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  1. Perceived Therapist Effectiveness: An Examination of Orthodox Jewish Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindiger, Alissa

    2013-01-01

    The following study empirically tested whether Modem Orthodox Jewish adolescents prefer therapists with similar religious affiliations to themselves as assessed by their ratings of importance of having a therapist of that religious affiliation, their perceived comfort level, and perceived effectiveness of therapists of different religious…

  2. Gay, Orthodox, and trembling: the rise of Jewish Orthodox gay consciousness, 1970s-2000s.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    In 2001, the documentary movie, Trembling Before God, was played in Jewish and gay film festivals around the world, provoking strong emotional reactions. Trembling Before God comprises interviews with Orthodox Jewish gay and lesbian persons who vividly and movingly describe their struggles to live their lives as observant Jewish people, being faithful at the same time to their sexual desires and their religious tradition. Almost all the people interviewed in the movie expressed mixed emotions: love towards their tradition and attachment to their community of faith, coupled with resentment against a community, which in their eyes failed to respond with understanding to their emotional needs, thus adding to their pain. This article aims to modify the picture portrayed in the movie. The dilemmas and struggles of gays and lesbians who live their lives in Orthodox Jewish communities are indeed real. Orthodox gays and lesbians experience a greater dissonance between their sexuality and the values of their community and therefore face more anxieties and inner turmoils than gays and lesbians who live in more permissive environments. The struggles of gay and lesbian Orthodox Jews, however, are not necessarily greater than those of gays and lesbians who live their lives in other conservative communities. In fact, while it is almost impossible to be a sexually active gay or lesbian and a practicing Southern Baptist, Seventh-Day Adventist, Jehovah's Witness, or Mormon, it is not impossible for gays and lesbians to live their lives in an Orthodox Jewish environment. Amazingly, since the 1970s, thousands of gays and lesbians have given up on liberal environments and joined the ranks of traditionalist Jewish congregations. PMID:17594973

  3. London's Jewish Communities and State Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jane

    2012-01-01

    The Inner London education authority was a notable example of a radical and powerful local government body from which the fight for the comprehensive principle in English secondary education emerged. Building on previous work of women's contribution to state education in London, this articles focuses on Anglo-Jewish educator activists who helped…

  4. The Internalization of Jewish Values by Children Attending Orthodox Jewish Schools, and Its Relationship to Autonomy-Supportive Parenting and Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lori R.; Milyavskaya, Marina; Koestner, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the way in which children attending Orthodox Jewish schools internalize the value of both their Jewish studies and secular studies, as well as the value of Jewish cultural practices. A distinction was made between identified internalization, where children perceive Jewish studies and Jewish culture to be an important…

  5. Worldview Construction and Identity Formation in Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakowski, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how ultra-Orthodox Jewish elementary schools in America construct and maintain a distinct religious identity through the production of an all-encompassing communal worldview. The author argues that ultra-Orthodox schools model cultural engagement with secular American society by conceptually isolating secular education within…

  6. Student and Teacher Responses to Prayer at a Modern Orthodox Jewish High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Devra

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the attitudes of students and teachers to prayer at an American Modern Orthodox Jewish high school. Relevant data, based on observation and interviews, emerged from a larger study of the school's Jewish and secular worlds. A significant gap in responses became apparent. Students viewed prayer as a challenge to their autonomy,…

  7. The centrality of guilt: working with ultra-orthodox Jewish patients in Israel.

    PubMed

    Hess, Esther

    2014-09-01

    The ultra-orthodox Jewish (Haredi) community in Israel is characterized by strict observance of the requirements of orthodox Jewish life. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy within this community brings us into contact with guilt as a central emotion throughout the therapeutic process. The exposure to new concepts, ways of thought and a previously unknown space, together with increased awareness of internal wishes and drives, are experienced as forbidden areas that arouse an awakening of conscience and a sense of guilt. The author's cases illustrate these conflicts. PMID:25117784

  8. The Legacy of the Linguistic Fence: Linguistic Patterns among Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannenbaum, Michal; Abugov, Netta

    2010-01-01

    This study examined linguistic patterns in the Jewish ultra-Orthodox community in Israel, a group that has rarely been studied from a sociolinguistic perspective. Participants were 92 girls, 10-12 years old, who attend a school where Yiddish is the language of instruction and Hebrew, Israel's official language, is studied only in religious…

  9. Understanding culturally motivated requests from Orthodox Jewish women to delay ovulation.

    PubMed

    Grazi, Richard V; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2011-01-01

    We report here on the cultural reasons motivating some idiosyncratic requests from married Orthodox Jewish women to delay ovulation. Understanding and respecting the patient's individual concerns and religious values, including the complex psychological, sociological and cultural factors that they involve, is part of good medical practice. PMID:22010520

  10. Teachers (Melamdim) and Educators (Mehankhim)--Who Are We? Implications for Professionalizing Orthodox Jewish Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saks, Jeffrey

    This paper puts forth an argument for new lines of inquiry and deliberation in the process of professionalizing Orthodox Jewish education. Using professionalization to describe a process that emanates from within the profession and its practitioners, and not issues (such as salary, benefits, and status) which are largely controlled by those…

  11. Challenges of Pre- and Post-Test Counseling for Orthodox Jewish Individuals in the Premarital Phase.

    PubMed

    Rose, E; Schreiber-Agus, N; Bajaj, K; Klugman, S; Goldwaser, T

    2016-02-01

    The Jewish community has traditionally taken ownership of its health, and has taken great strides to raise awareness about genetic issues that affect the community, such as Tay-Sachs disease and Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome. Thanks in part to these heightened awareness efforts, many Orthodox Jewish individuals are now using genetics services as they begin to plan their families. Due to unique cultural and religious beliefs and perceptions, the Orthodox Jewish patients who seek genetic counseling face many barriers to a successful counseling session, and often seek the guidance of programs such as the Program for Jewish Genetic Health (PJGH). In this article, we present clinical vignettes from the PJGH's clinical affiliate, the Reproductive Genetics practice at the Montefiore Medical Center. These cases highlight unique features of contemporary premarital counseling and screening within the Orthodox Jewish Community, including concerns surrounding stigma, disclosure, "marriageability," the use of reproductive technologies, and the desire to include a third party in decision making. Our vignettes demonstrate the importance of culturally-sensitive counseling. We provide strategies and points to consider when addressing the challenges of pre- and post-test counseling as it relates to genetic testing in this population. PMID:26354339

  12. What is it to do good medical ethics? An orthodox Jewish physician and ethicist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    This article, dedicated to the 40th anniversary of the Journal of Medical Ethics, approaches the question 'what does it mean to do good medical ethics?' first from a general perspective and then from the personal perspective of a Jewish Orthodox physician and ethicist who tries, both at a personal clinical level and in national and sometimes international discussions and debates, to reconcile his own religious ethical values-especially the enormous value given by Jewish ethics to the preservation of human life-with the prima facie 'principlist' moral norms of contemporary secular medical ethics, especially that of respect for patients' autonomy. PMID:25516953

  13. The Faith Is the Pace: Educational Perspectives of Three Women Principals of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Ultra-Orthodox Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnieli, Mira

    2014-01-01

    Israel is a multicultural state where ultra-Orthodox groups run their own separate schools. The present phenomenological study examined and compared the management patterns and educational emphases of three women principals of religious schools (Muslim, Christian [Franciscan], and ultra-Orthodox Jewish). The findings show that the ultra-Orthodox…

  14. Understanding Causes of and Responses to Intimate Partner Violence in a Jewish Orthodox Community: Survivors' and Leaders' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringel, Shoshana; Bina, Rena

    2007-01-01

    There has been little research on intimate partner violence (IPV) in faith-based communities. This qualitative study examines social attitudes and religious values in an Ultra-Orthodox Jewish community that affect the incidence of IPV and prevent women survivors from seeking help. Interviews were conducted with 8 Orthodox women and 11 community…

  15. What are the attitudes of strictly-orthodox Jews to clinical trials: are they influenced by Jewish teachings?

    PubMed

    Box Bayes, Joan

    2013-10-01

    In order to explore whether and how Jewish teachings influence the attitudes of strictly-orthodox Jews to clinical trials, 10 strictly-orthodox Jews were purposively selected and interviewed, using a semi-structured schedule. Relevant literature was searched for similar studies and for publications covering relevant Jewish teachings. Thematic analysis was used to analyse transcribed interviews and explore relationships between attitudes and Jewish teachings identified in the review. Participants' attitudes were influenced in a variety of ways: by Jewish teachings on the over-riding importance of preserving life--the need to avoid risks affecting life and health, while taking risks to preserve life--and the religious obligation to help others, as well as by previous experience. Attitudes mirrored those in the general population, enabling many participants to reach conclusions that did not differ materially from those of the general population or research ethics committees. PMID:23268364

  16. From the Constitution to the Classroom: Educational Freedom in Antwerp's Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry-Hazan, Lotem

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how the constitutional right to educational freedom penetrates to the schools of the ultra-Orthodox Jewish (Haredi) community in Antwerp, which is one of the largest Haredi communities in the world. The findings indicate that the constitutional educational freedom is altered by various legal rules, social norms, and…

  17. Addressing the particular recordkeeping needs of infertile Orthodox Jewish couples considering the use of donated eggs.

    PubMed

    Grazi, Richard V; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2014-03-01

    Infertility counseling is a specialized field that will continue to grow in coming years as the impact of infertility and its treatment is documented more and more in terms of emotional, physical, social and life consequences. Counselors should anticipate issues that may arise in the future and assist couples in their efforts to address them. We report here on recordkeeping issues of possible future concern that should be addressed when Orthodox Jewish couples make use of donor eggs. Good medical practice values the importance of understanding the patient's individual concerns and values, including the complex psychological, sociological and cultural context in which they experience their infertility. Good counseling anticipates and addresses future problems about which patients might not currently be aware. PMID:24446049

  18. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge to Chemotherapy in an Orthodox Jewish Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ivascu, Natalia S.; Acres, Cathleen A.; Stark, Meredith; Furman, Richard R.; Fins, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) for cardiopulmonary support offers survival possibilities to patients who otherwise would succumb to cardiac failure. Often referred to as “a bridge to recovery,” involving a ventricular assist device or cardiac transplantation, this technology only affords temporary cardiopulmonary support. Physicians may have concerns about initiating VA-ECMO in patients who, in the absence of recovery or transfer to longer-term therapies, might assert religious or cultural objections to the terminal discontinuation of life-sustaining therapy (LST). We present a novel case of VA-ECMO use in an Orthodox Jewish woman with potentially curable lymphoma encasing her heart to demonstrate the value of anticipating and preemptively resolving foreseeable disputes. Patient. A 40-year-old Hasidic Orthodox Jewish woman with lymphoma encasing her right and left ventricles decompensated from heart failure before chemotherapy induction. The medical team, at an academic medical center in New York City, proposed VA-ECMO as a means for providing cardiopulmonary support to enable receipt of chemotherapy. Owing to the patient’s religious tradition, which customarily prohibits terminal discontinuation of LST, clinical staff asked for an ethics consultation to plan for initiation and discontinuation of VA-ECMO. Interventions. Meetings were held with the treating clinicians, clinical ethics consultants, family, religious leaders, and cultural liaisons. Through a deliberative process, VA-ECMO was reconceptualized as a bridge to treatment and not as an LST, a designation assigned to the chemotherapy on this occasion, given the mortal threat posed by the encasing tumor. Conclusion. Traditional religious objections to the terminal discontinuation of LST need not preclude initiation of VA-ECMO. The potential for disputes should be anticipated and steps taken to preemptively address such conflicts. The reconceptualization of VA

  19. Satisfaction and Stressors in a Religious Minority: A National Study of Orthodox Jewish Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnall, Eliezer; Pelcovitz, David; Fox, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    The paucity of mental health studies with Orthodox Jews makes culturally competent counseling care unlikely. In this large-scale investigation of marriage among Orthodox Jews, most respondents reported satisfaction with marriage and spouse, although satisfaction was highest among recently married couples. The most significant stressors were…

  20. Caloric Intake on the Sabbath: A Pilot Study of Contributing Factors to Obesity in the Orthodox Jewish Community.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Deborah A; Swencionis, Charles; Segal-Isaacson, C J

    2016-10-01

    The American Orthodox Jewish community has specific cultural factors that may contribute to overweight and obesity. This study aimed to look at caloric intake on the Sabbath and its contribution to overweight and obesity. Twelve married or previously married women who identify themselves as Orthodox Jews were recruited to do 24-h food recalls over the phone. The participants were divided into three weight groups (normal, overweight, and obese) based on their BMI. The overweight and obese participants' data were combined into one group for the purposes of statistical testing. Paired t tests looking at the data for all participants showed significantly great caloric intake during an average Sabbath day than an average weekday [t(4) = 7.58, p < 0.001]. A repeated-measures ANOVA showed significantly greater energy intake on the Sabbath for the overweight-obese women compared to the normal weight women [F(1) = 7.83, p = 0.02]. No statistical difference was seen between the weekday energy intake of the normal weight women as compared to the combined group of overweight-obese women [F(1) = 0.501, p = 0.499]. These results support the hypotheses that all groups eat significantly more on the Sabbath than on weekdays, and overweight and obese individuals eat significantly more on the Sabbath than normal weight individuals. This supports the theory that caloric intake on the Sabbath is a contributing factor to overweight and obesity within the American Orthodox Jewish community. PMID:26613588

  1. Cultural aspects within caregiver interactions of ultra-orthodox Jewish women and their family members with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Penina; Shor, Ron; Hadas-Lidor, Naomi

    2013-10-01

    The role of cultural dynamics and norms within families of persons with mental illness has been an underexplored subject, although the familial context has been recognized as influential. This subject was studied with 24 ultra-Orthodox Jewish mothers of persons with mental illness who live in a relatively closed religious community. While participating in the Keshet educational program designed for family caregivers in mental health, they wrote Meaningful Interactional Life Episodes that involved a dialogue exchange in their lives. Qualitative analysis of 50 episodes illuminates the significant role that religious and cultural norms have in the perceptions of what are considered stressors and the dynamics in these families surrounding these stressors. The necessity and value of incorporating cultural competence into family educational programs and interventions is emphasized, as this may contribute to the potential use and success of mental health service models within a population that essentially underutilizes these services. PMID:24164523

  2. Seeking help for postpartum depression in the Israeli Jewish orthodox community: factors associated with use of professional and informal help.

