic amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Zabolotskii, A. A.

    2009-11-15

    An integrable Yajima-Oikawa system is solved in the case of a finite density, which corresponds to a slowly varying (long-wavelength) wave with finite amplitude at infinity and a localized fast-oscillating (short-wavelength) wave. Application of the results to spinor Bose-Einstein condensates and other physical systems is discussed.

  12. Role of Möbius constants and scattering functions in Cachazo-He-Yuan scalar amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. S.; Yao, York-Peng

    2016-05-01

    The integration over the Möbius variables leading to the Cachazo-He-Yuan double-color n -point massless scalar amplitude are carried out one integral at a time. Möbius invariance dictates the final amplitude to be independent of the three Möbius constants σr,σs,σt, but their choice affects integrations and the intermediate results. The effect of the Möbius constants, which will be held finite but otherwise arbitrary, the two sets of colors, and the scattering functions on each integration is investigated. A general systematic way to carry out the n -3 integrations is explained, each exposing one of the n -3 propagators of a single Feynman diagram. Two detailed examples are shown to illustrate the procedure, one a five-point amplitude, and the other a nine-point amplitude. Our procedure does not generate intermediate spurious poles, in contrast to what is common by choosing Möbius constants at 0, 1, and ∞ .

  13. Cosmological dynamics with non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrycyna, Orest; Szydłowski, Marek

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical systems methods are used to investigate global behaviour of the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model in gravitational theory with a non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function. We show that the system can be reduced to an autonomous three-dimensional dynamical system and additionally is equipped with an invariant manifold corresponding to an accelerated expansion of the universe. Using this invariant manifold we find an exact solution of the reduced dynamics. We investigate all solutions for all admissible initial conditions using theory of dynamical systems to obtain a classification of all evolutional paths. The right-hand sides of the dynamical system depend crucially on the value of the non-minimal coupling constant therefore we study bifurcation values of this parameter under which the structure of the phase space changes qualitatively. We found a special bifurcation value of the non-minimal coupling constant which is distinguished by dynamics of the model and may suggest some additional symmetry in matter sector of the theory.

  14. Partition functions and equilibrium constants for diatomic molecules and atoms of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.; Collet, R.

    2016-04-01

    Partition functions and dissociation equilibrium constants are presented for 291 diatomic molecules for temperatures in the range from near absolute zero to 10 000 K, thus providing data for many diatomic molecules of astrophysical interest at low temperature. The calculations are based on molecular spectroscopic data from the book of Huber & Herzberg (1979, Constants of Diatomic Molecules) with significant improvements from the literature, especially updated data for ground states of many of the most important molecules by Irikura (2007, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 36, 389). Dissociation energies are collated from compilations of experimental and theoretical values. Partition functions for 284 species of atoms for all elements from H to U are also presented based on data collected at NIST. The calculated data are expected to be useful for modelling a range of low density astrophysical environments, especially star-forming regions, protoplanetary disks, the interstellar medium, and planetary and cool stellar atmospheres. The input data, which will be made available electronically, also provides a possible foundation for future improvement by the community. Full Tables 1-8 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A96

  15. Density functional theory investigation of hyperfine coupling constants in peroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetmore, Stacey D.; Boyd, Russell J.; Eriksson, Leif A.

    1997-05-01

    The geometries and 17O hyperfine coupling constants in several peroxyl radicals have been determined through the use of density functional theory. Becke's three-parameter hybrid exchange functional (B3) together with the correlation functional of Lee, Yang, and Parr (LYP) in combination with a variety of basis sets was used to study basis set effects. Subsequently, the effects of different gradient-correlated functionals were also examined. Results comparable to experimental values are obtained for all of the alkyl peroxyl radicals at the B3LYP level with IGLO-III or s-shell decontracted IGLO-III, 6-311G(d,p), 6-311+G(2df,p), and the augmented correlation-consistent polarized-valence triple-zeta basis set of D. E. Woon and T. H. Dunning [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 1358 (1993)], R. E. Kendall, T. H. Dunning, and R. J. Harrison [J. Chem. Phys. 96, 6796 (1992)], and T. H. Dunning [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 1007 (1989)]. Calculations imply that the spin density ratio between the inner and outer oxygens is 0.3:0.7, supporting earlier theoretical work [S. L. Boyd, R. J. Boyd, and L. R. C. Barclay, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 112, 5724 (1990)]. Erratic and strongly fluctuating results are exhibited for the fluoroperoxyl radical. Geometries close to the experimental values can be obtained at the B3LYP level, but at the expense of considerable spin contamination. A high degree of spin contamination can also be observed in calculations of the hyperfine coupling constants for this molecule. Possible explanations for the apparent failure to obtain converged results for FOO, apart from the considerable spin contamination, include vibrational, multireference, and matrix effects.

  16. Systematic Study of Locally Dense Basis Sets for NMR Shielding Constants.

    PubMed

    Reid, David M; Kobayashi, Rika; Collins, Michael A

    2014-01-14

    This paper presents a systematic study of partitioning schemes for locally dense basis sets in the context of NMR shielding calculations. The partitionings explored were based exclusively on connectivity and utilized the basis sets from the pcS-n series. Deviations from pcS-4 shieldings were calculated for a set of 28 organic molecules at the HF, B3LYP, and KT3 levels of theory, with the primary goal being the determination of an efficient scheme that achieves maximal deviations of 0.1 ppm for (1)H and 1 ppm for (13)C. Both atom based and group based divisions of basis sets were examined, with the latter providing the most promising results. It is demonstrated that for the systems studied, at least pcS-1 is required for all parts of the molecule. This, coupled with pcS-3 on the group of interest and pcS-2 on the adjacent groups, is sufficient to achieve the desired level of accuracy at a minimal computational expense. In addition, the suitability of the pcS-n basis sets for post-SCF methods was confirmed through a comparison with other standard basis sets at the MP2 level. PMID:26579898

  17. Remote Control of Gene Function by Local Translation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hosung; Gkogkas, Christos G.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Holt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    The subcellular position of a protein is a key determinant of its function. Mounting evidence indicates that RNA localization, where specific mRNAs are transported subcellularly and subsequently translated in response to localized signals, is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to control protein localization. On-site synthesis confers novel signaling properties to a protein and helps to maintain local proteome homeostasis. Local translation plays particularly important roles in distal neuronal compartments, and dysregulated RNA localization and translation cause defects in neuronal wiring and survival. Here, we discuss key findings in this area and possible implications of this adaptable and swift mechanism for spatial control of gene function. PMID:24679524

  18. Effects of commonly used inotropes on myocardial function and oxygen consumption under constant ventricular loading conditions.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, Elizabeth S; Black, Katherine J; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; DiNardo, James A; Colan, Steven D; McGowan, Francis X; Kheir, John N

    2016-07-01

    Inotropic medications are routinely used to increase cardiac output and arterial blood pressure during critical illness. However, few comparative data exist between these medications, particularly independent of their effects on venous capacitance and systemic vascular resistance. We hypothesized that an isolated working heart model that maintained constant left atrial pressure and aortic blood pressure could identify load-independent differences between inotropic medications. In an isolated heart preparation, the aorta and left atrium of Sprague Dawley rats were cannulated and placed in working mode with fixed left atrial and aortic pressure. Hearts were then exposed to common doses of a catecholamine (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, or dobutamine), milrinone, or triiodothyronine (n = 10 per dose per combination). Cardiac output, contractility (dP/dtmax), diastolic performance (dP/dtmin and tau), stroke work, heart rate, and myocardial oxygen consumption were compared during each 10-min infusion to an immediately preceding baseline. Of the catecholamines, dobutamine increased cardiac output, contractility, and diastolic performance more than clinically equivalent doses of norepinephrine (second most potent), dopamine, or epinephrine (P < 0.001). The use of triiodothyronine and milrinone was not associated with significant changes in cardiac output, contractility or diastolic function, either alone or added to a baseline catecholamine infusion. Myocardial oxygen consumption was closely related to dP/dtmax (r(2) = 0.72), dP/dtmin (r(2) = 0.70), and stroke work (r(2) = 0.53). In uninjured, isolated working rodent hearts under constant ventricular loading conditions, dobutamine increased contractility and cardiac output more than clinically equivalent doses of norepinephrine, dopamine, and epinephrine; milrinone and triiodothyronine did not have significant effects on contractility. PMID:27150829

  19. Evaluating Functional Localizers: The Case of the FFA

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Marc G.; Park, Joonkoo; Gonzalez, Richard; Polk, Thad A.; Gehrke, Amanda; Knaffla, Scott; Jonides, John

    2010-01-01

    Functional localizers are routinely used in neuroimaging studies to test hypotheses about the function of specific brain areas. The specific tasks and stimuli used to localize particular regions vary widely from study to study even when the same cortical region is targeted. Thus, it is important to ask whether task and stimulus changes lead to differences in localization or whether localization procedures are largely immune to differences in tasks and contrasting stimuli. We present two experiments and a literature review that explore whether face localizer tasks yield differential localization in the fusiform gyrus as a function of task and contrasting stimuli. We tested standard localization tasks---passive viewing, 1-back, and 2-back memory tests---and did not find differences in localization based on task. We did, however, find differences in the extent, strength and patterns/reliabilities of the activation in the fusiform gyrus based on comparison stimuli (faces vs. houses compared to faces vs. scrambled stimuli). PMID:20025980

  20. Localized orbitals from basis sets augmented with diffuse functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høyvik, Ida-Marie; Jørgensen, Poul

    2013-05-01

    Orbital localization of occupied and virtual Hartree-Fock orbitals generated from basis sets augmented with diffuse functions is performed using the Pipek-Mezey, Boys, powers of the second central moment, and powers of the fourth central moment localizations. The locality of the obtained orbital sets are presented in terms of second and fourth moment orbital spreads. The results show that both local occupied and virtual orbitals may be obtained when using powers of the second central moment and powers of the fourth central moment localizations, while the Pipek-Mezey and Boys localizations fail to produce sets of local virtual orbitals. The locality of the fourth central moment virtual orbitals exhibits a locality similar to the locality of a Boys localization for non-augmented basis sets.

  1. Benchmarking density-functional theory calculations of NMR shielding constants and spin-rotation constants using accurate coupled-cluster calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teale, Andrew M.; Lutnæs, Ola B.; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J.; Gauss, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Accurate sets of benchmark nuclear-magnetic-resonance shielding constants and spin-rotation constants are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster singles-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the calculated coupled-cluster constants is established by a careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. Coupled-cluster basis-set convergence is analyzed and extrapolation techniques are employed to estimate basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. Together with the set provided for rotational g-tensors and magnetizabilities in our previous work [O. B. Lutnæs, A. M. Teale, T. Helgaker, D. J. Tozer, K. Ruud, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 144104 (2009)], 10.1063/1.3242081, it provides a substantial source of consistently calculated high-accuracy data on second-order magnetic response properties. The utility of this benchmark data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the existing approximate functionals provide an accuracy competitive with that provided by CCSD or CCSD(T) theory. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of Kohn-Sham calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. Routes to future improvements are discussed in light of this comparison.

  2. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized,more » which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.« less

  3. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized, which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.

  4. Local hybrid functionals: An assessment for thermochemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaupp, Martin; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.

    2007-11-21

    Local hybrid functionals with position-dependent exact-exchange admixture are a new class of exchange-correlation functionals in density functional theory that promise to advance the available accuracy in many areas of application. Local hybrids with different local mixing functions (LMFs) governing the position dependence are validated for the heats of formation of the extended G3/99 set, and for two sets of barriers of hydrogen-transfer and heavy-atom transfer reactions (HTBH38 and NHTBH38 databases). A simple local hybrid Lh-SVWN with only Slater and exact exchange plus local correlation and a one-parameter LMF, g(r)=b({tau}{sub W}(r)/{tau}(r)), performs best and provides overall mean absolute errors for thermochemistry and kinetics that are a significant improvement over standard state-of-the-art global hybrid functionals. In particular, this local hybrid functional does not suffer from the systematic deterioration that standard functionals exhibit for larger molecules. In contrast, local hybrids based on generalized gradient approximation exchange tend to give rise to nonintuitive LMFs, and no improved functionals have been obtained along this route. The LMF is a real-space function and thus can be analyzed in detail. We use, in particular, graphical analyses to rationalize the performance of different local hybrids for thermochemistry and reaction barriers.

  5. Simultaneous determination of optical constants, local thickness and roughness of ZnSe thin films by imaging spectroscopic reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečas, D.; Ohlídal, I.; Franta, D.; Ohlídal, M.; Vodák, J.

    2016-01-01

    A rough non-uniform ZnSe thin film on a GaAs substrate is optically characterised using imaging spectroscopic reflectometry (ISR) in the visible, UV and near IR region, applied as a standalone technique. A global-local data processing algorithm is used to fit spectra from all pixels together and simultaneously determine maps of the local film thickness, roughness and overlayer thickness as well as spectral dependencies of film optical constants determined for the sample as a whole. The roughness of the film upper boundary is modelled using scalar diffraction theory (SDT), for which an improved calculation method is developed to process the large quantities of experimental data produced by ISR efficiently. This method avoids expensive operations by expressing the series obtained from SDT using a double recurrence relation and it is shown that it essentially eliminates the necessity for any speed-precision trade-offs in the SDT calculations. Comparison of characterisation results with the literature and other techniques shows the ability of multi-pixel processing to improve the stability and reliability of least-squares data fitting and demonstrates that standalone ISR, coupled with suitable data processing methods, is viable as a characterisation technique, even for thin films that are relatively far from ideal and require complex modelling.

  6. 'Syncing' Up with the Quinn-Rand-Strogatz Constant: Hurwitz-ZetaFunctions in Non-Linear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Durgin, Natalie J.; Garcia, Sofia M.; Flournoy, Tamara; Bailey,David H.

    2007-12-01

    This work extends the analytical and computationalinvestigation of the Quinn-Rand-Strogatz (QRS) constants from non-linearphysics. The QRS constants (c1, c2, ..., cN) are found in a Winfreeoscillator mean-field system used to examine the transition of coupledoscillators as they lose synchronization. The constants are part of anasymptotic expansion of a function related to the oscillatorsynchronization. Previous work used high-precision software packages toevaluate c1 to 42 decimal-digits, which made it possible to recognize andprove that c1 was the root of a certain Hurwitz-zeta function. Thisallowed a value of c2 to beconjectured in terms of c1. Therefore thereis interest in determining the exact values of these constants to highprecision in the hope that general relationships can be establishedbetween the constants and the zeta functions. Here, we compute the valuesof the higher order constants (c3, c4) to more than 42-digit precision byextending an algorithm developed by D.H. Bailey, J.M. Borwein and R.E.Crandall. Several methods for speeding up the computation are exploredand an alternate proof that c1 is the root of a Hurwitz-zeta function isattempted.

  7. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M

    2015-09-14

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H(12)C-(12)CH-DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated. PMID:26374014

  8. Merge Frame Design for Video Stream Switching Using Piecewise Constant Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Cheung, Gene; Cheung, Ngai-Man; Ortega, Antonio; Au, Oscar C.

    2016-08-01

    The ability to efficiently switch from one pre-encoded video stream to another (e.g., for bitrate adaptation or view switching) is important for many interactive streaming applications. Recently, stream-switching mechanisms based on distributed source coding (DSC) have been proposed. In order to reduce the overall transmission rate, these approaches provide a "merge" mechanism, where information is sent to the decoder such that the exact same frame can be reconstructed given that any one of a known set of side information (SI) frames is available at the decoder (e.g., each SI frame may correspond to a different stream from which we are switching). However, the use of bit-plane coding and channel coding in many DSC approaches leads to complex coding and decoding. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach for merging multiple SI frames, using a piecewise constant (PWC) function as the merge operator. In our approach, for each block to be reconstructed, a series of parameters of these PWC merge functions are transmitted in order to guarantee identical reconstruction given the known side information blocks. We consider two different scenarios. In the first case, a target frame is first given, and then merge parameters are chosen so that this frame can be reconstructed exactly at the decoder. In contrast, in the second scenario, the reconstructed frame and merge parameters are jointly optimized to meet a rate-distortion criteria. Experiments show that for both scenarios, our proposed merge techniques can outperform both a recent approach based on DSC and the SP-frame approach in H.264, in terms of compression efficiency and decoder complexity.

  9. Merge Frame Design for Video Stream Switching Using Piecewise Constant Functions.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Cheung, Gene; Cheung, Ngai-Man; Ortega, Antonio; Au, Oscar C

    2016-08-01

    The ability to efficiently switch from one pre-encoded video stream to another (e.g., for bitrate adaptation or view switching) is important for many interactive streaming applications. Recently, stream-switching mechanisms based on distributed source coding (DSC) have been proposed. In order to reduce the overall transmission rate, these approaches provide a merge mechanism, where information is sent to the decoder, such that the exact same frame can be reconstructed given that any one of a known set of side information (SI) frames is available at the decoder (e.g., each SI frame may correspond to a different stream from which we are switching). However, the use of bit-plane coding and channel coding in many DSC approaches leads to complex coding and decoding. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach for merging multiple SI frames, using a piecewise constant (PWC) function as the merge operator. In our approach, for each block to be reconstructed, a series of parameters of these PWC merge functions are transmitted in order to guarantee identical reconstruction given the known SI blocks. We consider two different scenarios. In the first case, a target frame is first given, and then merge parameters are chosen, so that this frame can be reconstructed exactly at the decoder. In contrast, in the second scenario, the reconstructed frame and the merge parameters are jointly optimized to meet a rate-distortion criteria. Experiments show that for both scenarios, our proposed merge techniques can outperform both a recent approach based on DSC and the SP-frame approach in H.264, in terms of compression efficiency and decoder complexity. PMID:27244739

  10. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M.

    2015-09-14

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H{sup 12}C–{sup 12}CH–DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  11. Linking Long Noncoding RNA Localization and Function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have revealed the regulatory potential of many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Most lncRNAs, like mRNAs, are transcribed by RNA polymerase II and are capped, polyadenylated, and spliced. However, the subcellular fates of lncRNAs are distinct and the mechanisms of action are diverse. Investigating the mechanisms that determine the subcellular fate of lncRNAs has the potential to provide new insights into their biogenesis and specialized functions. PMID:27499234

  12. Non-Friedmann cosmology for the Local Universe, significance of the universal Hubble constant, and short-distance indicators of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Baryshev, Yu. V.

    2006-09-01

    Based on the increasing evidence of the cosmological relevance of the local Hubble flow, we consider a simple analytical cosmological model for the Local Universe. This is a non-Friedmann model with a non-uniform static space-time. The major dynamical factor controlling the local expansion is the antigravity produced by the omnipresent and permanent dark energy of the cosmic vacuum (or the cosmological constant). The antigravity dominates at larger distances than 1-2 Mpc from the center of the Local group. The model gives a natural explanation of the two key quantitative characteristics of the local expansion flow, which are the local Hubble constant and the velocity dispersion of the flow. The observed kinematical similarity of the local and global flows of expansion is clarified by the model. We analytically demonstrate the efficiency of the vacuum cooling mechanism that allows one to see the Hubble law this close to the Local group. The "universal Hubble constant" HV (≈60 km s-1 Mpc-1), depending only on the vacuum density, has special significance locally and globally. The model makes a number of verifiable predictions. It also unexpectedly shows that the dwarf galaxies of the local flow with the shortest distances and lowest redshifts may be the most sensitive indicators of dark energy in our neighborhood.

  13. Semiconductor band gap localization via Gaussian function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, B.; Brown, G. J.; Xi, H.

    2012-10-01

    To determine the band gap of bulk semiconductors with transmission spectroscopy alone is considered as an extremely difficult task because in the higher energy range, approaching and exceeding the band gap energy, the material is opaque yielding no useful data to be recorded. In this paper, by investigating the transmission of industrial GaSb wafers with a thickness of 500 µm, we demonstrate how these obstacles of transmission spectroscopy can be overcome. The key is the transmission spectrums’ derivative, which coincides with the Gaussian function. This understanding can be used to transfer Beers’ law in an integral form opening the pathway of band gap determinations based on mathematical parameters only. The work also emphasizes the correlation between the thermal band gap variation and Debye temperature.

  14. Applying and assessing some semi-local density functionals for condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Pan

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a widely used quantum mechanical method for the simulation of the electronic structure of atoms, molecules, and solids. The only part that needs to be approximated is the exchange-correlation energy as a functional of the electron density. After many-year development, there is a huge variety of exchange-correlation functionals. According to the ingredients, an exchange-correlation functional can be classified as a semi-local functional or beyond. A semi-local functional can be nonempirical or empirical and only uses locality information, such as electron density, gradient of the density, Laplacian of the density, and kinetic energy density. Unlike a non-local functional that uses non-locality information, a semi-local functional is computationally efficient and can be applied to large systems. The meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA), which is the highest-level semi-local functional, has the potential to give a good description for condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. We built the self-consistent revised Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (revTPSS) meta-GGA into the band-structure program BAND to test the performances of some self-consistent semi-local functionals on lattice constant with a 58-solid test set. The self-consistent effect of revTPSS was also discussed. The vibration of a crystal has a contribution to the ground state energy of a system, which is the zero-point energy at zero temperature. It has anharmonicity at the equilibrium geometry. The standard DFT doesn't consider the zero-point energy of a crystal. We used density functional perturbation theory (DFPT), which is a powerful and flexible theoretical technique within the density functional framework, to study the zero-point energy and make a correction to the lattice constant. The method was compared to a traditional zero-point anharmonic expansion method that is based on the Debye and Dugdale-MacDonald approximations. We also tested some new

  15. Local Analytic Solutions of a Functional Differential Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingxia

    This paper is concerned with the existence of analytic solutions of an iterative functional differential equation. Employing the method of majorant series, we need to discuss the constant α given in Schröder transformation. we study analytic solutions of the equation in the case of α at resonance and the case of α near resonance under the Brjuno condition.

