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Sample records for loci controlling lymphocyte

  1. Quantitative-Trait Loci on Chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 18 Control Variation in Levels of T and B Lymphocyte Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. A.; Norman, P. J.; Thiel, B.; Tiwari, H.; Peiffer, A.; Vaughan, R. W.; Prescott, S.; Leppert, M.; Schork, N. J.; Lanchbury, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Lymphocyte subpopulation levels are used for prognosis and monitoring of a variety of human diseases, especially those with an infectious etiology. As a primary step to defining the major gene variation underlying these phenotypes, we conducted the first whole-genome screen for quantitative variation in lymphocyte count, CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, B cell, and natural killer cell numbers, as well as CD4:CD8 ratio. The screen was performed in 15 of the CEPH families that form the main human genome genetic project mapping resource. Quantitative-trait loci (QTLs) that account for significant proportions of the phenotypic variance of lymphocyte subpopulations were detected on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 18. The most significant QTL found was for CD4 levels on chromosome 8 (empirical P=.00005). Two regions of chromosome 4 showed significant linkage to CD4:CD8 ratio (empirical P=.00007 and P=.003). A QTL for the highly correlated measures of CD4 and CD19 levels colocalized at 18q21 (both P=.003). Similarly, a shared region of chromosome 1 was linked to CD8 and CD19 levels (P=.0001 and P=.002, respectively). Several of the identified chromosome regions are likely to harbor polymorphic candidate genes responsible for these important human phenotypes. Their discovery has important implications for understanding the generation of the immune repertoire and understanding immune-system homeostasis. More generally, these data show the power of an integrated human gene–mapping approach for heritable molecular phenotypes, using large pedigrees that have been extensively genotyped. PMID:11951176

  2. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Camp, Nicola J.; Skibola, Christine F.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S.; Smedby, Karin E.; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S.; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R.; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Novak, Anne J.; Kay, Neil E.; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M.; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T.; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K.; Weiner, George J.; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K.; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Vachon, Celine M.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Strom, Sara S.; Leis, Jose F.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Caporaso, Neil E.; Norman, Aaron D.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María- Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Travis, Ruth C.; Southey, Melissa C.; Milne, Roger L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Villano, Danylo J.; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E.; Snowden, John A.; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10−11), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10−8) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10−8), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10−11) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10−7) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10−8) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10−7). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  3. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Sonja I; Camp, Nicola J; Skibola, Christine F; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S; Smedby, Karin E; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P; Birmann, Brenda M; Vajdic, Claire M; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D; Novak, Anne J; Kay, Neil E; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K; Weiner, George J; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Jackson, Rebecca D; Tinker, Lesley F; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G; Achenbach, Sara J; Vachon, Celine M; Goldin, Lynn R; Strom, Sara S; Leis, Jose F; Weinberg, J Brice; Caporaso, Neil E; Norman, Aaron D; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Travis, Ruth C; Southey, Melissa C; Milne, Roger L; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R; Villano, Danylo J; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E; Snowden, John A; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10(-11)), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10(-8)) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10(-8)), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10(-11)) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10(-7)) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10(-8)) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10(-7)). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  4. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Speedy, Helen E; Di Bernardo, Maria Chiara; Sava, Georgina P; Dyer, Martin J S; Holroyd, Amy; Wang, Yufei; Sunter, Nicola J; Mansouri, Larry; Juliusson, Gunnar; Smedby, Karin E; Roos, Göran; Jayne, Sandrine; Majid, Aneela; Dearden, Claire; Hall, Andrew G; Mainou-Fowler, Tryfonia; Jackson, Graham H; Summerfield, Geoffrey; Harris, Robert J; Pettitt, Andrew R; Allsup, David J; Bailey, James R; Pratt, Guy; Pepper, Chris; Fegan, Chris; Rosenquist, Richard; Catovsky, Daniel; Allan, James M; Houlston, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have shown that common genetic variation contributes to the heritable risk of CLL. To identify additional CLL susceptibility loci, we conducted a GWAS and performed a meta-analysis with a published GWAS totaling 1,739 individuals with CLL (cases) and 5,199 controls with validation in an additional 1,144 cases and 3,151 controls. A combined analysis identified new susceptibility loci mapping to 3q26.2 (rs10936599, P = 1.74 × 10(-9)), 4q26 (rs6858698, P = 3.07 × 10(-9)), 6q25.2 (IPCEF1, rs2236256, P = 1.50 × 10(-10)) and 7q31.33 (POT1, rs17246404, P = 3.40 × 10(-8)). Additionally, we identified a promising association at 5p15.33 (CLPTM1L, rs31490, P = 1.72 × 10(-7)) and validated recently reported putative associations at 5p15.33 (TERT, rs10069690, P = 1.12 × 10(-10)) and 8q22.3 (rs2511714, P = 2.90 × 10(-9)). These findings provide further insights into the genetic and biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to CLL. PMID:24292274

  5. Overlap between differentially methylated DNA regions in blood B lymphocytes and genetic at-risk loci in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Wang-Renault, Shu-Fang; Boudaoud, Saida; Busato, Florence; Lallemand, Céline; Bethune, Kevin; Belkhir, Rakiba; Nocturne, Gaétane; Mariette, Xavier; Tost, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Background Beyond genetics, epigenetics alterations and especially those related to DNA methylation, play key roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and systemic lupus erythematosus. This study aimed to assess the role of methylation deregulation in pSS pathogeny through a genome-wide methylation approach. Patients and methods 26 female patients with pSS and 22 age-matched controls were included in this study. CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by magnetic microbeads and their genome-wide DNA methylation profiles were analysed using Infinium Human Methylation 450 K BeadChips. Probes with a median DNA methylation difference of at least 7% and p<0.01 between patients and controls were considered significantly differentially methylated. Results Methylation alterations were mainly present in B cells compared with T cells. In B cells, an enrichment of genes with differentially methylated probes in genetic at-risk loci was observed, suggesting involvement of both genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in the same genes. Methylation alterations in B cells were more frequent in some specific pathways including Interferon Regulated Genes, mainly among patients who were autoantibody positive. Moreover, genes with differentially methylated probes were over-represented in B cells from patients with active disease. Conclusions This study demonstrated more important deregulation of DNA methylation patterns in B cells compared with T cells, emphasising the importance of B cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Overlap between genes with differentially methylated probes in B lymphocytes and genetic at-risk loci is a new finding highlighting their importance in pSS. PMID:26183421

  6. A high-density SNP genome-wide linkage search of 206 families identifies susceptibility loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sellick, Gabrielle S; Goldin, Lynn R; Wild, Ruth W; Slager, Susan L; Ressenti, Laura; Strom, Sara S; Dyer, Martin J S; Mauro, Francesca R; Marti, Gerald E; Fuller, Stephen; Lyttelton, Matthew; Kipps, Thomas J; Keating, Michael J; Call, Timothy G; Catovsky, Daniel; Caporaso, Neil; Houlston, Richard S

    2007-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders display familial aggregation. To identify a susceptibility gene for CLL, we assembled families from the major European (ICLLC) and American (GEC) consortia to conduct a genome-wide linkage analysis of 101 new CLL pedigrees using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and combined the results with data from our previously reported analysis of 105 families. Here, we report on the combined analysis of the 206 families. Multipoint linkage analyses were undertaken using both nonparametric (model-free) and parametric (model-based) methods. After the removal of high linkage disequilibrium SNPs, we obtained a maximum nonparametric linkage (NPL) score of 3.02 (P = .001) on chromosome 2q21.2. The same genomic position also yielded the highest multipoint heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score under a common recessive model of disease susceptibility (HLOD = 3.11; P = 7.7 x 10(-5)), which was significant at the genome-wide level. In addition, 2 other chromosomal positions, 6p22.1 (corresponding to the major histocompatibility locus) and 18q21.1, displayed HLOD scores higher than 2.1 (P < .002). None of the regions coincided with areas of common chromosomal abnormalities frequently observed in CLL. These findings provide direct evidence for Mendelian predisposition to CLL and evidence for the location of disease loci. PMID:17687107

  7. Mapping loci controlling flowering time in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Camargo, L E; Osborn, T C

    1996-04-01

    The timing of the transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is a major determinant of the morphology and value of Brassica oleracea crops. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling flowering time in B. oleracea were mapped using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) loci and flowering data of F3 families derived from a cabbage by broccoli cross. Plants were grown in the field, and a total of 15 surveys were made throughout the experiment at 5-15 day intervals, in which plants were inspected for the presence of flower buds or open flowers. The flowering traits used for data analysis were the proportion of annual plants (PF) within each F3 family at the end of the experiment, and a flowering-time index (FT) that combined both qualitative (annual/biennial) and quantitative (days to flowering) information. Two QTLs on different linkage groups were found associated with both PF and FT and one additional QTL was found associated only with FT. When combined in a multi-locus model, all three QTLs explained 54.1% of the phenotypic variation in FT. Epistasis was found between two genomic regions associated with FT. Comparisons of map positions of QTLs in B. oleracea with those in B. napus and B. rapa provided no evidence for conservation of genomic regions associated with flowering time between these species. PMID:24166330

  8. Effect of controlled ozone exposure on human lymphocyte function

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.L.; Smialowicz, R.; Harder, S.; Ketcham, B.; House, D.

    1981-04-01

    The effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ O/sub 3/ (0.6 ppM) for 2 h in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood samples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and O/sub 3/ exposures, as well as at 72 h, 2 and 4 weeks, and at one random time at least 1 month after treatment. The relative frequency of T lymphocytes in blood and the in vitro blastogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and Candida albicans were determined. During the course of the experiment, no statistically significant changes were observed in the number of T lymphocytes that form spontaneous rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. The response of T lymphocytes to PHA was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in samples taken at 2 and 4 weeks, following O/sub 3/ exposure. Normal response to PHA was observed at 2 months post-O/sub 3/ exposure. No statistically significant changes in lymphocyte responses to Con A, PWM, or Candida were seen. These results show that one 2 h exposure of humans to 0.6 ppM O/sub 3/ may lead to a transient suppression of the PHA-stimulated blastogenic transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The data indicate that the blastogenic response to PHA of human lymphocytes is exquisitely sensitive to O/sub 3/ exposure and could serve as a bioassay for evaluating subtle changes in cellular immunity induced by O/sub 3/ and possibly other pollutants.

  9. Proactive control of proactive interference using the method of loci

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Willa S.; Oswald, Karl M.

    2014-01-01

    Proactive interferencebuilds up with exposure to multiple lists of similar items with a resulting reduction in recall. This study examined the effectiveness of using a proactive strategy of the method of loci to reduce proactive interference in a list recall paradigm of categorically similar words. While all participants reported using some form of strategy to recall list words, this study demonstrated that young adults were able to proactively use the method of loci after 25 min of instruction to reduce proactive interference as compared with other personal spontaneous strategies. The implications of this study are that top-down proactive strategies such as the method of loci can significantly reduce proactive interference, and that the use of image and sequence or location are especially useful in this regard. PMID:25157300

  10. Proactive control of proactive interference using the method of loci.

    PubMed

    Bass, Willa S; Oswald, Karl M

    2014-01-01

    Proactive interferencebuilds up with exposure to multiple lists of similar items with a resulting reduction in recall. This study examined the effectiveness of using a proactive strategy of the method of loci to reduce proactive interference in a list recall paradigm of categorically similar words. While all participants reported using some form of strategy to recall list words, this study demonstrated that young adults were able to proactively use the method of loci after 25 min of instruction to reduce proactive interference as compared with other personal spontaneous strategies. The implications of this study are that top-down proactive strategies such as the method of loci can significantly reduce proactive interference, and that the use of image and sequence or location are especially useful in this regard. PMID:25157300

  11. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci by Controlling Polygenic Background Effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shizhong

    2013-01-01

    A new mixed-model method was developed for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) by incorporating multiple polygenic covariance structures. First, we used genome-wide markers to calculate six different kinship matrices. We then partitioned the total genetic variance into six variance components, one corresponding to each kinship matrix, including the additive, dominance, additive × additive, dominance × dominance, additive × dominance, and dominance × additive variances. The six different kinship matrices along with the six estimated polygenic variances were used to control the genetic background of a QTL mapping model. Simulation studies showed that incorporating epistatic polygenic covariance structure can improve QTL mapping resolution. The method was applied to yield component traits of rice. We analyzed four traits (yield, tiller number, grain number, and grain weight) using 278 immortal F2 crosses (crosses between recombinant inbred lines) and 1619 markers. We found that the relative importance of each type of genetic variance varies across different traits. The total genetic variance of yield is contributed by additive × additive (18%), dominance × dominance (14%), additive × dominance (48%), and dominance × additive (15%) variances. Tiller number is contributed by additive (17%), additive × additive (22%), and dominance × additive (43%) variances. Grain number is mainly contributed by additive (42%), additive × additive (19%), and additive × dominance (31%) variances. Grain weight is almost exclusively contributed by the additive (73%) variance plus a small contribution from the additive × additive (10%) variance. Using the estimated genetic variance components to capture the polygenic covariance structure, we detected 39 effects for yield, 39 effects for tiller number, 24 for grain number, and 15 for grain weight. The new method can be directly applied to polygenic-effect-adjusted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in human and other

  12. MicroRNA control of lymphocyte differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Belver, Laura; Papavasiliou, Nina F; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2011-01-01

    Summary MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding regulatory RNAs that control gene regulation by guiding silencing protein complexes to mRNA in a sequence-dependent manner. In this way miRNAs are able to repress gene expression post-transcriptionally by affecting mRNA stability or translation. These ubiquitous molecules play central roles in a wide range of biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Within the context of the immune system, genetic studies have identified distinct roles for specific miRNAs in gene regulation during development, activation and maturation. Conversely, dysregulation of miRNA expression has been specifically correlated with cancer. This review outlines our current understanding of miRNA function in lymphocytes as it impacts expression of protein-coding genes in the context of proper development, as well as oncogenesis. PMID:21353514

  13. Segregations for Onion-Bulb Colors Reveal that Red is Controlled by at Least Three Loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onion seed-coat color is controlled by one locus (B) and bulb color by at least five major loci. White bulbs are conditioned by a dominant allele at the I locus or recessive alleles at the C locus. Colored bulbs (pink, red, yellow, or chartreuse) are homozygous recessive at the I locus and carry a...

  14. Genetic control of gene expression at novel and established chronic obstructive pulmonary disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter J.; Cho, Michael H.; Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Mcgeachie, Michael; Celli, Bartolome; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Rennard, Stephen; Harshfield, Benjamin; Lange, Christoph; Singh, Dave; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Riley, John H.; Quackenbush, John; Raby, Benjamin A.; Carey, Vincent J.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk loci have been identified for a wide range of diseases through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but the relevant functional mechanisms have been identified for only a small proportion of these GWAS-identified loci. By integrating results from the largest current GWAS of chronic obstructive disease (COPD) with expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in whole blood and sputum from 121 subjects with COPD from the ECLIPSE Study, this analysis identifies loci that are simultaneously associated with COPD and the expression of nearby genes (COPD eQTLs). After integrative analysis, 19 COPD eQTLs were identified, including all four previously identified genome-wide significant loci near HHIP, FAM13A, and the 15q25 and 19q13 loci. For each COPD eQTL, fine mapping and colocalization analysis to identify causal shared eQTL and GWAS variants identified a subset of sites with moderate-to-strong evidence of harboring at least one shared variant responsible for both the eQTL and GWAS signals. Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analysis confirms that multiple COPD eQTL lead SNPs disrupt TFBS, and enhancer enrichment analysis for loci with the strongest colocalization signals showed enrichment for blood-related cell types (CD3 and CD4+ T cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines). In summary, integrative eQTL and GWAS analysis confirms that genetic control of gene expression plays a key role in the genetic architecture of COPD and identifies specific blood-related cell types as likely participants in the functional pathway from GWAS-associated variant to disease phenotype. PMID:25315895

  15. Method to detect differentially methylated loci with case-control designs using Illumina arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang

    2011-11-01

    It is now understood that many human cancer types are the result of the accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic changes. DNA methylation is a molecular modification of DNA that is crucial for normal development. Genes that are rich in CpG dinucleotides are usually not methylated in normal tissues, but are frequently hypermethylated in cancer. With the advent of high-throughput platforms, large-scale structure of genomic methylation patterns is available through genome-wide scans and tremendous amount of DNA methylation data have been recently generated. However, sophisticated statistical methods to handle complex DNA methylation data are very limited. Here, we developed a likelihood based Uniform-Normal-mixture model to select differentially methylated loci between case and control groups using Illumina arrays. The idea is to model the data as three types of methylation loci, one unmethylated, one completely methylated, and one partially methylated. A three-component mixture model with two Uniform distributions and one truncated normal distribution was used to model the three types. The mixture probabilities and the mean of the normal distribution were used to make inference about differentially methylated loci. Through extensive simulation studies, we demonstrated the feasibility and power of the proposed method. An application to a recently published study on ovarian cancer identified several methylation loci that are missed by the existing method. PMID:21818777

  16. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling milk production in dairy cattle by exploiting progeny testing

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, M.; Nielsen, D.; Mackinnon, M.; Mishra, A.; Okimoto, R.; Sargeant, L.S.; Steele, M.R.; Zhao, X.; Pasquino, A.T.

    1995-02-01

    We have exploited {open_quotes}progeny testing{close_quotes} to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying the genetic variation of milk production in a selected dairy cattle population. A total of 1,518 sires, with progeny tests based on the milking performances of >150,000 daughters jointly, was genotyped for 159 autosomal microsatellites bracketing 1645 centimorgan or approximately two thirds of the bovine genome. Using a maximum likelihood multilocus linkage analysis accounting for variance heterogeneity of the phenotypes, we identified five chromosomes giving very strong evidence (LOD score {ge} 3) for the presence of a QTL controlling milk production: chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10 and 20. These findings demonstrate that loci with considerable effects on milk production are still segregating in highly selected populations and pave the way toward marker-assisted selection in dairy cattle breeding. 44 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Actin nucleation at the centrosome controls lymphocyte polarity

    PubMed Central

    Obino, Dorian; Farina, Francesca; Malbec, Odile; Sáez, Pablo J.; Maurin, Mathieu; Gaillard, Jérémie; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Gautreau, Alexis; Yuseff, Maria-Isabel; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is required for the functional specialization of many cell types including lymphocytes. A hallmark of cell polarity is the reorientation of the centrosome that allows repositioning of organelles and vesicles in an asymmetric fashion. The mechanisms underlying centrosome polarization are not fully understood. Here we found that in resting lymphocytes, centrosome-associated Arp2/3 locally nucleates F-actin, which is needed for centrosome tethering to the nucleus via the LINC complex. Upon lymphocyte activation, Arp2/3 is partially depleted from the centrosome as a result of its recruitment to the immune synapse. This leads to a reduction in F-actin nucleation at the centrosome and thereby allows its detachment from the nucleus and polarization to the synapse. Therefore, F-actin nucleation at the centrosome—regulated by the availability of the Arp2/3 complex—determines its capacity to polarize in response to external stimuli. PMID:26987298

  18. Actin nucleation at the centrosome controls lymphocyte polarity.

    PubMed

    Obino, Dorian; Farina, Francesca; Malbec, Odile; Sáez, Pablo J; Maurin, Mathieu; Gaillard, Jérémie; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Gautreau, Alexis; Yuseff, Maria-Isabel; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is required for the functional specialization of many cell types including lymphocytes. A hallmark of cell polarity is the reorientation of the centrosome that allows repositioning of organelles and vesicles in an asymmetric fashion. The mechanisms underlying centrosome polarization are not fully understood. Here we found that in resting lymphocytes, centrosome-associated Arp2/3 locally nucleates F-actin, which is needed for centrosome tethering to the nucleus via the LINC complex. Upon lymphocyte activation, Arp2/3 is partially depleted from the centrosome as a result of its recruitment to the immune synapse. This leads to a reduction in F-actin nucleation at the centrosome and thereby allows its detachment from the nucleus and polarization to the synapse. Therefore, F-actin nucleation at the centrosome-regulated by the availability of the Arp2/3 complex-determines its capacity to polarize in response to external stimuli. PMID:26987298

  19. Transcriptional programs of lymphoid tissue capillary and high endothelium reveal control mechanisms for lymphocyte homing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mike; Kiefel, Helena; LaJevic, Melissa D.; Macauley, Matthew S.; Kawashima, Hiroto; O'Hara, Edward; Pan, Junliang; Paulson, James C.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes are recruited from blood by high-endothelial venules (HEVs). We performed transcriptomic analyses and identified molecular signatures that distinguish HEVs from capillary endothelium and that define tissue-specific HEV specialization. Capillaries displayed gene programs for vascular development. HEVs were enriched in genes for immune defense and lymphocyte migration. We identify capillary and HEV markers and candidate mechanisms for regulated lymphocyte recruitment including a lymph node HEV-selective transmembrane mucin; transcriptional control of functionally specialized carbohydrate ligands for lymphocyte L-selectin; HEV expression of molecules for transendothelial migration; and metabolic programs for lipid mediators of lymphocyte motility and chemotaxis. We also elucidate a carbohydrate recognition pathway that targets B cells to intestinal lymphoid tissues, defining CD22 as a lectin-homing receptor for mucosal HEVs. PMID:25173345

  20. The Utilization during Mitotic Cell Division of Loci Controlling Meiotic Recombination and Disjunction in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Bruce S.; Carpenter, Adelaide T. C.; Ripoll, P.

    1978-01-01

    are in a nondividing (G2) state.—Mitotic recombination is at or above control levels in the presence of each of the recombination-defective meiotic mutants examined, suggesting that meiotic and mitotic recombination are under separate genetic control in Drosophila.—Of the six mutants examined that are defective in processes required for regular meiotic chromosome segregation, four (l(1)TW-6cs, cand, mei-S332, ord) affect mitotic chromosome behavior. At semi-restrictive temperatures, the cold sensitive lethal l(1)TW-6cs causes very frequent somatic spots, a substantial proportion of which are attributable to nondisjunction or loss. Thus, this locus specifies a function essential for chromosome segregation at mitosis as well as at the first meiotic division in females. The patterns of mitotic effects caused by cand, mei-S332, and ord suggest that they may be leaky alleles at essential loci that specify functions common to meiosis and mitosis. Mutants at the two remaining loci (nod, pal) do not affect mitotic chromosome stability. PMID:17248870

  1. CD4+ lymphocytes control gut epithelial apoptosis and mediate survival in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stromberg, Paul E; Woolsey, Cheryl A; Clark, Andrew T; Clark, Jessica A; Turnbull, Isaiah R; McConnell, Kevin W; Chang, Katherine C; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Ayala, Alfred; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-06-01

    Lymphocytes help determine whether gut epithelial cells proliferate or differentiate but are not known to affect whether they live or die. Here, we report that lymphocytes play a controlling role in mediating gut epithelial apoptosis in sepsis but not under basal conditions. Gut epithelial apoptosis is similar in unmanipulated Rag-1(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice. However, Rag-1(-/-) animals have a 5-fold augmentation in gut epithelial apoptosis following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) compared to septic WT mice. Reconstitution of lymphocytes in Rag-1(-/-) mice via adoptive transfer decreases intestinal apoptosis to levels seen in WT animals. Subset analysis indicates that CD4(+) but not CD8(+), gammadelta, or B cells are responsible for the antiapoptotic effect of lymphocytes on the gut epithelium. Gut-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 in transgenic mice decreases mortality following CLP. This survival benefit is lymphocyte dependent since gut-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 fails to alter survival when the transgene is overexpressed in Rag-1(-/-) mice. Further, adoptively transferring lymphocytes to Rag-1(-/-) mice that simultaneously overexpress gut-specific Bcl-2 results in improved mortality following sepsis. Thus, sepsis unmasks CD4(+) lymphocyte control of gut apoptosis that is not present under homeostatic conditions, which acts as a key determinant of both cellular survival and host mortality. PMID:19158156

  2. Greater variation in BCL-2 mutation frequency among lymphocytes of heavy smokers than among those of controls

    SciTech Connect

    Cortopassi, G.A.; Liu, Y.; Bell, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    It is possible that the risk for tumors in specific human individuals might be most usefully estimated by determining the frequency of (rare) somatic mutations at oncogenic loci in their tissue. Using a sensitive nested PCR assay, we have investigated the frequency of rare t(14;18) (q32;q21) translocations at the bcl-2 proto-oncogene locus in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 85 smokers and 36 control non-smokers. The variation in translocation frequencies (plus or minus the variation at the 95% confidence interval) were 1.4 {+-} -0.37 per million lymphocytes among smokers, versus 0.53 {+-} -0.20 among non-smokers, a 2.6-fold excess of such oncogenic translocations among lymphocytes of smokers. Logistic regression analysis including age, race, sex, years of smoking and pack-years indicated that only current smoking was significantly associated with increased frequency of the translocation of bcl-2 occur in 85% of follicular lymphoma tumors, and about 50% of all Non-Hodgkin`s Lymphoma, and are thought to be the result of errors of the V(D)J recombinase. Epidemiological studies by others have shown that there is about a two-fold higher relative risk of Non-Hodgkin`s Lymphoma for heavy smokers vs. non-smokers. We speculate that one reason for excess NHL tumors among heavy smokers may be their increased average burden of t(14;18) mutations, and that smoke-derived substances may induce errors of the V(D)J recombinase by mutagenic or antigenic mechanisms.

  3. Modular Skeletal Evolution in Sticklebacks Is Controlled by Additive and Clustered Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig T.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Summers, Brian R.; Blackman, Benjamin K.; Norman, Andrew R.; Shapiro, Michael D.; Cole, Bonnie L.; Peichel, Catherine L.; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of evolutionary change remains a long-standing goal in biology. In vertebrates, skeletal evolution has contributed greatly to adaptation in body form and function in response to changing ecological variables like diet and predation. Here we use genome-wide linkage mapping in threespine stickleback fish to investigate the genetic architecture of evolved changes in many armor and trophic traits. We identify >100 quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the pattern of serially repeating skeletal elements, including gill rakers, teeth, branchial bones, jaws, median fin spines, and vertebrae. We use this large collection of QTL to address long-standing questions about the anatomical specificity, genetic dominance, and genomic clustering of loci controlling skeletal differences in evolving populations. We find that most QTL (76%) that influence serially repeating skeletal elements have anatomically regional effects. In addition, most QTL (71%) have at least partially additive effects, regardless of whether the QTL controls evolved loss or gain of skeletal elements. Finally, many QTL with high LOD scores cluster on chromosomes 4, 20, and 21. These results identify a modular system that can control highly specific aspects of skeletal form. Because of the general additivity and genomic clustering of major QTL, concerted changes in both protective armor and trophic traits may occur when sticklebacks inherit either marine or freshwater alleles at linked or possible “supergene” regions of the stickleback genome. Further study of these regions will help identify the molecular basis of both modular and coordinated changes in the vertebrate skeleton. PMID:24652999

  4. Modular skeletal evolution in sticklebacks is controlled by additive and clustered quantitative trait Loci.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig T; Glazer, Andrew M; Summers, Brian R; Blackman, Benjamin K; Norman, Andrew R; Shapiro, Michael D; Cole, Bonnie L; Peichel, Catherine L; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of evolutionary change remains a long-standing goal in biology. In vertebrates, skeletal evolution has contributed greatly to adaptation in body form and function in response to changing ecological variables like diet and predation. Here we use genome-wide linkage mapping in threespine stickleback fish to investigate the genetic architecture of evolved changes in many armor and trophic traits. We identify >100 quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the pattern of serially repeating skeletal elements, including gill rakers, teeth, branchial bones, jaws, median fin spines, and vertebrae. We use this large collection of QTL to address long-standing questions about the anatomical specificity, genetic dominance, and genomic clustering of loci controlling skeletal differences in evolving populations. We find that most QTL (76%) that influence serially repeating skeletal elements have anatomically regional effects. In addition, most QTL (71%) have at least partially additive effects, regardless of whether the QTL controls evolved loss or gain of skeletal elements. Finally, many QTL with high LOD scores cluster on chromosomes 4, 20, and 21. These results identify a modular system that can control highly specific aspects of skeletal form. Because of the general additivity and genomic clustering of major QTL, concerted changes in both protective armor and trophic traits may occur when sticklebacks inherit either marine or freshwater alleles at linked or possible "supergene" regions of the stickleback genome. Further study of these regions will help identify the molecular basis of both modular and coordinated changes in the vertebrate skeleton. PMID:24652999

  5. Preparation of Internal Quality Control Material for Lymphocyte Subset Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Oh, Sohee; Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Nuri; Song, Eun Young

    2016-07-01

    Lymphocyte subset analysis is widely used in clinical laboratories, and more than two levels of daily QC materials are required for reliable results. Commercially available, expensive QC materials have short shelf lives and may not be suitable in resource-poor settings. We compared different methods for preparing homemade QC material, including fixation with 1%, 2%, or 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA); freezing with 10% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), 0.1% bovine serum albumin-phosphate buffered saline, or after ethanolic dehydration; and using cryopreservation temperatures of -20°C, -80°C, or -196°C. We found an optimal experimental condition, which is 'fixation with 4% PFA, freezing with 10% DMSO, and storage at 80°C'. To evaluate long-term stability of QC materials prepared in this optimal condition, two levels of QC materials (QM1 and QM2) were thawed after 30, 33, 35, 37, 60, 62, 64, and 67 days of cryopreservation. Lymphocyte subset was analyzed with BD Multitest IMK kit (BD Biosciences, USA). QM1 and QM2 were stable after 1-2 months of cryopreservation (CV <3% for CD3, CD4, and CD8 and 5-7% for CD16/56 and CD19). We propose this method as an alternative cost-effective protocol for preparing homemade internal QC materials for lymphocyte subset analysis in resource-poor settings. PMID:27139609

  6. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, Darren G.; Wooten, David K.; Teague, T. Kent; Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Caudell, Eva G.; Udagawa, Taturo; Andruss, Bernard F.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. RESULTS: Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin beta1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to beta1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. CONCLUSIONS: GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  7. Apicobasal polarity controls lymphocyte adhesion to hepatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reglero-Real, Natalia; Alvarez-Varela, Adrián; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Feito, Jorge; Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Gómez-Lechón, Maria José; Muntané, Jordi; Sandoval, Pilar; Majano, Pedro L; Correas, Isabel; Alonso, Miguel A; Millán, Jaime

    2014-09-25

    Loss of apicobasal polarity is a hallmark of epithelial pathologies. Leukocyte infiltration and crosstalk with dysfunctional epithelial barriers are crucial for the inflammatory response. Here, we show that apicobasal architecture regulates the adhesion between hepatic epithelial cells and lymphocytes. Polarized hepatocytes and epithelium from bile ducts segregate the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) adhesion receptor onto their apical, microvilli-rich membranes, which are less accessible by circulating immune cells. Upon cell depolarization, hepatic ICAM-1 becomes exposed and increases lymphocyte binding. Polarized hepatic cells prevent ICAM-1 exposure to lymphocytes by redirecting basolateral ICAM-1 to apical domains. Loss of ICAM-1 polarity occurs in human inflammatory liver diseases and can be induced by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We propose that adhesion receptor polarization is a parenchymal immune checkpoint that allows functional epithelium to hamper leukocyte binding. This contributes to the haptotactic guidance of leukocytes toward neighboring damaged or chronically inflamed epithelial cells that expose their adhesion machinery. PMID:25242329

  8. Disease control by regulation of P-glycoprotein on lymphocytes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimura, Shizuyo; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) is to control activation of lymphocytes, although some patients do not respond adequately to such treatment. Among various mechanisms of multidrug resistance, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a member of ATP-binding cassette transporters, causes drug-resistance by efflux of intracellular drugs. Certain stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, activate lymphocytes and induce P-gp expression on lymphocytes, as evident in active RA. Studies from our laboratories showed spontaneous nuclear accumulation of human Y-box-binding protein-1, a multidrug resistance 1 transcription factor, in unstimulated lymphocytes, and surface overexpression of P-gp on peripheral lymphocytes of RA patients with high disease activity. The significant correlation between P-gp expression level and RA disease activity is associated with active efflux of drugs from the lymphocyte cytoplasm and in drug-resistance. However, the use of biological agents that reduce P-gp expression as well as P-gp antagonists (e.g., cyclosporine) can successfully reduce the efflux of corticosteroids from lymphocytes in vitro, suggesting that both types of drugs can be used to overcome drug-resistance and improve clinical outcome. We conclude that lymphocytes activated by various stimuli in RA patients with highly active disease acquire P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance against corticosteroids and probably some DMARDs, which are substrates of P-gp. Inhibition/reduction of P-gp could overcome such drug resistance. Expression of P-gp on lymphocytes is a promising marker of drug resistance and a suitable therapeutic target to prevent drug resistance in patients with active RA. PMID:26618109

  9. CD4+ lymphocytes control gut epithelial apoptosis and mediate survival in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Stromberg, Paul E.; Woolsey, Cheryl A.; Clark, Andrew T.; Clark, Jessica A.; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; McConnell, Kevin W.; Chang, Katherine C.; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Ayala, Alfred; Buchman, Timothy G.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Lymphocytes help determine whether gut epithelial cells proliferate or differentiate but are not known to affect whether they live or die. Here, we report that lymphocytes play a controlling role in mediating gut epithelial apoptosis in sepsis but not under basal conditions. Gut epithelial apoptosis is similar in unmanipulated Rag-1−/− and wild-type (WT) mice. However, Rag-1−/− animals have a 5-fold augmentation in gut epithelial apoptosis following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) compared to septic WT mice. Reconstitution of lymphocytes in Rag-1−/− mice via adoptive transfer decreases intestinal apoptosis to levels seen in WT animals. Subset analysis indicates that CD4+ but not CD8+, γδ, or B cells are responsible for the antiapoptotic effect of lymphocytes on the gut epithelium. Gut-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 in transgenic mice decreases mortality following CLP. This survival benefit is lymphocyte dependent since gut-specific overexpression of Bcl-2 fails to alter survival when the transgene is overexpressed in Rag-1−/− mice. Further, adoptively transferring lymphocytes to Rag-1−/− mice that simultaneously overexpress gut-specific Bcl-2 results in improved mortality following sepsis. Thus, sepsis unmasks CD4+ lymphocyte control of gut apoptosis that is not present under homeostatic conditions, which acts as a key determinant of both cellular survival and host mortality.—Stromberg, P. E., Woolsey, C. A., Clark, A. T., Clark, J. A., Turnbull, I. R., McConnell, K. W., Chang, K. C., Chung, C.-S., Ayala, A., Buchman, T. G., Hotchkiss, R. S., Coopersmith, C. M. CD4+ lymphocytes control gut epithelial apoptosis and mediate survival in sepsis. PMID:19158156

  10. The Importance of the Nurse Cells and Regulatory Cells in the Control of T Lymphocyte Responses

    PubMed Central

    Reyes García, María Guadalupe; García Tamayo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    T lymphocytes from the immune system are bone marrow-derived cells whose development and activities are carefully supervised by two sets of accessory cells. In the thymus, the immature young T lymphocytes are engulfed by epithelial “nurse cells” and retained in vacuoles, where most of them (95%) are negatively selected and removed when they have an incomplete development or express high affinity autoreactive receptors. The mature T lymphocytes that survive to this selection process leave the thymus and are controlled in the periphery by another subpopulation of accessory cells called “regulatory cells,” which reduce any excessive immune response and the risk of collateral injuries to healthy tissues. By different times and procedures, nurse cells and regulatory cells control both the development and the functions of T lymphocyte subpopulations. Disorders in the T lymphocytes development and migration have been observed in some parasitic diseases, which disrupt the thymic microenvironment of nurse cells. In other cases, parasites stimulate rather than depress the functions of regulatory T cells decreasing T-mediated host damages. This paper is a short review regarding some features of these accessory cells and their main interactions with T immature and mature lymphocytes. The modulatory role that neurotransmitters and hormones play in these interactions is also revised. PMID:23509712

  11. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genes involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.

  12. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; et al

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore » involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  13. Natural Variation Identifies Multiple Loci Controlling Petal Shape and Size in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Mary C.; Metheetrairut, Chanatip; Irish, Vivian F.

    2013-01-01

    Natural variation in organ morphologies can have adaptive significance and contribute to speciation. However, the underlying allelic differences responsible for variation in organ size and shape remain poorly understood. We have utilized natural phenotypic variation in three Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes to examine the genetic basis for quantitative variation in petal length, width, area, and shape. We identified 23 loci responsible for such variation, many of which appear to correspond to genes not previously implicated in controlling organ morphology. These analyses also demonstrated that allelic differences at distinct loci can independently affect petal length, width, area or shape, suggesting that these traits behave as independent modules. We also showed that ERECTA (ER), encoding a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor-like serine-threonine kinase, is a major effect locus determining petal shape. Allelic variation at the ER locus was associated with differences in petal cell proliferation and concomitant effects on petal shape. ER has been previously shown to be required for regulating cell division and expansion in other contexts; the ER receptor-like kinase functioning to also control organ-specific proliferation patterns suggests that allelic variation in common signaling components may nonetheless have been a key factor in morphological diversification. PMID:23418598

  14. Mechanisms controlling expression of the RAG locus during lymphocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tracy C.; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Recombination activating genes (RAG)1 and RAG2 are expressed in developing B and T lymphocytes and are required for the rearrangement of antigen receptor genes. In turn, RAG expression is regulated by the products of these assembled immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes. Upon successful assembly of Ig genes, the antigen receptor is expressed on the immature B cell surface and tested for autoreactivity leading to either maintenance or inactivation of RAG expression. Successful assembly of TCR genes is followed by surface TCR expression and testing for its ability to interact with self-MHC, which if appropriate leads to the inactivation of RAG expression. Recent studies in B and T lymphocytes demonstrate that the reduction in RAG expression at the immature B and double-positive (DP) T cell stages is mediated through tonic (foreign antigen independent) receptor signaling. In B cells, tonic signaling activates PI(3)K and Akt kinases, which phosphorylate and lead to the cytoplasmic sequestration of FoxO proteins, key transcriptional activators of RAG expression. In T cells, tonic signaling activates Abl and Erk kinases, leading to the transcriptional inactivation of RAGs. PMID:19359154

  15. T lymphocytes control microbial composition by regulating the abundance of Vibrio in the zebrafish gut

    PubMed Central

    Brugman, Sylvia; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Witte, Merlijn; Klein, Mark R; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Boes, Marianne L; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Nieuwenhuis, Edward ES

    2014-01-01

    Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbial community is considered a risk factor for development of chronic intestinal inflammation as well as other diseases such as diabetes, obesity and even cancer. Study of the innate and adaptive immune pathways controlling bacterial colonization has however proven difficult in rodents, considering the extensive cross-talk between bacteria and innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we used the zebrafish to study innate and adaptive immune processes controlling the microbial community. Zebrafish lack a functional adaptive immune system in the first weeks of life, enabling study of the innate immune system in the absence of adaptive immunity. We show that in wild type zebrafish, the initial lack of adaptive immunity associates with overgrowth of Vibrio species (a group encompassing fish and human pathogens), which is overcome upon adaptive immune development. In Rag1-deficient zebrafish (lacking adaptive immunity) Vibrio abundance remains high, suggesting that adaptive immune processes indeed control Vibrio species. Using cell transfer experiments, we confirm that adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes, but not B lymphocytes into Rag1-deficient recipients suppresses outgrowth of Vibrio. In addition, ex vivo exposure of intestinal T lymphocytes to Rag1-deficient microbiota results in increased interferon-gamma expression by these T lymphocytes, compared to exposure to wild type microbiota. In conclusion, we show that T lymphocytes control microbial composition by effectively suppressing the outgrowth of Vibrio species in the zebrafish intestine. PMID:25536157

  16. T lymphocytes control microbial composition by regulating the abundance of Vibrio in the zebrafish gut.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Sylvia; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Witte, Merlijn; Klein, Mark R; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Boes, Marianne L; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S

    2014-01-01

    Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbial community is considered a risk factor for development of chronic intestinal inflammation as well as other diseases such as diabetes, obesity and even cancer. Study of the innate and adaptive immune pathways controlling bacterial colonization has however proven difficult in rodents, considering the extensive cross-talk between bacteria and innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we used the zebrafish to study innate and adaptive immune processes controlling the microbial community. Zebrafish lack a functional adaptive immune system in the first weeks of life, enabling study of the innate immune system in the absence of adaptive immunity. We show that in wild type zebrafish, the initial lack of adaptive immunity associates with overgrowth of Vibrio species (a group encompassing fish and human pathogens), which is overcome upon adaptive immune development. In Rag1-deficient zebrafish (lacking adaptive immunity) Vibrio abundance remains high, suggesting that adaptive immune processes indeed control Vibrio species. Using cell transfer experiments, we confirm that adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes, but not B lymphocytes into Rag1-deficient recipients suppresses outgrowth of Vibrio. In addition, ex vivo exposure of intestinal T lymphocytes to Rag1-deficient microbiota results in increased interferon-gamma expression by these T lymphocytes, compared to exposure to wild type microbiota. In conclusion, we show that T lymphocytes control microbial composition by effectively suppressing the outgrowth of Vibrio species in the zebrafish intestine. PMID:25536157

  17. Multiple loci govern the bone marrow-derived immunoregulatory mechanism controlling dominant resistance to autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, N D; Hickey, W F; Korngold, R; Hansen, W K; Sudweeks, J D; Wardell, B B; Griffith, J S; Teuscher, C

    1995-01-01

    The existence of immunoregulatory genes conferring dominant resistance to autoimmunity is well documented. In an effort to better understand the nature and mechanisms of action of these genes, we utilized the murine model of autoimmune orchitis as a prototype. When the orchitis-resistant strain DBA/2J is crossed with the orchitis-susceptible strain BALB/cByJ, the F1 hybrid is completely resistant to the disease. By using reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimeras, the functional component mediating this resistance was mapped to the bone marrow-derived compartment. Resistance is not a function of either low-dose irradiation- or cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg)-sensitive immunoregulatory cells, but can be adoptively transferred by primed splenocytes. Genome exclusion mapping identified three loci controlling the resistant phenotype. Orch3 maps to chromosome 11, whereas Orch4 and Orch5 map to the telomeric and centromeric regions of chromosome 1, respectively. All three genes are linked to a number of immunologically relevant candidate loci. Most significant, however, is the linkage of Orch3 to Idd4 and Orch5 to Idd5, two susceptibility genes which play a role in autoimmune insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus in the nonobese diabetic mouse. PMID:7777570

  18. Genetic loci that control the size of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Kei; Rogers, Michael S.; Baba, Takashi; Funakoshi, Taisaku; Birsner, Amy E.; Luyindula, Dema S.; D'Amato, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis is controlled by a balance between stimulators and inhibitors. We propose that the balance, as well as the general sensitivity of the endothelium to these factors, varies from individual to individual. Indeed, we have found that individual mouse strains have dramatically different responses to growth factor-induced neovascularization. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which influence the extent of corneal angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), were previously identified by our laboratory. To investigate the genetic contribution to choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a leading cause of blindness, we have undertaken a similar mapping approach to identify QTLs that influence laser-induced CNV in the BXD series of recombinant inbred mouse strains. Composite interval mapping identified new angiogenic QTLs on chromosomes 2 and 19, in addition to confirming our previous corneal neovascularization QTLs of AngVq1 and AngFq2. The new QTLs are named AngCNVq1 and AngCNVq2. The newly mapped regions contain several candidate genes involved in the angiogenic process, including thrombospondin 1, delta-like 4, BclII modifying factor, phospholipase C, beta 2, adrenergic receptor, beta 1, actin-binding LIM protein 1 and colony stimulating factor 2 receptor, alpha. Differences in these regions may control individual susceptibility to CNV.—Nakai, K., Rogers, M. S., Baba, T., Funakoshi, T., Birsner, A. E., Luyindula, D. S., D’Amato, R. J. Genetic loci that control the size of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization. PMID:19237505

  19. Reactive oxygen species delay control of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P A; Xu, H C; Grusdat, M; McIlwain, D R; Pandyra, A A; Harris, I S; Shaabani, N; Honke, N; Kumar Maney, S; Lang, E; Pozdeev, V I; Recher, M; Odermatt, B; Brenner, D; Häussinger, D; Ohashi, P S; Hengartner, H; Zinkernagel, R M; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2013-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation (CD)8+ T cells are like a double edged sword during chronic viral infections because they not only promote virus elimination but also induce virus-mediated immunopathology. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported during virus infections. However, the role of ROS in T-cell-mediated immunopathology remains unclear. Here we used the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus to explore the role of ROS during the processes of virus elimination and induction of immunopathology. We found that virus infection led to elevated levels of ROS producing granulocytes and macrophages in virus-infected liver and spleen tissues that were triggered by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Lack of the regulatory subunit p47phox of the NADPH oxidase diminished ROS production in these cells. While CD8+ T cells exhibited ROS production that was independent of NADPH oxidase expression, survival and T-cell function was elevated in p47phox-deficient (Ncf1−/−) mice. In the absence of p47phox, enhanced T-cell immunity promoted virus elimination and blunted corresponding immunopathology. In conclusion, we find that NADPH-mediated production of ROS critically impairs the immune response, impacting elimination of virus and outcome of liver cell damage. PMID:23328631

  20. Forging T-Lymphocyte Identity: Intersecting Networks of Transcriptional Control.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Ellen V; Ungerbäck, Jonas; Champhekar, Ameya

    2016-01-01

    T-lymphocyte development branches off from other lymphoid developmental programs through its requirement for sustained environmental signals through the Notch pathway. In the thymus, Notch signaling induces a succession of T-lineage regulatory factors that collectively create the T-cell identity through distinct steps. This process involves both the staged activation of T-cell identity genes and the staged repression of progenitor-cell-inherited regulatory genes once their roles in self-renewal and population expansion are no longer needed. With the recent characterization of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) that share transcriptional regulation programs extensively with T-cell subsets, T-cell identity can increasingly be seen as defined in modular terms, as the processes selecting and actuating effector function are potentially detachable from the processes generating and selecting clonally unique T-cell receptor structures. The developmental pathways of different classes of T cells and ILCs are distinguished by the numbers of prerequisites of gene rearrangement, selection, and antigen contact before the cells gain access to nearly common regulatory mechanisms for choosing effector function. Here, the major classes of transcription factors that interact with Notch signals during T-lineage specification are discussed in terms of their roles in these programs, the evidence for their spectra of target genes at different stages, and their cross-regulatory and cooperative actions with each other. Specific topics include Notch modulation of PU.1 and GATA-3, PU.1-Notch competition, the relationship between PU.1 and GATA-3, and the roles of E proteins, Bcl11b, and GATA-3 in guiding acquisition of T-cell identity while avoiding redirection to an ILC fate. PMID:26791859

  1. Genetic loci that control the size of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kei; Rogers, Michael S; Baba, Takashi; Funakoshi, Taisaku; Birsner, Amy E; Luyindula, Dema S; D'Amato, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    Angiogenesis is controlled by a balance between stimulators and inhibitors. We propose that the balance, as well as the general sensitivity of the endothelium to these factors, varies from individual to individual. Indeed, we have found that individual mouse strains have dramatically different responses to growth factor-induced neovascularization. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which influence the extent of corneal angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), were previously identified by our laboratory. To investigate the genetic contribution to choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a leading cause of blindness, we have undertaken a similar mapping approach to identify QTLs that influence laser-induced CNV in the BXD series of recombinant inbred mouse strains. Composite interval mapping identified new angiogenic QTLs on chromosomes 2 and 19, in addition to confirming our previous corneal neovascularization QTLs of AngVq1 and AngFq2. The new QTLs are named AngCNVq1 and AngCNVq2. The newly mapped regions contain several candidate genes involved in the angiogenic process, including thrombospondin 1, delta-like 4, BclII modifying factor, phospholipase C, beta 2, adrenergic receptor, beta 1, actin-binding LIM protein 1 and colony stimulating factor 2 receptor, alpha. Differences in these regions may control individual susceptibility to CNV. PMID:19237505

  2. Unique genetic loci identified for emotional behavior in control and chronic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carhuatanta, Kimberly A. K.; Shea, Chloe J. A.; Herman, James P.; Jankord, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    An individual's genetic background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional behavior or stress response, it remains unknown how prior stress history alters the interaction between an individual's genome and their emotional behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify chromosomal regions that affect emotional behavior and are sensitive to stress exposure. We utilized the BXD behavioral genetics mouse model to identify chromosomal regions that predict fear learning and emotional behavior following exposure to a control or chronic stress environment. 62 BXD recombinant inbred strains and C57BL/6 and DBA/2 parental strains underwent behavioral testing including a classical fear conditioning paradigm and the elevated plus maze. Distinct quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified for emotional learning, anxiety and locomotion in control and chronic stress populations. Candidate genes, including those with already known functions in learning and stress were found to reside within the identified QTLs. Our data suggest that chronic stress history reveals novel genetic predictors of emotional behavior. PMID:25374516

  3. Spinal fluid lymphocytes responsive to autologous and allogeneic cells in multiple sclerosis and control individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, G; Kotilinek, L; Schwartz, M; Sternad, M

    1984-01-01

    Spinal fluid lymphocytes from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and controls were stimulated with either autologous non-T cells or with allogeneic non-T cells followed by stimulation with autologous non-T lymphocytes. Cells responding to these stimuli were cloned and their proliferative responses to autologous and allogeneic MS and normal non-T cells were measured. Large numbers of clones with specific patterns of reaction to both autologous and allogeneic cells were obtained from lymphocytes in MS cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but only occasionally from cells in control CSF. Patterns of responses among clones from a particular CSF were similar and often identical, which suggested that cells in MS CSF were relatively restricted in their specificities. Surface antigen phenotyping of the clones showed them to be predominantly OKT4+, with 13% OKT8+ and 11% OKT4+8+. Peripheral T cells that were stimulated and cultured in parallel with CSF cells were different in that they usually did not give rise to as many clones nor were their patterns of response similar. Many CSF clones were heteroclitic, that is they responded to particular allogeneic cells but not autologous cells. Lymphocytes in MS CSF thus appear to represent a selected population of cells with a high frequency of responsiveness to autologous and allogeneic antigens. Such responses may be evidence for immune regulation within the central nervous system or could represent responses to altered-self antigens. PMID:6237121

  4. Alterations in the mir-15a/16-1 Loci Impairs Its Processing and Augments B-1 Expansion in De Novo Mouse Model of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL).

    PubMed

    Kasar, Siddha; Underbayev, Chingiz; Hassan, Moinuddin; Ilev, Ilko; Degheidy, Heba; Bauer, Steven; Marti, Gerald; Lutz, Carol; Raveche, Elizabeth; Batish, Mona

    2016-01-01

    New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, a de novo model of CLL, share multiple characteristics with CLL patients, including decreased expression of miR-15a/16-1. We previously discovered a point mutation and deletion in the 3' flanking region of mir-16-1 of NZB and a similar mutation has been found in a small number of CLL patients. However, it was unknown whether the mutation is the cause for the reduced miR-15a/16-1 expression and CLL development. Using PCR and in vitro microRNA processing assays, we found that the NZB sequence alterations in the mir-15a/16-1 loci result in deficient processing of the precursor forms of miR-15a/16-1, in particular, we observe impaired conversion of pri-miR-15a/16-1 to pre-miR-15a/16-1. The in vitro data was further supported by derivation of congenic strains with replaced mir-15a/16-1 loci at one or both alleles: NZB congenic mice (NmiR+/-) and DBA congenic mice (DmiR-/-). The level of miR-15a/16-1 reflected the configuration of the mir-15a/16-1 loci with DBA congenic mice (DmiR-/-) showing reduced miR-15a levels compared to homozygous wild-type allele, while the NZB congenic mice (NmiR+/-) showed an increase in miR-15a levels relative to homozygous mutant allele. Similar to Monoclonal B-cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), the precursor stage of the human disease, an overall expansion of the B-1 population was observed in DBA congenic mice (DmiR-/-) relative to wild-type (DmiR+/+). These studies support our hypothesis that the mutations in the mir-15a/16-1 loci are responsible for decreased expression of this regulatory microRNA leading to B-1 expansion and CLL development. PMID:26959643

  5. Alterations in the mir-15a/16-1 Loci Impairs Its Processing and Augments B-1 Expansion in De Novo Mouse Model of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    PubMed Central

    Kasar, Siddha; Underbayev, Chingiz; Hassan, Moinuddin; Ilev, Ilko; Degheidy, Heba; Bauer, Steven; Marti, Gerald; Lutz, Carol; Raveche, Elizabeth; Batish, Mona

    2016-01-01

    New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, a de novo model of CLL, share multiple characteristics with CLL patients, including decreased expression of miR-15a/16-1. We previously discovered a point mutation and deletion in the 3' flanking region of mir-16-1 of NZB and a similar mutation has been found in a small number of CLL patients. However, it was unknown whether the mutation is the cause for the reduced miR-15a/16-1 expression and CLL development. Using PCR and in vitro microRNA processing assays, we found that the NZB sequence alterations in the mir-15a/16-1 loci result in deficient processing of the precursor forms of miR-15a/16-1, in particular, we observe impaired conversion of pri-miR-15a/16-1 to pre-miR-15a/16-1. The in vitro data was further supported by derivation of congenic strains with replaced mir-15a/16-1 loci at one or both alleles: NZB congenic mice (NmiR+/-) and DBA congenic mice (DmiR-/-). The level of miR-15a/16-1 reflected the configuration of the mir-15a/16-1 loci with DBA congenic mice (DmiR-/-) showing reduced miR-15a levels compared to homozygous wild-type allele, while the NZB congenic mice (NmiR+/-) showed an increase in miR-15a levels relative to homozygous mutant allele. Similar to Monoclonal B-cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), the precursor stage of the human disease, an overall expansion of the B-1 population was observed in DBA congenic mice (DmiR-/-) relative to wild-type (DmiR+/+). These studies support our hypothesis that the mutations in the mir-15a/16-1 loci are responsible for decreased expression of this regulatory microRNA leading to B-1 expansion and CLL development. PMID:26959643

  6. Nuclear positioning rather than contraction controls ordered rearrangements of immunoglobulin loci.

    PubMed

    Rother, Magdalena B; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; van Kester, Kevin A M; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Hendriks, Rudi W; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Murre, Cornelis; van Zelm, Menno C

    2016-01-01

    Progenitor-B cells recombine their immunoglobulin (Ig) loci to create unique antigen receptors. Despite a common recombination machinery, the Ig heavy and Ig light chain loci rearrange in a stepwise manner. We studied pre-pro-B cells and Rag(-/-) progenitor-B cells to determine whether Ig locus contraction or nuclear positioning is decisive for stepwise rearrangements. We found that both Ig loci were contracted in pro-B and pre-B cells. Igh relocated from the nuclear lamina to central domains only at the pro-B cell stage, whereas, Igκ remained sequestered at the lamina, and only at the pre-B cell stage located to central nuclear domains. Finally, in vitro induced re-positioning of Ig alleles away from the nuclear periphery increased germline transcription of Ig loci in pre-pro-B cells. Thus, Ig locus contraction juxtaposes genomically distant elements to mediate efficient recombination, however, sequential positioning of Ig loci away from the nuclear periphery determines stage-specific accessibility of Ig loci. PMID:26384565

  7. Multiple loci and epistases control genetic variation for seed dormancy in weedy rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xing-You; Kianian, Shahryar F; Foley, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    Weedy rice has much stronger seed dormancy than cultivated rice. A wild-like weedy strain SS18-2 was selected to investigate the genetic architecture underlying seed dormancy, a critical adaptive trait in plants. A framework genetic map covering the rice genome was constructed on the basis of 156 BC(1) [EM93-1 (nondormant breeding line)//EM93-1/SS18-2] individuals. The mapping population was replicated using a split-tiller technique to control and better estimate the environmental variation. Dormancy was determined by germination of seeds after 1, 11, and 21 days of after-ripening (DAR). Six dormancy QTL, designated as qSD(S)-4, -6, -7-1, -7-2, -8, and -12, were identified. The locus qSD(S)-7-1 was tightly linked to the red pericarp color gene Rc. A QTL x DAR interaction was detected for qSD(S)-12, the locus with the largest main effect at 1, 11, and 21 DAR (R(2) = 0.14, 0.24, and 0.20, respectively). Two, three, and four orders of epistases were detected with four, six, and six QTL, respectively. The higher-order epistases strongly suggest the presence of genetically complex networks in the regulation of variation for seed dormancy in natural populations and make it critical to select for a favorable combination of alleles at multiple loci in positional cloning of a target dormancy gene. PMID:15082564

  8. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling fibre length and lignin content in Arabidopsis thaliana stems

    PubMed Central

    Berleth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fibre properties and the biochemical composition of cell walls are important traits in many applications. For example, the lengths of fibres define the strength and quality of paper, and lignin content is a critical parameter for the use of biomass in biofuel production. Identifying genes controlling these traits is comparatively difficult in woody species, because of long generation times and limited amenability to high-resolution genetic mapping. To address this problem, this study mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) defining fibre length and lignin content in the Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line population Col-4×Ler-0. Adapting high-throughput phenotyping techniques for both traits for measurements in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems identified significant QTLs for fibre length on chromosomes 2 and 5, as well as one significant QTL affecting lignin content on chromosome 2. For fibre length, total variation within the population was 208% higher than between parental lines and the identified QTLs explained 50.58% of the observed variation. For lignin content, the values were 261 and 26.51%, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of the associated intervals identified a number of candidate genes for fibre length and lignin content. This study demonstrates that molecular mapping of QTLs pertaining to wood and fibre properties is possible in Arabidopsis, which substantially broadens the use of Arabidopsis as a model species for the functional characterization of plant genes. PMID:23136168

  9. Quantitative Trait Loci That Control Dengue-2 Virus Dissemination in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kristine E.; Flick, Don; Fleming, Karen H.; Jochim, Ryan; Beaty, Barry J.; Black, William C.

    2005-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the most important vector of yellow fever and dengue fever flaviviruses. Ae. aegypti eradication campaigns have not been sustainable and there are no effective vaccines for dengue viruses. Alternative control strategies may depend upon identification of mosquito genes that condition flavivirus susceptibility and may ultimately provide clues for interrupting transmission. Quantitative trait loci affecting the ability of Ae. aegypti to develop a dengue-2 infection in the midgut have been mapped previously. Herein we report on QTL that determine whether mosquitoes with a dengue-2-infected gut can then disseminate the virus to other tissues. A strain selected for high rates of dengue-2 dissemination was crossed to a strain selected for low dissemination rates. QTL were mapped in the F2 and again in an F5 advanced intercross line. QTL were detected at 31 cM on chromosome I, at 32 cM on chromosome II, and between 44 and 52 cM on chromosome III. Alleles at these QTL were additive or dominant in determining rates of dengue-2 dissemination and accounted for ∼45% of the phenotypic variance. The locations of dengue-2 midgut infection and dissemination QTL correspond to those found in earlier studies. PMID:15781707

  10. Miro-1 links mitochondria and microtubule Dynein motors to control lymphocyte migration and polarity.

    PubMed

    Morlino, Giulia; Barreiro, Olga; Baixauli, Francesc; Robles-Valero, Javier; González-Granado, José M; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Cuenca, Jesús; Sánchez-Sorzano, Carlos O; Veiga, Esteban; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    The recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation is crucial for a functional immune response. In the present work, we explored the role of mitochondria in lymphocyte adhesion, polarity, and migration. We show that during adhesion to the activated endothelium under physiological flow conditions, lymphocyte mitochondria redistribute to the adhesion zone together with the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) in an integrin-dependent manner. Mitochondrial redistribution and efficient lymphocyte adhesion to the endothelium require the function of Miro-1, an adaptor molecule that couples mitochondria to microtubules. Our data demonstrate that Miro-1 associates with the dynein complex. Moreover, mitochondria accumulate around the MTOC in response to the chemokine CXCL12/SDF-1α; this redistribution is regulated by Miro-1. CXCL12-dependent cell polarization and migration are reduced in Miro-1-silenced cells, due to impaired myosin II activation at the cell uropod and diminished actin polymerization. These data point to a key role of Miro-1 in the control of lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the regulation of mitochondrial redistribution. PMID:24492963

  11. Quantitative trait loci that control vector competence for dengue-2 virus in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed Central

    Bosio, C F; Fulton, R E; Salasek, M L; Beaty, B J; Black, W C

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting the ability of the mosquito Aedes aegypti to become infected with dengue-2 virus were mapped in an F(1) intercross. Dengue-susceptible A. aegypti aegypti were crossed with dengue refractory A. aegypti formosus. F(2) offspring were analyzed for midgut infection and escape barriers. In P(1) and F(1) parents and in 207 F(2) individuals, regions of 14 cDNA loci were analyzed with single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis to identify and orient linkage groups with respect to chromosomes I-III. Genotypes were also scored at 57 RAPD-SSCP loci, 5 (TAG)(n) microsatellite loci, and 6 sequence-tagged RAPD loci. Dengue infection phenotypes were scored in 86 F(2) females. Two QTL for a midgut infection barrier were detected with standard and composite interval mapping on chromosomes II and III that accounted for approximately 30% of the phenotypic variance (sigma(2)(p)) in dengue infection and these accounted for 44 and 56%, respectively, of the overall genetic variance (sigma(2)(g)). QTL of minor effect were detected on chromosomes I and III, but these were not detected with composite interval mapping. Evidence for a QTL for midgut escape barrier was detected with standard interval mapping but not with composite interval mapping on chromosome III. PMID:11014816

  12. Multiple-interval mapping for quantitative trait loci controlling endosperm traits.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chen-Hung

    2004-01-01

    Endosperm traits are trisomic inheritant and are of great economic importance because they are usually directly related to grain quality. Mapping for quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying endosperm traits can provide an efficient way to genetically improve grain quality. As the traditional QTL mapping methods (diploid methods) are usually designed for traits under diploid control, they are not the ideal approaches to map endosperm traits because they ignore the triploid nature of endosperm. In this article, a statistical method considering the triploid nature of endosperm (triploid method) is developed on the basis of multiple-interval mapping (MIM) to map for the underlying QTL. The proposed triploid MIM method is derived to broadly use the marker information either from only the maternal plants or from both the maternal plants and their embryos in the backcross and F2 populations for mapping endosperm traits. Due to the use of multiple intervals simultaneously to take multiple QTL into account, the triploid MIM method can provide better detection power and estimation precision, and as shown in this article it is capable of analyzing and searching for epistatic QTL directly as compared to the traditional diploid methods and current triploid methods using only one (or two) interval(s). Several important issues in endosperm trait mapping, such as the relation and differences between the diploid and triploid methods, variance components of genetic variation, and the problems if effects are present and ignored, are also addressed. Simulations are performed to further explore these issues, to investigate the relative efficiency of different experimental designs, and to evaluate the performance of the proposed and current methods in mapping endosperm traits. The MIM-based triploid method can provide a powerful tool to estimate the genetic architecture of endosperm traits and to assist the marker-assisted selection for the improvement of grain quality in crop science

  13. Multi-ethnic genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick MA; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Yanes, Maria Pino; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A J; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; Pasmans, Suzanne GMA; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe MR; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla MT; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Hensch, Nicole M Probst; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, WH Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Noethen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified 10 novel risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with novel secondary signals at 4 of these). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in regulation of innate host defenses and T-cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto-)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. PMID:26482879

  14. Association Analysis of Genomic Loci Important for Grain Weight Control in Elite Common Wheat Varieties Cultivated with Variable Water and Fertiliser Supply

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kunpu; Wang, Junjun; Zhang, Liyi; Rong, Chaowu; Zhao, Fengwu; Peng, Tao; Li, Huimin; Cheng, Dongmei; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Zhang, Aimin; Tong, Yiping; Wang, Daowen

    2013-01-01

    Grain weight, an essential yield component, is under strong genetic control and markedly influenced by the environment. Here, by genome-wide association analysis with a panel of 94 elite common wheat varieties, 37 loci were found significantly associated with thousand-grain weight (TGW) in one or more environments differing in water and fertiliser levels. Five loci were stably associated with TGW under all 12 environments examined. Their elite alleles had positive effects on TGW. Four, two, three, and two loci were consistently associated with TGW in the irrigated and fertilised (IF), rainfed (RF), reduced nitrogen (RN), and reduced phosphorus (RP) environments. The elite alleles of the IF-specific loci enhanced TGW under well-resourced conditions, whereas those of the RF-, RN-, or RP-specific loci conferred tolerance to the TGW decrease when irrigation, nitrogen, or phosphorus were reduced. Moreover, the elite alleles of the environment-independent and -specific loci often acted additively to enhance TGW. Four additional loci were found associated with TGW in specific locations, one of which was shown to contribute to the TGW difference between two experimental sites. Further analysis of 14 associated loci revealed that nine affected both grain length and width, whereas the remaining loci influenced either grain length or width, indicating that these loci control grain weight by regulating kernel size. Finally, the elite allele of Xpsp3152 frequently co-segregated with the larger grain haplotype of TaGW2-6A, suggesting probable genetic and functional linkages between Xpsp3152 and GW2 that are important for grain weight control in cereal plants. Our study provides new knowledge on TGW control in elite common wheat lines, which may aid the improvement of wheat grain weight trait in further research. PMID:23469248

  15. Mapping the quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling seed morphology in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the results of analyzing the quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying sunflower seed morphological traits in a segregating population derived from an oilseed by confection cross. A linkage map containing 165 target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) and 44 simple sequence re...