    PubMed

    Bina, Rena

    2014-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) has potentially devastating personal and familial consequences. However, very few women receive treatment, either professional or informal. Use patterns and factors associated with both professional and informal help for PPD have not yet been investigated. This study examined factors associated with use of professional and informal help for PPD in an Israeli sample that included women from secular, traditional, orthodox, and ultra-orthodox Jewish religious groups. One to two days postpartum, 1,059 women were recruited from a large hospital in Jerusalem, Israel, and completed an initial survey; 805 women (76%) participated at the 6-week follow-up; 94 women (12%) screened positive for PPD symptoms at the 6-week follow-up and were referred for help; and 88 women completed the 6-month postpartum follow-up interview. Of the women referred for help, 69% used some sort of help, with 24% using professional help and 45% using informal help. Confidence in mental health professionals and higher levels of PPD symptomatology were associated with use of professional help. Recognition of personal need for professional psychological help was negatively associated with use of informal help. Findings from this study highlight the importance of routine screening for PPD and culturally sensitive referrals using informal sources of help. PMID:24791859

  3. Travel- and Community-Based Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Shigella sonnei Lineage among International Orthodox Jewish Communities

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S.; Dallman, Timothy J.; Behar, Adi; Weill, François-Xavier; Gouali, Malika; Sobel, Jeremy; Fookes, Maria; Valinsky, Lea; Gal-Mor, Ohad; Connor, Thomas R.; Nissan, Israel; Bertrand, Sophie; Parkhill, Julian; Jenkins, Claire; Cohen, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Shigellae are sensitive indicator species for studying trends in the international transmission of antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Orthodox Jewish communities (OJCs) are a known risk group for shigellosis; Shigella sonnei is cyclically epidemic in OJCs in Israel, and sporadic outbreaks occur in OJCs elsewhere. We generated whole-genome sequences for 437 isolates of S. sonnei from OJCs and non-OJCs collected over 22 years in Europe (the United Kingdom, France, and Belgium), the United States, Canada, and Israel and analyzed these within a known global genomic context. Through phylogenetic and genomic analysis, we showed that strains from outbreaks in OJCs outside of Israel are distinct from strains in the general population and relate to a single multidrug-resistant sublineage of S. sonnei that prevails in Israel. Further Bayesian phylogenetic analysis showed that this strain emerged approximately 30 years ago, demonstrating the speed at which antimicrobial drug–resistant pathogens can spread widely through geographically dispersed, but internationally connected, communities. PMID:27532625

  4. Travel- and Community-Based Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Shigella sonnei Lineage among International Orthodox Jewish Communities.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kate S; Dallman, Timothy J; Behar, Adi; Weill, François-Xavier; Gouali, Malika; Sobel, Jeremy; Fookes, Maria; Valinsky, Lea; Gal-Mor, Ohad; Connor, Thomas R; Nissan, Israel; Bertrand, Sophie; Parkhill, Julian; Jenkins, Claire; Cohen, Dani; Thomson, Nicholas R

    2016-09-01

    Shigellae are sensitive indicator species for studying trends in the international transmission of antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Orthodox Jewish communities (OJCs) are a known risk group for shigellosis; Shigella sonnei is cyclically epidemic in OJCs in Israel, and sporadic outbreaks occur in OJCs elsewhere. We generated whole-genome sequences for 437 isolates of S. sonnei from OJCs and non-OJCs collected over 22 years in Europe (the United Kingdom, France, and Belgium), the United States, Canada, and Israel and analyzed these within a known global genomic context. Through phylogenetic and genomic analysis, we showed that strains from outbreaks in OJCs outside of Israel are distinct from strains in the general population and relate to a single multidrug-resistant sublineage of S. sonnei that prevails in Israel. Further Bayesian phylogenetic analysis showed that this strain emerged approximately 30 years ago, demonstrating the speed at which antimicrobial drug-resistant pathogens can spread widely through geographically dispersed, but internationally connected, communities. PMID:27532625

  5. A Case Study of Culturally Sensitive Mail Survey Methods for Understanding Walking within an Orthodox Jewish Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahan, David

    2006-01-01

    Adequate response to mail health surveys by minority populations has proved problematic. The impact of mail survey design features utilized to promote Orthodox Jews' responses (N = 138; 82 eligible synagogue member households) to a mailed questionnaire used to measure walking behavior are described and assessed. An examination of response…

  6. Your faith or mine: a pregnancy spacing intervention in an ultra-orthodox Jewish community in Israel.

    PubMed

    Birenbaum-Carmeli, Daphna

    2008-11-01

    Ultra-orthodox (haredi) Jews in Israel have an exceptionally high fertility rate of 7.7. As most fathers spend their days studying the Bible, the women struggle to support their large families under severe economic pressures. Some women experience maternal exhaustion coping with this life situation. Contraception for pregnancy spacing raises myriad dilemmas in the haredi community, however, many of which apply to promoting family planning in religious settings more generally. In a health promotion course for 23 haredi registered nurses at the University of Haifa in 2006-2007, pregnancy spacing was selected as the subject of the class project, the main aim of which was to convey an influential health message in a culturally acceptable manner. As the issue was debated, it was agreed the project should also address a range of women's health problems as well as pregnancy spacing. Thus, maternal nutrition, pelvic floor tone, dental health, maternal exhaustion and competition over number of children were added. A brochure was prepared and widely distributed in the haredi community, where it was well received. This paper describes the classroom dynamics during the planning and application of the project. It illustrates the importance of cultural awareness when addressing sensitive issues and communities with particular cultural dispositions. PMID:19027635

  7. Depression stigma and treatment preferences among Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews.

    PubMed

    Baruch, David E; Kanter, Jonathan W; Pirutinsky, Steven; Murphy, Joseph; Rosmarin, David H; Rosmain, David H

    2014-07-01

    Anecdotal reports of increased stigma toward mental illness among Orthodox Jews seems to conflict with an existing literature describing less stigmatization toward depression among Jewish individuals. This online survey study investigated stigma toward depression and treatment preference among Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews (N = 391). All participants were presented with a depression vignette to assess for stigma and then randomized to a vignette depicting a treatment modality (behaviorally oriented or insight oriented) to assess for treatment preference across several delivery options (individual, group, or Internet). Results indicated elevated depression stigma among Orthodox Jews as expressed by elevated levels of secrecy, treatment-seeking stigma, family/marriage stigma, and stigmatizing experiences, but not attitudinal social distancing. No group differences were found with respect to overall treatment preference, treatment modality, or manner of delivery. Overall, participants preferred individual therapy more than group and Internet therapy and preferred group therapy more than Internet therapy. Clinical and research implications are discussed. PMID:24921418

  8. Community Attitudes towards Culture-Influenced Mental Illness: Scrupulosity vs. Nonreligious OCD among Orthodox Jews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirutinsky, Steven; Rosmarin, David H.; Pargament, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    Culture may particularly influence community attitudes towards mental illness, when the illness itself is shaped by a cultural context. To explore the influence of culture-specific, religious symptoms on Orthodox Jewish community attitudes, the authors compared the attitudes of 169 Orthodox Jews, who randomly viewed one of two vignettes describing…

  9. Am I "That Jew"? North African Jewish Experiences in the Toronto Jewish Day School System and the Establishment of or Haemet Sephardic School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Train, Kelly Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the North African Jewish community's establishment of Or Haemet Sephardic School as a response to the forced "Ashkenazification" of Sephardic students in the Orthodox Jewish day school system. The establishment of the school signifies the North African Jewish community's refusal and resistance to an essentialist Jewish…

  10. Women Pursuing Higher Education in Ultra-Orthodox Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Nehami; Yedidya, Tova; Schwartz, Chaya; Aran, Ofra

    2014-01-01

    The study reported in this article concerns the beginnings of higher education for women in the Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) enclave in Israel. Haredi Jews are a self-secluded fundamentalist group committed to particularly strict interpretation of Jewish religious law. In recent years, they have been compelled by poverty and other factors to allow…

  11. Thoughts on the Jewish perspective regarding organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S L

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to convey some understanding of Orthodox Jewish thought on organ donation and transplantation. This perspective is particularly important as practitioners become more culturally diverse and medical care becomes more globalized. The Jewish ethical position, found in the Compendium on Medical Ethics: Jewish Moral, Ethical and Religious Principles in Medical Practice, is described. Points of view for determining death in Jewish law as well as some halakic (Jewish law) issues for the donor and recipient are also indicated. PMID:9295591

  12. Jewish medical ethics – a brief overview

    PubMed Central

    Jakobovits, Immanuel

    1983-01-01

    This paper outlines the traditional Jewish approach to medical ethics, as perceived by the Chief Rabbi of the British Commonwealth, himself an academic specialist in this field. It is based on a `St Paul's Lecture' given to the London Diocesan Council for Christian Jewish understanding. PMID:6576175

  13. Hebrew-Language Narratives of Yiddish-Speaking Ultra-Orthodox Girls in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannenbaum, Michal; Abugov, Netta; Ravid, Dorit

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a study conducted with children belonging to a rarely studied minority group, the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Israel, an extremely religious group that endorses patterns of voluntary segregation. The research population also demonstrates linguistic segregation, as they use only Yiddish for daily communication with…

  14. Jewish Holidays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Joan

    This paper examines the development of Hebrew literature since the recording of Genesis and provides resources for teaching about Jewish holidays and folklore. Although originally designed for use in teaching a six-week junior high school unit, the materials included may be adapted for use with students at the elementary through senior high school…

  15. Rosenak "Teaching Jewish Values"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, David

    2014-01-01

    Rosenak's "Teaching Jewish Values" (1986) is perhaps his most accessible book about Jewish education. After diagnosing the "diseases" of Jewish education, he endorses "teaching Jewish values" as the curricular strategy most likely to succeed given the chasm which divides traditional Jewish subject matter and the…

  16. A Mentoring Volunteer Program for Orthodox Jewish Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Robin Fran

    2012-01-01

    Prevocational and vocational training are interventions that are widely recognized as personally satisfying forms of occupation that can increase self-determination and employability while improving a person's health and well-being. In recent years a related intervention, structured peer mentoring, has been associated with increased community…

  17. Adult Jewish Education and Participation among Reform Jewish Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mareschal, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    The history of adult Jewish education is rich and is replete with learning opportunities for Jewish adults, and Jewish women are active participants in adult Jewish education. In this chapter, the author examines Reform Jewish women's motivations to participate in adult Jewish education. First, she provides a historical overview of Judaism and…

  18. Education and the Orthodox Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirill, Metropolitan

    2009-01-01

    These days many interested observers, in both this and other countries, are asking why for so many years the Russian Orthodox Church has been persistently raising the same questions in the field of education and, very likely, will continue to do so. Some attribute it to a desire to gain power over society and limit the freedom of citizens. A few…

  19. Translation as a Site of Language Policy Negotiation in Jewish Day School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avni, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how students and teachers at a non-Orthodox Jewish day school in New York City negotiate the use of translation within the context of an institutionalized language policy that stresses the use of a sacred language over that of the vernacular. Specifically, this paper analyzes the negotiation of a Hebrew-only policy through…