  16. Local-hybrid functional based on the correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Erin R.

    2014-09-28

    Local-hybrid functionals involve position-dependent mixing of Hartree-Fock and density-functional exchange, which should allow improved performance relative to conventional hybrids by reducing the inherent delocalization error and improving the long-range behaviour. Herein, the same-spin correlation length, obtained from the Fermi-hole radius, is used as the mixing parameter. The performance of the resulting local-hybrid functional is assessed for standard thermochemical and kinetics benchmarks. The local hybrid is shown to perform significantly better than the corresponding global hybrid in almost all cases.

  17. Selective determination of rate constants of reactions of atomic hydrogen with various functional groups of a complex molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, G. B.; Pugachev, D. V.; Azatyan, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    The possibility of determining absolute values of the rate constants of reactions of active intermediate species with different functional groups of molecules is demonstrated by measuring macrokinetic combustion characteristics. The Arrhenius parameters of the rate constant of the reaction between atomic hydrogen with the methylene group of ethanol and molecular oxygen within the temperature range of 830-970 K are determined. The reasons for the differences between the rate constants of reactions with the methylene and methyl groups of an ethanol molecule are discussed using thermochemical data. It is found that the obtained values of activation energies and preexponential factors of rate constants are in good agreement with the literature data on the region of lower temperatures.

  18. The local structure, infrared phonon modes and the origin of the dielectric constant in La2Hf2O7 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zeming; Cheng, Xuerui; Zhang, Guobin; Li, Tingting; Wang, Yuyin; Shao, Tao; Li, Chengxiang; He, Bo

    2012-03-01

    The local structure and dielectric properties of crystalline and amorphous La2Hf2O7 (LHO) thin film were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The basic infrared phonon modes with most contributions to the static dielectric constant of crystal LHO are preserved, which causes the considerable value of the static dielectric constant in the amorphous thin film. The preservation of the main infrared phonon modes in the amorphous thin film is because it has similar the nearest local structures around Hf and La atoms as the crystal LHO. This inheritance of the local structural and vibrational features of the crystal phase is the origin of the dielectric constant of the LHO thin film.

  19. Local Function Conservation in Sequence and Structure Space

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Nils; Sander, Oliver; Domingues, Francisco S.; Lengauer, Thomas; Sommer, Ingolf

    2008-01-01

    We assess the variability of protein function in protein sequence and structure space. Various regions in this space exhibit considerable difference in the local conservation of molecular function. We analyze and capture local function conservation by means of logistic curves. Based on this analysis, we propose a method for predicting molecular function of a query protein with known structure but unknown function. The prediction method is rigorously assessed and compared with a previously published function predictor. Furthermore, we apply the method to 500 functionally unannotated PDB structures and discuss selected examples. The proposed approach provides a simple yet consistent statistical model for the complex relations between protein sequence, structure, and function. The GOdot method is available online (http://godot.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de). PMID:18604264

  20. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context. PMID:21660323

  1. Stability Constants of Technetium (IV) Oxalate Complexes as a Function of Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuanxian; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2006-03-01

    Solvent extraction methods were used to determine the stability constants of Tc(IV) with oxalate anions in NaCl solutions ranging in concentration from 0.5 M to 2.0 M. All experiments were conducted in an atmosphere-controlled chamber under Ar atmosphere (< 1.0ppm O2). A reducing agent (hydrazine) was used during extractions to maintain technetium in the tetravalent oxidation state. Independent tests confirmed that the oxidation state of technetium did not change during extractions. The distribution ratio of Tc(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentration of oxalic acid increased. At the oxalic acid concentrations used in these experiments, the complexes TcO(Ox) and TcO(Ox)22- were found to be the dominant aqueous species. Based on these data, the thermodynamic stability constants of Tc(IV) with oxalate complexes were calculated by the Specific Ion Interaction Theory (SIT).

  2. Comments on the locality in density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Salomonson, Sten

    2003-05-01

    The 'locality hypothesis' in density-functional theory (DFT), implying that the functional derivative is equivalent to a multiplicative local function, forms the basis of models of Kohn-Sham type. This has been generally accepted by the community since the advent of the model, and has later been formally proved for a large class of functionals. The hypothesis has recently been questioned by Nesbet [Phys. Rev. A 58, R12 (1998) and Phys. Rev. A 65, 010502 (2001)], who claims that it fails for the kinetic-energy functional for a system with more than two noninteracting electrons with a nondegenerate ground state. This conclusion has been questioned by Gal [Phys. Rev. A 62, 044501 (2000)] and by Holas and March [Phys. Rev. A 64, 016501 (2001)]. We claim that the arguments of Nesbet are incorrect, since the orbital functional used for the kinetic energy is not a unique functional of the total density in the domain of unnormalized orbitals. We have demonstrated that with a proper definition of the kinetic energy, which is a unique density functional also in the unnormalized region, the derivative can be represented by a single local multiplicative function for all v-representable densities. Therefore, we consider the controversy connected with the issue raised by Nesbet as resolved. We believe that the proof of the differentiability given here can be extended to larger groups of DFT functionals, and works along these lines are in progress.

  3. The local characteristic function of interplanetary particle propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, G.; Schlueter, W.

    1985-01-01

    An easily measurable intensity function which characterizes the interplanetary propagation of charged solar flare particles is presented. This function is nearly time invariant during a solar event despite the large variations of intensity and anisotropy, but varies from event to event. It characterizes the systematic and stochastic forces of the interplanetary magnetic field which focus and scatter the particles in pitch angle. The model of focused transport shows that this function is essentially determined by the local shape and amplitude of the pitch angle diffusion coefficient kappa (mu) and by the local value of the focusing length. The time profile of the solar particle injection is typically of negligible influence. The local characteristic function may be used as a powerful new tool for a systematic analysis of flare particle angular distributions, Examples are given.

  4. A Local Representation of The Dielectric Response Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    The screened dielectric response function (χ) is a fundamental physical quantity that captures the many-electron correlation effects, key to the accurate description of van der Waals dispersion interaction in the ground state and a range of excited state properties. Although χ is non-local by definition, a real space partition of χ onto local structural motifs can help us gain further physical insight into, e.g., effective local screening properties. Because the construction of bare response function, χ0, is associated with the product of electron - hole orbitals, standard localization procedures for electron wave functions can not be directly applied. In this work, we propose a new method to decompose χ0 into contributions from local response functions. Exemplary results of finite and bulk systems are discussed. Research carried out at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  5. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C. Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-28

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O, SiH{sub 4}, PH{sub 3}, SH{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  6. On the truncation of the number of excited states in density functional theory sum-over-states calculations of indirect spin spin coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C.; Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-01

    It is investigated, whether the number of excited (pseudo)states can be truncated in the sum-over-states expression for indirect spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs), which is used in the Contributions from Localized Orbitals within the Polarization Propagator Approach and Inner Projections of the Polarization Propagator (IPPP-CLOPPA) approach to analyzing SSCCs in terms of localized orbitals. As a test set we have studied the nine simple compounds, CH4, NH3, H2O, SiH4, PH3, SH2, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6. The excited (pseudo)states were obtained from time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and the specialized core-property basis set, aug-cc-pVTZ-J. We investigated both how the calculated coupling constants depend on the number of (pseudo)states included in the summation and whether the summation can be truncated in a systematic way at a smaller number of states and extrapolated to the total number of (pseudo)states for the given one-electron basis set. We find that this is possible and that for some of the couplings it is sufficient to include only about 30% of the excited (pseudo)states.

  7. Characterizing dynamic local functional connectivity in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lifu; Sun, Junfeng; Cheng, Lin; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    Functional connectivity (FC), obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), brings insights into the functional organization of the brain. Recently, rich and complex behaviour of brain has been revealed by the dynamic fluctuation of FC, which had previously been regarded as confounding 'noise'. While the dynamics of long-distance, inter-regional FC has been extensively studied, the dynamics of local FC within a few millimetres in space remains largely unexplored. In this study, the local FC was depicted by regional homogeneity (ReHo), and the dynamics of local FC was obtained using sliding windows method. We observed a robust positive correlation between ReHo and its temporal variability, which was shown to be an intrinsic feature of the brain rather than a pure stochastic effect. Furthermore, fluctuation of ReHo was associated with global functional organization: (i) brain regions with higher centrality of inter-regional FC tended to possess higher ReHo variability; (ii) coherence of ReHo fluctuation was higher within brain's functional modules. Finally, we observed alteration of ReHo variability during a motor task compared with resting-state. Our findings associated the temporal fluctuation of ReHo with brain function, opening up the possibility of dynamic local FC study in the future. PMID:27231194

  8. Characterizing dynamic local functional connectivity in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lifu; Sun, Junfeng; Cheng, Lin; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    Functional connectivity (FC), obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), brings insights into the functional organization of the brain. Recently, rich and complex behaviour of brain has been revealed by the dynamic fluctuation of FC, which had previously been regarded as confounding ‘noise’. While the dynamics of long-distance, inter-regional FC has been extensively studied, the dynamics of local FC within a few millimetres in space remains largely unexplored. In this study, the local FC was depicted by regional homogeneity (ReHo), and the dynamics of local FC was obtained using sliding windows method. We observed a robust positive correlation between ReHo and its temporal variability, which was shown to be an intrinsic feature of the brain rather than a pure stochastic effect. Furthermore, fluctuation of ReHo was associated with global functional organization: (i) brain regions with higher centrality of inter-regional FC tended to possess higher ReHo variability; (ii) coherence of ReHo fluctuation was higher within brain’s functional modules. Finally, we observed alteration of ReHo variability during a motor task compared with resting-state. Our findings associated the temporal fluctuation of ReHo with brain function, opening up the possibility of dynamic local FC study in the future. PMID:27231194

  9. Function and evolution of local repeats in the Firre locus

    PubMed Central

    Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Shukla, Chinmay J.; Weiner, Catherine L.; Rinn, John L.

    2016-01-01

    More than half the human and mouse genomes are comprised of repetitive sequences, such as transposable elements (TEs), which have been implicated in many biological processes. In contrast, much less is known about other repeats, such as local repeats that occur in multiple instances within a given locus in the genome but not elsewhere. Here, we systematically characterize local repeats in the genomic locus of the Firre long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). We find a conserved function for the RRD repeat as a ribonucleic nuclear retention signal that is sufficient to retain an otherwise cytoplasmic mRNA in the nucleus. We also identified a repeat, termed R0, that can function as a DNA enhancer element within the intronic sequences of Firre. Collectively, our data suggest that local repeats can have diverse functionalities and molecular modalities in the Firre locus and perhaps more globally in other lncRNAs. PMID:27009974

  10. Stability constants for the formation of lead chloride complexes as a function of temperature and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yanxin; Millero, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    The stability constants for the formation of lead (Pb 2+) with chloride Pb+nCl↔PbCln2-nβn(n=1,2,3) have been determined using a spectrophotometric method in NaClO 4 solutions as a function of ionic strength (0-6 m) and temperature (15-45 °C). The results have been fitted to the equations:

  11. Spectral emissivities and optical constants of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals as functions of temperature and wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, S.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a noncontact temperature measurement device utilizing rotating analyzer ellipsometry is described. The technique circumvents the necessity of spectral emissivity estimation by direct measurement concomittant with radiance brightness. Using this approach, the optical properties of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Zr were measured in situ at four wavelengths and up to 600 K superheat in the liquid. The data suggest an increase in the emissivity of the liquid compared with the incandescent solid. The data also show moderate temperature dependence of the spectral emissivity. A few measurements of the optical properties of undercooled liquid metals were also conducted. The data for both solids and liquids show excellent agreement with available values in the literature for the spectral emissivities as well as the optical constants.

  12. Steroidogenesis in the skin: implications for local immune functions

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Andrzej; Zbytek, Bazej; Nikolakis, Georgios; Manna, Pulak R.; Skobowiat, Cezary; Zmijewski, Michal; Li, Wei; Janjetovic, Zorica; Postlethwaite, Arnold; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Tuckey, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The skin has developed a hierarchy of systems that encompasses the skin immune and local steroidogenic activities in order to protect the body against the external environment and biological factors and to maintain local homeostasis. Most recently it has been established that skin cells contain the entire biochemical apparatus necessary for production of glucocorticoids, androgens and estrogens either from precursors of systemic origin or, alternatively, through the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone and its subsequent transformation to biologically active steroids. Examples of these products are corticosterone, cortisol, testosterone, dihydrotesterone and estradiol. Their local production can be regulated by locally produced corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or cytokines. Furthermore the production of glucocorticoids is affected by ultraviolet B radiation. The level of production and nature of the final steroid products are dependent on the cell type or cutaneous compartment, e.g., epidermis, dermis, adnexal structures or adipose tissue. Locally produced glucocorticoids, androgens and estrogens affect functions of the epidermis and adnexal structures as well as local immune activity. Malfunction of these steroidogenic activities can lead to inflammatory disorders or autoimmune diseases. The cutaneous steroidogenic system can also have systemic effects, which are emphasized by significant skin contribution to circulating androgens and/or estrogens. Furthermore, local activity of CYP11A1 can produce novel 7 -steroids and secosteroids that are biologically active. Therefore, modulation of local steroidogenic activity may serve as a new therapeutic approach for treatment of inflammatory disorders, autoimmune processes or other skin disorders. In conclusion, the skin can be defined as an independent steroidogenic organ, whose activity can affect its functions and the development of local or systemic inflammatory or

  13. On Extension of Measurable Functions and Local Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shragin, Isaak V.; Nepomnyashchikh, Yurii V.

    2003-04-01

    In this work we generalize a number of results from1 on extension of measurable functions and local operators. In comparasion with 1 we assume neither measure to be defined on considered σ- algebras, nor the metric space on functions values is complete. As well in contrast to 1 here we do not make use Boolean algebras. This circumstance made possible essentially to simplify the presentation.

  14. Quality function deployment applied to local traffic accident reduction.

    PubMed

    Sohn, S Y

    1999-11-01

    One of the major tasks of police stations is the management of local road traffic accidents. Proper prevention policy which reflects the local accident characteristics could immensely help individual police stations in decreasing various severity levels of road traffic accidents. In order to relate accident variation to local driving environmental characteristics, we use both cluster analysis and Poisson regression. The fitted result at the level of each cluster for each type of accident severity is utilized as an input to quality function deployment. Quality function deployment (QFD) has been applied to customer satisfaction in various industrial quality improvement settings, where several types of customer requirements are related to various control factors. We show how QFD enables one to set priorities on various road accident control policies to which each police station has to pay particular attention. PMID:10487350

  15. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Feng Mattsson, Ann E.; Armiento, Rickard

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu–O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  16. Enhancing the accuracy of the Fowler method for monitoring non-constant work functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Fowler method is a prominent non-invasive technique to determine the absolute work function of a surface based on the photoelectric effect. The evaluation procedure relies on the correlation of the photocurrent with the incident photon energy hν which is mainly dependent on the surface work function χ. Applying Fowler's theory of the photocurrent, the measurements can be fitted by the theoretical curve near the threshold hν⪆χ yielding the work function χ and a parameter A. The straightforward experimental implementation of the Fowler method is to use several particular photon energies, e.g. via interference filters. However, with a realization like that the restriction hν ≈ χ can easily be violated, especially when the work function of the material is decreasing during the measurements as, for instance, with coating or adsorption processes. This can lead to an overestimation of the evaluated work function value of typically some 0.1 eV, reaching up to more than 0.5 eV in an unfavorable case. A detailed analysis of the Fowler theory now reveals the background of that effect and shows that the fit-parameter A can be used to assess the accuracy of the determined value of χ conveniently during the measurements. Moreover, a scheme is introduced to quantify a potential overestimation and to perform a correction to χ to a certain extent. The issues are demonstrated exemplarily at the monitoring of the work function reduction of a stainless steel sample surface due to caesiation.

  17. Enhancing the accuracy of the Fowler method for monitoring non-constant work functions.

    PubMed

    Friedl, R

    2016-04-01

    The Fowler method is a prominent non-invasive technique to determine the absolute work function of a surface based on the photoelectric effect. The evaluation procedure relies on the correlation of the photocurrent with the incident photon energy hν which is mainly dependent on the surface work function χ. Applying Fowler's theory of the photocurrent, the measurements can be fitted by the theoretical curve near the threshold hν⪆χ yielding the work function χ and a parameter A. The straightforward experimental implementation of the Fowler method is to use several particular photon energies, e.g. via interference filters. However, with a realization like that the restriction hν ≈ χ can easily be violated, especially when the work function of the material is decreasing during the measurements as, for instance, with coating or adsorption processes. This can lead to an overestimation of the evaluated work function value of typically some 0.1 eV, reaching up to more than 0.5 eV in an unfavorable case. A detailed analysis of the Fowler theory now reveals the background of that effect and shows that the fit-parameter A can be used to assess the accuracy of the determined value of χ conveniently during the measurements. Moreover, a scheme is introduced to quantify a potential overestimation and to perform a correction to χ to a certain extent. The issues are demonstrated exemplarily at the monitoring of the work function reduction of a stainless steel sample surface due to caesiation. PMID:27131682

  18. Elastic constants and Fermi surface topology change in Calaverite AuTe{sub 2}: A density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Gudelli, Vijay Kumar Kanchana, V.

    2014-04-24

    Structural, elastic, electronic and Fermi surface studies of AuTe{sub 2} have been carried out by means of first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The calculated ground state properties agree well with the experiment. Fermi surface and elastic constants are predicted for the first time and from the calculated elastic constants we find the compound to be mechanically stable satisfying the stability criteria of monoclinic structure. In addition, we also find the c-axis to be more compressible than the other two which is also speculated from the present work. The metallic behaviour of this compound is confirmed from the electronic band structure calculation as we find the bands to cross the Fermi level (E{sub F}). In addition, we also observe a FS topology change under pressure which is also explained in the present work.

  19. The galaxy luminosity function and the Local Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbourn, J. R.; Shanks, T.

    2016-06-01

    In a previous study Whitbourn & Shanks have reported evidence for a local void underdense by ≈15 per cent extending to 150-300 h-1 Mpc around our position in the Southern Galactic Cap (SGC). Assuming a local luminosity function they modelled K- and r-limited number counts and redshift distributions in the 6dFGS/2MASS and SDSS redshift surveys and derived normalized n(z) ratios relative to the standard homogeneous cosmological model. Here we test further these results using maximum likelihood techniques that solve for the galaxy density distributions and the galaxy luminosity function simultaneously. We confirm the results from the previous analysis in terms of the number density distributions, indicating that our detection of the `Local Hole' in the SGC is robust to the assumption of either our previous, or newly estimated, luminosity functions. However, there are discrepancies with previously published K- and r-band luminosity functions. In particular the r-band luminosity function has a steeper faint end slope than the r0.1 results of Blanton et al. but is consistent with the r0.1 results of Montero-Dorta & Prada and Loveday et al.

  20. Local properties of three-body atomic wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Krivec, R.; Mandelzweig, V. B.; Varga, K.

    2000-06-01

    The local properties and accuracy of the positronium negative-ion (Ps{sup -}) ground-state wave functions obtained by the stochastic variational method (SVM) and by direct solution of the Schroedinger equation with the help of the correlation-function hyperspherical-harmonic method (CFHHM) are studied and compared. Though the energy, calculated by both methods, agrees to up to ten digits, the amplitudes of the values of the operator D=H{psi}/E{psi}-1, characterizing local deviation of the wave function from its true value, in all of the coordinate space in the SVM are consistently larger (by up to five orders of magnitude) than in the CFHHM, despite the fact that the SVM observables except <{delta}(r{sub k})> converge to significantly more digits than the CFHHM observables for their respective selected bases. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. Constant-distance mode SECM as a tool to visualize local electrocatalytic activity of oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Michaela; Erichsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multidimensional shearforce-based constant-distance mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (4D SF/CD-SECM) was utilized for the investigation of the activity distribution of oxygen reduction catalysts. Carbon-supported Pt model catalyst powders have been immobilized in recessed microelectrodes and compared to a spot preparation technique. Microcavities serve as platform for the binder-free catalyst sample preparation exhibiting beneficial properties for constant-distance mode SECM imaging concerning modified surface area and catalyst loading. The integration of the redox competition mode of SECM into the detection scheme of the 4D SF/CD mode is demonstrated for specifically adapting high-resolution SECM experiments to powder-based catalyst preparations. PMID:24600538

  2. Automated construction of maximally localized Wannier functions: Optimized projection functions method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Jamal I.; Coh, Sinisa; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-10-01

    Maximally localized Wannier functions are widely used in electronic structure theory for analyses of bonding, electric polarization, orbital magnetization, and for interpolation. The state of the art method for their construction is based on the method of Marzari and Vanderbilt. One of the practical difficulties of this method is guessing functions (initial projections) that approximate the final Wannier functions. Here we present an approach based on optimized projection functions that can construct maximally localized Wannier functions without a guess. We describe and demonstrate this approach on several realistic examples.