  16. Analysis techniques for multivariate root loci. [a tool in linear control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis and techniques are developed for the multivariable root locus and the multivariable optimal root locus. The generalized eigenvalue problem is used to compute angles and sensitivities for both types of loci, and an algorithm is presented that determines the asymptotic properties of the optimal root locus.

  17. Genetic identification of multiple loci that control breast cancer susceptibility in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shepel, L A; Lan, H; Haag, J D; Brasic, G M; Gheen, M E; Simon, J S; Hoff, P; Newton, M A; Gould, M N

    1998-01-01

    We have used a rat model of induced mammary carcinomas in an effort to identify breast cancer susceptibility genes. Using genetic crosses between the carcinoma-resistant Copenhagen (COP) and carcinoma-sensitive Wistar-Furth rats, we have confirmed the identification of the Mcs1 locus that modulates tumor number. We have now also identified two additional loci, Mcs2 and Mcs3. These three loci map to chromosomes 2, 7, and 1, respectively, and interact additively to suppress mammary carcinoma development in the COP strain. They are responsible for a major portion of the tumor-resistant phenotype of the COP rat. No loss of heterozygosity was observed surrounding the three loci. A fourth COP locus, Mcs4, has also been identified on chromosome 8 and acts in contrast to increase the number of carcinomas. These results show that mammary carcinoma susceptibility in the COP rat is a polygenic trait. Interestingly, a polymorphism in the human genomic region homologous to the rat Mcs4 region is associated with an increased breast cancer risk in African-American women. The isolation of the Mcs genes may help elucidate novel mechanisms of carcinogenesis, provide information important for human breast cancer risk estimation, and also provide unique drug discovery targets for breast cancer prevention. PMID:9584103

  18. Association of gastrointestinal gland cancer susceptibility loci with esophageal carcinoma among the Chinese Han population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junqi; Zhang, Baoping; Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Long; Geng, Tingting; Li, Haipeng; Fu, Xiaowei; Xue, Xiaolei; Liu, Mingwei; Tong, Ruifeng; Jin, Tianbo; Zhang, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) is a common malignancy worldwide. Previous studies indicated that gastrointestinal gland cancer and EC share some susceptibility loci. Our aim was to identify new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with EC by investigating whether known gastrointestinal cancers susceptibility loci are found in EC patients. A Chinese Han population case-control study was conducted to assess SNP associations with EC risk. Twenty-six SNPs were selected from gastrointestinal cancer susceptibility loci, and 360 EC patients and 310 controls were genotyped for these SNPs using Sequenom MassARRAY technology. The association of SNP frequencies with EC was analyzed by chi-square tests, and genetic model analysis. After Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) p value screening, we excluded two SNPs. Based on chi-square tests, the minor alleles of rs13294589 (p = 0.046) and rs4924935 (p = 0.046) were correlated with reduced EC risk and rs4269383 (p = 0.010) and rs10953615 (p = 0.036) were correlated with increased EC risk. In the genetic model analyses, we found that the minor alleles "T" of rs401681, "A" of rs10088262, and "C" of rs4924935 may reduce the risk of EC. rs401681 has previously been reported to be associated with EC. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to report an association of the other five SNPs with EC. Our findings provide evidence for the genetic variants associated with susceptibility to EC in the Chinese Han population, which might be used as potential molecular markers for detecting susceptibility to EC in Chinese Han people. PMID:26304507

  19. Controlled expression of Drosophila homeobox loci using the Hostile takeover system

    PubMed Central

    Javeed, Naureen; Tardi, Nicholas J.; Maher, Maggie; Singari, Swetha; Edwards, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hostile takeover (Hto) is a Drosophila protein trapping system that allows the investigator to both induce a gene and tag its product. The Hto transposon carries a GAL4-regulated promoter expressing an exon encoding a FLAG-mCherry tag. Upon expression, the Hto exon can splice to a downstream genomic exon, generating a fusion transcript and tagged protein. Results Using rough-eye phenotypic screens, Hto inserts were recovered at eight homeobox or Pax loci: cut, Drgx/CG34340, Pox neuro, araucan, shaven/D-Pax2, Zn finger homeodomain 2, Sex combs reduced (Scr), and the abdominal-A region. The collection yields diverse misexpression phenotypes. Ectopic Drgx was found to alter the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion in ovary follicle cells. Hto expression of cut, araucan or shaven gives phenotypes similar to those of the corresponding UAS-cDNA constructs. The cut and Pox neuro phenotypes are suppressed by the corresponding RNAi constructs. The Scr and abdominal-A inserts do not make fusion proteins, but may act by chromatin- or RNA-based mechanisms. Conclusions Hto can effectively express tagged homeodomain proteins from their endogenous loci; the Minos vector allows inserts to be obtained even in transposon cold-spots. Hto screens may recover homeobox genes at high rates because they are particularly sensitive to misexpression. PMID:25820349

  20. Evidence for coordinate genetic control of Na,K pump density in erythrocytes and lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuise, M.; Flier, J.S.

    1985-08-01

    The erythrocyte is widely used as a model cell for studies of the Na,K pump in health and disease. However, little is known about the factors that control the number of Na,K pumps expressed on the erythrocytes of a given individual, nor about the extent to which erythrocytes can be used to validly assess the pump density on other cell types. In this report, the authors have compared the interindividual variance of Na,K pump density in erythrocytes of unrelated individuals to that seen with identical twins. Unlike unrelated individuals, in whom pump parameters, i.e., ouabain binding sites, /sup 86/Rb uptake, and cell Na concentration vary widely, identical twin pairs showed no significant intrapair variation for these values. Thus, a role for genetic factors is suggested. In addition, the authors established and validated a method for determining Na,K pump density and pump-mediated /sup 86/Rb uptake in human peripheral lymphocytes. Using this method, they show that whereas Na,K pump density differs markedly between erythrocytes (mean of 285 sites per cell) and lymphocytes (mean 40,600 sites per cell), there is a strong and highly significant correlation (r = 0.79, P less than 0.001) between the pump density in these cell types in any given individual. Taken together, these studies suggest that genetic factors are important determinants of Na,K pump expression, and that pump density appears to be coordinately regulated in two cell types in healthy individuals.

  1. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space. PMID:22273506

  2. Quantitative trait loci and underlying candidate genes controlling agronomical and fruit quality traits in octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Cabeza, Amalia; Domínguez, Pedro; Medina, Juan Jesús; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Denoyes-Rothan, Beatrice; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Amaya, Iraida

    2011-09-01

    Breeding for fruit quality traits in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, 2n = 8x = 56) is complex due to the polygenic nature of these traits and the octoploid constitution of this species. In order to improve the efficiency of genotype selection, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated molecular markers will constitute a valuable tool for breeding programs. However, the implementation of these markers in breeding programs depends upon the complexity and stability of QTLs across different environments. In this work, the genetic control of 17 agronomical and fruit quality traits was investigated in strawberry using a F(1) population derived from an intraspecific cross between two contrasting selection lines, '232' and '1392'. QTL analyses were performed over three successive years based on the separate parental linkage maps and a pseudo-testcross strategy. The integrated strawberry genetic map consists of 338 molecular markers covering 37 linkage groups, thus exceeding the 28 chromosomes. 33 QTLs were identified for 14 of the 17 studied traits and approximately 37% of them were stable over time. For each trait, 1-5 QTLs were identified with individual effects ranging between 9.2 and 30.5% of the phenotypic variation, indicating that all analysed traits are complex and quantitatively inherited. Many QTLs controlling correlated traits were co-located in homoeology group V, indicating linkage or pleiotropic effects of loci. Candidate genes for several QTLs controlling yield, anthocyanins, firmness and L-ascorbic acid are proposed based on both their co-localization and predicted function. We also report conserved QTLs among strawberry and other Rosaceae based on their syntenic location. PMID:21667037

  3. Case-control study of allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci in males with impulsive violent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Ba, Huajie; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhao, Hanqing; Yu, Haiying; Guo, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in short tandem repeats (STRs) is an accepted method for detecting associations between genotype and phenotype but it has not previously been used in the study of the genetics of impulsive violent behavior. Objective Compare the prevalence of different polymorphisms in 15 STR loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) between men with a history of impulsive violence and male control subjects without a history of impulsive violence. Methods The distributions of the alleles of the 15 STR loci were compared between 407 cases with impulsive violent behavior and 415 controls using AmpFlSTR® Identifiler™ kits. Results Compared to controls, the average frequencies of the following alleles were significantly lower in individuals with a history of violent behavior: allele 10 of TH01 (OR=0.29, 95%CI=0.16-0.52, p<0.0001,), allele 8 of TPOX (OR=0.71, 95%CI=0.58-0.86, p=0.0005), allele 9 of TPOX (OR=0.65, 95%CI=0.47-0.89, p=0.0072) and allele 14 of CSF1PO (OR=0.27, 95%CI=0.11-0.68, p=0.0035). One allele was significantly higher in cases than controls: allele 11 of TPOX (OR=1.79, 95%CI=1.45-2.22, p<0.0001). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first behavioral genetic study that clearly demonstrates a close relationship between specific genetic markers and impulsive aggression in non-psychiatric offenders. Further prospective work will be needed to determine whether or not the alleles identified can be considered risk factors for impulsive aggression and, if so, the underlying mechanisms that result in this relationship. PMID:24991178

  4. Genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling trace element concentrations in perennial grasses grown on phytotoxic soil contaminated with heavy metals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial grasses cover diverse soils throughout the world, including sites contaminated with heavy metals, producing forages that must be safe for livestock and wildlife. Chromosome regions known as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling forage mineral concentrations were mapped in a populatio...

  5. QTL meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of loci controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in four sources of resistance in pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More knowledge about diversity of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling polygenic disease resistance in natural genetic variation of crop species is required for durably improving plant genetic resistances to pathogens. Polygenic partial resistance to Aphanomyces root rot, due to Aphanomcyces eu...

  6. GPR18 Controls Reconstitution of Mouse Small Intestine Intraepithelial Lymphocytes following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Becker, Amy M; Callahan, Derrick J; Richner, Justin M; Choi, Jaebok; DiPersio, John F; Diamond, Michael S; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2015-01-01

    Specific G protein coupled receptors (GPRs) regulate the proper positioning, function, and development of immune lineage subsets. Here, we demonstrate that GPR18 regulates the reconstitution of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) of the small intestine following bone marrow transplantation. Through analysis of transcriptional microarray data, we find that GPR18 is highly expressed in IELs, lymphoid progenitors, and mature follicular B cells. To establish the physiological role of this largely uncharacterized GPR, we generated Gpr18-/- mice. Despite high levels of GPR18 expression in specific hematopoietic progenitors, Gpr18-/- mice have no defects in lymphopoiesis or myelopoiesis. Moreover, antibody responses following immunization with hapten-protein conjugates or infection with West Nile virus are normal in Gpr18-/- mice. Steady-state numbers of IELs are also normal in Gpr18-/- mice. However, competitive bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that GPR18 is cell-intrinsically required for the optimal restoration of small intestine TCRγδ+ and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ IELs. In contrast, GPR18 is dispensable for the reconstitution of large intestine IELs. Moreover, Gpr18-/- bone marrow reconstitutes small intestine IELs similarly to controls in athymic recipients. Gpr18-/- chimeras show no changes in susceptibility to intestinal insults such as Citrobacter rodentium infections or graft versus host disease. These data reveal highly specific requirements for GPR18 in the development and reconstitution of thymus-derived intestinal IEL subsets in the steady-state and after bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26197390

  7. Calpains Released by T Lymphocytes Cleave TLR2 To Control IL-17 Expression.

    PubMed

    Perez, Joëlle; Dansou, Boris; Hervé, Roxane; Levi, Charlène; Tamouza, Houda; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Demey-Thomas, Emmanuelle; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Zafrani, Lara; Klatzmann, David; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Baud, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular proteases that play a key role in inflammation/immunity. Rare studies show that they are partially externalized. However, the mechanism of this secretion and the functions of exteriorized calpains remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that mouse and human lymphocytes secreted calpains through an ABCA1-driven process. In turn, extracellular calpains inhibited IL-17A expression. We were able to attribute this function to a cleavage of the TLR2 extracellular domain, which prevented TLR2-induced transcription of molecules essential for IL-17A induction. Calpain exteriorization and TLR2 cleavage were critical for the control of IL-17A expression by low doses of IL-2. By using newly developed transgenic mice in which extracellular calpains are specifically inactivated, we provide evidence for the relevance of calpain externalization in vivo in regulating IL-17A expression and function in experimental sterile peritonitis and autoimmune arthritis, respectively. Thus, this study identifies calpain exteriorization as a potential target for immune modulation. PMID:26608921

  8. GPR18 Controls Reconstitution of Mouse Small Intestine Intraepithelial Lymphocytes following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Amy M.; Callahan, Derrick J.; Richner, Justin M.; Choi, Jaebok; DiPersio, John F.; Diamond, Michael S.; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2015-01-01

    Specific G protein coupled receptors (GPRs) regulate the proper positioning, function, and development of immune lineage subsets. Here, we demonstrate that GPR18 regulates the reconstitution of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) of the small intestine following bone marrow transplantation. Through analysis of transcriptional microarray data, we find that GPR18 is highly expressed in IELs, lymphoid progenitors, and mature follicular B cells. To establish the physiological role of this largely uncharacterized GPR, we generated Gpr18-/- mice. Despite high levels of GPR18 expression in specific hematopoietic progenitors, Gpr18-/- mice have no defects in lymphopoiesis or myelopoiesis. Moreover, antibody responses following immunization with hapten-protein conjugates or infection with West Nile virus are normal in Gpr18-/- mice. Steady-state numbers of IELs are also normal in Gpr18-/- mice. However, competitive bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that GPR18 is cell-intrinsically required for the optimal restoration of small intestine TCRγδ+ and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ IELs. In contrast, GPR18 is dispensable for the reconstitution of large intestine IELs. Moreover, Gpr18-/- bone marrow reconstitutes small intestine IELs similarly to controls in athymic recipients. Gpr18-/- chimeras show no changes in susceptibility to intestinal insults such as Citrobacter rodentium infections or graft versus host disease. These data reveal highly specific requirements for GPR18 in the development and reconstitution of thymus-derived intestinal IEL subsets in the steady-state and after bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26197390

  9. Night shift work and chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the MCC-Spain case-control study.

    PubMed

    Costas, Laura; Benavente, Yolanda; Olmedo-Requena, Rocío; Casabonne, Delphine; Robles, Claudia; Gonzalez-Barca, Eva-Maria; de la Banda, Esmeralda; Alonso, Esther; Aymerich, Marta; Tardón, Adonina; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Gimeno-Vázquez, Eva; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Papantoniou, Kyriaki; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Aragonés, Nuria; Pollán, Marina; Kogevinas, Manolis; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2016-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has few known modifiable risk factors. Recently, circadian disruption has been proposed as a potential contributor to lymphoid neoplasms' etiology. Serum melatonin levels have been found to be significantly lower in CLL subjects compared with healthy controls, and also, CLL prognosis has been related to alterations in the circadian molecular signaling. We performed the first investigation of an association between night shift work and CLL in 321 incident CLL cases and 1728 population-based controls in five areas of Spain. Participants were interviewed face-to-face by trained interviewers to collect information on sociodemographic factors, familial, medical and occupational history, including work shifts and other lifestyle factors. We used logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Seventy-nine cases (25%) and 339 controls (20%) had performed night work. Overall, working in night shifts was not associated with CLL (OR = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.78-1.45, compared with day work). However, long-term night shift (>20 years) was positively associated with CLL (OR(tertile 3 vs . day-work)  = 1.77; 95% = 1.14-2.74), although no linear trend was observed (P trend = 0.18). This association was observed among those with rotating (OR(tertile 3 vs . day-work)  = 2.29; 95% CI = 1.33-3.92; P trend = 0.07), but not permanent night shifts (OR(tertile 3 vs . day-work) = 1.16; 95% CI = 0.60-2.25; P trend = 0.86). The association between CLL and long-term rotating night shift warrants further investigation. PMID:27416551

  10. Mapping of Genomic Regions (Quantitative Trait Loci) Controlling Production and Quality in Industrial Cultures of the Edible Basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Larraya, Luis M.; Alfonso, Mikel; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Ramírez, Lucía

    2003-01-01

    Industrial production of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) is based on a solid fermentation process in which a limited number of selected strains are used. Optimization of industrial mushroom production depends on improving the culture process and breeding new strains with higher yields and productivities. Traditionally, fungal breeding has been carried out by an empirical trial and error process. In this study, we used a different approach by mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling culture production and quality within the framework of the genetic linkage map of P. ostreatus. Ten production traits and four quality traits were studied and mapped. The production QTLs identified explain nearly one-half of the production variation. More interestingly, a single QTL mapping to the highly polymorphic chromosome VII appears to be involved in control of all the productivity traits studied. Quality QTLs appear to be scattered across the genome and to have less effect on the variation of the corresponding traits. Moreover, some of the new hybrid strains constructed in the course of our experiments had production or quality values higher than those of the parents or other commercial strains. This approach opens the possibility of marker-assisted selection and breeding of new industrial strains of this fungus. PMID:12788770

  11. Identification of quantitative trait loci(QTL) controlling important fatty acids in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids play important role in controlling oil quality of peanut. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80%, there are several minor fatty acids accounting for about 20% in peanut oil, such as palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), stearic (S...

  12. Bias in effect size of systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility loci across Europe: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to investigate whether the effect size of the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) risk alleles varies across European subpopulations. Methods European SLE patients (n = 1,742) and ethnically matched healthy controls (n = 2,101) were recruited at 17 centres from 10 different countries. Only individuals with self-reported ancestry from the country of origin were included. In addition, participants were genotyped for top ancestry informative markers and for 25 SLE associated SNPs. The results were used to compare effect sizes between the Central Eureopan and Southern European subgroups. Results Twenty of the 25 SNPs showed independent association with SLE, These SNPs showed a significant bias to larger effect sizes in the Southern subgroup, with 15/20 showing this trend (P = 0.019) and a larger mean odds ratio of the 20 SNPs (1.46 vs. 1.34, P = 0.02) as well as a larger difference in the number of risk alleles (2.06 vs. 1.63, P = 0.027) between SLE patients and controls than for Central Europeans. This bias was reflected in a very significant difference in the cumulative genetic risk score (4.31 vs. 3.48, P = 1.8 × 10-32). Effect size bias was accompanied by a lower number of SLE risk alleles in the Southern subjects, both patients and controls, the difference being more marked between the controls (P = 1.1 × 10-8) than between the Southern and Central European patients (P = 0.016). Seven of these SNPs showed significant allele frequency clines. Conclusion Our findings showed a bias to larger effect sizes of SLE loci in the Southern Europeans relative to the Central Europeans together with clines of SLE risk allele frequencies. These results indicate the need to study risk allele clines and the implications of the polygenic model of inheritance in SLE. PMID:22541939

  13. Comparative analysis of quantitative trait loci controlling glucosinolates, myrosinase and insect resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Kliebenstein, Daniel; Pedersen, Deana; Barker, Bridget; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Evolutionary interactions among insect herbivores and plant chemical defenses have generated systems where plant compounds have opposing fitness consequences for host plants, depending on attack by various insect herbivores. This interplay complicates understanding of fitness costs and benefits of plant chemical defenses. We are studying the role of the glucosinolate-myrosinase chemical defense system in protecting Arabidopsis thaliana from specialist and generalist insect herbivory. We used two Arabidopsis recombinant inbred populations in which we had previously mapped QTL controlling variation in the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. In this study we mapped QTL controlling resistance to specialist (Plutella xylostella) and generalist (Trichoplusia ni) herbivores. We identified a number of QTL that are specific to one herbivore or the other, as well as a single QTL that controls resistance to both insects. Comparison of QTL for herbivory, glucosinolates, and myrosinase showed that T. ni herbivory is strongly deterred by higher glucosinolate levels, faster breakdown rates, and specific chemical structures. In contrast, P. xylostella herbivory is uncorrelated with variation in the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. This agrees with evolutionary theory stating that specialist insects may overcome host plant chemical defenses, whereas generalists will be sensitive to these same defenses. PMID:12019246

  14. Susceptibility to ozone-induced inflammation. II. Separate loci control responses to acute and subacute exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Levitt, R.C.; Zhang, L.Y. )

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that inbred strains of mice are differentially susceptible to acute (3 h) and subacute (48 h) exposures to 2 parts per million (ppm) ozone (O3) and 0.30 ppm O3, respectively. Genetic studies with O3-resistant C3H/HeJ and O3-susceptible C57BL/6J strains have indicated that susceptibility to each of these O3 exposures is under Mendelian (single gene) control. In the present study, we hypothesized that the same gene controls susceptibility to the airway inflammatory responses to 2 ppm and 0.30 ppm O3 exposures. To test this hypothesis, airway inflammation was induced in 10 BXH and 16 BXD recombinant inbred (RI) strains of mice by acute as well as subacute O3 exposures. Airway inflammation was assessed by counting the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) returns obtained immediately after 48-h subacute exposure to 0.30 ppm O3, or 6 h after 3 h acute exposure to 2 ppm O3. Each RI strain was classified as susceptible or resistant to each exposure, based on a comparison of mean numbers of PMNs with those of the respective progenitor strains. For each RI set, a phenotypic strain distribution pattern (SDP) was thus derived for each exposure regimen, and the SDPs were then compared for concordance. Among the BXH RI strains, 4 of 10 responded discordantly to the two exposures: 3 were susceptible to acute exposure and resistant to subacute exposure, whereas 1 was conversely susceptible. Among the BXD RI strains, 4 of 16 were discordant: 1 was susceptible to acute exposure, and resistant to subacute exposure, whereas 3 were conversely susceptible.

  15. The granzyme B-Serpinb9 axis controls the fate of lymphocytes after lysosomal stress.

    PubMed

    Bird, C H; Christensen, M E; Mangan, M S J; Prakash, M D; Sedelies, K A; Smyth, M J; Harper, I; Waterhouse, N J; Bird, P I

    2014-06-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CLs) contain lysosome-related organelles (LROs) that perform the normal degradative functions of the lysosome, in addition to storage and release of powerful cytotoxins employed to kill virally infected or abnormal cells. Among these cytotoxins is granzyme B (GrB), a protease that has also been implicated in activation (restimulation)-induced cell death of natural killer (NK) and T cells, but the underlying mechanism and its regulation are unclear. Here we show that restimulation of previously activated human or mouse lymphocytes induces lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP), followed by GrB release from LROs into the CL cytosol. The model lysosomal stressors sphingosine and Leu-Leu-methyl-ester, and CLs from gene-targeted mice were used to show that LMP releases GrB in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and that the liberated GrB is responsible for cell death. The endogenous GrB inhibitor Serpinb9 (Sb9) protects CLs against LMP-induced death but is decreasingly effective as the extent of LMP increases. We also used these model stressors to show that GrB is the major effector of LMP-mediated death in T cells, but that in NK cells additional effectors are released, making GrB redundant. We found that limited LMP and GrB release occurs constitutively in proliferating lymphocytes and in NK cells engaged with targets in vitro. In Ectromelia virus-infected lymph nodes, working NK cells lacking Sb9 are more susceptible to GrB-mediated death. Taken together, these data show that a basal level of LMP occurs in proliferating and activated lymphocytes, and is increased on restimulation. LMP releases GrB from LROs into the lymphocyte cytoplasm and its ensuing interaction with Sb9 dictates whether or not the cell survives. The GrB-Sb9 nexus may therefore represent an additional mechanism of limiting lymphocyte lifespan and populations. PMID:24488096

  16. The granzyme B-Serpinb9 axis controls the fate of lymphocytes after lysosomal stress

    PubMed Central

    Bird, C H; Christensen, M E; Mangan, M S J; Prakash, M D; Sedelies, K A; Smyth, M J; Harper, I; Waterhouse, N J; Bird, P I

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CLs) contain lysosome-related organelles (LROs) that perform the normal degradative functions of the lysosome, in addition to storage and release of powerful cytotoxins employed to kill virally infected or abnormal cells. Among these cytotoxins is granzyme B (GrB), a protease that has also been implicated in activation (restimulation)-induced cell death of natural killer (NK) and T cells, but the underlying mechanism and its regulation are unclear. Here we show that restimulation of previously activated human or mouse lymphocytes induces lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP), followed by GrB release from LROs into the CL cytosol. The model lysosomal stressors sphingosine and Leu-Leu-methyl-ester, and CLs from gene-targeted mice were used to show that LMP releases GrB in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and that the liberated GrB is responsible for cell death. The endogenous GrB inhibitor Serpinb9 (Sb9) protects CLs against LMP-induced death but is decreasingly effective as the extent of LMP increases. We also used these model stressors to show that GrB is the major effector of LMP-mediated death in T cells, but that in NK cells additional effectors are released, making GrB redundant. We found that limited LMP and GrB release occurs constitutively in proliferating lymphocytes and in NK cells engaged with targets in vitro. In Ectromelia virus-infected lymph nodes, working NK cells lacking Sb9 are more susceptible to GrB-mediated death. Taken together, these data show that a basal level of LMP occurs in proliferating and activated lymphocytes, and is increased on restimulation. LMP releases GrB from LROs into the lymphocyte cytoplasm and its ensuing interaction with Sb9 dictates whether or not the cell survives. The GrB-Sb9 nexus may therefore represent an additional mechanism of limiting lymphocyte lifespan and populations. PMID:24488096

  17. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Siddharth S; Foley, Jonathan E; Limsirichai, Prajit; Schaffer, David V; Arkin, Adam P

    2015-01-01

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH and protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise. PMID:25943345

  18. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; Schaffer, David V.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH andmore » protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.« less

  19. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; Schaffer, David V.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH and protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.

  20. [Apoptosis of alveolar lymphocytes in sarcoidosis and in control group is more frequent in smokers than in nonsmoking persons].

    PubMed

    Kopiński, Piotr; Przybylsk, Grzegorz; Balicka-Slusarczyk, Barbara; Jarzemska, Agnieszka; Dyczek, Andrzej; Pinis, Grazyna; Bartczak, Karina; Plato, Marta; Jankowski, Marek; Szczeklik, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Cigarette smoking enhances apoptosis rate of alveolar macrophages. However, little is known about the appearance and extension of apoptosis in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) lymphocytes originating from smoker individuals, both in pulmonary sarcoidosis (the disease characterized by lymphocytic alveolitis) and in controls. BAL was carried out in 60 nontreated patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis, subdivided acc. smoking status and in 22 control persons, free of any lung pathology. BAL (alveolar) lymphocytes were a) stained for TUNEL; b) permeabilized and stained with PI for late apoptosis/cell cycle analyses; c) immunophenotyped, including CD95, CD95 Ligand, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bak and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) expression. BD FACSCalibure flow cytometer, PC Lysys and ModFit software were applied. The low number of AL entered apoptosis, which was confirmed by both techniques. Cigarette smokers were characterized by higher AL apoptosis percentage in respective subgroups (sarcoidosis: 0.6 +/- 0.13 in nonsmokers vs 0.9 +/- 0.23 in smokers; controls: 0.85 +/- 0.23 in nonsmokers vs 1.5 +/- 0.35 smokers, median +/- SEM, p < 0.05); the proliferation rate was lower. Decreased IGF-I expression in AL of sarcoidosis smokers was observed (13.5 +/- 9.2 vs 46.0 +/- 6.0 in nonsmokers, p < 0.05). No differences were found between studied groups in expression of Bcl-2, Fas and FasL molecules (except significantly declined ratio of CD8+FasL+ cells in sarcoidosis nonsmokers). AL apoptosis rate was positively correlated with respective alveolar macrophage results (Rs = +0.59, p < 0.00001) and negatively with CD4/CD8 ratio (Rs = -0.32, p < 0.001); no correlation was found with lung function test results and with Bcl-2, Fas and FasL expression in BAL cells. Apoptosis of alveolar lymphocytes was more frequent in nonsmokers both in pulmonary sarcoidosis and in controls; lower AL percentage proliferates. These phenomena seem to participate in lower AL percentage, observed in smoker

  1. L-selectin controls trafficking of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in lymph node high endothelial venules in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lafouresse, Fanny; Bellard, Elisabeth; Laurent, Camille; Moussion, Christine; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Ysebaert, Loïc; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2015-09-10

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults. Lymph nodes (LNs) are sites of malignant proliferation and LN enlargement is associated with poor prognosis in the clinics. The LN microenvironment is believed to favor disease progression by promoting CLL cell growth and drug resistance. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating trafficking of CLL cells to LNs is thus urgently needed. Here, we studied the first step of CLL cell migration to LNs, their interaction with high endothelial venules (HEVs), specialized blood vessels for lymphocyte extravasation in lymphoid organs. We observed that the density of HEV blood vessels was increased in CLL LNs and that CD20(+) CLL cells accumulated within HEV pockets, suggesting intense trafficking. We used intravital imaging to visualize the behavior of human CLL cells within the mouse LN microcirculation, and discovered that CLL cells bind to HEVs in vivo via a multistep adhesion cascade, which involves rolling, sticking, and crawling of the leukemic cells on the endothelium. Functional analyses revealed that the lymphocyte homing receptor L-selectin (CD62L) is the key factor controlling the binding of CLL cells to HEV walls in vivo. Interestingly, L-selectin expression was decreased on CLL cells from patients treated with idelalisib, a phosphoinositide-3-kinase δ inhibitor recently approved for CLL therapy. Interference with L-selectin-mediated trafficking in HEVs could represent a novel strategy to block dissemination of CLL cells to LNs and increase the efficacy of conventional therapy. PMID:26162407

  2. Mapping the quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling seed morphology and disk diameter in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several seed morphological traits, along with disk diameter, differ greatly between oilseed and confection sunflower types, which are bred for different end-use purposes. This paper reports the results of analyzing the quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying seed morphological traits and disk diam...

  3. GENETIC MAPPING OF THE QCTS12 AND QCTS4 LOCI CONTROLLING M202 RICE SEEDLING RESPONSE TO LOW TEMPERATURES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California variety M202 exhibits good tolerance to low temperatures during the seedling stage of development. We have identified two major genetic loci, qCTS12 and qCTS4, which are involved in the low temperature tolerance of M202 seedlings. The qCTS12 locus, provides tolerance to cold-induced w...

  4. Control of intestinal Nod2-mediated peptidoglycan recognition by epithelium-associated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Duerr, C U; Salzman, N H; Dupont, A; Szabo, A; Normark, B H; Normark, S; Locksley, R M; Mellroth, P; Hornef, M W

    2011-05-01

    Innate immune recognition of the bacterial cell wall constituent peptidoglycan by the cytosolic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2) receptor has a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal mucosal homeostasis. Whereas peptidoglycan cleavage by gut-derived lysozyme preserves the recognition motif, the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase activity of the peptidoglycan recognition protein 2 (PGLYRP-2) destroys the Nod2-detected muramyl dipeptide structure. PGLYRP-2 green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter and wild-type mice were studied by flow cytometry and quantitative RT-PCR to identify Pglyrp-2 expression in cells of the intestinal mucosa and reveal a potential regulatory function on epithelial peptidoglycan recognition. CD3(+)/CD11c(+) T lymphocytes revealed significant Pglyrp-2 expression, whereas epithelial cells and intestinal myeloid cells were negative. The mucosal Pglyrp-2-expressing lymphocyte population demonstrated a mixed T-cell receptor (TCR) αβ or γδ phenotype with predominant CD8α and less so CD8β expression, as well as significant staining for the activation markers B220 and CD69, presenting a typical intraepithelial lymphocyte phenotype. Importantly, exposure of peptidoglycan to PGLYRP-2 significantly reduced Nod2/Rip2-mediated epithelial activation. Also, moderate but significant alterations of the intestinal microbiota composition were noted in Pglyrp-2-deficient animals. PGLYRP-2 might thus have a significant role in regulation of the enteric host-microbe homeostasis. PMID:20980996

  5. Species-specific differences in tissue-specific expression of alcohol dehydrogenase are under the control of complex cis-acting loci: Evidence from Drosophila hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganayakulu, G.; Reddy, A.R. ); Kirkpatrick, R.B.; Martin, P.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Differences in the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase in the hindgut and testis of adult Drosophila virilis, D. texana, D. novamexicana and D. borealis flies were observed. These heritable differences do not arise due to chromosomal rearrangements, since the polytene chromosome banding patterns did not reveal any such gross chromosomal rearrangements near the Adh locus in any of the tested species. Analysis of the interspecific hybrids revealed that these differences are controlled by complex cis-acting genetic loci. Further, the cis-acting locus controlling the expression of ADH in testis was found to be separable by crossing-over.

  6. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, David H.; Young, Margaret A.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Helton, Nichole M.; Fulton, Robert; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan T.; Miller, Christopher A.; Klco, Jeffery M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34+ cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements. PMID:25600023

  7. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D H; Young, M A; Lamprecht, T L; Helton, N M; Fulton, R; O'Laughlin, M; Fronick, C; Magrini, V; Demeter, R T; Miller, C A; Klco, J M; Wilson, R K; Ley, T J

    2015-06-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34(+) cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements. PMID:25600023

  8. Spatial Interplay between Polycomb and Trithorax Complexes Controls Transcriptional Activity in T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Atsushi; Tumes, Damon J; Watanabe, Yukiko; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Kaneda, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2015-11-01

    Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are two mutually antagonistic chromatin modifying complexes, however, how they together mediate transcriptional counter-regulation remains unknown. Genome-wide analysis revealed that binding of Ezh2 and menin, central members of the PcG and TrxG complexes, respectively, were reciprocally correlated. Moreover, we identified a developmental change in the positioning of Ezh2 and menin in differentiated T lymphocytes compared to embryonic stem cells. Ezh2-binding upstream and menin-binding downstream of the transcription start site was frequently found at genes with higher transcriptional levels, and Ezh2-binding downstream and menin-binding upstream was found at genes with lower expression in T lymphocytes. Interestingly, of the Ezh2 and menin cooccupied genes, those exhibiting occupancy at the same position displayed greatly enhanced sensitivity to loss of Ezh2. Finally, we also found that different combinations of Ezh2 and menin occupancy were associated with expression of specific functional gene groups important for T cell development. Therefore, spatial cooperative gene regulation by the PcG and TrxG complexes may represent a novel mechanism regulating the transcriptional identity of differentiated cells. PMID:26324324

  9. Human T lymphocytes express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors functionally active in controlling T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Gianluca; Varsaldi, Federica; Lombardi, Grazia . E-mail: lombardi@pharm.unipmn.it

    2005-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the functional role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in human T cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and Jurkat T cells express genes encoding for both NR1 and NR2B subunits: phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated PBL also expresses both these genes and the NR2A and NR2D genes. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that NR1 expression increases as a consequence of PHA (10 {mu}g/ml) treatment. D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine [(+)-MK 801], competitive and non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively, inhibited PHA-induced T cell proliferation, whereas they did not affect IL-2 (10 U/ml)-induced proliferation of PHA blasts. These effects were due to the prevention of T cell activation (inhibition of cell aggregate formation and CD25 expression), but not to cell cycle arrest or death. These results demonstrate that human T lymphocytes express NMDA receptors, which are functionally active in controlling cell activation.

  10. Directionality of Fission Yeast Mating-Type Interconversion Is Controlled by the Location of the Donor Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Klar, AJS.

    1993-01-01

    Cells of homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe efficiently switch between two mating types called P and M. The phenotypic switches are due to conversion of the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) by two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P and mat3-M, that contain unexpressed information for the P and M mating types, respectively. In this process, switching-competent cells switch to the opposite mating type in 72-90% of the cell divisions. Hence, mat2-P is a preferred donor of information to mat1 in M cells, whereas mat3-M is a preferred donor in P cells. We investigated the reason for the donor preference by constructing a strain in which the genetic contents of the donor loci were swapped. We found that switching to the opposite mating type was very inefficient in that strain. This shows that the location of the silent cassettes in the chromosome, rather than their content, is the deciding factor for recognition of the donor for each cell type. We propose a model in which switching is achieved by regulating accessibility of the donor loci, perhaps by changing the chromatin structure in the mating-type region, thus promoting an intrachromosomal folding of mat2 or mat3 onto mat1 in a cell type-specific fashion. We also present evidence for the involvement of the Swi6 and Swi6-mod trans-acting factors in the donor-choice mechanism. We suggest that these factors participate in forming the proposed folded structure. PMID:8375648

  11. The impact of self-hypnosis and Johrei on lymphocyte subpopulations at exam time: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Naito, Akira; Laidlaw, Tannis M; Henderson, Don C; Farahani, Linda; Dwivedi, Prabudha; Gruzelier, John H

    2003-12-30

    In a prospective randomised controlled trial, 48 students were randomly assigned to stress reduction training before exams with self-hypnosis, Johrei or a mock neurofeedback relaxation control. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations and self-reported stress (Perceived Stress Scale) were measured before training and 1-2 months later as exams approached. Absolute number and percentages of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T lymphocytes, CD3(-)CD56(+) Natural Killer cells (NK cells) and NK cell cytotoxic activity was measured from venous blood. Stressed participants showed small but significant declines in both CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cell percentages and NK cell cytotoxic activity levels while CD3(+)CD4(+) T cell percentages increased, changes supported by correlations with perceived stress. The effects of stress were moderated in those who learned Johrei at exam time; 11/12 showed increases in CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cell percentages with decreased percentages of CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells, effects not seen in the relaxation control group. Stress was also buffered in those who learned and practised self-hypnosis in whom CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cell and CD3(+)CD4(+) T cell levels were maintained, and whose CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell percentages, shown previously to decline with exams, increased. The results compliment beneficial effects on mood of self-hypnosis and Johrei. The results are in keeping with beneficial influences of self-hypnosis and provide the first evidence of the suggestive value of the Japanese Johrei procedure for stress reduction, which clearly warrants further investigation. PMID:14698357

  12. Persistent Multiyear Control of Relapsed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With Successive Donor Lymphocyte Infusions: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jeffrey S; Symons, Heather J; Robey, Nancy; Borowitz, Michael J; Schafer, Eric S; Chen, Allen R

    2016-07-01

    There are few therapeutic options for patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) who have recurrent disease after initial matched sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. While a second hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from a haploidentical donor offers the conceptual possibility of greater graft versus leukemia effect, there is minimal literature to describe the efficacy of this approach in recurrent pediatric T-ALL. We present the case of a now 9-year-old female in whom second haploidentical HSCT, followed by successive donor lymphocyte infusions in response to minimal residual disease reemergence, has led to 3+ years of ongoing disease control without graft versus host disease and excellent quality of life. PMID:26990138

  13. [Ultrastructure of blood lymphocytes in dairy cows with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Cerný, L; Hajdu, I

    1982-03-01

    The morphology of blood lymphocytes was studied ultrastructurally in cows with chronical lymphocytic leucosis (CLL) and in healthy controls. A significantly higher occurrence of the so-called nuclear pockets in the leucaemic lymphocytes was found (13.8% v. 0.83% in healthy animals). The surfaces of lymphocytes were stained with ruthenium red; this showed the possibility of differentiating two distinct populations of lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In this way, a prevalence of B-lymphocytes, constituting 89.7% of all lymphocytes, was demonstrated in animals suffering from CLL. PMID:6179285

  14. Increased threshold for TCR-mediated signaling controls self reactivity of intraepithelial lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Guehler, S R; Finch, R J; Bluestone, J A; Barrett, T A

    1998-06-01

    To examine the effect of self Ag on activation requirements of TCR-alphabeta intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), we utilized the 2C transgenic (Tg) mouse model specific for a peptide self Ag presented by class I MHC, H-2Ld. CD8alpha alpha and CD4-CD8- IELs from syngeneic (H-2b, self Ag-) and self Ag-bearing (H-2b/d, self Ag+) strains were examined for their ability to respond in vitro to P815 (H-2d) cell lines expressing the endogenous antigenic peptide, p2Ca. Proliferation, cytokine production, and CTL activity were elicited in IEL T cells isolated from self Ag- H-2b mice when stimulated with P815 cells expressing basal levels of self Ag. These responses were enhanced following the addition of exogenous p2Ca peptide and ectopic expression of the costimulatory molecule, B7-1. By comparison, IEL from self Ag-bearing mice failed to respond to basal levels of self Ag presented by P815 cells even in the presence of B7-1-mediated costimulation. However, the addition of increasing amounts of exogenous p2Ca peptide induced a response from the in vivo "tolerized" T cells. These results suggest that exposure to self Ag in vivo increased the threshold of TCR activation of Ag-exposed self-reactive IELs. The dependence of increased signal 1 to activate self-reactive IELs suggests a defect in TCR signaling that may maintain self tolerance in vivo. These data suggest that conditions that overcome signal 1 IEL defects may initiate autoreactive responses in the intestine. PMID:9605133

  15. Identification of genes for controlling swine adipose deposition by integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and quantitative trait loci data.

    PubMed

    Xing, Kai; Zhu, Feng; Zhai, LiWei; Chen, ShaoKang; Tan, Zhen; Sun, YangYang; Hou, ZhuoCheng; Wang, ChuDuan

    2016-01-01

    Backfat thickness is strongly associated with meat quality, fattening efficiency, reproductive performance, and immunity in pigs. Fat storage and fatty acid synthesis mainly occur in adipose tissue. Therefore, we used a high-throughput massively parallel sequencing approach to identify transcriptomes in adipose tissue, and whole-genome differences from three full-sibling pairs of pigs with opposite (high and low) backfat thickness phenotypes. We obtained an average of 38.69 million reads for six samples, 78.68% of which were annotated in the reference genome. Eighty-nine overlapping differentially expressed genes were identified among the three pair comparisons. Whole-genome resequencing also detected multiple genetic variations between the pools of DNA from the two groups. Compared with the animal quantitative trait loci (QTL) database, 20 differentially expressed genes were matched to the QTLs associated with fatness in pigs. Our technique of integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and QTL database information provided a rich source of important differentially expressed genes and variations. Associate analysis between selected SNPs and backfat thickness revealed that two SNPs and one haplotype of ME1 significantly affected fat deposition in pigs. Moreover, genetic analysis confirmed that variations in the differentially expressed genes may affect fat deposition. PMID:26996612

  16. Identification of genes for controlling swine adipose deposition by integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and quantitative trait loci data

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Zhu, Feng; Zhai, LiWei; Chen, ShaoKang; Tan, Zhen; Sun, YangYang; Hou, ZhuoCheng; Wang, ChuDuan

    2016-01-01

    Backfat thickness is strongly associated with meat quality, fattening efficiency, reproductive performance, and immunity in pigs. Fat storage and fatty acid synthesis mainly occur in adipose tissue. Therefore, we used a high-throughput massively parallel sequencing approach to identify transcriptomes in adipose tissue, and whole-genome differences from three full-sibling pairs of pigs with opposite (high and low) backfat thickness phenotypes. We obtained an average of 38.69 million reads for six samples, 78.68% of which were annotated in the reference genome. Eighty-nine overlapping differentially expressed genes were identified among the three pair comparisons. Whole-genome resequencing also detected multiple genetic variations between the pools of DNA from the two groups. Compared with the animal quantitative trait loci (QTL) database, 20 differentially expressed genes were matched to the QTLs associated with fatness in pigs. Our technique of integrating transcriptome, whole-genome resequencing, and QTL database information provided a rich source of important differentially expressed genes and variations. Associate analysis between selected SNPs and backfat thickness revealed that two SNPs and one haplotype of ME1 significantly affected fat deposition in pigs. Moreover, genetic analysis confirmed that variations in the differentially expressed genes may affect fat deposition. PMID:26996612

  17. Novel Genetic Loci Control Calcium Absorption and Femur Bone Mass as Well as Their Response to Low Calcium Intake in Male BXD Recombinant Inbred Mice.

    PubMed

    Reyes Fernandez, Perla C; Replogle, Rebecca A; Wang, Libo; Zhang, Min; Fleet, James C

    2016-05-01

    Low dietary calcium (Ca) intake during growth limits peak bone mass but physiological adaptation can prevent this adverse effect. To assess the genetic control on the physiologic response to dietary Ca restriction (RCR), we conducted a study in 51 BXD lines fed either 0.5% (basal) or 0.25% (low) Ca diets from ages 4 to 12 weeks (n = 8/line/diet). Ca absorption (CaAbs), femur bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC) were examined. ANCOVA with body size as covariate was used to detect significant line and diet main effects, and line-by-diet interactions. Body size-corrected residuals were used for linkage mapping and to estimate heritability (h(2) ). Loci controlling the phenotypes were identified using composite interval mapping on each diet and for the RCR. h(2) of basal phenotypes (0.37-0.43) and their RCR (0.32-0.38) was moderate. For each phenotype, we identified multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) on each diet and for the RCR. Several loci affected multiple traits: Chr 1 (88.3-90.6 cM, CaAbs, BMC), Chr 4 (45.8-49.2 cM, CaAbs, BMD, BMC), Chr 8 (28.6-31.6 cM, CaAbs, BMD, RCR), and Chr 15 (13.6-24 cM, BMD, BMC; 32.3-36 cM, CaAbs RCR, BMD). This suggests that gene clusters may regulate interdependent bone-related phenotypes. Using in silico expression QTL (eQTL) mapping and bioinformatic tools, we identified novel candidates for the regulation of bone under Ca stress (Ext1, Deptor), and for the first time, we report genes modulating Ca absorption (Inadl, Sc4mol, Sh3rf1, and Dennd3), and both Ca and bone metabolism (Tceanc2, Tll1, and Aadat). Our data reveal gene-by-diet interactions and the existence of novel relationships between bone and Ca metabolism during growth. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26636428

  18. Genetic evidence that two independent S-loci control RNase-based self-incompatibility in diploid strawberry.

    PubMed

    Bosković, Radovan I; Sargent, Daniel J; Tobutt, Kenneth R

    2010-03-01

    The self-incompatibility mechanism that reduces inbreeding in many plants of the Rosaceae is attributed to a multi-allelic S locus which, in the Prunoideae and Maloideae subfamilies, comprises two complementary genes, a stylar-expressed S-RNase and a pollen-expressed SFB. To elucidate incompatibility in the subfamily Rosoideae, stylar-specific RNases and self-(in)compatibility status were analysed in various diploid strawberries, especially Fragaria nubicola and F. viridis, both self-incompatible, and F. vesca, self-compatible, and in various progenies derived from them. Unexpectedly, two unlinked RNase loci, S and T, were found, encoding peptides distinct from Prunoideae and Maloideae S-RNases; the presence of a single active allele at either is sufficient to confer self-incompatibility. By contrast, in diploid Maloideae and Prunoideae a single locus encodes S-RNases that share several conserved regions and two active alleles are required for self-incompatibility. Our evidence implicates the S locus in unilateral inter-specific incompatibility and shows that S and T RNases can, remarkably, confer not only allele-specific rejection of cognate pollen but also unspecific rejection of Sn Tn pollen, where n indicates a null allele, consistent with the the presence of the pollen component, SFB, activating the cognitive function of these RNases. Comparison of relevant linkage groups between Fragaria and Prunus suggests that Prunus S-RNases, unique in having two introns, may have resulted from gene conversion in an ancestor of Prunus. In addition, it is shown that there is a non-S locus that is essential for self-incompatibility in diploid Fragaria. PMID:20008462

  19. Differential Influence on Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitope Presentation by Controlled Expression of Either Proteasome Immunosubunits or Pa28

    PubMed Central

    van Hall, Thorbald; Sijts, Alice; Camps, Marcel; Offringa, Rienk; Melief, Cornelis; Kloetzel, Peter-M.; Ossendorp, Ferry

    2000-01-01

    The proteasome is the principal provider of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I–presented peptides. Interferon (IFN)-γ induces expression of three catalytically active proteasome subunits (LMP2, LMP7, and MECL-1) and the proteasome-associated activator PA28. These molecules are thought to optimize the generation of MHC class I–presented peptides. However, known information on their contribution in vivo is very limited. Here, we examined the antigen processing of two murine leukemia virus-encoded cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in murine cell lines equipped with a tetracycline-controlled, IFN-γ–independent expression system. We thus were able to segregate the role of the immunosubunits from the role of PA28. The presence of either immunosubunits or PA28 did not alter the presentation of a subdominant murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-derived CTL epitope. However, the presentation of the immunodominant MuLV-derived epitope was markedly enhanced upon induction of each of these two sets of genes. Thus, the IFN-γ–inducible proteasome subunits and PA28 can independently enhance antigen presentation of some CTL epitopes. Our data show that tetracycline-regulated expression of PA28 increases CTL epitope generation without affecting the 20S proteasome composition or half-life. The differential effect of these IFN-γ–inducible proteins on MHC class I processing may have a decisive influence on the quality of the CTL immune response. PMID:10952718

  20. Different roles for CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and macrophage subsets in the control of a generalized virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Karupiah, G; Buller, R M; Van Rooijen, N; Duarte, C J; Chen, J

    1996-01-01

    The importance of T-lymphocyte subsets in the control of poxvirus infections is controversial. To determine the relative contribution of lymphocyte subsets important for recovery from infection with ectromelia virus (EV), a natural murine poxvirus pathogen, C57BL/6 (B6) mice lacking functional CD8+ T cells because of disruption of the beta2-microglobulin gene or lacking functional CD4+ T cells because of disruption of the I-(A)beta gene, acutely depleted of CD8+ or CD4+ T cells with monoclonal antibody, or depleted of macrophage subsets by the macrophage suicide technique were used. Recovery from infection was strictly dependent on the effector functions of CD8+ T cells, in the absence of which 100% mortality resulted. This lymphocyte population had demonstrable antiviral activity early in the infection process even before class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity was detectable. CD4+ T cells were found to be necessary for the generation of an optimal virus-specific, class I MHC-restricted CD8+ CTL response and contributed to virus clearance not involving cytolytic mechanisms. In both models of CD4+ T-cell deficiency, virus clearance was incomplete and persisted at low levels in most organs and at very high levels in the skin, but the animals did not die. The elimination of macrophage subpopulations impeded virus clearance, impaired the generation of class I MHC-restricted antiviral CTL response, and resulted in 100% mortality. These findings establish an absolute requirement for CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophage subsets in the elimination of a natural murine poxvirus infection and support the idea that macrophages may be essential accessory cells for the generation of class I MHC-restricted antiviral CTL responses. PMID:8970949

  1. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Natalie J; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell - cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell - melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27625650

  2. A Well-Controlled Experimental System to Study Interactions of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes with Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Natalie J.; Soneson, Charlotte; Barras, David; Baumgaertner, Petra; Rimoldi, Donata; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    While T cell-based immunotherapies are steadily improving, there are still many patients who progress, despite T cell-infiltrated tumors. Emerging evidence suggests that T cells themselves may provoke immune escape of cancer cells. Here, we describe a well-controlled co-culture system for studying the dynamic T cell – cancer cell interplay, using human melanoma as a model. We explain starting material, controls, and culture parameters to establish reproducible and comparable cultures with highly heterogeneous tumor cells. Low passage melanoma cell lines and melanoma-specific CD8+ T cell clones generated from patient blood were cultured together for up to 3 days. Living melanoma cells were isolated from the co-culture system by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We demonstrate that the characterization of isolated melanoma cells is feasible using flow cytometry for protein expression analysis as well as an Agilent whole human genome microarray and the NanoString technology for differential gene expression analysis. In addition, we identify five genes (ALG12, GUSB, RPLP0, KRBA2, and ADAT2) that are stably expressed in melanoma cells independent of the presence of T cells or the T cell-derived cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. These genes are essential for correct normalization of gene expression data by NanoString. Further to the characterization of melanoma cells after exposure to CTLs, this experimental system might be suitable to answer a series of questions, including how the affinity of CTLs for their target antigen influences the melanoma cell response and whether CTL-induced gene expression changes in melanoma cells are reversible. Taken together, our human T cell – melanoma cell culture system is well suited to characterize immune-related mechanisms in cancer cells. PMID:27625650

  3. Interferon regulatory factor 3 controls interleukin-17 expression in CD8 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ysebrant de Lendonck, Laure; Tonon, Sandrine; Nguyen, Muriel; Vandevenne, Patricia; Welsby, Iain; Martinet, Valerie; Molle, Céline; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Leo, Oberdan; Goriely, Stanislas

    2013-08-20

    IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 3 plays a key role in innate responses against viruses. Herein we assessed its contribution to T-cell activation. We observed that poly(I:C)-induced IRF3 activation in CD8 T cells represses IL-17 expression in a type I IFN-independent fashion. Even in the absence of poly(I:C), polyclonally activated naïve IRF3(-/-) CD8 T cells expressed high levels of IL-17 and IL-23R in comparison with wild-type cells. Furthermore, IRF3(-/-) OT1 cells adoptively transferred into wild-type hosts also produced higher IL-17 levels upon immunization than their wild-type counterparts. This phenotype could be reversed by ectopic expression of IRF3, confirming that this effect is intrinsic to T cells. We show that IRF3 directly interacts with RORγt in the cytoplasm through its IRF interaction domain and limits its ability to bind and transactivate the IL-17 promoter. These observations uncover an unexpected role of IRF3 in the control of CD8 T-cell polarization. PMID:23918362

  4. CXCR4 and a cell-extrinsic mechanism control immature B lymphocyte egress from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Thomas C.; Gomes, Ana Cordeiro; Cyster, Jason G.

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte residence in lymphoid organs is controlled by a balance between retention and egress-promoting chemoattractants sensed by pertussis toxin (PTX)–sensitive Gαi protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we use two-photon intravital microscopy to show that immature B cell retention within bone marrow (BM) was strictly dependent on amoeboid motility mediated by CXCR4 and CXCL12 and by α4β1 integrin–mediated adhesion to VCAM-1. However, B lineage cell egress from BM is independent of PTX-sensitive GPCR signaling. B lineage cells expressing PTX rapidly exited BM even though their motility within BM parenchyma was significantly reduced. Our experiments reveal that when immature B cells are near BM sinusoids their motility is reduced, their morphology is predominantly rounded, and cells reverse transmigrate across sinusoidal endothelium in a largely nonamoeboid manner. Immature B cell egress from BM was dependent on a twofold CXCR4 down-regulation that was antagonized by antigen-induced BCR signaling. This passive mode of cell egress from BM also contributes significantly to the export of other hematopoietic cells, including granulocytes, monocytes, and NK cells, and is reminiscent of erythrocyte egress. PMID:25403444

  5. Who is really in control of skin immunity under physiological circumstances - lymphocytes, dendritic cells or keratinocytes?