  20. Infertility in Jewish couples, biblical and rabbinic law.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The Jewish religion is family orientated, and life is guided by 'Halacha', a code of conduct based on biblical and rabbinic law. There is a duty to have children, in view of the first biblical commandment 'be fruitful and multiply', which sanctions most treatments for infertility. Interpretations vary among Orthodox, Conservative and Progressive rabbis, but it is only rabbis who have authority to advise infertile couples on which procedures concur with Jewish law, and their appraisals tend towards leniency in the interests of domestic happiness. Prohibitions against 'wasting seed', and against marriage to a man with 'wounded testes or severed membrum', may be waived to allow semen collection for analysis and treatment for male infertility. All types of assisted conception are approved, including in vitro and micro-assisted fertilization, provided the gametes are from married couples. In short cycles, artificial insemination can be permitted in the post-menstrual week of 'niddah' when coitus is forbidden. Jewish descent from the mother is automatic but, for Orthodox couples, a technical violation of the law against adultery or incest can spoil the marriage prospects of a child or interrupt the paternal priestly line of Cohen or Levi. Donor gametes are largely unacceptable to Orthodox rabbis, since egg donation confuses the definition of the mother, and because sperm donation creates subterfuge in a child's genealogy and a risk of consanguinity. However, Progressive and Conservative rabbis place more emphasis on the social attributes of parents and frequently approve of gamete donation. The Jewish status of children resulting from surrogacy or adoption can be settled by religious conversion. Objections to treating unmarried couples, single or lesbian women, and to posthumous conception, arise because such households are not traditional families. PMID:11844302

  1. Developing Musically, Spiritually, and Jewishly All at One Time: Jewish Choral Activity as Adult Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Diane Tickton

    2011-01-01

    Research about Jewish choral singers provides insight to a previously unstudied population of adult Jewish learners. Drawing on over 2,000 responses to the First-Ever Survey of Jewish Choral Activity, this article describes how Jewish choral experiences enable adults to deepen their involvement in Jewish life and learning. Survey results suggest…

  2. Explaining Jewish Student Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoem, David

    1982-01-01

    Ethnographic study of a suburban Jewish afternoon school suggests that students' failure to meet school behavior and learning standards occurred because they did not value or understand the rewards made available to them through the school and because their means of achieving status mobility had shifted away from the Jewish school. (Author/GC)

  3. "Jewish Education" and American Jewish Education, Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    This is the last in a series of articles exploring the history of "Jewish Education" magazine, later known as the "Journal of Jewish Education," with a particular emphasis on its intersection with the history of American Jewish education and, more generally, American Jewish life. Major themes and issues that preoccupied the magazine's editors and…

  4. "Jewish Education" and American Jewish Education, Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    This series of articles explores the history of Jewish Education magazine, later known as the Journal of Jewish Education, with a particular emphasis on its intersection with the history of American Jewish education and, more generally, American Jewish life. Major themes and issues that preoccupied the magazine's editors and writers are isolated…

  5. Pharmacogenetics in Jewish populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yao; Peter, Inga; Scott, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Spanning over 2000 years, the Jewish population has a long history of migration, population bottlenecks, expansions, and geographical isolation, which has resulted in a unique genetic architecture among the Jewish people. As such, many Mendelian disease genes and founder mutations for autosomal recessive diseases have been discovered in several Jewish groups, which have prompted recent genomic studies in the Jewish population on common disease susceptibility and other complex traits. Although few studies on the genetic determinants of drug response variability have been reported in the Jewish population, a number of unique pharmacogenetic variants have been discovered that are more common in Jewish populations than in other major racial groups. Notable examples identified in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population include the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) c.106G>T (p.D36Y) variant associated with high warfarin dosing requirements and the recently reported cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) allele, CYP2C19*4B, that harbors both loss-of-function [*4 (c.1A>G)] and increased-function [*17 (c.−806C>T)] variants on the same haplotype. These data are encouraging in that like other ethnicities and subpopulations, the Jewish population likely harbors numerous pharmacogenetic variants that are uncommon or absent in other larger racial groups and ethnicities. In addition to unique variants, common multi-ethnic variants in key drug metabolism genes (e.g., ABCB1, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, NAT2) have also been detected in the AJ and other Jewish groups. This review aims to summarize the currently available pharmacogenetics literature and discuss future directions for related research with this unique population. PMID:24867283

  6. A Jewish response to the Vatican's new bioethical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Zivotofsky, Ari Z; Jotkowitz, Alan

    2009-11-01

    The Vatican recently published directives (Dignitas Personae) regarding "beginning of life" issues that explain the Catholic Church's position regarding new technologies in this area. We think that it is important to develop a response that presents the traditional Orthodox Jewish position on these same issues in order to present an alternative, parallel system. There are many points of commonality between the Vatican document and traditional Jewish thought as well as several important issues where there is a divergence of opinion. The latter include the status of the zygote as produced during in vitro fertilization (IVF), the acceptable of procreation in a method other than through the conjugal act, and the permissibility of deriving benefit from the products of an illicit act. These points of agreement and disagreement are discussed in detail in this article. PMID:19882451

  7. Sexuality in advanced age in Jewish thought and law.

    PubMed

    David, Benjamin E; Weitzman, Gideon A

    2015-01-01

    Judaism has a positive attitude to sexual relations within a marriage, and views such sexual relations as important not only for procreation but also as part of the framework of marriage. This is true for any age group, and sexuality is seen as an essential element of marriage for couples of advanced age. In this article, the authors present the views of Jewish law and thought regarding sexuality among older couples. The authors illustrate this using 3 case studies of couples who sought guidance in the area of sexuality. In addition, this area of counseling benefits greatly from an ongoing relationship and dialogue between expert rabbis in the field and therapists treating older Orthodox Jewish patients for sexual dysfunction. The triad relationship of couple, therapist, and rabbi enhances the ability to treat and assist such couples to seek treatment and overcome their difficulties. PMID:24313599

  8. Jewish mortality reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Staetsky, Laura Daniel; Hinde, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    It is known that mortality of Jews is different from the mortality of the populations that surround them. However, the existence of commonalities in mortality of different Jewish communities across the world has not received scholarly attention. This paper aims to identify common features of the evolution of Jewish mortality among Jews living in Israel and the Diaspora. In the paper the mortality of Jews in Israel is systematically compared with the mortality of the populations of developed countries, and the findings from the earlier studies of mortality of Jews in selected Diaspora communities are re-examined. The outcome is a re-formulation and extension of the notion of the 'Jewish pattern of mortality'. The account of this pattern is based on the consistently low level of behaviourally induced mortality, the migration history of Jewish populations and the enduring influence of early-life conditions on mortality at older ages. PMID:24784140

  9. Expanding sisterhood: Jewish lesbians and externalizations of Jewishness.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Amy K

    2014-01-01

    The body is a canvas that can be used to express a kaleidoscope of identities. For Jewish lesbians, who experience marginalization at the hands of both secular and religious society, externalizations of Jewishness can be empowering. For some women, this embodied Jewishness makes a political statement; for others, it gives voice to their Jewish spirituality. In both cases, this ethnographic study probes the ways in which Jewish lesbians experience queerness and Jewishness and how overlaps of these identities manifest in hair styling, yarmulkes, and the wearing of prayer shawls. PMID:25298102

  10. [Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in the ultra-orthodox community--cultural aspects of diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Vinker, Michal; Jaworowski, Sol; Mergui, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is reflected similarly in different communities, while symptoms are affected by the patient's cultural and spiritual world. An ultra-orthodox Jew with OCD will perform compulsive actions and will have obsessive thoughts related to the Jewish religious world. The religious symptoms do not necessarily correspond with the main commandments. Despite their significance, Shabbat or moral commandments such as respecting one's parents do not play a central role in the compulsive pattern. The religious compulsiveness of OCD patients focuses on commandments having to do with order and cleanliness and is characterized by repetition, checking and slowness. Obsessive thoughts and compulsive actions of ultra-orthodox OCD patients are usually based on the Jewish scriptures. One might assume that religion, as a framework with rules and dictated rituals, serves as a strong foundation for the development of OCD. However, it is estimated that the prevalence of OCD in the ultra-orthodox community is similar to the general population. Rabbis acknowledge OCD as a psychiatric illness and do not encourage the obsessive punctuality in following the commandments. An ultra-orthodox patient will first consult his rabbi, and after receiving his recommendation, will turn to psychiatric treatment. He might prefer to receive drug treatment rather than Cognitive Behavioral Therapy that may oppose his beliefs. Understanding the cultural background of the patient is essential, in particular when the patient is ultra-orthodox and the treatment is considered "secular". Therefore, cooperation with the patient's rabbi is important in order to obtain the patient's trust and develop a treatment plan. PMID:25286637

  11. Fritz London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavroglu, Kostas

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. From Philosophy to Physics: The years that left nothing unaffected; 1. The appeal of ideas; 2. Goëthe as a scientist; 3. How absolute is our knowledge?; 4. How do we come to know things?; 5. London's teachers in philosophy; 6. Husserl's teachings; 7. Expectations of things to come; 8. The thesis in philosophy; 9. Tolman's principle of similitude; 10. The necessary clarifications; 11. Work on quantum theory; 12. Transformation theory; 13. Unsuccessful attempts at unification; Part II. The Years in Berlin and the Beginnings of Quantum Chemistry: The mysterious bond; 14. London in Zürich; 15. Binding forces; 16. The Pauli principle; 17. Reactions to the Heitler-London paper; 18. Polyelectronic molecules and the application of group theory to problems of chemical valence; 19. Chemists as physicists?; 20. London's first contacts in Berlin; 21. Marriage; 22. Job offers; 23. Intermolecular forces; 24. The book which could not be written; 25. Leningrad and Rome; 26. Difficulties with group theory; 27. Linus Pauling's resonance structures; 28. Robert Mulliken's molecular orbitals; Part III. Oxford and Superconductivity: The rise of the Nazis; 29. Going to Oxford; 30. Lindemann, Simon and Heinz London; 31. Electricity in the very cold; 32. The end of old certainties; 33. The thermodynamic treatment; 34. The theory of Fritz and Heinz London; 35. Initial reactions by von Laue; 36. The discussion at the Royal Society; 37. Termination of the ICI fellowship; Part IV. Paris and Superfluidity: The Front Populaire; 38. The article in Nature 1937 and 'Nouvelle Conception'; 39. Laue again; 40. The structure of solid helium; 41. The peculiar properties of helium; 42. Bose-Einstein condensation; 43. The note in Nature; 44. The two-fluid model; 45. The trip to Jerusalem; 46. Leaving again; 47. The observer in quantum mechanics; Part V. United States and the Typing up of Loose Ends: Duke University, North Carolina; 48. The Soviet Union, Kapitza and

  12. "Jewish Education" and American Jewish Education, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    In this series of articles, I explore the history of "Jewish Education" magazine with particular emphasis on its intersection with the history of American Jewish education and American Jewish life more generally. I isolate major themes and issues that preoccupied the magazine's editors and writers, and analyze how their discourse sheds light on…

  13. Considering the Informal Jewish Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winer, Laura Novak

    2007-01-01

    Informal Jewish education can and must put greater focus on the goals of education. While socialization is a key component, it is not its sole goal. Informal Jewish education must make more central deep, serious Jewish learning in which learners can experience moments of transcendence, connection, and transformation. A key to reaching this goal…

  14. Remembering More Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The history of medicine has been an intriguing topic for both authors. The modern relevance of past discoveries led both authors to take a closer look at the lives and contributions of persecuted physicians. The Jewish physicians who died in the Holocaust stand out as a stark example of those who merit being remembered. Many made important contributions to medicine which remain relevant to this day. Hence, this paper reviews the lives and important contributions of two persecuted Jewish physicians: Arthur Kessler (1903-2000) and Bronislawa Fejgin (1883-1943). PMID:27487308

  15. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler. PMID:25120923

  16. In Search of the jüdische Typus: A Proposed Benchmark to Test the Genetic Basis of Jewishness Challenges Notions of “Jewish Biomarkers”

    PubMed Central

    Elhaik, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The debate as to whether Jewishness is a biological trait inherent from an “authentic” “Jewish type” (jüdische Typus) ancestor or a system of beliefs has been raging for over two centuries. While the accumulated biological and anthropological evidence support the latter argument, recent genetic findings, bolstered by the direct-to-consumer genetic industry, purport to identify Jews or quantify one’s Jewishness from genomic data. To test the merit of claims that Jews and non-Jews are genetically distinguishable, we propose a benchmark where genomic data of Jews and non-Jews are hybridized over two generations and the observed and predicted Jewishness of the terminal offspring according to either the Orthodox religious law (Halacha) or the Israeli Law of Return are compared. Members of academia, the public, and 23andMe were invited to use the benchmark to test claims that Jews are genetically distinct from non-Jews. Here, we report the findings from these trials. We also compare the genomic similarity of ∼300 individuals from nearly thirty Afro-Eurasian Jewish communities to a simulated jüdische Typus population. The results are discussed in light of modern trends in the genetics of Jews and related fields and provide a tentative answer to the ageless question “who is a Jew?” PMID:27547215

  17. In Search of the jüdische Typus: A Proposed Benchmark to Test the Genetic Basis of Jewishness Challenges Notions of "Jewish Biomarkers".