  3. Covalent addition of chitosan to graphene sheets: Density functional theory explorations of quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Ali; Harismah, Kun; Mirzaei, Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to detect the stabilities and properties of chitosan-functionalized graphene and graphene-oxide structures (G-Chit and GO-Chit). The model systems with two different sizes of sheets have been optimized and the molecular and atomic properties have been evaluated for them. The results indicated that investigated G-Chit and GO-Chit structures could be considered as stable structures but with different properties. The properties for GO and GO-Chit structures are almost similar; however, they are different from the original G and G-Chit structures. The results also indicated that the properties could be also size-dependent, in which different molecular and atomic properties have been observed for the investigate G sheets.

  4. Reliable Spectroscopic Constants for CCH-, NH2- and Their Isotopomers from an Accurate Potential Energy Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Chaban, Galina M.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate quartic force fields have been determined for the CCH- and NH2- molecular anions using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T). Very large one-particle basis sets have been used including diffuse functions and up through g-type functions. Correlation of the nitrogen and carbon core electrons has been included, as well as other "small" effects, such as the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction, and basis set extrapolation, and corrections for higher-order correlation effects and scalar relativistic effects. Fundamental vibrational frequencies have been computed using standard second-order perturbation theory as well as variational methods. Comparison with the available experimental data is presented and discussed. The implications of our research for the astronomical observation of molecular anions will be discussed.

  5. Local quality functions for graph clustering with non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Laarhoven, Twan; Marchiori, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Many graph clustering quality functions suffer from a resolution limit, namely the inability to find small clusters in large graphs. So-called resolution-limit-free quality functions do not have this limit. This property was previously introduced for hard clustering, that is, graph partitioning. We investigate the resolution-limit-free property in the context of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for hard and soft graph clustering. To use NMF in the hard clustering setting, a common approach is to assign each node to its highest membership cluster. We show that in this case symmetric NMF is not resolution-limit free, but that it becomes so when hardness constraints are used as part of the optimization. The resulting function is strongly linked to the constant Potts model. In soft clustering, nodes can belong to more than one cluster, with varying degrees of membership. In this setting resolution-limit free turns out to be too strong a property. Therefore we introduce locality, which roughly states that changing one part of the graph does not affect the clustering of other parts of the graph. We argue that this is a desirable property, provide conditions under which NMF quality functions are local, and propose a novel class of local probabilistic NMF quality functions for soft graph clustering.

  6. Initial Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Data Acquired from Soyuz Landings: Establishing a Functional Performance Recovery Time Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Kofman, I. S.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Stenger, M. B.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Fisher, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Testing of crew responses following long-duration flights has not been previously possible until a minimum of more than 24 hours after landing. As a result, it has not been possible to determine the trend of the early recovery process, nor has it been possible to accurately assess the full impact of the decrements associated with long-duration flight. To overcome these limitations, both the Russian and U.S. programs have implemented joint testing at the Soyuz landing site. This International Space Station research effort has been identified as the functional Field Test, and represents data collect on NASA, Russian, European Space Agency, and Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency crews. RESEARCH The primary goal of this research is to determine functional abilities associated with long-duration space flight crews beginning as soon after landing as possible on the day of landing (typically within 1 to 1.5 hours). This goal has both sensorimotor and cardiovascular elements. To date, a total of 15 subjects have participated in a 'pilot' version of the full 'field test'. The full version of the 'field test' will assess functional sensorimotor measurements included hand/eye coordination, standing from a seated position (sit-to-stand), walking normally without falling, measurement of dynamic visual acuity, discriminating different forces generated with the hands (both strength and ability to judge just noticeable differences of force), standing from a prone position, coordinated walking involving tandem heel-to-toe placement (tested with eyes both closed and open), walking normally while avoiding obstacles of differing heights, and determining postural ataxia while standing (measurement of quiet stance). Sensorimotor performance has been obtained using video records, and data from body worn inertial sensors. The cardiovascular portion of the investigation has measured blood pressure and heart rate during a timed stand test in conjunction with postural ataxia

  7. Near-infrared optical constants of naturally occurring olivine and synthetic pyroxene as a function of mineral composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, David; Lucey, Paul G.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Klima, Rachel L.; Isaacson, Peter J.

    2013-04-01

    Radiative transfer theory will assist in determining olivine and pyroxene proportions and compositions from the surface of a planetary body composed of intimately mixed minerals. In order to use radiative transfer techniques, the model requires the optical constants of olivine and pyroxene. Optical constants are parameters that describe the degree light absorbed (k) and refracted (n) in a medium. Here we only parameterize k in the near infrared from 0.6 to 2.5 µm of natural olivine as a function of forsterite number and synthetic pyroxene with respect to wollastonite and ferrosilite number. In contrast to previous work, this study is an improvement on previous work because we have a diverse and larger sample size leading to robust optical parameters. Additionally, we characterize each k-spectrum with the modified Gaussian model (MGM). MGM is a physically realistic model of near-infrared absorptions due to electronic transitions. In each spectrum, we model each absorption and continuum with Gaussians and an inverse of a linear function, respectively. We find that our fitting routine characterizes the olivine and pyroxene k-spectra in a robust and consistent manner. Then we use regression analysis to characterize each parameter of the Gaussians and the continuum as a function of mineral composition. The developed optical parameters from this work will allow calculations of mineral proportions and compositions on planetary surfaces with use of data from missions such as Dawn, MESSENGER, SELENE, and Chandrayaan-1.

  8. Range Separation and Local Hybridization in Density Functional Theory†

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Kohn–Sham density functional theory has become a standard method for modeling energetic, spectroscopic, and chemical reactivity properties of large molecules and solids. Density functional theory provides a rigorous theoretical framework for modeling the many-body exchange-correlation effects that dominate the computational cost of traditional wave function approaches. The advent of hybrid exchange-correlation functionals which incorporate a fraction of nonlocal exact exchange has solidified the prominence of density functional theory within computational chemistry. Hybrids provide accurate treatments of properties such as thermochemistry and molecular geometry. But they also exhibit some rather spectacular failures, and often contain multiple empirical parameters. This article reviews our work on developing novel exchange-correlation functionals that build upon the successes of global hybrids. We focus on more flexible functional forms, including local and range-separated hybrid functionals, constructed to obey known exact constraints and (ideally) to incorporate a minimum of empirical parametrization. The article places our work within the context of some other new approximate density functionals and discusses prospects for future work. PMID:19006280

  9. Strong coupling constant from vacuum polarization functions in three-flavor lattice QCD with dynamical overlap fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, E.; Aoki, S.; Fukaya, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Onogi, T.; Yamada, N.

    2010-10-25

    We determine the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} from a lattice calculation of vacuum polarization functions (VPF) in three-flavor QCD with dynamical overlap fermions. Fitting lattice data of VPF to the continuum perturbative formula including the operator product expansion, we extract the QCD scale parameter {Lambda}{sub MS}{sup -(3)}. At the Z boson mass scale, we obtain {alpha}{sub s}{sup (5)}(M{sub z}) = 0.1181(3)(+14/-12), where the first error is statistical and the second is our estimate of various systematic uncertainties.

  10. Host microbiota constantly control maturation and function of microglia in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Erny, Daniel; Hrabě de Angelis, Anna Lena; Jaitin, Diego; Wieghofer, Peter; Staszewski, Ori; David, Eyal; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Mahlakoiv, Tanel; Jakobshagen, Kristin; Buch, Thorsten; Schwierzeck, Vera; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Chun, Eunyoung; Garrett, Wendy S; McCoy, Kathy D; Diefenbach, Andreas; Staeheli, Peter; Stecher, Bärbel; Amit, Ido; Prinz, Marco

    2015-07-01

    As the tissue macrophages of the CNS, microglia are critically involved in diseases of the CNS. However, it remains unknown what controls their maturation and activation under homeostatic conditions. We observed substantial contributions of the host microbiota to microglia homeostasis, as germ-free (GF) mice displayed global defects in microglia with altered cell proportions and an immature phenotype, leading to impaired innate immune responses. Temporal eradication of host microbiota severely changed microglia properties. Limited microbiota complexity also resulted in defective microglia. In contrast, recolonization with a complex microbiota partially restored microglia features. We determined that short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), microbiota-derived bacterial fermentation products, regulated microglia homeostasis. Accordingly, mice deficient for the SCFA receptor FFAR2 mirrored microglia defects found under GF conditions. These findings suggest that host bacteria vitally regulate microglia maturation and function, whereas microglia impairment can be rectified to some extent by complex microbiota. PMID:26030851

  11. Functional Analysis and Intracellular Localization of Rice Cryptochromes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Nanako; Hirano, Tomoharu; Iwasaki, Toshisuke; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2003-01-01

    Blue-light-receptor cryptochrome (CRY), which mediates cotyledon expansion, increased accumulation of anthocyanin, and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, was first identified in Arabidopsis. Two Arabidopsis cryptochromes (AtCRY1 and AtCRY2) have been reported to be localized to the nucleus. However, there is no information on the cryptochromes in monocotyledons. In this study, we isolated two cryptochrome cDNAs, OsCRY1 and OsCRY2, from rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The deduced amino acid sequences of OsCRY1 and OsCRY2 have a photolyase-like domain in their N termini and are homologous to AtCRY1. To investigate the function of OsCRY1, we overexpressed a green fluorescence protein-OsCRY1 fusion gene in Arabidopsis and assessed the phenotypes of the resulting transgenic plants. When the seedlings were germinated in the dark, no discernible effect was observed. However, light-germinated seedlings showed pronounced inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and increased accumulation of anthocyanin. These phenotypes were induced in a blue-light-dependent manner, indicating that OsCRY1 functions as a blue-light-receptor cryptochrome. We also examined the intracellular localization of green fluorescence protein-OsCRY1 in the transgenic plants. It was localized to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We identified two nuclear localization domains in the primary structure of OsCRY1. We discuss the relationship between the function and intracellular localization of rice cryptochromes by using additional data obtained with OsCRY2. PMID:14657402

  12. Structure and Possible Functions of Constant-Frequency Calls in Ariopsis seemanni (Osteichthyes, Ariidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Daniel; Schulz, Jochen; Hartung, Jörg; Esser, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    In the 1970s, Tavolga conducted a series of experiments in which he found behavioral evidence that the vocalizations of the catfish species Ariopsis felis may play a role in a coarse form of echolocation. Based on his findings, he postulated a similar function for the calls of closely related catfish species. Here, we describe the physical characteristics of the predominant call-type of Ariopsis seemanni. In two behavioral experiments, we further explore whether A. seemanni uses these calls for acoustic obstacle detection by testing the hypothesis that the call-emission rate of individual fish should increase when subjects are confronted with novel objects, as it is known from other vertebrate species that use pulse-type signals to actively probe the environment. Audio-video monitoring of the fish under different obstacle conditions did not reveal a systematic increase in the number of emitted calls in the presence of novel objects or in dependence on the proximity between individual fish and different objects. These negative findings in combination with our current understanding of directional hearing in fishes (which is a prerequisite for acoustic obstacle detection) make it highly unlikely that A. seemanni uses its calls for acoustic obstacle detection. We argue that the calls are more likely to play a role in intra- or interspecific communication (e.g. in school formation or predator deterrence) and present results from a preliminary Y-maze experiment that are indicative for a positive phonotaxis of A. seemanni towards the calls of conspecifics. PMID:23741408

  13. Communication: Localized molecular orbital analysis of the effect of electron correlation on the anomalous isotope effect in the NMR spin-spin coupling constant in methane

    SciTech Connect

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C. Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2014-10-21

    We discuss the effect of electron correlation on the unexpected differential sensitivity (UDS) in the {sup 1}J(C–H) coupling constant of CH{sub 4} using a decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals and compare with the {sup 1}J(N–H) coupling constant in NH{sub 3}. In particular, we discuss the well known fact that uncorrelated coupled Hartree-Fock (CHF) calculations are not able to reproduce the UDS in methane. For this purpose we have implemented for the first time a localized molecular orbital analysis for the second order polarization propagator approximation with coupled cluster singles and doubles amplitudes—SOPPA(CCSD) in the DALTON program. Comparing the changes in the localized orbital contributions at the correlated SOPPA and SOPPA(CCSD) levels and at the uncorrelated CHF level, we find that the latter overestimates the effect of stretching the bond between the coupled atoms on the contribution to the coupling from the localized bonding orbital between these atoms. This disturbs the subtle balance between the molecular orbital contributions, which lead to the UDS in methane.

  14. Global functions in global-local finite-element analysis of localized stresses in prismatic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Stanley B.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in the global local finite-element method (GLFEM) is the availability of global functions for the given problem. The role and mathematical requirements of these global functions in a GLFEM analysis of localized stress states in prismatic structures are discussed. A method is described for determining these global functions. Underlying this method are theorems due to Toupin and Knowles on strain energy decay rates, which are related to a quantitative expression of Saint-Venant's principle. It is mentioned that a mathematically complete set of global functions can be generated, so that any arbitrary interface condition between the finite element and global subregions can be represented. Convergence to the true behavior can be achieved with increasing global functions and finite-element degrees of freedom. Specific attention is devoted to mathematically two-dimensional and three-dimensional prismatic structures. Comments are offered on the GLFEM analysis of NASA flat panel with a discontinuous stiffener. Methods for determining global functions for other effects are also indicated, such as steady-state dynamics and bodies under initial stress.

  15. Investigation of Biodiesel Through Photopyroelectric and Dielectric-Constant Measurements as a Function of Temperature: Freezing/Melting Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanelato, E. B.; Machado, F. A. L.; Rangel, A. B.; Guimarães, A. O.; Vargas, H.; da Silva, E. C.; Mansanares, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    Biodiesel is a promising option for alternative fuels since it derives from natural and renewable materials; it is biodegradable and less polluting than fossil fuels. A gradual replacement of diesel by biodiesel has been adopted by many countries, making necessary the investigation of the physical properties of biodiesel and of its mixture in diesel. Photothermal techniques, specifically the photopyroelectric technique (PPE), have proved to be suitable in the characterization of biodiesel and of its precursor oils, as well as of the biodiesel/diesel mixtures. In this paper, we investigate thermal and electrical properties of animal fat-based biodiesel as a function of temperature, aiming to characterize the freezing/melting interval and the changes in the physical properties from the solid to the liquid phase. The samples were prepared using the transesterification method, by the ethylic route. Optical transmittance experiments were carried out in order to confirm the phase transition interval. Solid and liquid phases present distinct thermal diffusivities and conductivities, as well as dielectric constants. The PPE signal amplitude is governed by the changes in the thermal diffusivity/conductivity. As a consequence, the amplitude of the signal becomes like a step function, which is smoothed and sometimes delayed by the nucleation processes during cooling. A similar behavior is found in the dielectric constant data, which is higher in the liquid phase since the molecules have a higher degree of freedom. Both methods (PPE/dielectric constant) proved to be useful in the characterization of the freezing/melting interval, as well as to establish the distinction in the physical properties of solid and liquid phases. The methodology allowed a discussion of the cloud point and the pour point of the samples in the temperature variation interval.

  16. Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions from Phenolic Compounds by Peroxyl Radicals: Multireference Character and Density Functional Theory Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Muñoz-Rugeles, Leonardo; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan Raul; Bao, Junwei Lucas; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-07-14

    An assessment of multireference character in transition states is considered to be an important component in establishing the expected reliability of various electronic structure methods. In the present work, the multireference characters of the transition states and the forming and breaking of bonds for a large set of hydrogen abstraction reactions from phenolic compounds by peroxyl radicals have been analyzed using the T1, M, B1, and GB1 diagnostics. The extent of multireference character depends on the system and on the conditions under which the reaction takes place, and some systematic trends are observed. In particular, the multireference character is found to be reduced by solvation, the size of the phenolic compound, and deprotonation in aqueous solution. However, the deviations of calculated rate constants from experimental ones are not correlated with the extent of multireference character. The performance of single-determinant density functional theory was investigated for the kinetics of these reactions by comparing calculated rate constants to experimental data; the results from these analyses showed that the M05 functional performs well for the task at hand. PMID:26378461

  17. Stability prediction of amorphous benzodiazepines by calculation of the mean relaxation time constant using the Williams-Watts decay function.

    PubMed

    Van den Mooter, G; Augustijns, P; Kinget, R

    1999-07-01

    The enthalpic relaxation of three amorphous benzodiazepines, diazepam, temazepam and triazolam was studied using differential scanning calorimetry for ageing temperatures which were below the glass transition temperature, and ageing times up to 16 h. Experimental determination of the relaxation enthalpy and the heat capacity change, both accompanying the glass transition, enabled us to calculate the extent of relaxation of the amorphous drugs at specific ageing conditions. Fitting of the relaxation function to the Williams-Watts two parameter decay function led to calculation of the mean relaxation time constant tau and the molecular relaxation time distribution parameter beta. The mean relaxation time constants for the three drugs increased from approximately ten h at the glass transition temperature with more than eight orders of magnitude at 66 K below the glass transition temperature. It was found that the benzodiazepines exhibited significant molecular mobility until approximately 50 K below the glass transition temperature; below this temperature molecular mobility becomes unimportant with respect to the shelf life stability. Hence the presented procedure provides the formulation scientist with a tool to set storage conditions for amorphous drugs and glassy pharmaceutical products. PMID:10477327

  18. Global and local curvature in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Ioannidis, Efthymios I.; Kulik, Heather J.

    2016-08-01

    Piecewise linearity of the energy with respect to fractional electron removal or addition is a requirement of an electronic structure method that necessitates the presence of a derivative discontinuity at integer electron occupation. Semi-local exchange-correlation (xc) approximations within density functional theory (DFT) fail to reproduce this behavior, giving rise to deviations from linearity with a convex global curvature that is evidence of many-electron, self-interaction error and electron delocalization. Popular functional tuning strategies focus on reproducing piecewise linearity, especially to improve predictions of optical properties. In a divergent approach, Hubbard U-augmented DFT (i.e., DFT+U) treats self-interaction errors by reducing the local curvature of the energy with respect to electron removal or addition from one localized subshell to the surrounding system. Although it has been suggested that DFT+U should simultaneously alleviate global and local curvature in the atomic limit, no detailed study on real systems has been carried out to probe the validity of this statement. In this work, we show when DFT+U should minimize deviations from linearity and demonstrate that a "+U" correction will never worsen the deviation from linearity of the underlying xc approximation. However, we explain varying degrees of efficiency of the approach over 27 octahedral transition metal complexes with respect to transition metal (Sc-Cu) and ligand strength (CO, NH3, and H2O) and investigate select pathological cases where the delocalization error is invisible to DFT+U within an atomic projection framework. Finally, we demonstrate that the global and local curvatures represent different quantities that show opposing behavior with increasing ligand field strength, and we identify where these two may still coincide.

  19. Global and local curvature in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Ioannidis, Efthymios I; Kulik, Heather J

    2016-08-01

    Piecewise linearity of the energy with respect to fractional electron removal or addition is a requirement of an electronic structure method that necessitates the presence of a derivative discontinuity at integer electron occupation. Semi-local exchange-correlation (xc) approximations within density functional theory (DFT) fail to reproduce this behavior, giving rise to deviations from linearity with a convex global curvature that is evidence of many-electron, self-interaction error and electron delocalization. Popular functional tuning strategies focus on reproducing piecewise linearity, especially to improve predictions of optical properties. In a divergent approach, Hubbard U-augmented DFT (i.e., DFT+U) treats self-interaction errors by reducing the local curvature of the energy with respect to electron removal or addition from one localized subshell to the surrounding system. Although it has been suggested that DFT+U should simultaneously alleviate global and local curvature in the atomic limit, no detailed study on real systems has been carried out to probe the validity of this statement. In this work, we show when DFT+U should minimize deviations from linearity and demonstrate that a "+U" correction will never worsen the deviation from linearity of the underlying xc approximation. However, we explain varying degrees of efficiency of the approach over 27 octahedral transition metal complexes with respect to transition metal (Sc-Cu) and ligand strength (CO, NH3, and H2O) and investigate select pathological cases where the delocalization error is invisible to DFT+U within an atomic projection framework. Finally, we demonstrate that the global and local curvatures represent different quantities that show opposing behavior with increasing ligand field strength, and we identify where these two may still coincide. PMID:27497541

  20. Exponentially localized Wannier functions in periodic zero flux magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nittis, G.; Lein, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, we investigate conditions which ensure the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis for a given periodic hamiltonian. We extend previous results [Panati, G., Ann. Henri Poincare 8, 995-1011 (2007), 10.1007/s00023-007-0326-8] to include periodic zero flux magnetic fields which is the setting also investigated by Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. The new notion of magnetic symmetry plays a crucial rôle; to a large class of symmetries for a non-magnetic system, one can associate "magnetic" symmetries of the related magnetic system. Observing that the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis is equivalent to the triviality of the so-called Bloch bundle, a rank m hermitian vector bundle over the Brillouin zone, we prove that magnetic time-reversal symmetry is sufficient to ensure the triviality of the Bloch bundle in spatial dimension d = 1, 2, 3. For d = 4, an exponentially localized Wannier basis exists provided that the trace per unit volume of a suitable function of the Fermi projection vanishes. For d > 4 and d ⩽ 2m (stable rank regime) only the exponential localization of a subset of Wannier functions is shown; this improves part of the analysis of Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. Finally, for d > 4 and d > 2m (unstable rank regime) we show that the mere analysis of Chern classes does not suffice in order to prove triviality and thus exponential localization.

  1. Dipole correlation effects on the local field and the effective dielectric constant in composite dielectrics containing high-k inclusions.