    PubMed

    Schröder, J M; Reich, K; Kabashima, K; Liu, F T; Romani, N; Metz, M; Kerstan, A; Lee, P H A; Loser, K; Schön, M P; Maurer, M; Stoitzner, P; Beissert, S; Tokura, Y; Gallo, R L

    2006-11-01

    Our views of the skin immunity theatre are undergoing constant change. These not only reflect paradigm shifts in general immunology and skin biology, but also have profound clinical implications, which call for strategic changes in dermatological therapy. Nowhere can this be witnessed at a greater level of instructiveness and fascination than when addressing the question posed by this new Controversies feature. Thus, after a very long period of dominance by T cells and Langerhans cells as 'lead actors' on the skin immunity stage, the lowly keratinocyte has recently made an astounding theatrical appearance as a key protagonist of the innate skin immunity system, which may control even acquired skin immune responses. Further enhancing dramatic complexity and tension, the mast cell has entered as an additional actor claiming centre stage, and the epidermal Langerhans cell has slipped in a surprise appearance as the chief agent of immunotolerance. May you, esteemed reader, enjoy the spectacle offered here by selected immunodermatology authorities who double as 'stage managers' pushing their respective favourite actors into the limelight. You get everything you may expect from a good performance - complete with the impresario's overture that lures you into the theatre and sets the stage, competing divas, recently discovered new talents and even the critic's digest while the performance is still ongoing. By the time the curtain drops, you will have reached your own, independent conclusions on how to answer the title question of this play - at least for the time being... PMID:17002689

  6. Genetic Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Growth and Wood Quality Traits in Eucalyptus Grandis Using a Maternal Half-Sib Family and Rapd Markers

    PubMed Central

    Grattapaglia, D.; Bertolucci, FLG.; Penchel, R.; Sederoff, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping of forest productivity traits was performed using an open pollinated half-sib family of Eucalyptus grandis. For volume growth, a sequential QTL mapping approach was applied using bulk segregant analysis (BSA), selective genotyping (SG) and cosegregation analysis (CSA). Despite the low heritability of this trait and the heterogeneous genetic background employed for mapping. BSA detected one putative QTL and SG two out of the three later found by CSA. The three putative QTL for volume growth were found to control 13.7% of the phenotypic variation, corresponding to an estimated 43.7% of the genetic variation. For wood specific gravity five QTL were identified controlling 24.7% of the phenotypic variation corresponding to 49% of the genetic variation. Overlapping QTL for CBH, WSG and percentage dry weight of bark were observed. A significant case of digenic epistasis was found, involving unlinked QTL for volume. Our results demonstrate the applicability of the within half-sib design for QTL mapping in forest trees and indicate the existence of major genes involved in the expression of economically important traits related to forest productivity in Eucalyptus grandis. These findings have important implications for marker-assisted tree breeding. PMID:8913761

  7. Randomized controlled trials in relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Police, Rachel L; Trask, Peter C; Wang, Jianmin; Olivares, Robert; Khan, Shahnaz; Abbe, Adeline; Colosia, Ann; Njue, Annete; Sherrill, Beth; Ruiz-Soto, Rodrigo; Kaye, James A; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-04-01

    This systematic literature review with meta-analysis was conducted on the clinical efficacy and safety of interventions used in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We systematically searched databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase; 1997 to August 2, 2012), conference abstracts, bibliographic reference lists, recent reviews, and Clinicaltrials.gov. Primary efficacy outcomes were objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Safety end points were Grade 3/4 toxicities, serious adverse events, withdrawals because of toxicity, and deaths due to toxicity. Studies were selected if they were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting on the efficacy or safety of relapsed or refractory CLL and if outcomes for CLL were reported separately from trials that included other lymphoid neoplasms. We used the Bucher method for conducting adjusted indirect comparisons within a meta-analysis. We identified 6 RCTs of pharmacologic treatment for relapsed/refractory CLL. The most common drugs investigated (alone or in combination) were fludarabine and cyclophosphamide. When reported, median overall survival ranged from 27.3 to 52.9 months, and overall response rate from 58% to 82%. Although meta-analysis of efficacy results was considered, details are not presented because only 3 studies qualified and the common comparator treatment was not clinically relevant. The relatively small number of RCTs, few overlapping treatment arms, and variability in end points studied make it difficult to formally compare therapies for relapsed/refractory CLL. Significant variability in RCT features presents a further challenge to meaningful comparisons. Additional well-designed RCTs are needed to fully understand the relative efficacy and safety of older and more recently developed therapies. PMID:25445467

  8. Migratory and adhesive cues controlling innate-like lymphocyte surveillance of the pathogen-exposed surface of the lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Roth, Theodore L; Gray, Elizabeth E; Chen, Hsin; Rodda, Lauren B; Liang, Yin; Ventura, Patrick; Villeda, Saul; Crocker, Paul R; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) contain innate-like lymphocytes that survey the subcapsular sinus (SCS) and associated macrophages for pathogen entry. The factors promoting this surveillance behavior have not been defined. Here, we report that IL7RhiCcr6+ lymphocytes in mouse LNs rapidly produce IL17 upon bacterial and fungal challenge. We show that these innate-like lymphocytes are mostly LN resident. Ccr6 is required for their accumulation near the SCS and for efficient IL17 induction. Migration into the SCS intrinsically requires S1pr1, whereas movement from the sinus into the parenchyma involves the integrin LFA1 and its ligand ICAM1. CD169, a sialic acid-binding lectin, helps retain the cells within the sinus, preventing their loss in lymph flow. These findings establish a role for Ccr6 in augmenting innate-like lymphocyte responses to lymph-borne pathogens, and they define requirements for cell movement between parenchyma and SCS in what we speculate is a program of immune surveillance that helps achieve LN barrier immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18156.001 PMID:27487469

  9. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci and a candidate locus for freezing tolerance in controlled and outdoor environments in the overwintering crucifer Boechera stricta

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jae-Yun; Feng, Dongsheng; Niu, Xiaomu; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; van Tienderen, Peter H.; Tomes, Dwight; Schranz, M. Eric

    2015-01-01

    Development of chilling and freezing tolerance is complex and can be affected by photoperiod, temperature and photosynthetic performance; however, there has been limited research on the interaction of these three factors. We evaluated 108 recombinant inbred lines of Boechera stricta, derived from a cross between lines originating from Idaho and Colorado, under controlled Long-Day (LD), Short-Day (SD) and in an Outdoor Environment (OE). We measured maximum quantum yield of photosystem II, lethal temperature for 50% survival and electrolyte leakage of leaves. Our results revealed significant variation for chilling and freezing tolerance and photosynthetic performance in different environments. Using both single and multi-trait analyses, three main-effect Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) were identified. QTL on LG3 were SD-specific, whereas QTL on LG4 were found under both LD and SD. Under all conditions, QTL on LG7 were identified, but were particularly predictive for the Outdoor Experiment. The co-localization of photosynthetic performance and freezing tolerance effects supports these traits being co-regulated. Finally, the major QTL on LG7 is syntenic to the Arabidopsis CBF locus, known regulators of chilling and freezing responses in A. thaliana and other species. PMID:24811132

  10. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  11. COPD and levels of Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and Hsp27 (HSPB1) in plasma and lymphocytes among coal workers: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiuqing; Xing, Jingcai; Liu, Yuewei; Zhou, Yun; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Zhihong; Han, Wenhui; Wu, Tangchun; Chen, Weihong

    2015-05-01

    This case-control study aimed to investigate whether the levels of Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and Hsp27 (HSPB1) in plasma and lymphocytes were associated with the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among coal workers. A total of 76 COPD cases and 48 age-matched healthy controls from a group of coal workers were included. The case group consisted of 35 COPD patients whose condition was complicated with coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) and 41 COPD patients without CWP. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) in plasma and lymphocytes were detected by ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. Multiple logistic regression models were applied to estimate the association between Hsp levels and COPD risk. Our results showed that plasma Hsp70 and lymphocyte Hsp27 levels were significantly higher and plasma Hsp27 levels were significantly lower in COPD cases than in controls (p < 0.01). No significant differences in lymphocyte Hsp70 levels were found between COPD cases and the matched subjects. Higher plasma Hsp70 levels (odds ratio (OR) = 13.8, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 5.7-33.5) and lower plasma Hsp27 levels (OR = 4.6, 95 % CI = 2.0-10.5) were significantly associated with an increased risk of COPD after adjusting for confounders. Higher lymphocyte Hsp27 levels were only associated with an increased risk of COPD with CWP (OR = 6.6, 95 % CI = 2.0-22.1) but not with an increased risk of COPD without CWP (OR = 3.0, 95 % CI = 0.9-8.9). Additionally, there were strong joint effects of different Hsps on COPD risk. These results showed that higher levels of plasma Hsp70 and lower levels of plasma Hsp27 might be associated with an increased risk of COPD among coal workers. They may have the potential to serve as monitoring markers for COPD in coal workers. PMID:25620081

  12. Peripheral blood B lymphocytes derived from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension express a different RNA pattern compared with healthy controls: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Silvia; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima; Huber, Lars C; Speich, Rudolf; Voelkel, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a progressive and still incurable disease. Research of IPAH-pathogenesis is complicated by the lack of a direct access to the involved tissue, the human pulmonary vasculature. Various auto-antibodies have been described in the blood of patients with IPAH. The purpose of the present work was therefore to comparatively analyze peripheral blood B lymphocyte RNA expression characteristics in IPAH and healthy controls. Methods Patients were diagnosed having IPAH according to WHO (mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥ 25 mmHg, pulmonary capillary occlusion pressure ≤ 15 mmHg, absence of another explaining disease). Peripheral blood B-lymphocytes of patients and controls were immediately separated by density gradient centrifugation and magnetic beads for CD19. RNA was thereafter extracted and analyzed by the use of a high sensitivity gene chip (Affymetrix HG-U133-Plus2) able to analyze 47000 transcripts and variants of human genes. The array data were analyzed by two different softwares, and up-and down-regulations were defined as at least 1.3 fold with standard deviations smaller than fold-changes. Results Highly purified B-cells of 5 patients with IPAH (mean pulmonary artery pressure 51 ± 13 mmHg) and 5 controls were analyzed. Using the two different analyzing methods we found 225 respectively 128 transcripts which were up-regulated (1.3–30.7 fold) in IPAH compared with healthy controls. Combining both methods, there were 33 overlapping up-regulated transcripts and no down-regulated B-cell transcripts. Conclusion Patients with IPAH have a distinct RNA expression profile of their peripheral blood B-lymphocytes compared to healthy controls with some clearly up-regulated genes. Our finding suggests that in IPAH patients B cells are activated. PMID:18269757

  13. Constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB activity preserves homeostasis of quiescent mature lymphocytes and granulocytes by controlling the expression of distinct Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Fabrice; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Jaspar, Fabrice; Minner, Frédéric; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre; Merville, Marie-Paule; Bours, Vincent; Lekeux, Pierre

    2002-05-15

    Constitutive nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity protects quiescent mature immune cells from spontaneous apoptosis. Here, we examined whether NF-kappaB exerts its antiapoptotic function in these cells through the control of Bcl-2 family proteins. Specific pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-kappaB were used to achieve total NF-kappaB inactivation in quiescent human blood lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes. NF-kappaB inhibition induced drastic lymphocyte and granulocyte apoptosis, but only moderate monocyte apoptosis. T- and B-cell apoptosis was slow and associated with a gradual down-regulation of the prosurvival Bcl-2 family proteins Bcl-x(L) and Bcl-2, respectively. By contrast, granulocyte apoptosis was fast and accompanied by a rapid cellular accumulation of Bcl-x(S), the proapoptotic Bcl-x isoform that is generated from alternative splicing of the bcl-x pre-mRNA. Finally, antisense bcl-x(L) and bcl-2 knockdown in T and B cells, respectively, and induction of Bcl-x(S) expression in granulocytes through antisense oligonucleotide-mediated redirection of bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing were sufficient to induce significant apoptosis in these cells. Taken together, these results reveal that basal NF-kappaB activity preserves homeostasis of quiescent mature lymphocytes and granulocytes through regulation of distinct members of the Bcl-2 family. This study sheds light on the constitutive mechanisms by which NF-kappaB maintains defense integrity. PMID:11986224

  14. Deciphering the conserved genetic loci implicated in plant disease control through comparative genomics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad J; Ran, Chao; Liu, Ke; Ryu, Choong-Min; Rasmussen-Ivey, Cody R; Williams, Malachi A; Hassan, Mohammad K; Choi, Soo-Keun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Newman, Molli; Kloepper, Joseph W; Liles, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    To understand the growth-promoting and disease-inhibiting activities of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains, the genomes of 12 Bacillus subtilis group strains with PGPR activity were sequenced and analyzed. These B. subtilis strains exhibited high genomic diversity, whereas the genomes of B. amyloliquefaciens strains (a member of the B. subtilis group) are highly conserved. A pairwise BLASTp matrix revealed that gene family similarity among Bacillus genomes ranges from 32 to 90%, with 2839 genes within the core genome of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. Comparative genomic analyses of B. amyloliquefaciens strains identified genes that are linked with biological control and colonization of roots and/or leaves, including 73 genes uniquely associated with subsp. plantarum strains that have predicted functions related to signaling, transportation, secondary metabolite production, and carbon source utilization. Although B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains contain gene clusters that encode many different secondary metabolites, only polyketide biosynthetic clusters that encode difficidin and macrolactin are conserved within this subspecies. To evaluate their role in plant pathogen biocontrol, genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis were deleted in a B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain, revealing that difficidin expression is critical in reducing the severity of disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in tomato plants. This study defines genomic features of PGPR strains and links them with biocontrol activity and with host colonization. PMID:26347755

  15. Deciphering the conserved genetic loci implicated in plant disease control through comparative genomics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Ran, Chao; Liu, Ke; Ryu, Choong-Min; Rasmussen-Ivey, Cody R.; Williams, Malachi A.; Hassan, Mohammad K.; Choi, Soo-Keun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Newman, Molli; Kloepper, Joseph W.; Liles, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the growth-promoting and disease-inhibiting activities of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains, the genomes of 12 Bacillus subtilis group strains with PGPR activity were sequenced and analyzed. These B. subtilis strains exhibited high genomic diversity, whereas the genomes of B. amyloliquefaciens strains (a member of the B. subtilis group) are highly conserved. A pairwise BLASTp matrix revealed that gene family similarity among Bacillus genomes ranges from 32 to 90%, with 2839 genes within the core genome of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. Comparative genomic analyses of B. amyloliquefaciens strains identified genes that are linked with biological control and colonization of roots and/or leaves, including 73 genes uniquely associated with subsp. plantarum strains that have predicted functions related to signaling, transportation, secondary metabolite production, and carbon source utilization. Although B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains contain gene clusters that encode many different secondary metabolites, only polyketide biosynthetic clusters that encode difficidin and macrolactin are conserved within this subspecies. To evaluate their role in plant pathogen biocontrol, genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis were deleted in a B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain, revealing that difficidin expression is critical in reducing the severity of disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in tomato plants. This study defines genomic features of PGPR strains and links them with biocontrol activity and with host colonization. PMID:26347755

  16. Changes in human lymphocyte subpopulations in tonsils and regional lymph nodes of human head and neck squamous carcinoma compared to control lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Rubio, Berta; Sanchez-Carril, Marta; Oliver-Morales, Josefina; González-Femandez, África; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    Background Lymphoid tissues constitute basic structures where specific immune responses take place. This leads to the development of germinal centres (GCs), migration of cells and the generation of memory cells. Here, we have compared human tumour reactive lymph nodes and tonsils with control lymph nodes. Results The study by flow cytometry shows that in control lymph nodes the majority of cells were naive T-lymphocytes (CD45RA+/CD7+). In reactive nodes, although the percentage of CD45RO+ T cells remains constant, there is an increase in the number of B-lymphocytes, and a reduction in naive T cells. The percentage of cells expressing CD69 was similar in reactive nodes and in controls. In both cases, we have found two populations of B cells of either CD69- or CD69dull. Two populations of T cells, which are either negative for CD69 or express it in bright levels (CD69bright), were also found. The analysis of tissue sections by confocal microscopy revealed differences between control, tonsils and tumor reactive lymph nodes. In control lymph nodes, CD19 B cells are surrounded by a unique layer of CD69bright/CD45RO+ T cells. GCs from tonsils and from tumour reactive nodes are mainly constituted by CD19 B cells and have four distinct layers. The central zone is composed of CD69- B cells surrounded by CD69bright/CD45RO+ T cells. The mantle region has basically CD69dull B-lymphocytes and, finally, there is an outer zone with CD69-/CD45RO+ T cells. Conclusions Human secondary lymphoid organs react with an increase in the proportion of B lymphocytes and a decrease in the number of CD45RA+ T cells (naive). In tonsils, this is due to chronic pathogen stimulation, whereas in lymph nodes draining head and neck carcinomas the reaction is prompted by surrounded tumors. During this process, secondary lymphoid organs develop secondary follicles with a special organization of T and B cells in consecutive layers, that are described here by confocal microscopy. This pattern of cellular

  17. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Root and Shoot Traits Associated with Drought Tolerance in a Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Recombinant Inbred Line Population

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Omar; Udupa, Sripada M.; De Keyser, Ellen; McGee, Rebecca J.; Coyne, Clarice J.; Saha, Gopesh C.; Muehlbauer, Fred J.; Van Damme, Patrick; De Riek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding programs. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) analysis on 132 lentil recombinant inbred lines based on greenhouse experiments for root and shoot traits during two seasons under progressive drought-stressed conditions. Eighteen QTLs controlling a total of 14 root and shoot traits were identified. A QTL-hotspot genomic region related to a number of root and shoot characteristics associated with drought tolerance such as dry root biomass, root surface area, lateral root number, dry shoot biomass and shoot length was identified. Interestingly, a QTL (QRSratioIX-2.30) related to root-shoot ratio, an important trait for drought avoidance, explaining the highest phenotypic variance of 27.6 and 28.9% for the two consecutive seasons, respectively, was detected. This QTL was closed to the co-dominant SNP marker TP6337 and also flanked by the two SNP TP518 and TP1280. An important QTL (QLRNIII-98.64) related to lateral root number was found close to TP3371 and flanked by TP5093 and TP6072 SNP markers. Also, a QTL (QSRLIV-61.63) associated with specific root length was identified close to TP1873 and flanked by F7XEM6b SRAP marker and TP1035 SNP marker. These two QTLs were detected in both seasons. Our results could be used for marker-assisted selection in lentil breeding programs targeting root and shoot characteristics conferring drought avoidance as an efficient alternative to slow and labor-intensive conventional breeding methods. PMID:27602034

  18. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Root and Shoot Traits Associated with Drought Tolerance in a Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Recombinant Inbred Line Population.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Omar; Udupa, Sripada M; De Keyser, Ellen; McGee, Rebecca J; Coyne, Clarice J; Saha, Gopesh C; Muehlbauer, Fred J; Van Damme, Patrick; De Riek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding programs. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) analysis on 132 lentil recombinant inbred lines based on greenhouse experiments for root and shoot traits during two seasons under progressive drought-stressed conditions. Eighteen QTLs controlling a total of 14 root and shoot traits were identified. A QTL-hotspot genomic region related to a number of root and shoot characteristics associated with drought tolerance such as dry root biomass, root surface area, lateral root number, dry shoot biomass and shoot length was identified. Interestingly, a QTL (QRSratioIX-2.30) related to root-shoot ratio, an important trait for drought avoidance, explaining the highest phenotypic variance of 27.6 and 28.9% for the two consecutive seasons, respectively, was detected. This QTL was closed to the co-dominant SNP marker TP6337 and also flanked by the two SNP TP518 and TP1280. An important QTL (QLRNIII-98.64) related to lateral root number was found close to TP3371 and flanked by TP5093 and TP6072 SNP markers. Also, a QTL (QSRLIV-61.63) associated with specific root length was identified close to TP1873 and flanked by F7XEM6b SRAP marker and TP1035 SNP marker. These two QTLs were detected in both seasons. Our results could be used for marker-assisted selection in lentil breeding programs targeting root and shoot characteristics conferring drought avoidance as an efficient alternative to slow and labor-intensive conventional breeding methods. PMID:27602034

  19. Application of a New Method for GWAS in a Related Case/Control Sample with Known Pedigree Structure: Identification of New Loci for Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tore, Silvia; Casula, Stefania; Casu, Giuseppina; Concas, Maria Pina; Pistidda, Paola; Persico, Ivana; Sassu, Alessandro; Maestrale, Giovanni Battista; Mele, Caterina; Caruso, Maria Rosa; Bonerba, Bibiana; Usai, Paolo; Deiana, Ivo; Thornton, Timothy; Pirastu, Mario; Forabosco, Paola

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to large GWA studies based on thousands of individuals and large meta-analyses combining GWAS results, we analyzed a small case/control sample for uric acid nephrolithiasis. Our cohort of closely related individuals is derived from a small, genetically isolated village in Sardinia, with well-characterized genealogical data linking the extant population up to the 16th century. It is expected that the number of risk alleles involved in complex disorders is smaller in isolated founder populations than in more diverse populations, and the power to detect association with complex traits may be increased when related, homogeneous affected individuals are selected, as they are more likely to be enriched with and share specific risk variants than are unrelated, affected individuals from the general population. When related individuals are included in an association study, correlations among relatives must be accurately taken into account to ensure validity of the results. A recently proposed association method uses an empirical genotypic covariance matrix estimated from genome-screen data to allow for additional population structure and cryptic relatedness that may not be captured by the genealogical data. We apply the method to our data, and we also investigate the properties of the method, as well as other association methods, in our highly inbred population, as previous applications were to outbred samples. The more promising regions identified in our initial study in the genetic isolate were then further investigated in an independent sample collected from the Italian population. Among the loci that showed association in this study, we observed evidence of a possible involvement of the region encompassing the gene LRRC16A, already associated to serum uric acid levels in a large meta-analysis of 14 GWAS, suggesting that this locus might lead a pathway for uric acid metabolism that may be involved in gout as well as in nephrolithiasis. PMID:21283782

  20. Stimulation of human tonsillar lymphocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Oettgen, H. F.; Silber, R.; Miescher, P. A.; Hirschhorn, K.

    1966-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro behaviour of cultured human tonsillar lymphocytes. In comparison with peripheral blood lymphocytes these cells show a higher degree of formation of large cells and mitoses in control cultures without any additive. They behave in a manner similar to peripheral blood lymphocytes when cultured with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), streptolysin S (SLS) and specific antigens. The only exception is a lack of response to streptolysin O (SLO). PMID:5916348

  1. QTL meta-analysis provides a comprehensive view of loci controlling partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in four sources of resistance in pea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    the moderately low diversity of loci controlling partial resistance to A. euteiches in four main sources of resistance in pea. Seven highly consistent genomic regions with potential use in marker-assisted-selection were identified. Confidence intervals at several main QTL regions were reduced and co-segregation among resistance and morphological/phenological alleles was identified. Further work will be required to identify the best combinations of QTL for durably increasing partial resistance to A. euteiches. PMID:23497245

  2. Increased transendothelial migration of scleroderma lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stummvoll, G; Aringer, M; Grisar, J; Steiner, C; Smolen, J; Knobler, R; Graninger, W

    2004-01-01

    Background: CD4+ T lymphocytes play an important part in the pathogenesis of scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, SSc) and predominate in perivascular SSc skin lesions. Both soluble and membrane bound adhesion molecules are overexpressed in SSc, possibly influencing lymphocyte/endothelial cell (EC) contact. Objective: To assess the transendothelial migration capacity of peripheral lymphocytes in vitro. Patients and methods: Collagen was covered with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients and matched healthy controls (HC) were added in parallel experiments. Before and after fractionated harvest of non-adherent, bound, and migrated lymphocytes, the CD4/CD8 ratio and the lymphocytic expression of activation markers and adhesion molecules were analysed by fluorocytometry. Results: 13 (SD 12)% of the SSc PBMC migrated compared with only 5 (5)% HC PBMC (p<0.0002); this increase was primarily due to the migration of CD3+ T lymphocytes and mainly to a larger proportion of CD4+ cells within this CD3+ fraction (71 (SD 14)% for SSc v 56 (14)% for HC, p<0.03), leading to an increased CD4/CD8 ratio among migrated SSc lymphocytes in comparison with controls (3.3 (1.5) v 1.62 (0.93), p<0.006). Among migrated SSc CD4+ T lymphocytes, the frequency of HLA-DR+ cells was increased; migrated lymphocytes highly expressed the adhesion molecules CD11a, CD49d, CD29, and CD44. Conclusion: Transendothelial migration of CD4+ T lymphocytes is enhanced in SSc, and migrating cells exhibit an activated phenotype. The data suggest that activated CD3+CD4+ lymphocytes as found in SSc peripheral blood are prone to transvascular migration, thus contributing to the formation of typical perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates. PMID:15082489

  3. Lymphocyte apoptosis in murine Pneumocystis pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xin; LeCapitaine, Nicole J; Rudner, Xiaowen L; Ruan, Sanbao; Shellito, Judd E

    2009-01-01

    Background Apoptosis of lymphocytes is important in the termination of an immune response to infection but has also been shown to have detrimental effects in animal models of systemic infection and sepsis. We sought to characterize lymphocyte apoptosis in an animal model of pneumonia due to Pneumocystis murina, an infection localized to the lungs. Methods Control mice and mice depleted of CD4+ lymphocytes were inoculated with Pneumocystis. Apoptosis of lung and spleen lymphocytes was assayed by flow cytometry and PCR assay of apoptotic proteins. Results In control mice, apoptosis of lung lymphocytes was maximal just after the infection was cleared from lung tissue and then declined. However, in CD4-depleted mice, apoptosis was also upregulated in recruited lymphocytes in spite of progressive infection. In splenic lymphocytes, apoptosis was observed early at 1 week after inoculation and then declined. Apoptosis of lung lymphocytes in control mice was associated with a decrease in mRNA for Bcl-2 and an increase in mRNA for Bim. In CD4-depleted mice, lavaged CD8+ cells did change intracellular Bcl-2 but showed increased mRNA for Bim. Conclusion Apoptosis of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary lymphocytes is part of the normal host response to Pneumocystis but is also triggered in CD4-deficient animals with progressive infection. In normal mice apoptosis of pulmonary lymphocytes may serve to terminate the immune response in lung tissue. Apoptosis of lung lymphocytes takes place via both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways and is associated with changes in both pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. PMID:19558669

  4. T lymphocytes redirected against the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 control the growth of multiple solid tumors both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Geldres, Claudia; Savoldo, Barbara; Hoyos, Valentina; Caruana, Ignazio; Zhang, Ming; Yvon, Eric; Vecchio, Michele Del; Creighton, Chad J; Ittmann, Michael; Ferrone, Soldano; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Because of its high expression on various types of tumors and its restricted distribution in normal tissues, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (CSPG4) represents an attractive target for the antibody-based therapy of several solid tumors. We tested whether T cells transduced with a CSPG4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) inhibited the growth of CSPG4-expressing tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We first independently validated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) the expression of CSPG4 in an extensive panel of tumor arrays and normal tissues as well as queried public gene expression profiling datasets of human tumors. We constructed a second generation CSPG4-specific CAR also encoding the CD28 costimulatory endodomain (CAR.CSPG4). We then evaluated human T lymphocytes expressing this CAR for their ex vivo and in vivo anti-tumor activity against a broad panel of solid tumors. Results IHC showed that CSPG4 is highly expressed in melanoma, breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and mesothelioma. In addition, in silico analysis of microarray expression data identified other important potential tumors expressing this target, including glioblastoma, clear cell renal carcinoma and sarcomas. T lymphocytes genetically modified with a CSPG4-CAR controlled tumor growth in vitro and in vivo in NSG mice engrafted with human melanoma, HNSCC and breast carcinoma cell lines. Conclusions CAR.CSPG4-redirected T cells should provide an effective treatment modality for a variety of solid tumors. PMID:24334762

  5. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    MedlinePlus

    CLL; Leukemia - chronic lymphocytic (CLL) ... Byrd JC, Flynn JM. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  6. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  7. Major Loci on Chromosomes 8q and 3q Control Interferon γ Production Triggered by Bacillus Calmette-Guerin and 6-kDa Early Secretory Antigen Target, Respectively, in Various Populations

    PubMed Central

    Jabot-Hanin, Fabienne; Cobat, Aurélie; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Grange, Ghislain; Remus, Natascha; Poirier, Christine; Boland-Auge, Anne; Besse, Céline; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Hoal, Eileen G.; Delacourt, Christophe; Abel, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background. Interferon γ (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) provide an in vitro measurement of antimycobacterial immunity that is widely used as a test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. IGRA outcomes are highly heritable in various populations, but the nature of the involved genetic factors remains unknown. Methods. We conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis of IGRA phenotypes in families from a tuberculosis household contact study in France and a replication study in families from South Africa to confirm the loci identified. Results. We identified a major locus on chromosome 8q controlling IFN-γ production in response to stimulation with live bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG; LOD score, 3.81; P = 1.40 × 10−5). We also detected a second locus, on chromosome 3q, that controlled IFN-γ levels in response to stimulation with 6-kDa early secretory antigen target, when accounting for the IFN-γ production shared with that induced by BCG (LOD score, 3.72; P = 1.8 × 10−5). Both loci were replicated in South African families, where tuberculosis is hyperendemic. These loci differ from those previously identified as controlling the response to the tuberculin skin test (TST1 and TST2) and the production of TNF-α (TNF1). Conclusions. The identification of 2 new linkage signals in populations of various ethnic origins living in different M. tuberculosis exposure settings provides new clues about the genetic control of human antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:26690346

  8. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  9. Combination of Targeted Drugs to Control Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Harnessing the Power of New Monoclonal Antibodies in Combination With Ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Paula; Langerbeins, Petra; Hallek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The landscape of treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia is rapidly changing at present. Considerable improvement has been achieved with the introduction of the anti-CD20 antibodies, and chemoimmunotherapy has now become an established standard for patients without the high-risk features del(17p)/TP53 mutation. Also, the outcome of patients with these adverse genetic aberrations was dramatically improved with the introduction of the kinase inhibitors ibrutinib and idelalisib. Different combinations of these and additional novel agents are currently evaluated in clinical trials. The combination of the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib with an anti-CD20 antibody is an attractive option, because both drugs act synergistically: ibrutinib redistributes the CLL cells from their homing organs to the peripheral blood, and obinutuzumab eliminates the leukemic cells in the blood with particular efficiency. Adding the Bcl-2 antagonist venetoclax could further intensify the treatment of CLL. This combination might hold the potential to achieve a deep remission with an eradication of residual CLL cells and thus lead to long-term remissions of CLL. PMID:26841018

  10. Response of lymphocytes to a mitogenic stimulus during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Several studies were performed that demonstrate that immunological activities of lymphocytes can be affected by spaceflight or by models that attempt to simulate some aspects of weightlessness. Included among these are the responses of lymphocytes to external stimuli such as mitogens and viruses. When cultures of lymphocytes were flown in space, the ability of the lymphocytes to respond to mitogens was inhibited. Similar results were obtained when lymphocytes from astronauts or animals just returned from space were placed into culture immediately upon return to earth, and when models of hypogravity were used. Lymphocytes placed in culture during spaceflights produced enhanced levels of interferon compared to control cultures. When cultures of lymphocytes were prepared for cosmonauts or rodents immediately upon return to earth, interferon production was inhibited. These results suggest that space flight can have profound effects on lymphocyte function, and that effects on isolated cells may be different from that on cells in the whole organism.

  11. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  12. Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  13. Remote Symbolic Computation of Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abanades, Miguel A.; Escribano, Jesus; Botana, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a web-based tool designed to compute certified equations and graphs of geometric loci specified using standard Dynamic Geometry Systems (DGS). Complementing the graphing abilities of the considered DGS, the equations of the loci produced by the application are remotely computed using symbolic algebraic techniques from the…

  14. Lymphocyte Functions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diane; Sundaresan, A.; Cooper, D.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of immunity impairment in space it is important to analyze the direct effects of space-related conditions on different lymphocytes functions. Since 1992, we are investigating the effect of modeled and true microgravity (MG) on numerous lymphocyte functions. We had shown that modeled (MMG) and true microgravity inhibit lymphocyte locomotion through type I collagen. Modeled microgravity also suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Polyclonal activation of lymphocytes prior to exposure to MMG abrogates the MG-induced inhibition of lymphocyte locomotion. The relationship between activation deficits and the loss of locomotion in MG was investigated using PKC activation by phorbol ester (PMA) and calcium ionophore (ionomycin). Direct activation of PKC by PMA substantially restored the MMG-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion and PHA-induced lymphocyte activation lonomycin by itself did not restore either locomotion or activation of the lymphocytes, indicating that these changes are not related to the impairment in the calcium flux in MMG. Treatment of lymphocytes with PMA before exposure to MMG prevented the loss of locomotion. It was observed that DNA synthesis is not necessary for restoration of locomotion since mitomicin C treated and untreated cells recovered their locomotion to the same level after PKC activation. Our recent data indicate that microgravity may selectively effect the expression of novel Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC, in particularly PKC sigma and delta. This provides a new insight in understanding of the mechanisms of MG-sensitive cellular functions.

  15. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Genetic Damage by HCMV in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes from a Brain Tumor Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, Elizabeth A.; Lopez, Mirtha S.; Monroy, Claudia M.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Etzel, Carol J.; Albrecht, Thomas; Bondy, Melissa L.; El-Zein, Randa A.

    2010-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection occurs early in life and viral persistence remains through life. An association between HCMV infection and malignant gliomas has been reported, suggesting that HCMV may play a role in glioma pathogenesis and could facilitate an accrual of genotoxic damage in the presence of γ-radiation; an established risk factor for gliomas. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV infection modifies the sensitivity of cells to γ-radiation-induced genetic damage. We used peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 110 glioma patients and 100 controls to measure the level of chromosome damage and cell death. We evaluated baseline, HCMV-, γ-radiation and HCMV + γ-radiation induced genetic instability with the comprehensive Cytokinesis-Blocked Micronucleus Cytome (CBMN-CYT). HCMV, similar to radiation, induced a significant increase in aberration frequency among cases and controls. PBLs infected with HCMV prior to challenge with γ-radiation led to a significant increase in aberrations as compared to baseline, γ-radiation and HCMV alone. With regards to apoptosis, glioma cases showed a lower percentage of induction following in vitro exposure to γ-radiation and HCMV infection as compared to controls. This strongly suggests that, HCMV infection enhances the sensitivity of PBLs to γ-radiation-induced genetic damage possibly through an increase in chromosome damage and decrease in apoptosis. PMID:24281077

  16. Blood lymphocyte subpopulations in breast cancer patients following radiotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, B; Wasserman, J; Blomgren, H; Baral, E

    1977-01-01

    Both T and non-T lymphocytes decreased immediately following radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. The relative depletion of non-T lymphocytes, however, was more marked than that of T cells. 3 years later the number and the proportion of non-T lymphocytes was higher than immediately after radiotherapy, while T lymphocytes were still depressed. The proportion of cells with membrane-associated Ig was higher in patients 3 years following radiotherapy than in non-treated patients and healthy controls. There was no difference in the proportion of T and non-T lymphocytes between patients with and without metastases, respectively. PMID:330065

  17. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Antigen Receptor-Intrinsic Non-Self: The Key to Understanding Regulatory Lymphocyte-Mediated Idiotypic Control of Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The clone-specific or idiotypic characters of B as well as T cell antigen receptors (BCRs/TCRs) are associated with (1) the third-complementarity-determining regions (CDR3s) that are created during V(D)J recombination (they scarcely occur in antibody light chains) and (2) BCR idiotopes created by somatic hypermutations (SHMs) during immune responses. Therefore, BCR/TCR idiotypic sites are antigen receptor-intrinsic Non-Self (AgR-iNS) portions that fulfill two tasks: serving as a crucial component of the epitope-binding paratope and serving as target sites for anti-idiotypic BCR/TCR paratopes of other anti-Non-Self clones that are contained in both normal repertoires. The antigen-induced immune response is thus directed not only toward the environmental stimulus but also against the AgR-iNS portions of the directly and further activated clones that form a subsiding idiotypic cascade. These idiotypic chain reactions form a completely integrated idiotypic control circuit among B and T cells which contains all regulatory T and B cells. However, this circuit cannot be viewed as a network of fixed interacting nodes but rather uses the genetic Self as reference. Hence, AgR-iNS offers a mechanistic understanding of regulatory lymphocyte-mediated idiotypic control of adaptive immune responses and reconciles clonal selection and idiotypic network theories hitherto believed to be incompatible. PMID:27480901

  19. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  20. Lenalidomide and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Early-Stage Asymptomatic Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. Type 1 diabetes risk for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3 haplotypes depends on genotypic context: association of DPB1 and HLA class I loci among DR3- and DR4-matched Italian patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Noble, Janelle A; Martin, Adelle; Valdes, Ana M; Lane, Julie A; Galgani, Andrea; Petrone, Antonio; Lorini, Renata; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Erlich, Henry A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-DQ genotypes for type 1 diabetes (T1D) were compared with HLA-matched controls to evaluate T1D risk for other HLA loci, including HLA-A, -B, -Cw, and DPB1. Patients (n = 133) with high-risk genotypes (DR3/DR3, DR3/DR4, DR4/DR4) were selected from the Lazio (Rome) region of Italy. Screening of more than 9000 patients from the Lazio region and northern Italy yielded 162 controls with high-T1D-risk haplotypes. Although the overall distributions did not differ significantly, allele frequency differences were discovered between the controls from Lazio and controls from northern Italy for some alleles previously determined to affect T1D risk, such as A*3002, DPB1*0301, and DPB1*0402. Therefore, Lazio patient data were compared both with the Lazio subset of controls (n = 53) and with the entire group of controls for association analyses. Significant allele frequency differences between patients and DR-DQ-matched controls existed for specific alleles at all loci. Data for the DR3/DR3 subset of patients and controls demonstrated an increase of Cw*0702 in patients. Compared with controls, reduced patient frequencies were seen for several alleles, including A*0101, B*0801, and Cw*0701, all on the highly conserved, extended DR3 haplotype known as 8.1 in DR3/DR3, but not DR3/DR4, subgroup. DPB1*0101, often reported on 8.1 haplotypes, was also less frequent in DR3/DR3 patients than controls. Analysis of family-based data from the HBDI repository was consistent with the observed results from the Italian patients, indicating the presence of a T1D-protective locus at or near A*0101 and a second T1D-protective locus at or near DPB1*0101. These data indicate that T1D risk conferred by the 8.1 haplotype is genotype dependent. PMID:18486765

  2. Core 2 branching beta1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase and high endothelial venule-restricted sulfotransferase collaboratively control lymphocyte homing.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Kawashima, Hiroto; Petryniak, Bronislawa; Nakayama, Jun; Mitoma, Junya; Marth, Jamey D; Lowe, John B; Fukuda, Minoru

    2004-01-23

    L-selectin mediates lymphocyte homing by facilitating lymphocyte adhesion to carbohydrate ligands expressed on high endothelial venules (HEV) of the secondary lymphoid organs. Previous studies demonstrated that L-selectin ligand sulfotransferase (LSST) forms 6-sulfo sialyl Lewis x (sLe(x)) on both core 2 branch and MECA-79-positive extended core 1 O-glycans, but the chemical nature and roles of HEV ligands elaborated by LSST and core 2 beta1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-1 (Core2GlcNAcT) have been undefined. In the present study, we have generated mutant mice with deficient LSST and show that inactivation of LSST gene alone leads to only partial impairment of lymphocyte homing to peripheral lymph nodes and moderate reduction in lymphocyte counts in the peripheral lymph nodes, despite the fact that L-selectin ligands that contain 6-sulfo sLe(x) are reduced at HEV. By contrast, LSST/Core2GlcNAcT double null mice exhibited a markedly reduced lymphocyte homing and reduced lymphocyte counts as a result of significantly decreased 6-sulfo sLe(x) on HEV L-selectin counterreceptors, relative to LSST- or Core2GlcNAcT-single null mice. Moreover, induction of LSST and Core2GlcNAcT transcripts was observed in HEV-like structure formed in the salivary gland of the non-obese diabetic mouse, which displays chronic inflammation. These results indicate that LSST and Core2GlcNAcT cooperatively synthesize HEV-specific L-selectin ligands required for lymphocyte homing and suggest that LSST and Core2GlcNAcT play a critical role in lymphocyte trafficking during chronic inflammation. PMID:14593101

  3. Association of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4 (CTLA4) Gene Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Children and Adults: Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ting, Wei-Hsin; Chien, Ming-Nan; Lo, Fu-Sung; Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Chi-Yu; Lin, Chiung-Ling; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chang, Tzu-Yang; Yang, Horng-Woei; Chen, Wei-Fang; Lien, Ya-Ping; Cheng, Bi-Wen; Lin, Chao-Hsu; Chen, Chia-Ching; Wu, Yi-Lei; Hung, Chen-Mei; Li, Hsin-Jung; Chan, Chon-In; Lee, Yann-Jinn

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves disease (GD) and Hashimoto disease (HD), is an organ-specific autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component. Although the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) polymorphism has been reported to be associated with AITD in adults, few studies have focused on children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the CTLA4 polymorphisms, including -318C/T (rs5742909), +49A/G (rs231775), and CT60 (rs3087243), were associated with GD and HD in Han Chinese adults and children. We studied 289 adult GD, 265 pediatric GD, 229 pediatric HD patients, and 1058 healthy controls and then compared genotype, allele, carrier, and haplotype frequencies between patients and controls. We found that CTLA4 SNPs +49A/G and CT60 were associated with GD in adults and children. Allele G of +49A/G was significantly associated with GD in adults (odds ratio [OR], 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-1.84; corrected P value [Pc] < 0.001) and children (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.15-1.77; Pc = 0.002). Allele G of CT60 also significantly increased risk of GD in adults (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.27-2.09; Pc < 0.001) and GD in children (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.22-2.04; Pc < 0.001). Significant linkage disequilibrium was found between +49A/G and CT60 in GD and control subjects (D' = 0.92). Our results showed that CTLA4 was associated with both GD and HD and played an equivalent role in both adult and pediatric GD in Han Chinese population. PMID:27111218

  4. Association of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4 (CTLA4) Gene Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Children and Adults: Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Fu-Sung; Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Chi-Yu; Lin, Chiung-Ling; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chang, Tzu-Yang; Yang, Horng-Woei; Chen, Wei-Fang; Lien, Ya-Ping; Cheng, Bi-Wen; Lin, Chao-Hsu; Chen, Chia-Ching; Wu, Yi-Lei; Hung, Chen-Mei; Li, Hsin-Jung; Chan, Chon-In; Lee, Yann-Jinn

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves disease (GD) and Hashimoto disease (HD), is an organ-specific autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component. Although the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) polymorphism has been reported to be associated with AITD in adults, few studies have focused on children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the CTLA4 polymorphisms, including -318C/T (rs5742909), +49A/G (rs231775), and CT60 (rs3087243), were associated with GD and HD in Han Chinese adults and children. We studied 289 adult GD, 265 pediatric GD, 229 pediatric HD patients, and 1058 healthy controls and then compared genotype, allele, carrier, and haplotype frequencies between patients and controls. We found that CTLA4 SNPs +49A/G and CT60 were associated with GD in adults and children. Allele G of +49A/G was significantly associated with GD in adults (odds ratio [OR], 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21–1.84; corrected P value [Pc] < 0.001) and children (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.15–1.77; Pc = 0.002). Allele G of CT60 also significantly increased risk of GD in adults (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.27–2.09; Pc < 0.001) and GD in children (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.22–2.04; Pc < 0.001). Significant linkage disequilibrium was found between +49A/G and CT60 in GD and control subjects (D’ = 0.92). Our results showed that CTLA4 was associated with both GD and HD and played an equivalent role in both adult and pediatric GD in Han Chinese population. PMID:27111218

  5. T and B lymphocytes in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Itoyama, Y; Kawanami, S; Goto, I; Kuroiwa, Y

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from seventeen non-thymectomized and nine thymectomized patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and thirteen healthy controls were examined for the presence of surface markers characteristic of T and B lymphocytes by rosette formation with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). T cells were identified by their capacity to spontaneously form rosettes with SRBCs. The percentage of B lymphocytes was determined by the erythrocyte antibody complement (EAC) rosette-forming test. The EAC complex was prepared with either whole rabbit anti-SRBC serum or with the IgM fraction of rabbit anti-SRBC serum. The two kind of erythrocyte complement rosette-forming cells (EAC-RFC) are designated erythrocyte-haemolysin-complement RFC (EA(H)C-RFC), and erythrocyte-IgM-complement RFC (EA(M)C-RFC). The percentage of total lymphocytes and T cells was not altered in MG patients. The percentage of 'active' T cells, which have been considered to be more actively involved in cellular immunity, was also similar in MG patients and controls. A significant increase in EA(H)C-RFC occurred in both thymectomized and non-thymectomized MG patients, while in B cells detected by EA(M)C-RFC no alterations were found. The increase in EA(H)C-RFC in lymphocytes from MG patients may be due to an increase in the 19S antibody-forming B lymphocytes or to an increase in T cells which have Fc receptors on their surface. PMID:315844

  6. Increased mitogenic response in lymphocytes from chronically centrifuged mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Otfried; Hunzinger, E.; Cogoli, Augusto; Bechler, B.; Lee, J.; Moore, J.; Duke, J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects upon the mitogenic response of splenic lymphocytes when exposing mice to prolonged hypergravity conditions (3.5 G for 1 year) were studied. Cultures of splenic lymphocytes isolated from both centrifuged and control (1 G) animals were stimulated with Concanavalin A and the response measured using both morphological and biochemical means. Lymphocytes obtained from centrifuged mice exhibited much higher activation rates (as measured by the incorporation of H-3 thymidine) and larger cell aggregates consisting of more lymphoblasts and mitotic figures than those observed in non centrifuged control animals. Isolated splenic lymphocytes thus appear to have been conditioned by hypergravity state.

  7. Evolution of V genes from the TRV loci of mammals.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, David N; Gambón-Cerdá, Santiago; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Information concerning the evolution of T lymphocyte receptors (TCR) can be deciphered from that part of the molecule that recognizes antigen presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC), namely the variable (V) regions. The genes that code for these variable regions are found within the TCR loci. Here, we describe a study of the evolutionary origin of V genes that code for the α and β chains of the TCR loci of mammals. In particular, we demonstrate that most of the 35 TRAV and 25 TRBV conserved genes found in Primates are also found in other Eutheria, while in Marsupials, Monotremes, and Reptiles, these genes diversified in a different manner. We also show that in mammals, all TRAV genes are derived from five ancestral genes, while all TRBV genes originate from four such genes. In Reptiles, the five TRAV and three out of the four TRBV ancestral genes exist, as well as other V genes not found in mammals. We also studied the TRGV and TRDV loci from all mammals, and we show a relationship of the TRDV to the TRAV locus throughout evolutionary time. PMID:26024913

  8. Regulation of Lymphocyte Function by Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Joel; Cekic, Caglar

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine regulates the interaction between lymphocytes and the vasculature and is important for controlling lymphocyte trafficking in response to tissue injury or infection. Adenosine can blunt the effects of T cell receptor (TCR) activation primarily by activating adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) and signaling via cyclic AMP and protein kinase A (PKA). PKA reduces proximal TCR signaling by phosphorylation of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). PKA activation can either enhance or inhibit the survival of T cells depending on the strength and duration of signaling. Inducible enzymes such as CD73 and CD39 regulate adenosine formation and degradation in vivo. The extravasation of lymphocytes through blood vessels is influenced by A2AR-mediated suppression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM) expression on lymphocytes and diminished production of IFNγ and IFNγ-inducible chemokines that are chemotactic to activated lymphocytes. Adenosine also decreases the barrier function of vascular endothelium by activating A2BRs. In sum, adenosine signaling is influenced by tissue inflammation and injury through induction of receptors and enzymes and has generally inhibitory effects on lymphocyte migration into inflamed tissues due to PKA-mediated effects on adhesion molecules, IFNγ production and endothelial barrier function. PMID:22772752

  9. Rat dendritic cells function as accessory cells and control the production of a soluble factor required for mitogenic responses of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Klinkert, W E; LaBadie, J H; O'Brien, J P; Beyer, C F; Bowers, W E

    1980-01-01

    Transformation of T lymphocytes, induced by treatment with periodate or with neuraminidase plus galactose oxidase, requires the participation of accessory cells. Procedures were developed for the fractionation of rat lymph node cells, by which most of the lymphocytes can be recovered as a major population of cells that do not respond to mitogenic stimulation unless accessory cells from a separated minor population are added. Further purification led to a 1000-fold overall increase in accessory activity per cell, with a 50-70% yield. The purest preparations were virtually free of macrophages and contained more than 90% typical dendritic cells. Maximum responses occurred at a ratio of only one dendritic cell per 200 periodate-treated lymphocytes. This evidence thus indicates strongly that in rats, dendritic cells--not macrophages--function as accessory cells. Further, the number of dendritic cells in a preparation governed the magnitude of the mitogenic response and was limiting in the case of unfractionated lymph node cells. In addition, when oxidized with periodate or with neuraminidase plus galactose oxidase, the dendritic cell served as a very potent indirect stimulator of untreated responder lymphocytes. Both functions of the dendritic cell appeared to lack species specificity, since mouse dendritic cells were very active when tested with rat responder lymphocytes. A soluble factor (accessory cell-replacing factor), produced by cultures of lymph node or spleen cells subjected to oxidative mitogenesis, enabled otherwise unresponsive mitogen-treated lymphocytes to respond. Dendritic cells were required for the production of this factor but may not be solely responsible for its production. Images PMID:6968911

  10. Vaccine-elicited memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes contribute to Mamu-A*01-associated control of simian/human immunodeficiency virus 89.6P replication in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Michael S; Santra, Sampa; Newberg, Michael H; Philippon, Valerie; Manson, Kelledy; Xu, Ling; Gelman, Rebecca S; Panicali, Dennis; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J; Letvin, Norman L

    2005-04-01

    The expression of particular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I alleles can influence the rate of disease progression following lentiviral infections. This effect is a presumed consequence of potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses that are restricted by these MHC class I molecules. The present studies have examined the impact of the MHC class I allele Mamu-A*01 on simian/human immunodeficiency virus 89.6P (SHIV-89.6P) infection in unvaccinated and vaccinated rhesus monkeys by exploring the contribution of dominant-epitope specific CTL in this setting. Expression of Mamu-A*01 in immunologically naive monkeys was not associated with improved control of viral replication, CD4+ T-lymphocyte loss, or survival. In contrast, Mamu-A*01+ monkeys that had received heterologous prime/boost immunizations prior to challenge maintained higher CD4+ T-lymphocyte levels and better control of SHIV-89.6P replication than Mamu-A*01- monkeys. This protection was associated with the evolution of high-frequency anamnestic CTL responses specific for a dominant Mamu-A*01-restricted Gag epitope following infection. These data indicate that specific MHC class I alleles can confer protection in the setting of a pathogenic SHIV infection by their ability to elicit memory CTL following vaccination. PMID:15795244

  11. Fine mapping of eight psoriasis susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayantan; Stuart, Philip E; Ding, Jun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Li, Yanming; Tsoi, Lam C; Chandran, Vinod; Fischer, Judith; Helms, Cynthia; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Voorhees, John J; Bowcock, Anne M; Krueger, Gerald G; Lathrop, G Mark; Nair, Rajan P; Rahman, Proton; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gladman, Dafna; Elder, James T

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have identified 41 independent genome-wide significant psoriasis susceptibility loci. After our first psoriasis genome-wide association study, we designed a custom genotyping array to fine-map eight genome-wide significant susceptibility loci known at that time (IL23R, IL13, IL12B, TNIP1, MHC, TNFAIP3, IL23A and RNF114) enabling genotyping of 2269 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the eight loci for 2699 psoriasis cases and 2107 unaffected controls of European ancestry. We imputed these data using the latest 1000 Genome reference haplotypes, which included both indels and SNPs, to increase the marker density of the eight loci to 49 239 genetic variants. Using stepwise conditional association analysis, we identified nine independent signals distributed across six of the eight loci. In the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, we detected three independent signals at rs114255771 (P = 2.94 × 10(-74)), rs6924962 (P = 3.21 × 10(-19)) and rs892666 (P = 1.11 × 10(-10)). Near IL12B we detected two independent signals at rs62377586 (P = 7.42 × 10(-16)) and rs918518 (P = 3.22 × 10(-11)). Only one signal was observed in each of the TNIP1 (rs17728338; P = 4.15 × 10(-13)), IL13 (rs1295685; P = 1.65 × 10(-7)), IL23A (rs61937678; P = 1.82 × 10(-7)) and TNFAIP3 (rs642627; P = 5.90 × 10(-7)) regions. We also imputed variants for eight HLA genes and found that SNP rs114255771 yielded a more significant association than any HLA allele or amino-acid residue. Further analysis revealed that the HLA-C*06-B*57 haplotype tagged by this SNP had a significantly higher odds ratio than other HLA-C*06-bearing haplotypes. The results demonstrate allelic heterogeneity at IL12B and identify a high-risk MHC class I haplotype, consistent with the existence of multiple psoriasis effectors in the MHC. PMID:25182136

  12. Fine mapping of eight psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayantan; Stuart, Philip E; Ding, Jun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Li, Yanming; Tsoi, Lam C; Chandran, Vinod; Fischer, Judith; Helms, Cynthia; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Voorhees, John J; Bowcock, Anne M; Krueger, Gerald G; Lathrop, G Mark; Nair, Rajan P; Rahman, Proton; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gladman, Dafna; Elder, James T

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have identified 41 independent genome-wide significant psoriasis susceptibility loci. After our first psoriasis genome-wide association study, we designed a custom genotyping array to fine-map eight genome-wide significant susceptibility loci known at that time (IL23R, IL13, IL12B, TNIP1, MHC, TNFAIP3, IL23A and RNF114) enabling genotyping of 2269 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the eight loci for 2699 psoriasis cases and 2107 unaffected controls of European ancestry. We imputed these data using the latest 1000 Genome reference haplotypes, which included both indels and SNPs, to increase the marker density of the eight loci to 49 239 genetic variants. Using stepwise conditional association analysis, we identified nine independent signals distributed across six of the eight loci. In the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, we detected three independent signals at rs114255771 (P=2.94 × 10−74), rs6924962 (P=3.21 × 10−19) and rs892666 (P=1.11 × 10−10). Near IL12B we detected two independent signals at rs62377586 (P=7.42 × 10−16) and rs918518 (P=3.22 × 10−11). Only one signal was observed in each of the TNIP1 (rs17728338; P=4.15 × 10−13), IL13 (rs1295685; P=1.65 × 10−7), IL23A (rs61937678; P=1.82 × 10−7) and TNFAIP3 (rs642627; P=5.90 × 10−7) regions. We also imputed variants for eight HLA genes and found that SNP rs114255771 yielded a more significant association than any HLA allele or amino-acid residue. Further analysis revealed that the HLA-C*06-B*57 haplotype tagged by this SNP had a significantly higher odds ratio than other HLA-C*06-bearing haplotypes. The results demonstrate allelic heterogeneity at IL12B and identify a high-risk MHC class I haplotype, consistent with the existence of multiple psoriasis effectors in the MHC. PMID:25182136

  13. Use of the clonal assay for the measurement of frequencies of HPRT mutants in T-lymphocytes from five control populations.

    PubMed

    Tates, A D; van Dam, F J; van Mossel, H; Schoemaker, H; Thijssen, J C; Woldring, V M; Zwinderman, A H; Natarajan, A T

    1991-10-01

    The clonal assay was used to measure frequencies of 6-thioguanine-resistant (HPRT) T-lymphocytes in 111 donors from the following 5 control populations: 55 adult healthy volunteers; 20 untreated cancer patients; 8 healthy hospital workers serving as controls for 9 hospital workers sterilizing equipment with ethylene oxide; 15 factory workers serving as controls for 15 workers occupationally exposed to high doses of ethylene oxide; 13 pretreatment samples from donors undergoing a diagnostic test with Technetium-99m for an analysis of heart function. With respect to mutant frequency (MF), cloning efficiency (CE) and age distribution, the first 4 populations were identical. The Technetium group had significantly higher MFs and lower CEs but this can be attributed to the higher mean age of this group. Using the total data base, we calculated the following relationships between MF, CE, age and smoking: (1) ln MF = 4.23-0.63 x ln CE indicating that a doubling of the CE has the effect of decreasing the MF by 37%, (2) ln MF = 0.71 + 0.03 x age meaning that the MF increases by 3% from one year to the next, (3) ln CE = 4.87-0.04 X age indicating that the CE decreases by 0.98% from one year to the next, (4) ln MF = 3.25-0.52 x ln CE + 0.02 X age being the equation quantifying the interrelationship between MF, CE and age, (5) ln MF = 3.32-0.56 x ln CE + 0.01 x age + 0.31 s (where s = 1 for smokers and s = 0 for nonsmokers). Using the latter equation, which allows for effects of CE and age on the MF, a statistically significant effect of smoking could be established. For any combination of CE and age smoking has the effect of increasing the MF by 36%. The above conclusions and calculations remain essentially the same when donors with cloning efficiencies lower than 10 or 20% are excluded from the data base. PMID:1922146

  14. Lymphocyte Surface Markers and Serum Immunoglobulins in Persons with Down's Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Hann, Hie-Won L.

    1979-01-01

    Distributions of the serum immunoglobulins (IgM), of T and B lymphocytes, and subpopulations of B lymphocytes were studied in children and institutionalized adults with Down's syndrome and appropriate mentally retarded controls. (Author)

  15. Comprehensive Survey of miRNA-mRNA Interactions Reveals That Ccr7 and Cd247 (CD3 zeta) are Posttranscriptionally Controlled in Pancreas Infiltrating T Lymphocytes of Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Claudia; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T.; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Passos, Geraldo A.

    2015-01-01

    In autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), auto-reactive clones of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the periphery evolve into pancreas-infiltrating T lymphocytes (PILs), which destroy insulin-producing beta-cells through inflammatory insulitis. Previously, we demonstrated that, during the development of T1D in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a set of immune/inflammatory reactivity genes were differentially expressed in T lymphocytes. However, the posttranscriptional control involving miRNA interactions that occur during the evolution of thymocytes into PILs remains unknown. In this study, we postulated that miRNAs are differentially expressed during this period and that these miRNAs can interact with mRNAs involved in auto-reactivity during the progression of insulitis. To test this hypothesis, we used NOD mice to perform, for the first time, a comprehensive survey of miRNA and mRNA expression as thymocytes mature into peripheral CD3+ T lymphocytes and, subsequently, into PILs. Reconstruction of miRNA-mRNA interaction networks for target prediction revealed the participation of a large set of miRNAs that regulate mRNA targets related to apoptosis, cell adhesion, cellular regulation, cellular component organization, cellular processes, development and the immune system, among others. The interactions between miR-202-3p and the Ccr7 chemokine receptor mRNA or Cd247 (Cd3 zeta chain) mRNA found in PILs are highlighted because these interactions can contribute to a better understanding of how the lack of immune homeostasis and the emergence of autoimmunity (e.g., T1D) can be associated with the decreased activity of Ccr7 or Cd247, as previously observed in NOD mice. We demonstrate that these mRNAs are controlled at the posttranscriptional level in PILs. PMID:26606254

  16. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  17. In vitro effects of flunarizine on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Brohée, D; Piro, P; Kennes, B; Nève, P

    1986-01-01

    Flunarizine, a slow-channel calcium entry blocker used as a vasodilator, interferes in vitro with human lymphocyte functions. It prevents lymphocytes from capping sheep erythrocytes, an effect which is probably due to the disconnection of the membrane from its cytoskeletal control. Flunarizine antagonizes both colchicine and cytochalasin B effects upon capping. Although the mitogen-induced lymphocyte stimulation has been shown to be sensitive to calcium depletion or calcium entry blocking by Verapamil, an enhanced response to phytohaemagglutinin A was observed with flunarizine. This suggests a differential sensitivity of the lymphocytes to calcium-entry blockers. PMID:3731875

  18. Spare PRELI Gene Loci: Failsafe Chromosome Insurance?

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Roberto; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca; Blackburn, Michael R.; Martinez-Valdez, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins encode conserved N-terminal mitochondrial signal domains and C-terminal (A/TAEKAK) motif repeats, long-presumed to confer cell resistance to stress and death cues. This prompted the hypothesis that LEA proteins are central to mitochondria mechanisms that connect bioenergetics with cell responses to stress and death signaling. In support of this hypothesis, recent studies have demonstrated that mammalian LEA protein PRELI can act as a biochemical hub, which upholds mitochondria energy metabolism, while concomitantly promoting B cell resistance to stress and induced death. Hence, it is important to define in vivo the physiological relevance of PRELI expression. Methods and Findings Given the ubiquitous PRELI expression during mouse development, embryo lethality could be anticipated. Thus, conditional gene targeting was engineered by insertion of flanking loxP (flox)/Cre recognition sites on PRELI chromosome 13 (Chr 13) locus to abort its expression in a tissue-specific manner. After obtaining mouse lines with homozygous PRELI floxed alleles (PRELIf/f), the animals were crossed with CD19-driven Cre-recombinase transgenic mice to investigate whether PRELI inactivation could affect B-lymphocyte physiology and survival. Mice with homozygous B cell-specific PRELI deletion (CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI−/−) bred normally and did not show any signs of morbidity. Histopathology and flow cytometry analyses revealed that cell lineage identity, morphology, and viability were indistinguishable between wild type CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI+/+ and CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI−/− deficient mice. Furthermore, B cell PRELI gene expression seemed unaffected by Chr13 PRELI gene targeting. However, identification of additional PRELI loci in mouse Chr1 and Chr5 provided an explanation for the paradox between LEA-dependent cytoprotection and the seemingly futile consequences of Chr 13 PRELI gene inactivation. Importantly, PRELI expression from spare

  19. Subsets of T lymphocytes in relation to T lymphocyte function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J C; Hawkins, S A; Swallow, M W; Lyttle, J A; Patterson, V H; Merrett, J D; Haire, M

    1985-01-01

    T lymphocyte control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of autologous B lymphocytes was examined in parallel to the enumeration of subpopulations of mononuclear cells in 22 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and in 22 healthy individuals. All were seropositive for EBV. The incidence of lack of T cell control was significantly higher in patients than in controls, confirming previous published work. In the present study, we have shown in addition a significantly reduced proportion of OKT8+ cells and a significantly increased ratio of OKT4/OKT8 cells in the group of patients with lack of control. The findings point to abnormal immunoregulation in MS. PMID:3000660

  20. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Scarfò, Lydia; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Ghia, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is the most common leukaemia among the adults in the Western World. CLL (and the corresponding nodal entity small lymphocytic lymphoma, SLL) is classified as a lymphoproliferative disorder characterised by the relentless accumulation of mature B-lymphocytes showing a peculiar immunophenotype in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen. CLL clinical course is very heterogeneous: the majority of patients follow an indolent clinical course with no or delayed treatment need and with a prolonged survival, while others experience aggressive disease requiring early treatment followed by frequent relapses. In the last decade, the improved understanding of CLL pathogenesis shed light on premalignant conditions (i.e., monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, MBL), defined new prognostic and predictive markers, improving patient stratification, but also broadened the therapeutic armamentarium with novel agents, targeting fundamental signaling pathways. PMID:27370174

  1. Cyclophosphamide, Alvocidib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With High Risk B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-10

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  2. Unlinked genetic loci control the reduced transcription of aminopeptidase N 1 and 3 in the European corn borer and determine tolerance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystalline (Cry) toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) control insect feeding damage on crop plants via foliar applications or by expression within transgenic plants, but continued Bt use is threatened by the buildup of insect resistance traits. Aminopeptidase N (apn) gene family members encode m...

  3. Discovery of six new susceptibility loci and analysis of pleiotropic effects in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Irwanto, Astrid; Fu, Xi'an; Yu, Gongqi; Yu, Yongxiang; Sun, Yonghu; Wang, Chuan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Okada, Yukinori; Low, Huiqi; Li, Yi; Liany, Herty; Chen, Mingfei; Bao, Fangfang; Li, Jinghui; You, Jiabao; Zhang, Qilin; Liu, Jian; Chu, Tongsheng; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Wang, Na; Niu, Guiye; Liu, Dianchang; Yu, Xiulu; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Hongqing; Zhou, Guizhi; Rotzschke, Olaf; Chen, Shumin; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Furen

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have led to the discovery of several susceptibility loci for leprosy with robust evidence, providing biological insight into the role of host genetic factors in mycobacterial infection. However, the identified loci only partially explain disease heritability, and additional genetic risk factors remain to be discovered. We performed a 3-stage GWAS of leprosy in the Chinese population using 8,313 cases and 16,017 controls. Besides confirming all previously published loci, we discovered six new susceptibility loci, and further gene prioritization analysis of these loci implicated BATF3, CCDC88B and CIITA-SOCS1 as new susceptibility genes for leprosy. A systematic evaluation of pleiotropic effects demonstrated a high tendency for leprosy susceptibility loci to show association with autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Further analysis suggests that molecular sensing of infection might have a similar pathogenic role across these diseases, whereas immune responses have discordant roles in infectious and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25642632

  4. Analysis of Lymphocytic DNA Damage in Early Multiple Sclerosis by Automated Gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 Foci Detection: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Ludwig; Heiserich, Lisa; Behrens, Janina Ruth; Lenz, Klaus; Pfuhl, Catherina; Wakonig, Katharina; Gieß, René Markus; Freitag, Erik; Eberle, Caroline; Wuerfel, Jens; Dörr, Jan; Bauer, Peter; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Paul, Friedemann; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Ruprecht, Klemens

    2016-01-01

    Background In response to DNA double-strand breaks, the histone protein H2AX becomes phosphorylated at its C-terminal serine 139 residue, referred to as γ-H2AX. Formation of γ-H2AX foci is associated with recruitment of p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1), a regulator of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks. γ-H2AX expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was recently proposed as a diagnostic and disease activity marker for multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective To evaluate the significance of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci in PBMCs as diagnostic and disease activity markers in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) using automated γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci detection. Methods Immunocytochemistry was performed on freshly isolated PBMCs of patients with CIS/early RRMS (n = 25) and healthy controls (n = 27) with γ-H2AX and 53BP1 specific antibodies. Nuclear γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci were determined using a fully automated reading system, assessing the numbers of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci per total number of cells and the percentage of cells with foci. Patients underwent contrast enhanced 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical examination including expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score. γ-H2AX and 53BP1 were also compared in previously frozen PBMCs of each 10 CIS/early RRMS patients with and without contrast enhancing lesions (CEL) and 10 healthy controls. Results The median (range) number of γ-H2AX (0.04 [0–0.5]) and 53BP1 (0.005 [0–0.2]) foci per cell in freshly isolated PBMCs across all study participants was low and similar to previously reported values of healthy individuals. For both, γ-H2AX and 53BP1, the cellular focus number as well as the percentage of positive cells did not differ between patients with CIS/RRMS and healthy controls. γ-H2AX and 53BP1 levels neither correlated with number nor volume of T2-weighted lesions on MRI, nor with the EDSS. Although γ-H2AX, but not

  5. Effect of spaceflight on lymphocyte proliferation and interleukin-2 production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Patricia V.; Konstantinova, Irina V.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Rakhmilevich, Alexandr L.; Lesniak, A. T.; Mastro, Andrea M.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, inguinal lymp node lymphocytes from rats flown on the Cosmos 2044 mission were tested for proliferation and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. Cells cultured with mitogenic lectins, phorbol ester, and calcium ionophore, or T-cell mitogen and lymphokine, were assayed for DNA synthesis by (H-3) thymidine incorporation. Lymphocytes incubated with a T-cell mitogen alone also were tested for IL-2 production. Proliferation of lymphocytes from flight rats was not significantly different from controls for any of the mitogens tested. Furthermore, lymph node lymphocytes from control and flown rats produced similar amounts of IL-23. Thus microgravity may act on lymphocytes in a tissue-specific manner, a new finding that could impact on the evaluation of spaceflight effects on immunocompetence.