    PubMed

    Elhaik, Eran

    2016-01-01

    The debate as to whether Jewishness is a biological trait inherent from an "authentic" "Jewish type" (jüdische Typus) ancestor or a system of beliefs has been raging for over two centuries. While the accumulated biological and anthropological evidence support the latter argument, recent genetic findings, bolstered by the direct-to-consumer genetic industry, purport to identify Jews or quantify one's Jewishness from genomic data. To test the merit of claims that Jews and non-Jews are genetically distinguishable, we propose a benchmark where genomic data of Jews and non-Jews are hybridized over two generations and the observed and predicted Jewishness of the terminal offspring according to either the Orthodox religious law (Halacha) or the Israeli Law of Return are compared. Members of academia, the public, and 23andMe were invited to use the benchmark to test claims that Jews are genetically distinct from non-Jews. Here, we report the findings from these trials. We also compare the genomic similarity of ∼300 individuals from nearly thirty Afro-Eurasian Jewish communities to a simulated jüdische Typus population. The results are discussed in light of modern trends in the genetics of Jews and related fields and provide a tentative answer to the ageless question "who is a Jew?" PMID:27547215

  18. An Introductory Course in Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    "Foundations of Jewish Education" is a required course for masters degree students in Jewish Education offered by the William S. Davidson School of Jewish Education at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. As an introduction to the theory and practice of Jewish education, it seeks to integrate theory from a wide range of fields as a way of…

  19. Multicultural Counseling and the Orthodox Jew

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnall, Eliezer

    2006-01-01

    The cultural diversity literature largely ignores the effects of religion, and especially Judaism, on counseling and psychotherapy. The author reviews the meager and mostly anecdotal accounts relating to Orthodox Jews in the literature of several related disciplines, including counseling, social work, psychology, and psychiatry. The objective is…

  20. Human reproduction: Jewish perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Joseph G

    2013-11-01

    Developments in science and technology and corresponding clinical applications raise new religious questions, often without clear answers. The role of theology in bioethics is integral to clarify perceived attitudes toward these developments for different religious communities. The Jewish attitude towards procreation is derived from the first commandment of God to Adam to 'Be fruitful and multiply'. Judaism allows the practice of all techniques of assisted reproduction when the oocyte and spermatozoon originate from the wife and husband respectively. This paper presents the attitude of Jewish Law -- Halacha to therapeutic procedures, such as IVF-embryo transfer, spermatozoa, oocytes, embryo donation, cryopreservation of genetic material, surrogacy, posthumous reproduction, gender preselection, reproductive and therapeutic cloning. PMID:24000935

  1. London, England

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For almost 2,000 years, the River Thames has served as the life force of London, capital of the United Kingdom and one of the world's most famous cities. In AD 43 the Romans established the trading settlement of Londinium at a favorable crossing point on the river. The Romans remained until the 5th century, when the city came under Saxon control. The early 17th century saw enormous growth, but the deadly plague of 1664 and 1665 ravaged the population, and in the following year the Great Fire, which burned for four days, destroyed most of the city. A public transportation system and other city services in the early 19th century eased many of the increasing urban problems of the burgeoning capital of the wealthy British Empire. After coping with the devastating effects of bombing during World War II and the gradual dismantling of the empire, London today thrives as a vital modern metropolis. London is one of 100 cities being studied using ASTER data to map and monitor urban use patterns and growth.

    This image was acquired on October 12, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats

  2. Genetic differentiation of Jewish populations.

    PubMed

    Klitz, W; Gragert, L; Maiers, M; Fernandez-Viña, M; Ben-Naeh, Y; Benedek, G; Brautbar, C; Israel, S

    2010-12-01

    The Jewish diaspora can be viewed as a natural process in population dispersion and differentiation. We extend genetic studies on the Jewish diaspora to an analysis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype distributions in the Jewish peoples, and show the value of this information for the design of Jewish marrow donor registries. HLA data from the Hadassah Bone Marrow Registry having parental country-of-origin information comprise samples of geographically discrete regions. We analyzed the HLA allele and haplotype frequencies for each national sample using population genetic and clustering methods. Population differentiation among diaspora populations was shown on the basis of HLA haplotype frequencies, including differences within the more recently diverged European groups. A method of haplotype and population clustering showed patterns of unique haplotype affinities associated with specific Jewish populations. The evidence showed that diaspora Jewish populations can be sorted into distinct clades of which the Ashkenazi are but one. Relationships among Jewish populations are interpretable in light of the historical record. We suggest that a major contributing factor to the genetic divergence between Jewish groups may have been admixture with local host populations, while, at the same time, threads of Eastern Mediterranean ancestry remain evident. PMID:20860586

  3. Exploration of Jewish Ethnic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Abby N.; Inman, Arpana G.; Fine, Stephanie G.; Ritter, Hollie A.; Howard, Erin E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite a growing amount of research on the topic of ethnic identity, Jews, and the important aspects of a Jewish identity, have not been included in the multicultural and psychological literature. Using consensual qualitative research (C. E. Hill et al., 2005), the authors sought to gain an understanding of Jewish ethnic identity in 10 American…

  4. Making technology familiar: orthodox Jews and infertility support, advice, and inspiration.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Susan Martha

    2006-12-01

    This paper examines how orthodox Jews use traditional strategies and new media simultaneously to cope with infertility in the age of new reproductive technologies. Not only have they used the Internet to establish support, information, and educational networks, but also they have created frameworks for unique professional collaborations among rabbis, doctors, and clinic personnel in order to ensure that their fertility treatments are conducted with strict attention to Jewish legal concerns, particularly with regard to incest, adultery, and traditional practices regarding bodily emissions. Throughout these processes, they have innovated a hybrid language for describing and explaining infertility treatments that blends Hebrew prayers, Yiddish aphorisms, English slang, Gematria (numerology), and biomedical terminology. By using idiomatic language and folk practice, orthodox Jews construct a unique terrain that shapes and makes familiar their experience and understanding of fertility treatment. Biomedicine in this context is understood as a set of tools and strategies that can be readily appropriated and harnessed to a particular set of individual and collective goals. PMID:17082984

  5. Curricular Choices of Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Communities: Translating International Human Rights Law into Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry-Hazan, Lotem

    2015-01-01

    This paper employs the provisions of international human rights law in order to analyse whether and how liberal states should regulate Haredi educational practices, which sanctify the exclusive focus on religious studies in schools for boys. It conceptualises the conflict between the right to acceptable education and the right to adaptable…

  6. Relationship Education for Modern Orthodox Jewish Adolescents as a Factor of Marital Satisfaction: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maybruch, Chana

    2012-01-01

    Research on the influence of relationship education on marital satisfaction over the last decade has demonstrated positive outcomes for both high school and premarital programs within the general American population. Yet few studies have examined relationship education as a factor of marital satisfaction specifically within the North American…

  7. Osler and the Jewish people

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, D B; Clarfield, A M

    1997-01-01

    In his writings and actions, Sir William Osler betrayed no evidence of anti-Semitism. In his era, this trait was unusual. Two of his articles, "Letter from Berlin" and "Israel and medicine," dealt directly with his thoughts on the Jewish people. In both he spoke out against anti-Semitism. Osler had friendships with Jewish colleagues--an example is the great regard in which he held US pediatrician Dr. Abraham Jacobi. Osler was not a saint, and he had his "rough side," but in his relationships with Jewish colleagues his example remains relevant. PMID:9176423

  8. Jewish College Women: Future Leaders of the Jewish Community?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Abraham D.

    1977-01-01

    It is concluded from this data that the American Jewish community deprives itself of many needed talents to the extent that it does not encourage participation in its leadership positions of all individuals, regardless of sex. (Author/AM)

  9. The use of narrative in Jewish medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Jotkowitz, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Anne Jones has pointed out that over the last three decades, stories have been important to medical ethics in at least three ways: (1). Stories as cases for teaching principle-based medical ethics (2). Narratives for moral guides on what is considered living a good life (3). Stories as testimonials written by both patients and physicians. A pioneer in this effort, particularly in regard to using narratives as moral guides, has been the ethicist and philosopher Stanley Hauerwas. Heavily influenced by virtue ethics, Hauerwas believes that it is a person's particular narrative tradition that provides one with convictions that form the basis of one's morality. Befitting a Protestant theologian, he is particularly concerned with the Christian narrative. From a Jewish perspective, there has been much less written on the use of narrative in medical ethics. However, it is a mistake to think that narrative has little, if any, role in Rabbinic ethical decision making. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the centrality of narrative in the thought of Orthodox Jewish decisors and the problems inherent in this methodology. PMID:22395754

  10. The Relationship between Dogmatism, Orthodox Christian Beliefs, and Ethical Judgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Radha J.

    1990-01-01

    Examined relationship between dogmatism, ethical judgment, and orthodox Christian beliefs in master's level counselor education students (N=50). Found dogmatism and orthodox Christian beliefs correlated negatively with ethical judgment. Recommends counselor training programs may better prepare counselors by using a combined emphasis upon values…

  11. [The terminal patient: Jewish religious law, the Steinberg report and the bioethical discourse in Israel].

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y Michael

    2003-07-01

    This article surveys key texts in contemporary orthodox Jewish law (Halakha) with regard to end-of-life decision making. The author proposes twelve principles that govern Jewish law in that matter. The article proceeds to examine the Steinberg report in the light of Halakha. Orthodox Judaism regards human life as a prime value, which is always beyond consideration of economical means or quality of life. The avoidance of suffering is the only justification to shorten the life of the sufferer, provided that the acts performed do not fall within the Halakhic definition of murder, namely active and direct action that shortens life. It is argued that the main challenge of bioethics in Israel is the bridging between the positive law of Halakha whose fundamental value is submission to God's will as manifested in Halakha, and the rationalism, universalism, and egalitarianism which constitute naturalistic ethics. This challenge may produce ideas such as the "clock machine". It is too early to know if this is a trickery, or genuine ethical creativity. PMID:12908395

  12. Gender Role Socialization in Jewish Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasser, Jon; Gottlieb, Michael C.

    There has been little empirical research on the gender role socialization of Jewish men. This paper explores Jewish male gender role socialization and provides a model by which gender and ethnicity may be studied. A description of the gender role socialization of Jewish men, with an emphasis on advantages and disadvantages of such socialization…

  13. The Greening of "Informal Jewish Education" Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chazan, Barry

    2007-01-01

    The concept "informal education" is receiving new attention in Jewish education. That is a welcome development since this is an important idea in Jewish life. However, these developments are accompanied by a plethora of loose and sloppy use of terms, concepts, and ideas. Joseph Reimer's article, "Beyond More Jews Doing Jewish: Clarifying the Goals…

  14. Jewish Multicultural Education: A Minority View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, David

    1996-01-01

    Rejecting assimilationist notions, proposes Jewish education emphasize the Jewish minority status and sense of separateness. Recommends that Jewish education stress commands and customs that reassert ethnic identity as well as foods, fashion, festivals, and family. Defends this approach on sociological and theological grounds. (MJP)

  15. Practical Parenting: A Jewish Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitz, Gail Josephson

    Based on the clinical expertise of social workers at Jewish Family Services of Central Maryland, this book presents practical advice for parents of all faiths, with each of 34 chapters exploring a specific parenting issue. The book is divided into five sections: (1) "Many Kinds of Families," dealing with only children, sibling struggles, adoption,…

  16. The Perspective of Jewish Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ronald M.

    1988-01-01

    Examines traditional Jewish teachings about disease and relates them to the AIDS epidemic. Describes two traditional attitudes toward infectious disease: the first emphasizes self-protection and avoidance, whereas the second advocates compassion and service to victims. Concludes that, where AIDS is concerned, Jews are now part of mainstream…

  17. Hitler’s Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.

    2014-01-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler. PMID:25120923

  18. Materials modelling in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciudad, David

    2016-04-01

    Angelos Michaelides, Professor in Theoretical Chemistry at University College London (UCL) and co-director of the Thomas Young Centre (TYC), explains to Nature Materials the challenges in materials modelling and the objectives of the TYC.

  19. Jewish Women's Psychological Well-Being: The Role of Attachment, Separation, and Jewish Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Julie L.; O'Brien, Karen M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the contributions of attachment, separation, and Jewish identity to psychological well-being in a sample of 115 late adolescent Jewish women. Results from multiple regression analyses demonstrated that attachment to parents, separation from parents, and Jewish identity collectively accounted for variance in…

  20. Jewish Education in Extremis: A Prolegomenon to Postmodern Jewish Educational Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Hanan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this article the author argues that for 150 years Jewish education has negotiated the tensions between modernity and Judaism by means of liberal religion, ultra Orthodoxy, and secular Zionism. All three are in crisis today due to the rise of postmodernism. Jewish educational thought therefore needs to create new syntheses between Jewish and…

  1. "Feeling Jewish" and "Knowing Jewish": The Cognitive Dimension of Informal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamoran, Adam

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Joseph Reimer's article titled, "Beyond More Jews Doing Jewish: Clarifying the Goals of Informal Jewish Education." Reimer's essay on the goals of informal education is a welcome contribution to discussions about whether and how Jewish education may contribute to the continuity of Jews and Judaism…

  2. Texts in Tension: Negotiating Jewish Values in the Adult Jewish Learning Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woocher, Meredith L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author begins with a brief classroom scene that illustrates a number of significant features of contemporary American Jewish life. The engagement of adult students with Jewish text study is an example and outgrowth of the flourishing of programs of adult Jewish learning over the past two decades. Thousands of similar Jewish…

  3. Ancient and Medieval Jewish Calendars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Sacha

    This chapter surveys the history of Jewish calendars from Biblical origins to the later Middle Ages, with reference to their structure, astronomical basis, and cultural context. Special attention is given to the 364-day calendar (third century BCE-first century CE) and the fixed rabbinic calendar (from late Antiquity to the Middle Ages). The chapter concludes with a discussion of attempts to date the institution of the rabbinic calendar on the basis of its minor astronomical discrepancies.