    PubMed

    Allahyarov, Elshad; Löwen, Hartmut; Zhu, Lei

    2016-07-28

    Mixing dielectric polymers with high permittivity (high-k) inclusions can affect their electrical properties. In actuation applications of dielectric elastomers, the polarized inclusions generate additional volume polarization-related electrostriction. In energy storage applications, it is possible to store more energy in dielectric composites because of additional polarization of the inclusions and interfaces. However, mixing an electroactive polymer with high-k inclusions also brings several disadvantages. The expulsion of the field from the interior of high-k fillers and the presence of two poles on the filler surface along the applied field direction result in higher local fields EL near the inclusion poles. The resulting field enhancement lowers the breakdown field (Eb) threshold for the material and therefore compromises the actuation and energy storage capabilities of dielectric composites. To mitigate this issue, the dependence of EL on the morphology of inclusion distribution, the field localization effect in chained configurations, and the role of the dipole-dipole correlation effects in the enhancement of the dipolar field of inclusions are analyzed. We show that the dipolar correlation effects are strong in large inclusion composites and their contribution to the inclusion dipole moment μ and to the local fields EL can reach 30-50%. A new method for deriving the composite permittivity from the field EL distribution, based on a caged probe technique, is also presented. PMID:27357433

  2. Effects of Local Compression on Peroneal Nerve Function in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Botte, Michael J.; Swenson, Michael R.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Rhoades, Charles E.; Akeson, Wayne H.

    1993-01-01

    A new apparatus was developed to compress the anterior compartment selectively and reproducibly in humans. Thirty-five normal volunteers were studied to determine short-term thresholds of local tissue pressure that produce significant neuromuscular dysfunction. Local tissue fluid pressure adjacent to the deep peroneal nerve was elevated by the compression apparatus and continuously monitored for 2-3 h by the slit catheter technique. Elevation of tissue fluid pressure to within 35-40 mm Hg of diastolic blood pressure (approx. 40 mm Hg of in situ pressure in our subjects) elicited a consistent progression of neuromuscular deterioration including, in order, (a) gradual loss of sensation, as assessed by Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, (b) subjective complaints, (c) reduced nerve conduction velocity, (d) decreased action potential amplitude of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle, and (e) motor weakness of muscles within the anterior compartment. Generally, higher intracompartment at pressures caused more rapid deterioration of neuromuscular function. In two subjects, when in situ compression levels were 0 and 30 mm Hg, normal neuromuscular function was maintained for 3 h. Threshold pressures for significant dysfunction were not always the same for each functional parameter studied, and the magnitudes of each functional deficit did not always correlate with compression level. This variable tolerance to elevated pressure emphasizes the need to monitor clinical signs and symptoms carefully in the diagnosis of compartment syndromes. The nature of the present studies was short term; longer term compression of myoneural tissues may result in dysfunction at lower pressure thresholds.

  3. Novel subcellular localization for α-synuclein: possible functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Guardia-Laguarta, Cristina; Area-Gomez, Estela; Schon, Eric A.; Przedborski, Serge

    2015-01-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is one of the genes that when mutated or overexpressed causes Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Initially, it was described as a synaptic terminal protein and later was found to be localized at mitochondria. Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM) have emerged as a central endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subcellular compartments where key functions of the cell occur. These domains, enriched in cholesterol and anionic phospholipids, are where calcium homeostasis, lipid transfer, and cholesterol metabolism are regulated. Some proteins, related to mitochondrial dynamics and function, are also localized to this area. Several neurodegenerative diseases have shown alterations in MAM functions and resident proteins, including Charcot Marie-Tooth and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have recently reported that MAM function is downregulated in cell and mouse models of PD expressing pathogenic mutations of α-syn. This review focuses on the possible role of α-syn in these cellular domains and the early pathogenic features of PD that could be explained by α-syn-MAM disturbances. PMID:25755636

  4. Hypertrophy induced KIF5B controls mitochondrial localization and function in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; de Jong, Anne Margreet; Bloks, Vincent W; van Gilst, Wiek H; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with growth and functional changes of cardiomyocytes, including mitochondrial alterations, but the latter are still poorly understood. Here we investigated mitochondrial function and dynamic localization in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) stimulated with insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF1) or phenylephrine (PE), mimicking physiological and pathological hypertrophic responses, respectively. A decreased activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) (state 3) was observed in permeabilized NRVCs stimulated with PE, whereas this was improved in IGF1 stimulated NRVCs. In contrast, in intact NRVCs, mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR) was increased in PE stimulated NRVCs, but remained constant in IGF1 stimulated NRVCs. After stimulation with PE, mitochondria were localized to the periphery of the cell. To study the differences in more detail, we performed gene array studies. IGF1 and PE stimulated NRVCs did not reveal major differences in gene expression of mitochondrial encoding proteins, but we identified a gene encoding a motor protein implicated in mitochondrial localization, kinesin family member 5b (Kif5b), which was clearly elevated in PE stimulated NRVCs but not in IGF1 stimulated NRVCs. We confirmed that Kif5b gene and protein expression were elevated in animal models with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Silencing of Kif5b reverted the peripheral mitochondrial localization in PE stimulated NRVCs and diminished PE induced increases in mitochondrial OCR, indicating that KIF5B dependent localization affects cellular responses to PE stimulated NRVCs. These results indicate that KIF5B contributes to mitochondrial localization and function in cardiomyocytes and may play a role in pathological hypertrophic responses in vivo. PMID:27094714

  5. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model. PMID:26723661

  6. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Gázquez, José L. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Vela, Alberto E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  7. Avoiding coral reef functional collapse requires local and global action.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Emma V; Perry, Chris T; Halloran, Paul R; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Schönberg, Christine H L; Wisshak, Max; Form, Armin U; Carricart-Ganivet, Juan P; Fine, Maoz; Eakin, C Mark; Mumby, Peter J

    2013-05-20

    Coral reefs face multiple anthropogenic threats, from pollution and overfishing to the dual effects of greenhouse gas emissions: rising sea temperature and ocean acidification. While the abundance of coral has declined in recent decades, the implications for humanity are difficult to quantify because they depend on ecosystem function rather than the corals themselves. Most reef functions and ecosystem services are founded on the ability of reefs to maintain their three-dimensional structure through net carbonate accumulation. Coral growth only constitutes part of a reef's carbonate budget; bioerosion processes are influential in determining the balance between net structural growth and disintegration. Here, we combine ecological models with carbonate budgets and drive the dynamics of Caribbean reefs with the latest generation of climate models. Budget reconstructions using documented ecological perturbations drive shallow (6-10 m) Caribbean forereefs toward an increasingly fragile carbonate balance. We then projected carbonate budgets toward 2080 and contrasted the benefits of local conservation and global action on climate change. Local management of fisheries (specifically, no-take marine reserves) and the watershed can delay reef loss by at least a decade under "business-as-usual" rises in greenhouse gas emissions. However, local action must be combined with a low-carbon economy to prevent degradation of reef structures and associated ecosystem services. PMID:23664976

  8. Identification and functional dissection of localization signals within ataxin-3.

    PubMed

    Antony, Paul Michel Aloyse; Mäntele, Simone; Mollenkopf, Phillip; Boy, Jana; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Riess, Olaf; Schmidt, Thorsten

    2009-11-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) or Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) belongs to a group of autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases, which are caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine repeat in the affected protein, in this case ataxin-3. Ataxin-3 is mainly localized in the cytoplasm; however, one hallmark of SCA3 is the formation of ataxin-3-containing protein aggregates in the nucleus of neurons. Currently, it is not known how mutant ataxin-3 translocates into the nucleus. We performed localization assays of recently proposed and novel potential signals, functionally confirmed the activity of a nuclear localization signal, identified two novel nuclear export signals (NES 77 and NES 141), and determined crucial amino acids. In addition, we demonstrate the relevance of the identified signals for the intracellular localization of the N- and C-terminus of ataxin-3. Our findings stress the importance of investigating the mechanisms, which influence the intracellular distribution of ataxin-3 during the pathogenesis of SCA3. PMID:19660550

  9. Imaging local brain function with emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1984-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to map local cerebral glucose utilization in the study of local cerebral function. This information differs fundamentally from structural assessment by means of computed tomography (CT). In normal human volunteers, the FDG scan was used to determine the cerebral metabolic response to conrolled sensory stimulation and the effects of aging. Cerebral metabolic patterns are distinctive among depressed and demented elderly patients. The FDG scan appears normal in the depressed patient, studded with multiple metabolic defects in patients with multiple infarct dementia, and in the patients with Alzheimer disease, metabolism is particularly reduced in the parietal cortex, but only slightly reduced in the caudate and thalamus. The interictal FDG scan effectively detects hypometabolic brain zones that are sites of onset for seizures in patients with partial epilepsy, even though these zones usually appear normal on CT scans. The future prospects of PET are discussed.

  10. Determination of plasma frequency, damping constant, and size distribution from the complex dielectric function of noble metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Arboleda, David Muñetón; Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B.

    2014-12-01

    This paper develops a novel method for simultaneously determining the plasma frequency ωP and the damping constant γfr e e in the bulk damped oscillator Drude model, based on experimentally measured real and imaginary parts of the metal refractive index in the IR wavelength range, lifting the usual approximation that restricts frequency values to the UV-deep UV region. Our method was applied to gold, silver, and copper, improving the relative uncertainties in the final values for ωp (0.5%-1.6%) and for γfr e e (3%-8%), which are smaller than those reported in the literature. These small uncertainties in ωp and γfr e e determination yield a much better fit of the experimental complex dielectric function. For the case of nanoparticles (Nps), a series expansion of the Drude expression (which includes ωp and γfr e e determined using our method) enables size-dependent dielectric function to be written as the sum of three terms: the experimental bulk dielectric function plus two size corrective terms, one for free electron, and the other for bound-electron contributions. Finally, size distribution of nanometric and subnanometric gold Nps in colloidal suspension was determined through fitting its experimental optical extinction spectrum using Mie theory based on the previously determined dielectric function. Results are compared with size histogram obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

  11. Determination of plasma frequency, damping constant, and size distribution from the complex dielectric function of noble metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Arboleda, David Muñetón; Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B.

    2014-12-21

    This paper develops a novel method for simultaneously determining the plasma frequency ω{sub P}   and the damping constant γ{sub free} in the bulk damped oscillator Drude model, based on experimentally measured real and imaginary parts of the metal refractive index in the IR wavelength range, lifting the usual approximation that restricts frequency values to the UV-deep UV region. Our method was applied to gold, silver, and copper, improving the relative uncertainties in the final values for ω{sub p} (0.5%–1.6%) and for γ{sub free} (3%–8%), which are smaller than those reported in the literature. These small uncertainties in ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determination yield a much better fit of the experimental complex dielectric function. For the case of nanoparticles (Nps), a series expansion of the Drude expression (which includes ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determined using our method) enables size-dependent dielectric function to be written as the sum of three terms: the experimental bulk dielectric function plus two size corrective terms, one for free electron, and the other for bound-electron contributions. Finally, size distribution of nanometric and subnanometric gold Nps in colloidal suspension was determined through fitting its experimental optical extinction spectrum using Mie theory based on the previously determined dielectric function. Results are compared with size histogram obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

  12. Density functional method including weak interactions: Dispersion coefficients based on the local response approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2009-12-01

    A new method to calculate the atom-atom dispersion coefficients in a molecule is proposed for the use in density functional theory with dispersion (DFT-D) correction. The method is based on the local response approximation due to Dobson and Dinte [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1780 (1996)], with modified dielectric model recently proposed by Vydrov and van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104105 (2009)]. The local response model is used to calculate the distributed multipole polarizabilities of atoms in a molecule, from which the dispersion coefficients are obtained by an explicit frequency integral of the Casimir-Polder type. Thus obtained atomic polarizabilities are also used in the damping function for the short-range singularity. Unlike empirical DFT-D methods, the local response dispersion (LRD) method is able to calculate the dispersion energy from the ground-state electron density only. It is applicable to any geometry, free from physical constants such as van der Waals radii or atomic polarizabilities, and computationally very efficient. The LRD method combined with the long-range corrected DFT functional (LC-BOP) is applied to calculations of S22 weakly bound complex set [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]. Binding energies obtained by the LC-BOP+LRD agree remarkably well with ab initio references.

  13. Density functional method including weak interactions: Dispersion coefficients based on the local response approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2009-12-01

    A new method to calculate the atom-atom dispersion coefficients in a molecule is proposed for the use in density functional theory with dispersion (DFT-D) correction. The method is based on the local response approximation due to Dobson and Dinte [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1780 (1996)], with modified dielectric model recently proposed by Vydrov and van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104105 (2009)]. The local response model is used to calculate the distributed multipole polarizabilities of atoms in a molecule, from which the dispersion coefficients are obtained by an explicit frequency integral of the Casimir-Polder type. Thus obtained atomic polarizabilities are also used in the damping function for the short-range singularity. Unlike empirical DFT-D methods, the local response dispersion (LRD) method is able to calculate the dispersion energy from the ground-state electron density only. It is applicable to any geometry, free from physical constants such as van der Waals radii or atomic polarizabilities, and computationally very efficient. The LRD method combined with the long-range corrected DFT functional (LC-BOP) is applied to calculations of S22 weakly bound complex set [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]. Binding energies obtained by the LC-BOP + LRD agree remarkably well with ab initio references.

  14. Functional specificity of local synaptic connections in neocortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ho; Hofer, Sonja B.; Pichler, Bruno; Buchanan, Kate; Sjöström, P. Jesper; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal connectivity is fundamental to information processing in the brain. Understanding the mechanisms of sensory processing, therefore, requires uncovering how connection patterns between neurons relate to their function. On a coarse scale long range projections can preferentially link cortical regions with similar responses to sensory stimuli1-4. But on the local scale, where dendrites and axons overlap substantially, the functional specificity of connections remains unknown. Here we determine synaptic connectivity between nearby layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in vitro whose response properties were first characterized in mouse visual cortex in vivo. We found that connection probability was related to the similarity of visually driven neuronal activity. Neurons with the same preference for oriented stimuli connected at twice the rate of neurons with orthogonal orientation preferences. Neurons responding similarly to naturalistic stimuli formed connections at much higher rates than those with uncorrelated responses. Bidirectional synaptic connections were found more frequently between neuronal pairs with strongly correlated visual responses. Our results reveal the deg of functional specificity of local synaptic connections in visual cortex, and point to the existence of fine-scale subnetworks dedicated to processing related sensory information. PMID:21478872

  15. Spectroscopic constants of diatomic molecules computed correcting Hartree-Fock or general-valence-bond potential-energy curves with correlation-energy functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Jordá, José M.; San-Fabián, Emilio; Moscardó, Federico

    1992-04-01

    The Kohn-Sham energy with exact exchange [using the exact Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange but an approximate correlation-energy functional] may be computed very accurately by adding the correlation obtained from the HF density to the total HF energy. Three density functionals are used: local spin density (LSD), LSD with self-interaction correction, and LSD with generalized gradient correction. This scheme has been extended (Lie-Clementi, Colle-Salvetti, and Moscardo-San-Fabian) to be used with general-valence-bond (GVB) energies and wave functions, so that the extra correlation included in the GVB energy is not counted again. The effect of all these approximate correlations on HF or GVB spectroscopic constants (Re,ωe, and De) is studied. Approximate relations showing how correlation affects them are derived, and may be summarized as follows: (1) the effect on Re and ωe depends only on the correlation derivative at Re, and (2) the effect on De depends mainly on the correlation difference between quasidissociated and equilibrium geometries. A consequence is that all the correlation corrections tested here give larger ωe and De and shorter Re than the uncorrected HF or GVB values. This trend is correct for De for both HF and GVB. For Re and ωe, it is correct in most cases for GVB, but it often fails for the HF cases. A comparison is made with Kohn-Sham calculations with both exchange and correlation approximated. As a final conclusion, it is found that, within the present scheme, a qualitatively correct HF or GVB potential-energy curve, together with a correlation-energy approximation with correct dissociation behavior, is crucial for obtaining good estimates of spectroscopic constants.

  16. Comparing Teacher-Directed and Computer-Assisted Constant Time Delay for Teaching Functional Sight Words to Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mari Beth; Hurley, Kevin J.; Cihak, David F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of teacher-directed and computer-assisted constant time delay strategies for teaching three students with moderate intellectual disability to read functional sight words. Target words were those found in recipes and were taught via teacher-delivered constant time delay or…

  17. Involvement of Local Lamellipodia in Endothelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Jerome W.; Zhang, Xun E.; Worthylake, Rebecca A.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we observed that endothelial cells cultured in tightly confluent monolayers display frequent local lamellipodia, and that thrombin, an agent that increases endothelial permeability, reduces lamellipodia protrusions. This led us to test the hypothesis that local lamellipodia contribute to endothelial barrier function. Movements of subcellular structures containing GFP-actin or VE-cadherin-GFP expressed in endothelial cells were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of endothelial barrier function. Changes in both lamellipodia dynamics and TER were assessed during baseline and after cells were treated with either the barrier-disrupting agent thrombin, or the barrier-stabilizing agent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin was used to selectively block lamellipodia formation, and was used to test their role in the barrier function of endothelial cell monolayers and isolated, perfused rat mesenteric venules. Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Rac1 and RhoA activation were evaluated using G-LISA assays. The role of Rac1 was tested with the specific inhibitor NSC23766 or by expressing wild-type or dominant negative GFP-Rac1. The results show that thrombin rapidly decreased both TER and the lamellipodia protrusion frequency. S1P rapidly increased TER in association with increased protrusion frequency. Blebbistatin nearly abolished local lamellipodia protrusions while cortical actin fibers and stress fibers remained intact. Blebbistatin also significantly decreased TER of cultured endothelial cells and increased permeability of isolated rat mesenteric venules. Both thrombin and S1P increased MLC phosphorylation and activation of RhoA. However, thrombin and S1P had differential impacts on Rac1, correlating with the changes in TER and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. Overexpression of Rac1 elevated, while NSC23766 and

  18. Involvement of local lamellipodia in endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Jerome W; Zhang, Xun E; Worthylake, Rebecca A; Souza-Smith, Flavia M

    2015-01-01

    Recently we observed that endothelial cells cultured in tightly confluent monolayers display frequent local lamellipodia, and that thrombin, an agent that increases endothelial permeability, reduces lamellipodia protrusions. This led us to test the hypothesis that local lamellipodia contribute to endothelial barrier function. Movements of subcellular structures containing GFP-actin or VE-cadherin-GFP expressed in endothelial cells were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of endothelial barrier function. Changes in both lamellipodia dynamics and TER were assessed during baseline and after cells were treated with either the barrier-disrupting agent thrombin, or the barrier-stabilizing agent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin was used to selectively block lamellipodia formation, and was used to test their role in the barrier function of endothelial cell monolayers and isolated, perfused rat mesenteric venules. Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Rac1 and RhoA activation were evaluated using G-LISA assays. The role of Rac1 was tested with the specific inhibitor NSC23766 or by expressing wild-type or dominant negative GFP-Rac1. The results show that thrombin rapidly decreased both TER and the lamellipodia protrusion frequency. S1P rapidly increased TER in association with increased protrusion frequency. Blebbistatin nearly abolished local lamellipodia protrusions while cortical actin fibers and stress fibers remained intact. Blebbistatin also significantly decreased TER of cultured endothelial cells and increased permeability of isolated rat mesenteric venules. Both thrombin and S1P increased MLC phosphorylation and activation of RhoA. However, thrombin and S1P had differential impacts on Rac1, correlating with the changes in TER and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. Overexpression of Rac1 elevated, while NSC23766 and

  19. Association constants and distribution functions for ion pairs in binary solvent mixtures: Application to a cyanine dye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinokov, A. V.; Basilevsky, M. V.; Nikitina, E. A.

    2011-10-01

    The computations of the association constants Kass were performed at the microscopic level for the ion pair Cy+I- composed of the complex cyanine dye cation Cy+ coupled to the negative iodine counterion. The wide array of Kass values is arranged by a variation of the composition of the binary solvent mixtures toluene/dimethylsulfoxide with the accompanying change of the solvent polarity. The potentials of mean force (PMFs) are calculated for a set of interionic separations R in the Cy+I- by a methodology which combines the quantum-chemical techniques for the treatment of the electronic structure of the Cy+I- system with the recent dielectric continuum approach which accounts for the solvation effects. For a given solute/solvent system the probability function P(R), which describes the distribution of interionic separations, is constructed in terms of the PMFs and implemented for the evaluation of the Kass.