  6. SHARPIN Regulates Uropod Detachment in Migrating Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rantakari, Pia; Auvinen, Kaisa; Karikoski, Marika; Mattila, Elina; Potter, Christopher; Sundberg, John P.; Hogg, Nancy; Gahmberg, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Sharpin-deficient mice display a multiorgan chronic inflammatory phenotype suggestive of altered leukocyte migration. We therefore studied the role of SHARPIN in lymphocyte adhesion, polarization and migration. We found that SHARPIN localizes to the trailing edges (uropods) of both mouse and human chemokine-activated lymphocytes migrating on ICAM-1, which is one of the major endothelial ligands for migrating leukocytes. SHARPIN-deficient cells adhere better to ICAM-1 and show highly elongated tails when migrating. The increased tail lifetime in SHARPIN-deficient lymphocytes decreases the migration velocity. The adhesion, migration and uropod defects in SHARPIN deficient lymphocytes were rescued by reintroducing SHARPIN into the cells. Mechanistically we show that SHARPIN interacts directly with LFA-1, a leukocyte counter-receptor for ICAM-1, and inhibits the expression of intermediate and high-affinity forms of LFA-1. Thus SHARPIN controls lymphocyte migration by endogenously maintaining LFA-1 inactive to allow adjustable detachment of the uropods in polarized cells. PMID:24210817

  7. Multiple loci affect genetic predisposition to hepatocarcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Manenti, G.; Gariboldi, M.; Canzian, F.

    1994-09-01

    The C3H/He mouse represents a good experimental model of genetic predispositoin to hepatocellular tumor development. We analyzed an interspecific test-cross population of 106 urethane-treated male (C3H/He x Mus spretus) x C57BL/6J mice, typed with 222 genetic markers to locate precisely the hepatocellular tumor susceptibility (Hcs) loci. Three regions, on chromosomes 2, 5, and 19, showed a significant linkage with hepatocellular tumor development, as indicated by different quantitative indexes estimating liver tumor size. Liver tumor frequency was not genetically controlled. These loci are different from three other Hcs loci that we have previously mapped in an F2 progeny of the C3H/He mouse crossed with the resistant laboratory strain A/J. The present result indicates a multigenic model of inheritance for hepatocellular tumor susceptibility.

  8. Two major quantitative trait loci controlling the number of seminal roots in maize co-map with the root developmental genes rtcs and rum1

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Silvio; Giuliani, Silvia; Ricciolini, Claudia; Carraro, Nicola; Maccaferri, Marco; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The genetic dissection of root architecture and functions allows for a more effective and informed design of novel root ideotypes and paves the way to evaluate their effects on crop resilience to a number of abiotic stresses. In maize, limited attention has been devoted to the genetic analysis of root architecture diversity at the early stage. The difference in embryonic (including seminal and primary) root architecture between the maize reference line B73 (which mostly develops three seminal roots) and the landrace Gaspé Flint (with virtually no seminal roots) was genetically dissected using a collection of introgression lines grown in paper rolls and pots. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified three QTLs controlling seminal root number (SRN) on chromosome bins 1.02, 3.07, and 8.04–8.05, which collectively explained 66% of the phenotypic variation. In all three cases, Gaspé Flint contributed the allele for lower SRN. Primary root dry weight was negatively correlated with SRN (r= −0.52), and QTLs for primary root size co-mapped with SRN QTLs, suggesting a pleiotropic effect of SRN QTLs on the primary root, most probably caused by competition for seed resources. Interestingly, two out of three SRN QTLs co-mapped with the only two known maize genes (rtcs and rum1) affecting the number of seminal roots. The strong additive effect of the three QTLs and the development of near isogenic lines for each QTL in the elite B73 background provide unique opportunities to characterize functionally the genes involved in root development and to evaluate how root architecture affects seedling establishment, early development, and eventually yield in maize. PMID:26880748

  9. Two major quantitative trait loci controlling the number of seminal roots in maize co-map with the root developmental genes rtcs and rum1.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Silvio; Giuliani, Silvia; Ricciolini, Claudia; Carraro, Nicola; Maccaferri, Marco; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Tuberosa, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    The genetic dissection of root architecture and functions allows for a more effective and informed design of novel root ideotypes and paves the way to evaluate their effects on crop resilience to a number of abiotic stresses. In maize, limited attention has been devoted to the genetic analysis of root architecture diversity at the early stage. The difference in embryonic (including seminal and primary) root architecture between the maize reference line B73 (which mostly develops three seminal roots) and the landrace Gaspé Flint (with virtually no seminal roots) was genetically dissected using a collection of introgression lines grown in paper rolls and pots. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified three QTLs controlling seminal root number (SRN) on chromosome bins 1.02, 3.07, and 8.04-8.05, which collectively explained 66% of the phenotypic variation. In all three cases, Gaspé Flint contributed the allele for lower SRN. Primary root dry weight was negatively correlated with SRN (r= -0.52), and QTLs for primary root size co-mapped with SRN QTLs, suggesting a pleiotropic effect of SRN QTLs on the primary root, most probably caused by competition for seed resources. Interestingly, two out of three SRN QTLs co-mapped with the only two known maize genes (rtcs and rum1) affecting the number of seminal roots. The strong additive effect of the three QTLs and the development of near isogenic lines for each QTL in the elite B73 background provide unique opportunities to characterize functionally the genes involved in root development and to evaluate how root architecture affects seedling establishment, early development, and eventually yield in maize. PMID:26880748

  10. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Keaton, Jacob M; Hellwege, Jacklyn N; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Pankow, James S; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der I; Taylor, Kent D; Rich, Stephen S; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Freedman, Barry I; Bowden, Donald W

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10-6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  11. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Keaton, Jacob M.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Pankow, James S.; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G.; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rich, Stephen S.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10−6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  12. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Yolanda; Blair, Aaron; Vermeulen, Roel; Cerhan, James R.; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Monnereau, Alain; Nieters, Alexandra; Clavel, Jacqueline; Call, Timothy G.; Maynadié, Marc; Lan, Qing; Clarke, Christina A.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Norman, Aaron D.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Casabonne, Delphine; Cocco, Pierluigi; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are two subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A number of studies have evaluated associations between risk factors and CLL/SLL risk. However, these associations remain inconsistent or lacked confirmation. This may be due, in part, to the inadequate sample size of CLL/SLL cases. Methods We performed a pooled analysis of 2440 CLL/SLL cases and 15186 controls from 13 case-control studies from Europe, North America, and Australia. We evaluated associations of medical history, family history, lifestyle, and occupational risk factors with CLL/SLL risk. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We confirmed prior inverse associations with any atopic condition and recreational sun exposure. We also confirmed prior elevated associations with usual adult height, hepatitis C virus seropositivity, living or working on a farm, and family history of any hematological malignancy. Novel associations were identified with hairdresser occupation (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.98) and blood transfusion history (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.66 to 0.94). We also found smoking to have modest protective effect (OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.99). All exposures showed evidence of independent effects. Conclusions We have identified or confirmed several independent risk factors for CLL/SLL supporting a role for genetics (through family history), immune function (through allergy and sun), infection (through hepatitis C virus), and height, and other pathways of immune response. Given that CLL/SLL has more than 30 susceptibility loci identified to date, studies evaluating the interaction among genetic and nongenetic factors are warranted. PMID:25174025

  13. Physiological implications of NTBI uptake by T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Jorge P.; Arezes, João; Dias, Vera; Oliveira, Susana; Vieira, Inês; Costa, Mónica; Vos, Matthijn; Carlsson, Anna; Rikers, Yuri; Rangel, Maria; Porto, Graça

    2014-01-01

    In iron overload disorders a significant fraction of the total iron circulates in the plasma as low molecular weight complexes not bound to transferrin, known as non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI). By catalyzing the formation of free radicals, NTBI accumulation results in oxidative stress and cellular damage, being a major cause of organ toxicity. NTBI is rapidly and preferentially cleared from circulation by the liver and the myocardium, the main disease targets in iron overload conditions. We have recently demonstrated that human peripheral blood T lymphocytes take up NTBI in vitro, with a pattern that resembles that of hepatocytes. Since T lymphocytes constitute a numerically important component of the circulating cell pool, these findings support a putative role for this cell type in the systemic protection against iron toxicity. Here we tested the hypothesis that the circulating peripheral blood T lymphocyte pool constitutes an important storage compartment for NTBI and is thus a modifier of NTBI deposition in target organs. First we show that NTBI uptake by human T lymphocytes increases the expression of the iron-storage protein ferritin and of the iron exporter ferroportin via an IRE-dependent mechanism. NTBI retention by T lymphocytes is shown to be critically controlled by the hepcidin-mediated modulation of ferroportin both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, the protective effect of T lymphocytes was tested by analyzing the patterns of iron accumulation in the T lymphocyte-deficient mouse model Foxn1nu before and after reconstitution with T lymphocytes by adoptive transfer. The results confirmed a significant increase of liver and pancreas iron accumulation in T lymphocyte-deficient mice. NTBI accumulation in the liver and spleen was prevented by reconstitution with syngeneic T lymphocytes. Altogether, our results demonstrate that T lymphocytes are important components of a circulating “NTBI storage compartment” and show its physiological relevance as a

  14. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  15. Role of interferon in lymphocyte recruitment into the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Issekutz, T.B.; Stoltz, J.M.; Webster, D.M.

    1986-05-01

    Large numbers of lymphocytes are recruited from the blood into sites of cutaneous DTH reactions. Our goal was to investigate the factors controlling this recruitment. /sup 111/In-labeled peritoneal exudate lymphocytes were injected iv and the accumulation of these cells in skin sites injected with a variety of stimuli, was used to measure lymphocyte recruitment in rats. Large numbers of lymphocytes migrated into vaccinia- and KLH-injected sites in sensitized animals, but only into the viral and not the KLH lesions in non-immune animals. Lymphocytes also migrated efficiently into sites injected with the alpha-interferon (IFN) inducers, uv-inactivated vaccinia virus and poly I:C, as well as into sites injected with IFN. In each case there was a dose-response relationship. Analysis of the kinetics of lymphocyte recruitment demonstrated that the peak rate of migration occurred most rapidly after the injection of IFN, later after poly I:C, and was slowest to be reached after vaccinia virus. Rabbit anti-IFN blocked the recruitment of lymphocytes by uv-inactivated vaccinia and by IFN. Histologically, all of these sites demonstrated a dense mononuclear cell infiltrate in the dermis. It is suggested that IFN may be an important mediator in the recruitment of lymphocytes into inflammatory reactions.

  16. Curcumin and Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage 0-II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  17. Tositumomab and Iodine I 131 Tositumomab in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Lymphoid Leukemia in Remission; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Seven new loci associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, Lars G; Chen, Wei; Schu, Matthew; Yaspan, Brian L; Yu, Yi; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zack, Donald J; Arakawa, Satoshi; Cipriani, Valentina; Ripke, Stephan; Igo, Robert P; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Sim, Xueling; Weeks, Daniel E; Guymer, Robyn H; Merriam, Joanna E; Francis, Peter J; Hannum, Gregory; Agarwal, Anita; Armbrecht, Ana Maria; Audo, Isabelle; Aung, Tin; Barile, Gaetano R; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Bird, Alan C; Bishop, Paul N; Branham, Kari E; Brooks, Matthew; Brucker, Alexander J; Cade, William H; Cain, Melinda S; Campochiaro, Peter A; Chan, Chi-Chao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chew, Emily Y; Chin, Kimberly A; Chowers, Itay; Clayton, David G; Cojocaru, Radu; Conley, Yvette P; Cornes, Belinda K; Daly, Mark J; Dhillon, Baljean; Edwards, Albert O; Evangelou, Evangelos; Fagerness, Jesen; Ferreyra, Henry A; Friedman, James S; Geirsdottir, Asbjorg; George, Ronnie J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Neel; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Harding, Simon P; Haritoglou, Christos; Heckenlively, John R; Holz, Frank G; Hughes, Guy; Ioannidis, John P A; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Joseph, Peronne; Jun, Gyungah; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Katsanis, Nicholas; N Keilhauer, Claudia; Khan, Jane C; Kim, Ivana K; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Kozak, Igor; Lee, Clara J; Lee, Kristine E; Lichtner, Peter; Lotery, Andrew J; Meitinger, Thomas; Mitchell, Paul; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Moore, Anthony T; Morgan, Denise J; Morrison, Margaux A; Myers, Chelsea E; Naj, Adam C; Nakamura, Yusuke; Okada, Yukinori; Orlin, Anton; Ortube, M Carolina; Othman, Mohammad I; Pappas, Chris; Park, Kyu Hyung; Pauer, Gayle J T; Peachey, Neal S; Poch, Olivier; Priya, Rinki Ratna; Reynolds, Robyn; Richardson, Andrea J; Ripp, Raymond; Rudolph, Guenther; Ryu, Euijung; Sahel, José-Alain; Schaumberg, Debra A; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Schwartz, Stephen G; Scott, William K; Shahid, Humma; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Silvestri, Giuliana; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Smith, R Theodore; Sobrin, Lucia; Souied, Eric H; Stambolian, Dwight E; Stefansson, Hreinn; Sturgill-Short, Gwen M; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Truitt, Barbara J; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vijaya, Lingam; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vithana, Eranga N; Webster, Andrew R; Wichmann, H-Erich; Winkler, Thomas W; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Alan F; Zelenika, Diana; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Kang; Klein, Michael L; Hageman, Gregory S; Lathrop, G Mark; Stefansson, Kari; Allikmets, Rando; Baird, Paul N; Gorin, Michael B; Wang, Jie Jin; Klaver, Caroline C W; Seddon, Johanna M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Iyengar, Sudha K; Yates, John R W; Swaroop, Anand; Weber, Bernhard H F; Kubo, Michiaki; Deangelis, Margaret M; Léveillard, Thierry; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Heid, Iris M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate the understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genome-wide association study, including >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 loci associated at P < 5 × 10(-8). These loci show enrichment for genes involved in the regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include seven loci with associations reaching P < 5 × 10(-8) for the first time, near the genes COL8A1-FILIP1L, IER3-DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9 and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNP genotypes from all loci showed similar ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  19. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Eun-Mi; Kittai, Adam; Tabbara, Imad A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common type of leukemia in adults, and while in early, asymptomatic stages treatment is not indicated, the threat to the quality of life and increased mortality of patients posed by more advanced-stage disease necessitate therapeutic intervention. Guidelines of when and how to treat are not well-established because CLL is a disease of the elderly and it is important to balance preservation of functional status and control of the disease. Advances in molecular and genetic profiling has led to the ability to identify sub-groups of patients with CLL whose disease may respond to selected therapy. This review discusses current standard therapies in the major sub-groups of CLL based on age and functional status, in both the front-line and relapsed/refractory settings. It also provides a concise review of novel agents that have shown considerable efficacy in CLL. PMID:26408673

  20. Quantitative diagnosis of lymphocytic myocarditis in forensic medicine.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Møller, Jesper; Banner, Jytte; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Baandrup, Ulrik Thorngren

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish quantitative diagnostic criteria for lymphocytic myocarditis on autopsy samples by using a stereological cell profile counting method. We quantified and compared the presence of lymphocytes and macrophages in myocardial autopsy specimens from 112 deceased individuals who had been diagnosed with myocarditis according to the Dallas criteria and 86 control subjects with morphologically normal hearts. We found the mean number to be 52.7 lymphocyte profiles/mm(2) (range 3.7-946; standard deviation 131) in the myocarditis group and 9.7 (range 2.1-25.9; standard deviation 4.6) in the control group. The cut-off value for the diagnosis of myocarditis was determined by calculating sensitivity plus specificity, which reached the highest combination at 13 lymphocyte profiles/mm(2) (sensitivity 68%; specificity 83%). A considerable proportion of subjects in both the myocarditis and control groups had lymphocyte profile counts below 30/mm(2), representing a diagnostic challenge due to the increased risk of creating false negative or false positive results. We found it practically impossible to obtain a reliable macrophage count. The present data add new important information on lymphocyte counts in inflamed and non-inflamed myocardium. We suggest a cut-off value in the range of 11-16 lymphocyte profiles/mm(2) for a reliable diagnosis of lymphocytic myocarditis from autopsy samples. To evaluate small inflammatory changes at low lymphocyte counts, a multidisciplinary approach should be implemented, in which diagnostic tools are used ancillary to histological examination. We advise against semi-quantification of macrophages based on cell profile counting. PMID:24631882

  1. Lymphocyte function in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanami, S; Kanaide, A; Itoyama, Y; Kuroiwa, Y

    1979-01-01

    Mitogen-induced blastoid transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with myasthenia gravis was studied using a microplate culture technique and evaluated with 3H-thymidine incorporation. It was found that both phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen responses decreased significantly in patients with myasthenia gravis. In myasthenic crisis, indices of stimulation by phytohaemagglutination became very low. The autologous plasma neither inhibited nor facilitated mitogenic responses of lymphocytes. The decreased mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes suggests that part of the T lymphocyte function is subnormal in myasthenia. PMID:490180

  2. Vorinostat, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  3. Is lymphocytic (hashimoto) thyroiditis associated with suicide?

    PubMed

    Cina, Stephen J; Perper, Joshua A

    2009-09-01

    The histologic diagnosis of lymphocytic (Hashimoto) thyroiditis requires lymphocytic inflammation of the thyroid gland in combination with Hourthle cell metaplasia of follicular epithelial cells. Clinically, this autoimmune process has been associated with hypothyroidism and psychiatric conditions including depression. This retrospective study was designed to quantify the incidence and severity of lymphocytic thyroiditis in a series of nonconsecutive suicides compared with a cohort of motor vehicle accident victim controls. Eighty-one suicide victims (61 male, 20 female; age range 13-79 years, average 43) were compared with 88 age and gender matched controls (64 males, 24 females; age range 19-85 years, average 36). The degree of lymphocytic inflammation of the thyroid gland was graded on a scale of 0 to 3 (0 = no inflammation, 1 = mild inflammation, 2-3 moderate-to-marked inflammation with Hourthle cell metaplasia). Slides from each case were reviewed while blinded to the cause and manner of death in each case. Of these 169 total cases, 8 (4.7%) received a score of 3, whereas additional 7 (4.1%) received a grade of 2. Eighty-six percent of all of the cases showed no significant inflammation and recorded a score of 0. Of the 81 suicides, 3 had a score of 3, and 3 had a score of 2 (combined incidence of 7.4%). Within the control group, 5 of 88 cases scored 3 and another 4 scored 2 (combined incidence = 10.2%). Three males and 5 females scored 3 with an age range of 23 to 63 years, average 42. Incidental data tabulated showed that 19% of suicide victims were on psychoactive medications compared with 6% in the motor vehicle accident control group. No one on this study was on thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Depression is strongly linked to suicide and lymphocytic thyroiditis may be a cause of depression. Based on this study, however, the presence of lymphocytic thyroiditis cannot be used as a histologic adjunct to discriminate between suicide and accident in

  4. MicroRNA-155 controls RB phosphorylation in normal and malignant B lymphocytes via the noncanonical TGF-β1/SMAD5 signaling module.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Daifeng; Aguiar, Ricardo C T

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) plays pleiotropic roles in the biology of normal and malignant B lymphocytes, including the modulation of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway via the targeting of SMAD5. However, the extent of the miR-155-mediated disruption of the TGF-β1/SMAD5 axis remains to be elucidated. To address this issue, we used the miR-155 knockout (KO) mouse and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines ectopically expressing miR-155. In the DLBCL models, expression of miR-155 blocked TGF-β1-mediated activation of the retinoblastoma protein (RB), decreasing the abundance of the inhibitory pRB-E2F1 complex and limiting G0/G1 arrest. Genetic knockdown of SMAD5, p15, or p21 recapitulated these effects, establishing a circuitry whereby the targeting of SMAD5 by miR-155 blunts the TGF-β1-induced transcription of p15 and p21, thus sustaining RB phosphorylation and inactivity. Next, we demonstrated that SMAD5 levels are elevated in mature B lymphocytes from the miR-155 KO mice, which display a heightened sensitivity to TGF-β1 characterized by suppression of RB phosphorylation and more pronounced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Our findings suggest that a miR-155-mediated perturbation of the RB/E2F axis may play a role in DLBCL pathogenesis, and contribute to the reduced number of germinal center B cells and impaired T cell-dependent antibody response found in the miR-155 KO mice. PMID:24136167

  5. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process. PMID:27514593

  6. Ten microsatellite loci from Zamia integrifolia (Zamiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten microsatellite loci isolated from Zamia integrifolia are described. All 10 are polymorphic, with three to ten alleles across 36 members of a single population from South Florida. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.067 to 1. Two loci depart significantly from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium, and exhibit het...

  7. Lymphocyte reactivity in patients with gonococcal urethritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, L; Sandström, E

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocyte reactivity to virulent gonococcal antigen T2 and the non-pathogenic Neisseria pharyngis (NPN) has been studied by using the 14C-thymidine uptake in cell cultures from 42 patients with gonococcal urethritis and from 18 controls. The DNA synthesis in cell cultures with T2 antigen was higher in 21 female patients than in the 18 controls. No differences in DNA synthesis were observed in antigen-stimulated cell cultures from patients with single or multiple infections, from patients with urogenital complication, or from controls. Gonococcal antibodies in the serum were detected by the gonococcal complement-fixation test (GCFT). A study of the possible correlation between the outcome of the serological test and the cellular response to gonococcal antigen showed that 14C-thymidine uptake in lymphocyte cultures from male patients with negative GCFT, stimulated with T2 antigen, was much lower than the thymidine uptake in stimulated cell cultures from all the other male and female patients (P less than 0.001). The DNA synthesis was higher in cell cultures from seronegative women than from seronegative men (P less than 0.01). A significant difference (P less than 0.01) was also noted in the lymphocyte reactivity to gonococcal antigen between controls and all patients, except in those men who gave negative results to the serological tests. There were no differences between these two groups with respect to the thymidine uptake in NPN-stimulated cell cultures. PMID:678955

  8. Decreased deformability of lymphocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Wen, Jun; Nguyen, John; Cachia, Mark A.; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the first study of stiffness/deformability changes of lymphocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, demonstrating that at the single cell level, leukemic metastasis progresses are accompanied by biophysical property alterations. A microfluidic device was utilized to electrically measure cell volume and transit time of single lymphocytes from healthy and CLL patients. The results from testing thousands of cells reveal that lymphocytes from CLL patients have higher stiffness (i.e., lower deformability), as compared to lymphocytes in healthy samples, which was also confirmed by AFM indentation tests. This observation is in sharp contrast to the known knowledge on other types of metastatic cells (e.g., breast and lung cancer cells) whose stiffness becomes lower as metastasis progresses.

  9. Human lymphocyte polymorphisms detected by quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.; Merril, C.R.

    1983-09-01

    A survey of 186 soluble lymphocyte proteins for genetic polymorphism was carried out utilizing two-dimensional electrophoresis of /sup 14/C-labeled phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocyte proteins. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited positional variation consistent with independent genetic polymorphism in a primary sample of 28 individuals. Each of these polymorphisms was characterized by quantitative gene-dosage dependence insofar as the heterozygous phenotype expressed approximately 50% of each allelic gene product as was seen in homozygotes. Patterns observed were also identical in monozygotic twins, replicate samples, and replicate gels. The three expected phenotypes (two homozygotes and a heterozygote) were observed in each of 10 of these polymorphisms while the remaining nine had one of the homozygous classes absent. The presence of the three phenotypes, the demonstration of gene-dosage dependence, and our own and previous pedigree analysis of certain of these polymorphisms supports the genetic basis of these variants. Based on this data, the frequency of polymorphic loci for man is: P . 19/186 . .102, and the average heterozygosity is .024. This estimate is approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the rate of polymorphism previously estimated for man in other studies using one-dimensional electrophoresis of isozyme loci. The newly described polymorphisms and others which should be detectable in larger protein surveys with two-dimensional electrophoresis hold promise as genetic markers of the human genome for use in gene mapping and pedigree analyses.

  10. Roles of the mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, NCLX, in B lymphocyte chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bongju; Takeuchi, Ayako; Hikida, Masaki; Matsuoka, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocyte chemotaxis plays important roles in immunological reactions, although the mechanism of its regulation is still unclear. We found that the cytosolic Na+-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux transporter, NCLX, regulates B lymphocyte chemotaxis. Inhibiting or silencing NCLX in A20 and DT40 B lymphocytes markedly increased random migration and suppressed the chemotactic response to CXCL12. In contrast to control cells, cytosolic Ca2+ was higher and was not increased further by CXCL12 in NCLX-knockdown A20 B lymphocytes. Chelating intracellular Ca2+ with BAPTA-AM disturbed CXCL12-induced chemotaxis, suggesting that modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ via NCLX, and thereby Rac1 activation and F-actin polymerization, is essential for B lymphocyte motility and chemotaxis. Mitochondrial polarization, which is necessary for directional movement, was unaltered in NCLX-knockdown cells, although CXCL12 application failed to induce enhancement of mitochondrial polarization, in contrast to control cells. Mouse spleen B lymphocytes were similar to the cell lines, in that pharmacological inhibition of NCLX by CGP-37157 diminished CXCL12-induced chemotaxis. Unexpectedly, spleen T lymphocyte chemotaxis was unaffected by CGP-37157 treatment, indicating that NCLX-mediated regulation of chemotaxis is B lymphocyte-specific, and mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ dynamics are more important in B lymphocytes than in T lymphocytes. We conclude that NCLX is pivotal for B lymphocyte motility and chemotaxis. PMID:27328625

  11. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  12. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Wren, Jonathan D; Harley, John B; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K

    2016-02-24

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,478 SLE cases and 12,656 controls from six East Asian cohorts to identify new SLE susceptibility loci and better localize known loci. We identified ten new loci and confirmed 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the new loci, the most significant locus was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta = 3.75 × 10(-117), odds ratio (OR) = 2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We identified the most likely functional variants at each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene expression data. Ten candidate variants are known to alter gene expression in cis or in trans. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B cell and T cell biology. The new loci, together with previously known loci, increase the explained heritability of SLE to 24%. The new loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics. PMID:26808113

  13. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22922229

  14. High-density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert M; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Using the Immunochip custom SNP array, which was designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed 11,475 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. We combined these data in a meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n = 2,363) and controls (n = 17,872). We identified 14 new susceptibility loci, 9 of which were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and five of which were specifically associated with disease that was positive for anticitrullinated peptide antibodies, bringing the number of confirmed rheumatoid arthritis risk loci in individuals of European ancestry to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at 6 loci and identified association to low-frequency variants at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analyses generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  15. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  16. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  17. B Lymphocytes in Multiple Sclerosis: Bregs and BTLA/CD272 Expressing-CD19+ Lymphocytes Modulate Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Piancone, Federica; Saresella, Marina; Marventano, Ivana; La Rosa, Francesca; Zoppis, Martina; Agostini, Simone; Longhi, Renato; Caputo, Domenico; Mendozzi, Laura; Rovaris, Marco; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    B lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) by secreting antibodies and producing cytokines. This latter function was analyzed in myelin olygodendrocyte protein (MOG)-stimulated CD19+ B lymphocytes of 71 MS patients with different disease phenotypes and 40 age-and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Results showed that: 1) CD19+/TNFα+, CD19+/IL-12+ and CD19+/IFNγ+ lymphocytes are significantly increased in primary progressive (PP) compared to secondary progressive (SP), relapsing-remitting (RR), benign (BE) MS and HC; 2) CD19+/IL-6+ lymphocytes are significantly increased in PP, SP and RR compared to BEMS and HC; and 3) CD19+/IL-13+, CD19+/IL-10+, and CD19+/IL-10+/TGFβ+ (Bregs) B lymphocytes are reduced overall in MS patients compared to HC. B cells expressing BTLA, a receptor whose binding to HVEM inhibits TcR-initiated cytokine production, as well as CD19+/BTLA+/IL-10+ cells were also significantly overall reduced in MS patients compared to HC. Analyses performed in RRMS showed that fingolimod-induced disease remission is associated with a significant increase in Bregs, CD19+/BTLA+, and CD19+/BTLA+/IL-10+ B lymphocytes. B lymphocytes participate to the pathogenesis of MS via the secretion of functionally-diverse cytokines that might play a role in determining disease phenotypes. The impairment of Bregs and CD19+/BTLA+ cells, in particular, could play an important pathogenic role in MS. PMID:27412504

  18. B Lymphocytes in Multiple Sclerosis: Bregs and BTLA/CD272 Expressing-CD19+ Lymphocytes Modulate Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Piancone, Federica; Saresella, Marina; Marventano, Ivana; La Rosa, Francesca; Zoppis, Martina; Agostini, Simone; Longhi, Renato; Caputo, Domenico; Mendozzi, Laura; Rovaris, Marco; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    B lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) by secreting antibodies and producing cytokines. This latter function was analyzed in myelin olygodendrocyte protein (MOG)-stimulated CD19+ B lymphocytes of 71 MS patients with different disease phenotypes and 40 age-and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Results showed that: 1) CD19+/TNFα+, CD19+/IL-12+ and CD19+/IFNγ+ lymphocytes are significantly increased in primary progressive (PP) compared to secondary progressive (SP), relapsing-remitting (RR), benign (BE) MS and HC; 2) CD19+/IL-6+ lymphocytes are significantly increased in PP, SP and RR compared to BEMS and HC; and 3) CD19+/IL-13+, CD19+/IL-10+, and CD19+/IL-10+/TGFβ+ (Bregs) B lymphocytes are reduced overall in MS patients compared to HC. B cells expressing BTLA, a receptor whose binding to HVEM inhibits TcR-initiated cytokine production, as well as CD19+/BTLA+/IL-10+ cells were also significantly overall reduced in MS patients compared to HC. Analyses performed in RRMS showed that fingolimod-induced disease remission is associated with a significant increase in Bregs, CD19+/BTLA+, and CD19+/BTLA+/IL-10+ B lymphocytes. B lymphocytes participate to the pathogenesis of MS via the secretion of functionally-diverse cytokines that might play a role in determining disease phenotypes. The impairment of Bregs and CD19+/BTLA+ cells, in particular, could play an important pathogenic role in MS. PMID:27412504

  19. [Towards an industrial control of the cloning of lymphocytes B human for the manufacturing of monoclonal antibodies stemming from the human repertoire].

    PubMed

    Guillot-Chene, P; Lebecque, S; Rigal, D

    2009-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are efficient drugs for treating infectious, inflammatory and cancer diseases. Antibodies secreted by human lymphocytes that have been isolated from either peripheral blood or tissues present the definite interest of being part of the physiological or disease-related response to antigens present in the human body. However, attempts to generate hybridomas with human B cells have been largely unsuccessful, and cloning of human B cells has been achieved only via their inefficient immortalization with Epstein Barr Virus (EBV). However, recent progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of polyclonal B cell activation has dramatically increased the capacity to clone human B cells. In particular, activation of human naïve and memory B cells through CD40 or memory B cells only through TLR9 was shown to greatly facilitate their immortalization by EBV. Industrial development based on these observations will soon provide large collections of high affinity human mAbs of every isotype directly selected by the human immune system directed to recognize epitopes relevant for individual patients. Moreover, after CD40 activation, these mAbs will cover the full human repertoire, including the natural auto-immune repertoire. Full characterization of the biological activity of these mAbs will in turn bring useful information for selecting vaccine epitopes. This breakthrough in human B cell cloning opens the way into new areas for therapeutic use of mAbs. PMID:19446667

  20. Integrin α4β1 controls G9a activity that regulates epigenetic changes and nuclear properties required for lymphocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Cook, Peter C.; Zindy, Egor; Williams, Craig J.; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Streuli, Charles H.; MacDonald, Andrew S.; Redondo-Muñoz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cell nucleus change to allow cells to migrate, but how chromatin modifications contribute to nuclear deformability has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that a major factor in this process involves epigenetic changes that underpin nuclear structure. We investigated the link between cell adhesion and epigenetic changes in T-cells, and demonstrate that T-cell adhesion to VCAM1 via α4β1 integrin drives histone H3 methylation (H3K9me2/3) through the methyltransferase G9a. In this process, active G9a is recruited to the nuclear envelope and interacts with lamin B1 during T-cell adhesion through α4β1 integrin. G9a activity not only reorganises the chromatin structure in T-cells, but also affects the stiffness and viscoelastic properties of the nucleus. Moreover, we further demonstrated that these epigenetic changes were linked to lymphocyte movement, as depletion or inhibition of G9a blocks T-cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Thus, our results identify a novel mechanism in T-cells by which α4β1 integrin signaling drives specific chromatin modifications, which alter the physical properties of the nucleus and thereby enable T-cell migration. PMID:26657637

  1. Exogenous Control of the Expression of Group I CD1 Molecules Competent for Presentation of Microbial Nonpeptide Antigens to Human T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Angelo; Graziani, Grazia; Franzese, Ornella; Prete, Salvatore P.; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; D'Atri, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Group I CD1 (CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c) glycoproteins expressed on immature and mature dendritic cells present nonpeptide antigens (i.e., lipid or glycolipid molecules mainly of microbial origin) to T cells. Cytotoxic CD1-restricted T lymphocytes recognizing mycobacterial lipid antigens were found in tuberculosis patients. However, thanks to a complex interplay between mycobacteria and CD1 system, M. tuberculosis possesses a successful tactic based, at least in part, on CD1 downregulation to evade CD1-dependent immunity. On the ground of these findings, it is reasonable to hypothesize that modulation of CD1 protein expression by chemical, biological, or infectious agents could influence host's immune reactivity against M. tuberculosis-associated lipids, possibly affecting antitubercular resistance. This scenario prompted us to perform a detailed analysis of the literature concerning the effect of external agents on Group I CD1 expression in order to obtain valuable information on the possible strategies to be adopted for driving properly CD1-dependent immune functions in human pathology and in particular, in human tuberculosis. PMID:21603161

  2. Integrin α4β1 controls G9a activity that regulates epigenetic changes and nuclear properties required for lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Cook, Peter C; Zindy, Egor; Williams, Craig J; Jowitt, Thomas A; Streuli, Charles H; MacDonald, Andrew S; Redondo-Muñoz, Javier

    2016-04-20

    The mechanical properties of the cell nucleus change to allow cells to migrate, but how chromatin modifications contribute to nuclear deformability has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that a major factor in this process involves epigenetic changes that underpin nuclear structure. We investigated the link between cell adhesion and epigenetic changes in T-cells, and demonstrate that T-cell adhesion to VCAM1viaα4β1 integrin drives histone H3 methylation (H3K9me2/3) through the methyltransferase G9a. In this process, active G9a is recruited to the nuclear envelope and interacts with lamin B1 during T-cell adhesion through α4β1 integrin. G9a activity not only reorganises the chromatin structure in T-cells, but also affects the stiffness and viscoelastic properties of the nucleus. Moreover, we further demonstrated that these epigenetic changes were linked to lymphocyte movement, as depletion or inhibition of G9a blocks T-cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Thus, our results identify a novel mechanism in T-cells by which α4β1 integrin signaling drives specific chromatin modifications, which alter the physical properties of the nucleus and thereby enable T-cell migration. PMID:26657637

  3. Multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Guy, Michelle; Morrison, Jonathan; Severi, Gianluca; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Jhavar, Sameer; Saunders, Ed; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Muir, Kenneth R; English, Dallas R; Dearnaley, David P; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have identified multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer risk. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SNP associations across 8q24 by genotyping tag SNPs in 5,504 prostate cancer cases and 5,834 controls. We confirmed associations at three previously reported loci and identified additional loci in two other linkage disequilibrium blocks (rs1006908: per-allele OR = 0.87, P = 7.9 x 10(-8); rs620861: OR = 0.90, P = 4.8 x 10(-8)). Eight SNPs in five linkage disequilibrium blocks were independently associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. PMID:19767752

  4. Immunochip analysis identifies multiple susceptibility loci for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Maureen D; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K; Arnett, Frank C; Reveille, John D; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K; Lee, Annette T; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M; Hummers, Laura K; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M; Molitor, Jerry A; Silver, Richard M; Steen, Virginia D; Simms, Robert W; Lafyatis, Robert A; Fessler, Barri J; Frech, Tracy M; Alkassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci. PMID:24387989

  5. Immunochip Analysis Identifies Multiple Susceptibility Loci for Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Maureen D.; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V.; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Reveille, John D.; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K.; Lee, Annette T.; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos, Raquel; Callejas, José Luis; Navarrete, Nuria; García Portales, Rosa; Camps, María Teresa; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; González-Escribano, María F.; Sánchez-Román, Julio; García-Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo, María Jesús; Aguirre, María Ángeles; Gómez-Gracia, Inmaculada; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Vicente, Esther; Andreu, José Luis; Fernández de Castro, Mónica; García de la Peña, Paloma; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Martínez, Lina; Fonollosa, Vicente; Espinosa, Gerard; Tolosa, Carlos; Pros, Anna; Rodríguez Carballeira, Mónica; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Rubio Rivas, Manel; Ortiz Santamaría, Vera; Díaz, Bernardino; Trapiella, Luis; Freire, María del Carmen; Sousa, Adrián; Egurbide, María Victoria; Fanlo Mateo, Patricia; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Díaz, Federico; Hernández, Vanesa; Beltrán, Emma; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; Grau, Elena; Alegre Sancho, Juan José; Blanco García, Francisco J.; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernández Sueiro, Luis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E.; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M.; Molitor, Jerry A.; Silver, Richard M.; Steen, Virginia D.; Simms, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert A.; Fessler, Barri J.; Frech, Tracy M.; AlKassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci. PMID:24387989

  6. Lymphocyte transformation in presumed ocular histoplasmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganley, J.P.; Nemo, G.J.; Comstock, G.W.; Brody, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    Lymphocytes from individuals with inactive macular disciform lesions of presumed ocular histoplasmosis challenged with three histoplasmin antigens incorporated tritiated thymidine at a significantly higher rate than histoplasmin-stimulated lymphocytes of matched control and peripheral scar groups. This finding is consistent with the etiologic association of the disciform ocular syndrome and previous systemic infection with Histoplasma capsulatum. The disciform group had a higher mean response than the other two groups to pokeweed mitogen but not to phytohemagglutinin and had higher mean counts per minute to the specific antigens Toxoplasma gondii, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M battery, and M gaus, but not to Candida albicans. These data would suggest that individuals with the disciform lesion of presumed ocular histoplasmosis have a hyperreactive cellular immune response; this response may play an important role in the development of the disciform.

  7. Effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to study the effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation to detect possible alteration of the cells responsible for the immune response during long-duration space flights is described. Human lymphocytes in culture medium will be delivered shortly before launch in an incubator which will be kept at 37C. Mitogen will be added to the culture. A control without mitogen will be run in parallel. After 70 hours of incubation, radioactive thymidine will be added. After two hours, cellular activity will be stopped by fixation and incubator power switched off. Later, the amount of incorporated thymidine will be determined and the cell morphology and the distribution of cell organelles will be investigated.

  8. Tempol protects human lymphocytes from genotoxicity induced by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Mfady, Doa'a S; Alasseiri, Mohammed; Hasheesh, Taghrid F

    2014-01-01

    The use of cisplatin in treatments of human malignancies is limited by its side effects that include DNA damage and the subsequent risk of developing secondary cancer. In this study, we examined the possible protective effect of Tempol against DNA damage induced by cisplatin in human lymphocytes using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) assays. Cisplatin induced significant elevation in the frequencies of CAs and SCEs in cultured human lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Treatment of lymphocytes with Tempol significantly lowered CAs and SCEs induced by cisplatin. Tempol alone did not affect spontaneous levels of SCEs and CAs observed in the control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, Tempol protects human lymphocytes against genotoxicity induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin. PMID:24955171

  9. High density genotyping study identifies four new susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ellinghaus, David; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rodríguez, Elke; Matanovic, Anja; Marenholz, Ingo; Hübner, Norbert; Schaarschmidt, Heidi; Novak, Natalija; Michel, Sven; Maintz, Laura; Werfel, Thomas; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Hotze, Melanie; Prokisch, Holger; Heim, Katharina; Herder, Christian; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Tamari, Mayumi; Kubo, Michiaki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tsoi, Lam C; Stuart, Philip; Elder, James T; Sun, Liangdan; Zuo, Xianbo; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Winkelmann, Juliane; Illig, Thomas; Boehm, Bernhard O; Duerr, Richard H; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Glas, Jürgen; McAleer, Maeve A; Fahy, Caoimhe M; Kabesch, Michael; Brown, Sara J; McLean, WH Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Schreiber, Stefan; Lee, Young-Ae; Franke, Andre; Weidinger, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease with a strong heritable component. Pathogenetic models consider keratinocyte differentiation defects and immune alterations as scaffolds1, and recent data indicate a role for autoreactivity in at least a subgroup of patients2. With filaggrin (FLG) a major locus causing a skin barrier deficiency was identified3. To better define risk variants and identify additional susceptibility loci, we densely genotyped 2,425 German cases and 5,449 controls using the Immunochip array, followed by replication in 7,196 cases and 15,480 controls from Germany, Ireland, Japan and China. We identified 4 new susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis and replicated previous associations. This brings the number of atopic dermatitis risk loci reported in individuals of European ancestry to 11. We estimate that these susceptibility loci together account for 14.4% of the heritability for atopic dermatitis. PMID:23727859

  10. Identification and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the red-crowned crane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, Z H; Shen, F J; Hou, R; Zhang, W P; Liu, Y L; Tu, K Y; Yang, A L

    2015-01-01

    We isolated and characterized microsatellite loci for the red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) from a microsatellite-enriched database, which was obtained using high-throughput sequencing technology. We designed primer sets for 445 microsatellite loci and after initial screening, 34 loci were genotyped in 31 red-crowned cranes. The number of observed alleles ranged from 3 to 10. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.197 to 0.935 and 0.453 to 0.887, respectively; the mean polymorphic information content was 0.663. Loci Lia10943, Lia60455, Lia48514, Lia62171, Lia1059, and Lia5286 deviated from expectation of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; however, significant linkage disequilibrium was not observed among the 34 loci. Using these 34 markers, we successfully completed parental identification for 19 cranes. The probability of exclusion for 7 selected loci (Lia271333, Lia3745, Lia11091, Lia45761, Lia16468, Lia21909, and Lia22355) was >0.9977 and analyses with more loci increased the combination efficiency. These 34 markers were also proven to be efficient for individual identification. We recommend that this marker system be used in the systematic control of pedigree management and future genetic variation studies of red-crowned cranes. PMID:26634480

  11. Comparative quantitative trait loci mapping of aliphatic, indolic and benzylic glucosinolate production in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Kliebenstein, D J; Gershenzon, J; Mitchell-Olds, T

    2001-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are a diverse set of plant compounds believed to have numerous functions in plant-environment interactions. Despite this importance, little is known about the regulation of secondary metabolite accumulation. We are studying the regulation of glucosinolates, a large group of secondary metabolites, in Arabidopsis to investigate how secondary metabolism is controlled. We utilized Ler and Cvi, two ecotypes of Arabidopsis that have striking differences in both the types and amounts of glucosinolates that accumulate in the seeds and leaves. QTL analysis identified six loci determining total aliphatic glucosinolate accumulation, six loci controlling total indolic glucosinolate concentration, and three loci regulating benzylic glucosinolate levels. Our results show that two of the loci controlling total aliphatic glucosinolates map to biosynthetic loci that interact epistatically to regulate aliphatic glucosinolate accumulation. In addition to the six loci regulating total indolic glucosinolate concentration, mapping of QTL for the individual indolic glucosinolates identified five additional loci that were specific to subsets of the indolic glucosinolates. These data show that there are a large number of variable loci controlling glucosinolate accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:11560911

  12. Five Hundred Microsatellite Loci for Peromyscus

    PubMed Central

    WEBER, JESSE N.; PETERS, MAUREEN B; TSYUSKO, OLGA V.; LINNEN, CATHERINE R.; HAGEN, CRIS; SCHABLE, NANCY A.; TUBERVILLE, TRACEY D.; MCKEE, ANNA M.; LANCE, STACEY L.; JONES, KENNETH L.; FISHER, HEIDI S.; DEWEY, MICHAEL J.; HOEKSTRA, HOPI E.; GLENN, TRAVIS C.

    2009-01-01

    Mice of the genus Peromyscus, including several endangered subspecies, occur throughout North America and have been important models for conservation research. We describe 526 primer pairs that amplify microsatellite DNA loci for P. maniculatus bairdii, 467 of which also amplify in P. polionotus subgriseus. For 12 of these loci, we report diversity data from a natural population. These markers will be an important resource for future genomic studies of Peromyscus evolution and mammalian conservation. PMID:20563244

  13. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Philip E.; Nair, Rajan P.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Ding, Jun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Gudjonsson, Johann E.; Li, Yun; Weidinger, Stephan; Eberlein, Bernadette; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H. Erich; Kunz, Manfred; Ike, Robert; Krueger, Gerald G.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Mroweitz, Ulrich; Lim, Henry W.; Voorhees, John J.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Weichenthal, Michael; Franke, Andre; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D.; Elder, James T.

    2010-01-01

    To identify novel psoriasis susceptibility loci, we carried out a meta-analysis of two recent genome-wide association studies 1,2, yielding a discovery sample of 1,831 cases and 2,546 controls. 102 of the most promising loci in the discovery analysis were followed up in a three-stage replication study using 4,064 cases and 4,685 controls from Michigan, Toronto, Newfoundland, and Germany. Association at a genome-wide level of significance for the combined discovery and replication samples was found for three genomic regions. One contains NOS2 (rs4795067, p = 4 × 10−11), another contains FBXL19 (rs10782001, p = 9 × 10−10), and a third contains PSMA6 and NFKBIA (rs12586317, p = 2 × 10−8). All three loci were also strongly associated with the subphenotypes of psoriatic arthritis and purely cutaneous psoriasis. Finally, we confirmed a recently identified3 association signal near RNF114. PMID:20953189

  14. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  15. Loci-STREAM Version 0.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Jeffrey; Thakur, Siddharth

    2006-01-01

    Loci-STREAM is an evolving computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software tool for simulating possibly chemically reacting, possibly unsteady flows in diverse settings, including rocket engines, turbomachines, oil refineries, etc. Loci-STREAM implements a pressure- based flow-solving algorithm that utilizes unstructured grids. (The benefit of low memory usage by pressure-based algorithms is well recognized by experts in the field.) The algorithm is robust for flows at all speeds from zero to hypersonic. The flexibility of arbitrary polyhedral grids enables accurate, efficient simulation of flows in complex geometries, including those of plume-impingement problems. The present version - Loci-STREAM version 0.9 - includes an interface with the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) library for access to enhanced linear-equation-solving programs therein that accelerate convergence toward a solution. The name "Loci" reflects the creation of this software within the Loci computational framework, which was developed at Mississippi State University for the primary purpose of simplifying the writing of complex multidisciplinary application programs to run in distributed-memory computing environments including clusters of personal computers. Loci has been designed to relieve application programmers of the details of programming for distributed-memory computers.

  16. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  17. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood, and lymphoid tissue What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  18. [Chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sadao

    2016-03-01

    Currently, several novel drugs are available for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in Western countries. Of these drugs, those that inhibit the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway are the most promising. Ibrutinib inhibits BTK in the BCR pathway and can be administered orally. The results of several clinical trials suggest that ibrutinib is highly effective against relapsed/resistant (RR) and treatment-naïve CLL. Furthermore, ibrutinib shows equivalent efficacy on CLL with the 17p deletion. Idelalisib, which also blocks the BCR pathway, inhibits PIK3delta and induces CLL cell death. Clinical trials have shown outstanding efficacy of idelalisib against RR-CLL, especially when administered with antiCD20 antibodies. This drug is also effective against CLL with the 17p deletion. ABT-199 is another novel drug; it inhibits BCL2 signaling, not the BCR pathway, and can be administered orally. The efficacy of ABT-199 against RR-CLL has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. These drugs have only mild toxicity and can be used for patients in poor general condition. Unfortunately, none of these drugs have yet been approved in Japan. Rapid resolution of the 'drug lag' problem is necessary. PMID:27076234

  19. [Large granular lymphocyte leukemia].

    PubMed

    Lazaro, Estibaliz; Caubet, Olivier; Menard, Fanny; Pellegrin, Jean-Luc; Viallard, Jean-François

    2007-11-01

    Large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia is a clonal proliferation of cytotoxic cells, either CD3(+) (T-cell) or CD3(-) (natural killer, or NK). Both subtypes can manifest as indolent or aggressive disorders. T-LGL leukemia is associated with cytopenias and autoimmune diseases and most often has an indolent course and good prognosis. Rheumatoid arthritis and Felty syndrome are frequent. NK-LGL leukemias can be more aggressive. LGL expansion is currently hypothesized to be a virus (Ebstein Barr or human T-cell leukemia viruses) antigen-driven T-cell response that involves disruption of apoptosis. The diagnosis of T-LGL is suggested by flow cytometry and confirmed by T-cell receptor gene rearrangement studies. Clonality is difficult to determine in NK-LGL but use of monoclonal antibodies specific for killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) has improved this process. Treatment is required when T-LGL leukemia is associated with recurrent infections secondary to chronic neutropenia. Long-lasting remission can be obtained with immunosuppressive treatments such as methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, and cyclosporine A. NK-LGL leukemias may be more aggressive and refractory to conventional therapy. PMID:17596907

  20. Quantifying T Lymphocyte Turnover

    PubMed Central

    De Boer, Rob J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral T cell populations are maintained by production of naive T cells in the thymus, clonal expansion of activated cells, cellular self-renewal (or homeostatic proliferation), and density dependent cell life spans. A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to quantify the relative contributions of these processes. In modern studies lymphocytes are typically labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU), deuterium, or the fluorescent dye carboxy-fluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE), their division history has been studied by monitoring telomere shortening and the dilution of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or the dye CFSE, and clonal expansion has been documented by recording changes in the population densities of antigen specific cells. Proper interpretation of such data in terms of the underlying rates of T cell production, division, and death has proven to be notoriously difficult and involves mathematical modeling. We review the various models that have been developed for each of these techniques, discuss which models seem most appropriate for what type of data, reveal open problems that require better models, and pinpoint how the assumptions underlying a mathematical model may influence the interpretation of data. Elaborating various successful cases where modeling has delivered new insights in T cell population dynamics, this review provides quantitative estimates of several processes involved in the maintenance of naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell pools in mice and men. PMID:23313150

  1. Microgravity and Cellular Consequences in Lymphocyte Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cells adapt to the environment of low gravity and express a series of responses, some possibly from direct effects on cells and others based on environmental conditions created by microgravity. Human lymphocytes in microgravity culture are functionally diminished in activation and locomotion. Both processes are integral to optimal immune response to fight pathogens. The NASA Rotating-wall vessel (RWV) is a well-accepted analog for microgravity culture on the ground. Gene array experiments and immunoblotting identified upstream events in human lymphocytes adapting to microgravity analog culture. Microgravity induces selective changes, many of which are cell membrane related. Results showed that upstream of PKC in the T cell activation cascade, PLC-gamma and LAT are significantly diminished. ZAP 70 which controls LAT activation is also down regulated in modeled microgravity. Thus events governing cell shape might warrant attention in microgravity conditions. The goal of this study is to delineate response suites that are consequential, direct or indirect effects of the microgravity environment and which of these are essential to lymphocytes

  2. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis-associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis-associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression. PMID:23749187

  3. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis–associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis–associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression. PMID:23749187

  4. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Law, Matthew H; Bishop, D Timothy; Lee, Jeffrey E; Brossard, Myriam; Martin, Nicholas G; Moses, Eric K; Song, Fengju; Barrett, Jennifer H; Kumar, Rajiv; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D P; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Kypreou, Katerina P; Taylor, John C; Harland, Mark; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Akslen, Lars A; Andresen, Per A; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Azizi, Esther; Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi; Brown, Kevin M; Dȩbniak, Tadeusz; Duffy, David L; Elder, David E; Fang, Shenying; Friedman, Eitan; Galan, Pilar; Ghiorzo, Paola; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gruis, Nelleke A; Hansson, Johan; Helsing, Per; Hočevar, Marko; Höiom, Veronica; Ingvar, Christian; Kanetsky, Peter A; Chen, Wei V; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lang, Julie; Lathrop, G Mark; Lubiński, Jan; Mackie, Rona M; Mann, Graham J; Molven, Anders; Montgomery, Grant W; Novaković, Srdjan; Olsson, Håkan; Puig, Susana; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Qureshi, Abrar A; Radford-Smith, Graham L; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Doorn, Remco; Whiteman, David C; Craig, Jamie E; Schadendorf, Dirk; Simms, Lisa A; Burdon, Kathryn P; Nyholt, Dale R; Pooley, Karen A; Orr, Nick; Stratigos, Alexander J; Cust, Anne E; Ward, Sarah V; Hayward, Nicholas K; Han, Jiali; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Dunning, Alison M; Bishop, Julia A Newton; Demenais, Florence; Amos, Christopher I; MacGregor, Stuart; Iles, Mark M

    2015-09-01

    Thirteen common susceptibility loci have been reproducibly associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). We report the results of an international 2-stage meta-analysis of CMM genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This meta-analysis combines 11 GWAS (5 previously unpublished) and a further three stage 2 data sets, totaling 15,990 CMM cases and 26,409 controls. Five loci not previously associated with CMM risk reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)), as did 2 previously reported but unreplicated loci and all 13 established loci. Newly associated SNPs fall within putative melanocyte regulatory elements, and bioinformatic and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data highlight candidate genes in the associated regions, including one involved in telomere biology. PMID:26237428

  5. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Law, Matthew H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Martin, Nicholas G.; Moses, Eric K.; Song, Fengju; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Kumar, Rajiv; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Kypreou, Katerina P.; Taylor, John C.; Harland, Mark; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Akslen, Lars A.; Andresen, Per A.; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Azizi, Esther; Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi; Brown, Kevin M.; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Duffy, David L.; Elder, David E.; Fang, Shenying; Friedman, Eitan; Galan, Pilar; Ghiorzo, Paola; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gruis, Nelleke A.; Hansson, Johan; Helsing, Per; Hočevar, Marko; Höiom, Veronica; Ingvar, Christian; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Chen, Wei V.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lang, Julie; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lubiński, Jan; Mackie, Rona M.; Mann, Graham J.; Molven, Anders; Montgomery, Grant W.; Novaković, Srdjan; Olsson, Håkan; Puig, Susana; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Radford-Smith, Graham L.; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Doorn, Remco; Whiteman, David C.; Craig, Jamie E.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Simms, Lisa A.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pooley, Karen A.; Orr, Nick; Stratigos, Alexander J.; Cust, Anne E.; Ward, Sarah V.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Han, Jiali; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Dunning, Alison M.; Bishop, Julia A. Newton; MacGregor, Stuart; Iles, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Thirteen common susceptibility loci have been reproducibly associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). We report the results of an international 2-stage meta-analysis of CMM genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This meta-analysis combines 11 GWAS (5 previously unpublished) and a further three stage 2 data sets, totaling 15,990 CMM cases and 26,409 controls. Five loci not previously associated with CMM risk reached genome-wide significance (P < 5×10–8), as did two previously-reported but un-replicated loci and all thirteen established loci. Novel SNPs fall within putative melanocyte regulatory elements, and bioinformatic and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data highlight candidate genes including one involved in telomere biology. PMID:26237428

  6. Alzheimer disease (AD) specific transcription, DNA methylation and splicing in twenty AD associated loci

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Crystal; Kohli, Martin A.; Whitehead, Patrice; Mash, Deborah C.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Gilbert, John

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified twenty loci associated with late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). We examined each of the twenty loci, specifically the ±50kb region surrounding the most strongly associated variant, for changes in gene(s) transcription specific to LOAD. Post-mortem human brain samples were examined for expression, methylation, and splicing differences. LOAD specific differences were detected by comparing LOAD to normal and “disease” controls. Eight loci, prominently ABCA7, contain LOAD specific differences. Significant changes in the CELF1 and ZCWPW1 loci occurred in genes not located nearest the associated variant, suggesting that these genes should be investigated further as LOAD candidates. PMID:26004081

  7. Effects of Beryllium on Human Serum Immunoglobulin and Lymphocyte Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, DaeSeong; Won, Yong Lim; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of short-term exposure of beryllium on the human immune system, the proportion of T-lymphocytes such as CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD95, and NK cells, andthe proportion of B cells and TNFα level in peripheral blood and immunoglobulins in the serum of 43 exposed workers and 34 healthy control subjects were studied. External exposure to beryllium was measured by atomic absorption spectrometer as recommended by the NIOSH analytical method 7300. T lymphocyte subpopulation analysis was carried out with flow cytometer. The working duration of exposed workers was less than 3 months and the mean ambient beryllium level was 3.4 μg/m3, 112.3 μg/m3, and 2.3 μg/m3 in molding (furnace), deforming (grinding), and sorting processes, respectively (cited from Kim et al., 2008). However, ambient beryllium level after process change was non-detectable (< 0.1 μg/m3). The number of T lymphocytes and the amount of immunoglobulins in the beryllium-exposed workers and control subjects were not significantly different, except for the total number of lymphocytes and CD95 (APO1/FAS). The total number of lymphocytes was higher in the beryllium-exposed individuals than in the healthy control subjects. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed lymphocytes to be affected by beryllium exposure (odd ratio = 7.293; p < 0.001). These results show that short-term exposure to beryllium does not induce immune dysfunction but is probably associated with lymphocytes proliferation. PMID:24278637

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10−11) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10−9), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10−8) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10−9). PMID:21926974

  9. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Andlauer, Till F. M.; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A.; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G.; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H.; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K.; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O.; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M.; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M.; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis. PMID:27386562

  10. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Andlauer, Till F M; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis. PMID:27386562

  11. Identification of loci affecting flavour volatile emissions in tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Tieman, Denise M; Zeigler, Michelle; Schmelz, Eric A; Taylor, Mark G; Bliss, Peter; Kirst, Matias; Klee, Harry J

    2006-01-01

    Fresh tomato fruit flavour is the sum of the interaction between sugars, acids, and a set of approximately 30 volatile compounds synthesized from a diverse set of precursors, including amino acids, lipids, and carotenoids. Some of these volatiles impart desirable qualities while others are negatively perceived. As a first step to identify the genes responsible for the synthesis of flavour-related chemicals, an attempt was made to identify loci that influence the chemical composition of ripe fruits. A genetically diverse but well-defined Solanum pennellii IL population was used. Because S. pennellii is a small green-fruited species, this population exhibits great biochemical diversity and is a rich source of genes affecting both fruit development and chemical composition. This population was used to identify multiple loci affecting the composition of chemicals related to flavour. Twenty-five loci were identified that are significantly altered in one or more of 23 different volatiles and four were altered in citric acid content. It was further shown that emissions of carotenoid-derived volatiles were directly correlated with the fruit carotenoid content. Linked molecular markers should be useful for breeding programmes aimed at improving fruit flavour. In the longer term, the genes responsible for controlling the levels of these chemicals will be important tools for understanding the complex interactions that ultimately integrate to provide the unique flavour of a tomato. PMID:16473892

  12. Smallness of the number of incompatibility loci can facilitate parapatric speciation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ryo; Iwasa, Yoh

    2016-09-21

    We studied the time to speciation by geographic isolation for a species living on two islands connected by infrequent migration. Assumptions were that incompatibility was controlled by a finite number of quantitative loci, and individuals differing in loci of more than some threshold fraction do not mix genetically with each other. We also assumed sexual haploid species, each population being nearly monomorphic, and free recombination between loci for within-population processes. The genetic distance (defined as the fraction of loci differing between populations) followed stochastic processes, which were analyzed by means of stochastic differential equations, diffusion equations, and individual-based simulations. The distance increases by the accumulation of novel mutations but decreases by migration and hybridization. It may converge to a quasi-equilibrium around which it fluctuates thereafter. If the threshold fraction of speciation is controlled, the smallness of the number of incompatibility loci enhanced the magnitude of fluctuation around the quasi-equilibrium and shortened the time to speciation considerably. Novel species were created by mutation accumulation and repeated infrequent migration, and the rate of species creation was the fastest for an intermediate rate of migration. A smaller number of loci increased the optimal migration rate and the species creation rate. PMID:26582724

  13. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio and Platelet-to-Lymphocyte Ratio are Predictors of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Erdal; Kivrak, Tarik; Gerin, Fethullah; Sunbul, Murat; Sari, Ibrahim; Erdogan, Okan

    2015-01-01

    Background Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are inflammatory markers used as prognostic factors in various diseases. The aims of this study were to compare the PLR and the NLR of heart failure (HF) patients with those of age-sex matched controls, to evaluate the predictive value of those markers in detecting HF, and to demonstrate the effect of NLR and PLR on mortality in HF patients during follow-up. Methods This study included 56 HF patients and 40 controls without HF. All subjects underwent transthoracic echocardiography to evaluate cardiac functions. The NLR and the PLR were calculated as the ratio of neutrophil count to lymphocyte count and as the ratio of platelet count to lymphocyte count, respectively. All HF patients were followed after their discharge from the hospital to evaluate mortality, cerebrovascular events, and re-hospitalization. Results The NLR and the PLR of HF patients were significantly higher compared to those of the controls (p < 0.01). There was an inverse correlation between the NLR and the left ventricular ejection fraction of the study population (r: -0.409, p < 0.001). The best cut-off value of NLR to predict HF was 3.0, with 86.3% sensitivity and 77.5% specificity, and the best cut-off value of PLR to predict HF was 137.3, with 70% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Only NLR was an independent predictor of mortality in HF patients. A cut-off value of 5.1 for NLR can predict death in HF patients with 75% sensitivity and 62% specificity during a 12.8-month follow-up period on average. Conclusion NLR and PLR were higher in HF patients than in age-sex matched controls. However, NLR and PLR were not sufficient to establish a diagnosis of HF. NLR can be used to predict mortality during the follow-up of HF patients. PMID:26536980

  14. Natural and Sexual Selection on Many Loci

    PubMed Central

    Barton, N. H.; Turelli, M.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed that describes the effects on an arbitrary number of autosomal loci of selection on haploid and diploid stages, of nonrandom mating between haploid individuals, and of recombination. We provide exact recursions for the dynamics of allele frequencies and linkage disequilibria (nonrandom associations of alleles across loci). When selection is weak relative to recombination, our recursions provide simple approximations for the linkage disequilibria among arbitrary combinations of loci. We show how previous models of sex-independent natural selection on diploids, assortative mating between haploids, and sexual selection on haploids can be analyzed in this framework. Using our weak-selection approximations, we derive new results concerning the coevolution of male traits and female preferences under natural and sexual selection. In particular, we provide general expressions for the intensity of linkage-disequilibrium induced selection experienced by loci that contribute to female preferences for specific male traits. Our general results support the previous observation that these indirect selection forces are so weak that they are unlikely to dominate the evolution of preference-producing loci. PMID:2016044

  15. Ability of bovine mammary macrophages to enhance proliferation of autologous blood and mammary secretion lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Concha, C; Holmberg, O

    1990-02-01

    Cells were obtained by centrifuging the mammary secretion of healthy udders of 19 cows during the dry-period and during mid-lactation. The suspended cells were incubated in plastic wells. Those adhered cells classified as mammary macrophages were incubated with pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes were added to wells containing untreated macrophage cultures or cultures pretreated with PWM. In seven cows autologous dry-period mammary lymphocytes were added instead of blood lymphocytes. The macrophages + lymphocyte cultures were subjected to the lymphocyte stimulation test (LST). For comparison, peripheral blood lymphocytes and dry-period secretion lymphocytes were also subjected to the LST in the presence of PWM. In all cases, mitogenic responses were higher in pretreated macrophage cultures than in background control cultures. The stimulation indices (SI) showed that PWM-pretreated dry-period mammary macrophages enhanced the proliferation of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes to a greater extent than did blood lymphocytes plus PWM (49 +/- 10 v. 30 +/- 6; P less than or equal to 0.05). Mammary macrophages taken from the same cows but during midlactation also clearly induced proliferation of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes but to a lesser extent than dry-period macrophages (16 +/- 2 v. 49 +/- 10; 16 +/- 2 v. 30 +/- 6; P less than or equal to 0.01 and P less than or equal to 0.05). The PWM pretreatment of mammary macrophages increased the proliferation of autologous dry-period mammary lymphocytes by at least a factor of three (28 +/- 8 v. 8 +/- 2 P less than or equal to 0.05). The present results indicate that bovine mammary macrophages pretreated with PWM enhance proliferation as well as modulation of mammary and peripheral blood lymphocytes. The modulation of lymphocyte stimulation as demonstrated here in vitro, has great significance regarding aspects of local immunostimulation related to modern treatment of mastitis. PMID

  16. Expression of activated molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Xu, Wenyan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Huaquan; Fu, Rong; Wu, Yuhong; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guojin; Guan, Jing; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the expression of activation molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)/Evans patients. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD69 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was detected using flow cytometry in 30 AIHA/Evans patients, 18 normal controls (NC) and nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in untreated patients was higher than that in remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01) and CLL patients (P < 0.01). CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was higher than that on CD5(-)B lymphocytes in untreated patients (P > 0.05), but lower than those of CD5(-)B lymphocytes in remission patients and NC (P < 0.05). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of untreated patients was higher than that of remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than that of NC, remission (P < 0.05), and untreated patients (P > 0.05). CD80 and CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was negatively correlated with hemoglobin (HB), C3, C4 (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with reticulocyte (Ret) (P < 0.05). CD69 on CD5(+) and CD5(-)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than those of AIHA/Evans patients and NC (P < 0.05). The active molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of AIHA/Evans patients differ from those on CD5(-) and clonal CD5(+)B lymphocytes. PMID:26968550

  17. The Role of the T lymphocytes and Remodeling in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Amin, Kawa

    2016-08-01

    In allergic asthma (AA), inflammatory changes in the airway epithelium may contribute to the characteristic pathophysiology and symptoms. The presence of T lymphocytes, eosinophils, mast cells and macrophages, the presence of cytokines, and also structural changes in the airway mucous membrane are characteristic for asthma. Bronchial biopsy specimens were obtained from 33 AA, 25 nonallergic asthma (NAA), and 20 healthy controls (HC). This study used immunohistochemical techniques for identified monoclonal antibodies (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, ECP, MBP, tenascin, and laminin) in the bronchi. The highest number of eosinophils and T lymphocyte cells in bronchial biopsies was found in AA, and NAA. The number of T lymphocytes in AA was significantly higher than in NAA and HC. The degree of epithelial damage was higher in the AA group compared to the other groups. The tenascin- and laminin-positive layers in AA were thicker than other groups. In AA, a significant negative correlation was found between epithelial integrity and the count for eosinophils or T lymphocytes. T lymphocytes and eosinophils in AA were found in the area of epithelial and lamina propria damage. This article suggests that T lymphocytes may not only contribute to the chronic airway inflammatory response, airway remodeling, and symptomatology but may also have a central role at the initiation of the allergic immune response. Th-targeted therapy would be of considerable interest in controlling AA. Having more knowledge on the roles of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation highlights the contributions of these cells in regulating and may lead to a new therapeutic target-AA. PMID:27221139

  18. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Patrick MA; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the esophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune disease, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the esophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our etiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, esophageal inflammation and remodeling. PMID:25407941

  19. Prognosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia from infrared spectra of lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Christian P.; Liu, Kan-Zhi; Johnston, James B.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1997-06-01

    Peripheral mononuclear cells obtained from blood of normal individuals and from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were investigated by infrared spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis. Not only are the spectra of CLL cells different from those of normal cells, but hierarchical clustering also separated the CLL cells into a number of subclusters, based on their different DNA content, a fact which may provide a useful diagnostic tool for staging (progression of the disease) and multiple clone detection. Moreover, there is evidence for a correlation between the increased amount of DNA in the CLL cells and the in-vivo doubling time of the lymphocytes in a given patient.