  4. Coming out of the Hasidic closet: Jiří Mordechai Langer (1894–1943) and the fashioning of homosexual-Jewish identity.

    PubMed

    Halper, Shaun Jacob

    2011-01-01

    This essay inaugurates the historical study of the modern homosexual Jewish experience before Stonewall. I begin with a historiographic introduction to the emerging subfield of gay Jewish history. I then turn to reintroduce Jiri Langer, a homosexual and Hasidic writer affiliated with the interwar "Prague circle" (and friend of Franz Kafka and Max Brod) into the purview of modern Jewish Studies. I take up two questions: first, how Langer reconciled his homosexual and Orthodox religious identity; and second, why Langer"s homosexuality became exigent as a Jewish question at this particular historical moment. In his key text, Die Erotik der Kabbala, Langer engages with the dominant interwar debates on homosexuality, but most directly with the work of Hans Blüher, the major theoretician of the German Wandervogelbewegung. In the course of correcting Blüher's antisemitic claims about Jews and homosexuality, Langer managed to delineate a specifically homosexual Jewish identity by renegotiating the relationship between homosexuality and Judaism and by adumbrating a history of "gay" Jews. I contextualize this long-neglected text within Langer's fascinating biography; the debates in the early homosexual rights movement; the particular cultural features of the "Prague circle" in which Langer wrote; and the dislocation and devastation of Langer's beloved eastern-European Hasidic communities caused by World War I—communities that Langer experienced as deeply homoerotic. PMID:21961190

  5. Teaching Jewish History to the "Other."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goffman, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Presents a course in Jewish history and culture for non-Jewish students. Stresses the importance of understanding and respecting all cultures, eliminating cultural stereotypes, and preventing polarization and xenophobia. Includes a weekly course syllabus and bibliography. Discusses the importance of countering stereotypes before presenting some…

  6. Jewish tradition in death and dying.

    PubMed

    Ross, H M

    1998-10-01

    Death is often a spiritually difficult time for the dying and their families. Judaism approaches dying with some unique views that can differ from other religious traditions. Through an understanding of Jewish tradition, nurses can ease the dying process for Jewish patients and their families. PMID:10036429

  7. Ethnolect Debate: Evidence from Jewish Lithuanian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschik, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the concept of Jewish Lithuanian as a range of post-Yiddish varieties spoken by some Jews in Lithuania and seeks to synthesise findings in contemporary ethnolect studies and in the field of Jewish language research. The legitimacy of the term "ethnolect" is questioned by some researchers; however, it is argued that…

  8. Religious Experience as a Jewish Educational Ideal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levisohn, Jon A.

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the question of whether one ought to hold religious experience as a Jewish educational goal and, more fundamentally, to ask what this might mean. The objective is to begin to probe what an education toward (Jewish) religious experience would entail and what some of the theoretical, moral and practical obstacles might be. The…

  9. Intergenerational Challenges in Australian Jewish School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Zehavit; Rutland, Suzanne D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the intergenerational changes that have occurred in Australian Jewish day schools and the challenges these pose for religious and Jewish education. Using a grounded theory approach according to the constant comparative method (Strauss 1987), data from three sources (interviews [296], observations [27],…

  10. Experiential Jewish Education Has Arrived! Now What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Experiential Jewish education has been experiencing a time of growth, during which theory development, research, and practice have established a strong voice for the construct. Much of the focus to this point has been on definitions (particularly the distinction between "experiential" and "informal" Jewish education) and on…

  11. Key Resources on Jewish Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This review examines seven scholarly, high quality publications on Jewish religious education that have appeared in the past decade and that are also accessible for various forms of readers. The books in question represent the best in the academic study of Jewish education, and they share the virtue of being engaging and useful resources for a…

  12. The Relationship between Dogmatism, Orthodox Christian Beliefs, and Ethical Judgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Radha Janis

    Professional ethics is becoming a topic of high interest for counselors and counselor educators. Dogmatism and orthodox Christian religious beliefs are two variables which may help to explain the relationship between a counselor's personal characteristics and his or her ethical orientation. This study examined these variables and their…

  13. Catholicity and Context: The Cenotaphs of Orthodox Theological Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marangos, Frank

    2006-01-01

    For more than twenty-five years, field education programs have been the primary pedagogical strategy by which contextual (practical) theological training has occurred at most Orthodox theological schools in America. These programs are based on a developmental approach, with students progressing from observation to participation to actual…

  14. 119. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    119. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. 118. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    118. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  16. 120. Thames River Bridge draw span. New London, New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. Thames River Bridge draw span. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 117. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 116. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    116. Thames River Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.09. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. 111. Shaws Cove Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. Shaws Cove Bridge. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 122.65. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  20. [Jewish veterinarians in Germany, 1918-1945].

    PubMed

    Möllers, G; Schaffer, J

    2005-10-01

    In 1998 there were only twelve Jewish veterinarians known who practised in Germany between 1918 and 1945. 133 of them have now been found. Most of the Jewish veterinarians had their roots in merchant families and were general practitioners in the countryside. To be "Jewish" did not concern until 1933. Compared with the other medical professionals like human medical professionals (10,9 %), in 1933 the number of Jewish veterinarians was low (1,6 %, whole German Jewish population 0,77 %). Right with the beginning of the National Socialistic rule Jewish veterinarians were exposed to different forms of harassment. Soon after, on April 7th 1933, with the so-called Gesetz zur Wiederherstellung des Berufsbeamtentums (BBG; law for the restoration of civil service), the prosecution took on an official quality. The Reichstierärztekammer (Chamber of veterinary service) was very eager to Aryanize the German veterinary service. The BBG made the Jewish veterinarians who worked in public positions lose their jobs with the single exception of those who had the status of a so-called "Frontkämpfer" (a soldier who fought at the frontline during World War I). Many of the Jewish veterinarians who were still in Germany in November 1938 were arrested after the pogrom of November 9/10th and kept in concentration camps and prisons for about one month. The few students of veterinary medicine who already had started their studies in 1933 still could make their exams in Germany, but they did not get a licence. On January 31st 1939 all Jewish veterinarians in Germany lost their licence. 55 Jewish vets managed to emigrate in time. Nineteen German Jewish Veterinarians died in concentration camps and ghettos. Two are known to have committed suicide. Until 1997, there was no act of appreciation or rehabilitation of German Jewish veterinarians. In 2003 the degrees of two Jewish veterinarians, Hermann Cussel and Paul Stern, were renewed posthumously by the Hanover School of Veterinary Medicine

  1. [Bernard Schapiro--an orthodox Jew as an early andrologist in the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Borgwardt, Götz

    2002-01-01

    The unusual history and professional background of one of the first andrologists is reported. Bernhard Schapiro, born in 1888 in Dvinsk in Latvia, then a city in the Russian Pale of Settlements for Jews, grew up as an orthodox (hassidic) Jew receiving exclusively talmudic lessons until he was 18 years old. During the final years of this period of life he was educated at the famous Slobodka Talmud Academy Kenesset Israel in Kovno where he absorbed the ideals of Musar-doctrines, thus being influenced for the rest of his life. The Rogachover Gaon J. Rozin supported his desire to study medicine. After a brief stay in Frankfurt/Main he acquired by own efforts the necessary general knowledge to matriculate for access to university. Medical studies at Zurich University (1913-1919) were followed by a one-year-internship at a dermatologic department in Breslau/Silesia. The thesis for his doctorate at Zurich University in 1920 was on, Relations between Nodular Erythema and Tuberculosis'. He spent two years training in dermatology at Breslau University under Jadassohn. Back in Berlin, he married and had four children, while he worked at Magnus Hirschfeld's Institute for Sexual Sciences. After initial clinical studies in venerology he more and more turned to andrological problems, including treatment of underdeveloped male genitals, premature ejaculation and impotence in general. In this context he tested the new drug Praehormon and developed the two remedies Testifortan and Praejaculin. He was the first to describe the effect of anterior pituitary lobe hormone on the descent of cryptorchid testicles, thus initiating a treatment modality still in motion today. When Hitler came to power he and his family were spared as Swiss citizens, but he lost his base for working after the Institute was looted. He established an andrologic practice at Zurich. What he had witnessed in Germany caused him to set up a Swiss branch of Mizrachi, the spiritually based center of Zionism in

  2. Synthetic biology: a Jewish view.

    PubMed

    Glick, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    The discipline of synthetic biology may be one of the most dramatic advances of the past few decades. It represents a radical upgrading of humankind's ability to manipulate the world in which we live. The potential for benefits to society is enormous, but the risks for deliberate abuse or dangerous miscalculations are no less great. There are serious ethical issues, legitimate concerns for biosafety, and fears of bioterrorism. The ethical dilemmas posed are new and challenging and are being addressed by various groups and commissions. The present paper presents a Jewish approach to some of the ethical issues posed by this new technology. Judaism traditionally looks favorably on man as a co-creator with God and encourages research for the benefit of humankind. Thus it would have a positive attitude towards the current goals of synthetic biology. But in the Jewish tradition man is also charged with stewardship over nature and is admonished to preserve and nurture, not just to exploit and destroy. In line with the Presidential Commission on Bioethics, it would support a carefully weighed balance between the precautionary and the "proactionary" approaches. PMID:23502565

  3. "Low Income"--Levels in the Jewish Population; The "Jewish Poor" in Los Angeles. A Summary of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massarik, Fred

    The concept "Jewish Poor" is defined simply as Jewish households (viz. households containing one or more persons defined as Jewish) whose total household cash income (1969, comparable to U.S. Census) was under 4000 dollars. The data were obtained from four sources: (1) analysis of "Jewish Poor" drawn from Los Angeles phase of National Jewish…

  4. Medical Ethics in Nephrology: A Jewish Perspective.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Allon N

    2016-01-01

    Jewish medical ethics is arguably the oldest recorded system of bioethics still in use. It should be of interest to practicing nephrologists because of its influence on the ethical systems of Christianity, Islam, and Western secular society; because of the extensive written documentation of rabbinical response in addressing a broad range of bioethical dilemmas; and in understanding the values of patients who choose to adhere to religious Jewish law. The goal of this review is to provide a brief overview of the basic principles underlying mainstream traditional Jewish medical ethics, apply them to common clinical scenarios experienced in nephrology practice, and contrast them with that of secular medical ethics. PMID:27101218

  5. Medical Ethics in Nephrology: A Jewish Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Allon N.

    2016-01-01

    Jewish medical ethics is arguably the oldest recorded system of bioethics still in use. It should be of interest to practicing nephrologists because of its influence on the ethical systems of Christianity, Islam, and Western secular society; because of the extensive written documentation of rabbinical response in addressing a broad range of bioethical dilemmas; and in understanding the values of patients who choose to adhere to religious Jewish law. The goal of this review is to provide a brief overview of the basic principles underlying mainstream traditional Jewish medical ethics, apply them to common clinical scenarios experienced in nephrology practice, and contrast them with that of secular medical ethics. PMID:27101218

  6. Radiocarbon dating: Jewish inspiration of Christian catacombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutgers, Leonard V.; van der Borg, Klaas; de Jong, Arie F. M.; Poole, Imogen

    2005-07-01

    The famous catacombs of ancient Rome are huge underground cemeteries, of which two Jewish catacomb complexes of uncertain age and 60 early-Christian catacombs have survived. Here we use radiocarbon dating to determine the age of wood originating from one of the Jewish catacombs and find that it pre-dates its Christian counterparts by at least 100 years. These results indicate that burial in Roman catacombs may not have begun as a strictly Christian practice, as is commonly believed, but rather that its origin may lie in Jewish funerary customs.