  20. Learning Task-Optimal Registration Cost Functions for Localizing Cytoarchitecture and Function in the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncu, Mert R.; Vercauteren, Tom; Holt, Daphne J.; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl; Golland, Polina; Fischl, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Image registration is typically formulated as an optimization problem with multiple tunable, manually set parameters. We present a principled framework for learning thousands of parameters of registration cost functions, such as a spatially-varying tradeoff between the image dissimilarity and regularization terms. Our approach belongs to the classic machine learning framework of model selection by optimization of cross-validation error. This second layer of optimization of cross-validation error over and above registration selects parameters in the registration cost function that result in good registration as measured by the performance of the specific application in a training data set. Much research effort has been devoted to developing generic registration algorithms, which are then specialized to particular imaging modalities, particular imaging targets and particular postregistration analyses. Our framework allows for a systematic adaptation of generic registration cost functions to specific applications by learning the “free” parameters in the cost functions. Here, we consider the application of localizing underlying cytoarchitecture and functional regions in the cerebral cortex by alignment of cortical folding. Most previous work assumes that perfectly registering the macro-anatomy also perfectly aligns the underlying cortical function even though macro-anatomy does not completely predict brain function. In contrast, we learn 1) optimal weights on different cortical folds or 2) optimal cortical folding template in the generic weighted sum of squared differences dissimilarity measure for the localization task. We demonstrate state-of-the-art localization results in both histological and functional magnetic resonance imaging data sets. PMID:20529736

  1. SNAP-Tag Technology: A Useful Tool To Determine Affinity Constants and Other Functional Parameters of Novel Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Niesen, Judith; Sack, Markus; Seidel, Melanie; Fendel, Rolf; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Stein, Christoph

    2016-08-17

    Antibody derivatives, such as the single chain fragment variable (scFv), can be developed as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer research, especially in the form of fusion proteins. Such derivatives are easier to produce and modify than monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and achieve better tissue/tumor penetration. The genetic modification of scFvs is also much more straightforward than the challenging chemical modification of mAbs. Therefore, we constructed two scFvs derived from the approved monoclonal antibodies cetuximab (scFv2112) and panitumumab (scFv1711), both of which are specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a well-characterized solid tumor antigen. Both scFvs were genetically fused to the SNAP-tag, an engineered version of the human DNA repair enzyme O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase that allows the covalent coupling of benzylguanine (BG)-modified substrates such as fluorescent dyes. The SNAP-tag achieves controllable and irreversible protein modification and is an important tool for experimental studies in vitro and in vivo. The affinity constant of a scFv is a key functional parameter, especially in the context of a fusion protein. Therefore, we developed a method to define the affinity constants of scFv-SNAP fusion proteins by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. We could confirm that both scFvs retained their functionality after fusion to the SNAP-tag in a variety of procedures and assays, including ELISA, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. The experimental procedures described herein, and the new protocol for affinity determination by SPR spectroscopy, are suitable for the preclinical evaluation of diverse antibody formats and derivatives. PMID:27391930

  2. Calculating dispersion interactions using maximally localized Wannier functions.

    PubMed

    Andrinopoulos, Lampros; Hine, Nicholas D M; Mostofi, Arash A

    2011-10-21

    We investigate a recently developed approach [P. L. Silvestrelli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 053002 (2008); J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5224 (2009)] that uses maximally localized Wannier functions to evaluate the van der Waals contribution to the total energy of a system calculated with density-functional theory. We test it on a set of atomic and molecular dimers of increasing complexity (argon, methane, ethene, benzene, phthalocyanine, and copper phthalocyanine) and demonstrate that the method, as originally proposed, has a number of shortcomings that hamper its predictive power. In order to overcome these problems, we have developed and implemented a number of improvements to the method and show that these modifications give rise to calculated binding energies and equilibrium geometries that are in closer agreement to results of quantum-chemical coupled-cluster calculations. PMID:22029295

  3. Exact density functional and wave function embedding schemes based on orbital localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hégely, Bence; Nagy, Péter R.; Ferenczy, György G.; Kállay, Mihály

    2016-08-01

    Exact schemes for the embedding of density functional theory (DFT) and wave function theory (WFT) methods into lower-level DFT or WFT approaches are introduced utilizing orbital localization. First, a simple modification of the projector-based embedding scheme of Manby and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A507 (2014)] is proposed. We also use localized orbitals to partition the system, but instead of augmenting the Fock operator with a somewhat arbitrary level-shift projector we solve the Huzinaga-equation, which strictly enforces the Pauli exclusion principle. Second, the embedding of WFT methods in local correlation approaches is studied. Since the latter methods split up the system into local domains, very simple embedding theories can be defined if the domains of the active subsystem and the environment are treated at a different level. The considered embedding schemes are benchmarked for reaction energies and compared to quantum mechanics (QM)/molecular mechanics (MM) and vacuum embedding. We conclude that for DFT-in-DFT embedding, the Huzinaga-equation-based scheme is more efficient than the other approaches, but QM/MM or even simple vacuum embedding is still competitive in particular cases. Concerning the embedding of wave function methods, the clear winner is the embedding of WFT into low-level local correlation approaches, and WFT-in-DFT embedding can only be more advantageous if a non-hybrid density functional is employed.

  4. Local functional descriptors for surface comparison based binding prediction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular recognition in proteins occurs due to appropriate arrangements of physical, chemical, and geometric properties of an atomic surface. Similar surface regions should create similar binding interfaces. Effective methods for comparing surface regions can be used in identifying similar regions, and to predict interactions without regard to the underlying structural scaffold that creates the surface. Results We present a new descriptor for protein functional surfaces and algorithms for using these descriptors to compare protein surface regions to identify ligand binding interfaces. Our approach uses descriptors of local regions of the surface, and assembles collections of matches to compare larger regions. Our approach uses a variety of physical, chemical, and geometric properties, adaptively weighting these properties as appropriate for different regions of the interface. Our approach builds a classifier based on a training corpus of examples of binding sites of the target ligand. The constructed classifiers can be applied to a query protein providing a probability for each position on the protein that the position is part of a binding interface. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach on a number of benchmarks, demonstrating performance that is comparable to the state-of-the-art, with an approach with more generality than these prior methods. Conclusions Local functional descriptors offer a new method for protein surface comparison that is sufficiently flexible to serve in a variety of applications. PMID:23176080

  5. Maximally-localized Wannier functions for GW quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, D. R.; Vanderbilt, David

    2009-03-01

    Recent efforts carrying the GW many-body approximation to self-consistency have given improved electronic structure results.^1 Maximally-localized Wannier functions^2 formed from the quasiparticle wave functions^3 provide an efficient and highly accurate basis for interpolating the SCGW bands from a coarse Brillouin-zone mesh to symmetry lines. Since the MLWF's correspond to chemists' bond orbitals, they potentially also provide insight into the qualitative effects of the improved treatment of correlations in SCGW compared to LDA. We report results on SrTiO3, solid Ar, and molecular CO. Band interpolation is accurate and effective for both solids. Small shifts in the degree of hybridization can be visualized for some of the SrTiO3 and CO MLWF's. In Ar, individual conduction-band Bloch functions were found to have large differences between LDA and SCGW.^1 However, a manifold of 9 d and spd-hybrid MLWF's which proved to be the minimum necessary for the lower conduction bands showed minimal differences in the two cases. A fully-functional interface to the WANNIER90 library within the SCGW-capable ABINIT code has been implemented and will be publicly available in the near future. 1. F. Bruneval et al., Phys. Rev. B 74, 045102 (2006). 2. N. Marzari and D. Vanderbilt, Phys. Rev. B 56, 12 847 (1997). 3. M. van Schilfgaarde et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 226402 (2006).

  6. Local invertible analytic solution of a functional differential equation with deviating arguments depending on the state derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jianguo; Ma, Minghuan

    2007-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a functional differential equation of the formx'(z)=1/x(az+bx'(z)) with the distinctive feature that the argument of the unknown function depends on the state derivative, where a,b are two complex numbers. By reducing the equation with the Schroder transformation to another functional differential equation with proportional delay, we give existence of its local invertible analytic solutions. We discuss not only that the constant [alpha] given in Schroder transformation at resonance, i.e., at a root of the unity, but also those [alpha] near resonance (near a root of the unity) under the Brjuno condition.

  7. The Multicenter Aerobic Iron Respiratory Chain of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Functions as an Ensemble with a Single Macroscopic Rate Constant*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting-Feng; Painter, Richard G.; Ban, Bhupal; Blake, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions among three prominent colored proteins in intact cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scattered light. The concentrations of proteins in the periplasmic space were estimated to be 350 and 25 mg/ml for rusticyanin and cytochrome c, respectively; cytochrome a was present as one molecule for every 91 nm2 in the cytoplasmic membrane. All three proteins were rapidly reduced to the same relative extent when suspensions of live bacteria were mixed with different concentrations of ferrous ions at pH 1.5. The subsequent molecular oxygen-dependent oxidation of the multicenter respiratory chain occurred with a single macroscopic rate constant, regardless of the proteins' in vitro redox potentials or their putative positions in the aerobic iron respiratory chain. The crowded electron transport proteins in the periplasm of the organism constituted an electron conductive medium where the network of protein interactions functioned in a concerted fashion as a single ensemble with a standard reduction potential of 650 mV. The appearance of product ferric ions was correlated with the reduction levels of the periplasmic electron transfer proteins; the limiting first-order catalytic rate constant for aerobic respiration on iron was 7,400 s−1. The ability to conduct direct spectrophotometric studies under noninvasive physiological conditions represents a new and powerful approach to examine the extent and rates of biological events in situ without disrupting the complexity of the live cellular environment. PMID:26041781

  8. The Multicenter Aerobic Iron Respiratory Chain of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Functions as an Ensemble with a Single Macroscopic Rate Constant.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting-Feng; Painter, Richard G; Ban, Bhupal; Blake, Robert C

    2015-07-24

    Electron transfer reactions among three prominent colored proteins in intact cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scattered light. The concentrations of proteins in the periplasmic space were estimated to be 350 and 25 mg/ml for rusticyanin and cytochrome c, respectively; cytochrome a was present as one molecule for every 91 nm(2) in the cytoplasmic membrane. All three proteins were rapidly reduced to the same relative extent when suspensions of live bacteria were mixed with different concentrations of ferrous ions at pH 1.5. The subsequent molecular oxygen-dependent oxidation of the multicenter respiratory chain occurred with a single macroscopic rate constant, regardless of the proteins' in vitro redox potentials or their putative positions in the aerobic iron respiratory chain. The crowded electron transport proteins in the periplasm of the organism constituted an electron conductive medium where the network of protein interactions functioned in a concerted fashion as a single ensemble with a standard reduction potential of 650 mV. The appearance of product ferric ions was correlated with the reduction levels of the periplasmic electron transfer proteins; the limiting first-order catalytic rate constant for aerobic respiration on iron was 7,400 s(-1). The ability to conduct direct spectrophotometric studies under noninvasive physiological conditions represents a new and powerful approach to examine the extent and rates of biological events in situ without disrupting the complexity of the live cellular environment. PMID:26041781

  9. The role of local scale heterogeneities in terrestrial ecosystem functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, C.; Fatichi, S.; Rimkus, S.; Burlando, P.; Bugmann, H.; Huber, M.

    2013-12-01

    The coarse-grained spatial representation of many terrestrial ecosystem models hampers the importance of local scale heterogeneities. To discuss this issue, we combine a range of observations (forest inventories, eddy flux tower data, remote sensing products) and modeling approaches which allow us to investigate the role of local climate, topography and initial conditions (land cover and soil properties) when simulating vegetation dynamics. Three approaches for modeling terrestrial ecosystems, with contrasting degrees of abstraction, were selected: (i) LPJ, a well-established, area-based, Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM) that incorporates plant physiological and biogeochemical processes; (ii) LPJ-GUESS, a hybrid, individual-based approach that additionally considers more detailed processes of plant population dynamics; and (iii) D-LPJ, a spatially distributed version of LPJ, operating at a fine resolution (100m x 100m), which uses an enhanced hydrological representation accounting for lateral connectivity of surface and subsurface water fluxes. By confronting model simulations with a multivariate data-set available at the catchment scale, we argue that: (i) local environmental and topographic attributes that are often ignored or at best crudely represented within DGVM applications exert a strong control on terrestrial ecosystem functioning; (ii) the assumption of steady-state vegetation and soil carbon pools at the beginning of simulation studies (e.g., under 'current conditions'), as embedded in many DGVM applications, is in contradiction with the current state of many forests that, due to natural or anthropogenic disturbances, are often out of equilibrium; (iii) model evaluation against vegetation carbon fluxes (i.e., photosynthetic activity and respiration rates) does not imply an accurate simulation of vegetation carbon stocks (i.e., biomass). In addition, having gained insights about model performance at the catchment scale, where a wealth of information

  10. Local structure studies of materials using pair distribution function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joseph W.

    A collection of pair distribution function studies on various materials is presented in this dissertation. In each case, local structure information of interest pushes the current limits of what these studies can accomplish. The goal is to provide insight into the individual material behaviors as well as to investigate ways to expand the current limits of PDF analysis. Where possible, I provide a framework for how PDF analysis might be applied to a wider set of material phenomena. Throughout the dissertation, I discuss 0 the capabilities of the PDF method to provide information pertaining to a material's structure and properties, ii) current limitations in the conventional approach to PDF analysis, iii) possible solutions to overcome certain limitations in PDF analysis, and iv) suggestions for future work to expand and improve the capabilities PDF analysis.

  11. Localization and potential function of kindlin-1 in periodontal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Petricca, Giorgio; Leppilampi, Mari; Jiang, Guoqiao; Owen, Gethin Rhys; Wiebe, Colin; Tu, Yizeng; Koivisto, Leeni; Häkkinen, Lari; Wu, Chuanyue; Larjava, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Kindlin-1 is an intracellular focal adhesion protein that regulates actin cytoskeleton. Patients suffering from Kindler syndrome have a homologous mutation of the kindlin-1 gene and develop skin blisters, periodontal disease and intestinal complications because of deficient adhesion of the basal epithelial cells. We investigated kindlin-1 localization in periodontal tissue and its functions in cultured keratinocytes and showed that kindlin-1 co-localizes with migfilin and paxillin in the basal epithelial cells of oral mucosa and in cultured keratinocytes. The kindlin-1 deficient oral mucosal tissue from a Kindler syndrome patient showed a complete lack of paxillin and reduced migfilin immunostaining in the basal keratinocytes. Co-immunoprecipitation showed that migfilin directly interacted with kindlin-1. RNA interference-induced kindlin-1 deficiency in keratinocytes led to an altered distribution of migfilin containing focal adhesions, reduced cell spreading, decreased cell proliferation and decelerated cell migration. Disruption of microtubules in the kindling-1-deficient cells further reduced cell spreading, suggesting that microtubules can partially compensate for kindlin-1 deficiency. Kindlin-1 supported mature cell-extracellular matrix adhesions of keratinocytes, as downregulation of kindlin-1 expression significantly reduced cell adhesion strength. In summary, kindlin-1 interacts with migfilin and plays a crucial role in actin-dependent keratinocyte cell adhesion essential for epidermal and periodontal health. PMID:19758247

  12. A modified Monte Carlo 'local importance function transform' method

    SciTech Connect

    Keady, K. P.; Larsen, E. W.

    2013-07-01

    The Local Importance Function Transform (LIFT) method uses an approximation of the contribution transport problem to bias a forward Monte-Carlo (MC) source-detector simulation [1-3]. Local (cell-based) biasing parameters are calculated from an inexpensive deterministic adjoint solution and used to modify the physics of the forward transport simulation. In this research, we have developed a new expression for the LIFT biasing parameter, which depends on a cell-average adjoint current to scalar flux (J{sup *}/{phi}{sup *}) ratio. This biasing parameter differs significantly from the original expression, which uses adjoint cell-edge scalar fluxes to construct a finite difference estimate of the flux derivative; the resulting biasing parameters exhibit spikes in magnitude at material discontinuities, causing the original LIFT method to lose efficiency in problems with high spatial heterogeneity. The new J{sup *}/{phi}{sup *} expression, while more expensive to obtain, generates biasing parameters that vary smoothly across the spatial domain. The result is an improvement in simulation efficiency. A representative test problem has been developed and analyzed to demonstrate the advantage of the updated biasing parameter expression with regards to solution figure of merit (FOM). For reference, the two variants of the LIFT method are compared to a similar variance reduction method developed by Depinay [4, 5], as well as MC with deterministic adjoint weight windows (WW). (authors)

  13. A Mapping of the Electron Localization Function for Earth Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David F.; Ross, Nancy; Crawford, T Daniel; Burt, Jason; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2005-06-01

    The electron localization function, ELF, generated for a number of geometry-optimized earth materials, provides a graphical representation of the spatial localization of the probability electron density distribution as embodied in domains ascribed to localized bond and lone pair electrons. The lone pair domains, displayed by the silica polymorphs quartz, coesite and cristobalite, are typically banana-shaped and oriented perpendicular to the plane of the SiOSi angle at ~0.60 Å from the O atom on the reflex side of the angle. With decreasing angle, the domains increase in magnitude, indicating an increase in the nucleophilic character of the O atom, rendering it more susceptible to potential electrophilic attack. The Laplacian isosurface maps of the experimental and theoretical electron density distribution for coesite substantiates the increase in the size of the domain with decreasing angle. Bond pair domains are displayed along each of the SiO bond vectors as discrete concave hemispherically-shaped domains at ~0.70 Å from the O atom. For more closed-shell ionic bonded interactions, the bond and lone pair domains are often coalesced, resulting in concave hemispherical toroidal-shaped domains with local maxima centered along the bond vectors. As the shared covalent character of the bonded interactions increases, the bond and lone pair domains are better developed as discrete domains. ELF isosurface maps generated for the earth materials tremolite, diopside, talc and dickite display banana-shaped lone pair domains associated with the bridging O atoms of SiOSi angles and concave hemispherical toroidal bond pair domains associated with the nonbridging ones. The lone pair domains in dickite and talc provide a basis for understanding the bonded interactions between the adjacent neutral layers. Maps were also generated for beryl, cordierite, quartz, low albite, forsterite, wadeite, åkermanite, pectolite, periclase, hurlbutite, thortveitite and vanthoffite. Strategies

  14. Ritz analysis of discontinuous beams using local trigonometric functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Thi D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Patil, Mayuresh J.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the current paper is to present a Ritz-type analytical model for predicting the behavior of discontinuous beams such as thin-walled beams with cracks and multiply-stepped beams. The beam is discretized in the cracked as well as the un-cracked domains for a cracked thin-walled beam and in uniform beams for a multiple-stepped beam. A set of local trigonometric trial functions is used to define the twist angle for the cracked domain and the un-cracked domains, as well as to define the displacement field for uniform domains. A global equation system of unknown Ritz coefficients is derived by minimizing the Lagrangian functional or the total potential energy. In the present Ritz model, the interface continuity conditions between sub-domains are investigated and enforced into the global equation system using the condensation procedure or the Lagrange multipliers. Examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the current model for free vibration and torsional analysis. Results obtained from the current model are found to agree well with those obtained using a detailed finite element method or with existing results in literature. The proposed model offers an efficient approach to reduce the modeling efforts and computational time required to analyze complex beams with cracks or multiple steps.

  15. Probability density function transformation using seeded localized averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, N. B.; Jordanov, V. T.

    2011-07-01

    Seeded Localized Averaging (SLA) is a spectrum acquisition method that averages pulse-heights in dynamic windows. SLA sharpens peaks in the acquired spectra. This work investigates the transformation of the original probability density function (PDF) in the process of applying SLA procedure. We derive an analytical expression for the resulting probability density function after an application of SLA. In addition, we prove the following properties: 1) for symmetric distributions, SLA preserves both the mean and symmetry. 2) for uni-modal symmetric distributions, SLA reduces variance, sharpening the distributions peak. Our results are the first to prove these properties, reinforcing past experimental observations. Specifically, our results imply that in the typical case of a spectral peak with Gaussian PDF the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the transformed peak becomes narrower even with averaging of only two pulse-heights. While the Gaussian shape is no longer preserved, our results include an analytical expression for the resulting distribution. Examples of the transformation of other PDFs are presented. (authors)

  16. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  17. Stability constants for the formation of lead chloride complexes as a function of temperature and ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanxin; Millero, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    The stability constants for the formation of lead (Pb2+) with chloride Pb2+=nCl−↔PbCln2−nβn(n=1,2,3) have been determined using a spectrophotometric method in NaClO4 solutions as a function of ionic strength (0–6 m) and temperature (15–45 °C). The results have been fitted to the equations: logβ1∗=logβ1+0.21I−8.61I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)+1927.40[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕Tlogβ2∗=logβ2+0.32I−4.67I0.5(1+1.2I0.5)+594.54[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕Tlogβ3∗=logβ3+0.40I−2.68I0.5(1+1.2I0.5)−43.98[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕T with standard errors of 0.05, 0.04 and 0.06, respectively. The thermodynamic values of log β1, logβ2 and logβ3 at 25.0 °C and the enthalpies of formation of PbCl+, PbCl20 and PbCl3− are in good agreement with literature values. We have combined our results with the earlier work of Seward (1984) to yield thermodynamic constants that are valid from 15 to 300 °C: logβ1=44.82+0.031T−21.21logTlogβ2=61.42+0.046T−29.51logTlogβ3=107.97+0.071T−51.46logT with standard errors of 0.05, 0.08 and 0.10, respectively. PMID:26937043

  18. Different subcellular localizations and functions of Arabidopsis myosin VIII

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Lior; Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Belausov, Eduard; Sadot, Einat

    2008-01-01

    Background Myosins are actin-activated ATPases that use energy to generate force and move along actin filaments, dragging with their tails different cargos. Plant myosins belong to the group of unconventional myosins and Arabidopsis myosin VIII gene family contains four members: ATM1, ATM2, myosin VIIIA and myosin VIIIB. Results In transgenic plants expressing GFP fusions with ATM1 (IQ-tail truncation, lacking the head domain), fluorescence was differentially distributed: while in epidermis cells at the root cap GFP-ATM1 equally distributed all over the cell, in epidermal cells right above this region it accumulated in dots. Further up, in cells of the elongation zone, GFP-ATM1 was preferentially positioned at the sides of transversal cell walls. Interestingly, the punctate pattern was insensitive to brefeldin A (BFA) while in some cells closer to the root cap, ATM1 was found in BFA bodies. With the use of different markers and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, it was found that myosin VIII co-localized to the plasmodesmata and ER, colocalized with internalized FM4-64, and partially overlapped with the endosomal markers ARA6, and rarely with ARA7 and FYVE. Motility of ARA6 labeled organelles was inhibited whenever associated with truncated ATM1 but motility of FYVE labeled organelles was inhibited only when associated with large excess of ATM1. Furthermore, GFP-ATM1 and RFP-ATM2 (IQ-tail domain) co-localized to the same spots on the plasma membrane, indicating a specific composition at these sites for myosin binding. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that myosin VIII functions differently in different root cells and can be involved in different steps of endocytosis, BFA-sensitive and insensitive pathways, ER tethering and plasmodesmatal activity. PMID:18179725

  19. Quantum mechanical reaction rate constants by vibrational configuration interaction: the OH + H2->H2O + H reaction as a function of temperature.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arindam; Truhlar, Donald G

    2005-05-10

    The thermal rate constant of the 3D OH + H(2)-->H(2)O + H reaction was computed by using the flux autocorrelation function, with a time-independent square-integrable basis set. Two modes that actively participate in bond making and bond breaking were treated by using 2D distributed Gaussian functions, and the remaining (nonreactive) modes were treated by using harmonic oscillator functions. The finite-basis eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian were obtained by solving the resulting generalized eigenvalue equation, and the flux autocorrelation function for a dividing surface optimized in reduced-dimensionality calculations was represented in the basis formed by the eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian. The rate constant was obtained by integrating the flux autocorrelation function. The choice of the final time to which the integration is carried was determined by a plateau criterion. The potential energy surface was from Wu, Schatz, Lendvay, Fang, and Harding (WSLFH). We also studied the collinear H + H(2) reaction by using the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) potential energy surface. The calculated thermal rate constant results were compared with reported values on the same surfaces. The success of these calculations demonstrates that time-independent vibrational configuration interaction can be a very convenient way to calculate converged quantum mechanical rate constants, and it opens the possibility of calculating converged rate constants for much larger reactions than have been treated until now. PMID:15774583

  20. Towards a Density Functional Theory Exchange-Correlation Functional able to describe localization/delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Ann E.; Wills, John M.