  20. Vehicle and positive control values from the in vivo rodent comet assay and biomonitoring studies using human lymphocytes: historical database and influence of technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Pant, Kamala; Springer, S; Bruce, S; Lawlor, T; Hewitt, N; Aardema, M J

    2014-10-01

    There is increased interest in the in vivo comet assay in rodents as a follow-up approach for determining the biological relevance of chemicals that are genotoxic in in vitro assays. This is partly because, unlike other assays, DNA damage can be assessed in this assay in virtually any tissue. Since background levels of DNA damage can vary with the species, tissue, and cell processing method, a robust historical control database covering multiple tissues is essential. We describe extensive vehicle and positive control data for multiple tissues from rats and mice. In addition, we report historical data from control and genotoxin-treated human blood. Technical issues impacting comet results are described, including the method of cell preparation and freezing. Cell preparation by scraping (stomach and other GI tract organs) resulted in higher % tail DNA than mincing (liver, spleen, kidney etc) or direct collection (blood or bone marrow). Treatment with the positive control genotoxicant, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) in rats and methyl methanesulfonate in mice, resulted in statistically significant increases in % tail DNA. Background DNA damage was not markedly increased when cell suspensions were stored frozen prior to preparing slides, and the outcome of the assay was unchanged (EMS was always positive). In conclusion, historical data from our laboratory for the in vivo comet assay for multiple tissues from rats and mice, as well as human blood show very good reproducibility. These data and recommendations provided are aimed at contributing to the design and proper interpretation of results from comet assays. PMID:24957907

  1. GWAS meta-analysis and replication identifies three new susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Lawrenson, Kate; Price, Melissa; Fridley, Brooke L.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Shen, Howard; Weber, Rachel; Karevan, Rod; Larson, Melissa C.; Song, Honglin; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie M.; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Aben, Katja K.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Birrer, Michael J.; Bloom, Greg; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brenton, James D.; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brown, Robert; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian; Carney, Michael E; Carvalho, Renato S.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Anne; Chen, Zhihua; Chow, Wong-Ho; Cicek, Mine S.; Coetzee, Gerhard; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Despierre, Evelyn; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fenstermacher, David; Flanagan, James; Gao, Yu-Tang; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Gore, Martin; Gronwald, Jacek; Guo, Qi; Halle, Mari K; Harter, Philipp; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hillemanns, Peter; Hoatlin, Maureen; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K.; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Nathan; Lee, Janet; Leminen, Arto; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubiński, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nakanishi, Toru; Narod, Steven A.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stefan; Noushmehr, Houtan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara; Orlow, Irene; Paul, James; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Qu, Xiaotao; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schwaab, Ira; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hui; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Southey, Melissa C.; Spellman, Paul; Tajima, Kazuo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Berg, David Van Den; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wik, Elisabeth; Winterhoff, Boris; Woo, Yin Ling; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah P.; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zulkifli, Famida; Goodman, Marc T.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Iversen, Edwin; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified four susceptibility loci for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) with another two loci being close to genome-wide significance. We pooled data from a GWAS conducted in North America with another GWAS from the United Kingdom. We selected the top 24,551 SNPs for inclusion on the iCOGS custom genotyping array. Follow-up genotyping was carried out in 18,174 cases and 26,134 controls from 43 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We validated the two loci at 3q25 and 17q21 previously near genome-wide significance and identified three novel loci associated with risk; two loci associated with all EOC subtypes, at 8q21 (rs11782652, P=5.5×10-9) and 10p12 (rs1243180; P=1.8×10-8), and another locus specific to the serous subtype at 17q12 (rs757210; P=8.1×10-10). An integrated molecular analysis of genes and regulatory regions at these loci provided evidence for functional mechanisms underlying susceptibility that implicates CHMP4C in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. PMID:23535730

  2. Evaluation of Genome Wide Association Study Associated Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci in Sub Saharan Africans.

    PubMed

    Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Doumatey, Ayo P; Bentley, Amy R; Chen, Guanjie; Huang, Hanxia; Zhou, Jie; Shriner, Daniel; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Okafor, Godfrey; Eghan, Benjamin; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Adeleye, Jokotade; Balogun, Williams; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Owusu, Samuel; Amoah, Albert; Acheampong, Joseph; Johnson, Thomas; Oli, Johnnie; Adebamowo, Clement; Collins, Francis; Dunston, Georgia; Rotimi, Charles N

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) undertaken in European and Asian ancestry populations have yielded dozens of robustly associated loci. However, the genomics of T2D remains largely understudied in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of T2D are increasing dramatically and where the environmental background is quite different than in these previous studies. Here, we evaluate 106 reported T2D GWAS loci in continental Africans. We tested each of these SNPs, and SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with these index SNPs, for an association with T2D in order to assess transferability and to fine map the loci leveraging the generally reduced LD of African genomes. The study included 1775 unrelated Africans (1035 T2D cases, 740 controls; mean age 54 years; 59% female) enrolled in Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya as part of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study. All samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom PanAFR SNP array. Forty-one of the tested loci showed transferability to this African sample (p < 0.05, same direction of effect), 11 at the exact reported SNP and 30 others at SNPs in LD with the reported SNP (after adjustment for the number of tested SNPs). TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was the most significant locus in this study (p = 1.61 × 10(-8)). Most of the loci that showed transferability were successfully fine-mapped, i.e., localized to smaller haplotypes than in the original reports. The findings indicate that the genetic architecture of T2D in SSA is characterized by several risk loci shared with non-African ancestral populations and that data from African populations may facilitate fine mapping of risk loci. The study provides an important resource for meta-analysis of African ancestry populations and transferability of novel loci. PMID:26635871

  3. Evaluation of Genome Wide Association Study Associated Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci in Sub Saharan Africans

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Huang, Hanxia; Zhou, Jie; Shriner, Daniel; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Okafor, Godfrey; Eghan, Benjamin; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Adeleye, Jokotade; Balogun, Williams; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Owusu, Samuel; Amoah, Albert; Acheampong, Joseph; Johnson, Thomas; Oli, Johnnie; Adebamowo, Clement; Collins, Francis; Dunston, Georgia; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) undertaken in European and Asian ancestry populations have yielded dozens of robustly associated loci. However, the genomics of T2D remains largely understudied in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of T2D are increasing dramatically and where the environmental background is quite different than in these previous studies. Here, we evaluate 106 reported T2D GWAS loci in continental Africans. We tested each of these SNPs, and SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with these index SNPs, for an association with T2D in order to assess transferability and to fine map the loci leveraging the generally reduced LD of African genomes. The study included 1775 unrelated Africans (1035 T2D cases, 740 controls; mean age 54 years; 59% female) enrolled in Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya as part of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study. All samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom PanAFR SNP array. Forty-one of the tested loci showed transferability to this African sample (p < 0.05, same direction of effect), 11 at the exact reported SNP and 30 others at SNPs in LD with the reported SNP (after adjustment for the number of tested SNPs). TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was the most significant locus in this study (p = 1.61 × 10−8). Most of the loci that showed transferability were successfully fine-mapped, i.e., localized to smaller haplotypes than in the original reports. The findings indicate that the genetic architecture of T2D in SSA is characterized by several risk loci shared with non-African ancestral populations and that data from African populations may facilitate fine mapping of risk loci. The study provides an important resource for meta-analysis of African ancestry populations and transferability of novel loci. PMID:26635871

  4. Lymphocytic hypophysitis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Sellayah, Renishka; Gonzales, Michael; Fourlanos, Spiros; King, James

    2015-11-01

    We report a 73-year-old woman with lymphocytic hypophysitis who presented with atypical clinical features and what appeared to be pituitary apoplexy on radiological analysis. Lymphocytic hypophysitis is a rare cause of pituitary dysfunction, and is thought to be an autoimmune disorder. It typically affects young peri-partum women, with clinical features that are related to pituitary hypofunction, and an uncertain natural history. It is difficult to radiologically differentiate lymphocytic hypophysitis from pituitary macroadenoma, therefore, the gold standard of diagnosis remains histological. It is rarely reported in the elderly (> 70 years old), however, given its unpredictable clinical course it remains an important differential diagnosis in patients of this age group who present with features suggestive of pituitary dysfunction. PMID:26094558

  5. Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, Paolo; Hallek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia has undergone profound changes that have been driven by an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the approval of several new drugs. Moreover, many novel drugs are currently under evaluation for rapid approval or have been approved by regulatory agencies, further broadening the available therapeutic armamentarium for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The use of novel biological and genetic parameters combined with a careful clinical evaluation allows us to dissect some of the heterogeneity of the disease and to distinguish patients with a very mild onset and course, who often will not need any treatment, from those with an intermediate prognosis and a third group with a very aggressive course (high-risk leukemia). On this background, it becomes increasingly challenging to select the right treatment strategy. In this paper, we describe our own approach to the management of different patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24881042

  6. Approach to Chronic Lymphocytic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Nadkarni, Nilesh

    2015-09-01

    Chronic meningitis is a common clinical problem. Early diagnosis and appropriate therapy is important in improving the overall outcome and to prevent long-lasting sequels. As many etiological agents lead to the development of chronic lymphocytic meningitis, it is important to develop a systematic approach to the diagnosis; taking clues from history, examination and laboratory tests, to make an accurate diagnosis and institute appropriate therapy. This review focuses on the diagnostic approach towards the commonly encountered situation of chronic lymphocytic meningitis. Chronic meningitis is defined as meningeal inflammation that persists for more than 4 weeks. Chronic meningitis accounts for less than 10% of all the cases of meningitis.1 Causes of chronic lymphocytic meningitis are mainly divided into infectious and non-infectious listed in Table 1.2 Due to advancement in investigations, diseases causing chronic meningitis may be diagnosed earlier than 4 weeks and hence the definition should be considered as a rough guideline. PMID:27608867

  7. Preparative electrophoresis of living lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.; Bigazzi, P. E.; Gillman, C. F.; Allen, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Vertical liquid columns containing low molecular weight dextran density gradients can be used for preparative lymphocyte electrophoresis on earth, in simulation of 0 gravity conditions. Another method that has been tested at 1 G, is the electrophoresis of lymphocytes in a upward direction in vertical columns. By both methods up to 10 to the 7th power lymphocytes can be separated at one time in a 30 cm glass column of 8 mm inside diameter, at 12 v/cm, in 2 hours. Due to convection and sedimentation problems, the separation at 1 G is less than ideal, but it is expected that at 0 gravity electrophoresis will prove to be a uniquely powerful cell separation tool. The technical feasibility of electrophoresing inert particles at 0 G has been proven earlier, during the flight of Apollo 16.

  8. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-09-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  9. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  10. Genes controlling receptors for ecotropic and xenotropic type C virus in Mus cervicolor and Mus musculus.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, T H; Rapp, U R

    1979-01-01

    Gene loci controlling cell surface receptors for murine leukemia virus were studied by using murine X Chinese hamster hybrid cells. Hybrids which exclusively segregate murine chromosomes were made by fusing Mus cervicolor and Mus musculus lymphocytes to hamster fibroblasts. Sensitivity to Moloney murine leukemia virus infecotion and specific binding of the envelope glycoprotein of Rauscher murine leukemia virus (gp70) cosegregate and isozyme analysis show an association with chromosome 5 in both species. With the possible exception of one clone, no evidence was found for a proviral integration site independent of chromosome 5. Evidence is presented for additional unlinked ectropic and xenotropic receptors independent of chromosome 5. PMID:219245

  11. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios: are they useful for predicting gestational diabetes mellitus during pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Sargın, Mehmet Akif; Yassa, Murat; Taymur, Bilge Dogan; Celik, Ayhan; Ergun, Emrah; Tug, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate whether the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) could be utilized to screen for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Subjects and methods NLR and PLR were assessed by retrospective analysis of 762 healthy and pregnant women with GDM. The patients were stratified into four groups, as follows: GDM (n=144), impaired glucose tolerance (n=76), only screen positive (n=238), and control (n=304). Results The leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in the study groups compared with the control group (P=0.001; P<0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to the NLR and PLR (P>0.05). Conclusion We do not recommend that blood NLR and PLR can be used to screen for GDM. However, increase in the leukocyte count is an important marker for GDM as it provides evidence of subclinical inflammation. PMID:27217758

  12. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Looger, Loren L.; Zhou, Xu-jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Harley, John B.; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,492 SLE cases and 12,675 controls from six East-Asian cohorts, to identify novel and better localize known SLE susceptibility loci. We identified 10 novel loci as well as 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the novel loci, the most significant was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta=3.75×10−117, OR=2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We localized the most likely functional variants for each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene regulation data. Ten putative variants are known to alter cis- or trans-gene expression. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B- and T-cell biology. Together with previously known loci, the explained heritability of SLE increases to 24%. Novel loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci, and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics. PMID:26808113

  13. Functional inactivation of lymphocytes by methylene blue with visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Cheng, Zhenzhen; Mo, Qin; Wang, Li; Wang, Xun; Wu, Xiaofei; Jia, Yao; Huang, Yuwen

    2015-10-01

    Transfusion of allogeneic white blood cells (WBCs) may cause adverse reactions in immunocompromised recipients, including transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), which is often fatal and incurable. In this study, the in vitro effect of methylene blue with visible light (MB + L) treatment on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production was measured to investigate whether MB + L can be used to prevent immune reactions that result from transfused lymphocytes. WBCs and 3 μM of MB were mixed and transferred into medical PVC bags, which were then exposed to visible light. Gamma irradiation was conducted as a parallel positive control. The cells without treatment were used as untreated group. All the groups were tested for the ability of cell proliferation and cytokine production upon stimulation. After incubation with mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or plate-bound anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, the proliferation of MB + L/gamma-irradiation treated lymphocytes was significantly inhibited (P < 0.01) as compared to the untreated ones; the proliferation inhibitive rate of the MB + L group was even higher than that of gamma-irradiated cells (73.77% ± 28.75% vs. 44.72% ± 38.20%). MB + L treated cells incubated up to 7 days with PHA also showed no significant proliferation. The levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-1β present in the supernatant of MB + L treated lymphocytes upon stimulation were significantly lower than those of untreated lymphocytes. These results demonstrated that MB + L treatment functionally and irreversibly inactivated lymphocytes by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation and the production of cytokines. MB + L treatment might be a promising method for the prevention of adverse immune responses caused by WBCs. PMID:26295729

  14. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  15. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoclonal antibodies to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia Targeted therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia In recent years, new ... These drugs are often referred to as targeted therapy. Some of these drugs can be useful in ...

  16. Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Fawwaz, Rashid A.; Richards, Powell

    1985-01-01

    Lymphocytes labelled with .beta.-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

  17. Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Richards, P.

    1983-05-03

    Lymphocytes labelled with ..beta..-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

  18. Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic: Overview Print to PDF Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic: Overview Approved by the ... Platelets that help the blood to clot About leukemia Types of leukemia are named after the specific ...

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies 12 new susceptibility loci for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mells, George F; Floyd, James A B; Morley, Katherine I; Cordell, Heather J; Franklin, Christopher S; Shin, So-Youn; Heneghan, Michael A; Neuberger, James M; Donaldson, Peter T; Day, Darren B; Ducker, Samantha J; Muriithi, Agnes W; Wheater, Elizabeth F; Hammond, Christopher J; Dawwas, Muhammad F; Jones, David E; Peltonen, Leena; Alexander, Graeme J; Sandford, Richard N; Anderson, Carl A

    2011-04-01

    In addition to the HLA locus, six genetic risk factors for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have been identified in recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To identify additional loci, we carried out a GWAS using 1,840 cases from the UK PBC Consortium and 5,163 UK population controls as part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). We followed up 28 loci in an additional UK cohort of 620 PBC cases and 2,514 population controls. We identified 12 new susceptibility loci (at a genome-wide significance level of P < 5 × 10⁻⁸) and replicated all previously associated loci. We identified three further new loci in a meta-analysis of data from our study and previously published GWAS results. New candidate genes include STAT4, DENND1B, CD80, IL7R, CXCR5, TNFRSF1A, CLEC16A and NFKB1. This study has considerably expanded our knowledge of the genetic architecture of PBC. PMID:21399635

  20. Combination of bendamustine and rituximab as front-line therapy for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: multicenter, retrospective clinical practice experience with 279 cases outside of controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Massimo; Zirlik, Katja; Ciolli, Stefania; Mauro, Francesca R; Di Renzo, Nicola; Mastrullo, Lucia; Angrilli, Francesco; Molica, Stefano; Tripepi, Giovanni; Giordano, Annamaria; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Selleri, Carmine; Coscia, Marta; Musso, Maurizio; Orsucci, Lorella; Mannina, Donato; Rago, Angela; Giannotta, Angela; Ferrara, Felicetto; Herishanu, Yair; Shvidel, Lev; Tadmor, Tamar; Scortechini, Ilaria; Ilariucci, Fiorella; Murru, Roberta; Guarini, Attilio; Musuraca, Gerardo; Mineo, Giuseppe; Vincelli, Iolanda; Arcari, Annalisa; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Caparrotti, Giuseppe; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Levato, Luciano; Villa, Maria Rosaria; De Paolis, Maria Rosaria; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Polliack, Aaron; Morabito, Fortunato

    2016-06-01

    Recently, encouraging results in terms of safety and efficacy have been obtained using bendamustine-rituximab (BR) in untreated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) patients enrolled in a phase II study. Here, we report a retrospective international multicenter study of CLL patients treated with BR as front-line therapy. The cohort included 279 patients with progressive CLL from 33 centers (29 Italian, 3 Israeli and 1 German) who received at least 1 cycle of BR as first-line treatment during the 2008-2014 period. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BR administered as front-line therapy, outside of controlled clinical trials. Median age was 70 years (range, 43-86 years); 62.4% were males and 35.8% had Binet stage C. Forty-two patients (15.2%) were unfit (cumulative illness rating scale [CIRS] score ≥7), and 140 (50.2%) had creatinine clearance ≤70 ml/min. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation analysis, available for 192 cases, showed that 21 (10.9%) had del11q and 18 (9.4%) del17p. The overall response rate (ORR) was 86.4%, with a complete remission rate of 28%. Patients with del17p had an ORR of 66.7%. After median follow-up of 24 months, the 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 69.9%; CIRS ≥7, immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (IGHV) unmutated status, del17p and BR dose intensity <80% were independently associated with shorter PFS. Grade III or IV neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anaemia were observed in 25.9%, 15.4%, and 15.1% of patients, respectively. Twenty-four patients (8.6%) had severe infections. BR is also an effective and safe regimen for untreated CLL patients, outside of controlled clinical trials. PMID:27127905

  1. Memory B lymphocytes determine repertoire oligoclonality early after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    OMAZIC, B; LUNDKVIST, I; MATTSSON, J; PERMERT, J; NÄSMAN-BJÖRK, I

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if oligoclonality of the Ig repertoire post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is restricted to memory B lymphocytes or if it is a general property among B lymphocytes. As a measure of B lymphocyte repertoire diversity, we have analysed size distribution of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified Ig H complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) in naive and memory B lymphocytes isolated from patients before HSCT and at 3, 6 and 12 months after HSCT as well as from healthy controls. We demonstrate a limited variation of the IgH CDR3 repertoire in the memory B lymphocyte population compared to the naive B cell population. This difference was significant at 3 and 6 months post-HSCT. Compared to healthy controls there is a significant restriction of the memory B lymphocyte repertoire at 3 months after HSCT, but not of the naive B lymphocyte repertoire. Twelve months after HSCT, the IgH CDR3 repertoire in both memory and naive B lymphocytes are as diverse as in healthy controls. Thus, our findings suggest a role for memory B cells in the restriction of the oligoclonal B cell repertoire observed early after HSCT, which may be of importance when considering reimmunization of transplanted patients. PMID:12974769

  2. Detection of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Associated Antigen-4 Gene Polymorphism in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Roshdan M; Desouky, Somaya M; Emam, Sherin M; Abed, Neveen Tawfik; Mohamed, Sahar Y

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic childhood illnesses. Interplay between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors is thought to provide the fundamental element for the disease. It has been shown that more than 40 genetic loci are associated with T1DM. Important one among these is the CTLA-4. This work aimed to detect Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) gene polymorphism in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus T1DM using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to clarify its role in the susceptibility to T1DM. The study was carried out on forty unrelated Egyptian children with TIDM. Twenty unrelated healthy children were enrolled as a control group. Blood samples were collected from patients and control groups and subjected to CTLA-4 gene polymorphism analysis using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). CTLA-4 G allele and GG homozygous genotype were significantly increased in T1DM patients than in control group (P < 0.001, P = 0.002 respectively). There was significant association between the three CTLA-4 genotypes (AA, AG, GG) and diabetic complications (p = 0.002), AG and GG polymorphisms were associated with complications of diabetes with ratio 84.6% and 100% respectively. While no association was found with sex, weight, height, risk factors of diabetes or insulin treatment. It was concluded that there is a strong association between AG polymorphism and T1DM (P = 0.002). PMID:26415372

  3. Multispecific and heterogeneous recognition of the gag protein by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) from HIV-infected patients: factors other than the MHC control the epitopic specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Buseyne, F; Janvier, G; Fleury, B; Schmidt, D; Rivière, Y

    1994-01-01

    The HIV gag polyprotein is a major target for recognition by CTL in infected humans. Using recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVV) expressing truncations of the p24gag, and the p18gag, p15gag and HIV-2 p56gag proteins, the characterization of epitope regions recognized by in vitro-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 18 infected patients has been studied. The gag-specific response of most individuals is polyclonal and multispecific, and interindividual variations between target epitope regions were frequently observed, despite shared MHC alleles. As CTL may play an important role in the control of HIV replication in infected hosts, these results have important implications for designing vaccine strategies. PMID:7521806

  4. Real-Time Imaging of Resident T Cells in Human Lung and Ovarian Carcinomas Reveals How Different Tumor Microenvironments Control T Lymphocyte Migration

    PubMed Central

    Bougherara, Houcine; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Alifano, Marco; Ngô, Charlotte; Damotte, Diane; Le Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Peranzoni, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    T cells play a key role in the battle against cancer. To perform their antitumor activities, T cells need to adequately respond to tumor antigens by establishing contacts with either malignant cells or antigen-presenting cells. These latter functions rely on a series of migratory steps that go from entry of T cells into the tumor followed by their locomotion in the tumor stroma. Our knowledge of how T cells migrate within tumors mainly comes from experiments performed in mouse models. Whereas such systems have greatly advanced our understanding, they do not always faithfully recapitulate the disease observed in cancer patients. We previously described a technique based on tissue slices that enables to track with real-time imaging microscopy the motile behavior of fluorescent T cells plated onto fresh sections of human lung tumors. We have now refined this approach to monitor the locomotion of resident tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cells labeled with fluorescently coupled antibodies. Using this approach, our findings reveal that CD8 T cells accumulate in the stroma of ovarian and lung carcinomas but move slowly in this compartment. Conversely, even though less populated, tumors islets were found to be zones of faster migration for resident CD8 T cells. We also confirm the key role played by collagen fibers, which, by their orientation, spacing and density, control the distribution and migration of resident CD8 T cells within the tumor stroma. We have subsequently demonstrated that, under some physical tissue constraints, CD8 T cells exhibited a mode of migration characterized by alternate forward and backward movements. In sum, using an ex vivo assay to track CD8 T cells in fresh human tumor tissues, we have identified the extracellular matrix as a major stromal component in influencing T cell migration, thereby impacting the control of tumor growth. This approach will aid in the development and testing of novel immunotherapy strategies to promote T cell migration in

  5. Study of Toll-like receptor gene loci in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, M; Kwiatkowski, R; Albrecht, M; Fischer, A; Hampe, J; Müller-Quernheim, J; Schwinger, E; Schreiber, S

    2008-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-factorial systemic disease of granulomatous inflammation. Current concepts of the aetiology include interactions of unknown environmental triggers with an inherited susceptibility. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are main components of innate immunity and therefore TLR genes are candidate susceptibility genes in sarcoidosis. Ten members of the human TLR gene family have been identified and mapped to seven chromosomal segments. The aim of this study was to investigate all known TLR gene loci for genetic linkage with sarcoidosis and to follow positive signals with different methods. We analysed linkage of TLR gene loci to sarcoidosis by use of closely flanking microsatellite markers in 83 families with 180 affected siblings. We found significant linkage between sarcoidosis and markers of the TLR4 gene locus on chromosome 9q (non-parametric linkage score 2·63, P = 0·0043). No linkage was found for the remaining TLR gene loci. We subsequently genotyped 1203 sarcoidosis patients from 997 families, 1084 relatives and 537 control subjects for four single nucleotide polymorphisms of TLR4, including Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile. This genotype data set was studied by case–control comparisons and transmission disequilibrium tests, but showed no significant results. In summary, TLR4 − w ith significant genetic linkage results − appears to be the most promising member of the TLR gene family for further investigation in sarcoidosis. However, our results do not confirm the TLR4 polymorphisms Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile as susceptibility markers. Our results rather point to another as yet unidentified variant within or close to TLR4 that might confer susceptibility to sarcoidosis. PMID:18422738

  6. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. )

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  7. The course of lymphocytic hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    Bitton, R N; Slavin, M; Decker, R E; Zito, J; Schneider, B S

    1991-07-01

    A 27-year-old woman presented to our institution in her seventh month of pregnancy with complaints of headache and visual field disturbance. Workup revealed bitemporal hemianopia, a markedly enlarged pituitary gland on computed tomography scan, and biochemical evidence of partial hypopituitarism. At surgery, a biopsy specimen of the pituitary gland was taken revealing lymphocytic hypophysitis. The patient was treated with steroids and replacement doses of thyroid hormone. Visual fields improved postoperatively. A repeat computed tomography scan obtained 2 months after an uneventful pregnancy showed that her pituitary had regained normal size and contour. Over the next 9 months she had gradual recovery of all pituitary function. This case allowed us to follow and document the course of lymphocytic hypophysitis from its presentation as a macroadenoma with partial hypopituitarism to full recovery of both size and hormonal function of the pituitary. Lymphocytic hypophysitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pituitary mass or pituitary dysfunction presenting in pregnancy. In patients with suspected lymphocytic hypophysitis and a pituitary mass, a trial of steroids may be therapeutic. PMID:2053072

  8. Recurrent abortions and lymphocyte transfusions.

    PubMed

    Bjercke, S

    1994-05-01

    Normal pregnancies depend on successful implantation of the placenta in the uterus. The trophoblast which forms the ultimate interface between the fetal and maternal tissue seems to lack the foreign (allo) antigens (namely HLA/TLX) required to induce immunological rejection reactions in the mother. It was previously believed that the trophoblast expressed paternal allo antigens and that successful pregnancies were dependent on so called 'kind' (non-cytotoxic or non-complement binding) blocking antibodies in order to protect the fetal unit from maternal cytotoxic T-cells and -antibodies. Blocking antibodies attached to paternal antigens on the trophoblast were assumed to prevent maternal cytotoxic T cell and cytotoxic antibodies from recognising the trophoblast as foreign tissue. On this assumption it was reasoned that transfusions of paternal HLA-expressing lymphocytes would increase maternal antipaternal HLA (TLX) blocking antibodies and thus be beneficial to women who experienced multiple miscarriages. There is, however, no scientific evidence for a specific immune response after lymphocyte transfusions that fulfil this function. Immunological tests, as for example mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), on peripheral blood lymphocytes do not seem to reflect the local immune state in the uterus, either in the pregnant or the non-pregnant state. Since the trophoblast forms the ultimate interface between fetal and maternal tissue, its structure, secretions, and interaction with the decidua must be of definite importance for implantation of the blastocyst and growth of the embryo. PMID:8009967

  9. Aiolos and Lymphocyte Mimicry in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Lance S; Liu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive carcinomas tend to adopt behaviors normally restricted to lymphocytes, including anchorage-independent mobilization, response to chemokines, and modulation of local inflammatory conditions. In a recent study we identified the lymphocyte-restricted chromatin regulator Aiolos as an epigenetic driver of lymphocyte mimicry in lung cancer that links immune cell development to metastatic behavior. PMID:27308319

  10. Presence of Multiple Independent Effects in Risk Loci of Common Complex Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiayi

    2012-01-01

    Many genetic loci and SNPs associated with many common complex human diseases and traits are now identified. The total genetic variance explained by these loci for a trait or disease, however, has often been very small. Much of the “missing heritability” has been revealed to be hidden in the genome among the large number of variants with small effects. Several recent studies have reported the presence of multiple independent SNPs and genetic heterogeneity in trait-associated loci. It is therefore reasonable to speculate that such a phenomenon could be common among loci known to be associated with a complex trait or disease. For testing this hypothesis, a total of 117 loci known to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn disease (CD), type 1 diabetes (T1D), or type 2 diabetes (T2D) were selected. The presence of multiple independent effects was assessed in the case-control samples genotyped by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium study and imputed with SNP genotype information from the HapMap Project and the 1000 Genomes Project. Eleven loci with evidence of multiple independent effects were identified in the study, and the number was expected to increase at larger sample sizes and improved statistical power. The variance explained by the multiple effects in a locus was much higher than the variance explained by the single reported SNP effect. The results thus significantly improve our understanding of the allelic structure of these individual disease-associated loci, as well as our knowledge of the general genetic mechanisms of common complex traits and diseases. PMID:22770979

  11. Investigation of four novel male androgenetic alopecia susceptibility loci: no association with female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Nuwaihyd, Rima; Redler, Silke; Heilmann, Stefanie; Drichel, Dmitriy; Wolf, Sabrina; Birch, Pattie; Dobson, Kathy; Lutz, Gerhard; Giehl, Kathrin A; Kruse, Roland; Tazi-Ahnini, Rachid; Hanneken, Sandra; Böhm, Markus; Miesel, Anja; Fischer, Tobias; Wolff, Hans; Becker, Tim; Garcia-Bartels, Natalie; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Nöthen, Markus M; Messenger, Andrew G; Betz, Regina C

    2014-05-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a common hair loss disorder in women and has a complex mode of inheritance. The etiopathogenesis of FPHL is largely unknown; however, it is hypothesized that FPHL and male pattern baldness [androgenetic alopecia (AGA)] share common genetic susceptibility alleles. Our recent findings indicate that the major AGA locus, an X-chromosome region containing the androgen receptor and the ectodysplasin A2 receptor (EDA2R) genes, may represent a common genetic factor underlying both early-onset FPHL and AGA. This gives further support for the widespread assumption of shared susceptibility loci for FPHL and AGA. However, we could not demonstrate association of further AGA risk loci, including 20p11, 1p36.22, 2q37.3, 7p21.1, 7q11.22, 17q21.31, and 18q21.1, with FPHL. Interestingly, a recent study identified four novel AGA risk loci in chromosomal regions 2q35, 3q25.1, 5q33.3, and 12p12.1. In particular, the 2q35 locus and its gene WNT10A point to an as-yet unknown involvement of the WNT signaling pathway in AGA. We hypothesized that the novel loci and thus also the WNT signaling may have a role in the etiopathogenesis of FPHL and therefore examined the role of these novel AGA risk loci in our FPHL samples comprising 440 German and 145 UK affected patients, 500 German unselected controls (blood donors), and 179 UK supercontrols. Patients and controls were genotyped for the top two single nucleotide polymorphisms at each of the four AGA loci. However, none of the genotyped variants displayed any significant association. In conclusion, the results of this study provide no support for the hypothesis that the novel AGA loci influence susceptibility to FPHL. PMID:24352509

  12. Chemokine receptor patterns in lymphocytes mirror metastatic spreading in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P.; Flament, Caroline; Vimond, Nadège; Blattner, Carolin; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Roberti, María Paula; Daillère, Romain; Vétizou, Marie; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Semeraro, Michaëla; Caignard, Anne; Slingluff, Craig L.; Sallusto, Federica; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Weide, Benjamin; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook; Dalle, Stéphane; Cavalcanti, Andréa; Kroemer, Guido; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Maio, Michele; Wong, Phillip; Yuan, Jianda; Wolchok, Jedd; Umansky, Viktor; Eggermont, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma prognosis is dictated by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, the migratory and functional behavior of which is guided by chemokine or cytokine gradients. Here, we retrospectively analyzed the expression patterns of 9 homing receptors (CCR/CXCR) in naive and memory CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in 57 patients with metastatic melanoma (MMel) with various sites of metastases to evaluate whether T cell CCR/CXCR expression correlates with intratumoral accumulation, metastatic progression, and/or overall survival (OS). Homing receptor expression on lymphocytes strongly correlated with MMel dissemination. Loss of CCR6 or CXCR3, but not cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA), on circulating T cell subsets was associated with skin or lymph node metastases, loss of CXCR4, CXCR5, and CCR9 corresponded with lung involvement, and a rise in CCR10 or CD103 was associated with widespread dissemination. High frequencies of CD8+CCR9+ naive T cells correlated with prolonged OS, while neutralizing the CCR9/CCL25 axis in mice stimulated tumor progression. The expansion of CLA-expressing effector memory CD8+ T cells in response to a single administration of CTLA4 blockade predicted disease control at 3 months in 47 patients with MMel. Thus, specific CCR/CXCR expression patterns on circulating T lymphocytes may guide potential diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:26854930

  13. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  14. Chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of pharmaceutical factory workers

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpavathi, K.; Prasad, M.H.; Reddy, P.P.

    1986-10-01

    Chromosomes were analyzed in peripheral lymphocytes of 31 male workers who were exposed to sulfonamide drugs in a pharmaceutical factory. The number of cells with structural chromosomal aberrations was significantly increased as compared to 15 unexposed individuals (controls). The chromosomal damage observed was mainly gaps and breaks.

  15. Moderate exercise increases the metabolism and immune function of lymphocytes in rats.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Francisco; Bacurau, Aline Villa Nova; Pereira, Guilherme Borges; Araújo, Ronaldo Carvalho; Almeida, Sandro Soares; Moraes, Milton Rocha; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Costa Rosa, Luis Fernando Bicudo Pereira; Navalta, James; Prestes, Jonato; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira

    2013-05-01

    Exercise modulates both glucose and glutamine metabolism which influences lymphocyte function. We investigated the influence of chronic moderate exercise on glucose and glutamine metabolism in lymphocytes, the associated influence on proliferation, and cytokine and immunoglobulin production. Male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were placed in an exercise training group (N = 15, 1 h day(-1) at 60 % VO₂max, 5 days week(-1)) for 8 weeks of exercise, or a sedentary control group. Twenty-four hours following the final training session, lymphocytes were separated, and the incorporation of [U-14C]-glucose, [U-14C]-glutamine, and [2-14C]-thymidine from the supernatant was measured. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, hexokinase, and glutaminase was measured. Lymphocytes were stimulated with ConA and LPS and incubated with the Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine and plasma IgG and IgE were measured. Glutamine metabolism increased in both T and B lymphocytes in the trained group. In the trained group, proliferative capacity increased T lymphocytes under ConA stimulation, and increased B lymphocytes with LPS. There was a significant increase in IL-2 production and decrease in IL-4 in the trained group compared with sedentary controls. IL-2R and TNFR increased in trained rats while IL-4R decreased and were more pronounced in T lymphocytes compared with B lymphocytes. In both lymphocyte subsets, exercise training significantly increased the expression of CD54+ and CD30+ cell markers. Exercise training increased plasma IgG compared with the sedentary group. In conclusion, moderate exercise training improves immune function and metabolism in T and B lymphocytes, reflecting an increased ability to respond to immune challenges. PMID:23212119

  16. Lymphocyte protein synthesis is increased with the progression of HIV-associated disease to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Caso, G; Garlick, P J; Gelato, M C; McNurlan, M A

    2001-12-01

    HIV infection has been shown to affect lymphocyte function and to reduce lymphocyte responsiveness in vitro to mitogenic stimulation, but little is known about lymphocyte metabolism in vivo and how it is affected during the course of the disease. This study investigated the metabolic activity of lymphocytes in vivo through the progression of HIV-associated disease. Lymphocyte protein synthesis was measured with L-[(2)H(5)]phenylalanine (45 mg/kg body weight) in healthy volunteers (n=7), in patients who were HIV-positive (n=7) but asymptomatic, and in patients with AIDS (n=8). The rates of lymphocyte protein synthesis [expressed as a percentage of lymphocyte protein, i.e. fractional synthesis rate (FSR)] were not altered in HIV-positive patients compared with healthy controls (7.9+/-1.28% and 9.1+/-0.53%/day respectively), but were significantly elevated in AIDS patients (14.0+/-1.16%/day; P<0.05). The serum concentration of the cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) increased with the progression of the disease, and TNF-alpha levels were significantly higher in AIDS patients (6.81+/-0.88 ng/l) than in healthy controls (3.09+/-0.27 ng/l; P<0.05). Lymphocyte protein FSR was positively correlated with serum TNF-alpha concentration (r=0.55, P=0.009) and negatively correlated with CD4(+) lymphocyte count (r=-0.70, P=0.004). The elevation of lymphocyte protein synthesis in AIDS patients suggests a higher rate of turnover of lymphocytes. This may be associated with a generalized activation of the immune system, which is also reflected by the elevated serum TNF-alpha concentration in the late stages of HIV-associated disease. PMID:11724643

  17. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  18. Ibrutinib or Idelalisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  19. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M; Do, Chuong B; Hernandez, Dena G; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M Arfan; Ioannidis, John P A; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Bis, Joshua C; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H; Clark, Lorraine N; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were then tested in an independent set of 5,353 cases and 5,551 controls. Of the 32 tested SNPs, 24 replicated, including 6 newly identified loci. Conditional analyses within loci showed that four loci, including GBA, GAK-DGKQ, SNCA and the HLA region, contain a secondary independent risk variant. In total, we identified and replicated 28 independent risk variants for Parkinson's disease across 24 loci. Although the effect of each individual locus was small, risk profile analysis showed substantial cumulative risk in a comparison of the highest and lowest quintiles of genetic risk (odds ratio (OR) = 3.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.55-4.30; P = 2 × 10(-16)). We also show six risk loci associated with proximal gene expression or DNA methylation. PMID:25064009

  20. Sex-specific quantitative trait loci govern susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination.

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Russell J; Roper, Randall J; Rhein, Dominic M; Melvold, Roger W; Haynes, Lia; Ma, Runlin Z; Doerge, R W; Teuscher, Cory

    2003-01-01

    Susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination (TMEVD), a mouse model for multiple sclerosis (MS), is genetically controlled. Through a mouse-human comparative mapping approach, identification of candidate susceptibility loci for MS based on the location of TMEVD susceptibility loci may be possible. Composite interval mapping (CIM) identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling TMEVD severity in male and female backcross populations derived from susceptible DBA/2J and resistant BALBc/ByJ mice. We report QTL on chromosomes 1, 5, 15, and 16 affecting male mice. In addition, we identified two QTL in female mice located on chromosome 1. Our results support the existence of three linked sex-specific QTL on chromosome 1 with opposing effects on the severity of the clinical signs of TMEV-induced disease in male and female mice. PMID:12663542

  1. Sequencing-based approach identified three new susceptibility loci for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yujun; Jin, Xin; Xu, Jinhua; Gao, Jinping; Du, Xiaoqing; Duan, Dawei; Li, Bing; Zhao, Jinhua; Zhan, Wenying; Tang, Huayang; Tang, Xianfa; Li, Yang; Cheng, Hui; Zuo, Xianbo; Mei, Junpu; Zhou, Fusheng; Liang, Bo; Chen, Gang; Shen, Changbing; Cui, Hongzhou; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Change; Wang, Wenjun; Zheng, Xiaodong; Fan, Xing; Wang, Zaixing; Xiao, Fengli; Cui, Yong; Li, Yingrui; Wang, Jun; Yang, Sen; Xu, Lei; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    In a previous large-scale exome sequencing analysis for psoriasis, we discovered seven common and low-frequency missense variants within six genes with genome-wide significance. Here we describe an in-depth analysis of noncoding variants based on sequencing data (10,727 cases and 10,582 controls) with replication in an independent cohort of Han Chinese individuals consisting of 4,480 cases and 6,521 controls to identify additional psoriasis susceptibility loci. We confirmed four known psoriasis susceptibility loci (IL12B, IFIH1, ERAP1 and RNF114; 2.30 × 10(-20)≤P≤2.41 × 10(-7)) and identified three new susceptibility loci: 4q24 (NFKB1) at rs1020760 (P=2.19 × 10(-8)), 12p13.3 (CD27-LAG3) at rs758739 (P=4.08 × 10(-8)) and 17q12 (IKZF3) at rs10852936 (P=1.96 × 10(-8)). Two suggestive loci, 3p21.31 and 17q25, are also identified with P<1.00 × 10(-6). The results of this study increase the number of confirmed psoriasis risk loci and provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:25006012

  2. Genome scan for nonadditive heterotic trait loci reveals mainly underdominant effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Laiba, Efrat; Glikaite, Ilana; Levy, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Fridman, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The overdominant model of heterosis explains the superior phenotype of hybrids by synergistic allelic interaction within heterozygous loci. To map such genetic variation in yeast, we used a population doubling time dataset of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 × 16 diallel and searched for major contributing heterotic trait loci (HTL). Heterosis was observed for the majority of hybrids, as they surpassed their best parent growth rate. However, most of the local heterozygous loci identified by genome scan were surprisingly underdominant, i.e., reduced growth. We speculated that in these loci adverse effects on growth resulted from incompatible allelic interactions. To test this assumption, we eliminated these allelic interactions by creating hybrids with local hemizygosity for the underdominant HTLs, as well as for control random loci. Growth of hybrids was indeed elevated for most hemizygous to HTL genes but not for control genes, hence validating the results of our genome scan. Assessing the consequences of local heterozygosity by reciprocal hemizygosity and allele replacement assays revealed the influence of genetic background on the underdominant effects of HTLs. Overall, this genome-wide study on a multi-parental hybrid population provides a strong argument against single gene overdominance as a major contributor to heterosis, and favors the dominance complementation model. PMID:26967146

  3. [Particularities of blood lymphocyte response to irradiation in vitro in breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, N Iu; Antonenko, A V; Osipov, A N

    2011-01-01

    DNA breaks and their repair efficiency were analyzed in irradiated in vitro lymphocytes (at doses 1 Gy, gamma-radiation of 60Co, dose rate 1 Gy/min) isolated from peripheral blood of 41 untreated patients with breast cancer and 25 healthy donors using the DNA comet assay under non-denaturing conditions (mainly double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), as well as apoptotic cell death using the DNA halo assay. To estimate the expression of bystander effect, the cells were incubated in a culture medium obtained from lymphocytes irradiated in vitro at doses 1 Gy. The average DSB level in blood lymphocytes of breast cancer patients was shown to be significantly higher (p < 0.05) compared with that in control donors. In general, the following effects were observed in irradiated in vitro lymphocytes of cancer patients: (1) increased sensitivity to y-radiation-induced DNA DSBs compared with lymphocytes from healthy donors, (2) reduced repair efficiency of these damages. Incubation of irradiated blood lymphocytes in a medium from irradiated cells led to an increased relative number of DNA DSBs and an elevated fraction of cells dying through apoptotic pathway both in blood lymphocytes from cancer patients and control donors. However, these non-targeted effects were more expressed for the blood lymphocytes of breast cancer patients. PMID:21950102

  4. Control of Murine Cytomegalovirus in the Lungs: Relative but Not Absolute Immunodominance of the Immediate-Early 1 Nonapeptide during the Antiviral Cytolytic T-Lymphocyte Response in Pulmonary Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Holtappels, Rafaela; Podlech, Jürgen; Geginat, Gernot; Steffens, Hans-Peter; Thomas, Doris; Reddehase, Matthias J.

    1998-01-01

    The lungs are a major organ site of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, pathogenesis, and latency. Interstitial CMV pneumonia represents a critical manifestation of CMV disease, in particular in recipients of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We have employed a murine model for studying the immune response to CMV in the lungs in the specific scenario of immune reconstitution after syngeneic BMT. Control of pulmonary infection was associated with a vigorous infiltration of the lungs, which was characterized by a preferential recruitment and massive expansion of the CD8 subset of α/β T cells. The infiltrate provided a microenvironment in which the CD8 T cells differentiated into mature effector cells, that is, into functionally active cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL). This gave us the opportunity for an ex vivo testing of the antigen specificities of CTL present at a relevant organ site of viral pathogenesis. The contribution of the previously identified immediate-early 1 (IE1) nonapeptide of murine CMV was evaluated by comparison with the CD3ɛ-redirected cytolytic activity used as a measure of the overall CTL response in the lungs. The IE1 peptide was detected by pulmonary CTL, but it accounted for a minor part of the response. Interestingly, no additional viral or virus-induced antigenic peptides were detectable among naturally processed peptides derived from infected lungs, even though infected fibroblasts were recognized in a major histocompatibility complex-restricted manner. We conclude that the antiviral pulmonary immune response is a collaborative function that involves many antigenic peptides, among which the IE1 peptide is immunodominant in a relative sense. PMID:9696814

  5. Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N.M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G.M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10−7 study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r2 = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10−7 at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies. PMID:22100073

  6. Blood pressure loci identified with a gene-centric array.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R; Newhouse, Stephen J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G; Whincup, Peter H; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Dobson, Richard J; Howard, Philip J; Mein, Charles A; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Goodall, Alison H; Fowkes, F Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Nelson, Christopher P; Tobin, Martin D; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Hastie, Claire E; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Wells, George A; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V; Dominiczak, Anna F; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D; Samani, Nilesh J; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B

    2011-12-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10(-7) study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r(2) = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10(-7) at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies. PMID:22100073

  7. Binding of antagonists of H1 and H2 histamine receptors to peripheral blood lymphocytes of atopic and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Zak-Nejmark, T; Małolepszy, J; Osos, M; Nadobna, G; Jutel, M

    1991-01-01

    The binding of the antagonists of histamine H1 and H2 receptors by peripheral blood lymphocytes from atopic and healthy subjects was investigated. We found that lymphocytes from atopic subjects showed statistically significant decrease in the binding of H2 receptor antagonist - ranitidine. In addition, lymphocytes from atopic and control subjects had similar capacity of binding of H1 receptor antagonist - promethazine. The ratio of the amount of H1 and H2 antagonists, bound to lymphocytes from atopic and healthy subjects, was calculated. The difference between the values in the group of atopic (2.55) and control subjects (1.55) was statistically significant. PMID:1841552

  8. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Fortney, Kristen; Dobriban, Edgar; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Monti, Daniela; Mari, Daniela; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir; Franceschi, Claudio; Owen, Art B.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS), takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centenarians versus the general population. Next, we used iGWAS to harness information from 14 meta-analyses of disease and trait GWAS to identify longevity loci in two studies of long-lived humans. In a standard GWAS analysis, only one locus in these studies is significant (APOE/TOMM40) when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at 10%. With iGWAS, we identify eight genetic loci to associate significantly with exceptional human longevity at FDR < 10%. We followed up the eight lead SNPs in independent cohorts, and found replication evidence of four loci and suggestive evidence for one more with exceptional longevity. The loci that replicated (FDR < 5%) included APOE/TOMM40 (associated with Alzheimer’s disease), CDKN2B/ANRIL (implicated in the regulation of cellular senescence), ABO (tags the O blood group), and SH2B3/ATXN2 (a signaling gene that extends lifespan in Drosophila and a gene involved in neurological disease). Our results implicate new loci in longevity and reveal a genetic overlap between longevity and age-related diseases and traits, including coronary artery disease and Alzheimer’s disease. iGWAS provides a new analytical strategy for uncovering SNPs that influence extreme longevity, and can be applied more broadly to boost power in other studies of complex phenotypes. PMID:26677855

  9. Generation and Repair of AID-initiated DNA Lesions in B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhangguo; Wang, Jing H.

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates the secondary antibody diversification process in B lymphocytes. In mammalian B cells, this process includes somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), both of which require AID. AID induces U:G mismatch lesions in DNA that are subsequently converted into point mutations or DNA double stranded breaks during SHM/CSR. In a physiological context, AID targets immunoglobulin (Ig) loci to mediate SHM/CSR. However, recent studies reveal genome-wide access of AID to numerous non-Ig loci. Thus, AID poses a threat to the genome of B cells if AID-initiated DNA lesions cannot be properly repaired. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the specificity of AID targeting and the repair pathways responsible for processing AID-initiated DNA lesions. PMID:24748462

  10. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Ransler, F.A.; Quinn, T.W.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primers for 16 microsatellite loci were developed for the trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), a species recovering from a recent population bottleneck. In a screen of 158 individuals, the 16 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci repeatedly revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amplification in the closely related tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) was successful for all except one locus. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and ultimately aid in management efforts. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  11. G1/S Cell Cycle Checkpoint Defect in Lymphocytes from Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Misun; Kwon, Young-Ah; Lee, Yujin; Kim, Hyeran; Yun, Ji Hea; Kim, Seonwoo

    2012-01-01

    Objective We compared the cell responsiveness of activated lymphocytes to rapamycin, which blocks the G1/S transition, between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal controls to assess the early phase control defect in cell cycle. Methods Blood samples of 26 patients with AD and 28 normal controls were collected to separate peripheral lymphocytes. We measured the proportion of each cell cycle phase in activated lymphocytes using flow cytometry and evaluated the responsiveness of these lymphocytes to rapamycin. Results The patients with AD were older than the normal controls (AD 74.03±7.90 yr vs. control 68.28±6.21 yr, p=0.004). The proportion of G1 phase cells in the AD group was significantly lower than that in the control group (70.29±6.32% vs. 76.03±9.05%, p=0.01), and the proportion of S phase cells in the AD group was higher than that in control group (12.45±6.09% vs. 6.03±5.11%, p=0.001). Activated lymphocytes in patients with AD were not arrested in the G1 phase and they progressed to the late phase of the cell cycle despite rapamycin treatment, in contrast to those of normal subjects. Conclusion The patients with AD probably have a control defect of early phase cell cycle in peripheral lymphocytes that may be associated with the underlying pathology of neuronal death. PMID:23251208

  12. Sister chromatid exchange analysis in lymphocytes of workers exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed Central

    Nagaya, T; Ishikawa, N; Hata, H

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis in lymphocytes as an indicator for mutagenic effects after in vivo exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr), SCE frequency was analysed in lymphocytes of 44 Cr platers occupationally exposed to hexavalent Cr and 47 controls. Although urinary Cr analysis confirmed that the Cr platers were exposed to Cr, no effects of the exposure on SCE frequency were found. Smokers, both Cr platers and controls, had a significantly higher SCE frequency than non-smokers. These results suggest that SCE analysis in human lymphocytes is not a good indicator of possible mutagenic effects of exposure to hexavalent Cr. PMID:2920143

  13. Modified expression of peripheral blood lymphocyte muscarinic cholinergic receptors in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Emanuela; Tabbì, Luca; Scozzi, Davide; Mariotta, Salvatore; Galli, Elena; Carello, Rossella; Avitabile, Simona; Tayebati, Seyed Koshrow; Amenta, Francesco; De Vitis, Claudia; Mancini, Rita; Ricci, Alberto

    2015-07-15

    Lymphocytes possess an independent cholinergic system. We assessed the expression of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in lymphocytes from 49 asthmatic children and 10 age matched controls using Western blot. We demonstrated that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressed M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors which density were significantly increased in asthmatic children in comparison with controls. M2 and M4 receptor increase was strictly related with IgE and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measurements and with impairment in objective measurements of airway obstruction. Increased lymphocyte muscarinic cholinergic receptor expression may concur with lung cholinergic dysfunction and with inflammatory molecular framework in asthma. PMID:26025056

  14. Cryopreservation of human lymphocytes: a brief review and evaluation of an automated liquid nitrogen freezer.

    PubMed

    Glassman, A B; Bennett, C E

    1979-01-01

    Successful cryopreservation of human lymphocytes has been previously described. Cryopreserved lymphocytes are useful for a variety of in vitro immunologic studies. This study was performed to determine the applicability and/or advantages of using a programmable freezing system, and compares glycerol versus dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at varying concentrations on post-thaw viability, E-rosetting and immunoglobulin fluorescence. Prefreeze T and B lymphocyte percentages were determined. Cells were then frozen in varying concentrations of glycerol and DMSO. Optimum cryoprotectant type and concentration was determined. Lymphocytes from seven individuals were frozen by the batch method in a mechanical freezer and with the automated liquid nitrogen injection system. Data on post-thaw T and B percentages and viability revealed 10% DMSO and liquid nitrogen control freezing method at 1 C/minute as the best conditions for lymphocyte preservation as reflected by post-thaw in vitro testing. PMID:373178

  15. T-cell receptor gamma--delta lymphocytes and Eimeria vermiformis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M E; Hesketh, P; Rothwell, L; Gramzinski, R A

    1996-01-01

    The role of T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes in coccidiosis was examined by determining the course of infection with Eimeria vermiformis in BALB/c mice depleted of gamma--delta lymphocytes by treatment with GL3 monoclonal antibody. The replication of the parasite in primary infections was not greatly, or consistently, affected by this treatment, and there was no correlation between the extent of depletion of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and the number of oocysts produced. The resistance of immunized mice to challenge was not compromised by depletion of intraintestinal epithelial lymphocytes when their depletion was effected at the time of primary infection and/or administration of the challenge inoculum. Thus, T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes do not appear to be crucial to the establishment, or the control, of primary infection with E. vermiformis and are not principal mediators of the solid immunity to challenge that this infection induces. PMID:8890252

  16. The role of HLA-DR antigens in PPD-stimulated lymphocyte-monocyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Haar, D; Heron, I

    1982-11-01

    Autologous monocytes are required for an optimal lymphocyte proliferative response to purified protein derivate of tuberculin (PPD) in vitro and for a mixed lymphocyte culture induced by alloantigens. In the proliferative response to PPD we found that autologous monocytes could be replaced with HLA-DR-compatible monocytes and partly with HLA-DR semi-identical. In spite of a statistically significant difference between autologous and HLA-DR disparate monocytes in their cooperative capacity with PPD-stimulated lymphocytes, replacement in nearly one third of the cases was possible. These findings were supported by more detailed studies in which increasing numbers of allogenic and autologous monocytes were added to the isolated lymphocytes in the presence of PPD. It is concluded that the serologically defined HLA-DR antigens alone give insufficient information of the restriction elements controlling the PPD-stimulated lymphocyte-monocyte interactions. PMID:6184773

  17. Reduced lymphocyte activation in space - Role of cell-substratum interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmuender, F. K.; Kiess, M.; Lee, J.; Cogoli, A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of substratum adhesiveness on lymphocyte responsiveness was investigated by reducing and blocking cell adhesion with poly-HEMA in a simple on ground system. Cells grown on medium thick and thick poly-HEMA films were rounded in shape and displayed no signs of spreading. By contrast, on tissue culture plastic and very thin poly-HEMA films, they showed clear signs of spreading. The mitogenic response of lymphocytes grown on thick poly-HEMA films was reduced by up to 68 percent of the control (tissue culture plastic). Interferon gamma production was virtually nil when the cells were grown on the least adhesive substratum. These results show that activated lymphocytes need to anchor and spread prior to achieving an optimal proliferation response. It is concluded that decreased lymphocyte adhesion could contribute to the depressed in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness found in the microgravity conditions of space flight.

  18. Reduced lymphocyte activation in space: Role of cell-substratum interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmuender, Felix K.; Kiess, M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Lee, J.; Cogoli, Augusto

    1990-01-01

    The effect of substratum adhesiveness on lymphocyte responsiveness was investigated by reducing and blocking cell adhesion with poly-HEMA (poly (2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate)) in a simple on ground system. Cells grown on medium thick and thick poly-HEMA films were rounded in shape and displayed no signs of spreading. By contrast, on tissue culture plastic and very thin poly-HEMA films, they showed clear signs of spreading. The mitogenic response of lymphocytes grown on thick poly-HEMA films was reduced by up to 68 percent of the control (tissue culture plastic). Interferon gamma production was virtually nil when the cells were grown on the least adhesive substratum. These results show that activated lymphocytes need to anchor and spread prior to achieving an optimal proliferation response. It is concluded that decreased lymphocyte adhesion could contribute to the depressed in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness found in the microgravity conditions of space flight.

  19. The effects of a 10% soybean oil emulsion on lymphocyte transformation.

    PubMed

    Ota, D M; Copeland, E M; Corriere, J N; Richie, E R; Jacobson, K; Dudrick, S J

    1978-05-01

    Free essential fatty acids (EFA) are reported to suppress cell-mediated immunity. Because Intralipid contains a high concentration of esterified EFA, the effects of this emulsion on in vitro lymphocyte transformation were studied. Intralipid concentrations of 11.5, 115, and 230 mg% in lymphocyte cultures increased phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation by an average of 8.2% (not significant [NS]), 18.1% (p < 0.01), and 11.8% (NS), respectively. These same concentrations also increased Varidase stimulation in lymphocyte cultures by an average of 11.3 (p < 0.02), 18.9 (p < 0.02), and 4.4% (NS), respectively. Control wells did not demonstrate allergic reactions to Intralipid. These data demonstrate that Intralipid can significantly increase the mitogenic response of human thymic lymphocytes and the antigenic response of human lymphocytes, in vitro. PMID:575908

  20. Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  1. Identification of seven loci affecting mean telomere length and their association with disease.