  7. North African Jewish and non-Jewish populations form distinctive, orthogonal clusters.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Christopher L; Palamara, Pier F; Dubrovsky, Maya; Botigué, Laura R; Fellous, Marc; Atzmon, Gil; Oddoux, Carole; Pearlman, Alexander; Hao, Li; Henn, Brenna M; Burns, Edward; Bustamante, Carlos D; Comas, David; Friedman, Eitan; Pe'er, Itsik; Ostrer, Harry

    2012-08-21

    North African Jews constitute the second largest Jewish Diaspora group. However, their relatedness to each other; to European, Middle Eastern, and other Jewish Diaspora groups; and to their former North African non-Jewish neighbors has not been well defined. Here, genome-wide analysis of five North African Jewish groups (Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian, Djerban, and Libyan) and comparison with other Jewish and non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive North African Jewish population clusters with proximity to other Jewish populations and variable degrees of Middle Eastern, European, and North African admixture. Two major subgroups were identified by principal component, neighbor joining tree, and identity-by-descent analysis-Moroccan/Algerian and Djerban/Libyan-that varied in their degree of European admixture. These populations showed a high degree of endogamy and were part of a larger Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish group. By principal component analysis, these North African groups were orthogonal to contemporary populations from North and South Morocco, Western Sahara, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Thus, this study is compatible with the history of North African Jews-founding during Classical Antiquity with proselytism of local populations, followed by genetic isolation with the rise of Christianity and then Islam, and admixture following the emigration of Sephardic Jews during the Inquisition. PMID:22869716

  8. North African Jewish and non-Jewish populations form distinctive, orthogonal clusters

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher L.; Palamara, Pier F.; Dubrovsky, Maya; Botigué, Laura R.; Fellous, Marc; Atzmon, Gil; Oddoux, Carole; Pearlman, Alexander; Hao, Li; Henn, Brenna M.; Burns, Edward; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Comas, David; Friedman, Eitan; Pe'er, Itsik; Ostrer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    North African Jews constitute the second largest Jewish Diaspora group. However, their relatedness to each other; to European, Middle Eastern, and other Jewish Diaspora groups; and to their former North African non-Jewish neighbors has not been well defined. Here, genome-wide analysis of five North African Jewish groups (Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian, Djerban, and Libyan) and comparison with other Jewish and non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive North African Jewish population clusters with proximity to other Jewish populations and variable degrees of Middle Eastern, European, and North African admixture. Two major subgroups were identified by principal component, neighbor joining tree, and identity-by-descent analysis—Moroccan/Algerian and Djerban/Libyan—that varied in their degree of European admixture. These populations showed a high degree of endogamy and were part of a larger Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish group. By principal component analysis, these North African groups were orthogonal to contemporary populations from North and South Morocco, Western Sahara, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Thus, this study is compatible with the history of North African Jews—founding during Classical Antiquity with proselytism of local populations, followed by genetic isolation with the rise of Christianity and then Islam, and admixture following the emigration of Sephardic Jews during the Inquisition. PMID:22869716

  9. Chicago Center for Jewish Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Partners Norton & Elaine Sarnoff Center for Jewish Genetics Get Screened Genetics 101 The Screening Process FAQs Disorders on Screening Panel Judaism & Genetics Ashkenazi Genetic Traits Bloom’s Syndrome Canavan Disease Cystic ...

  10. Beyond More Jews Doing Jewish: Clarifying the Goals of Informal Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Why has it been so difficult to define the goals of Jewish informal education? Often informal educators define their work in terms of the goals of Jewish socialization. Those terms have worked to attract funders' support, but also limited the educational creativity of this field. This article argues for a dual defining of goals: socialization and…

  11. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection following Jewish ritual circumcisions that included direct orogenital suction - New York City, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection commonly causes "cold sores" (HSV type 1 [HSV-1]) and genital herpes (HSV-1 or HSV type 2 [HSV-2]); HSV infection in newborns can result in death or permanent disability. During November 2000-December 2011, a total of 11 newborn males had laboratory-confirmed HSV infection in the weeks following out-of-hospital Jewish ritual circumcision, investigators from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) learned. Ten of the 11 newborns were hospitalized; two died. In six of the 11 cases, health-care providers confirmed parental reports that the ritual circumcision included an ultra-Orthodox Jewish practice known as metzitzah b'peh, in which the circumciser (mohel, plural: mohelim) places his mouth directly on the newly circumcised penis and sucks blood away from the circumcision wound (direct orogenital suction). In the remaining cases, other evidence suggested that genital infection was introduced by direct orogenital suction (probable direct orogenital suction). Based on cases reported to DOHMH during April 2006-December 2011, the risk for neonatal herpes caused by HSV-1 and untyped HSV following Jewish ritual circumcision with confirmed or probable direct orogenital suction in New York City was estimated at 1 in 4,098 or 3.4 times greater than the risk among male infants considered unlikely to have had direct orogenital suction. Oral contact with a newborn's open wound risks transmission of HSV and other pathogens. Circumcision is a surgical procedure that should be performed under sterile conditions. Health-care professionals advising parents and parents choosing Jewish ritual circumcision should inquire in advance whether direct orogenital suction will be performed, and orogenital suction should be avoided. PMID:22672975

  12. Lifelong Education in Jewish Sources: Principles and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodesh, Shlomo

    1997-01-01

    Jewish cultural tradition shows strong support for lifelong learning and study for its own sake. Basic principles of Jewish education include functionalism (life change resulting from education) and accessibility (all are entitled to education). (SK)

  13. Religious fundamentalism and religious orientation among the Greek Orthodox.

    PubMed

    Mora, Louis Ernesto; Stavrinides, Panayiotis; McDermut, Wilson

    2014-10-01

    The experimenters explored how religious fundamentalism related with religious orientation, irrational thinking, and immature defense mechanisms. They also explored the possible moderational role of the Big 5 personality factors. The participants were predominantly Greek Orthodox College students from a Cypriot University. The experimenters employed a cross-sectional design and required participants to complete a series of self-report measures. Religious fundamentalism significantly predicted irrational thinking. Intrinsic and personal extrinsic religious orientations significantly predicted religious fundamentalism. The results provide support for the idea that the more dogmatically one holds their religious beliefs, the more likely they are to think irrationally. PMID:23716083

  14. Contemporary Concerns, Assessments, and Aspirations in Jewish Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This essay reviews the Vision and Practice section of the "International Handbook of Jewish Education" published in 2011. Gathered in this section, 24 Jewish educators (spread across 18 chapters) offer theoretical reflections on the state of Jewish education in the contemporary moment. These chapters seem, on first reading, a rather eclectic…

  15. Contributing Factors to Teacher Satisfaction for Jewish Day School Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanner, Malka

    2010-01-01

    At a time of rising concern for hiring and retaining qualified Jewish educators, this study looked at factors contributing to the decision to enter or remain in the field of Jewish education. If Jewish day school administrators can determine what characteristics attract and retain qualified teachers then perhaps they can mitigate the current…

  16. Pluralism and Its Purposeful Introduction to a Jewish Day School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyer, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Pluralism is an ambiguous term with a multiplicity of meanings. In recent decades there has been a proliferation of a newer category of Jewish Day Schools, the Jewish Community School. Jewish Community Schools distinguish themselves by positioning pluralism as a foundational concept of their school's ethos. Very little is known about how…

  17. Inspiring Jewish Connections: Outreach to Parents with Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertlieb, Donald; Rosen, Mark I.

    2008-01-01

    Jewish agencies and organizations in communities across the country have developed a variety of innovative programs for parents with young children. Programs combine Jewish themes with content about parenting and child development, both to provide information and support and to inspire families to become more involved with Jewish religion and…

  18. London: An Art Teacher's Inspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Often overshadowed in people's minds by Paris, London is truly an artist's jewel. The art and architecture, history, gardens and museums are inspiring, yes, but there's so much more to this ancient city. The performances, attractions and markets are a boon to the creative soul. London can be surprisingly inexpensive to visit. Gazing at statues,…

  19. London International Youth Science Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the 2010 London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF) and shares his experience in attending the forum. Unlike the Harry Messel event in Sydney, which takes place every two years, LIYSF is an annual event. Before moving to Imperial College London, LIYSF was held at the Institute of Electrical Engineers and…

  20. Bagels, Schnitzel and McDonald's--"Fuzzy Frontiers" of Jewish Identity in an English Jewish Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholefield, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    Using data gathered during a case study of the "culture" of a Jewish secondary school, this article explores the indeterminate boundaries of Jewish identity. By examining the mechanisms that control what and who comes into the school, and what is approved and disapproved of in the school, a picture emerges of what and who is counted as "Jewish".…

  1. The commerce of human body parts: an Eastern Orthodox response.

    PubMed

    Reardon, P H

    2000-08-01

    The Orthodox Church teaches that the bodies of those in Christ are to be regarded as sanctified by the hearing of the Word and faithful participation in the Sacraments, most particularly the Holy Eucharist; because of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit the consecrated bodies of Christians do not belong to them but to Christ; with respect to the indwelling Holy Spirit there is no difference between the bodies of Christians before and after death; whether before or after death, the Christian body is also to receive the same veneration; and notwithstanding the physical corruptions that the body endures by reason of death, there remains a strict continuity between the body in which the Christian dies and the body in which the Christian will rise again. That is to say, it is the very same reality that is sown in corruption and will be raised in incorruption. Given such consideration, the notion of "selling" and integral part of a human being is simply outside the realm of rational comprehension. Indeed, it is profoundly repugnant to those Orthodox Christian sentiments that are formed and nourished by the Church's sacramental teaching and liturgical worship. One does not sell or purchase that which has been consecrated in those solemn ways that the Church consecrates the human body. PMID:12171078

  2. Homosexuality in Classroom Discourse at an American Modern Orthodox High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Devra

    2011-01-01

    In light of recent developments in the Modern Orthodox community's approach to homosexuality, this article presents a classroom discussion on homosexuality that took place at a Modern Orthodox high school. An examination of the discussion's heteroglossia, or multiplicity of languages existing in tension, along with attention to the discussion's…

  3. Dissecting life with a Jewish scalpel: a qualitative analysis of Jewish-centered family life.

    PubMed

    Semans, M P; Fish, L S

    2000-01-01

    This article highlights findings from a qualitative analysis of the ways in which Jewish families identify how Judaism influences their lives. A theoretical sample of two religious and two cultural families were chosen from a larger sample of 48 Jewish families in Central New York. The qualitative part of this study, which was part of a larger multimethod investigation, was done in order to gather inductively any data that would allow the researchers to build a theory about a particular type of ethnic identity--Jewish identity--and how it affects family dynamics. Eleven categories emerged from this study, which suggest that this particular type of ethnic identity influences many family dynamics, for example, styles of communicating, parenting, values, and family rituals. The participants seem to dissect the world with a "Jewish scalpel." This "scalpel" informs their daily interactions, their parenting styles, and their childrens' self-perceptions. PMID:10742935

  4. PISA Assessment: The Problematic Issue of Administrating PISA Science Literacy Survey to Ultra-Orthodox Pupils in Israel, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamir, Sara; Sabo, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to point out the problematic issue of administrating PISA science literacy exam to the ultra-orthodox schools in Israel. It has been assumed that some texts included in the test may offend the feelings of the ultra-orthodox population or may contradict Orthodox upbringing and therefore constitute a cultural bias.

  5. A Therapist's Perspective on Jewish Family Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1978-01-01

    Family therapy has been deficient in accounting for the impact of ethnic, religious, and racial values on success or failure in treating families. Jewish families respond well in family therapy due to a set of values. An individual's neurotic disposition may evolve from conflicts between family values and independent identity. (Author/JEL)

  6. Jewish Studies: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill Univ., Montreal (Quebec). McLennan Library.

    An annotated bibliography to the reference sources for Jewish Studies in the McLennan Library of McGill University (Canada) is presented. Any titles in Hebrew characters are listed by their transliterated equivalents. There is also a list of relevant Library of Congress Subject Headings. General reference sources listed are: encyclopedias,…

  7. Loss and mourning in the Jewish tradition.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Simon Shimshon

    Robert Kastenbaum was a man who helped reintroduce issues related to death, dying, and bereavement to academic, clinical, and general discourse. This article, devoted to an encounter with the observance of mourning custom and ritual in the Jewish tradition, continues the dialogue in this journal that Bob founded. The article utilizes the Two-Track Model of Bereavement to address the Jewish tradition's structuring of the loss experience. After a brief introduction, I present a schematic presentation of some of the issues operant in grief and mourning for the believer. This is followed by two responses to loss that portray the pain of loss in the tradition. The article goes on to consider the Jewish time cycle of response to loss-from preburial Aninut, to Shiva, the first week, to Shloshim, the first month, to Shanah, the first year, to the expectations for encounters across the life cycle. The Yizkor and Kaddish are also considered. In the Jewish tradition, alongside attention to what level of functioning to require of the bereaved, there are lifelong opportunities to re-work and maintain connection to the memories, associations, narratives, and experiences that comprise the psychological organization of the continuing bond and relationship to the deceased. PMID:25351592

  8. The Groningen Protocol - the Jewish perspective.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Steinberg, Avraham; Blazer, Shraga; Jotkowitz, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Despite significant advances in neonatology, there will always be newborns with serious life-threatening conditions creating most difficult bioethical dilemmas. Active euthanasia for adult patients is one of the most controversial bioethical questions; for severely ill neonates, the issue is even more complex, due to their inability to take part in any decision concerning their future. The Groningen Protocol introduced in 2005 by P.J. Sauer proposes criteria allowing active euthanasia for severely ill, not necessarily terminal, newborns with incurable conditions and poor quality of life in order to spare them unbearable suffering. We discuss the ethical dilemma and ideological foundations of the protocol, the opinions of its defenders and critics, and the dangers involved. The Jewish perspective relating to the subject is presented based on classical Jewish sources, which we trust may enrich modern bioethical debates. In Jewish law, the fetus acquires full legal status only after birth. However, while the lives of terminally ill neonates must in no way be actively destroyed or shortened, there is no obligation to make extraordinary efforts to prolong their lives. Accurate preimplantation or prenatal diagnosis might significantly reduce the incidence of nonviable births, but active killing of infants violates the basic foundations of Jewish law, and opens the 'slippery slope' for uncontrolled abuse. Therefore, we call upon the international medical and bioethical community to reject the Groningen Protocol that permits euthanization and to develop ethical guidelines for the optimal care of severely compromised neonates. PMID:19176977

  9. Religious Diversity from a Jewish Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Dana Heller; Balkin, Richard S.

    2003-01-01

    Exploration of spiritual and religious diversity often receives little attention in counselor education, resulting in counselors unprepared to deal with spiritual and religious issues. This trend could have a negative impact on Jewish and other religious clients, who feel that issues related to their identity are ignored. Article explores…

  10. Looking into 'London'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This mosaic image from the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rock abrasion tool target, 'London.' The image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on its 149th sol on Mars (June 24, 2004). Scientists 'read' the geology of the image from bottom to top, with the youngest material pictured at the bottom of the image and the oldest material in the layers pictured at the top. Millimeter-scale layers run horizontally across the exposed surface, with two sliced sphere-like objects, or 'blueberries' on the upper left and upper right sides of the impression. This material is similar to the evaporative material found in 'Eagle Crater.' However, the intense review of these layers in Endurance Crater is, in essence, deepening the water story authored by ancient Mars.