    2013-03-01

    The inability to computationally describe the physics governing the properties of actinides and their alloys is the poster child of failure of existing Density Functional Theory exchange-correlation functionals. The intricate competition between localization and delocalization of the electrons, present in these materials, exposes the limitations of functionals only designed to properly describe one or the other situation. We will discuss the manifestation of this competition in real materials and propositions on how to construct a functional able to accurately describe properties of these materials. I addition we will discuss both the importance of using the Dirac equation to describe the relativistic effects in these materials, and the connection to the physics of transition metal oxides. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. The black hole mass function derived from local spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Hartley, Matthew T.

    2014-07-10

    We present our determination of the nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass function for spiral galaxies in the local universe, established from a volume-limited sample consisting of a statistically complete collection of the brightest spiral galaxies in the southern (δ < 0°) hemisphere. Our SMBH mass function agrees well at the high-mass end with previous values given in the literature. At the low-mass end, inconsistencies exist in previous works that still need to be resolved, but our work is more in line with expectations based on modeling of black hole evolution. This low-mass end of the spectrum is critical to our understanding of the mass function and evolution of black holes since the epoch of maximum quasar activity. The sample is defined by a limiting luminosity (redshift-independent) distance, D{sub L} = 25.4 Mpc (z = 0.00572) and a limiting absolute B-band magnitude, M{sub B}=−19.12. These limits define a sample of 140 spiral galaxies, with 128 measurable pitch angles to establish the pitch angle distribution for this sample. This pitch-angle distribution function may be useful in the study of the morphology of late-type galaxies. We then use an established relationship between the logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle and the mass of the central SMBH in a host galaxy in order to estimate the mass of the 128 respective SMBHs in this volume-limited sample. This result effectively gives us the distribution of mass for SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies over a lookback time, t{sub L} ≤ 82.1 h{sub 67.77}{sup −1} Myr and contained within a comoving volume, V{sub C} = 3.37 × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup −3} Mpc{sup 3}. We estimate that the density of SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies in the local universe is ρ=5.54{sub −2.73}{sup +6.55} × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup 3} M{sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3}. Thus, our derived cosmological SMBH mass density for spiral galaxies is Ω{sub BH}=4.35{sub −2.15}{sup +5.14} × 10{sup –7} h{sub 67.77}. Assuming that

  2. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI with Localized Arterial Input Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J.J.; Bretthorst, G.L.; Derdeyn, C.P.; Powers, W.J.; Videen, T.O.; Snyder, A.Z.; Markham, J.; Shimony, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Compared to gold-standard measurements of cerebral perfusion with positron emission tomography (PET) using H2[15O] tracers, measurements with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MR are more accessible, less expensive and less invasive. However, existing methods for analyzing and interpreting data from DSC MR have characteristic disadvantages that include sensitivity to incorrectly modeled delay and dispersion in a single, global arterial input function (AIF). We describe a model of tissue microcirculation derived from tracer kinetics which estimates for each voxel a unique, localized AIF (LAIF). Parameters of the model were estimated using Bayesian probability theory and Markov-chain Monte Carlo, circumventing difficulties arising from numerical deconvolution. Applying the new method to imaging studies from a cohort of fourteen patients with chronic, atherosclerotic, occlusive disease showed strong correlations between perfusion measured by DSC MR with LAIF and perfusion measured by quantitative PET with H2[15O]. Regression to PET measurements enabled conversion of DSC MR to a physiological scale. Regression analysis for LAIF gave estimates of a scaling factor for quantitation which described perfusion accurately in patients with substantial variability in hemodynamic impairment. PMID:20432301

  3. Localization and function of three monothiol glutaredoxins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Roe, Jung-Hye . E-mail: jhroe@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-05-06

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains two dithiol glutaredoxins (Grx1 and Grx2) and genes for three putative monothiol glutaredoxins (grx3, 4, and 5). We investigated the expression, sub-cellular localization, and functions of the three monothiol glutaredoxins. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that Grx3 is targeted to nuclear rim and endoplasmic reticulum, Grx4 primarily to the nucleus, and Grx5 to mitochondria. Null mutation of grx3 did not significantly affect growth and resistance against various oxidants, whereas grx5 mutation caused slow growth and sensitivity toward oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, and diamide. The grx2grx5 double mutation, deficient in all mitochondrial glutaredoxins, caused further retardation in growth and severe sensitivity toward all the oxidants tested. The grx4 mutation was not viable, suggesting a critical role of Grx4 for the physiology of S. pombe. Overproduction of Grx3 and Grx5, but not the truncated form of Grx5 without mitochondrial target sequence, severely retarded growth as Grx2 did, supporting the idea that Grx2, 3, and 5 are targeted to organellar compartments. Our results propose a distinct role for each glutaredoxin to maintain thiol redox balance, and hence the growth and stress resistance, of the fission yeast.

  4. Chemistry as a function of the fine-structure constant and the electron-proton mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Rollin A.; Siddiqi, Ali; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    2010-04-01

    In standard computations in theoretical quantum chemistry the accepted values of the fundamental physical constants are assumed. Alternatively, the tools of computational quantum chemistry can be used to investigate hypothetical chemistry that would result from different values of these constants, given the same physical laws. In this work, the dependence of a variety of basic chemical quantities on the values of the fine-structure constant and the electron-proton mass ratio is explored. In chemistry, the accepted values of both constants may be considered small, in the sense that their increase must be substantial to seriously impact bond energies. It is found that if the fine-structure constant were larger, covalent bonds between light atoms would be weaker, and the dipole moment and hydrogen-bonding ability of water would be reduced. Conversely, an increase in the value of the electron-proton mass ratio increases dissociation energies in molecules such as H2, O2, and CO2. Specifically, a sevenfold increase in the fine-structure constant decreases the strength of the O-H bond in the water molecule by 7 kcal mol-1 while reducing its dipole moment by at least 10%, whereas a 100-fold increase in the electron-proton mass ratio increases the same bond energy by 11 kcal mol-1.

  5. On the Khinchin Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We prove known identities for the Khinchin constant and develop new identities for the more general Hoelder mean limits of continued fractions. Any of these constants can be developed as a rapidly converging series involving values of the Riemann zeta function and rational coefficients. Such identities allow for efficient numerical evaluation of the relevant constants. We present free-parameter, optimizable versions of the identities, and report numerical results.

  6. Many-body Localization Transition in Rokhsar-Kivelson-type wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Yu, Xiongjie; Cho, Gil Young; Clark, Bryan; Fradkin, Eduardo

    We construct a family of many-body wave functions to study the many-body localization phase transition. The wave functions have a Rokhsar-Kivelson form, in which the weight for the configurations are chosen from the Gibbs weights of a classical spin glass model, known as the Random Energy Model, multiplied by a random sign structure to represent a highly excited state. These wave functions show a phase transition into an MBL phase. In addition, we see three regimes of entanglement scaling with subsystem size: scaling with entanglement corresponding to an infinite temperature thermal phase, constant scaling, and a sub-extensive scaling between these limits. Near the phase transition point, the fluctuations of the Renyi entropies are non-Gaussian. We find that Renyi entropies with different Renyi index transition into the MBL phase at different points and have different scaling behavior, suggesting a multifractal behavior. This work was supported in part by DMR-1064319 and DMR-1408713 (XC,GYC,EF) at the University of Illinois, PHY11-25915 at KITP (EF), DOE, SciDAC FG02-12ER46875 (BKC and XY), and the Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project of Korea Government (GYC).

  7. Functionality of bismuth sulfide quantum dots/wires-glass nanocomposite as an optical current sensor with enhanced Verdet constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panmand, Rajendra P.; Kumar, Ganapathy; Mahajan, Satish M.; Kulkarni, Milind V.; Amalnerkar, D. P.; Kale, Bharat B.; Gosavi, Suresh. W.

    2011-02-01

    We report optical studies with magneto-optic properties of Bi2S3 quantum dot/wires-glass nanocomposite. The size of the Q-dot was observed to be in the range 3-15 nm along with 11 nm Q-wires. Optical study clearly demonstrated the size quantization effect with drastic band gap variation with size. Faraday rotation tests on the glass nanocomposites show variation in Verdet constant with Q-dot size. Bi2S3 Q-dot/wires glass nanocomposite demonstrated 190 times enhanced Verdet constant compared to the host glass. Prima facie observations exemplify the significant enhancement in Verdet constant of Q-dot glass nanocomposites and will have potential application in magneto-optical devices.

  8. Comparison of Constant Time Delay and Simultaneous Prompting Procedures: Teaching Functional Sight Words to Students with Intellectual Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Rasheeda; Lane, Justin D.; Gast, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Constant time delay (CTD) and simultaneous prompting (SP) are effective response prompting procedures for teaching students with moderate to severe disabilities. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficiency of CTD and SP when teaching functional sight words to four students, 8-11 years of age, with moderate intellectual disability (ID)…

  9. Stability constants for the formation of rare earth-inorganic complexes as a function of ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.

    1992-08-01

    Recent studies have been made on the distribution of the rare earths (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in natural waters relative to their concentration in shales. These metals have also been used as models for the behavior of the trivalent actinides. The speciation of the rare earths in natural waters is modelled by using ionic interaction models which require reliable stability constants. In this paper the stability constants for the formation of lanthanide complexes ( k mx∗) with Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, OH -, HCO 3-, H 2PO 4-, HPO 42-, and CO 32- determined in NaClO 44 at various ionic strengths have been extrapolated to infinite dilution using the Pitzer interaction model. The activity coefficients for free ions ( γM, γx) needed for this extrapolation have been estimated from the Pitzer equations. The thermodynamic stability constants ( KMX) and activity coefficients of the various ion pairs ( γMX) were determined from In ( solK MX∗/γ Mγ x) = In K mx+ In (γ MX). The activity coefficients of the ion pairs have been used to determine Pitzer parameters ( BMX) for the rare earth complexes. The values of BMX were found to be the same for complexes of the same charge. These results make it possible to estimate the stability constants for the formation of rare earth complexes over a wide range of ionic strengths. The stability constants have been used to determine the speciation of the lanthanides in seawater and in brines. The carbonate complexes dominate for all natural waters where the carbonate alkalinity is greater than 0.001 eq/L at a pH near 8.

  10. 34 CFR 489.1 - What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local Prisoners Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FUNCTIONAL LITERACY FOR STATE AND LOCAL PRISONERS PROGRAM General § 489.1 What is the Functional Literacy for State and...

  11. 34 CFR 489.1 - What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local Prisoners Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FUNCTIONAL LITERACY FOR STATE AND LOCAL PRISONERS PROGRAM General § 489.1 What is the Functional Literacy for State and...

  12. 34 CFR 489.1 - What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local Prisoners Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FUNCTIONAL LITERACY FOR STATE AND LOCAL PRISONERS PROGRAM General § 489.1 What is the Functional Literacy for State and...

  13. 34 CFR 489.1 - What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local Prisoners Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FUNCTIONAL LITERACY FOR STATE AND LOCAL PRISONERS PROGRAM General § 489.1 What is the Functional Literacy for State and...

  14. 34 CFR 489.1 - What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local Prisoners Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the Functional Literacy for State and Local... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FUNCTIONAL LITERACY FOR STATE AND LOCAL PRISONERS PROGRAM General § 489.1 What is the Functional Literacy for State and...

  15. The ClpXP protease functions as a motor with constant “rpm” but different “gears”

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Aliaga, Piere; Pressé, Steve; Martin, Andreas; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent proteases are vital to maintain cellular protein homeostasis, but the mechanisms by which these machines couple ATP hydrolysis to mechanical protein unfolding and translocation remain unclear. Here, we study the mechanisms of force generation and inter-subunit coordination in the ClpXP protease from E. coli. We identify phosphate release as the force-generating step of the ATPase cycle and reveal that ClpXP translocates substrate polypeptides by highly coordinated conformational changes in up to four ATPase subunits. To unfold stable substrates like GFP, ClpXP must use this maximum successive firing capacity. The dwell duration between individual bursts of translocation is constant and governed by an internal clock, regardless of the number of translocating subunits, implying that ClpXP operates with constant “rpm” but different “gears”. PMID:24243020

  16. Four-Component Relativistic Density-Functional Theory Calculations of Nuclear Spin-Rotation Constants: Relativistic Effects in p-Block Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-08-11

    We present an implementation of the nuclear spin-rotation (SR) constants based on the relativistic four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. This formalism has been implemented in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham theory, allowing assessment of both pure and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. In the density-functional theory (DFT) implementation of the response equations, a noncollinear generalized gradient approximation (GGA) has been used. The present approach enforces a restricted kinetic balance condition for the small-component basis at the integral level, leading to very efficient calculations of the property. We apply the methodology to study relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants by performing calculations on XHn (n = 1-4) for all elements X in the p-block of the periodic table and comparing the effects of relativity on the nuclear SR tensors to that observed for the nuclear magnetic shielding tensors. Correlation effects as described by the density-functional theory are shown to be significant for the spin-rotation constants, whereas the differences between the use of GGA and hybrid density functionals are much smaller. Our calculated relativistic spin-rotation constants at the DFT level of theory are only in fair agreement with available experimental data. It is shown that the scaling of the relativistic effects for the spin-rotation constants (varying between Z(3.8) and Z(4.5)) is as strong as for the chemical shieldings but with a much smaller prefactor. PMID:26574455

  17. Instructional Quality as a Function of Locale, Grade, and Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randhawa, Bikkar S.

    1977-01-01

    Sixty urban and 57 rural elementary school classrooms were observed to document the effects of rural versus urban locale, grade level, and subject matter taught on instructional quality. Teachers' verbal behaviors were grouped into 16 process-by-substance categories. Results showed that all three main effects were significant. (Author/MV)

  18. Instructional Quality as a Function of Locale, Grade, and Subject.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randhawa, Bikkar S.

    This study investigated the effect of locale, grade, and subject on instructional quality. Rural and urban teachers were observed teaching grades 4, 5, and 6 in social studies, mathematics, and language arts. It was hypothesized that teacher verbal behavior in a classroom predicated the quality and quantity of cognitive behavior of pupils. Rural…

  19. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  20. Local thermodynamic mapping for effective liquid density-functional theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrlidis, Agathagelos; Brown, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The structural-mapping approximation introduced by Lutsko and Baus (1990) in the generalized effective-liquid approximation is extended to include a local thermodynamic mapping based on a spatially dependent effective density for approximating the solid phase in terms of the uniform liquid. This latter approximation, called the local generalized effective-liquid approximation (LGELA) yields excellent predictions for the free energy of hard-sphere solids and for the conditions of coexistence of a hard-sphere fcc solid with a liquid. Moreover, the predicted free energy remains single valued for calculations with more loosely packed crystalline structures, such as the diamond lattice. The spatial dependence of the weighted density makes the LGELA useful in the study of inhomogeneous solids.

  1. Influencing uptake and localization of aminoglycoside-functionalized peptoids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Melissa M; French, Jonathan M; Disney, Matthew D

    2011-08-01

    The development of small-molecule therapeutics that target RNA remains a promising field but one hampered with considerable challenges that include programming high affinity, specificity, cell permeability, and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Previously, we employed the use of peptoids to modularly display RNA-binding modules to enhance binding affinity and specificity by altering valency and the distance between ligand modules. Herein, factors that affect uptake, localization, and toxicity of peptoids that display a kanamycin derivative into a variety of mammalian cells lines are reported. A series of peptoids that display various spacing modules was synthesized to determine if the spacing module affects permeability and localization. The spacing module does affect cellular permeability into C2C12, A549, HeLa, and MCF7 cell lines but not into Jurkat cells. Moreover, the modularly assembled peptoids carrying the kanamycin cargo localize in the cytoplasm and perinuclear region of C2C12 and A549 cells and throughout HeLa cells, including the nucleus. These studies could contribute to the development of general strategies to afford cell permeable, modularly assembled small molecules that specifically target RNAs present in a variety of cell types. PMID:21611644

  2. Influencing uptake and localization of aminoglycoside-functionalized peptoids†

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Melissa M.; French, Jonathan M.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    The development of small-molecule therapeutics that target RNA remains a promising field but one hampered with considerable challenges that include programming high affinity, specificity, cell permeability, and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Previously, we employed the use of peptoids to modularly display RNA-binding modules to enhance binding affinity and specificity by altering valency and the distance between ligand modules. Herein, factors that affect uptake, localization, and toxicity of peptoids that display a kanamycin derivative into a variety of mammalian cells lines are reported. A series of peptoids that display various spacing modules was synthesized to determine if the spacing module affects permeability and localization. The spacing module does affect cellular permeability into C2C12, A549, HeLa, and MCF7 cell lines but not into Jurkat cells. Moreover, the modularly assembled peptoids carrying the kanamycin cargo localize in the cytoplasm and perinuclear region of C2C12 and A549 cells and throughout HeLa cells, including the nucleus. These studies could contribute to the development of general strategies to afford cell permeable, modularly assembled small molecules that specifically target RNAs present in a variety of cell types. PMID:21611644

  3. Protein Function Annotation By Local Binding Site Surface Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E.; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N.

    2013-01-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against approximately 60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that pre-dated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of twelve currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins. PMID:24166661

  4. DSCAM Localization and Function at the Mouse Cone Synapse

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Gabriel Belem; Long, Samuel S.; Fleming, Harrison; Li, Wei; Fuerst, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (DSCAM) is required for regulation of cell number, soma spacing and cell type specific dendrite avoidance in many types of retinal ganglion and amacrine cells. In this study we assay the organization of cells making up the outer plexiform layer of the retina in the absence of Dscam. Some types of OFF bipolar cells, type 3b and type 4 bipolar cells, had defects in dendrite arborization in the Dscam mutant retina, while other cell types appeared similar to wild type. The cone synapses that these cells project their dendrites to were intact, as visualized by electron microscopy, and had a distribution and density that was not significantly different than wild type. The spacing of type 3b bipolar cell dendrites was further analyzed by Voronoi domain analysis, Density Recovery Profiling (DRP) analysis and Nearest Neighbor Analysis (NNA). Spacing was found to be significantly different when comparing wild type and mutant type 3b bipolar cell dendrites. Defects in arborization of these bipolar cells could not be attributed to the disorganization of inner plexiform layer cells that occurs in the Dscam mutant retina or an increase in cell number, as they arborized when Dscam was targeted in retinal ganglion cells only or in the bax null retina. Localization of DSCAM was assayed and the protein was localized near to cone synapses in mouse, macaque and ground squirrel retinas. DSCAM protein was detected in several types of bipolar cells, including type 3b and type 4 bipolar cells. PMID:24477985

  5. Local hybrid functionals with orbital-free mixing functions and balanced elimination of self-interaction error

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Piotr de E-mail: clemence.corminboeuf@epfl.ch; Corminboeuf, Clémence E-mail: clemence.corminboeuf@epfl.ch

    2015-02-21

    The recently introduced density overlap regions indicator (DORI) [P. de Silva and C. Corminboeuf, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10(9), 3745–3756 (2014)] is a density-dependent scalar field revealing regions of high density overlap between shells, atoms, and molecules. In this work, we exploit its properties to construct local hybrid exchange-correlation functionals aiming at balanced reduction of the self-interaction error. We show that DORI can successfully replace the ratio of the von Weizsäcker and exact positive-definite kinetic energy densities, which is commonly used in mixing functions of local hybrids. Additionally, we introduce several semi-empirical parameters to control the local and global admixture of exact exchange. The most promising of our local hybrids clearly outperforms the underlying semi-local functionals as well as their global hybrids.