    PubMed

    Codd, Veryan; Nelson, Christopher P; Albrecht, Eva; Mangino, Massimo; Deelen, Joris; Buxton, Jessica L; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Fischer, Krista; Esko, Tõnu; Surakka, Ida; Broer, Linda; Nyholt, Dale R; Mateo Leach, Irene; Salo, Perttu; Hägg, Sara; Matthews, Mary K; Palmen, Jutta; Norata, Giuseppe D; O'Reilly, Paul F; Saleheen, Danish; Amin, Najaf; Balmforth, Anthony J; Beekman, Marian; de Boer, Rudolf A; Böhringer, Stefan; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; de Craen, Anton J M; Denniff, Matthew; Dong, Yanbin; Douroudis, Konstantinos; Dubinina, Elena; Eriksson, Johan G; Garlaschelli, Katia; Guo, Dehuang; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Henders, Anjali K; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Kananen, Laura; Karssen, Lennart C; Kettunen, Johannes; Klopp, Norman; Lagou, Vasiliki; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Madden, Pamela A; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Männistö, Satu; McCarthy, Mark I; Medland, Sarah E; Mihailov, Evelin; Montgomery, Grant W; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peters, Annette; Pollard, Helen; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Suchiman, H Eka D; Valdes, Ana M; Verweij, Niek; Viñuela, Ana; Wang, Xiaoling; Wichmann, H-Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wright, Margaret J; Xia, Kai; Xiao, Xiangjun; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Catapano, Alberico L; Tobin, Martin D; Hall, Alistair S; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; van Gilst, Wiek H; Zhu, Haidong; Erdmann, Jeanette; Reilly, Muredach P; Kathiresan, Sekar; Schunkert, Heribert; Talmud, Philippa J; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Ouwehand, Willem; Kaprio, Jaakko; Martin, Nicholas G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hovatta, Iiris; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Boomsma, Dorret I; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Slagboom, P Eline; Thompson, John R; Spector, Tim D; van der Harst, Pim; Samani, Nilesh J

    2013-04-01

    Interindividual variation in mean leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with cancer and several age-associated diseases. We report here a genome-wide meta-analysis of 37,684 individuals with replication of selected variants in an additional 10,739 individuals. We identified seven loci, including five new loci, associated with mean LTL (P < 5 × 10(-8)). Five of the loci contain candidate genes (TERC, TERT, NAF1, OBFC1 and RTEL1) that are known to be involved in telomere biology. Lead SNPs at two loci (TERC and TERT) associate with several cancers and other diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, a genetic risk score analysis combining lead variants at all 7 loci in 22,233 coronary artery disease cases and 64,762 controls showed an association of the alleles associated with shorter LTL with increased risk of coronary artery disease (21% (95% confidence interval, 5-35%) per standard deviation in LTL, P = 0.014). Our findings support a causal role of telomere-length variation in some age-related diseases. PMID:23535734

  2. Large-scale association analyses identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Schunkert, Heribert; König, Inke R.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Holm, Hilma; Preuss, Michael; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Barbalic, Maja; Gieger, Christian; Absher, Devin; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Allayee, Hooman; Altshuler, David; Anand, Sonia S.; Andersen, Karl; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Ardissino, Diego; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Timothy A.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Berger, Klaus; Bis, Joshua C.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnett, Mary Susan; Buysschaert, Ian; Carlquist, Cardiogenics, John F.; Chen, Li; Cichon, Sven; Codd, Veryan; Davies, Robert W.; Dedoussis, George; Dehghan, Abbas; Demissie, Serkalem; Devaney, Joseph M.; Do, Ron; Doering, Angela; Eifert, Sandra; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Ellis, Stephen G.; Elosua, Roberto; Engert, James C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faire, Ulf de; Fischer, Marcus; Folsom, Aaron R.; Freyer, Jennifer; Gigante, Bruna; Girelli, Domenico; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Halperin, Eran; Hammond, Naomi; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hofman, Albert; Horne, Benjamin D.; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jones, Gregory T.; Jukema, J.Wouter; Kaiser, Michael A.; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kong, Augustine; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lambrechts, Diether; Leander, Karin; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Mingyao; Lieb, Wolfgang; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Lotery, Andrew J.; Mannucci, Pier M.; Maouche, Seraya; Martinelli, Nicola; McKeown, Pascal P.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Mooser, Vincent; Morgan, Thomas; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Muhlestein, Joseph B.; Münzel, Thomas; Musunuru, Kiran; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Patel, Riyaz S.; Patterson, Chris C.; Peters, Annette; Peyvandi, Flora; Qu, Liming; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Rice, Catherine; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rubin, Diana; Salomaa, Veikko; Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Sandhu, Manj S.; Schadt, Eric; Schäfer, Arne; Schillert, Arne; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Sivananthan, Mohan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Smith, Albert; Smith, Tamara B.; Snoep, Jaapjan D.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spertus, John A.; Stark, Klaus; Stirrups, Kathy; Stoll, Monika; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Rij, Andre M.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wareham, Nick J.; Wells, George A.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Willenborg, Christina; Witteman, Jaqueline C. M.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Ye, Shu; Zeller, Tanja; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison H.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Quertermous, Thomas; März, Winfried; Hengstenberg, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Hall, Alistair S.; Deloukas, Panos; Thompson, John R.; Stefansson, Kari; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 cases and 64,762 controls of European descent, followed by genotyping of top association signals in 60,738 additional individuals. This genomic analysis identified 13 novel loci harboring one or more SNPs that were associated with CAD at P<5×10−8 and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 novel loci displayed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6 to 17 percent increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the novel loci displayed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors, while the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the novel CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits. PMID:21378990

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel loci for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuo; Fujita, Hayato; Johnson, Todd A; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Yasuda, Kazuki; Horikoshi, Momoko; Peng, Chen; Hu, Cheng; Ma, Ronald C W; Imamura, Minako; Iwata, Minoru; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Morizono, Takashi; Shojima, Nobuhiro; So, Wing Yee; Leung, Ting Fan; Kwan, Patrick; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jie; Yu, Weihui; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Hirose, Hiroshi; Kaku, Kohei; Ito, Chikako; Watada, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Yasushi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Jia, Weiping; Chan, Juliana C N; Teo, Yik Ying; Shyong, Tai E; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kubo, Michiaki; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Although over 60 loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified, there still remains a large genetic component to be clarified. To explore unidentified loci for T2D, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6 209 637 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were directly genotyped or imputed using East Asian references from the 1000 Genomes Project (June 2011 release) in 5976 Japanese patients with T2D and 20 829 nondiabetic individuals. Nineteen unreported loci were selected and taken forward to follow-up analyses. Combined discovery and follow-up analyses (30 392 cases and 34 814 controls) identified three new loci with genome-wide significance, which were MIR129-LEP [rs791595; risk allele = A; risk allele frequency (RAF) = 0.080; P = 2.55 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.17], GPSM1 [rs11787792; risk allele = A; RAF = 0.874; P = 1.74 × 10(-10); OR = 1.15] and SLC16A13 (rs312457; risk allele = G; RAF = 0.078; P = 7.69 × 10(-13); OR = 1.20). This study demonstrates that GWASs based on the imputation of genotypes using modern reference haplotypes such as that from the 1000 Genomes Project data can assist in identification of new loci for common diseases. PMID:23945395

  4. Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Schunkert, Heribert; König, Inke R; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Assimes, Themistocles L; Holm, Hilma; Preuss, Michael; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Barbalic, Maja; Gieger, Christian; Absher, Devin; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Allayee, Hooman; Altshuler, David; Anand, Sonia S; Andersen, Karl; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Ardissino, Diego; Ball, Stephen G; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barnes, Timothy A; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Berger, Klaus; Bis, Joshua C; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braund, Peter S; Brown, Morris J; Burnett, Mary Susan; Buysschaert, Ian; Carlquist, John F; Chen, Li; Cichon, Sven; Codd, Veryan; Davies, Robert W; Dedoussis, George; Dehghan, Abbas; Demissie, Serkalem; Devaney, Joseph M; Diemert, Patrick; Do, Ron; Doering, Angela; Eifert, Sandra; Mokhtari, Nour Eddine El; Ellis, Stephen G; Elosua, Roberto; Engert, James C; Epstein, Stephen E; de Faire, Ulf; Fischer, Marcus; Folsom, Aaron R; Freyer, Jennifer; Gigante, Bruna; Girelli, Domenico; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Halperin, Eran; Hammond, Naomi; Hazen, Stanley L; Hofman, Albert; Horne, Benjamin D; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jones, Gregory T; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaiser, Michael A; Kaplan, Lee M; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kong, Augustine; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lambrechts, Diether; Leander, Karin; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Mingyao; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loley, Christina; Lotery, Andrew J; Mannucci, Pier M; Maouche, Seraya; Martinelli, Nicola; McKeown, Pascal P; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Mooser, Vincent; Morgan, Thomas; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Muhlestein, Joseph B; Münzel, Thomas; Musunuru, Kiran; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Nelson, Christopher P; Nöthen, Markus M; Olivieri, Oliviero; Patel, Riyaz S; Patterson, Chris C; Peters, Annette; Peyvandi, Flora; Qu, Liming; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Rader, Daniel J; Rallidis, Loukianos S; Rice, Catherine; Rosendaal, Frits R; Rubin, Diana; Salomaa, Veikko; Sampietro, M Lourdes; Sandhu, Manj S; Schadt, Eric; Schäfer, Arne; Schillert, Arne; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siscovick, David S; Sivananthan, Mohan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Smith, Albert; Smith, Tamara B; Snoep, Jaapjan D; Soranzo, Nicole; Spertus, John A; Stark, Klaus; Stirrups, Kathy; Stoll, Monika; Tang, W H Wilson; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Rij, Andre M; Voight, Benjamin F; Wareham, Nick J; Wells, George A; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wild, Philipp S; Willenborg, Christina; Witteman, Jaqueline C M; Wright, Benjamin J; Ye, Shu; Zeller, Tanja; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison H; Cupples, L Adrienne; Quertermous, Thomas; März, Winfried; Hengstenberg, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem H; Hall, Alistair S; Deloukas, Panos; Thompson, John R; Stefansson, Kari; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; O'Donnell, Christopher J; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J

    2011-04-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis identified 13 loci newly associated with CAD at P < 5 × 10⁻⁸ and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 new loci showed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6% to 17% increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the new loci showed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors and the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the new CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits. PMID:21378990

  5. Meta-analysis of 375,000 individuals identifies 38 susceptibility loci for migraine.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Padhraig; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Palta, Priit; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H; Farh, Kai-How; Cuenca-Leon, Ester; Muona, Mikko; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Kurth, Tobias; Ingason, Andres; McMahon, George; Ligthart, Lannie; Terwindt, Gisela M; Kallela, Mikko; Freilinger, Tobias M; Ran, Caroline; Gordon, Scott G; Stam, Anine H; Steinberg, Stacy; Borck, Guntram; Koiranen, Markku; Quaye, Lydia; Adams, Hieab H H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Wedenoja, Juho; Hinds, David A; Buring, Julie E; Schürks, Markus; Ridker, Paul M; Hrafnsdottir, Maria Gudlaug; Stefansson, Hreinn; Ring, Susan M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Färkkilä, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Malik, Rainer; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kurki, Mitja I; Kals, Mart; Mägi, Reedik; Pärn, Kalle; Hämäläinen, Eija; Huang, Hailiang; Byrnes, Andrea E; Franke, Lude; Huang, Jie; Stergiakouli, Evie; Lee, Phil H; Sandor, Cynthia; Webber, Caleb; Cader, Zameel; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Eriksson, Johan G; Salomaa, Veikko; Heikkilä, Kauko; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Cherkas, Lynn; Pedersen, Linda M; Stubhaug, Audun; Nielsen, Christopher S; Männikkö, Minna; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Göbel, Hartmut; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Werge, Thomas; Kaprio, Jaakko; Aromaa, Arpo J; Raitakari, Olli; Ikram, M Arfan; Spector, Tim; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Metspalu, Andres; Kubisch, Christian; Strachan, David P; Ferrari, Michel D; Belin, Andrea C; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Zwart, John-Anker; Boomsma, Dorret I; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Eriksson, Nicholas; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M; Olesen, Jes; Chasman, Daniel I; Nyholt, Dale R; Palotie, Aarno

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting around one in seven people worldwide, but its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. There is some debate about whether migraine is a disease of vascular dysfunction or a result of neuronal dysfunction with secondary vascular changes. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have thus far identified 13 independent loci associated with migraine. To identify new susceptibility loci, we carried out a genetic study of migraine on 59,674 affected subjects and 316,078 controls from 22 GWA studies. We identified 44 independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with migraine risk (P < 5 × 10(-8)) that mapped to 38 distinct genomic loci, including 28 loci not previously reported and a locus that to our knowledge is the first to be identified on chromosome X. In subsequent computational analyses, the identified loci showed enrichment for genes expressed in vascular and smooth muscle tissues, consistent with a predominant theory of migraine that highlights vascular etiologies. PMID:27322543

  6. Dense fine-mapping study identifies new susceptibility loci for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jimmy Z; Almarri, Mohamed A; Gaffney, Daniel J; Mells, George F; Jostins, Luke; Cordell, Heather J; Ducker, Samantha J; Day, Darren B; Heneghan, Michael A; Neuberger, James M; Donaldson, Peter T; Bathgate, Andrew J; Burroughs, Andrew; Davies, Mervyn H; Jones, David E; Alexander, Graeme J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Sandford, Richard N; Anderson, Carl A

    2012-10-01

    We genotyped 2,861 cases of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) from the UK PBC Consortium and 8,514 UK population controls across 196,524 variants within 186 known autoimmune risk loci. We identified 3 loci newly associated with PBC (at P<5×10(-8)), increasing the number of known susceptibility loci to 25. The most associated variant at 19p12 is a low-frequency nonsynonymous SNP in TYK2, further implicating JAK-STAT and cytokine signaling in disease pathogenesis. An additional five loci contained nonsynonymous variants in high linkage disequilibrium (LD; r2>0.8) with the most associated variant at the locus. We found multiple independent common, low-frequency and rare variant association signals at five loci. Of the 26 independent non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) signals tagged on the Immunochip, 15 have SNPs in B-lymphoblastoid open chromatin regions in high LD (r2>0.8) with the most associated variant. This study shows how data from dense fine-mapping arrays coupled with functional genomic data can be used to identify candidate causal variants for functional follow-up. PMID:22961000

  7. Proliferation and Foxp3 Expression in Virus-Specific Memory CD8+ T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hoji, Aki; Coro, Alfonso; Ng, Hwee L.; Jamieson, Beth D.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Foxp3 plays a critical role in development of CD4+ regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). It was originally proposed as a specific marker for Tregs, but recent studies have shown that Foxp3 can be expressed in proliferating CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We further investigated the association between Foxp3 expression and proliferation of peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and focused on virus-specific memory CD8+ T lymphocytes. We found that resting peripheral blood bulk and cytomegalovirus- or HIV-1-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes do not normally express Foxp3. However, stimulation in vitro triggered these cells to express Foxp3 as well as CD25, and the addition of interleukin-2 possibly enhanced the expression of Foxp3. These data demonstrate that proliferation itself is sufficient to induce the Treg-like phenotype. Given that others have demonstrated Treg functional activity in such “induced Tregs,” these results suggest that virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes have the capacity to acquire regulatory functions. Although the implications of Foxp3 expression in virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in the immunologic control of persistent HIV-1 viremia remain to be determined, our results are consistent with Foxp3 expression playing an essential role in regulation of cell proliferation and functional outcomes for HIV-1-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:18620494

  8. Radiofrequency radiation alters the immune system. II. Modulation of in vivo lymphocyte circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liburdy, R.P.

    1980-07-01

    In vivo lymphocyte circulation was significantly altered in mice exposed to whole-body radiofrequency radiation (RFR). In vivo lymphocyte circulation was followed by quantitating activity of sodium chromate-51-labeled lymphocytes in the lung, spleen, liver, and bone marrow of animals at different times after iv spleen lymphocyte injection. Immediately after cell injection, animals were exposed to 2.6-GHz RFR (CW) at 25 or 5 mW/cm/sup 2/ (3.8 W/kg) for 1 h. At 1,6, and 24 h aftr lymphocyte injection target organs were removed, weighed, and counted. Sham RFR, warm-air, and steroid-treated groups were included as controls. Hyperthermic RFR exposure (25 mW/cm/sup 2/, 2.0/sup 0/C increase in core temperature) led to a 37% reduction in lymphocytes leaving the lung to migrate into the spleen. In addition, a threefold increse in spleen lymphocytes entering the bone marrow occurred. Significantly, this pattern was also observed in the steroid-treated group; nonthermogenic RFR exposure (5 mWcm/sup 2/) and warm-air exposures did not lead to altered lymphocyte traffic. These results support the idea that steroid release associated with thermal stress and the process of thermoregulation is a significant operatnt factor responsible for RFR effects on the immune system.

  9. Influence of ethanol on human T-lymphocyte migration

    SciTech Connect

    Kaelin, R.M.; Semerjian, A.; Center, D.M.; Bernardo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Because ethanol consumption is associated with increased susceptibility to infection, an examination was made of the effects of ethanol and its metabolite acetaldehyde on human T-lymphocyte migration, an important functional component of cellular inflammatory responses. With a modified Boyden chamber system, ethanol at 0.25% and 0.50% (vol/vol) inhibited spontaneous motility of human T-lymphocytes, in a noncytotoxic manner, to 65% +/- 7% (mean +/- SEM) and 62% +/- 7% of control values of migration, respectively. When T-lymphocyte migration was stimulated by colchicine (10/sup -5/ mol/L), incubation with ethanol (0.25% and 0.50%, vol/vol) decreased migration to 80% +/- 4% and 66% +/- 8% of control values, respectively. Similar degrees of inhibition of migration were obtained with acetaldehyde at concentrations five to 10 times less than ethanol. Ethanol was similarly capable of inhibiting T cell migration induced by dibutyryl cyclic guanosine monophosphate, but it had no effect on stimulated migration induced by a human chemokinetic lymphokine. The study demonstrates that ethanol, at concentrations achievable in vivo, is capable of depressing T-lymphocyte migration. This effect might contribute to the immunosuppression associated with ethanol consumption. 36 references, 4 figures.

  10. Identification of 23 new prostate cancer susceptibility loci using the iCOGS custom genotyping array

    PubMed Central

    Eeles, Rosalind A; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Benlloch, Sara; Saunders, Edward J; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Ghoussaini, Maya; Luccarini, Craig; Dennis, Joe; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Dadaev, Tokhir; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Muir, Ken; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth; Campa, Daniele; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Hayes, Richard B; Pharoah, Paul DP; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet; Ostrander, Elaine A; Signorello, Lisa B; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Dan; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Cannon-Albright; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Spurdle, Amanda B; Clements, Judith A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Dunning, Alison; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie J; Ahmed, Shahana; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma J; Morgan, Angela; Dearnaley, David P; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Van As, Nicholas J; Woodhouse, J; Thompson, Alan; Dudderidge, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Cox, Angela; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Aly, Markus; Adolfsson, Jan; Xu, Jiangfeng; Zheng, Siqun; Yeager, Meredith; Kaaks, Rudolf; Diver, W Ryan; Gaudet, Mia M; Stern, Mariana; Corral, Roman; Joshi, Amit D; Shahabi, Ahva; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo J; Auvinen, Anssi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Røder, Andreas; Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Siddiq, Afshan; FitzGerald, Liesel; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika; Karyadi, Danielle; Blot, William J; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin; McDonnell, Shannon K; Rinckleb, Antje; Drake, Bettina; Colditz, Graham; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Stephenson, Robert A; Teerlink, Craig; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Sellers, Thomas A; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Lose, Felicity; Srinivasan, Srilakshmi; Maia, Sofia; Paulo, Paula; Lange, Ethan; Cooney, Kathleen A; Antoniou, Antonis; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, we genotyped 211,155 SNPs on a custom Illumina array (iCOGS) in blood DNA from 25,074 prostate cancer cases and 24,272 controls from the international PRACTICAL Consortium. Twenty-three new prostate cancer susceptibility loci were identified at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). More than 70 prostate cancer susceptibility loci, explaining ~30% of the familial risk for this disease, have now been identified. On the basis of combined risks conferred by the new and previously known risk loci, the top 1% of the risk distribution has a 4.7-fold higher risk than the average of the population being profiled. These results will facilitate population risk stratification for clinical studies. PMID:23535732

  11. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Fang, L; Liu, J L; He, Z; Hu, H Y

    2015-01-01

    The parasitoid wasp Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani) is a common pupal parasitoid of many fly pests that is distributed worldwide. This organism can be used for biological control in orchards or livestock farms. Identifying polymorphic microsatellite loci would be useful for analyzing the population genetic structure of the parasitoid. In the current study, based on a modified biotin-capture method, 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for the insect, 7 of which did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The allelic number per locus varied from 3-7 (N = 30). The expected and observed heterozygosities of 10 loci ranged from 0.369-0.775 and from 0.300-0.867, respectively. PMID:25867324

  12. Heterogeneity of Breast Cancer Associations with Five Susceptibility Loci by Clinical and Pathological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pooley, Karen; Morrison, Jonathan; Richesson, Douglas A.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Axelsson, Christen K.; Arias, Jose I.; Milne, Roger L.; Ribas, Gloria; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Zamora, Pilar; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Bruening, Thomas; Haas, Susanne; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bremer, Michael; Karstens, Johann Hinrich; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Aittomäki, Kristiina; von Smitten, Karl; Blomqvist, Carl; Mannermaa, Arto; Uusitupa, Matti; Eskelinen, Matti; Tengström, Maria; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Australian Ovarian Cancer Management Group; The Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christi J.; Jacobi, Catharina E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Huijts, Petra E.A.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kropp, Silke; Slanger, Tracy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Mutschelknauss, Elke; Salazar, Ramona; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Couch, Fergus; Goode, Ellen L.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas R.; Southey, Melissa C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Stram, Daniel O.; Hunter, David J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Cox, David G.; Tamimi, Rulla; Kraft, Peter; Sherman, Mark E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A.; Peplonska, Beata; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Han; Collee, J. Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Liu, Jianjun; Lin, Low Yen; Yuqing, Li; Humphreys, Keith; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Dunning, Alison; Tyrer, Jonathan; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gabrieau, Valerie; Sigurdson, Alice; Doody, Michele; Struewing, Jeffrey P.; Alexander, Bruce; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    A three-stage genome-wide association study recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five loci (fibroblast growth receptor 2 (FGFR2), trinucleotide repeat containing 9 (TNRC9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 K1 (MAP3K1), 8q24, and lymphocyte-specific protein 1 (LSP1)) associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether the associations between these SNPs and breast cancer risk varied by clinically important tumor characteristics in up to 23,039 invasive breast cancer cases and 26,273 controls from 20 studies. We also evaluated their influence on overall survival in 13,527 cases from 13 studies. All participants were of European or Asian origin. rs2981582 in FGFR2 was more strongly related to ER-positive (per-allele OR (95%CI) = 1.31 (1.27–1.36)) than ER-negative (1.08 (1.03–1.14)) disease (P for heterogeneity = 10−13). This SNP was also more strongly related to PR-positive, low grade and node positive tumors (P = 10−5, 10−8, 0.013, respectively). The association for rs13281615 in 8q24 was stronger for ER-positive, PR-positive, and low grade tumors (P = 0.001, 0.011 and 10−4, respectively). The differences in the associations between SNPs in FGFR2 and 8q24 and risk by ER and grade remained significant after permutation adjustment for multiple comparisons and after adjustment for other tumor characteristics. Three SNPs (rs2981582, rs3803662, and rs889312) showed weak but significant associations with ER-negative disease, the strongest association being for rs3803662 in TNRC9 (1.14 (1.09–1.21)). rs13281615 in 8q24 was associated with an improvement in survival after diagnosis (per-allele HR = 0.90 (0.83–0.97). The association was attenuated and non-significant after adjusting for known prognostic factors. Our findings show that common genetic variants influence the pathological subtype of breast cancer and provide further support for the hypothesis that ER-positive and ER-negative disease are

  13. [Activation of peripheral T lymphocytes in children with epilepsy and production of cytokines].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Hu, Chongkang; Jiang, Xun

    2016-09-01

    Objective To study the state of peripheral T lymphocytes and cytokine levels in children with epilepsy. Methods Twenty children with epilepsy and 20 healthy age-matched children were recruited and their peripheral blood was collected. The activation of T lymphocytes was evaluated by detecting the expressions of CD25, CD69 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-assicated antigen 4 (CTLA4). The function of T lymphocytes was evaluated by detecting the expressions of interferon γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), IL-17A and IL-6. The activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) was evaluated by detecting the expression of IL-10. Results Children with epilepsy had higher expressions of CD25, CD69 and CTLA-4 in T lymphocytes than the controls did. The expressions of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-6 in T lymphocytes of children with epilepsy were higher than those of the controls. Frequency of Tregs producing IL-10 was higher in children with epilepsy as compared with the controls. Conclusion Peripheral T lymphocytes of children with epilepsy are activated and produce cytokines. PMID:27609580

  14. Stress, Cortisol, and B-Lymphocytes: A Novel Approach to Understanding Academic Stress and Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Bonnie A; Murphy, Karly Mary; Albano, Denise L; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2016-01-01

    Animal and human in vitro models suggest that stress-related B lymphocyte decrements are due to high levels of glucocorticoids which cause apoptosis of pre-B-cells as they emerge from the bone marrow. The present study sought to explore the relationships among distress, salivary cortisol and human B lymphocytes in vivo. Distress (perceived stress, negative affect, depressive symptoms), lymphocyte phenotype, and salivary cortisol were assessed among first year graduate students (n=22) and a community control sample (n= 30) at the start of classes in the fall and the week immediately before spring preliminary exams. Compared to controls, students reported greater distress on all measures at each time point except baseline perceived stress. Hierarchical linear regression with necessary control variables was used to assess the effect of student status on the three measures of distress, the four measures of lymphocyte phenotype, and cortisol AUC and CAR over time (T1-T2). Student status was associated with a significant decrease in CD19+ B lymphocytes and flattened cortisol awakening response (CAR). Change in CAR was associated with the decrease in CD19+ B lymphocytes. Results indicated that there are significant associations among student status, flattening of CAR, and decrements in CD19+ lymphocytes. PMID:26644211

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to quantitative trait loci for grain quality traits in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain quality traits that are controlled by quantitative traits loci (QTLs) define suitable growing areas and potential end-use products of a wheat cultivar. To dissect the QTLs for these traits including protein content (GPC), test weight (TW), single kernel characteriz...

  16. Mapping quantitative trait loci for plant adaptation and morphology traits in wheat using single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) morphological and adaptation-related traits that are controlled by quantitative traits loci (QTL) define potential growing areas of a wheat cultivar. To dissect the QTL for heading date (HD), lodging resistance (LR), shattering resistance (SR), cold tolerance (CT), plant...

  17. Association between polymorphism of the norepinephrine transporter gene rs2242446 and rs5669 loci and depression disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yu; Cheng, Qi; Shan, Mo-Shui; Yan, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the association between polymorphism of the norepinephrine transporter (NET) gene rs2242446 and rs5669 loci and depression in Chinese Han population. Methods: A case-control study was carried out, the gene types and allele distributions of NFT gene rs2242446 and rs5569 loci in 302 depression patients and 302 healthy controls were detected by Taqman SNP genotyping technology. Results: The gene types and allele frequency distributions of NFT gene rs2242446 and rs5569 loci had significant differences between case group and control group (rs2242446, x2=26.045, P<0.05, x2=8.827, P<0.05, rs5569, x2=42.47, P<0.05, x2=20.9, P<0.05). The CC genotype of NET gene rs2242446 locus and rs5569 loci was a protective factor of depression compared with the CT and TT genotypes. Conclusion: The NET genepoly morphism of rs2242446 and rs5569 loci was a ssociated with depression in Chinese Han population, in which the CC genotype of rs2242446 and rs5569 loci was a protective factor of depression. PMID:26770504

  18. Helicobacter pylori antigens as potential modulators of lymphocytes' cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Rudnicka, Karolina; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Moran, Anthony P; Rechciński, Tomasz; Miszczyk, Eliza; Matusiak, Agnieszka; Szczęsna, Ewelina; Walencka, Maria; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.p) colonizes human gastric mucosa and causes gastric and duodenal ulcer disease or gastric cancer. Various H.p compounds may modulate the host immune response in regards to tolerance of the infection or disease development. The aim of this study was to determine whether H.p lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and glycine acid extract antigens (GE) or E. coli LPS influence the cytotoxic activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from H.p infected - H.p (+) or uninfected - H.p (-) individuals, in the presence or absence of exogenous interleukin (IL)12. Individual H.p status was defined by the urea breath test. Lymphocytes, stimulated or not with H.p, and control antigens, with or without IL-12, were used as effector cells and epithelial HeLa cells as targets. The cytotoxicity of lymphocytes was expressed as the percentage of dead target cells unable to reduce tetrazolium salt. The supernatants from HeLa/lymphocyte cultures were used for detection of the cellular cytotoxicity markers granzyme B and caspase 8. The natural cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes from H.p (+) was less than that of H.p (-) donors. This may have been due to fewer natural killer cells of CD3(-) CD56(+) Nkp46(+) phenotype in H.p (+) in comparison to H.p (-) subjects. H.p GE and standard E. coli LPS enhanced the cytotoxicity of lymphocytes towards target cells whereas H.p LPS downregulated this activity. The decrease in lymphocyte cytotoxicity in response to H.p LPS correlated with a lack of IL-2 and IL-12 production, inhibition of interferon-γ production, and low IL-10 secretion by mononuclear leukocytes. IL-12 significantly enhanced the natural as well as H.p LPS and H.p GE driven cytotoxic capacity of lymphocytes. In conclusion, H.p LPS may negatively modulate natural cytotoxic activity and cytokine secretion by immunocompetent cells and thus be involved in the maintenance of infection and development of gastric pathologies. PMID:22040089

  19. Ibrutinib and Rituximab Compared With Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-13

    Anemia; Fever, Sweat, and Hot Flashes; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Weight Change

  20. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  1. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  2. Chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes from car painters.

    PubMed

    Silva, J M; Santos-Mello, R

    1996-05-01

    In the present paper we report the results of biological monitoring of a group of 25 car painters working in different automobile shops in Brasília. There was a significantly higher frequency of aneuplodies and chromosome deletions in the peripheral lymphocytes of car painters than in control subjects. We also detected a significant correlation between the time worked as a car painter and the frequency of aneuploidy. Smoking habits do not represent a significant factor in terms of production of the various types of chromosome aberrations among car painters. These results permitted us to conclude that the individuals studied represent a risk group and should be medically followed up with judicious periodic examinations. PMID:8637507

  3. Epigenetic aspects of lymphocyte antigen receptor gene rearrangement or 'when stochasticity completes randomness'.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Sébastien; Fernandez, Bastien; Ferrier, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    To perform their specific functional role, B and T lymphocytes, cells of the adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates, need to express one (and, preferably, only one) form of antigen receptor, i.e. the immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor (TCR), respectively. This end goal depends initially on a series of DNA cis-rearrangement events between randomly chosen units from separate clusters of V, D (at some immunoglobulin and TCR loci) and J gene segments, a biomolecular process collectively referred to as V(D)J recombination. V(D)J recombination takes place in immature T and B cells and relies on the so-called RAG nuclease, a site-specific DNA cleavage apparatus that corresponds to the lymphoid-specific moiety of the VDJ recombinase. At the genome level, this recombinase's mission presents substantial biochemical challenges. These relate to the huge distance between (some of) the gene segments that it eventually rearranges and the need to achieve cell-lineage-restricted and developmentally ordered routines with at times, mono-allelic versus bi-allelic discrimination. The entire process must be completed without any recombination errors, instigators of chromosome instability, translocation and, potentially, tumorigenesis. As expected, such a precisely choreographed and yet potentially risky process demands sophisticated controls; epigenetics demonstrates what is possible when calling upon its many facets. In this vignette, we will recall the evidence that almost from the start appeared to link the two topics, V(D)J recombination and epigenetics, before reviewing the latest advances in our knowledge of this joint venture. PMID:23278765

  4. A revised nomenclature for transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and ERV-like sequences comprise 8% of the human genome. A hitherto unknown proportion of ERV loci are transcribed and thus contribute to the human transcriptome. A small proportion of these loci encode functional proteins. As the role of ERVs in normal and diseased biological processes is not yet established, transcribed ERV loci are of particular interest. As more transcribed ERV loci are likely to be identified in the near future, the development of a systematic nomenclature is important to ensure that all information on each locus can be easily retrieved. Results Here we present a revised nomenclature of transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci that sorts loci into groups based on Repbase classifications. Each symbol is of the format ERV + group symbol + unique number. Group symbols are based on a mixture of Repbase designations and well-supported symbols used in the literature. The presented guidelines will allow newly identified loci to be easily incorporated into the scheme. Conclusions The naming system will be employed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for naming transcribed human ERV loci. We hope that the system will contribute to clarifying a certain aspect of a sometimes confusing nomenclature for human endogenous retroviruses. The presented system may also be employed for naming transcribed loci of human non-ERV repeat loci. PMID:21542922

  5. Mercury-specific lymphocytes: an indication of mercury allergy in man.

    PubMed

    Stejskal, V D; Forsbeck, M; Cederbrant, K E; Asteman, O

    1996-01-01

    In this study, 18 patients with oral lichen planus (OLP), adjacent to amalgam fillings, were tested in vitro with an optimized lymphocyte proliferation test, MELISA (memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay) and with a patch test. Twenty subjects with amalgam fillings but without oral discomfort and 12 amalgam-free subjects served as controls. The results show that patients with OLP have significantly higher lymphocyte reactivity to inorganic mercury, a corrosion product of amalgam, compared to control groups. Removal of amalgam fillings resulted in the disappearance of oral mucosal changes, thus indicating a causal relationship. Positive responses to phenylmercury (phenyl-Hg), a bactericidal agent in root fillings and in pharmaceutical preparations, were also noted in the oral lichen group but not in the control groups. Thus, low-grade chronic exposure to mercury may induce a state of systemic sensitization as verified by Hg-specific lymphocyte reactivity in vitro. PMID:8926283

  6. Newly discovered breast cancer susceptibility loci on 3p24 and 17q23.2

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shahana; Thomas, Gilles; Ghoussaini, Maya; Healey, Catherine S; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Platte, Radka; Morrison, Jonathan; Maranian, Melanie; Pooley, Karen A; Luben, Robert; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D Gareth; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Stratton, Michael R; Rahman, Nazneen; Jacobs, Kevin; Prentice, Ross; Anderson, Garnet L; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Curb, J David; Ziegler, Regina G; Berg, Christine D; Buys, Saundra S; McCarty, Catherine A; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Calle, Eugenia E; Thun, Michael J; Diver, W Ryan; Bojesen, Stig; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Hillemanns, Peter; Karstens, Johann H; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Zalutsky, Iosif V; Bermisheva, Marina; Fedorova, Sardana; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christi J; Tollenaar, R A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Peplonska, Beata; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Smith, Letitia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; van Hien, Richard R; Cornelissen, Sten; Milne, Roger L; Ribas, Gloria; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Schmutzler, Rita K; Burwinkel, Barbara; Bartram, Claus R; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R; Hankinson, Susan E; Cox, David G; Kraft, Peter; Vatten, Lars J; Hveem, Kristian; Kumle, Merethe; Sigurdson, Alice; Doody, Michele; Bhatti, Parveen; Alexander, Bruce H; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Oldenburg, Rogier A; Schutte, Mieke; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Yuqing; Cox, Angela; Elliott, Graeme; Brock, Ian; Reed, Malcolm W R; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; kConFab; Beesley, Jonathan; Goode, Ellen L; Couch, Fergus; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hoover, Robert N; Ponder, Bruce A J; Hunter, David J; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified seven breast cancer susceptibility loci, but these explain only a small fraction of the familial risk of the disease. Five of these loci were identified through a two-stage GWAS involving 390 familial cases and 364 controls in the first stage, and 3,990 cases and 3,916 controls in the second stage1. To identify additional loci, we tested over 800 promising associations from this GWAS in a further two stages involving 37,012 cases and 40,069 controls from 33 studies in the CGEMS collaboration and Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We found strong evidence for additional susceptibility loci on 3p (rs4973768: per-allele OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.08–1.13, P = 4.1 × 10−23) and 17q (rs6504950: per-allele OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.92–0.97, P = 1.4 × 10−8). Potential causative genes include SLC4A7 and NEK10 on 3p and COX11 on 17q. PMID:19330027

  7. An improved method on stimulated T-lymphocytes to functionally characterize novel and known LDLR mutations[S

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Maria; Di Taranto, Maria Donata; Mirabelli, Peppino; D'Agostino, Maria Nicoletta; Iannuzzi, Arcangelo; Marotta, Gennaro; Gentile, Marco; Raia, Maddalena; Di Noto, Rosa; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Rubba, Paolo; Fortunato, Giuliana

    2011-01-01

    The main causes of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) are mutations in LDL receptor (LDLR) gene. Functional studies are necessary to demonstrate the LDLR function impairment caused by mutations and would be useful as a diagnostic tool if they allow discrimination between FH patients and controls. In order to identify the best method to detect LDLR activity, we compared continuous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-lymphocytes and mitogen stimulated T-lymphocytes. In addition, we characterized both novel and known mutations in the LDLR gene. T-lymphocytes and EBV-transformed B-lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral blood of 24 FH patients and 24 control subjects. Functional assays were performed by incubation with fluorescent LDL followed by flow cytometry analysis. Residual LDLR activity was calculated normalizing fluorescence for the mean fluorescence of controls. With stimulated T-lymphocytes we obtained a better discrimination capacity between controls and FH patients compared with EBV-transformed B-lymphocytes as demonstrated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis (the areas under the curve are 1.000 and 0.984 respectively; P < 0.0001 both). The characterization of LDLR activity through T-lymphocytes is more simple and faster than the use of EBV-transformed B-lymphocytes and allows a complete discrimination between controls and FH patients. Therefore the evaluation of residual LDLR activity could be helpful not only for mutation characterization but also for diagnostic purposes. PMID:21865347

  8. Lymphocyte reactivity to Ostertagia ostertagi L3 antigen in type I ostertagiasis.

    PubMed

    Klesius, P H; Washburn, S M; Ciordia, H; Haynes, T B; Snider, T G

    1984-02-01

    To better understand the immune response of calves infected with Ostertagia ostertagi, studies were conducted to examine cell-mediated immune responses to L3 antigen and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) by lymphocyte reactivity assay. The L3 antigen was prepared by freeze-thawing and sonication of exsheathed O ostertagi L3. Antigen preparations contained 40 to 60 micrograms of protein/ml and no detectable endotoxin. Cell-mediated immune responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes were determined in 3 groups of 12 calves each: (i) calves given consecutive multiple dose inoculations with L3; (ii) noninfected controls. Consecutive multiple-dose-inoculated calves showed marked increases in stimulation indices (SI) to L3 antigen over the SI of naturally inoculated calves (56.5 and 25.8, respectively). Negative SI were obtained in calves of the noninoculated control group (-1.0). No significant difference (P greater than or equal to 0.05) in response to PHA was obtained between lymphocytes from calves inoculated with O ostertagi and lymphocytes obtained from noninoculated control calves. There was significant (P less than or equal to 0.01) agreement between positive SI and evidence of patent infection (development of type I ostertagiasis). Specificity of lymphocyte reactivity was determined, using lymphocytes from 4 O ostertagi- and 2 Cooperia punctata-infected calves after challenge inoculation. Positive SI to L3 antigen were obtained, using lymphocytes from either O ostertagi- or C punctata-infected calves, indicating that there may be a lack of genus specificity for O ostertagi L3 antigen in lymphocyte reactivity assay. Kinetic studies of lymphocyte reactivity to L3 antigen and PHA showed that responses were briefly suppressed to both of these stimuli in prepatent calves.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6608886

  9. Expression quantitative trait loci: present and future

    PubMed Central

    Nica, Alexandra C.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.

    2013-01-01

    The last few years have seen the development of large efforts for the analysis of genome function, especially in the context of genome variation. One of the most prominent directions has been the extensive set of studies on expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), namely, the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Such studies have offered promise not just for the characterization of functional sequence variation but also for the understanding of basic processes of gene regulation and interpretation of genome-wide association studies. In this review, we discuss some of the key directions of eQTL research and its implications. PMID:23650636

  10. Challenge assay in vitro using lymphocyte blastogenesis for the contact hypersensitivity assay.

    PubMed

    Kashima, R; Okada, J; Ikeda, Y; Yoshizuka, N

    1993-10-01

    To confirm positivity in routine guinea pig studies, contact allergenicity was investigated by a challenge assay in vitro using a co-culture of autologous lymphocytes passed through a nylon-wool column and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) modified with or without antigen. Proliferation of the lymphocytes primed with ovalbumin and/or 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene was antigen specific and dependent on the presence of APCs (peripheral blood monocytes, splenic macrophages and macrophages induced by liquid paraffin). For another nine haptens, primed lymphocytes proliferated significantly more than control lymphocytes; the stimulation index (SI; ratio between [3H]methylthymidine ([3H]TdR) incorporation of lymphocytes with antigen-modified APCs and [3H]TdR incorporation of lymphocytes with APCs not modified by antigen) was 1.6-4.8 in sensitized animals whereas it was about 1.0 in control animals. Sodium dodecyl sulfate did not cause lymphocyte proliferation. The SI value in vitro was correlated with both the positive rate in vivo (r = 0.736) and the mean response score in vivo (r = 0.645). Thus, it was possible to confirm that positivity in routine experiments was a true sign of allergy. A combination of this assay and short-term animal studies would provide an efficient assessment of the allergic potential of chemicals. PMID:8225135

  11. Alemtuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, G.; Smith, C.A.; Imrie, K.; Meyer, R.

    2007-01-01

    Questions With respect to outcomes such as survival, response rate, response duration, time to progression, and quality of life, is alemtuzumab a beneficial treatment option for patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (cll)? What toxicities are associated with the use of alemtuzumab? Which patients are more likely—or less likely—to benefit from treatment with alemtuzumab? Perspectives Evidence was selected and reviewed by one member of the Hematology Disease Site Group (dsg) of Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care (pebc) and by methodologists. The practice guideline report was reviewed and approved by the Hema-tology dsg, which comprises hematologists, medical and radiation oncologists, and a patient representative. As part of an external review process, the report was disseminated to obtain feedback from practitioners in Ontario. Outcomes Outcomes of interest were overall survival, quality of life, response rates and duration, and adverse event rates. Methodology A systematic review of the medline, embase, HealthStar, cinahl, and Cochrane Library databases was conducted to search for primary articles and practice guidelines. The evidence informed the development of clinical practice recommendations. The evidence review and recommendations were appraised by a sample of practitioners from Ontario, Canada, and were modified in response to the feedback received. The systematic review and modified recommendations were approved by a review body within the pebc. Results The literature review found no published randomized controlled trials (rcts) that evaluated alem-tuzumab alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of relapsed or refractory cll. One rct evaluated alemtuzumab administered to consolidate a complete or partial response to first-line fludarabine-containing chemotherapy. That study was stopped early because of excessive grades 3 and 4 infection-related toxicity in the alemtuzumab arm. Patients

  12. Monitoring of cardiac antirejection therapy with /sup 111/In lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, R.A.; Bergmann, S.R.; Carlson, E.M.; Saffitz, J.E.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-06-01

    To determine whether lymphocytes labeled with /sup 111/In permit noninvasive assessment of antirejection therapy, we performed 40 allogeneic heterotopic cardiac transplants in rats. Antirejection therapy with azathioprine (30 mg/kg) and sodium salicylate (200 mg/kg) prolonged contractile function of the graft from 7.5 +/- 1.5 (s.d.) days in controls to 19.4 +/- 3.7 days in treated animals. Six to seven days after transplantation, autologous lymphocytes labeled with /sup 111/In were injected intravenously in seven untreated and eight treated rats. Scintigraphy and organ counting were performed 24 hr after administration of labeled cells. At sacrifice all grafts in untreated rats exhibited contractile failure, whereas grafts in all treated rats were beating well. Transplants in untreated recipients exhibited marked accumulation of /sup 111/In lymphocytes detectable scintigraphically, with ratios of 7.7 +/- 1.9 for the activity in the transplant over that in the native heart (HT/HO), as obtained by well counting. In contrast, accumulation was not scintigraphically detectable in transplants of treated rats, with HT/HO ratios of 2.6 +/- 1.8 (p less than 0.005). The results suggested that imaging with /sup 111/In-labeled lymphocytes will permit noninvasive assessment of antirejection therapy.

  13. Lymphocytic panniculitis: an algorithmic approach to lymphocytes in subcutaneous tissue.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Carolyn J; Abi Daoud, Marie S; Wong, Se Mang; Crawford, Richard I

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis of panniculitis is a relatively rare occurrence for many practising pathologists. The smaller subset of lymphocyte-predominant panniculitis is further complicated by the diagnostic consideration of T cell lymphoma involving the subcutaneous tissue, mimicking inflammatory causes of panniculitis. Accurate classification of the panniculitis is crucial to direct clinical management as treatment options may vary from non-medical therapy to immunosuppressive agents to aggressive chemotherapy. Many diseases show significant overlap in clinical and histological features, making the process of determining a specific diagnosis very challenging. However, with an adequate biopsy including skin and deep subcutaneous tissue, a collaborative effort between clinician and pathologist can often lead to a specific diagnosis. This review provides an algorithmic approach to the diagnosis of lymphocyte-predominant panniculitis, including entities of septal-predominant pattern panniculitis (erythema nodosum, deep necrobiosis lipoidica, morphea profunda and sclerosing panniculitis) and lobular-predominant pattern panniculitis (lupus erythematous panniculitis/lupus profundus, subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma, cutaneous γ-δ T cell lymphoma, Borrelia infection and cold panniculitis). PMID:26602413

  14. Identification and Validation of Loci Governing Seed Coat Color by Combining Association Mapping and Bulk Segregation Analysis in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yansong; Tian, Long; Li, Xinxiu; Li, Ying-Hui; Guan, Rongxia; Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Soybean seed coat exists in a range of colors from yellow, green, brown, black, to bicolor. Classical genetic analysis suggested that soybean seed color was a moderately complex trait controlled by multi-loci. However, only a couple of loci could be detected using a single biparental segregating population. In this study, a combination of association mapping and bulk segregation analysis was employed to identify genes/loci governing this trait in soybean. A total of 14 loci, including nine novel and five previously reported ones, were identified using 176,065 coding SNPs selected from entire SNP dataset among 56 soybean accessions. Four of these loci were confirmed and further mapped using a biparental population developed from the cross between ZP95-5383 (yellow seed color) and NY279 (brown seed color), in which different seed coat colors were further dissected into simple trait pairs (green/yellow, green/black, green/brown, yellow/black, yellow/brown, and black/brown) by continuously developing residual heterozygous lines. By genotyping entire F2 population using flanking markers located in fine-mapping regions, the genetic basis of seed coat color was fully dissected and these four loci could explain all variations of seed colors in this population. These findings will be useful for map-based cloning of genes as well as marker-assisted breeding in soybean. This work also provides an alternative strategy for systematically isolating genes controlling relative complex trait by association analysis followed by biparental mapping. PMID:27404272

  15. Genome-wide association studies in the Japanese population identify seven novel loci for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Minako; Takahashi, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Hara, Kazuo; Yasuda, Kazuki; Grarup, Niels; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Xu; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Hu, Cheng; Moon, Sanghoon; Long, Jirong; Kwak, Soo Heon; Rasheed, Asif; Saxena, Richa; Ma, Ronald C W; Okada, Yukinori; Iwata, Minoru; Hosoe, Jun; Shojima, Nobuhiro; Iwasaki, Minaka; Fujita, Hayato; Suzuki, Ken; Danesh, John; Jørgensen, Torben; Jørgensen, Marit E; Witte, Daniel R; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Hansen, Torben; Mercader, Josep M; Flannick, Jason; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Burtt, Noël P; Zhang, Rong; Kim, Young Jin; Zheng, Wei; Singh, Jai Rup; Tam, Claudia H T; Hirose, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Ito, Chikako; Kaku, Kohei; Watada, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Yasushi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Kubo, Michiaki; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chan, Juliana C N; Sanghera, Dharambir; Frossard, Philippe; Park, Kyong Soo; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Bong-Jo; Florez, Jose C; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Jia, Weiping; Tai, E Shyong; Pedersen, Oluf; Saleheen, Danish; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 80 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but most of its heritability still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWAS for T2D in the Japanese population. Combined data from discovery and subsequent validation analyses (23,399 T2D cases and 31,722 controls) identify 7 new loci with genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)), rs1116357 near CCDC85A, rs147538848 in FAM60A, rs1575972 near DMRTA1, rs9309245 near ASB3, rs67156297 near ATP8B2, rs7107784 near MIR4686 and rs67839313 near INAFM2. Of these, the association of 4 loci with T2D is replicated in multi-ethnic populations other than Japanese (up to 65,936 T2Ds and 158,030 controls, P<0.007). These results indicate that expansion of single ethnic GWAS is still useful to identify novel susceptibility loci to complex traits not only for ethnicity-specific loci but also for common loci across different ethnicities. PMID:26818947

  16. Genome-wide association studies in the Japanese population identify seven novel loci for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Minako; Takahashi, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Hara, Kazuo; Yasuda, Kazuki; Grarup, Niels; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Xu; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Hu, Cheng; Moon, Sanghoon; Long, Jirong; Kwak, Soo Heon; Rasheed, Asif; Saxena, Richa; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Okada, Yukinori; Iwata, Minoru; Hosoe, Jun; Shojima, Nobuhiro; Iwasaki, Minaka; Fujita, Hayato; Suzuki, Ken; Danesh, John; Jørgensen, Torben; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Witte, Daniel R.; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Hansen, Torben; Mercader, Josep M.; Flannick, Jason; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Burtt, Noël P.; Zhang, Rong; Kim, Young Jin; Zheng, Wei; Singh, Jai Rup; Tam, Claudia H. T.; Hirose, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Ito, Chikako; Kaku, Kohei; Watada, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Yasushi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Kubo, Michiaki; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Sanghera, Dharambir; Frossard, Philippe; Park, Kyong Soo; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Kim, Bong-Jo; Florez, Jose C.; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Jia, Weiping; Tai, E Shyong; Pedersen, Oluf; Saleheen, Danish; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 80 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but most of its heritability still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWAS for T2D in the Japanese population. Combined data from discovery and subsequent validation analyses (23,399 T2D cases and 31,722 controls) identify 7 new loci with genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8), rs1116357 near CCDC85A, rs147538848 in FAM60A, rs1575972 near DMRTA1, rs9309245 near ASB3, rs67156297 near ATP8B2, rs7107784 near MIR4686 and rs67839313 near INAFM2. Of these, the association of 4 loci with T2D is replicated in multi-ethnic populations other than Japanese (up to 65,936 T2Ds and 158,030 controls, P<0.007). These results indicate that expansion of single ethnic GWAS is still useful to identify novel susceptibility loci to complex traits not only for ethnicity-specific loci but also for common loci across different ethnicities. PMID:26818947

  17. Lymphocytic thrombophilic arteritis: an enigma.

    PubMed

    Kalegowda, Inchara Yeliur; Tirumalae, Rajalakshmi; Murthy, K Srinivasa; Rout, Pritilata

    2014-09-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with a 5-year history of livedo racemosa on her limbs. Histology showed vasculitis of medium-sized arteries with a circumferential, hyalinised, intraluminal fibrin ring. Her laboratory investigations did not indicate any underlying systemic disease. The findings were consistent with lymphocytic thrombophilic arteritis (LTA), alias macular arteritis, which is a recently described entity. The importance of LTA lies in the fact that it is a close clinical and microscopic mimic of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). LTA is believed to be a distinct entity by some and as a form of PAN by others. We have discussed this case in our report. PMID:25284860

  18. Lymphocytic Thrombophilic Arteritis: An Enigma

    PubMed Central

    Kalegowda, Inchara Yeliur; Tirumalae, Rajalakshmi; Murthy, K Srinivasa; Rout, Pritilata

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with a 5-year history of livedo racemosa on her limbs. Histology showed vasculitis of medium-sized arteries with a circumferential, hyalinised, intraluminal fibrin ring. Her laboratory investigations did not indicate any underlying systemic disease. The findings were consistent with lymphocytic thrombophilic arteritis (LTA), alias macular arteritis, which is a recently described entity. The importance of LTA lies in the fact that it is a close clinical and microscopic mimic of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). LTA is believed to be a distinct entity by some and as a form of PAN by others. We have discussed this case in our report. PMID:25284860

  19. Changes of lymphocyte membrane fluidity in rheumatoid arthritis: a fluorescence polarisation study.

    PubMed Central

    Beccerica, E; Piergiacomi, G; Curatola, G; Ferretti, G

    1988-01-01

    Fluorescence polarisation of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was used to study the lymphocyte membrane in rheumatoid arthritis. The increase of polarisation value in the patients (n = 27) compared with healthy controls (n = 32) suggests a decrease of membrane fluidity. Moreover, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and plasma fibrinogen concentrations were positively correlated with lymphocyte fluorescence polarisation values (r = 0.66 and r = 0.76 respectively). The results suggest that the changes in lymphocyte membrane fluidity could be involved in the pathogenetic mechanism of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3382266

  20. Evaluation of mean platelet volume, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and platelet/lymphocyte ratio in advanced stage endometriosis with endometrioma

    PubMed Central

    Yavuzcan, Ali; Çağlar, Mete; Üstün, Yusuf; Dilbaz, Serdar; Özdemir, İsmail; Yıldız, Elif; Özkara, Atilla; Kumru, Selahattin

    2013-01-01

    Objective We compared the preoperative values of mean platelet volume (MPV) and peripheral systemic inflammatory response (SIR) markers (neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and platelet/lymphocyte ratio) between patients with advanced-stage (stage 3/4) endometriosis having endometrioma (OMA) and patients with a non-neoplastic adnexal mass other than endometrioma (non-OMA). Material and Methods Patients who underwent operations with the pre-diagnosis of infertility or adnexal mass and who underwent laparoscopic tubal ligation were included. Results Haemoglobin levels, leucocyte count, platelet count, neutrophil count and lymphocyte count were not significantly different between patients with advanced stage endometriosis having OMA, patients with non-OMA and patients in the control group (p=0.970, p=0.902, p=0.373, p=0.501 and p=0.463, respectively). Patients with stage 3/4 endometriosis having OMA, patients with non-OMA and control patients were also not significantly different in terms of MPV (p=0.836), neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (p=0.555) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) (p=0.358). Preoperative cancer antigen 125 (Ca-125) levels were significantly higher in patients with OMA (p=0.006). Mean size of the OMAs was significantly lower than non-OMAs (p=0.000). Conclusion It is very important to determine advanced stage endometriosis and OMAs during preoperative evaluation in order to inform patients and plan an appropriate surgical approach. We demonstrate that MPV, NLR and PLR values are not useful for this purpose in patients with advanced stage endometriosis that are proven to develop severe inflammation at either the cellular or molecular level. PMID:24592108

  1. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  2. Evaluation of Costimulatory Molecules in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Canine Patients with Histiocytic Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Michihito; Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Takagi, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma is a rapidly progressive and fatal neoplastic disease in dogs. It is unclear whether costimulatory molecules, including CD28, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and programmed death-1 (PD-1), are expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of canine patients with histiocytic sarcoma. The objective of this study was to evaluate the expression of CD28, CTLA-4, and PD-1 molecules on PBLs of patients with histiocytic sarcoma, patients with other tumors, and healthy controls. Twenty-six dogs were included in the study, with eight, ten, and eight dogs in the histiocytic sarcoma, other tumor, and healthy control groups, respectively. PBLs and serum were prospectively obtained from patients diagnosed histopathologically with histiocytic sarcoma, other tumors and healthy controls. The surface expression of CTLA-4, CD28, and PD-1 on T lymphocytes was examined using flow cytometric analysis. Serum samples were frozen at −30°C until serum interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression level of CTLA-4 on CD4+ lymphocytes was significantly higher in the histiocytic sarcoma group than in the control group. The expression of CTLA-4 on CD8+ lymphocytes was significantly higher in the histiocytic sarcoma group than in the other two groups. In addition, the expression of PD-1 on CD8+ lymphocytes was significantly higher in the histiocytic sarcoma group than in the control group. However, no significant differences in CD28 expressions and serum IFN-γ levels were observed. The present results provided evidence showing that the expression levels of CTLA-4 on both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes and PD-1 on CD8+ lymphocytes in peripheral blood obtained from dogs with histiocytic sarcoma were upregulated. The overexpressions of CTLA 4 and PD-1 suggested that antitumor immunity may be suppressed in dogs with histiocytic sarcoma. PMID:26901565

  3. The mating type-like loci of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Robledo-Márquez, Karina A; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Candy Y; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid and opportunistic fungal pathogen that has not known sexual cycle, has conserved the majority of the genes required for mating and cell type identity. The C. glabrata genome contains three mating-type-like loci called MTL1, MTL2 and MTL3. The three loci encode putative transcription factors, a1, α1 and α2 that regulate cell type identity and sexual reproduction in other fungi like the closely related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MTL1 can contain either a or α information. MTL2, which contains a information and MTL3 with α information, are relatively close to two telomeres. MTL1 and MTL2 are transcriptionally active, while MTL3 is subject to an incomplete silencing nucleated at the telomere that depends on the silencing proteins Sir2, Sir3, Sir4, yKu70/80, Rif1, Rap1 and Sum1. C. glabrata does not seem to maintain cell type identity, as cell type-specific genes are expressed regardless of the type (or even absence) of mating information. These data highlight important differences in the control of mating and cell type identity between the non-pathogenic yeast S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which might explain the absence of a sexual cycle in C. glabrata. The fact that C. glabrata has conserved the vast majority of the genes involved in mating might suggest that some of these genes perhaps have been rewired to control other processes important for the survival inside the host as a commensal or as a human pathogen. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24252826

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for craniofacial microsomia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Biao; Hu, Jintian; Zhang, Jiao; Zhou, Xu; Li, Xin; Gu, Chaohao; Liu, Tun; Xie, Yangchun; Liu, Jiqiang; Gu, Mingliang; Wang, Panpan; Wu, Tingting; Qian, Jin; Wang, Yue; Dong, Xiaoqun; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Qingguo

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a rare congenital anomaly that involves immature derivatives from the first and second pharyngeal arches. The genetic pathogenesis of CFM is still unclear. Here we interrogate 0.9 million genetic variants in 939 CFM cases and 2,012 controls from China. After genotyping of an additional 443 cases and 1,669 controls, we identify 8 significantly associated loci with the most significant SNP rs13089920 (logistic regression P=2.15 × 10−120) and 5 suggestive loci. The above 13 associated loci, harboured by candidates of ROBO1, GATA3, GBX2, FGF3, NRP2, EDNRB, SHROOM3, SEMA7A, PLCD3, KLF12 and EPAS1, are found to be enriched for genes involved in neural crest cell (NCC) development and vasculogenesis. We then perform whole-genome sequencing on 21 samples from the case cohort, and identify several novel loss-of-function mutations within the associated loci. Our results provide new insights into genetic background of craniofacial microsomia. PMID:26853712

  5. SMAD7 loci contribute to risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and clinicopathologic development among Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenying; Song, Jingjing; Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Minjiang; Fan, Xiaoxi; Cheng, Xingyao; Lan, Xilin; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified three loci at 18q21 (rs4939827, rs7240004, and rs7229639), which maps to SMAD7 loci, were associated with risk of diseases of the digestive system. However, their associations with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk remain unknown. A case-control study was conducted to assess genetic associations with HCC risk and clinicopathologic development among Chinese Han population. Three SNPs were genotyped among 1,000 HCC cases and 1,000 controls using Sequenom Mass-ARRAY technology. We observed statistically significant associations for the three SMAD7 loci and HCC risk. Each copy of minor allele was associated with a 1.24–1.36 fold increased risk of HCC. We also found that significant differences were observed between rs4939827 and clinical TNM stage and vascular invasion, as well as rs7240004 and vascular invasion. We also established a genetic risk score (GRS) by summing the risk alleles. The GRS was significantly associated with increased risk of HCC and vascular invasion. Our data revealed the SMAD7 loci is associated with HCC susceptibility and its clinicopathologic development. PMID:26989026

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for craniofacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Biao; Hu, Jintian; Zhang, Jiao; Zhou, Xu; Li, Xin; Gu, Chaohao; Liu, Tun; Xie, Yangchun; Liu, Jiqiang; Gu, Mingliang; Wang, Panpan; Wu, Tingting; Qian, Jin; Wang, Yue; Dong, Xiaoqun; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Qingguo

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a rare congenital anomaly that involves immature derivatives from the first and second pharyngeal arches. The genetic pathogenesis of CFM is still unclear. Here we interrogate 0.9 million genetic variants in 939 CFM cases and 2,012 controls from China. After genotyping of an additional 443 cases and 1,669 controls, we identify 8 significantly associated loci with the most significant SNP rs13089920 (logistic regression P=2.15 × 10(-120)) and 5 suggestive loci. The above 13 associated loci, harboured by candidates of ROBO1, GATA3, GBX2, FGF3, NRP2, EDNRB, SHROOM3, SEMA7A, PLCD3, KLF12 and EPAS1, are found to be enriched for genes involved in neural crest cell (NCC) development and vasculogenesis. We then perform whole-genome sequencing on 21 samples from the case cohort, and identify several novel loss-of-function mutations within the associated loci. Our results provide new insights into genetic background of craniofacial microsomia. PMID:26853712

  7. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Turnbull, Clare; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie; Ahmed, Shahana; Driver, Kristy; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nicholas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Hopper, John L; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans BL; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Alonso, M. Rosario; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann H.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christie J.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm WR; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Muir, Kenneth R; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Perkins, Annie; Swann, Ruth; Velentzis, Louiza; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, Will J; Gerty, Susan M; Graham, Nikki J; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lathrop, Mark; Dunning, Alison M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Peto, Julian; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ~ 8% of the heritability of the disease. We followed up 72 promising associations from two independent Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) in ~70,000 cases and ~68,000 controls from 41 case-control studies and nine breast cancer GWAS. We identified three new breast cancer risk loci on 12p11 (rs10771399; P=2.7 × 10−35), 12q24 (rs1292011; P=4.3×10−19) and 21q21 (rs2823093; P=1.1×10−12). SNP rs10771399 was associated with similar relative risks for both estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and ER-positive breast cancer, whereas the other two loci were associated only with ER-positive disease. Two of the loci lie in regions that contain strong plausible candidate genes: PTHLH (12p11) plays a crucial role in mammary gland development and the establishment of bone metastasis in breast cancer, while NRIP1 (21q21) encodes an ER co-factor and has a role in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. PMID:22267197

  8. Screening for novel hexanucleotide repeat expansions at ALS- and FTD-associated loci

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang; Jones, Julie M.; Figueroa-Romero, Claudia; Zhang, Dapeng; Feldman, Eva L.; Goutman, Stephen A.; Meisler, Miriam H.; Callaghan, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansions at loci other than C9orf72 serve as common causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: We assessed G4C2 repeat number in 28 genes near known ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) loci by repeat-primed PCR coupled with fluorescent fragment analysis in 199 patients with ALS (17 familial, 182 sporadic) and 136 healthy controls. We also obtained blood from patients with ALS4 for evaluation of repeats surrounding the SETX gene locus. C9orf72 expansions were evaluated in parallel. Results: Expansions of G4C2 repeats in C9orf72 explained 8.8% of sporadic and 47% of familial ALS cases analyzed. Repeat variance was observed at one other locus, RGS14, but no large expansions were observed, and repeat sizes were not different between cases and controls. No G4C2 repeat expansions were identified at other ALS or FTD risk loci or in ALS4 cases. Conclusions: G4C2 expansions near known ALS and FTD loci other than C9orf72 are not a common cause of ALS. PMID:27274540

  9. Chemokines and T lymphocyte recruitment to lymph nodes in HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tedla, N.; Palladinetti, P.; Kelly, M.; Kumar, R. K.; DiGirolamo, N.; Chattophadhay, U.; Cooke, B.; Truskett, P.; Dwyer, J.; Wakefield, D.; Lloyd, A.