    In Eagle Crater, the effects of water were traced down a matter of centimeters. Endurance Crater's depth has allowed the tracing of water's telltale marks up to meters. Another process that significantly affects martian terrain is muddying the water story a bit. Although it is clear that the layers in Endurance were affected by water, it is also evident that Aeolian, or wind, processes have contributed to the makeup of the crater.

  11. Teachers' Study Guide: Jewish Legends. The Image of the Jew in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mersand, Joseph; Wiesel, Elie

    The Jewish legends which are a major part of Jewish life and literature are the focus of this study guide for teachers. Excerpts from a lecture on Jewish legends are followed by suggestions for classroom activities, discussion topics related to the study of Jewish legends, and a bibliography for both teachers and students on Jewish legend and…

  12. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Susannah K; Dawson, Jill; Lee, Jack A; Osman, Gizem; Levitin, Maria O; Guzel, Refika Mine; Djamgoz, Mustafa BA

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA “mimetics” (eg, gabapentin) appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can significantly affect the cancer process itself. More futuristically, several ion channels are being targeted with novel analgesics, but many of these are also involved in primary and/or secondary tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to elucidate possible cellular and molecular effects of orthodox analgesics and their possible long-term impact, both positive and negative, and thus enable the best possible clinical gain for cancer patients. PMID:24470767

  13. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susannah K; Dawson, Jill; Lee, Jack A; Osman, Gizem; Levitin, Maria O; Guzel, Refika Mine; Djamgoz, Mustafa Ba

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA "mimetics" (eg, gabapentin) appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can significantly affect the cancer process itself. More futuristically, several ion channels are being targeted with novel analgesics, but many of these are also involved in primary and/or secondary tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to elucidate possible cellular and molecular effects of orthodox analgesics and their possible long-term impact, both positive and negative, and thus enable the best possible clinical gain for cancer patients. PMID:24470767

  14. Some letters on Jewish Medical Ethics.

    PubMed

    Jakobovits, I

    1983-08-01

    Specializing in Jewish Medical Ethics--a term, I believe, first used as the title of my doctor's thesis (1955) subsequently condensed and revised in book form (1959)--I frequently receive inquiries from individuals and organizations seeking guidance on the Jewish attitude to moral issues in medicine. After a review of my voluminous correspondence on many phases of this subject, I have made a small selection on a variety of topics. The correspondence on the last of the four topics, 'Medical Experimentation on Animals', is the longest, because it contains an element of polemics. Since this might make it of special interest to the Journal's readers, and since this subject is infrequently discussed in the literature of Medical Ethics, I decided to include it in this brief selection. PMID:6579161

  15. Genetic markers cannot determine Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Humans differentiate, classify, and discriminate: social interaction is a basic property of human Darwinian evolution. Presumably inherent differential physical as well as behavioral properties have always been criteria for identifying friend or foe. Yet, biological determinism is a relatively modern term, and scientific racism is, oddly enough, largely a consequence or a product of the Age of Enlightenment and the establishment of the notion of human equality. In recent decades ever-increasing efforts and ingenuity were invested in identifying Biblical Israelite genotypic common denominators by analysing an assortment of phenotypes, like facial patterns, blood types, diseases, DNA-sequences, and more. It becomes overwhelmingly clear that although Jews maintained detectable vertical genetic continuity along generations of socio-religious-cultural relationship, also intensive horizontal genetic relations were maintained both between Jewish communities and with the gentile surrounding. Thus, in spite of considerable consanguinity, there is no Jewish genotype to identify. PMID:25653666

  16. The genome-wide structure of the Jewish people.

    PubMed

    Behar, Doron M; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Metspalu, Mait; Metspalu, Ene; Rosset, Saharon; Parik, Jüri; Rootsi, Siiri; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Kutuev, Ildus; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Balanovsky, Oleg; Semino, Ornella; Pereira, Luisa; Comas, David; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Parfitt, Tudor; Hammer, Michael F; Skorecki, Karl; Villems, Richard

    2010-07-01

    Contemporary Jews comprise an aggregate of ethno-religious communities whose worldwide members identify with each other through various shared religious, historical and cultural traditions. Historical evidence suggests common origins in the Middle East, followed by migrations leading to the establishment of communities of Jews in Europe, Africa and Asia, in what is termed the Jewish Diaspora. This complex demographic history imposes special challenges in attempting to address the genetic structure of the Jewish people. Although many genetic studies have shed light on Jewish origins and on diseases prevalent among Jewish communities, including studies focusing on uniparentally and biparentally inherited markers, genome-wide patterns of variation across the vast geographic span of Jewish Diaspora communities and their respective neighbours have yet to be addressed. Here we use high-density bead arrays to genotype individuals from 14 Jewish Diaspora communities and compare these patterns of genome-wide diversity with those from 69 Old World non-Jewish populations, of which 25 have not previously been reported. These samples were carefully chosen to provide comprehensive comparisons between Jewish and non-Jewish populations in the Diaspora, as well as with non-Jewish populations from the Middle East and north Africa. Principal component and structure-like analyses identify previously unrecognized genetic substructure within the Middle East. Most Jewish samples form a remarkably tight subcluster that overlies Druze and Cypriot samples but not samples from other Levantine populations or paired Diaspora host populations. In contrast, Ethiopian Jews (Beta Israel) and Indian Jews (Bene Israel and Cochini) cluster with neighbouring autochthonous populations in Ethiopia and western India, respectively, despite a clear paternal link between the Bene Israel and the Levant. These results cast light on the variegated genetic architecture of the Middle East, and trace the origins

  17. [Complementary medicine--Jewish medical ethics].

    PubMed

    Katz, Yisrae; Schiff, Elad

    2011-08-01

    In Israel, as in the Western world, the use of different methods of complementary and alternative medicine ICAM) is spreading. CAM raises ethical questions of concern to healthcare providers and to the public: Can physicians recommend a treatment that has no scientific evidence? Should the government include such therapies in the health budget? Can complementary therapists receive protection against lawsuits if their treatment is recognized? The purpose of this article is to present a Jewish perspective on these issues. The fundamental sources that deal with the subject are based on the approach of rabbinic authorities toward unproven medicine, as expressed in the "Mishnah" and "Talmud" (200-500 C.E). The great Jewish scholar who discusses the subject in detail is Maimonides (1135-1204), who defines what "medicine" is and claims that medicine has to rely on reason or experience. Contemporary Jewish commentators present their position based on the interpretation of Maimonides' texts. In this article we claim that treatments can be divided into four groups, each group having a different halachic status: (1) Treatment that might be dangerous--should not be used. (2) Treatment that is safe--can be used, but has no other special status. (3) Treatment recognized by alternative therapists--has consequences for the observant Jew, such as laws of Kashrut and Shabbat. (4) Treatment that was tested and proven using modern medical methods has public significance--the therapist is entitled to legal defense if he made a reasonable mistake; the government can consider funding such treatment using public money. This article presents the Jewish halachic sources upon which we propose an ethical-practical approach to CAM. PMID:21939123

  18. Genetic affinities of the Jewish populations of India.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Singh, Manvendra; Rai, Niraj; Kariappa, Mini; Singh, Kamayani; Singh, Ashish; Pratap Singh, Deepankar; Tamang, Rakesh; Selvi Rani, Deepa; Reddy, Alla G; Kumar Singh, Vijay; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of written records or inscription, the origin and affiliation of Indian Jewish populations with other world populations remain contentious. Previous genetic studies have found evidence for a minor shared ancestry of Indian Jewish with Middle Eastern (Jewish) populations. However, these studies (relied on limited individuals), haven't explored the detailed temporal and spatial admixture process of Indian Jewish populations with the local Indian populations. Here, using large sample size with combination of high resolution biparental (autosomal) and uniparental markers (Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA), we reconstructed genetic history of Indian Jewish by investigating the patterns of genetic diversity. Consistent with the previous observations, we detected minor Middle Eastern specific ancestry component among Indian Jewish communities, but virtually negligible in their local neighbouring Indian populations. The temporal test of admixture suggested that the first admixture of migrant Jewish populations from Middle East to South India (Cochin) occurred during fifth century. Overall, we concluded that the Jewish migration and admixture in India left a record in their genomes, which can link them to the 'Jewish Diaspora'. PMID:26759184

  19. Genetic affinities of the Jewish populations of India

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Singh, Manvendra; Rai, Niraj; Kariappa, Mini; Singh, Kamayani; Singh, Ashish; Pratap Singh, Deepankar; Tamang, Rakesh; Selvi Rani, Deepa; Reddy, Alla G.; Kumar Singh, Vijay; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of written records or inscription, the origin and affiliation of Indian Jewish populations with other world populations remain contentious. Previous genetic studies have found evidence for a minor shared ancestry of Indian Jewish with Middle Eastern (Jewish) populations. However, these studies (relied on limited individuals), haven’t explored the detailed temporal and spatial admixture process of Indian Jewish populations with the local Indian populations. Here, using large sample size with combination of high resolution biparental (autosomal) and uniparental markers (Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA), we reconstructed genetic history of Indian Jewish by investigating the patterns of genetic diversity. Consistent with the previous observations, we detected minor Middle Eastern specific ancestry component among Indian Jewish communities, but virtually negligible in their local neighbouring Indian populations. The temporal test of admixture suggested that the first admixture of migrant Jewish populations from Middle East to South India (Cochin) occurred during fifth century. Overall, we concluded that the Jewish migration and admixture in India left a record in their genomes, which can link them to the ‘Jewish Diaspora’. PMID:26759184

  20. Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Weyher, J.L.; Lazar, S.; Macht, L.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Molnar,R.J.; Muller, S.; Nowak, G.; Grzegory, I.

    2006-08-10

    Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN in molten eutectic of KOH + NaOH (E etch) and in hot sulfuric and phosphoric acids (HH etch) is discussed in detail. Three size grades of pits are formed by the preferential E etching at the outcrops of threading dislocations on the Ga-polar surface of GaN. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as the calibration tool it is shown that the largest pits are formed on screw, intermediate on mixed and the smallest on edge dislocations. This sequence of size does not follow the sequence of the Burgers values (and thus the magnitude of the elastic energy) of corresponding dislocations. This discrepancy is explained taking into account the effect of decoration of dislocations, the degree of which is expected to be different depending on the lattice deformation around the dislocations, i.e. on the edge component of the Burgers vector. It is argued that the large scatter of optimal etching temperatures required for revealing all three types of dislocations in HVPE-grown samples from different sources also depends upon the energetic status of dislocations. The role of kinetics for reliability of etching in both etches is discussed and the way of optimization of the etching parameters is shown.