  6. Influence of pressure derivative of partition function on thermodynamic properties of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2015-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties (compressibility coefficient Z γ , specific heat at constant volume c v , adiabatic coefficient γ a , isentropic coefficient γ i s e n , and sound speed c s ) of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium hydrogen thermal plasma have been investigated for different values of pressure and non-equilibrium parameter θ (=Te/Th) in the electron temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. In order to estimate the influence of pressure derivative of partition function on thermodynamic properties, two cases have been considered: (a) in which pressure derivative of partition function is taken into account in the expressions and (b) without pressure derivative of partition function in their expressions. Here, the case (b) represents expressions already available in literature. It has been observed that the temperature from which pressure derivative of partition function starts influencing a given thermodynamic property increases with increase of pressure and non-equilibrium parameter θ. Thermodynamic property in the case (a) is always greater than its value in the case (b) for compressibility coefficient and specific heat at constant volume, whereas for adiabatic coefficient, isentropic coefficient, and sound speed, its value in the case (a) is always less than its value in the case (b). For a given value of θ, the relationship of compressibility coefficient with degree of ionization depends upon pressure in the case (a), whereas it is independent of pressure in the case (b). Relative deviation between the two cases shows that the influence of pressure derivative of partition function is significantly large and increases with the augmentation of pressure and θ for compressibility coefficient, specific heat at constant volume, and adiabatic coefficient, whereas for isentropic coefficient and sound speed, it is marginal even at high values of pressure and non-equilibrium parameter θ.

  7. A Tomographic Method for the Reconstruction of Local Probability Density Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivathanu, Y. R.; Gore, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    A method of obtaining the probability density function (PDF) of local properties from path integrated measurements is described. The approach uses a discrete probability function (DPF) method to infer the PDF of the local extinction coefficient from measurements of the PDFs of the path integrated transmittance. The local PDFs obtained using the method are compared with those obtained from direct intrusive measurements in propylene/air and ethylene/air diffusion flames. The results of this comparison are good.

  8. Determination of the effective strong coupling constant $\\alpha_{s,g_1}(Q^2)$ from CLAS spin structure function data

    SciTech Connect

    Deur, Alexandre; Burkert, Volker; Chen, Jian-Ping; Korsch, Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    We present a new extraction of the effective strong coupling constant $\\alpha_{s,g_1}(Q^2)$. The result agrees with a previous determination and extends the measurement of the low and high $Q^2$ behavior of $\\alpha_{s,g_1}(Q^2)$ that was previously deduced from sum rules. In particular, it experimentally verifies the lack of $Q^2$-dependence of $\\alpha_{s,g_1}(Q^2)$ in the low $Q^2$ limit. This fact is necessary for application of the AdS/CFT correspondence to QCD calculations. We provide a physics motivated parameterization of $\\alpha_{s,g_1}(Q^2)$ that can equivalently be used to parameterize the $Q^2$-dependence of the generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn and Bjorken sums.

  9. The elastic and bonding properties of the sulvanite compounds: A first-principles study by local and semi-local functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-García, W. F.; Ruiz-Tobón, C. M.; Osorio-Guillén, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    The elastic properties of the compound family of the sulvanite Cu3TMX4 (TM=V, Nb, Ta; X=S, Se) have been calculated using first-principles total energy calculations within the density functional theory along with the local density and the generalized gradient approximations. The calculated elastic properties are the bulk modulus ( B), the elastic constants ( c11, c12 and c44), the Zener anisotropy factor ( A), the isotropic shear modulus ( G) and the Young modulus ( E). By means of these quantities we have also computed other thermodynamic properties such as the average sound velocity ( s) and the Debye temperature (ΘD). The calculated values of the elastic properties led to the conclusion that these compounds are brittle and fragile. We have also calculated the electron localization function, which exhibits the bonding characteristics in these compounds, showing that the Cu-X bond as well as the TM-X bond have a covalent character, but there is also present some ionicity in these compounds due to the Cu-TMX 4 bond.

  10. DSCAM localization and function at the mouse cone synapse.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Gabriel Belem; Long, Samuel S; Fleming, Harrison; Li, Wei; Fuerst, Peter G

    2014-08-01

    The Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) is required for regulation of cell number, soma spacing, and cell type-specific dendrite avoidance in many types of retinal ganglion and amacrine cells. In this study we assay the organization of cells making up the outer plexiform layer of the retina in the absence of Dscam. Some types of OFF bipolar cells, type 3b and type 4 bipolar cells, had defects in dendrite arborization in the Dscam mutant retina, whereas other cell types appeared similar to wild type. The cone synapses that these cells project their dendrites to were intact, as visualized by electron microscopy, and had a distribution and density that was not significantly different from that of wild type. The spacing of type 3b bipolar cell dendrites was further analyzed by Voronoi domain analysis, density recovery profiling (DRP) analysis, and nearest neighbor analysis. Spacing was found to be significantly different when wild-type and mutant type 3b bipolar cell dendrites were compared. Defects in arborization of these bipolar cells could not be attributed to the disorganization of inner plexiform layer cells that occurs in the Dscam mutant retina or an increase in cell number, as they arborized when Dscam was targeted in retinal ganglion cells only or in the bax null retina. Localization of DSCAM was assayed and the protein was localized near to cone synapses in mouse, macaque, and ground squirrel retinas. DSCAM protein was detected in several types of bipolar cells, including type 3b and type 4 bipolar cells. PMID:24477985

  11. Dielectric function and magneto-optical Voigt constant of Cu2O: A combined spectroscopic ellipsometry and polar magneto-optical Kerr spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidu, Francisc; Fronk, Michael; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Scarlat, Camelia; Salvan, Georgeta; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2011-11-01

    Cuprous oxide is a highly interesting material for the emerging field of transparent oxide electronics. In this work the energy dispersion of the dielectric function of Cu2O bulk material is revised by spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements in an extended spectral range from 0.73 to 10 eV. For the first time, the magneto-optical Kerr effect was measured in the spectral range from 1.7 to 5.5 eV and the magneto-optical Voigt constant of Cu2O was obtained by numerical calculations from the magneto-optical Kerr effect spectra and the dielectric function.

  12. Localization of Asymmetric Brain Function in Emotion and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, John D.; Heller, Wendy; Mohanty, Aprajita; Engels, Anna S.; Banich, Marie T.; Webb, Andrew G.; Miller, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous EEG studies have shown that depression is associated with abnormal functional asymmetries in frontal cortex, fMRI and PET studies have largely failed to identify specific brain areas showing this effect. The present study tested the hypothesis that emotion processes are related to asymmetric patterns of fMRI activity, particularly within dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Eleven depressed and 18 control participants identified the color in which pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant words were printed. Both groups showed a leftward lateralization for pleasant words in DLPFC. In a neighboring DLPFC area, the depression group showed more right-lateralized activation than controls, replicating EEG findings. These data confirm that emotional stimulus processing and trait depression are associated with asymmetric brain functions in distinct subregions of the DLPFC that may go undetected unless appropriate analytic procedures are used. PMID:20070577

  13. Communication: Hole localization in Al-doped quartz SiO{sub 2} within ab initio hybrid-functional DFT

    SciTech Connect

    Gerosa, Matteo; Bottani, Carlo Enrico

    2015-09-21

    We investigate the long-standing problem of hole localization at the Al impurity in quartz SiO{sub 2}, using a relatively recent DFT hybrid-functional method in which the exchange fraction is obtained ab initio, based on an analogy with the static many-body COHSEX approximation to the electron self-energy. As the amount of the admixed exact exchange in hybrid functionals has been shown to be determinant for properly capturing the hole localization, this problem constitutes a prototypical benchmark for the accuracy of the method, allowing one to assess to what extent self-interaction effects are avoided. We obtain good results in terms of description of the charge localization and structural distortion around the Al center, improving with respect to the more popular B3LYP hybrid-functional approach. We also discuss the accuracy of computed hyperfine parameters, by comparison with previous calculations based on other self-interaction-free methods, as well as experimental values. We discuss and rationalize the limitations of our approach in computing defect-related excitation energies in low-dielectric-constant insulators.

  14. Localization and function of the renal calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Daniela; Valenti, Giovanna

    2016-07-01

    The ability to monitor changes in the ionic composition of the extracellular environment is a crucial feature that has evolved in all living organisms. The cloning and characterization of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) from the mammalian parathyroid gland in the early 1990s provided the first description of a cellular, ion-sensing mechanism. This finding demonstrated how cells can detect small, physiological variations in free ionized calcium (Ca(2+)) in the extracellular fluid and subsequently evoke an appropriate biological response by altering the secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) that acts on PTH receptors expressed in target tissues, including the kidney, intestine, and bone. Aberrant Ca(2+) sensing by the parathyroid glands, as a result of altered CaSR expression or function, is associated with impaired divalent cation homeostasis. CaSR activators that mimic the effects of Ca(2+) (calcimimetics) have been designed to treat hyperparathyroidism, and CaSR antagonists (calcilytics) are in development for the treatment of hypercalciuric disorders. The kidney expresses a CaSR that might directly contribute to the regulation of many aspects of renal function in a PTH-independent manner. This Review discusses the roles of the renal CaSR and the potential impact of pharmacological modulation of the CaSR on renal function. PMID:27157444

  15. MN15-L: A New Local Exchange-Correlation Functional for Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory with Broad Accuracy for Atoms, Molecules, and Solids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haoyu S; He, Xiao; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-01

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory is widely used for applications of electronic structure theory in chemistry, materials science, and condensed-matter physics, but the accuracy depends on the quality of the exchange-correlation functional. Here, we present a new local exchange-correlation functional called MN15-L that predicts accurate results for a broad range of molecular and solid-state properties including main-group bond energies, transition metal bond energies, reaction barrier heights, noncovalent interactions, atomic excitation energies, ionization potentials, electron affinities, total atomic energies, hydrocarbon thermochemistry, and lattice constants of solids. The MN15-L functional has the same mathematical form as a previous meta-nonseparable gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional, MN12-L, but it is improved because we optimized it against a larger database, designated 2015A, and included smoothness restraints; the optimization has a much better representation of transition metals. The mean unsigned error on 422 chemical energies is 2.32 kcal/mol, which is the best among all tested functionals, with or without nonlocal exchange. The MN15-L functional also provides good results for test sets that are outside the training set. A key issue is that the functional is local (no nonlocal exchange or nonlocal correlation), which makes it relatively economical for treating large and complex systems and solids. Another key advantage is that medium-range correlation energy is built in so that one does not need to add damped dispersion by molecular mechanics in order to predict accurate noncovalent binding energies. We believe that the MN15-L functional should be useful for a wide variety of applications in chemistry, physics, materials science, and molecular biology. PMID:26722866

  16. TransgeneOmics - A transgenic platform for protein localization based function exploration.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Susanne; Hyman, Anthony A; Sarov, Mihail

    2016-03-01

    The localization of a protein is intrinsically linked to its role in the structural and functional organization of the cell. Advances in transgenic technology have streamlined the use of protein localization as a function discovery tool. Here we review the use of large genomic DNA constructs such as bacterial artificial chromosomes as a transgenic platform for systematic tag-based protein function exploration. PMID:26475212

  17. Functional localization of the auditory thalamus in individual human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fang; Stecker, G. Christopher; Fine, Ione

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe an easily implemented protocol based on sparse MR acquisition and a scrambled ‘music’ auditory stimulus that allows for reliable measurement of functional activity within the medial geniculate body (MGB, the primary auditory thalamic nucleus) in individual subjects. We find that our method is equally accurate and reliable as previously developed structural methods, and offers significantly more accuracy in identifying the MGB than group based methods. We also find that lateralization and binaural summation within the MGB resembles that found in auditory cortex. PMID:23603350

  18. Structural changes of anodic layer on titanium in sulfate solution as a function of anodization duration in constant current mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Shinji; Sakamoto, Kouta; Ohtsu, Naofumi

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigated the effect of anodization time, in constant current mode, on the anodic oxide layer formed on titanium (Ti). Anodization of the Ti substrate was carried out in a 0.1 M (NH4)2SO4 aqueous solution with reaction times of various durations, after which the characteristics and photocatalytic activity were investigated in detail. The TiO2 layer fabricated in a short duration exhibited comparatively flat surface morphology and an anatase-type crystal structure. This layer acted as a photocatalyst only under ultraviolet light (UV) illumination. Upon prolonging the anodization, the layer structure changed drastically. The surface morphology became rough, and the crystal structure changed to rutile-type TiO2. Furthermore, the layer showed photocatalytic activity both under UV and visible light illumination. Further anodization increased the amount of methylene blue (MB) adsorbed on the surface, but did not cause additional change to the structure of the anodic layer. The surface morphology and crystal structure of the anodic layer were predominantly controlled by the anodization time; thus, the anodization time is an important parameter for controlling the characteristics of the anodic layer.

  19. Glycolytic Enzymes Localize to Synapses under Energy Stress to Support Synaptic Function.

    PubMed

    Jang, SoRi; Nelson, Jessica C; Bend, Eric G; Rodríguez-Laureano, Lucelenie; Tueros, Felipe G; Cartagenova, Luis; Underwood, Katherine; Jorgensen, Erik M; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A

    2016-04-20

    Changes in neuronal activity create local and transient changes in energy demands at synapses. Here we discover a metabolic compartment that forms in vivo near synapses to meet local energy demands and support synaptic function in Caenorhabditis elegans neurons. Under conditions of energy stress, glycolytic enzymes redistribute from a diffuse localization in the cytoplasm to a punctate localization adjacent to synapses. Glycolytic enzymes colocalize, suggesting the ad hoc formation of a glycolysis compartment, or a "glycolytic metabolon," that can maintain local levels of ATP. Local formation of the glycolytic metabolon is dependent on presynaptic scaffolding proteins, and disruption of the glycolytic metabolon blocks the synaptic vesicle cycle, impairs synaptic recovery, and affects locomotion. Our studies indicate that under energy stress conditions, energy demands in C. elegans synapses are met locally through the assembly of a glycolytic metabolon to sustain synaptic function and behavior. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27068791

  20. Label-Free Kinetics: Exploiting Functional Hemi-Equilibrium to Derive Rate Constants for Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Riddy, Darren M; Valant, Celine; Rueda, Patricia; Charman, William N; Sexton, Patrick M; Summers, Roger J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Langmead, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Drug receptor kinetics is as a key component in drug discovery, development, and efficacy; however, determining kinetic parameters has historically required direct radiolabeling or competition with a labeled tracer. Here we present a simple approach to determining the kinetics of competitive antagonists of G protein-coupled receptors by exploiting the phenomenon of hemi-equilibrium, the state of partial re-equilibration of agonist, antagonist, and receptor in some functional assays. Using functional [Ca(2+)]i-flux and extracellular kinases 1 and 2 phosphorylation assays that have short incubation times and therefore are prone to hemi-equilibrium "behaviors," we investigated a wide range of structurally and physicochemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists. Using a combined operational and hemi-equilibrium model of antagonism to both simulate and analyze data, we derived estimates of association and dissociation rates for the test set of antagonists, identifying both rapidly dissociating (4-DAMP, himbacine) and slowly dissociating (tiotropium, glycopyrrolate) ligands. The results demonstrate the importance of assay incubation time and the degree of receptor reserve in applying the analytical model. There was an excellent correlation between estimates of antagonist pK(B), k(on), and k(off) from functional assays and those determined by competition kinetics using whole-cell [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine binding, validating this approach as a rapid and simple method to functionally profile receptor kinetics of competitive antagonists in the absence of a labeled tracer. PMID:26243731

  1. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Primavera, F.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Biasotto, M.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Zucchetta, A.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, T. A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Da Cruz E Silva, C. Beir ao; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Yzquierdo, A. Pérez-Calero; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-06-01

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 was measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2 in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass is determined to be , which is in agreement with the world average.

  2. Local Analysis via the Real Space GREEN’S Function Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shi-Yu; Jayanthi, Chakram S.

    A complete account of the development of the method of real space Green’s function is given in this review. The emphasis is placed on the calculation of the local Green’s function in a real space representation. The discussion is centered on a list of issues particularly relevant to the study of properties of complex systems with reduced symmetry.They include: (i) the convergence procedure for calculating the local Green’s function of infinite systems without any boundary effects associated with an arbitrary truncation of the system; (ii) a general recursive relation which streamlines the calculation of the local Green’s function; (iii) the calculation of the eigenvector of selected eigenvalues directly from the Green’s function. An example of the application of the method to carry out a local analysis of dynamics of the Au(511) surface is also presented.

  3. Scanning tunneling microscopy current from localized basis orbital density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Alexander; Paulsson, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    We present a method capable of calculating elastic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) currents from localized atomic orbital density functional theory (DFT). To overcome the poor accuracy of the localized orbital description of the wave functions far away from the atoms, we propagate the wave functions, using the total DFT potential. From the propagated wave functions, the Bardeen's perturbative approach provides the tunneling current. To illustrate the method we investigate carbon monoxide adsorbed on a Cu(111) surface and recover the depression/protrusion observed experimentally with normal/CO-functionalized STM tips. The theory furthermore allows us to discuss the significance of s - and p -wave tips.

  4. Passive localization in the deep ocean based on cross-correlation function matching.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhixiong; Yang, Kunde; Ma, Yuanliang

    2016-06-01

    Passive localization of a sound source in the deep ocean is investigated in this study. The source can be localized by taking advantage of a cross-correlation function matching technique. When a two-sensor vertical array is used in the deep ocean, two types of side lobe curves appear in the ambiguity surface of the localization. The side lobe curves are analytically expressed and they are then used as indicators of the localization result instead of the scanning point with the maximum power. Simulation and experiment demonstrate the performance of the proposed passive localization method. PMID:27369172

  5. Austromegabalanus psittacus barnacle shell structure and proteoglycan localization and functionality.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M S; Arias, J I; Neira-Carrillo, A; Arias, J L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative analyzes of biomineralization models have being crucial for the understanding of the functional properties of biominerals and the elucidation of the processes through which biomacromolecules control the synthesis and structural organization of inorganic mineral-based biomaterials. Among calcium carbonate-containing bioceramics, egg, mollusk and echinoderm shells, and crustacean carapaces, have being fairly well characterized. However, Thoraceca barnacles, although being crustacea, showing molting cycle, build a quite stable and heavily mineralized shell that completely surround the animal, which is for life firmly cemented to the substratum. This makes barnacles an interesting model for studying processes of biomineralization. Here we studied the main microstructural and ultrastructural features of Austromegabalanus psittacus barnacle shell, characterize the occurrence of specific proteoglycans (keratan-, dermatan- and chondroitin-6-sulfate proteoglycans) in different soluble and insoluble organic fractions extracted from the shell, and tested them for their ability to crystallize calcium carbonate in vitro. Our results indicate that, in the barnacle model, proteoglycans are good candidates for the modification of the calcite crystal morphology, although the cooperative effect of some additional proteins in the shell could not be excluded. PMID:26276577

  6. DPP6 Domains Responsible for Its Localization and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Long, Laura K.; Hatch, Michael M.; Hoffman, Dax A.