    1996-01-01

    Recruitment of T lymphocytes to lymph nodes in patients with HIV infection is critical to the pathogenesis of disease. Chemokines are a family of cytokines, which are potent regulators of leukocyte migration. We studied the leukocyte populations and expression of chemokines known to be active upon T cells in lymph nodes of four HIV infected patients and seven control subjects using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and FACS analysis. The HIV lymph nodes showed CD8+ T lymphocyte accumulation and strongly enhanced chemokine expression, notably for the CD8+ T cell chemoattractant, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha. Resident macrophages appeared to be a major cellular source of chemokines in the HIV nodes. RANTES expression was present in both HIV and control lymph nodes, suggesting a physiological role for this chemokine in T lymphocyte recirculation. Chemokines may be important determinants of T lymphocyte accumulation in lymphoid tissue of patients with HIV/AIDS. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8623908

  10. Migration inhibition of peritoneal cells and PHA lymphocyte toxicity in rats during methylcholanthrene carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kalafut, F; Babusíková, O; Klobussická, M; Koníková, E

    1975-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells obtained from rats bearing primary methylcholanthrene-induced tumors were shown to be inhibited in their capillary tube migration capacity as compared to cells from nontreated control litter-mates. The survival of rat peripheral blood lymphocytes harvested from the same individuals were tested simultaneously in short-term cultures with a standard concentration of Phytohemagglutinin. Lymphocytes from tumor-bearing rats survived better than control lymphocytes in 24-hour cultures with Phytohemagglutinin. A correlation was found from a comparison of the results of these two methods. These findings are discussed with regard to the possibility of T cells depletion from peripheral lymphocyte population, together with the enrichment of this population with B cells in tumor-bearing individuals. PMID:1081658

  11. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in the United States for 2016 (including ...

  12. What's New in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for chronic lymphocytic leukemia What`s new in chronic lymphocytic leukemia research and treatment? Many ... person's outlook and whether they will need treatment. New drugs for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Dozens of new ...

  13. Utility of DF-1 for Radioprotection in Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Julia; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu; Huff, Janice; Emami, Kamal; Moore, Valerie; Jeevarajan, Antony

    2007-01-01

    The development of degenerative changes in the vasculature, such as atherosclerosis, is a known consequence of exposure to ionizing radiation, and is thus a concern for astronaut health following long duration space flight. Cellular damage caused by radiation is due to free radical generation and DNA damage. The goal of this project was to assess the ability of a C60-derivative, DF-1, to mitigate cellular damage resulting from radiation exposure in primary human lymphocytes. DF-1 is a water-soluble C60 fullerene encapsulated in dendrimeric functional groups that is proposed to exhibit antioxidant properties. Human lymphocytes are radiosensitive and travel throughout the body potentially causing bystander effects in any tissues they contact. These cells were subjected to varying doses of gamma radiation in the presence or absence of DF-1. Cells were collected at 48 hours post-irradiation for chromosomal aberration studies and at 72 hours post-irradiation for micronuclei studies. These studies showed that the irradiated cells contained more chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei than the control cells. Addition of the DF-1 reduced the amount of observed DNA damage in the irradiated cells. Growth curves were measured for the lymphocytes exposed to 0 and 4 Gray gamma irradiations, and we observed less growth in the cells irradiated at 4 Gy. 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used to detect reactive oxygen species production, and increased production of ROS was observed in the irradiated lymphocytes. Human lymphocytes were subjected to varying doses of gamma or photon radiation in the presence and absence of DF-1 and a known radioprotectant, amifostine. After irradiation, the production of reactive oxygen species, growth curves and cell viability were measured. These cells were also collected to quantify chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation. We predict that irradiated cells will show the most damage and that DF-1 will provide protective effects similar

  14. Growing B Lymphocytes in a Three-Dimensional Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. H. David; Bottaro, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) culture system for growing long-lived B lymphocytes has been invented. The capabilities afforded by the system can be expected to expand the range of options for immunological research and related activities, including testing of immunogenicity of vaccine candidates in vitro, generation of human monoclonal antibodies, and immunotherapy. Mature lymphocytes, which are the effectors of adaptive immune responses in vertebrates, are extremely susceptible to apoptotic death, and depend on continuous reception of survival-inducing stimulation (in the forms of cytokines, cell-to-cell contacts, and antigen receptor signaling) from the microenvironment. For this reason, efforts to develop systems for long-term culture of functional, non-transformed and non-activated mature lymphocytes have been unsuccessful until now. The bone-marrow microenvironment supports the growth and differentiation of many hematopoietic lineages, in addition to B-lymphocytes. Primary bone-marrow cell cultures designed to promote the development of specific cell types in vitro are highly desirable experimental systems, amenable to manipulation under controlled conditions. However, the dynamic and complex network of stromal cells and insoluble matrix proteins is disrupted in prior plate- and flask-based culture systems, wherein the microenvironments have a predominantly two-dimensional (2D) character. In 2D bone-marrow cultures, normal B-lymphoid cells become progressively skewed toward precursor B-cell populations that do not retain a normal immunophenotype, and such mature B-lymphocytes as those harvested from the spleen or lymph nodes do not survive beyond several days ex vivo in the absence of mitogenic stimulation. The present 3D culture system is a bioreactor that contains highly porous artificial scaffolding that supports the long-term culture of bone marrow, spleen, and lymph-node samples. In this system, unlike in 2D culture systems, B-cell subpopulations developing

  15. Pre-radiation lymphocyte harvesting and post-radiation reinfusion in patients with newly diagnosed high grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaobu; Gladstone, Douglas E.; Ambady, Prakash; Nirschl, Thomas R.; Borrello, Ivan; Golightly, Marc; King, Karen E.; Holdhoff, Matthias; Karp, Judith; Drake, Charles G.; Grossman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation (RT), temozolomide (TMZ), and dexamethasone in newly diagnosed high grade gliomas (HGG) produces severe treatment-related lymphopenia (TRL) that is associated with early cancer-related deaths. This TRL may result from inadvertent radiation to circulating lymphocytes. This study reinfused lymphocytes, harvested before chemo-radiation, and assessed safety, feasibility, and trends in lymphocyte counts. Patients with newly diagnosed HGG and total lymphocyte counts (TLC) ≥ 1000 cells/mm3 underwent apheresis. Cryopreserved autologous lymphocytes were reinfused once radiation was completed. Safety, feasibility, and trends in TLC, T cell subsets and cytokines were studied. Serial TLC were also compared with an unreinfused matched control group. Ten patients were harvested (median values: age 56 years, dexamethasone 3 mg/day, TLC/CD4 1980/772 cells/mm3). After 6 weeks of RT/TMZ, TLC fell 69 % (p < 0.0001) with similar reductions in CD4, CD8 and NK cells but not Tregs. Eight patients received lymphocyte reinfusions (median = 7.0 × 107 lymphocytes/kg) without adverse events. A post-reinfusion TLC rise of ≥300 cells/mm3 was noted in 3/8 patients at 4 weeks and 7/8 at 14 weeks which was similar to 23 matched controls. The reduced CD4/CD8 ratio was not restored by lymphocyte reinfusion. Severe lymphopenia was not accompanied by elevated serum interleukin-7 (IL-7) levels. This study confirms that severe TRL is common in HGG and is not associated with high plasma IL-7 levels. Although lymphocyte harvesting/rein-fusion is feasible and safe, serial lymphocyte counts are similar to unreinfused matched controls. Studies administering higher lymphocyte doses and/or IL-7 should be considered to restore severe treatment-related lymphopenia in HGG. PMID:26070554

  16. Reduced lymphocyte activation in space: role of cell-substratum interactions.

    PubMed

    Gmünder, F K; Kiess, M; Sonnenfeld, G; Lee, J; Cogoli, A

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of substratum adhesiveness on stimulated lymphocyte blastogenesis by reducing and blocking cell adhesion with poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly-HEMA) in a simple on-ground system. Cells grown on medium-thick and thick poly-HEMA films were rounded in shape and displayed no signs of spreading. By contrast, on tissue culture plastic and very thin poly-HEMA films, they showed clear signs of spreading. The mitogenic response of lymphocytes grown on thick poly-HEMA films was reduced by up to 68% of the control (tissue culture plastic). Interferon-gamma production was near zero when the cells were grown on the least adhesive substratum. On uncoated plastic, activated lymphocytes subjected to high gravity (20g) exhibited an increased proliferation rate (40%) compared with 1g. By contrast, on poly-HEMA, high gravity did not improve lymphocyte responsiveness. These results show that activated lymphocytes need to anchor and spread prior to achieving an optimal proliferation response. We conclude that decreased lymphocyte adhesion could contribute to the depressed in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness found in the microgravity conditions of space flight. PMID:11536989

  17. Effects of cytotoxic immunosuppressants on tuberculin-sensitive lymphocytes in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Winkelstein, A

    1975-01-01

    The immunosuppressive activities of two phase-specific drugs, 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and methotrexate, and a cycle-specific agent, cyclophosphamide, were evaluated on the lymphocytic component of established tuberculin hypersensitivity in guinea pigs. In these animals, purified protein derivative (PPD)-sensitive lymphocytes are in an intermitotic phase of their proliferative cycle. Neither phase-specific drug significantly altered either the number or functional activities of these lymphocytes. By two in vitro criteria, PPD-induced lymphoproliferation and elaboration of migration inhibition factor (MIF), the responses of lymph node cells were equivalent to sensitized controls. In addition, these agents did not deplete pools of T lymphocytes, impair responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), nor inhibit cutaneous reactivity if employed before sensitization. In contrast, cyclophosphamide showed broader immunosuppressive effects including significant toxicities for intermitotic lymphocytes. This drug depleted pools of T cells and markedly impaired the in vitro proliferative responses of residual lymphocytes. The latter occurred with both PHA and PPD. Suppression of PHA reactivity was a dose-dependent phenomenon but was evident even with small quantities of this alkylating agent. The suppression of antigen-induced responses was independent of the proliferative status of target lymphocytes in vivo, after a single large dose, it persisted for more than 3 wk. In total, these results indicate that the effective use of cytotoxic drugs as immunosuppressants must include consideration of both the cycle specificities of the agent and the proliferative activities of the target lymphoid population. PMID:1081551

  18. [Method for determining dopamine and morphine binding sites in lymphocytes from human peripheral blood].

    PubMed

    Gamaleia, N B; Kuz'mina, T I; Shostak, O A; Gamaleia, A A; Dmitrieva, I G

    2003-12-01

    A histochemical method was designed to detect the regions of binding the dopamine and morphine in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. It is based on incubating the suspension of lymphocytes and conjugated dopamine or morphine with bull serum albumin (BSA) marked by horse-radish peroxidase. After incubation, smears are prepared from the lymphocyte suspension, which are stained by diaminobenzidine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide for peroxidase. The light microscope with oil immersion is used to count the number of lymphocytes (from among 100 hundred of them), which contain the peroxidase granules. Smears from the lymphocyte suspension, which were incubated with the BSA-peroxidase conjugate, were controls. The binding of peroxidase-marked ligands of dopamine and mu-opioid receptors with lymphocytes was oppressed by the dose-dependant preliminary incubation with antagonists (haloperidol, naloxone), on the basis of which the presence of the ligand-receptor interaction can be suggested. The number of bindings of dopamine and morphine in lymphocytes was shown to be reliably higher in the alcoholic-intoxication state versus the healthy subjects without any signs of alcohol consumption. The designed method is simple enough in use and does not require any special equipment for the receptor detection in a moderate blood quantity. PMID:14971325

  19. CD73-generated Adenosine Restricts Lymphocyte Migration into Draining Lymph Nodes1

    PubMed Central

    Takedachi, Masahide; Qu, Dongfeng; Ebisuno, Yukihiko; Oohara, Hiroyuki; Joachims, Michelle L.; McGee, Stephanie T.; Maeda, Emiko; McEver, Rodger P.; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Murakami, Shinya; Krahn, Thomas; Blackburn, Michael R.; Thompson, Linda F.

    2009-01-01

    After an inflammatory stimulus, lymphocyte migration into draining lymph nodes increases dramatically to facilitate the encounter of naïve T cells with antigen-loaded dendritic cells. Here we show that CD73 (ecto-5′-nucleotidase) plays an important role in regulating this process. CD73 produces adenosine from AMP and is expressed on high endothelial venules (HEV) and subsets of lymphocytes. Cd73-/- mice have normal sized lymphoid organs in the steady state, but approximately 1.5-fold larger draining lymph nodes and 2.5-fold increased rates of L-selectin-dependent lymphocyte migration from the blood through HEV compared to wild type mice 24 hours after LPS administration. Migration rates of cd73+/+ and cd73-/- lymphocytes into lymph nodes of wild type mice are equal, suggesting that it is CD73 on HEV that regulates lymphocyte migration into draining lymph nodes. The A2B receptor is a likely target of CD73-generated adenosine, as it is the only adenosine receptor expressed on the HEV-like cell line KOP2.16 and it is up regulated by TNFα. Furthermore, increased lymphocyte migration into draining lymph nodes of cd73-/- mice is largely normalized by pretreatment with the selective A2B receptor agonist BAY 60-6583. Adenosine receptor signaling to restrict lymphocyte migration across HEV may be an important mechanism to control the magnitude of an inflammatory response. PMID:18424752

  20. Other Malignancies in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria; Wen, Sijin; McLaughlin, Peter; O'Brien, Susan; Wierda, William G.; Lerner, Susan; Strom, Sara; Freireich, Emil J; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Keating, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Other malignancies have been reported to occur with increased frequency in chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, outcomes, and factors associated with other cancers in patients with CLL/SLL. Patients and Methods We reviewed the records of consecutive patients with previously untreated CLL/SLL seen at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from 1985 to 2005. The number of second cancers observed was compared with the number expected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Results Among 2,028 patients, 324 (16%) had a history of other cancers and 227 (11.2%) developed other malignancies during the follow-up period. Overall, 625 cancers were observed in 551 patients, including skin (30%), prostate (13%), breast (9%), melanoma (8%), lymphoma (8%), gastrointestinal (9%), lung (6%), and other cancers (17%). The risk of a second cancer was 2.2 times higher than the expected risk. The response rates in patients with and without a history of other cancers were 86% and 92%, respectively (P = .04), and the 5-year survival rates were 70% and 82%, respectively (P < .001). In Cox analysis, independent factors predicting development of new cancers were older age, male sex, and elevated levels of β2-microglobulin, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatinine. In patients who were treated for CLL/SLL, the treatment regimen did not affect the risk of subsequent cancer (P = .49). Conclusion Patients with CLL/SLL have more than twice the risk of developing a second cancer and an increased frequency of certain cancer types. Awareness of risk factors could permit early detection. PMID:19114699

  1. Splenic lymphoma with circulating villous lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Imbing, F; Kumar, D; Kumar, S; Yuoh, G; Gardner, F

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the occurrence of splenic lymphoma with villous lymphocytes (SLVL) in a 56 year old white female with a family history of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Other unusual features included a marked lymphocytosis with counts up to 224 x 10(9)/l and marked clumping of lymphocytes in EDTA anticoagulated blood. The neoplastic cells were CD19+, CD20+, CD22+, CD22+, IgM+, lambda+, kappa-, CD5-, and CD10-. The spleen had nodular infiltrates of B lymphocytes in the region of the white pulp with minimal red pulp involvement. Electron microscopy of peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed cells with polar cytoplasmic processes. This report underlines the need for detailed analysis, including morphology and immunophenotyping, for each patient with a small B cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Images PMID:7665709

  2. Identification of seven new prostate cancer susceptibility loci through a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Giles, Graham G.; Guy, Michelle; Severi, Gianluca; Muir, Kenneth; Hopper, John L.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Schaid, Daniel; Park, Jong Y.; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith; Dickinson, Joanne L.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Dörk, Thilo; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Chappuis, Pierre O.; Hutter, Pierre; Zeegers, Maurice; Kaneva, Radka; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Foulkes, William D.; English, Dallas R.; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Morrison, Jonathan; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T.; Hall, Amanda L.; O’Brien, Lynne T.; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Saunders, Edward J.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Edwards, Stephen M.; Dearnaley, David P.; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Parker, Christopher C.; Van As, Nicholas; Woodhouse, Christopher J.; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Liu, Jo-Fen; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L.; Auvinen, Anssi; Lewis, Sarah J.; Cox, Angela; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Koopmeiners, Joseph S.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Kwon, Erika M.; Stern, Mariana C.; Corral, Roman; Joshi, Amit D.; Shahabi, Ahva; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Sellers, Thomas A; Pow-Sang, Julio; Chambers, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Gardiner, R.A. (Frank); Batra, Jyotsna; Kedda, Mary Anne; Lose, Felicity; Polanowski, Andrea; Patterson, Briony; Serth, Jürgen; Meyer, Andreas; Luedeke, Manuel; Stefflova, Klara; Ray, Anna M.; Lange, Ethan M.; Farnham, Jim; Khan, Humera; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitkova, Atanaska; Cao, Guangwen; Easton, Douglas F.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. To identify common PrCa susceptibility alleles, we have previously conducted a genome-wide association study in which 541, 129 SNPs were genotyped in 1,854 PrCa cases with clinically detected disease and 1,894 controls. We have now evaluated promising associations in a second stage, in which we genotyped 43,671 SNPs in 3,650 PrCa cases and 3,940 controls, and a third stage, involving an additional 16,229 cases and 14,821 controls from 21 studies. In addition to previously identified loci, we identified a further seven new prostate cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 8, 11, and 22 (P=1.6×10−8 to P=2.7×10−33). PMID:19767753

  3. Quantitative trait loci affecting pathogen resistance and ripening of grapevines.

    PubMed

    Zyprian, Eva; Ochßner, Iris; Schwander, Florian; Šimon, Silvio; Hausmann, Ludger; Bonow-Rex, Martina; Moreno-Sanz, Paula; Grando, Maria Stella; Wiedemann-Merdinoglu, Sabine; Merdinoglu, Didier; Eibach, Rudolf; Töpfer, Reinhard

    2016-08-01

    Grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) form the basis of viticulture, and are susceptible to diseases such as downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola) and powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator). Therefore, successful viticulture programs require the use of pesticides. Breeding for resistance is the only eco-friendly solution. Marker-assisted selection is currently widely used for grapevine breeding. Consequently, traits of interest must be tagged with molecular markers linked to quantitative trait loci (QTL). We herein present our findings regarding genetic mapping and QTL analysis of resistance to downy and powdery mildew diseases in the progenies of the GF.GA-47-42 ('Bacchus' × 'Seyval') × 'Villard blanc' cross. Simple sequence repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms of 151 individuals were analyzed. A map consisting of 543 loci was screened for QTL analyses based on phenotypic variations observed in plants grown in the field or under controlled conditions. A major QTL for downy mildew resistance was detected on chromosome 18. For powdery mildew resistance, a QTL was identified on chromosome 15. This QTL was replaced by a novel QTL on chromosome 18 in 2003 (abnormally high temperatures) and 2004. Subsequently, both QTLs functioned together. Additionally, variations in the timing of the onset of veraison, which is a crucial step during grape ripening, were studied to identify genomic regions affecting this trait. A major QTL was detected on linkage group 16, which was supplemented by a minor QTL on linkage group 18. This study provides useful information regarding novel QTL-linked markers relevant for the breeding of disease-resistant grapevines adapted to current climatic conditions. PMID:27038830

  4. Different deoxyribonucleases in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, E.Jürgen; Helm, Wolfgang; Zahn, Rudolf K.; Beck, Jörn; Reltz, Manfred

    1974-01-01

    The distribution pattern of deoxyribonuclease activities in human lymphocytes has been examined by micro-disc-electrophoresis. Four groups of deoxyribonuclease activities, differing in their electrophoretic mobility, in the nature of their optimal substrate and in their optimal incubation conditions, are characterized. There are two alkaline DNase-activities. One corresponds to DNase I (EC 3.1.4.5), the other having pH optimum of about pH 9.0, prefers denatured DNA as substrate and is not dependent on divalent cations. The fractions with an acid pH optimum can be subdivided into two groups, which differ in their activity towards native DNA, towards denatured DNA, in their activity when succinate is present and in their pH optimum. PMID:10793736

  5. Subpopulations of mouse spleen lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mugraby, Lea; Gery, I.; Sulitzeanu, D.

    1974-01-01

    Fractionation on bovine serum albumin (BSA) continuous gradients or passage through anti-immunoglobulin-coated (RaMIg) columns were used to separate the populations of mouse spleen cells which react against mitogens specific for B (E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) or T cells (concanavalin A (Con A) or phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)). These manipulations could distinguish the subsets of T cells reacting toward PHA or Con A. Fractionation on BSA gradients yielded two fractions, one light and the other dense, with high reactivity toward Con A; the cells reactive to LPS were concentrated in a fraction located between these two fractions, whereas the response to PHA was distributed irregularly throughout the gradient, without any apparent correlation with the response against Con A. Lymphocytes eluted from the RaMIg columns did not react to LPS, showed increased reactivity to PHA and decreased response to Con A, as compared to the unfractionated cells. PMID:4605183

  6. Association of eGFR-Related Loci Identified by GWAS with Incident CKD and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Böger, Carsten A.; Gorski, Mathias; Li, Man; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Huang, Chunmei; Yang, Qiong; Teumer, Alexander; Krane, Vera; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Haak, Thomas; Boes, Eva; Coassin, Stefan; Coresh, Josef; Kollerits, Barbara; Haun, Margot; Paulweber, Bernhard; Köttgen, Anna; Li, Guo; Shlipak, Michael G.; Powe, Neil; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Dehghan, Abbas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André; Hofman, Albert; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bochud, Murielle; Siscovick, David; Rettig, Rainer; Kronenberg, Florian; Wanner, Christoph; Thadhani, Ravi I.; Heid, Iris M.

    2011-01-01

    Family studies suggest a genetic component to the etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end stage renal disease (ESRD). Previously, we identified 16 loci for eGFR in genome-wide association studies, but the associations of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for incident CKD or ESRD are unknown. We thus investigated the association of these loci with incident CKD in 26,308 individuals of European ancestry free of CKD at baseline drawn from eight population-based cohorts followed for a median of 7.2 years (including 2,122 incident CKD cases defined as eGFR <60ml/min/1.73m2 at follow-up) and with ESRD in four case-control studies in subjects of European ancestry (3,775 cases, 4,577 controls). SNPs at 11 of the 16 loci (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, SHROOM3, DACH1, STC1, SLC34A1, ALMS1/NAT8, UBE2Q2, and GCKR) were associated with incident CKD; p-values ranged from p = 4.1e-9 in UMOD to p = 0.03 in GCKR. After adjusting for baseline eGFR, six of these loci remained significantly associated with incident CKD (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, DACH1, and STC1). SNPs in UMOD (OR = 0.92, p = 0.04) and GCKR (OR = 0.93, p = 0.03) were nominally associated with ESRD. In summary, the majority of eGFR-related loci are either associated or show a strong trend towards association with incident CKD, but have modest associations with ESRD in individuals of European descent. Additional work is required to characterize the association of genetic determinants of CKD and ESRD at different stages of disease progression. PMID:21980298

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Hinds, David A.; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7–11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Harvind S; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Hinds, David A; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7-11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  9. Hungarian population data on seven PCR-based loci.

    PubMed

    Budowle, B; Woller, J; Koons, B W; Furedi, S; Errera, J D; Padar, Z

    1996-07-01

    Hungarian population data for the loci LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, HLA-DQA1, and D1S80 were generated. The genotype frequency distributions for the loci do not deviate from Hardy Weinberg expectations. Furthermore, there was little evidence for departures from expectations of independence between the loci. Using a test for homogeneity all the loci were similar between two Hungarian population samples and only the HLA-DQA1 locus was statistically different between Hungarians and US Caucasians. There generally would be little forensic differences, whether a Hungarian or a US Caucasian database was used, for estimating multiple locus profile frequencies for the seven PCR-based loci. PMID:8754580

  10. Development of eighteen microsatellite loci in walleye (Sander vitreus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Stott, Wendy; Springmann, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    A suite of tri- and tetra-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed for walleye (Sander vitreus) from 454 pyrosequencing data. Eighteen of the 50 primer sets tested amplified consistently in 35 walleye from two lakes on Isle Royale, Lake Superior: Chickenbone Lake and Whittlesey Lake. The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 5.5 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 35.8 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and detect phylogeographic structuring as individuals assigned back to their population of origin. Cross-species amplification within S. canadensis (sauger) was successful for 15 loci, and 11 loci were diagnostic to species. The loci characterized here will be useful for detecting fine-scale spatial structuring, resolving the taxonomic status of Sander species and sub-species, and detecting walleye/sauger hybrids.

  11. Age associated oxidative damage in lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Nandeslu; Das, Subhasis; Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Kundu, Pratip Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocytes are an important immunological cell and have been played a significant role in acquired immune system; hence, may play in pivotal role in immunosenescence. Oxidative stress has been reported to increase in elderly subjects, possibly arising from an uncontrolled production of free radicals with aging and decreased antioxidant defenses. This study was aimed to evaluate the level of lipid-protein damage and antioxidant status in lymphocytes of healthy individuals to correlate between oxidative damage with the aging process. Twenty healthy individuals of each age group (11–20; 21–30; 31–40; 41–50; and 51–60 years) were selected randomly. Blood samples were drawn by medical practitioner and lymphocytes were isolated from blood samples. Malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls (PC) level were evaluated to determine the lipid and protein damage in lymphocytes. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione and glutathione dependent enzymes were estimated to evaluate the antioxidant status in the lymphocytes. Increased MDA and PC levels strongly support the increased oxidative damage in elderly subject than young subjects. The results indicated that, balance of oxidant and antioxidant systems in lymphocytes shifts in favor of accelerated oxidative damage during aging. Thus oxidative stress in lymphocytes may particular interest in aging and may play important role in immunosenescence. PMID:20972374

  12. Chromosomal instability in the lymphocytes of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Harsimran, Kaur; Kaur, Monga Gaganpreet; Nitika, Setia; Meena, Sudan; M. S., Uppal; Yamini; A. P. S., Batra; Vasudha, Sambyal

    2009-01-01

    Genomic instability in the tumor tissue has been correlated with tumor progression. In the present study, chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of breast tumor patients were studied to assess whether chromosomal instability (CIN) in PBLs correlates with aggressiveness of breast tumor (i.e., disease stage) and has any prognostic utility. Cultured blood lymphocyte metaphases were scored for aberrations in 31 breast cancer patients and 20 healthy age and sex-matched controls. A variety of CAs, including aneuploidy, polyploidy, terminal deletions, acentric fragments, double minutes, chromatid separations, ring chromosome, marker chromosome, chromatid gaps, and breaks were seen in PBLs of the patients. The CAs in patients were higher than in controls. A comparison of the frequency of metaphases with aberrations by grouping the patients according to the stage of advancement of disease did not reveal any consistent pattern of variation in lymphocytic CIN. Neither was any specific chromosomal abnormality found to be associated with the stage of cancer. This might be indicative of the fact that cancer patients have constitutional CIN, which predisposes them to the disease, and this inherent difference in the level of genomic instability might play a role in disease progression and response to treatment. PMID:20407644

  13. DOCK8 regulates lymphocyte shape integrity for skin antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Dove, Christopher G.; Hor, Jyh Liang; Murdock, Heardley M.; Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Garcia, Jordan A.; Mandl, Judith N.; Grodick, Rachael A.; Jing, Huie; Chandler-Brown, Devon B.; Lenardo, Timothy E.; Crawford, Greg; Matthews, Helen F.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Cornall, Richard J.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    DOCK8 mutations result in an inherited combined immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to skin and other infections. We show that when DOCK8-deficient T and NK cells migrate through confined spaces, they develop cell shape and nuclear deformation abnormalities that do not impair chemotaxis but contribute to a distinct form of catastrophic cell death we term cytothripsis. Such defects arise during lymphocyte migration in collagen-dense tissues when DOCK8, through CDC42 and p21-activated kinase (PAK), is unavailable to coordinate cytoskeletal structures. Cytothripsis of DOCK8-deficient cells prevents the generation of long-lived skin-resident memory CD8 T cells, which in turn impairs control of herpesvirus skin infections. Our results establish that DOCK8-regulated shape integrity of lymphocytes prevents cytothripsis and promotes antiviral immunity in the skin. PMID:25422492

  14. DOCK8 regulates lymphocyte shape integrity for skin antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Dove, Christopher G; Hor, Jyh Liang; Murdock, Heardley M; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Garcia, Jordan A; Mandl, Judith N; Grodick, Rachael A; Jing, Huie; Chandler-Brown, Devon B; Lenardo, Timothy E; Crawford, Greg; Matthews, Helen F; Freeman, Alexandra F; Cornall, Richard J; Germain, Ronald N; Mueller, Scott N; Su, Helen C

    2014-12-15

    DOCK8 mutations result in an inherited combined immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to skin and other infections. We show that when DOCK8-deficient T and NK cells migrate through confined spaces, they develop cell shape and nuclear deformation abnormalities that do not impair chemotaxis but contribute to a distinct form of catastrophic cell death we term cytothripsis. Such defects arise during lymphocyte migration in collagen-dense tissues when DOCK8, through CDC42 and p21-activated kinase (PAK), is unavailable to coordinate cytoskeletal structures. Cytothripsis of DOCK8-deficient cells prevents the generation of long-lived skin-resident memory CD8 T cells, which in turn impairs control of herpesvirus skin infections. Our results establish that DOCK8-regulated shape integrity of lymphocytes prevents cytothripsis and promotes antiviral immunity in the skin. PMID:25422492

  15. Analysis of putative resistance gene loci in UK field populations of Haemonchus contortus after 6years of macrocyclic lactone use.

    PubMed

    Laing, Roz; Maitland, Kirsty; Lecová, Lenka; Skuce, Philip J; Tait, Andy; Devaney, Eileen

    2016-09-01

    Sheep farmers in the UK rely on strategic anthelmintic use to treat and control gastrointestinal roundworms in their flocks. However, resistance to these drugs is now widespread and threatens the sustainability of sheep production. The mechanisms underlying resistance to the most commonly used class, the macrocyclic lactones, are not known and sensitive diagnostic tools based on molecular markers are not currently available. This prohibits accurate surveillance of resistance or assessment of strategies aimed at controlling its spread. In this study, we examined four UK field populations of Haemonchus contortus, differing in macrocyclic lactone treatment history, for evidence of selection at 'candidate gene' loci identified as determining macrocyclic lactone resistance in previously published research. Individual worms were genotyped at Hc-lgc-37, Hc-glc-5, Hc-avr-14 and Hc-dyf-7, and four microsatellite loci. High levels of polymorphism were identified at the first three candidate gene loci with remarkably little polymorphism at Hc-dyf-7. While some between-population comparisons of individual farms with and without long-term macrocyclic lactone use identified statistically significant differences in allele frequency and/or fixation index at the Hc-lgc-37, Hc-glc-5 or Hc-avr-14 loci, we found no consistent evidence of selection in other equivalent comparisons. While it is possible that different mechanisms are important in different populations or that resistance may be conferred by small changes at multiple loci, our findings suggest that these are unlikely to be major loci conferring macrocyclic lactone resistance on UK farms or suitable for diagnostic marker development. More powerful approaches, using genome-wide or whole genome sequencing, may be required to define macrocyclic lactone resistance loci in such genetically variable populations. PMID:27179994

  16. CD4+ LYMPHOCYTES IMPROVE VENOUS BLOOD FLOW IN EXPERIMENTAL ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULAE

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Juan C.; Martinez, Laisel; Mesa, Annia; Wei, Yuntao; Tabbara, Marwan; Salman, Loay H.; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I.

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of immune cells in arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) maturation is poorly understood and has received, until quite recently, little attention. This study examines the role of T lymphocytes in AVF vascular remodeling. Methods Experimental fistulae were created in athymic rnu nude rats lacking mature T lymphocytes and euthymic control animals by anastomosing the left superior epigastric vein to the nearby femoral artery. Blood flow rates, wall morphology and histological changes were assessed in AVF 21 days after creation. The effect of CD4+ lymphocytes on AVF maturation in athymic animals was analyzed by adoptive transfer of cells after fistula creation. Results The absence of T lymphocytes compromised blood flow in experimental fistulae. Histopathological inspection of AVF from athymic rats revealed that T cell immunodeficiency negatively affected venous vascular remodeling, as evidenced by a reduced lumen, a thick muscular layer and a low number of inflammatory cells compared to control animals. Adoptive transfer of CD4+ lymphocytes from euthymic rats into athymic animals before and after fistula creation improved blood flow and reduced intima-media thickness. Conclusion These results point at the protective role of CD4+ lymphocytes in the remodeling of the AVF vascular wall. PMID:25999254

  17. Lymphocyte-conditioned medium protects human monocyte-macrophages from cholesteryl ester accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelman, A M; Seager, J; Haberland, M E; Hokom, M; Tanaka, R; Edwards, P A

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of human monocyte-macrophages to as little as 50 microliters of cultured medium from lymphocytes stimulated by concanavalin A (Con A) resulted in a dramatic decrease in the activities of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor pathway, the LDL-dextran sulfate pathway, and the scavenger receptor pathway. This effect was not seen when the monocyte-macrophages were exposed to culture medium from lymphocytes cultured without Con A or with Con A together with alpha-methyl mannoside or control medium without lymphocytes. The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase also decreased in monocyte-macrophages exposed to culture medium from stimulated lymphocytes. Acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase activity, protein synthesis, protein content, phagocytosis of heat-killed yeast, and non-receptor-mediated endocytosis were not inhibited. Monocyte-macrophages exposed to malondialdehyde altered-LDL in the presence of stimulated lymphocyte culture medium accumulated substantially less cholesteryl esters than did cells in control medium. We propose that substances produced by stimulated lymphocytes may be useful in protecting macrophages from cholesteryl ester accumulation. Images PMID:6278500

  18. The Identification of Loci for Immune Traits in Chickens Using a Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Peng; Liu, Ranran; Zheng, Maiqing; Sun, Yan; Wu, Dan; Hu, Yaodong; Wen, Jie; Zhao, Guiping

    2015-01-01

    The genetic improvement of disease resistance in poultry continues to be a challenge. To identify candidate genes and loci responsible for these traits, genome-wide association studies using the chicken 60k high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array for six immune traits, total serum immunoglobulin Y (IgY) level, numbers of, and the ratio of heterophils and lymphocytes, and antibody responses against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) and Sheep Red Blood Cell (SRBC), were performed. RT-qPCR was used to quantify the relative expression of the identified candidate genes. Nine significantly associated SNPs (P < 2.81E-06) and 30 SNPs reaching the suggestively significant level (P < 5.62E-05) were identified. Five of the 10 SNPs that were suggestively associated with the antibody response to SRBC were located within or close to previously reported QTL regions. Fifteen SNPs reached a suggestive significance level for AIV antibody titer and seven were found on the sex chromosome Z. Seven suggestive markers involving five different SNPs were identified for the numbers of heterophils and lymphocytes, and the heterophil/lymphocyte ratio. Nine significant SNPs, all on chromosome 16, were significantly associated with serum total IgY concentration, and the five most significant were located within a narrow region spanning 6.4kb to 253.4kb (P = 1.20E-14 to 5.33E-08). After testing expression of five candidate genes (IL4I1, CD1b, GNB2L1, TRIM27 and ZNF692) located in this region, changes in IL4I1, CD1b transcripts were consistent with the concentrations of IgY, while abundances of TRIM27 and ZNF692 showed reciprocal changes to those of IgY concentrations. This study has revealed 39 SNPs associated with six immune traits (total serum IgY level, numbers of, and the ratio of heterophils and lymphocytes, and antibody responses against AIV and SRBC) in Beijing-You chickens. The narrow region spanning 247kb on chromosome 16 is an important QTL for serum total IgY concentration

  19. Does famotidine enhance tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer? Results of a randomized prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Parshad, Rajinder; Kapoor, Sorabh; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Kumar, Arvind; Chattopadhyaya, Tushar K

    2002-01-01

    Thirty patients with breast cancer were prospectively randomized into case and control groups receiving 40 mg famotidine preoperatively for 10-14 days and routine premedication, respectively. Surgical specimens were evaluated objectively for tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in the center and in the periphery of the tumor along with evaluation of metastatic lymph nodes for reactive changes. Ten famotidine-treated cases (67%) showed significant lymphocytic infiltration in the center compared to 4 controls (27%) (p = 0.03). Eleven cases (77%) had significant lymphocytic infiltration in the periphery (p = 0.03) compared to 5 controls (33%). Considering both sites, lymphocytic response was significant in 9 (60%) cases as opposed to only 3 (20%) controls (p = 0.03). This response did not correlate with the stage, grade of tumor or menopausal status of patients in either group. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of the cases showed significant reactive changes in the metastatic lymph nodes as compared to 22% in controls (p < 0.01). This study suggests that famotidine enhances tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer and might have potential as an immunomodulator. A larger confirmatory study is suggested. PMID:12234028

  20. Lymphocytes from wasted mice express enhanced spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Chung, Jen; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wasted (wst/wst) display a disease pattern including faulty repair of DNA damage in lymphocytes after radiation exposure, neurologic abnormalities, and immunodeficiency. Many of the features of this mouse model have suggested a premature or increased spontaneous frequency of apoptosis in thymocytes; past work has shown an inability to establish cultured T cell lines, an abnormally high death rate of stimulated T cells in culture, and an increased sensitivity of T cells to the killing effects of ionizing radiations in wst/wst mice relative to controls. The experiments reported here were designed to examine splenic and thymic lymphocytes from wasted and control mice for signs of early apoptosis. Our results revealed enhanced expression of Rp-8 mRNA (associated with apoptosis) in thymic lymphocytes and reduced expression in splenic lymphocytes of wst/wst mice relative to controls; expression of Rp-2 and Td-30 mRNA (induced during apoptosis) were not detectable in spleen or thymus. Higher spontaneous DNA fragmentation was observed in wasted mice than in controls; however, {gamma}-ray-induced DNA fragmentation peaked at a lower dose and occurred to a greater extent in wasted mice relative to controls. These results provide evidence for high spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis in T cells of wasted mice as a mechanism underlying the observed lymphocyte and DNA repair abnormalities.

  1. Meta-analysis of 74,046 individuals identifies 11 new susceptibility loci for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J C; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Harold, D; Naj, A C; Sims, R; Bellenguez, C; DeStafano, A L; Bis, J C; Beecham, G W; Grenier-Boley, B; Russo, G; Thorton-Wells, T A; Jones, N; Smith, A V; Chouraki, V; Thomas, C; Ikram, M A; Zelenika, D; Vardarajan, B N; Kamatani, Y; Lin, C F; Gerrish, A; Schmidt, H; Kunkle, B; Dunstan, M L; Ruiz, A; Bihoreau, M T; Choi, S H; Reitz, C; Pasquier, F; Cruchaga, C; Craig, D; Amin, N; Berr, C; Lopez, O L; De Jager, P L; Deramecourt, V; Johnston, J A; Evans, D; Lovestone, S; Letenneur, L; Morón, F J; Rubinsztein, D C; Eiriksdottir, G; Sleegers, K; Goate, A M; Fiévet, N; Huentelman, M W; Gill, M; Brown, K; Kamboh, M I; Keller, L; Barberger-Gateau, P; McGuiness, B; Larson, E B; Green, R; Myers, A J; Dufouil, C; Todd, S; Wallon, D; Love, S; Rogaeva, E; Gallacher, J; St George-Hyslop, P; Clarimon, J; Lleo, A; Bayer, A; Tsuang, D W; Yu, L; Tsolaki, M; Bossù, P; Spalletta, G; Proitsi, P; Collinge, J; Sorbi, S; Sanchez-Garcia, F; Fox, N C; Hardy, J; Deniz Naranjo, M C; Bosco, P; Clarke, R; Brayne, C; Galimberti, D; Mancuso, M; Matthews, F; Moebus, S; Mecocci, P; Del Zompo, M; Maier, W; Hampel, H; Pilotto, A; Bullido, M; Panza, F; Caffarra, P; Nacmias, B; Gilbert, J R; Mayhaus, M; Lannefelt, L; Hakonarson, H; Pichler, S; Carrasquillo, M M; Ingelsson, M; Beekly, D; Alvarez, V; Zou, F; Valladares, O; Younkin, S G; Coto, E; Hamilton-Nelson, K L; Gu, W; Razquin, C; Pastor, P; Mateo, I; Owen, M J; Faber, K M; Jonsson, P V; Combarros, O; O'Donovan, M C; Cantwell, L B; Soininen, H; Blacker, D; Mead, S; Mosley, T H; Bennett, D A; Harris, T B; Fratiglioni, L; Holmes, C; de Bruijn, R F; Passmore, P; Montine, T J; Bettens, K; Rotter, J I; Brice, A; Morgan, K; Foroud, T M; Kukull, W A; Hannequin, D; Powell, J F; Nalls, M A; Ritchie, K; Lunetta, K L; Kauwe, J S; Boerwinkle, E; Riemenschneider, M; Boada, M; Hiltuenen, M; Martin, E R; Schmidt, R; Rujescu, D; Wang, L S; Dartigues, J F; Mayeux, R; Tzourio, C; Hofman, A; Nöthen, M M; Graff, C; Psaty, B M; Jones, L; Haines, J L; Holmans, P A; Lathrop, M; Pericak-Vance, M A; Launer, L J; Farrer, L A; van Duijn, C M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Moskvina, V; Seshadri, S; Williams, J; Schellenberg, G D; Amouyel, P

    2013-12-01

    Eleven susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) were identified by previous studies; however, a large portion of the genetic risk for this disease remains unexplained. We conducted a large, two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In stage 1, we used genotyped and imputed data (7,055,881 SNPs) to perform meta-analysis on 4 previously published GWAS data sets consisting of 17,008 Alzheimer's disease cases and 37,154 controls. In stage 2, 11,632 SNPs were genotyped and tested for association in an independent set of 8,572 Alzheimer's disease cases and 11,312 controls. In addition to the APOE locus (encoding apolipoprotein E), 19 loci reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) in the combined stage 1 and stage 2 analysis, of which 11 are newly associated with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24162737

  2. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K.; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P.; Harju, John F.; Idos, Gregory E.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J.; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E.; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S.; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Aragaki, Aaron K.; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Curtis, Keith R.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gala, Manish; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Lemire, Mathieu; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W.; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T.; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Conti, David V.; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Fortini, Barbara K.; Gallinger, Steven J.; Gauderman, W. James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L.; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W.; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:26151821

  3. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schmit, Stephanie L; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P; Harju, John F; Idos, Gregory E; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C; Van Den Berg, David J; Hutter, Carolyn M; Aragaki, Aaron K; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Chanock, Stephen J; Curtis, Keith R; Fuchs, Charles S; Gala, Manish; Giovannucc, Edward L; Giocannucci, Edward L; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Hayes, Richard B; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; Kury, Sebastian; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Lemire, Mathieu; Lemire, Mathiew; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W; Berndt, Sonja I; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C; Fortini, Barbara K; Gallinger, Steven J; Gauderman, W James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B; Peters, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:26151821

  4. Differential DNA Methylation Regions in Cytokine and Transcription Factor Genomic Loci Associate with Childhood Physical Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Provençal, Nadine; Suderman, Matthew J.; Caramaschi, Doretta; Wang, Dongsha; Hallett, Michael; Vitaro, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal and human studies suggest that inflammation is associated with behavioral disorders including aggression. We have recently shown that physical aggression of boys during childhood is strongly associated with reduced plasma levels of cytokines IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, later in early adulthood. This study tests the hypothesis that there is an association between differential DNA methylation regions in cytokine genes in T cells and monocytes DNA in adult subjects and a trajectory of physical aggression from childhood to adolescence. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the methylation profiles of the entire genomic loci encompassing the IL-1α, IL-6, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-8 and three of their regulatory transcription factors (TF) NFkB1, NFAT5 and STAT6 genes in adult males on a chronic physical aggression trajectory (CPA) and males with the same background who followed a normal physical aggression trajectory (control group) from childhood to adolescence. We used the method of methylated DNA immunoprecipitation with comprehensive cytokine gene loci and TF loci microarray hybridization, statistical analysis and false discovery rate correction. We found differentially methylated regions to associate with CPA in both the cytokine loci as well as in their transcription factors loci analyzed. Some of these differentially methylated regions were located in known regulatory regions whereas others, to our knowledge, were previously unknown as regulatory areas. However, using the ENCODE database, we were able to identify key regulatory elements in many of these regions that indicate that they might be involved in the regulation of cytokine expression. Conclusions We provide here the first evidence for an association between differential DNA methylation in cytokines and their regulators in T cells and monocytes and male physical aggression. PMID:23977113

  5. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Karol; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Evangelou, Evangelos; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Duncan, Emma L; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Oei, Ling; Albagha, Omar M E; Amin, Najaf; Kemp, John P; Koller, Daniel L; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching-Ti; Minster, Ryan L; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Willner, Dana; Xiao, Su-Mei; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Alonso, Nerea; Eriksson, Joel; Kammerer, Candace M; Kaptoge, Stephen K; Leo, Paul J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wilson, Scott G; Wilson, James F; Aalto, Ville; Alen, Markku; Aragaki, Aaron K; Aspelund, Thor; Center, Jacqueline R; Dailiana, Zoe; Duggan, David J; Garcia, Melissa; Garcia-Giralt, Natàlia; Giroux, Sylvie; Hallmans, Göran; Hocking, Lynne J; Husted, Lise Bjerre; Jameson, Karen A; Khusainova, Rita; Kim, Ghi Su; Kooperberg, Charles; Koromila, Theodora; Kruk, Marcin; Laaksonen, Marika; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Lee, Seung Hun; Leung, Ping C; Lewis, Joshua R; Masi, Laura; Mencej-Bedrac, Simona; Nguyen, Tuan V; Nogues, Xavier; Patel, Millan S; Prezelj, Janez; Rose, Lynda M; Scollen, Serena; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Smith, Albert V; Svensson, Olle; Trompet, Stella; Trummer, Olivia; van Schoor, Natasja M; Woo, Jean; Zhu, Kun; Balcells, Susana; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Buckley, Brendan M; Cheng, Sulin; Christiansen, Claus; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George; Ford, Ian; Frost, Morten; Goltzman, David; González-Macías, Jesús; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Koh, Jung-Min; Kollia, Panagoula; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Leslie, William D; Lips, Paul; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorenc, Roman S; Marc, Janja; Mellström, Dan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Olmos, José M; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Reid, David M; Riancho, José A; Ridker, Paul M; Rousseau, François; Slagboom, P Eline; Tang, Nelson LS; Urreizti, Roser; Van Hul, Wim; Viikari, Jorma; Zarrabeitia, María T; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Grundberg, Elin; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kwan, Tony; Li, Rui; Luben, Robert; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Palsson, Stefan Th; Reppe, Sjur; Rotter, Jerome I; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Verlaan, Dominique; Williams, Frances MK; Wood, Andrew R; Zhou, Yanhua; Gautvik, Kaare M; Pastinen, Tomi; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Cauley, Jane A; Chasman, Daniel I; Clark, Graeme R; Cummings, Steven R; Danoy, Patrick; Dennison, Elaine M; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jones, Graeme; Jukema, J Wouter; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitchell, Braxton D; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Pols, Huibert A P; Prince, Richard L; Raitakari, Olli; Reid, Ian R; Robbins, John; Sambrook, Philip N; Sham, Pak Chung; Shuldiner, Alan R; Tylavsky, Frances A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nick J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Econs, Michael J; Evans, David M; Harris, Tamara B; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Psaty, Bruce M; Reeve, Jonathan; Spector, Timothy D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Zillikens, M Carola; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ohlsson, Claes; Karasik, David; Richards, J Brent; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; Ralston, Stuart H; Ioannidis, John P A; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most important predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We tested the top-associated BMD markers for replication in 50,933 independent subjects and for risk of low-trauma fracture in 31,016 cases and 102,444 controls. We identified 56 loci (32 novel)associated with BMD atgenome-wide significant level (P<5×10−8). Several of these factors cluster within the RANK-RANKL-OPG, mesenchymal-stem-cell differentiation, endochondral ossification and the Wnt signalling pathways. However, we also discovered loci containing genes not known to play a role in bone biology. Fourteen BMD loci were also associated with fracture risk (P<5×10−4, Bonferroni corrected), of which six reached P<5×10−8 including: 18p11.21 (C18orf19), 7q21.3 (SLC25A13), 11q13.2 (LRP5), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 2p16.2 (SPTBN1) and 10q21.1 (DKK1). These findings shed light on the genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying BMD variation and fracture susceptibility. PMID:22504420

  6. Peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype and function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, P J; Compston, D A

    1988-01-01

    T suppressor cell function and phenotype are abnormal in patients with multiple sclerosis, especially during the chronic progressive phase but the sub-populations defined by mitogen stimulation and serological methods may not be identical. In this study, involving 45 patients with multiple sclerosis and 33 controls, there was no correlation between T suppressor function and CD8 cell phenotype in patients with multiple sclerosis or in controls. These phenotypic and functional studies cannot therefore be used interchangeably in the assessment of patients with multiple sclerosis since they provide different information about lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:2976082

  7. The Pathogenesis of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Galton, D. A. G.

    1966-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was examined in a series of 88 cases observed during a 15-year period. In untreated cases the trend of the absolute lymphocyte counts followed two main patterns. In the type I trend, the counts rose throughout the observation period; in the type II trend, the tendency to rise ceased and the counts stabilized above and below a mean value, the stationary trend being maintained for months or years. The type II trend was associated with relatively benign disease. The development of lymphocytosis was correlated with the progression of lymphadenopathy. It is suggested that lymphocytosis may result from the physiological process of recirculation and that the accumulation of lymphocytes may result from the proliferation of a single slightly abnormal cell-line. The abnormal cells might survive an unusually long time because they are unable to respond to stimuli which cause normal lymphocytes to transform. PMID:4952384

  8. Microangiectasias: Structural regulators of lymphocyte transmigration

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, Timothy W.; Konerding, Moritz A.; West, Charles A.; Su, Mei; Young, Alan J.; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2003-01-01

    The migration of lymphocytes into inflammatory tissue requires the migrating cell to overcome mechanical forces produced by blood flow. A generally accepted hypothesis is that these forces are overcome by a multistep sequence of adhesive interactions between lymphocytes and endothelial cells. This hypothesis has been recently challenged by results demonstrating wall shear stress on the order of 20 dyn/cm2 in vivo and infrequent lymphocyte–endothelial adhesion at wall shear stress >1–2 dyn/cm2 in vitro. Here, we show that lymphocyte slowing and transmigration in the skin is associated with microangiectasias, i.e., focal structural dilatations of microvessel segments. Microangiectasias are inducible within 4 days of the onset of inflammation and lead to a greater than 10-fold local reduction in wall shear stress. These findings support the hypothesis that a preparatory step to lymphocyte transmigration involves structural adaptations in the inflammatory microcirculation. PMID:12782790

  9. Lymphocytes and ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Linfert, Douglas; Chowdhry, Tayseer; Rabb, Hamid

    2009-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common and important clinical problem in many different organ systems, including kidney, brain, heart, liver, lung, and intestine. IRI occurs during all deceased donor organ transplants. IRI is a highly complex cascade of events that includes interactions between vascular endothelium, interstitial compartments, circulating cells, and numerous biochemical entities. It is well established that the innate immune system, such as complement, neutrophils, cytokines, chemokines, and macrophages participate in IRI. Recent data demonstrates an important role for lymphocytes, particularly T cells but also B cells in IRI. Lymphocytes not only participate in augmenting injury responses after IRI, but could also be playing a protective role depending on the cell type and stage of injury. Furthermore, lymphocytes appear to be participating in the healing response from IRI. These new data open the possibility for lymphocyte targeted therapeutics to improve the short and long term outcomes from IRI. PMID:19027612

  10. Ontogeny of Innate T Lymphocytes – Some Innate Lymphocytes are More Innate than Others

    PubMed Central

    Vermijlen, David; Prinz, Immo

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphocytes have recently received a lot of attention. However, there are different ideas about the definition of what is “innate” in lymphocytes. Lymphocytes without V(D)J-rearranged antigen receptors are now termed innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and include cells formerly known as natural killer (NK) cells. Also, lymphocytes that are innate should be able to recognize microbial or stress-induced patterns and react rapidly without prior sensitization, as opposed to adaptive immune responses. Formally, genuine innate lymphocytes would be present before or at birth. Here, we review the ontogeny of human and mouse innate T lymphocyte populations. We focus on γδ T cells, which are prototype lymphocytes that often use their V(D)J rearrangement machinery to generate genetically encoded predetermined recombinations of antigen receptors. We make parallels between the development of γδ T cells with that of innate αβ T cells [invariant (i)NKT and mucosa-associated invariant T cells] and compare this with the ontogeny of innate B cells and ILCs (including NK cells). We conclude that some subsets are more innate than others, i.e., innate lymphocytes that are made primarily early in utero during gestation while others are made after birth. In practice, a ranking of innateness by ontogeny has implications for the reconstitution of innate lymphocyte subsets after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25346734

  11. Study of zinc-induced changes in lymphocyte membranes using atomic force microscopy, luminescence, and light scattering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonenko, D. S.; Khairullina, A. Ya.; Yasinskii, V. M.; Kozlova, N. M.; Zubritskaja, G. P.; Slobozhanina, E. I.

    2011-07-01

    Changes in the surface structure of lymphocyte membranes exposed to various concentrations of zinc ions are studied. It is found by atomic force microscopy that increasing the concentration of zinc ions leads to a reduction in the correlation length of the autocorrelation function of the roughness profile of a lymphocyte compared to control samples; this may indicate the existence of fine structure in the membrane surface. Fluorescence markers are used to observe a reduction in the microviscosity of the lipids in the outer monolayer of the lipid bilayer after lymphocytes are exposed to Zn ions, as well as the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the surface membrane, and the oxidation of HS-groups of membrane proteins. Calculations of the absorption coefficients of lymphocytes modified with zinc reveal the existence of absorption bands owing to the formation of metal-protein complexes and zinc oxide nanoparticles. These results indicate significant changes in the structural and functional state of lymphocyte membranes exposed to zinc ions.

  12. Contrasting evolutionary histories among tightly linked HLA loci.

    PubMed Central

    Klitz, W; Thomson, G; Baur, M P

    1986-01-01

    Genes comprising the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a central role in governing the immune response of vertebrates. A great deal of information has been revealed on the molecular biology and physiology of these loci, but three features-the high polymorphism, tight linkage among the loci, and the nonrandom association of alleles-make the system of particular interest from the perspective of population genetics. Information on the dynamic evolutionary forces that have acted on a locus can be inferred from the number and distribution of alleles that it carries. Ten loci from the HLA region of the human MHC, each sampled from several different populations, have been examined for departures from the expected value of homozygosity under the condition of selective neutrality. The homozygosities of five class I and II loci that code for membrane glycoproteins, HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ, and of glyoxylase I (GLO) were significantly less than the neutrality expectations. This suggests the presence of some form of balancing selection. In spite of being closely linked, in fact, located between the class I and class II histocompatibility loci, the homozygosities of the four class III or complement loci C2, Bf, C4A, and C4B, which are detected by electrophoresis, were indistinguishable from, or exceeded, that expected under neutrality. Although this conforms to the suggestion that, in general, electrophoretic variants are neutral, because of the tight linkage to loci demonstrating a history of selection, it is possible that the mechanism for generating variation in the class III loci may be different from that of the class I and class II loci. PMID:3766540

  13. Naturally segregating loci exhibit epistasis for fitness

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which gene interaction or epistasis contributes to fitness variation within populations remains poorly understood, despite its importance to a myriad of evolutionary questions. Here, we report a multi-year field study estimating fitness of Mimulus guttatus genetic lines in which pairs of naturally segregating loci exist in an otherwise uniform background. An allele at QTL x5b—a locus originally mapped for its effect on flower size—positively affects survival if combined with one genotype at quantitative trait locus x10a (aa) but has negative effects when combined with the other genotypes (Aa and AA). The viability differences between genotypes parallel phenotypic differences for the time and node at which a plant flowers. Viability is negatively correlated with fecundity across genotypes, indicating antagonistic pleiotropy for fitness components. This trade-off reduces the genetic variance for total fitness relative to the individual fitness components and thus may serve to maintain variation. Additionally, we find that the effects of each locus and their interaction often vary with the environment. PMID:26246336

  14. Mapping Environment-Specific Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Zhao, Fuping; Xu, Shizhong

    2010-01-01

    Environment-specific quantitative trait loci (QTL) refer to QTL that express differently in different environments, a phenomenon called QTL-by-environment (Q × E) interaction. Q × E interaction is a difficult problem extended from traditional QTL mapping. The mixture model maximum-likelihood method is commonly adopted for interval mapping of QTL, but the method is not optimal in handling QTL interacting with environments. We partitioned QTL effects into main and interaction effects. The main effects are represented by the means of QTL effects in all environments and the interaction effects are represented by the variances of the QTL effects across environments. We used the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) implemented Bayesian method to estimate both the main and the interaction effects. The residual error covariance matrix was modeled using the factor analytic covariance structure. A simulation study showed that the factor analytic structure is robust and can handle other structures as special cases. The method was also applied to Q × E interaction mapping for the yield trait of barley. Eight markers showed significant main effects and 18 markers showed significant Q × E interaction. The 18 interacting markers were distributed across all seven chromosomes of the entire genome. Only 1 marker had both the main and the Q × E interaction effects. Each of the other markers had either a main effect or a Q × E interaction effect but not both. PMID:20805558

  15. Alu insertion loci and platyrrhine primate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Ray, David A; Xing, Jinchuan; Hedges, Dale J; Hall, Michael A; Laborde, Meredith E; Anders, Bridget A; White, Brittany R; Stoilova, Nadica; Fowlkes, Justin D; Landry, Kate E; Chemnick, Leona G; Ryder, Oliver A; Batzer, Mark A

    2005-04-01

    Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs) make very useful phylogenetic markers because the integration of a particular element at a location in the genome is irreversible and of known polarity. These attributes make analysis of SINEs as phylogenetic characters an essentially homoplasy-free affair. Alu elements are primate-specific SINEs that make up a large portion of the human genome and are also widespread in other primates. Using a combination wet-bench and computational approach we recovered 190 Alu insertions, 183 of which are specific to the genomes of nine New World primates. We used these loci to investigate branching order and have produced a cladogram that supports a sister relationship between Atelidae (spider, woolly, and howler monkeys) and Cebidae (marmosets, tamarins, and owl monkeys) and then the joining of this two family clade to Pitheciidae (titi and saki monkeys). The data support these relationships with a homoplasy index of 0.00. In this study, we report one of the largest applications of SINE elements to phylogenetic analysis to date, and the results provide a robust molecular phylogeny for platyrrhine primates. PMID:15737586

  16. Rapid and robust association mapping of expression quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Lam, Alex C; Schouten, Michael; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Haley, Chris S; de Koning, Dirk-Jan

    2007-01-01

    We applied a simple and efficient two-step method to analyze a family-based association study of gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) in a mixed model framework. This two-step method produces very similar results to the full mixed model method, with our method being significantly faster than the full model. Using the Genetic Analysis Workshop 15 (GAW15) Problem 1 data, we demonstrated the value of data filtering for reducing the number of tests and controlling the number of false positives. Specifically, we showed that removing non-expressed genes by filtering on expression variability effectively reduced the number of tests by nearly 50%. Furthermore, we demonstrated that filtering on genotype counts substantially reduced spurious detection. Finally, we restricted our analysis to the markers and transcripts that were closely located. We found five times more signals in close proximity (cis-) to transcripts than in our genome-wide analysis. Our results suggest that careful pre-filtering and partitioning of data are crucial for controlling false positives and allowing detection of genuine effects in genetic analysis of gene expression. PMID:18466488

  17. Runs of homozygosity reveal highly penetrant recessive loci in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lencz, Todd; Lambert, Christophe; DeRosse, Pamela; Burdick, Katherine E.; Morgan, T. Vance; Kane, John M.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionarily significant selective sweeps may result in long stretches of homozygous polymorphisms in individuals from outbred populations. We developed whole-genome homozygosity association (WGHA) methodology to characterize this phenomenon in healthy individuals and to use this genomic feature to identify genetic risk loci for schizophrenia (SCZ). Applying WGHA to 178 SCZ cases and 144 healthy controls genotyped at 500,000 markers, we found that runs of homozygosity (ROHs), ranging in size from 200 kb to 15 mb, were common in unrelated Caucasians. Properties of common ROHs in healthy subjects, including chromosomal location and presence of nonancestral haplotypes, converged with prior reports identifying regions under selective pressure. This interpretation was further supported by analysis of multiethnic HapMap samples genotyped with the same markers. ROHs were significantly more common in SCZ cases, and a set of nine ROHs significantly differentiated cases from controls. Four of these 9 “risk ROHs” contained or neighbored genes associated with SCZ (NOS1AP, ATF2, NSF, and PIK3C3). Several of these risk ROHs were very rare in healthy subjects, suggesting that recessive effects of relatively high penetrance may explain a proportion of the genetic liability for SCZ. Other risk ROHs feature haplotypes that are also common in healthy individuals, possibly indicating a source of balancing selection. PMID:18077426

  18. Chemotaxis of large granular lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pohajdak, B.; Gomez, J.; Orr, F.W.; Khalil, N.; Talgoy, M.; Greenberg, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are capable of directed locomotion (chemotaxis) was tested. A population of LGL isolated from discontinuous Percoll gradients migrated along concentration gradients of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-MLP), casein, and C5a, well known chemoattractants for polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, as well as interferon-..beta.. and colony-stimulating factor. Interleukin 2, tuftsin, platelet-derived growth factor, and fibronectin were inactive. Migratory responses were greater in Percoll fractions with the highest lytic activity and HNK-1/sup +/ cells. The chemotactic response to f-MLP, casein, and C5a was always greater when the chemoattractant was present in greater concentration in the lower compartment of the Boyden chamber. Optimum chemotaxis was observed after a 1 hr incubation that made use of 12 ..mu..m nitrocellulose filters. LGL exhibited a high degree of nondirected locomotion when allowed to migrate for longer periods (> 2 hr), and when cultured in vitro for 24 to 72 hr in the presence or absence of IL 2 containing phytohemagluttinin-conditioned medium. LGL chemotaxis to f-MLP could be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the inactive structural analog CBZ-phe-met, and the RNK tumor line specifically bound f-ML(/sup 3/H)P, suggesting that LGL bear receptors for the chemotactic peptide.