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein 6 (DPP6) is an auxiliary subunit of the Kv4 family of voltage-gated K+ channels known to enhance channel surface expression and potently accelerate their kinetics. DPP6 is a single transmembrane protein, which is structurally remarkable for its large extracellular domain. Included in this domain is a cysteine-rich motif, the function of which is unknown. Here we show that this cysteine-rich domain of DPP6 is required for its export from the ER and expression on the cell surface. Disulfide bridges formed at C349/C356 and C465/C468 of the cysteine-rich domain are necessary for the enhancement of Kv4.2 channel surface expression but not its interaction with Kv4.2 subunits. The short intracellular N-terminal and transmembrane domains of DPP6 associates with and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4.2, but the entire extracellular domain is necessary to enhance Kv4.2 surface expression and stabilization. Our findings show that the cysteine-rich domain of DPP6 plays an important role in protein folding of DPP6 that is required for transport of DPP6/Kv4.2 complexes out of the ER. PMID:25190807

  7. DPP6 domains responsible for its localization and function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Long, Laura K; Hatch, Michael M; Hoffman, Dax A

    2014-11-14

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein 6 (DPP6) is an auxiliary subunit of the Kv4 family of voltage-gated K(+) channels known to enhance channel surface expression and potently accelerate their kinetics. DPP6 is a single transmembrane protein, which is structurally remarkable for its large extracellular domain. Included in this domain is a cysteine-rich motif, the function of which is unknown. Here we show that this cysteine-rich domain of DPP6 is required for its export from the ER and expression on the cell surface. Disulfide bridges formed at C349/C356 and C465/C468 of the cysteine-rich domain are necessary for the enhancement of Kv4.2 channel surface expression but not its interaction with Kv4.2 subunits. The short intracellular N-terminal and transmembrane domains of DPP6 associates with and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4.2, but the entire extracellular domain is necessary to enhance Kv4.2 surface expression and stabilization. Our findings show that the cysteine-rich domain of DPP6 plays an important role in protein folding of DPP6 that is required for transport of DPP6/Kv4.2 complexes out of the ER. PMID:25190807

  8. First principles optimally tuned range-separated density functional theory for prediction of phosphorus-hydrogen spin-spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Mojtaba; Fallahzadeh, Parisa

    2016-07-21

    Optimally tuned range-separated (OT-RS) density functional theory (DFT) is a recent endeavor toward the systematic and non-empirical routes for designing the exchange-correlation functionals. Herein, a detailed analysis of the development and benchmarking of the OT-RS functionals for predicting the experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs) in diverse sets of compounds containing phosphorus-hydrogen (P-H) bonds has been done. More specifically, besides analyzing the performances of standard long-range corrected (LC) functionals, two new non-empirical OT-RS functionals are proposed for this purpose. Furthermore, we dissect the importance of both short- and long-range exchange contributions and range separation parameters in LC density functional calculations of P-H SSCCs. It is shown that the proposed functionals not only give an improved description of SSCCs with respect to conventional LC approximations but also in many cases perform better than other functionals from various rungs. The accountability of the new models for predicting the SSCCs and their components in continuum solvents has also been examined and validated. Overall, we hope that this contribution stimulates the development of novel OT-RS DFT approximations based on theoretical arguments as a methodology with both high accuracy and computational efficiency for modeling the NMR parameters. PMID:27339276

  9. Henry's law constant measurements for phenol, o-, m-, and p-cresol as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigenbrugel, Valérie; Le Calvé, Stéphane; Mirabel, Philippe; Louis, Florent

    2004-10-01

    In this work, a dynamic system based on the water/air equilibrium at the interface within the length of a microporous tube was used to experimentally determine the Henry's law constants (HLC) of phenol and cresols. The measurements were conducted over the range 278-298 K in both deionized water and 35 gl-1 solution of NaCl. At 293 K and in pure water, HLC were found to be equal to (in units of Matm-1): phenol, HLC = (1005 ± 270); o-cresol, HLC = (690 ± 95); m-cresol, HLC = (1324 ± 172); p-cresol, HLC = (1742 ± 360). The obtained data were used to derive the following Arrhenius expressions: HLC = (4.1 ± 0.6) ×10-9 exp ((7684 ± 874) / T), HLC = (1.5 ± 0.1) ×10-10 exp ((8544 ± 512) / T), HLC = (5.5 ± 0.4) ×10-11 exp ((9028 ± 508) / T) and HLC = (3.3 ± 0.4) ×10-11 exp ((9258 ± 818) / T) for phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol and p-cresol, respectively. All of the values for HLC in 35 gl-1 salt solution were 10-30% lower than their respective values in deionized water, depending on the compound and the temperature. These data were then used to estimate the fractions of phenol or of cresols in atmospheric aqueous phase. In order to evaluate the impact of a cloud on the atmospheric chemistry of phenol and cresols, we compare also their atmospheric lifetimes under clear sky (τgas), and cloudy conditions (τmultiphase). The calculated multiphase lifetimes (in units of days) are significantly lower than those in gas phase at a cumulus temperature of 283 K (in parentheses): phenol, 0.26 (0.45); o-cresol, 0.17 (0.24); m-cresol, 0.13 (0.22); p-cresol, 0.11 (0.23).

  10. Local analyses of Planck maps with Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Bernui, A.; Marques, G. A.; Ferreira, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    Minkowski functionals (MF) are excellent tools to investigate the statistical properties of the cosmic background radiation (CMB) maps. Between their notorious advantages is the possibility to use them efficiently in patches of the CMB sphere, which allow studies in masked skies, inclusive analyses of small sky regions. Then, possible deviations from Gaussianity are investigated by comparison with MF obtained from a set of Gaussian isotropic simulated CMB maps to which are applied the same cut-sky masks. These analyses are sensitive enough to detect contaminations of small intensity like primary and secondary CMB anisotropies. Our methodology uses the MF, widely employed to study non-Gaussianities in CMB data, and asserts Gaussian deviations only when all of them points out an exceptional χ2 value, at more than 2.2σ confidence level, in a given sky patch. Following this rigorous procedure, we find 13 regions in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps that evince such high levels of non-Gaussian deviations. According to our results, these non-Gaussian contributions show signatures that can be associated to the presence of hot or cold spots in such regions. Moreover, some of these non-Gaussian deviations signals suggest the presence of foreground residuals in those regions located near the Galactic plane. Additionally, we confirm that most of the regions revealed in our analyses, but not all, have been recently reported in studies done by the Planck collaboration. Furthermore, we also investigate whether these non-Gaussian deviations can be possibly sourced by systematics, like inhomogeneous noise and beam effect in the released Planck data, or perhaps due to residual Galactic foregrounds.

  11. Towards improved local hybrid functionals by calibration of exchange-energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2014-11-01

    A new approach for the calibration of (semi-)local and exact exchange-energy densities in the context of local hybrid functionals is reported. The calibration functions are derived from only the electron density and its spatial derivatives, avoiding spatial derivatives of the exact-exchange energy density or other computationally unfavorable contributions. The calibration functions fulfill the seven more important out of nine known exact constraints. It is shown that calibration improves substantially the definition of a non-dynamical correlation energy term for generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based local hybrids. Moreover, gauge artifacts in the potential-energy curves of noble-gas dimers may be corrected by calibration. The developed calibration functions are then evaluated for a large range of energy-related properties (atomization energies, reaction barriers, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and total atomic energies) of three sets of local hybrids, using a simple one-parameter local-mixing. The functionals are based on (a) local spin-density approximation (LSDA) or (b) Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation, and on (c) Becke-88 (B88) exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) correlation. While the uncalibrated GGA-based functionals usually provide very poor thermochemical data, calibration allows a dramatic improvement, accompanied by only a small deterioration of reaction barriers. In particular, an optimized BLYP-based local-hybrid functional has been found that is a substantial improvement over the underlying global hybrids, as well as over previously reported LSDA-based local hybrids. It is expected that the present calibration approach will pave the way towards new generations of more accurate hyper-GGA functionals based on a local mixing of exchange-energy densities.

  12. Towards improved local hybrid functionals by calibration of exchange-energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Arbuznikov, Alexei V. E-mail: martin.kaupp@tu-berlin.de; Kaupp, Martin E-mail: martin.kaupp@tu-berlin.de

    2014-11-28

    A new approach for the calibration of (semi-)local and exact exchange-energy densities in the context of local hybrid functionals is reported. The calibration functions are derived from only the electron density and its spatial derivatives, avoiding spatial derivatives of the exact-exchange energy density or other computationally unfavorable contributions. The calibration functions fulfill the seven more important out of nine known exact constraints. It is shown that calibration improves substantially the definition of a non-dynamical correlation energy term for generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based local hybrids. Moreover, gauge artifacts in the potential-energy curves of noble-gas dimers may be corrected by calibration. The developed calibration functions are then evaluated for a large range of energy-related properties (atomization energies, reaction barriers, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and total atomic energies) of three sets of local hybrids, using a simple one-parameter local-mixing. The functionals are based on (a) local spin-density approximation (LSDA) or (b) Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation, and on (c) Becke-88 (B88) exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) correlation. While the uncalibrated GGA-based functionals usually provide very poor thermochemical data, calibration allows a dramatic improvement, accompanied by only a small deterioration of reaction barriers. In particular, an optimized BLYP-based local-hybrid functional has been found that is a substantial improvement over the underlying global hybrids, as well as over previously reported LSDA-based local hybrids. It is expected that the present calibration approach will pave the way towards new generations of more accurate hyper-GGA functionals based on a local mixing of exchange-energy densities.

  13. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Four Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.

    2015-06-01

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color-color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color-color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%-50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is

  14. Local electric dipole moments for periodic systems via density functional theory embedding.

    PubMed

    Luber, Sandra

    2014-12-21

    We describe a novel approach for the calculation of local electric dipole moments for periodic systems. Since the position operator is ill-defined in periodic systems, maximally localized Wannier functions based on the Berry-phase approach are usually employed for the evaluation of local contributions to the total electric dipole moment of the system. We propose an alternative approach: within a subsystem-density functional theory based embedding scheme, subset electric dipole moments are derived without any additional localization procedure, both for hybrid and non-hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. This opens the way to a computationally efficient evaluation of local electric dipole moments in (molecular) periodic systems as well as their rigorous splitting into atomic electric dipole moments. As examples, Infrared spectra of liquid ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate are presented, which are commonly employed as solvents in Lithium ion batteries. PMID:25527922

  15. Local electric dipole moments for periodic systems via density functional theory embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luber, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel approach for the calculation of local electric dipole moments for periodic systems. Since the position operator is ill-defined in periodic systems, maximally localized Wannier functions based on the Berry-phase approach are usually employed for the evaluation of local contributions to the total electric dipole moment of the system. We propose an alternative approach: within a subsystem-density functional theory based embedding scheme, subset electric dipole moments are derived without any additional localization procedure, both for hybrid and non-hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. This opens the way to a computationally efficient evaluation of local electric dipole moments in (molecular) periodic systems as well as their rigorous splitting into atomic electric dipole moments. As examples, Infrared spectra of liquid ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate are presented, which are commonly employed as solvents in Lithium ion batteries.

  16. Local electric dipole moments for periodic systems via density functional theory embedding

    SciTech Connect

    Luber, Sandra

    2014-12-21

    We describe a novel approach for the calculation of local electric dipole moments for periodic systems. Since the position operator is ill-defined in periodic systems, maximally localized Wannier functions based on the Berry-phase approach are usually employed for the evaluation of local contributions to the total electric dipole moment of the system. We propose an alternative approach: within a subsystem-density functional theory based embedding scheme, subset electric dipole moments are derived without any additional localization procedure, both for hybrid and non-hybrid exchange–correlation functionals. This opens the way to a computationally efficient evaluation of local electric dipole moments in (molecular) periodic systems as well as their rigorous splitting into atomic electric dipole moments. As examples, Infrared spectra of liquid ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate are presented, which are commonly employed as solvents in Lithium ion batteries.

  17. Relationship Between Nutrient Enrichment and Benthic Function: Local Effects and Spatial Patterns

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eutrophication-induced changes to benthic structure and function are problems of enormous ecological and economic significance. Understanding the relationships between nutrient enrichment and effects, modifying factors such as localized transport time, and symptoms of eutrophica...

  18. Evidence for a constant initial mass function in early-type galaxies based on their X-ray binary populations

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Kundu, Arunav; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Maraston, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    A number of recent studies have proposed that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of early type galaxies varies systematically as a function of galaxy mass, with higher mass galaxies having bottom-heavy IMFs. These bottom-heavy IMFs have more low-mass stars relative to the number of high mass stars, and therefore naturally result in proportionally fewer neutron stars (NSs) and black holes (BHs). In this paper, we specifically predict the variation in the number of BHs and NSs based on the power-law IMF variation required to reproduce the observed mass-to-light ratio trends with galaxy mass. We then test whether such variations are observed by studying the field low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations of nearby early-type galaxies. In these binaries, an NS or BH accretes matter from a low-mass donor star. Their number is therefore expected to scale with the number of BHs and NSs present in a galaxy. We find that the number of LMXBs per K-band light is similar among the galaxies in our sample. These data therefore demonstrate the uniformity of the slope of the IMF from massive stars down to those now dominating the K-band light and are consistent with an invariant IMF. Our results are inconsistent with an IMF which varies from a Kroupa/Chabrier like IMF for low-mass galaxies to a steep power-law IMF (with slope x = 2.8) for high mass galaxies. We discuss how these observations constrain the possible forms of the IMF variations and how future Chandra observations can enable sharper tests of the IMF.

  19. In Situ Characterization of the Local Work Function along Individual Free Standing Nanowire by Electrostatic Deflection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yicong; Zhao, Chengchun; Huang, Feng; Zhan, Runze; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In situ characterization of the work function of quasi one dimensional nanomaterials is essential for exploring their applications. Here we proposed to use the electrostatic deflection induced by work function difference between nanoprobe and nanowire for in situ measuring the local work function along a free standing nanowire. The physical mechanism for the measurement was discussed in details and a parabolic relationship between the deflection and the potential difference was derived. As a demonstration, measurement of the local work functions on the tip and the sidewall of a ZnO nanowire with Au catalyst at its end and a LaB6 nanowire have been achieved with good accuracy. PMID:26882827

  20. Structural information content of networks: graph entropy based on local vertex functionals.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Matthias; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we define the structural information content of graphs as their corresponding graph entropy. This definition is based on local vertex functionals obtained by calculating j-spheres via the algorithm of Dijkstra. We prove that the graph entropy and, hence, the local vertex functionals can be computed with polynomial time complexity enabling the application of our measure for large graphs. In this paper we present numerical results for the graph entropy of chemical graphs and discuss resulting properties. PMID:18243802

  1. Renormalization of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The problem of obtaining a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant is addressed. By a specific parametrization of metric fluctuations a gauge independent functional integral is constructed for the semiclassical theory around an arbitrary Einstein space. The effective action then has the property that only physical polarizations of the graviton contribute, while all other modes cancel with the functional measure. We are then able to compute a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant in d dimensions to one-loop order. No Landau pole is present provided Ng<18 , where Ng=d (d -3 )/2 is the number of polarizations of the graviton. While adding a large number of matter fields can change this picture, the absence of a pole persists for the particle content of the standard model in four spacetime dimensions.

  2. Evidence for a Constant Initial Mass Function in Early-type Galaxies Based on Their X-Ray Binary Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Kundu, Arunav; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Maraston, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    A number of recent studies have proposed that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of early type galaxies varies systematically as a function of galaxy mass, with higher mass galaxies having bottom-heavy IMFs. These bottom-heavy IMFs have more low-mass stars relative to the number of high mass stars, and therefore naturally result in proportionally fewer neutron stars (NSs) and black holes (BHs). In this paper, we specifically predict the variation in the number of BHs and NSs based on the power-law IMF variation required to reproduce the observed mass-to-light ratio trends with galaxy mass. We then test whether such variations are observed by studying the field low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations of nearby early-type galaxies. In these binaries, an NS or BH accretes matter from a low-mass donor star. Their number is therefore expected to scale with the number of BHs and NSs present in a galaxy. We find that the number of LMXBs per K-band light is similar among the galaxies in our sample. These data therefore demonstrate the uniformity of the slope of the IMF from massive stars down to those now dominating the K-band light and are consistent with an invariant IMF. Our results are inconsistent with an IMF which varies from a Kroupa/Chabrier like IMF for low-mass galaxies to a steep power-law IMF (with slope x = 2.8) for high mass galaxies. We discuss how these observations constrain the possible forms of the IMF variations and how future Chandra observations can enable sharper tests of the IMF. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA). The scientific results reported in this article are based in part on data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive and observations made by the

  3. Reconstruction of the Orientation Distribution Function in Single and Multiple Shell Q-Ball Imaging within Constant Solid Angle

    PubMed Central

    Aganj, Iman; Lenglet, Christophe; Sapiro, Guillermo; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Harel, Noam

    2010-01-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is a high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) technique which has been proven very successful in resolving multiple intravoxel fiber orientations in MR images. The standard computation of the orientation distribution function (ODF, the probability of diffusion in a given direction) from q-ball data uses linear radial projection, neglecting the change in the volume element along each direction. This results in spherical distributions that are different from the true ODFs. For instance, they are neither normalized nor as sharp as expected, and generally require post-processing, such as artificial sharpening. In this paper, a new technique is proposed that, by considering the solid angle factor, uses the mathematically correct definition of the ODF and results in a dimensionless and normalized ODF expression. Our model is flexible enough so that ODFs can be estimated either from single q-shell datasets, or by exploiting the greater information available from multiple q-shell acquisitions. We show that the latter can be achieved by using a more accurate multi-exponential model for the diffusion signal. The improved performance of the proposed method is demonstrated on artificial examples and high-resolution HARDI data acquired on a 7T magnet. PMID:20535807

  4. Benchmarking density functional perturbation theory to enable high-throughput screening of materials for dielectric constant and refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petousis, Ioannis; Chen, Wei; Hautier, Geoffroy; Graf, Tanja; Schladt, Thomas D.; Persson, Kristin A.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a high-throughput density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) methodology capable of screening compounds for their dielectric properties. The electronic and ionic dielectric tensors are calculated for 88 compounds, where the eigenvalues of the total dielectric tensors are compared with single crystal and polycrystalline experimental values reported in the literature. We find that GGA/PBE has a smaller mean average deviation from experiments (MARD=16.2 %) when compared to LDA. The prediction accuracy of DFPT is lowest for compounds that exhibit complex structural relaxation effects (e.g., octahedra rotation in perovskites) and/or strong anharmonicity. Despite some discrepancies between DFPT results and reported experimental values, the high-throughput methodology is found to be useful in identifying interesting compounds by ranking. This is demonstrated by the high Spearman correlation factor (ρ =0.92 ). Finally, we demonstrate that DFPT provides a good estimate for the refractive index of a compound without calculating the frequency dependence of the dielectric matrix (MARD=5.7 %).

  5. EVALUATION OF ANATOMICAL INTEGRITY USING ULTRASOUND EXAMINATION, AND FUNCTIONAL INTEGRITY USING THE CONSTANT & MURLEY SCORE, OF THE ROTATOR CUFF FOLLOWING ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; França, Flavio de Oliveira; Alves, Freitas José Marcio; Watanabe, Fábio Nagato; Nobre, Leonardo Oliveira; De Almeida Neto, Manoel Augusto; Mendes Da Silva, Marcos André

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and anatomical results from surgical treatment via arthroscopy in cases of complete rupture of the rotator cuff, using ultrasound images and the Constant and Murley functional index to investigate the correlation between them. Methods: 100 patients (110 shoulders) were evaluated. The mean follow-up was 48.8 ± 33.28 months (12 to 141 months). The mean age was 60.25 ± 10.09 (36 to 81 years). Rupture of the supraspinal tendon alone occurred in 85 cases (77%), and in association with the infraspinatus in 20 cases (18%) and subscapularis in four shoulders (4%). An association of supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis lesions was found in one shoulder (1%). The lesions were classified according to DeOrio and Cofield scores as small/medium in 85 shoulders (77%) and large/extensive in 25 (23%). The clinical results were assessed in accordance with the Constant and Murley criteria. The ultrasound results relate to reports issued by different radiologists. Statistical analysis was carried out using the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t test, Pearson's correlation, Kruskal-Wallis correlation and logistic regression (significance: p < 0.05). Results: The mean Constant evaluation was 85.3 ± 10.06 in the normal shoulders and 83.96 ± 8.67 in the operated shoulders (p = 0.224). Excellent and good results were found in 74 shoulders (67%), satisfactory and moderate results in 32 (29%) and poor results in four (4%). The ultrasound evaluation showed 38 shoulders with re-rupture (35%) and absence of rupture in 71 (65%). Among the 74 shoulders (67%) with excellent/good results, 22 (30%) presented re-rupture in the ultrasound report (p = 0.294). Among the four shoulders (4%) with poor results, two (50%) presented reports of intact tendons (p = 0.294). Conclusion: There was no statistically valid correlation between the ultrasound diagnosis and the clinical evaluation of results among the patients who underwent arthroscopic

  6. Change in blood coagulation indices as a function of the incubation period of plasma in a constant magnetic field. [considering heparin tolerance and recalcification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yepishina, S. G.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of a constant magnetic field (CMF) with a strength of 250 and 2500 oersteds on the recalcification reaction and the tolerance of plasma to heparin was studied as a function of the exposure time of the plasma to the CMF. The maximum and reliable change in the activation of the coagulatory system of the blood was observed after a 20-hour incubation of the plasma in a CMF. As the exposure time increased, the recalcification reaction changed insigificantly; the difference between the mean arithmetic of the experiment and control values was not statistically reliable. The tolerance of the plasma to heparin as a function of the exposure time to the CMF of the plasma was considerably modified, an was statistically reliable.

  7. The method of local linear approximation in the theory of nonlinear functional-differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusarchuk, Vasilii E

    2010-10-06

    Conditions for the existence of solutions to the nonlinear functional-differential equation (d{sup m}x(t))/dt{sup m} + (fx)(t)=h(t), t element of R in the space of functions bounded on the axes are obtained by using local linear approximation to the operator F. Bibliography: 21 items.

  8. Extension of local-type inequality for the higher order correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2011-07-01

    For the local-type primordial perturbation, it is known that there is an inequality between the bispectrum and the trispectrum. By using the diagrammatic method, we develop a general formalism to systematically construct the similar inequalities up to any order correlation function. As an application, we explicitly derive all the inequalities up to six and eight-point functions.

  9. A functional equivalent of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi in axons for secretion of locally synthesized proteins

    PubMed Central

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Lin, Andrew C.; Lam, Joyce S.Y.; Vuppalanchi, Deepika; Willis, Dianna E.; Karin, Norman; Holt, Christine E.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Subcellular localization of protein synthesis provides a means to regulate the protein composition in far reaches of a cell. This localized protein synthesis gives neuronal processes autonomy to rapidly respond to extracellular stimuli. Locally synthesized axonal proteins enable neurons to respond to guidance cues and can help to initiate regeneration after injury. Most studies of axonal mRNA translation have concentrated on cytoplasmic proteins. While ultrastructural studies suggest that axons do not have rough endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus, mRNAs for transmembrane and secreted proteins localize to axons. Here, we show that growing axons with protein synthetic activity contain ER and Golgi components needed for classical protein synthesis and secretion. Isolated axons have the capacity to traffic locally synthesized proteins into secretory pathways and inhibition of Golgi function attenuates translation-dependent axonal growth responses. Finally, the capacity for secreting locally synthesized proteins in axons appears to be increased by injury. PMID:19022387

  10. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.