  19. Overlapping functions between XLF repair protein and 53BP1 DNA damage response factor in end joining and lymphocyte development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyu; Jiang, Wenxia; Dubois, Richard L; Yamamoto, Kenta; Wolner, Zachary; Zha, Shan

    2012-03-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is required during lymphocyte development to resolve the programmed DSBs generated during Variable, Diverse, and Joining [V(D)J] recombination. XRCC4-like factor (XLF) (also called Cernunnos or NHEJ1) is a unique component of the NHEJ pathway. Although germ-line mutations of other NHEJ factors abrogate lymphocyte development and lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), XLF mutations cause a progressive lymphocytopenia that is generally less severe than SCID. Accordingly, XLF-deficient murine lymphocytes show no measurable defects in V(D)J recombination. We reported earlier that ATM kinase and its substrate histone H2AX are both essential for V(D)J recombination in XLF-deficient lymphocytes, despite moderate role in V(D)J recombination in WT cells. p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) is another substrate of ATM. 53BP1 deficiency led to small reduction of peripheral lymphocyte number by compromising both synapse and end-joining at modest level during V(D)J recombination. Here, we report that 53BP1/XLF double deficiency blocks lymphocyte development at early progenitor stages, owing to severe defects in end joining during chromosomal V(D)J recombination. The unrepaired DNA ends are rapidly degraded in 53BP1(-/-)XLF(-/-) cells, as reported for H2AX(-/-)XLF(-/-) cells, revealing an end protection role for 53BP1 reminiscent of H2AX. In contrast to the early embryonic lethality of H2AX(-/-)XLF(-/-) mice, 53BP1(-/-)XLF(-/-) mice are born alive and develop thymic lymphomas with translocations involving the T-cell receptor loci. Together, our findings identify a unique function for 53BP1 in end-joining and tumor suppression. PMID:22355127

  20. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Kysela, R.F.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Primers for 15 microsatellite loci were developed for Mountain Plover, a species whose distribution and abundance have been reduced drastically in the past 30 years. In a screen of 126 individuals collected from four breeding locales across the species' range, levels of polymorphism ranged from two to 13 alleles per locus. No two loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci can be used in population genetic studies, ultimately aiding in management efforts for Mountain Plover. Additionally, these markers can potentially be used in studies investigating the mating system of Mountain Plover. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Quercus fabri (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z Z; Chen, W W; Bao, W; Wang, R; Li, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Quercus fabri is a pioneer species of secondary succession in evergreen broadleaved forests in China. In this study, we isolated and developed 12 polymorphic and 2 monomorphic microsatellite loci for Q. fabri using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. We characterized 12 polymorphic loci in 52 individuals from two populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 23. The observed and expected heterozygosities per locus were 0.033-0.773 and 0.138-0.924, respectively. These microsatellite loci will facilitate the studies on genetic variation, mating system, and gene flow of Q. fabri. PMID:27420954

  2. A genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new childhood obesity loci

    PubMed Central

    Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Taal, H. Rob; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Scherag, André; Lecoeur, Cecile; Warrington, Nicole M.; Hypponen, Elina; Holst, Claus; Valcarcel, Beatriz; Thiering, Elisabeth; Salem, Rany M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Zhao, Jianhua; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Jarick, Ivonne; Pennell, Craig E.; Evans, David M.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Berry, Diane J.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeinera, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van der Valk, Ralf J.P.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gauderman, William J.; Hassanein, Mohamed T.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Mägi, Reedik; Boreham, Colin A.G.; Neville, Charlotte E.; Moreno, Luis A.; Elliott, Paul; Pouta, Anneli; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Li, Mingyao; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; Deloukas, Panos; McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M.; Kemp, John P.; Buxton, Jessica L.; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Bustamante, Mariona; Guxens, Mònica; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans; Gilliland, Frank D.; Heinrich, Joachim; Wheeler, Eleanor; Barroso, Inês; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Power, Chris; Palmer, Lyle J.; Hinney, Anke; Widen, Elisabeth; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; McCarthy, Mark I.; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Hebebrand, Johannes; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Smith, George Davey; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been associated with adult obesity and a few with severe obesity in childhood; however, less progress has been made to establish genetic influences on common early-onset obesity. We performed a North American-Australian-European collaborative meta-analysis of fourteen studies consisting of 5,530 cases (≥95th percentile of body mass index (BMI)) and 8,318 controls (<50th percentile of BMI) of European ancestry. Taking forward the eight novel signals yielding association with P < 5×10−6 in to nine independent datasets (n = 2,818 cases and 4,083 controls) we observed two loci that yielded a genome wide significant combined P-value, namely near OLFM4 on 13q14 (rs9568856; P=1.82×10−9; OR=1.22) and within HOXB5 on 17q21 (rs9299; P=3.54×10−9; OR=1.14). Both loci continued to show association when including two extreme childhood obesity cohorts (n = 2,214 cases and 2,674 controls). Finally, these two loci yielded directionally consistent associations in the GIANT meta-analysis of adult BMI1. PMID:22484627

  3. Genome-wide association analyses identify 13 new susceptibility loci for generalized vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying; Birlea, Stanca A; Fain, Pamela R; Ferrara, Tracey M; Ben, Songtao; Riccardi, Sheri L; Cole, Joanne B; Gowan, Katherine; Holland, Paulene J; Bennett, Dorothy C; Luiten, Rosalie M; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; van der Veen, J P Wietze; Hartmann, Anke; Eichner, Saskia; Schuler, Gerold; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Kemp, E Helen; Gawkrodger, David J; Weetman, Anthony P; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; Wallace, Margaret R; McCormack, Wayne T; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Overbeck, Andreas; Silverberg, Nanette B; Spritz, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported a genome-wide association study (GWAS) identifying 14 susceptibility loci for generalized vitiligo. We report here a second GWAS (450 individuals with vitiligo (cases) and 3,182 controls), an independent replication study (1,440 cases and 1,316 controls) and a meta-analysis (3,187 cases and 6,723 controls) identifying 13 additional vitiligo-associated loci. These include OCA2-HERC2 (combined P = 3.80 × 10(-8)), MC1R (P = 1.82 × 10(-13)), a region near TYR (P = 1.57 × 10(-13)), IFIH1 (P = 4.91 × 10(-15)), CD80 (P = 3.78 × 10(-10)), CLNK (P = 1.56 × 10(-8)), BACH2 (P = 2.53 × 10(-8)), SLA (P = 1.58 × 10(-8)), CASP7 (P = 3.56 × 10(-8)), CD44 (P = 1.78 × 10(-9)), IKZF4 (P = 2.75 × 10(-14)), SH2B3 (P = 3.54 × 10(-18)) and TOB2 (P = 6.81 × 10(-10)). Most vitiligo susceptibility loci encode immunoregulatory proteins or melanocyte components that likely mediate immune targeting and the relationships among vitiligo, melanoma, and eye, skin and hair coloration. PMID:22561518

  4. Cross-reactivity of sperm and T lymphocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Goust, J M; Williamson, H O; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented for cross-reactivity between antigens on human sperm and T lymphocytes. In 25 infertile couples in which both the males and females had significant antisperm immunity, antibody (Ab) titers to thymocytes (mean +/- S.E.M. 159 +/- 4 and 72 +/- 14, respectively, in males and females), T cell lines CCRF-CEM (69 +/- 5 and 48 +/- 8) and HSB-2 (56 +/- 15) and 41 +/- 8), suppressor-enriched (TG) cells (26 +/- 6 and 66 +/- 28) and helper-enriched (TG-) cells (26 +/- 4 and 46 +/- 14) were significantly elevated, as compared with Ab titers in 45 normal males and 45 normal females without antisperm immunity. Antibody titers to adult B cells, B cell line RAJI, and granulocytes were similar in the two groups. Antisperm Ab titers in sera, sperm extracts, and seminal plasma of the infertile subjects were significantly reduced after absorption with sperm, thymocytes, or T cell line CCRF-CEM but not with the B cell line RAJI. Antithymocyte Ab titers in the sera were significantly reduced (p less than 0.001) after absorption with thymocytes, CCRF-CEM, or sperm, but not RAJI. Lymphocytes from the infertile patients, when stimulated with pokeweed mitogen in vitro, produced antisperm and anti-T-lymphocyte antibodies at significantly higher titers than normal controls. PMID:6175235

  5. Diagnostic utility of lymphocyte subset analysis in AIDS case finding.

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, W J; Schechter, M T; MacLeod, A; Douglas, B; Maynard, M; Sharp, R; Wiggs, B

    1986-01-01

    Abnormalities of lymphocyte subsets, especially low absolute number of helper T cells, are characteristically present in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Similar abnormalities can be found in patients with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy (PGL) or AIDS-related complex (ARC) and, to a lesser degree, in asymptomatic people who have been exposed to human T-lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III). Nevertheless, there appears to be a widespread perception that lymphocyte subset analysis may be useful in AIDS case finding within high-risk groups. We evaluated the diagnostic utility of absolute number of helper T cells and ratio of helper to suppressor T cells in 33 patients with AIDS, 43 patients with PGL who had been referred for lymph node biopsy, 90 patients with PGL and 195 male homosexual controls. At conventional cutoff levels the tests did not appear to revise the probability of AIDS upward to any clinically significant degree when the pretest probability of AIDS was low. Lymphocyte subset analysis does not appear to be a cost-effective method of AIDS case finding in identified groups at risk in which the prevalence of AIDS is low. PMID:2938707

  6. Electrostimulation of rat callus cells and human lymphocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Aro, H.; Eerola, E.; Aho, A.J.; Penttinen, R.

    1984-01-01

    Asymmetrical pulsing low voltage current was supplied via electrodes to cultured rat fracture callus cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation of the callus cells and 5-(/sup 125/I)iodo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation of the lymphocytes were determined. The growth pattern of callus cells (estimated by cellular density) did not respond to electrical stimulation. However, the uptake of (/sup 3/H)thymidine was increased at the early phase of cell proliferation and inhibited at later phases of proliferation. The (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake of confluent callus cell cultures did not respond to electrical stimulation. Lymphocytes reacted in a similar way; stimulated cells took up more DNA precursor than control cells at the early phase of stimulation. During cell division, induced by the mitogens phytohemagglutinin and Concanavalin-A, the uptake of DNA precursor by stimulated cells was constantly inhibited. The results suggest that electrical stimuli affect the uptake mechanisms of cell membranes. The duality of the effect seems to be dependent on the cell cycle.

  7. Mechanisms of T Lymphocyte Activation Exposed by Super Resolution Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanello, Leonard; Losert, Wolfgang; Traver, Maria; Schaefer, Brian; York, Andrew; Schroff, Hari

    In order to avoid the deleterious consequences of an uncontrolled immune response, tight regulatory control of positive and negative regulators during lymphocyte activation is needed. Utilizing cutting-edge super-resolution imaging technologies in combination with quantitative image analysis we explore the interplay between positive and negative regulation in activated T lymphocytes and investigate whether intercellular signaling is possibly governed by the degradation of a complex intracellular structure called the POLKADOTS signalosome. In segmenting the POLKADOTS signalosome structure by the betweenness centrality of its 3D medial axis skeleton, it was discovered that autophagosomes, small degradative intracellular organelles, localize preferentially to the ends of the filamentous POLKADOTS signalosome. These results provide new insight into the mechanisms behind the complex regulatory process that govern T lymphocyte activation. This research was supported by an Irvington Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Cancer Research Institute (awarded to MT) and a U01 Grant from the National Institutes of Health (GM109887-01, awarded to BS and WL).

  8. Effects of isolation on various lymphocyte activities

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of Sprague Dawley male rats to isolation, water scheduling, or their combination resulted in an enhanced lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogen. Time course studies of effects of isolation on mitogenic response of splenic and/or blood T and B lymphocytes and splenic NK cell activity demonstrated a suppression with short term exposure followed by an enhancement with prolonged exposure. Use of immunoperoxidase staining techniques to identify splenic T or T helper cells revealed that prolonged exposure to isolation had no significant effect on the proportion of these cell populations in the spleen. Examination of the data by Lineweaver-Burke plot and plot of the data as % maximum response showed that prolonged exposure to isolation did not alter the sensitivity of the lymphocytes to mitogen. Involvement of corticosteroids and opioid peptides in mediation of the effects of exposure to isolation on lymphocyte activity was assessed by measurement of plasma corticosterone by radioimmunoassay and by examination of the ability of the opioid antagonist naltrexone to alter the effects of isolation on lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogen. Attempts were made to mimic the effects of short-term isolation on lymphocyte activity by morphine sulfate administration.

  9. Setting the clock for recirculating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Eichner, Alexander; Sixt, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In their search for antigens, lymphocytes continuously shuttle among blood vessels, lymph vessels, and lymphatic tissues. Chemokines mediate entry of lymphocytes into lymphatic tissues, and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) promotes localization of lymphocytes to the vasculature. Both signals are sensed through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Most GPCRs undergo ligand-dependent homologous receptor desensitization, a process that decreases their signaling output after previous exposure to high ligand concentration. Such desensitization can explain why lymphocytes do not take an intermediate position between two signals but rather oscillate between them. The desensitization of S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1) is mediated by GPCR kinase 2 (GRK2). Deletion of GRK2 in lymphocytes compromises desensitization by high vascular S1P concentrations, thereby reducing responsiveness to the chemokine signal and trapping the cells in the vascular compartment. The desensitization kinetics of S1PR1 allows lymphocytes to dynamically shuttle between vasculature and lymphatic tissue, although the positional information in both compartments is static. PMID:22067458

  10. CC Chemokine Receptor 6 Expression by B Lymphocytes Is Essential for the Development of Isolated Lymphoid Follicles

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Keely G.; McDonough, Jacquelyn S.; Wang, Caihong; Kucharzik, Torsten; Williams, Ifor R.; Newberry, Rodney D.

    2007-01-01

    Isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs) are organized lymphoid structures that facilitate the efficient interaction of antigen, antigen-presenting cells, and lymphocytes to generate controlled adaptive immune responses within the intestine. Because CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) deficiency affects the generation of mucosal immune responses, we evaluated a potential role for CCR6 in the development of ILFs. We observed that CCR6 and its ligand CCL20 are highly expressed within ILFs and that B lymphocytes are the largest CCR6-expressing population within ILFs. ILF development was profoundly arrested in the absence of CCR6. Concordant with a block in ILF development at a stage corresponding to the influx of B lymphocytes, we observed that CCR6-deficient mice had a diminished population of intestinal B lymphocytes. Bone marrow reconstitution studies demonstrated that ILF development is dependent on CCR6-sufficient B lymphocytes, and adoptive transfers demonstrated that CCR6−/− B lymphocytes were inefficient at localizing to intestinal lymphoid structures. Paralleling these findings, we observed that CCR6-deficient mice had a reduced proportion of Peyer’s patch B lymphocytes and an associated reduction in the number and size of Peyer’s patch follicular domes. These observations define an essential role for CCR6 expression by B lymphocytes in localizing to intestinal lymphoid structures and in ILF development. PMID:17392163

  11. Comparative genetic analysis of inflammatory bowel disease and type 1 diabetes implicates multiple loci with opposite effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Baldassano, Robert; Zhang, Haitao; Qu, Hui-Qi; Imielinski, Marcin; Kugathasan, Subra; Annese, Vito; Dubinsky, Marla; Rotter, Jerome I; Russell, Richard K; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Glessner, Joseph T; Walters, Thomas; Hou, Cuiping; Kim, Cecilia; Frackelton, Edward C; Garris, Maria; Doran, James; Romano, Claudio; Catassi, Carlo; Van Limbergen, Johan; Guthery, Stephen L; Denson, Lee; Piccoli, David; Silverberg, Mark S; Stanley, Charles A; Monos, Dimitri; Wilson, David C; Griffiths, Anne; Grant, Struan F A; Satsangi, Jack; Polychronakos, Constantin; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2010-05-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are autoimmune diseases that may share common susceptibility pathways. We examined known susceptibility loci for these diseases in a cohort of 1689 CD cases, 777 UC cases, 989 T1D cases and 6197 shared control subjects of European ancestry, who were genotyped by the Illumina HumanHap550 SNP arrays. We identified multiple previously unreported or unconfirmed disease associations, including known CD loci (ICOSLG and TNFSF15) and T1D loci (TNFAIP3) that confer UC risk, known UC loci (HERC2 and IL26) that confer T1D risk and known UC loci (IL10 and CCNY) that confer CD risk. Additionally, we show that T1D risk alleles residing at the PTPN22, IL27, IL18RAP and IL10 loci protect against CD. Furthermore, the strongest risk alleles for T1D within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) confer strong protection against CD and UC; however, given the multi-allelic nature of the MHC haplotypes, sequencing of the MHC locus will be required to interpret this observation. These results extend our current knowledge on genetic variants that predispose to autoimmunity, and suggest that many loci involved in autoimmunity may be under a balancing selection due to antagonistic pleiotropic effect. Our analysis implies that variants with opposite effects on different diseases may facilitate the maintenance of common susceptibility alleles in human populations, making autoimmune diseases especially amenable to genetic dissection by genome-wide association studies. PMID:20176734

  12. Lymphocyte phosphatase-associated phosphoprotein proteoforms analyzed using monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Filatov, Alexander; Kruglova, Natalia; Meshkova, Tatiana; Mazurov, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase CD45 regulates the activation of lymphocytes by controlling the level of receptor and signal molecule phosphorylation. However, it remains unknown which molecules mediate the phosphatase activity of CD45. A candidate for such a molecule is a small transmembrane adapter protein called lymphocyte phosphatase-associated phosphoprotein (LPAP). LPAP forms a supramolecular complex that consists of not only CD45 molecule but also CD4 and Lck kinase. The function of LPAP has not been defined clearly. In our study, we determined the pattern of LPAP expression in various cell types and characterized its proteoforms using new monoclonal antibodies generated against the intracellular portion of the protein. We show that LPAP is a pan-lymphocyte marker, and its expression in cells correlates with the expression of CD45. The majority of T, B and NK cells express high levels of LPAP, whereas monocytes, granulocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, platelets and red blood cells are negative for LPAP. Using one- and two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis, we demonstrate that LPAP has at least four sites of phosphorylation. The resting cells express at least six different LPAP phosphoforms representing mono-, di- and tri-phosphorylated LPAP. T and B cells differ in the distribution of the protein between phosphoforms. The activation of lymphocytes with PMA reduces the diversity of phosphorylated forms. Our experiments on Lck-deficient Jurkat cells show that Lck kinase is not involved in LPAP phosphorylation. Thus, LPAP is a dynamically phosphorylated protein, the function of which can be understood, when all phosphosites and kinases involved in its phosphorylation will be identified. PMID:26682052

  13. Benign monoclonal expansion of CD8+ lymphocytes in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P.; Cavenagh, J.; Milne, T.; Howe, D.; Wilkes, S.; Sinnott, P.; Forster, G.; Helbert, M.

    2000-01-01

    Background—A transient expansion of the CD8+ T cell pool normally occurs in the early phase of HIV infection. Persistent expansion of this pool is observed in two related settings: diffuse infiltrative lymphocytosis syndrome (DILS) and HIV associated CD8+ lymphocytosis syndrome. Aim—To investigate a group of HIV infected patients with CD8+ lymphocytosis syndrome with particular emphasis on whether monoclonality was present. Methods—A group of 18 patients with HIV-1 infection and persistent circulating CD8+ lymphocytosis was compared with 21 HIV positive controls. Serum samples were tested for antinuclear antibodies, antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens, immunoglobulin levels, paraproteins, human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus serology. Lymphocyte phenotyping and HLA-DR typing was performed, and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement studies used to identify monoclonal populations of T cells. CD4+ and CD8+ subsets of peripheral blood lymphocytes were purified to determine whether CD8+ populations inhibited HIV replication in autologous CD4+ cells. Results—A subgroup of patients with HIV-1 infection was found to have expanded populations of CD8+ T cell large granular lymphocytes persisting for 6 to 30 months. The consensus immunophenotype was CD4- CD8+ DRhigh CD11a+ CD11c+ CD16- CD28± CD56- CD57+, consistent with typical T cell large granular lymphocytes expressing cellular activation markers. Despite the finding of monoclonal TCR gene usage in five of 18 patients, there is evidence that the CD8+ expansions are reactive populations capable of mediating non-cytotoxic inhibition of HIV replication. Conclusions—A subgroup of HIV positive patients has CD8+ lymphocytosis, but despite the frequent occurrence of monoclonal TCR gene usage there is evidence that this represents an immune response to viral infection rather than a malignant disorder. Key Words: HIV infection • CD8+ lymphocytosis • clonality

  14. Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes of larynx cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowska, Halina; Lankoff, Anna; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Florek, Agnieszka; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Gozdz, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Andrzej . E-mail: awojcik@pu.kielce.pl

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The chromosomal radiosensitivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes of cancer patients was reported to be higher than that of healthy donors. This effect is especially prominent when aberrations induced in the G{sub 2} phase of the cell cycle are analyzed. The aim of our study was to investigate if the G{sub 2} aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of patients with larynx cancer are higher than in the case of control individuals. Also, we tested if the frequencies of G{sub 2} aberrations correlate with side effects of radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Peripheral blood of 38 patients was collected before the onset of radiotherapy, cultured for 72 h, and irradiated with 2 Gy after 67 h. Lymphocytes of 40 healthy donors were treated in the same way. Results: The spontaneous and radiation-induced aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of patients were on average higher than in those of healthy donors. No statistically significant correlation was observed between aberration frequencies in lymphocytes and the degree of both early and late normal tissue reactions. Conclusions: The chromosomal radiosensitivity of lymphocytes of patients with larynx cancer may be a marker of cancer predisposition; however, it does not appear to have a predictive value for the risk of developing side effects to radiotherapy.

  15. Genetic modification of human T lymphocytes for the treatment of hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos, Valentina; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2012-01-01

    Modern chemotherapy regimens and supportive care have produced remarkable improvements in the overall survival of patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the development of targeted small molecules, monoclonal antibodies, and biological therapies that demonstrate greater efficacy and lower toxicity remains highly desirable in hematology, and oncology in general. In the context of biological therapies, T-lymphocyte based treatments have enormous potential. Donor lymphocyte infusion in patients relapsed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant pioneered the concept that T lymphocytes can effectively control tumor growth, and this was then followed by the development of cell culture strategies to generate T lymphocytes with selective activity against tumor cells. Over the past decade, it has become clear that the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes promotes sustained antitumor effects in patients with virus-associated lymphomas, such as Epstein-Barr virus related post-transplant lymphomas and Hodgkin's lymphomas. Because of this compelling clinical evidence and the concomitant development of methodologies for robust gene transfer to human T lymphocytes, the field has rapidly evolved, offering new opportunities to extend T-cell based therapies. This review summarizes the most recent biological and clinical developments using genetically manipulated T cells for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:22929977

  16. Oxidative Damage in Lymphocytes of Copper Smelter Workers Correlated to Higher Levels of Excreted Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Jorge; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Coddou, Claudio; Nelson, Pablo; Maisey, Kevin; Valdés, Daniel; Aspee, Alexis; Espinosa, Victoria; Rozas, Carlos; Montoya, Margarita; Mandiola, Cristian; Rodríguez, Felipe E.; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Escobar, Alejandro; Fernández, Ricardo; Diaz, Hernán; Sandoval, Mario; Imarai, Mónica; Rios, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic has been associated with multiple harmful effects at the cellular level. Indirectly these defects could be related to impairment of the integrity of the immune system, in particular in lymphoid population. To characterize the effect of Arsenic on redox status on this population, copper smelter workers and arsenic unexposed donors were recruited for this study. We analyzed urine samples and lymphocyte enriched fractions from donors to determinate arsenic levels and lymphocyte proliferation. Moreover, we studied the presence of oxidative markers MDA, vitamin E and SOD activity in donor plasma. Here we demonstrated that in human beings exposed to high arsenic concentrations, lymphocyte MDA and arsenic urinary levels showed a positive correlation with SOD activity, and a negative correlation with vitamin E serum levels. Strikingly, lymphocytes from the arsenic exposed population respond to a polyclonal stimulator, phytohemaglutinin, with higher rates of thymidine incorporation than lymphocytes of a control population. As well, similar in vitro responses to arsenic were observed using a T cell line. Our results suggest that chronic human exposure to arsenic induces oxidative damage in lymphocytes and could be considered more relevant than evaluation of T cell surveillance. PMID:21253489

  17. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 expression in human breast cancer: implications for prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiming; Yang, Junlan; Jiao, Shunchang; Li, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jiandong

    2015-07-01

    To examine the relationship between cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression and breast cancer prognosis, CTLA-4 expression was immunohistochemically detected in paraffin-embedded specimens of primary tumors from 130 patients with breast cancer who had a mean follow-up period of 112 months. CTLA-4 expressed in cytoplasm of breast cancer cells and in cytoplasm and cell membranes of interstitial lymphocytes. Univariate analysis (log-rank) associated higher density of interstitial CTLA-4(+) lymphocytes with longer DFS and OS, but higher tumor CTLA-4 expression with shorter OS. After controlling for age, clinical stage, Scarff-Bloom-Richardson grade, tumor thrombus, ER, PR, HER2 and Ki-67, multivariate analysis (Cox) showed that density of interstitial CTLA-4(+) lymphocytes independently predicted longer DFS (HR 0.315, P = 0.002) and OS (HR 0.313, P = 0.005), whereas tumor CTLA-4 expression independently predicted shorter DFS (HR 2.176, P = 0.029) and OS (HR 2.820, P = 0.007), i.e., patients with high CTLA-4(+) lymphocyte density and CTLA-4(low) tumor cells had the best prognoses. These results indicated that CTLA-4 expression in lymphocytes was associated with better prognosis, but that in tumor cells was associated with worse prognosis. Patients' CTLA-4 profiles might thus be used to predict the benefits and toxicity of CTLA-4 blockade. PMID:25893809

  18. Possible role of L-selectin in T lymphocyte alveolitis in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kaseda, M; Kadota, J; Mukae, H; Kawamoto, S; Shukuwa, T; Iwashita, T; Matsubara, Y; Ishimatsu, Y; Yoshinaga, M; Abe, K; Kohno, S

    2000-07-01

    A number of adhesion molecules participate in the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site of inflammation, and selectins together with their ligands are important in the early transient adhesion phase. In this study, we evaluated the role of L-selectin in T lymphocyte alveolitis in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis. We measured serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) concentrations of soluble (s)L-selectin using an ELISA. Serum and BALF concentrations of sL-selectin were significantly elevated in patients with sarcoidosis compared with control healthy subjects and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients (P < 0.05 and P < 0. 01, respectively). The lymphocyte surface marker was also examined in peripheral blood and BALF by flow cytometric analysis. The percentage of CD3+CD62L+ cells (L-selectin-bearing T lymphocytes) was significantly lower in peripheral blood of sarcoidosis than in that of healthy subjects (P < 0.01). In contrast, the percentage of CD3+CD62L- cells (L-selectin-negative T lymphocytes) in BALF of patients with sarcoidosis was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (P < 0.05) and IPF patients (P < 0.01). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between serum concentrations of sL-selectin and the number of L-selectin-negative T lymphocytes in BALF (r = 0.535, P < 0.01). Our results suggest that L-selectin may be involved in T lymphocyte alveolitis in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis. PMID:10886252

  19. Possible role of l-selectin in T lymphocyte alveolitis in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaseda, M; Kadota, J; Mukae, H; Kawamoto, S; Shukuwa, T; Iwashita, T; Matsubara, Y; Ishimatsu, Y; Yoshinaga, M; Abe, K; Kohno, S

    2000-01-01

    A number of adhesion molecules participate in the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site of inflammation, and selectins together with their ligands are important in the early transient adhesion phase. In this study, we evaluated the role of l-selectin in T lymphocyte alveolitis in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis. We measured serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) concentrations of soluble (s)l-selectin using an ELISA. Serum and BALF concentrations of sl-selectin were significantly elevated in patients with sarcoidosis compared with control healthy subjects and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients (P < 0·05 and P < 0·01, respectively). The lymphocyte surface marker was also examined in peripheral blood and BALF by flow cytometric analysis. The percentage of CD3+CD62L+ cells (l-selectin-bearing T lymphocytes) was significantly lower in peripheral blood of sarcoidosis than in that of healthy subjects (P < 0·01). In contrast, the percentage of CD3+CD62L− cells (l-selectin-negative T lymphocytes) in BALF of patients with sarcoidosis was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (P < 0·05) and IPF patients (P < 0·01). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between serum concentrations of sl-selectin and the number of l-selectin-negative T lymphocytes in BALF (r = 0·535, P < 0·01). Our results suggest that l-selectin may be involved in T lymphocyte alveolitis in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis. PMID:10886252

  20. Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Depletion After Hepatic Arterial {sup 90}Yttrium Microsphere Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Brian I.; Metes, Diana M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The short- and long-term effects of {sup 90}Yttrium microspheres therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on peripheral blood lymphocytes are unknown and were therefore examined. Methods and Materials: Ninety-two HCC patients were enrolled in a {sup 90}Yttrium therapy study and routine blood counts were examined as part of standard clinical monitoring. Results: We found an early, profound, and prolonged lymphopenia. In a subsequent cohort of 25 additional HCC patients, prospective flow cytometric immune-monitoring analysis was performed to identify specific changes on distinct lymphocyte subsets (i.e., CD3, CD4, CD8 T, and CD19 B lymphocytes) and NK cells absolute numbers, in addition to the granulocytes and platelets subsets. We found that the pretreatment lymphocyte subset absolute numbers (with the exception of NK cells) had a tendency to be lower compared with healthy control values, but no significant differences were detected between groups. Posttherapy follow-up revealed that overall, all lymphocyte subsets, except for NK cells, were significantly (>50% from pretherapy values), promptly (as early as 24 h) and persistently (up to 30 months) depleted post-{sup 90}Yttrium microspheres therapy. In contrast, granulocytes increased rapidly (24 h) to compensate for lymphocyte depletion, and remained increased at 1-year after therapy. We further stratified patients into two groups, according to survival at 1 year. We found that lack of recovery of CD19, CD3, CD8, and especially CD4 T cells was linked to poor patient survival. No fungal or bacterial infections were noted during the 30-month follow-up period. Conclusions: The results show that lymphocytes (and not granulocytes, platelets, or NK cells) are sensitive to hepatic arterial {sup 90}Yttrium without associated clinical toxicity, and lack of lymphocyte recovery (possibly leading to dysregulation of adaptive cellular immunity) posttherapy indicates poor survival.

  1. Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Subset Counts in Pre-menopausal Women with Iron-Deficiency Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Reza Keramati, Mohammad; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Ayatollahi, Hossein; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Khajedaluea, Mohammad; Tavasolian, Houman; Borzouei, Anahita

    2011-01-01

    Background: Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a major worldwide public health problem. Children and women of reproductive age are especially vulnerable to IDA, and it has been reported that these patients are more prone to infection. This study was done to evaluate alteration of lymphocyte subgroups in IDA. Methods: In this prospective study, we investigated lymphocyte subsets in pre-menopausal women with iron-deficiency anaemia; 50 normal subjects and 50 IDA (hypochromic microcytic) cases were enrolled. Experimental and control anticoagulated blood samples were evaluated using flow cytometry to determine the absolute and relative numbers of various lymphocyte subgroups. Finally, the results of the patient and control groups were compared. Results: Mean (SD) absolute counts of lymphocytes, CD3+ cells, CD3+/CD4+ subsets (T helper) and CD3+/CD8+ subsets (T cytotoxic) in the patient group were 2.08 (0.65) x 109/L, 1.53 (0.53) x 109/L, 0.87 (0.28) x 109/L, and 0.51 (0.24) x 109/L, respectively. The results showed significant differences between case and control groups in mean absolute counts of lymphocytes (P = 0.014), T lymphocytes (P = 0.009), helper T cells (P = 0.004), and cytotoxic T cells (P = 0.043). Conclusion: This study showed that absolute counts of peripheral blood T lymphocytes as a marker of cell-mediated immunity may be decreased in pre-menopausal women with iron-deficiency anaemia, and that these patients may be more prone to infection. PMID:22135572

  2. Common polygenic variation in coeliac disease and confirmation of ZNF335 and NIFA as disease susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ciara; Quinn, Emma M; Ryan, Anthony W; Conroy, Judith; Trimble, Valerie; Mahmud, Nasir; Kennedy, Nicholas; Corvin, Aiden P; Morris, Derek W; Donohoe, Gary; O'Morain, Colm; MacMathuna, Padraic; Byrnes, Valerie; Kiat, Clifford; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kelleher, Dermot; Ennis, Sean; Anney, Richard JL; McManus, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated disease triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1% in European populations. Specific HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles are established coeliac susceptibility genes and are required for the presentation of gliadin to the immune system resulting in damage to the intestinal mucosa. In the largest association analysis of CD to date, 39 non-HLA risk loci were identified, 13 of which were new, in a sample of 12 014 individuals with CD and 12 228 controls using the Immunochip genotyping platform. Including the HLA, this brings the total number of known CD loci to 40. We have replicated this study in an independent Irish CD case–control population of 425 CD and 453 controls using the Immunochip platform. Using a binomial sign test, we show that the direction of the effects of previously described risk alleles were highly correlated with those reported in the Irish population, (P=2.2 × 10−16). Using the Polygene Risk Score (PRS) approach, we estimated that up to 35% of the genetic variance could be explained by loci present on the Immunochip (P=9 × 10−75). When this is limited to non-HLA loci, we explain a maximum of 4.5% of the genetic variance (P=3.6 × 10−18). Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of our data with the previous reports, identifying two further loci harbouring the ZNF335 and NIFA genes which now exceed genome-wide significance, taking the total number of CD susceptibility loci to 42. PMID:25920553

  3. Common polygenic variation in coeliac disease and confirmation of ZNF335 and NIFA as disease susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Ciara; Quinn, Emma M; Ryan, Anthony W; Conroy, Judith; Trimble, Valerie; Mahmud, Nasir; Kennedy, Nicholas; Corvin, Aiden P; Morris, Derek W; Donohoe, Gary; O'Morain, Colm; MacMathuna, Padraic; Byrnes, Valerie; Kiat, Clifford; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kelleher, Dermot; Ennis, Sean; Anney, Richard J L; McManus, Ross

    2016-02-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated disease triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1% in European populations. Specific HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles are established coeliac susceptibility genes and are required for the presentation of gliadin to the immune system resulting in damage to the intestinal mucosa. In the largest association analysis of CD to date, 39 non-HLA risk loci were identified, 13 of which were new, in a sample of 12,014 individuals with CD and 12 228 controls using the Immunochip genotyping platform. Including the HLA, this brings the total number of known CD loci to 40. We have replicated this study in an independent Irish CD case-control population of 425 CD and 453 controls using the Immunochip platform. Using a binomial sign test, we show that the direction of the effects of previously described risk alleles were highly correlated with those reported in the Irish population, (P=2.2 × 10(-16)). Using the Polygene Risk Score (PRS) approach, we estimated that up to 35% of the genetic variance could be explained by loci present on the Immunochip (P=9 × 10(-75)). When this is limited to non-HLA loci, we explain a maximum of 4.5% of the genetic variance (P=3.6 × 10(-18)). Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of our data with the previous reports, identifying two further loci harbouring the ZNF335 and NIFA genes which now exceed genome-wide significance, taking the total number of CD susceptibility loci to 42. PMID:25920553

  4. A Genetic Risk Score Combining Ten Psoriasis Risk Loci Improves Disease Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoyan; Poon, Annie; Yeung, Celestine; Helms, Cynthia; Pons, Jennifer; Bowcock, Anne M.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Liao, Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated skin disease affecting 2–3% of Caucasians. Recent genetic association studies have identified multiple psoriasis risk loci; however, most of these loci contribute only modestly to disease risk. In this study, we investigated whether a genetic risk score (GRS) combining multiple loci could improve psoriasis prediction. Two approaches were used: a simple risk alleles count (cGRS) and a weighted (wGRS) approach. Ten psoriasis risk SNPs were genotyped in 2815 case-control samples and 858 family samples. We found that the total number of risk alleles in the cases was significantly higher than in controls, mean 13.16 (SD 1.7) versus 12.09 (SD 1.8), p = 4.577×10−40. The wGRS captured considerably more risk than any SNP considered alone, with a psoriasis OR for high-low wGRS quartiles of 10.55 (95% CI 7.63–14.57), p = 2.010×10−65. To compare the discriminatory ability of the GRS models, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC). The AUC for wGRS was significantly greater than for cGRS (72.0% versus 66.5%, p = 2.13×10−8). Additionally, the AUC for HLA-C alone (rs10484554) was equivalent to the AUC for all nine other risk loci combined (66.2% versus 63.8%, p = 0.18), highlighting the dominance of HLA-C as a risk locus. Logistic regression revealed that the wGRS was significantly associated with two subphenotypes of psoriasis, age of onset (p = 4.91×10−6) and family history (p = 0.020). Using a liability threshold model, we estimated that the 10 risk loci account for only11.6% of the genetic variance in psoriasis. In summary, we found that a GRS combining 10 psoriasis risk loci captured significantly more risk than any individual SNP and was associated with early onset of disease and a positive family history. Notably, only a small fraction of psoriasis heritability is captured by the common risk variants identified to date. PMID:21559375

  5. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  6. Defining lymphocyte-predominant breast cancer by the proportion of lymphocyte-rich stroma and its significance in routine histopathological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Haruo; Mori-Shiraishi, Kazuko; Nakajima, Morio; Ueki, Hamaichi

    2015-12-01

    Lymphocyte-predominant breast cancer (LPBC) defined by the density of stromal lymphocytes shows favorable behavior. However, considerable distribution heterogeneity of lymphocytes is a major problem. The present study defined LPBC by the proportion of lymphocyte-rich stroma with the cut-off values of 30, 50, and 75%, and clinicopathologically analyzed mainly LPBC (area > 30%) defined by the cut-off value of 30%. LPBCs (area > 30%), 39 cases in total, were composed mainly of triple-negative and HER2(+) /ER(-) subtypes, without any luminal A-like subtype. LPBCs were composed predominantly of histological grade 3 tumors, without any grade 1 lesions. Multivariate analyses on 477 consecutive tumors revealed that ER-negativity and grade 3 status associated significantly with LPBC. LPBC (area > 30%) showed better disease-free survival than grade-matched controls, and it was a good indicator of complete pathological remission after pre-operative chemotherapy. Patients with LPBC with the cut-off value of 50% and that of 75% showed 100% disease-free survival. These results demonstrated the validity of our definition of LPBC. Our data also suggest that de-differentiated cancers without TILs could be regarded as high-grade cancer without lymphocyte-mediated responses. In conclusion, the definition of LPBC by the proportion of lymphoid stroma is useful for prognostication of high grade breast cancer in routine diagnosis. PMID:26530981

  7. The nature and identification of quantitative trait loci

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This white paper by eighty members of the Complex Trait Consortium presents a community’s view on the approaches and statistical analyses that are needed for the identification of genetic loci that determine quantitative traits. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) can be identified in several ways, but is there a definitive test of whether a candidate locus actually corresponds to a specific QTL? PMID:14634638

  8. Beta-adrenergic receptors of lymphocytes in children with allergic respiratory diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Bittera, I.; Gyurkovits, K.; Falkay, G.; Eck, E.; Koltai, M.

    1988-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic receptor binding sites on peripheral lymphocytes in children with bronchial asthma (n = 16) and seasonal allergic rhinitis (n = 8) were examined in comparison with normal controls (n = 18) by means of /sup 124/I-cyanopindolol. The number of beta-adrenergic receptors was significantly lower in the asthmatic group (858 +/- 460/lymphocyte) than in the controls (1564 +/- 983/lymphocyte). The value (1891 +/- 1502/lymphocyte in children with allergic rhinitis was slightly higher than that in healthy controls. Of the 24 patients suffering from allergic diseases of the lower or upper airways, the bronchial histamine provocation test was performed in 21; 16 gave positive results, while 5 were negative. No difference in beta-adrenergic receptor count was found between the histamine-positive and negative patients. Neither was there any correlation between the number of beta-adrenergic receptors and the high (16/24) and low (8/24) serum IgE concentrations found in allergic patients. The significant decrease in beta-adrenergic receptor count in asthmatic children lends support to Szentivanyi's concept. Further qualitative and quantitative analysis of lymphocyte beta-adrenergic receptors may provide an individual approach to the treatment of bronchial asthma with beta-sympathomimetic drugs.

  9. Immunization with stallion lymphocytes for treatment of recurrent spontaneous abortion in thoroughbred mares.

    PubMed

    Mathias, S; Allen, W R

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of recurrent spontaneous abortion within the human population in the Western world is low (2-5%) but significant, and a proportion of these pregnancy losses are thought to have an underlying immunological cause. Immunization of women who have a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion with lymphocytes isolated from their husband or a third party donor is one of several forms of immunotherapy used to treat the problem. Early pregnancy loss in Thoroughbred mares is also significant and, as in women, a small number of mares undergo repeated pregnancy losses. Two trials have been performed in which Thoroughbred mares suffering from recurrent spontaneous abortion before day 150 of gestation were immunized with lymphocytes isolated from the mating stallion or from an unrelated stallion. The first trial, which was conducted without control mares, resulted in a very high live birth rate (97%) for the mares (n=24) treated. Therefore, a second controlled double-blinded trial was established in which randomly selected mares (n=17) were treated with stallion (heterologous) lymphocytes and control mares (n=13) were injected with their own (autologous) lymphocytes. The live birth rates after these treatments were 88 and 77%, respectively. Thus, immunization with stallion lymphocytes had no effect on the incidence of abortion in mares suffering from recurrent spontaneous abortion. PMID:20681180

  10. Metabolic dysfunction in lymphocytes promotes postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mark R; Sultan, Pervez; del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; Whittle, John; Karmali, Shamir N; Moonesinghe, S Ramani; Haddad, Fares S; Mythen, Michael G; Singer, Mervyn; Ackland, Gareth L

    2015-09-01

    Perioperative lymphopenia has been linked with an increased risk of postoperative infectious complications, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that bioenergetic dysfunction is an important mechanism underlying lymphopenia, impaired functionality and infectious complications. In two cohorts of patients (61-82 years old) undergoing orthopaedic joint replacement (n=417 and 328, respectively), we confirmed prospectively that preoperative lymphopenia (≤1.3 x 10(9)·l(-1); <20% white cell count; prevalence 15-18%) was associated with infectious complications (relative risk 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.0); P=0.008) and prolonged hospital stay. Lymphocyte respirometry, mitochondrial bioenergetics and function were assessed (n=93 patients). Postoperative lymphocytes showed a median 43% fall (range: 26-65%; P=0.029; n=13 patients) in spare respiratory capacity, the extra capacity available to produce energy in response to stress. This was accompanied by reduced glycolytic capacity. A similar hypometabolic phenotype was observed in lymphocytes sampled preoperatively from chronically lymphopenic patients (n=21). This hypometabolic phenotype was associated with functional lymphocyte impairment including reduced T-cell proliferation, lower intracellular cytokine production and excess apoptosis induced by a range of common stressors. Glucocorticoids, which are ubiquitously elevated for a prolonged period postoperatively, generated increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, activated caspase-1 and mature interleukin (IL)-1β in human lymphocytes, suggesting inflammasome activation. mRNA transcription of the NLRP1 inflammasome was increased in lymphocytes postoperatively. Genetic ablation of the murine NLRP3 inflammasome failed to prevent glucocorticoid-induced lymphocyte apoptosis and caspase-1 activity, but increased NLRP1 protein expression. Our findings suggest that the hypometabolic phenotype observed in chronically lymphopenic

  11. Biology and Genetics of New Autosomal STR Loci Useful for Forensic DNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Butler, J M; Hill, C R

    2012-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are regions of tandemly repeated DNA segments found throughout the human genome that vary in length (through insertion, deletion, or mutation) with a core repeated DNA sequence. Forensic laboratories commonly use tetranucleotide repeats, containing a four base pair (4-bp) repeat structure such as GATA. In 1997, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory selected 13 STR loci that form the backbone of the U.S. national DNA database. Building on the European expansion in 2009, the FBI announced plans in April 2011 to expand the U.S. core loci to as many as 20 STRs to enable more global DNA data sharing. Commercial STR kits enable consistency in marker use and allele nomenclature between laboratories and help improve quality control. The STRBase website, maintained by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), contains helpful information on STR markers used in human identity testing. PMID:26231356

  12. Genome sequencing reveals loci under artificial selection that underlie disease phenotypes in the laboratory rat.

    PubMed

    Atanur, Santosh S; Diaz, Ana Garcia; Maratou, Klio; Sarkis, Allison; Rotival, Maxime; Game, Laurence; Tschannen, Michael R; Kaisaki, Pamela J; Otto, Georg W; Ma, Man Chun John; Keane, Thomas M; Hummel, Oliver; Saar, Kathrin; Chen, Wei; Guryev, Victor; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Garrett, Michael R; Joe, Bina; Citterio, Lorena; Bianchi, Giuseppe; McBride, Martin; Dominiczak, Anna; Adams, David J; Serikawa, Tadao; Flicek, Paul; Cuppen, Edwin; Hubner, Norbert; Petretto, Enrico; Gauguier, Dominique; Kwitek, Anne; Jacob, Howard; Aitman, Timothy J

    2013-08-01

    Large numbers of inbred laboratory rat strains have been developed for a range of complex disease phenotypes. To gain insights into the evolutionary pressures underlying selection for these phenotypes, we sequenced the genomes of 27 rat strains, including 11 models of hypertension, diabetes, and insulin resistance, along with their respective control strains. Altogether, we identified more than 13 million single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants across these rat strains. Analysis of strain-specific selective sweeps and gene clusters implicated genes and pathways involved in cation transport, angiotensin production, and regulators of oxidative stress in the development of cardiovascular disease phenotypes in rats. Many of the rat loci that we identified overlap with previously mapped loci for related traits in humans, indicating the presence of shared pathways underlying these phenotypes in rats and humans. These data represent a step change in resources available for evolutionary analysis of complex traits in disease models. PMID:23890820

  13. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite DNA loci for wild Brassica juncea (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Sun, X Q; Yan, Q Q; Guo, J L; Qiang, S; Song, X L; Li, M M

    2013-01-01

    Wild Brassica juncea is a widespread weed in China with increasingly great impact on the yield of many crops. This study aimed to develop microsatellite markers for assessing the genetic diversity and population genetic structure of B. juncea, and to provide basic information for biological and chemical control of the weed. The compound microsatellite marker technique was used to develop markers for investigating population genetics of wild B. juncea. Twelve loci were obtained, each of which showed high polymorphisms when tested in two populations in Sichuan and Jiangsu Provinces. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 27, with an average of 15.2 alleles per locus. The newly developed microsatellite loci will be informative for further investigations of the population genetics and evolutionary patterns of wild B. juncea. PMID:24301911

  14. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 10 loci influencing allergic sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Raquel; Strachan, David P; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Linneberg, Allan; Curtin, John A; Warrington, Nicole M; Standl, Marie; Kerkhof, Marjan; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Bukvic, Blazenka K; Kaakinen, Marika; Sleimann, Patrick; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schramm, Katharina; Baltic, Svetlana; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Simpson, Angela; St Pourcain, Beate; Coin, Lachlan; Hui, Jennie; Walters, Eugene H; Tiesler, Carla M T; Duffy, David L; Jones, Graham; Ring, Susan M; McArdle, Wendy L; Price, Loren; Robertson, Colin F; Pekkanen, Juha; Tang, Clara S; Thiering, Elisabeth; Montgomery, Grant W; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Husemoen, Lise L; Herder, Christian; Kemp, John P; Elliot, Paul; James, Alan; Waldenberger, Melanie; Abramson, Michael J; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Gupta, Ramneek; Thompson, Philip J; Holt, Patrick; Sly, Peter; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Blekic, Mario; Weidinger, Stephan; Hakonarsson, Hakon; Stefansson, Kari; Heinrich, Joachim; Postma, Dirkje S; Custovic, Adnan; Pennell, Craig E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koppelman, Gerard H; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A; Bisgaard, Hans; Henderson, A John

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE (allergic sensitization) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. We performed the first large-scale genome wide association study (GWAS) of allergic sensitization in 5,789 affected individuals and 10,056 controls and followed up the top SNP from 26 loci in 6,114 affected individuals and 9,920 controls. We increased the number of susceptibility loci with genome-wide significant association to allergic sensitization from three to 10, including SNPs in or near TLR6, C11orf30, STAT6, SLC25A46, HLA-DQB1, IL1RL1, LPP, MYC, IL2 and HLA-B. All the top-SNPs were associated with allergic symptoms in an independent study. Risk variants at these 10 loci were estimated to account for at least 25% of allergic sensitization and allergic rhinitis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations may provide novel insight into the etiology of allergic disease. PMID:23817571

  15. Association mapping of disease loci, by use of a pooled DNA genomic screen.

    PubMed Central

    Barcellos, L F; Klitz, W; Field, L L; Tobias, R; Bowcock, A M; Wilson, R; Nelson, M P; Nagatomi, J; Thomson, G

    1997-01-01

    Genomic screening to map disease loci by association requires automation, pooling of DNA samples, and 3,000-6,000 highly polymorphic, evenly spaced microsatellite markers. Case-control samples can be used in an initial screen, followed by family-based data to confirm marker associations. Association mapping is relevant to genetic studies of complex diseases in which linkage analysis may be less effective and to cases in which multigenerational data are difficult to obtain, including rare or late-onset conditions and infectious diseases. The method can also be used effectively to follow up and confirm regions identified in linkage studies or to investigate candidate disease loci. Study designs can incorporate disease heterogeneity and interaction effects by appropriate subdivision of samples before screening. Here we report use of pooled DNA amplifications-the accurate determination of marker-disease associations for both case-control and nuclear family-based data-including application of correction methods for stutter artifact and preferential amplification. These issues, combined with a discussion of both statistical power and experimental design to define the necessary requirements for detecting of disease loci while virtually eliminating false positives, suggest the feasibility and efficiency of association mapping using pooled DNA screening. PMID:9326338

  16. Genome-wide association analyses identify 18 new loci associated with serum urate concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Köttgen, Anna; Albrecht, Eva; Teumer, Alexander; Vitart, Veronique; Krumsiek, Jan; Hundertmark, Claudia; Pistis, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Daniela; O’Seaghdha, Conall M; Haller, Toomas; Yang, Qiong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Johnson, Andrew D; Kutalik, Zoltán; Smith, Albert V; Shi, Julia; Struchalin, Maksim; Middelberg, Rita P S; Brown, Morris J; Gaffo, Angelo L; Pirastu, Nicola; Li, Guo; Hayward, Caroline; Zemunik, Tatijana; Huffman, Jennifer; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Demirkan, Ayse; Feitosa, Mary F; Liu, Xuan; Malerba, Giovanni; Lopez, Lorna M; van der Harst, Pim; Li, Xinzhong; Kleber, Marcus E; Hicks, Andrew A; Nolte, Ilja M; Johansson, Asa; Murgia, Federico; Wild, Sarah H; Bakker, Stephan J L; Peden, John F; Dehghan, Abbas; Steri, Maristella; Tenesa, Albert; Lagou, Vasiliki; Salo, Perttu; Mangino, Massimo; Rose, Lynda M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Woodward, Owen M; Okada, Yukinori; Tin, Adrienne; Müller, Christian; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Putku, Margus; Czamara, Darina; Kraft, Peter; Frogheri, Laura; Thun, Gian Andri; Grotevendt, Anne; Gislason, Gauti Kjartan; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; McArdle, Patrick; Shuldiner, Alan R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Helena; Schallert, Michael; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Munroe, Patricia B; Samani, Nilesh J; Jacobs, David R; Liu, Kiang; D’Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Campbell, Susan; Devuyst, Olivier; Navarro, Pau; Kolcic, Ivana; Hastie, Nicholas; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Esko, Tõnu; Salumets, Andres; Khaw, Kay Tee; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Isaacs, Aaron; Kraja, Aldi; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Scott, Rodney J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Org, Elin; Viigimaa, Margus; Bandinelli, Stefania; Metter, Jeffrey E; Lupo, Antonio; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Sorice, Rossella; Döring, Angela; Lattka, Eva; Strauch, Konstantin; Theis, Fabian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wichmann, H-Erich; Davies, Gail; Gow, Alan J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Study, LifeLines Cohort; Stolk, Ronald P; Kooner, Jaspal S; Zhang, Weihua; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Lucae, Susanne; Penninx, Brenda W; Smit, Johannes H; Curhan, Gary; Mudgal, Poorva; Plenge, Robert M; Portas, Laura; Persico, Ivana; Kirin, Mirna; Wilson, James F; Leach, Irene Mateo; van Gilst, Wiek H; Goel, Anuj; Ongen, Halit; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Imboden, Medea; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Cucca, Francesco; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Piras, Maria Grazia; Nauck, Matthias; Schurmann, Claudia; Budde, Kathrin; Ernst, Florian; Farrington, Susan M; Theodoratou, Evropi; Prokopenko, Inga; Stumvoll, Michael; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Shin, So-Youn; Spector, Tim D; Sala, Cinzia; Ridker, Paul M; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Hengstenberg, Christian; Nelson, Christopher P; Consortium, CARDIoGRAM; Consortium, DIAGRAM; Consortium, ICBP; Consortium, MAGIC; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Singleton, Andrew B; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Zeller, Tanja; Burnier, Michel; Attia, John; Laan, Maris; Klopp, Norman; Hillege, Hans L; Kloiber, Stefan; Choi, Hyon; Pirastu, Mario; Tore, Silvia; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Völzke, Henry; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Parsa, Afshin; Schmidt, Reinhold; Whitfield, John B; Fornage, Myriam; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David S; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Metspalu, Andres; Loos, Ruth J F; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gambaro, Giovanni; Deary, Ian J; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Chambers, John C; März, Winfried; Pramstaller, Peter P; Snieder, Harold; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wright, Alan F; Navis, Gerjan; Watkins, Hugh; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Sanna, Serena; Schipf, Sabine; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tönjes, Anke; Ripatti, Samuli; Soranzo, Nicole; Toniolo, Daniela; Chasman, Daniel I; Raitakari, Olli; Kao, W H Linda; Ciullo, Marina; Fox, Caroline S; Caulfield, Mark; Bochud, Murielle; Gieger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum urate concentrations can cause gout, a prevalent and painful inflammatory arthritis. By combining data from >140,000 individuals of European ancestry within the Global Urate Genetics Consortium (GUGC), we identified and replicated 28 genome-wide significant loci in association with serum urate concentrations (18 new regions in or near TRIM46, INHBB, SFMBT1, TMEM171, VEGFA, BAZ1B, PRKAG2, STC1, HNF4G, A1CF, ATXN2, UBE2Q2, IGF1R, NFAT5, MAF, HLF, ACVR1B-ACVRL1 and B3GNT4). Associations for many of the loci were of similar magnitude in individuals of non-European ancestry. We further characterized these loci for associations with gout, transcript expression and the fractional excretion of urate. Network analyses implicate the inhibins-activins signaling pathways and glucose metabolism in systemic urate control. New candidate genes for serum urate concentration highlight the importance of metabolic control of urate production and excretion, which may have implications for the treatment and prevention of gout. PMID:23263486

  17. Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Voight, Benjamin F; Scott, Laura J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Morris, Andrew P; Dina, Christian; Welch, Ryan P; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Huth, Cornelia; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; McCulloch, Laura J; Ferreira, Teresa; Grallert, Harald; Amin, Najaf; Wu, Guanming; Willer, Cristen J; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; McCarroll, Steve A; Langenberg, Claudia; Hofmann, Oliver M; Dupuis, Josée; Qi, Lu; Segrè, Ayellet V; van Hoek, Mandy; Navarro, Pau; Ardlie, Kristin; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J; Blagieva, Roza; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bravenboer, Bert; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Burtt, Noisël P; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn; Couper, David J; Crawford, Gabe; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Katherine S; Elliott, Amanda L; Erdos, Michael R; Fox, Caroline S; Franklin, Christopher S; Ganser, Martha; Gieger, Christian; Grarup, Niels; Green, Todd; Griffin, Simon; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hadjadj, Samy; Hassanali, Neelam; Herder, Christian; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Paul R V; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen H L; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kraft, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Man; Lieverse, Aloysius; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Midthjell, Kristian; Morken, Mario A; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John R B; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Platou, Carl; Proença, Christine; Prokopenko, Inga; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Roden, Michael; Sampson, Michael J; Saxena, Richa; Shields, Beverley M; Shrader, Peter; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sparsø, Thomas; Strassburger, Klaus; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Swift, Amy J; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Dam, Rob M; van Haeften, Timon W; van Herpt, Thijs; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Walters, G Bragi; Weedon, Michael N; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bergman, Richard N; Cauchi, Stephane; Collins, Francis S; Gloyn, Anna L; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hansen, Torben; Hide, Winston A; Hitman, Graham A; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Hveem, Kristian; Laakso, Markku; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rudan, Igor; Sijbrands, Eric; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watanabe, Richard M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Campbell, Harry; Daly, Mark J; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hu, Frank B; Meigs, James B; Pankow, James S; Pedersen, Oluf; Wichmann, H-Erich; Barroso, Inês; Florez, Jose C; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif; Sladek, Rob; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Wilson, James F; Illig, Thomas; Froguel, Philippe; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Stefansson, Kari; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I

    2011-01-01

    By combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals with combinedP < 5 × 10−8. These include a second independent signal at the KCNQ1 locus; the first report, to our knowledge, of an X-chromosomal association (near DUSP9); and a further instance of overlap between loci implicated in monogenic and multifactorial forms of diabetes (at HNF1A). The identified loci affect both beta-cell function and insulin action, and, overall, T2D association signals show evidence of enrichment for genes involved in cell cycle regulation. We also show that a high proportion of T2D susceptibility loci harbor independent association signals influencing apparently unrelated complex traits. PMID:20581827

  18. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ghoussaini, Maya; Dennis, Joe; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C; Canisius, Sander; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Haiman, Christopher A; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Luccarini, Craig; Schoof, Nils; Humphreys, Keith; Li, Jingmei; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Stevens, Kristen N; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Paridaens, Robert; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Broeks, Annegien; Van’t Veer, Laura J; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Bui, Quang M; Stone, Jennifer; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Tsimiklis, Helen; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Kristensen, Vessela N; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Edge, Stephen; Fostira, Florentia; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Phuah, Sze Yee; Cornes, Belinda K; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Simard, Jacques; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Benitez, Javier; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ~9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part of a collaborative genotyping experiment involving four consortia (Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, COGS) and used a custom Illumina iSelect genotyping array, iCOGS, comprising more than 200,000 SNPs. We identified SNPs at 41 new breast cancer susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). Further analyses suggest that more than 1,000 additional loci are involved in breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:23535729

  19. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ghoussaini, Maya; Dennis, Joe; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C; Canisius, Sander; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Haiman, Christopher A; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Luccarini, Craig; Schoof, Nils; Humphreys, Keith; Li, Jingmei; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Stevens, Kristen N; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Paridaens, Robert; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Broeks, Annegien; Veer, Laura J Van't; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Bui, Quang M; Stone, Jennifer; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Tsimiklis, Helen; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Kristensen, Vessela N; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Edge, Stephen; Fostira, Florentia; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Phuah, Sze Yee; Cornes, Belinda K; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Simard, Jacques; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Benitez, Javier; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ∼9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part of a collaborative genotyping experiment involving four consortia (Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, COGS) and used a custom Illumina iSelect genotyping array, iCOGS, comprising more than 200,000 SNPs. We identified SNPs at 41 new breast cancer susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)). Further analyses suggest that more than 1,000 additional loci are involved in breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:23535729

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies new prostate cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Siddiq, Afshan; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Wang, Zhaoming; Lindstrom, Sara; Stevens, Victoria L.; Chen, Constance; Mondul, Alison M.; Travis, Ruth C.; Stram, Daniel O.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Giles, Graham; Hopper, John L.; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Muir, Kenneth; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Guy, Michelle; Severi, Gianluca; Grönberg, Henrik; Isaacs, William B.; Karlsson, Robert; Wiklund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Allen, Naomi E.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Johansson, Mattias; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Sieri, Sabina; Stattin, Pär; Stampfer, Meir J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vogel, Ulla; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Yeager, Meredith; Thun, Michael J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B.; Spencer Feigelson, Heather; Riboli, Elio; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kraft, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most common non-skin cancer diagnosed among males in developed countries and the second leading cause of cancer mortality, yet little is known regarding its etiology and factors that influence clinical outcome. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of PrCa have identified at least 30 distinct loci associated with small differences in risk. We conducted a GWAS in 2782 advanced PrCa cases (Gleason grade ≥ 8 or tumor stage C/D) and 4458 controls with 571 243 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Based on in silico replication of 4679 SNPs (Stage 1, P < 0.02) in two published GWAS with 7358 PrCa cases and 6732 controls, we identified a new susceptibility locus associated with overall PrCa risk at 2q37.3 (rs2292884, P= 4.3 × 10−8). We also confirmed a locus suggested by an earlier GWAS at 12q13 (rs902774, P= 8.6 × 10−9). The estimated per-allele odds ratios for these loci (1.14 for rs2292884 and 1.17 for rs902774) did not differ between advanced and non-advanced PrCa (case-only test for heterogeneity P= 0.72 and P= 0.61, respectively). Further studies will be needed to assess whether these or other loci are differentially associated with PrCa subtypes. PMID:21743057

  1. Escherichia coli Chromosomal Loci Segregate from Midcell with Universal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cass, Julie A; Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the Escherichia coli chromosome is inherently dynamic over the duration of the cell cycle. Genetic loci undergo both stochastic motion around their initial positions and directed motion to opposite poles of the rod-shaped cell during segregation. We developed a quantitative method to characterize cell-cycle dynamics of the E. coli chromosome to probe the chromosomal steady-state mobility and segregation process. By tracking fluorescently labeled chromosomal loci in thousands of cells throughout the entire cell cycle, our method allows for the statistical analysis of locus position and motion, the step-size distribution for movement during segregation, and the locus drift velocity. The robust statistics of our detailed analysis of the wild-type E. coli nucleoid allow us to observe loci moving toward midcell before segregation occurs, consistent with a replication factory model. Then, as segregation initiates, we perform a detailed characterization of the average segregation velocity of loci. Contrary to origin-centric models of segregation, which predict distinct dynamics for oriC-proximal versus oriC-distal loci, we find that the dynamics of loci were universal and independent of genetic position. PMID:27332118

  2. Discovery and Refinement of Loci Associated with Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian’an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Ingi Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable, risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,578 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5×10−8, including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipids are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index. Our results illustrate the value of genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestries and provide insights into biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological, and therapeutic research. PMID:24097068

  3. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stancáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-11-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10(-8), including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry, we narrow association si