  1. Eye casualty services in London

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H B; Daniel, C S; Verma, S

    2013-01-01

    The combined pressures of the European Working Time Directive, 4 h waiting time target, and growing rates of unplanned hospital attendances have forced a major consolidation of eye casualty departments across the country, with the remaining units seeing a rapid increase in demand. We examine the effect of these changes on the provision of emergency eye care in Central London, and see what wider lessons can be learned. We surveyed the managers responsible for each of London's 8 out-of-hours eye casualty services, analysed data on attendance numbers, and conducted detailed interviews with lead clinicians. At London's two largest units, Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Western Eye Hospital, annual attendance numbers have been rising at 7.9% per year (to 76 034 patients in 2010/11) and 9.6% per year (to 31 128 patients in 2010/11), respectively. Using Moorfields as a case study, we discuss methods to increase capacity and efficiency in response to this demand, and also examine some of the unintended consequences of service consolidation including patients travelling long distances to geographically inappropriate units, and confusion over responsibility for out-of-hours inpatient cover. We describe a novel ‘referral pathway' developed to minimise unnecessary travelling and delay for patients, and propose a forum for the strategic planning of London's eye casualty services in the future. PMID:23370420

  2. [Debates on the "Jewish nurse" within the Jewish communities in Austro-Hungary around 1900].

    PubMed

    Malleier, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The debate about the organisation of nursing became acute during the last decades of the 19th century when big modern Jewish hospitals were built in several cities of the Habsburg Monarchy. This led to an increase in the demand for nurses and to the initiation of a discussion about the professionalisation of Jewish nursing. In these debates different actors with different intentions were involved. While hospitals were looking mainly for inexpensive and unlimited working nurses, middle-class organisations such as B'nai B'rith emphasised the necessity for women to learn a useful profession to be able to support their husbands economically. Furthermore, feminists and women's associations tried to set new standards for female education, emphasising economic independence and improving the working conditions for women. Jewish feminists such as Henriette Weiss in Vienna, Ida Fuerst in Budapest, and Julie Leipen in Prague tried to build up Jewish nursing schools. The different strategies of implementations and the result of their efforts will be the main focus of this paper. PMID:19830957

  3. The Geographies of Jewish Life: Building a Home within Which Jewish Education Can Dwell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This essay reviews the Geographical section of the "International Handbook of Jewish Education" published in 2011. The differences between countries, their unique histories and cultures, are important, but their similarities are arguably more revealing. Indeed, on occasions when similar phenomena are examined in different places by different…

  4. Embracing Jewish Day School Education in England, 1965-1979

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelsson, David

    2009-01-01

    Between 1965 and 1979 the demand for places at Jewish day schools in England rose dramatically. In the preceding decades, most parents sent their children to state non-denominational schools, showing little interest in providing their children with a solid Jewish education. Sunday or after-school Hebrew classes, rarely extending beyond Bar/Bat…

  5. Teaching Vision: Cultivating a Philosophical Disposition about Jewish Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levisohn, Jon A.

    2012-01-01

    We are sometimes told that practitioners have a hard time with theory. But those who are committed to nurturing a certain kind of intellectual capacity among Jewish educational practitioners--the capacity to identify and critically engage with vision in Jewish education, a capacity that we can call a "philosophical disposition"--must accept the…

  6. Programs of Inclusion & Acceptance in the Jewish Faith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Shelly

    2009-01-01

    The great Jewish sage, Hillel, who lived in the first century BCE wrote: "If I am not for myself, who is for me? If I am for myself, what am I? If not now, when?" Parents of children with disabilities and Jewish educators have translated these words of wisdom into practice for they offer important guidelines toward educating children in religious…

  7. "Shalom Sesame": Using Media to Promote Jewish Education and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisch, Shalom M.; Lemish, Dafna; Spezia, Elizabeth; Siegel, Deborah; Fisch, Susan R. D.; Aladé, Fashina; Kasdan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A family survey, ethnographic study, and quasi-experimental study investigated "Shalom Sesame's" potential to enhance understanding of Jewish culture and identity among preschool families. Preschoolers demonstrated significant learning, recognizing that people who looked different could be Jewish, and in knowledge about Hebrew…

  8. Reinventing Jewish Education for the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woocher, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    A century ago a group of educators led an effort to transform American Jewish education to enable it to operate successfully in the 20th century. Today, with American Jews living under very different conditions, a similar effort is needed to reinvent Jewish education for the 21st century. Changes and new initiatives already taking place on the…

  9. Defying Normative Male Identities: The Transgressive Possibilities of Jewish Boyhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Michael C.; Ravitch, Sharon M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study discovers teenage boys whose connections to Judaism and Jewish life offered them resilience and contextual opportunities for identity development. Those who have active, positive Jewish identities describe adaptations that are more independent of adolescent peer norms and freer, in terms of masculine pressures, than less…

  10. Jewishly-Informed Mature Adult Service-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretan, Gail Helene

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe, implement, and interpret the intersection of service-learning, Jewish values and ways of knowing, adult education, and lifelong learning for people over the age of 50. By expanding service-learning to include both older adults and Jewish ways of knowing, there is potential for transforming these frameworks…

  11. 75 FR 25099 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-11013 Filed 5-6-10; 8:45 am... Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation In 1883, the Jewish American.... During Jewish American Heritage Month we celebrate this proud history and honor the...

  12. 78 FR 26215 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ...-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-10745 Filed 5-2-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ...;#0; ] Proclamation 8966 of April 30, 2013 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2013 By the President of... 350 years have passed since Jewish refugees first made landfall on American shores. We take this...

  13. The Gender Question and the Study of Jewish Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charme, Stuart Z.

    2006-01-01

    Although some researchers argue that a generation of feminist innovations and changes in American Jewish life has produced an egalitarian generation in which gender differences among Jewish children and adolescents are insignificant, this article argues that the salience of gender differences is a factor of the kinds of questions that children are…

  14. Nonprofit Groups Offer Genetic Testing for Jewish Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supiano, Beckie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how nonprofit organizations like Hillel are offering free genetic testing for Jewish college students. A growing number of colleges, including Pittsburgh, Brandeis University, and Columbia University are offering students free or reduced-cost screenings for diseases common to Jewish population. Genetic diseases common to…

  15. New Frontiers: "Milieu" and the Sociology of American Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Bethamie

    2008-01-01

    Over the course of the twentieth century changing circumstances have prompted American Jewish educators to develop new educational strategies to address these needs, and these developments are an important aspect of the sociology of American Jewish education. Using the method of historical sociology, I examine the educational configuration at…

  16. Barriers to organ donation in the Jewish community.

    PubMed

    Feld, J; Sherbin, P; Cole, E

    1998-03-01

    It has long been recognized that members of the Jewish community generally do not sign organ donor cards or consent to the donation of the organs of their family members. In order to address this issue, the position of Jewish law on organ donation was examined and a sample of the Jewish population of Toronto was surveyed in an attempt to better understand the reasons for the observed reluctance to donate within this community. The results confirmed that the rate of signing organ donor cards was much lower in the Jewish community than in the general population, and although other reasons do exist, the major barrier to donation was a perception that Jewish law prohibits such action. The study of Jewish law revealed that organ donation is permitted and, in fact, encouraged by all branches of modern Judaism. Finally, in response to these results, a guide titled "Organ Donation: A Jewish Perspective" was compiled to help explain both the religious and medical aspects of organ donation for Jewish people and transplant personnel. PMID:9726215

  17. "Visions of Jewish Education" as a Primer for Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Samuel K.

    2005-01-01

    As part of their requirements, second-year rabbinical students at Hebrew Union College--Jewish Institute of Religion, Cincinnati campus, must teach religious school or Hebrew school for a full year in one of the local congregations. At the same time, they take a course in the practices of Jewish education. The students must create a portfolio…

  18. Holocaust Education in Jewish Schools in Israel: Goals, Dilemmas, Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Zehavit

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown the Holocaust to be the primary component of Jewish identity (Farago in Yahadut Zmanenu 5:259-285, 1989; Gross in Influence of the trip to Poland within the framework of the Ministry of Education on the working through of the Holocaust. Unpublished M.A. thesis, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva, 2000; "Herman in Jewish identity:…

  19. Exploring 350 Years of Jewish American History on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Michael J.; Cruz, Barbara C.

    2005-01-01

    The recent Library of Congress exhibition, From Haven to Home: 350 Years of Jewish Life in America, has sparked renewed interest in the history of Jews in the United States. The collection featured more than 200 documents, images, and artifacts that chronicle the Jewish American experience. In exhibit from September through December 2004, From…

  20. Spiritual Care For Jewish Patients Facing A Life Threatening Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bluman, Rabbi Olga F.; Klein, Linda; Thomas, Jay; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Providing biopsychosocial/spiritual care for patients facing a life threatening illness can be complex, and this complexity can be amplified when a patient identifies as Jewish. A common but incorrect assumption is that a person who identifies him or herself as Jewish abides by the tenets of the Jewish religion. However, many Jews consider themselves Jewish in an ethnic or cultural sense rather than connected to a religion or belief in God. This case report presents an ethnic/cultural Jew with a life threatening illness of advanced lung cancer. Despite evidence of spiritual/existential suffering, this patient declined spiritual care. From an analysis of this case and clinical experience, we suggest exploratory questions that clinicians can use in response to common questions or statements made by such patients. This exploration may lead to a chaplain referral and we highlight interventions that chaplains and clinicians may find helpful as they come alongside Jewish patients. PMID:23614173

  1. Lessons from London Schools: Investigating the Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baars, Sam; Bernardes, Eleanor; Elwick, Alex; Malortie, Abigail; McAleavy, Tony; McInerney, Laura; Menzies, Loic; Riggall, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This research seeks to investigate the claim that London schools have improved dramatically since 2000. The authors have reviewed the evidence of transformational change and explored possible reasons for the development in London's schools. The project was guided by three questions: (1) Is the success of London's schools as real as has…

  2. The dieting experience: A Jewish perspective.

    PubMed

    Mount, Amanda; Bogle, Vanessa

    2016-04-01

    Considered to be a chronic recidivist condition, obesity places significant burdens on the society. The search for appropriate interventions remains challenging. Research suggests individuals' environments should be considered when addressing eating behaviours. Nomothetic accounts of the dieting experiences of eight self-selected British Jews within a commercially run, community-based weight-management programme adapted to Jewish participants' cultural needs were explored using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four themes were identified: 'Me, myself and I', 'behaviour change', 'structural framework' and 'social interaction'. Emergent aspects were social support and structural flexibility to motivate participants to initiate and sustain behaviour change. Implications for future weight-loss interventions are discussed. PMID:24713157

  3. Demystifying a Black Box: A Grounded Theory of How Travel Experiences Impact the Jewish Identity Development of Jewish Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The positive impact on the Jewish Identity Development of Jewish Emerging Adults of both the 10 day trips to Israel popularly known as Birthright trips and the service learning trips commonly known as Alternative Spring Breaks has been well-documented. However, the mechanics of how this positive impact occurs has not been well-understood. This…

  4. Jewish Community in Wichita, 1920-1970: Same Wagon, New Horses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Jay M.

    2008-01-01

    The Jewish experience in Wichita, Kansas, highlights the ongoing challenge of being Jewish in the Midwest. Ever since the mid-nineteenth century, Jewish life in the middle part of the country was quite different from that in cities like New York, which contained the largest concentration of Jewish Americans, and which has attracted most of the…

  5. The Problems of Eastern Orthodox Church Buildings of Historical Value - Changing Uses over the Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarocka-Mikrut, Aleksandra; Gleń, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    There are many Eastern Orthodox church buildings throughout the Lublin Province. Over the years, these architectural objects have undergone multiple transformations, both in terms of changing religious denominations and rituals and also adaptation to new functions, such as warehousing. This article classifies and presents the transformations carried out in selected Eastern Orthodox churches in the Lublin province. By using comparative analysis of the buildings' primary condition and their current state, it was possible to identify the risks and opportunities arising from the process of adapting these buildings and their rich historical background. Additionally, the article includes a subjective assessment of the adaptation works and their influence on the physical form of the Eastern Orthodox churches examined. To present the adaptation methods currently applied to religious buildings located in Poland, this article focuses on examples of already-transformed properties that used to have a religious function in the past, but that have now been turned into commercial properties.

  6. Challenges and conflicts in the delivery of mental health services to ultra-orthodox Jews.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David; Witztum, Eliezer

    2013-02-01

    Ultra-orthodox Jews are a religious group that lives apart, valuing its separateness and ascribing sanctity to its life style. Community members are reticent to seek help from mental health services, especially if provided by professionals from outside the community. Therapeutic interventions should be explained in terms meaningful to the patient's explanatory model. Community members may face stigmatic attitudes of service providers. Situations are presented of the challenges and conflicts that confront ultra-orthodox Jews and mental health service providers concerning seeking help, understanding idioms of distress, providing appropriate rehabilitation services and negotiating arranged matches for marriage (shidduchim). PMID:23380322

  7. The hierarchy of values in Jewish bioethics.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Chaya

    2011-07-01

    This article describes how ethical issues in health are approached and resolved within the framework of Jewish bioethics. Its main purpose is to explore the range of sources and methodologies used to determine the appropriate hierarchy of values for various ethical scenarios. Its major thrust is to illustrate how a divinely based but humanly negotiated ethical code stands firm upon 'red flag' principles, while at the same time, allowing for 'shades of gray' flexibility informed by given contexts. It provides significant insights and practical tools that can be instrumental in decision making for nurses and other health providers of all faiths. The following ethical domains are addressed: respect for patient autonomy, truth-telling and allocation of resources. PMID:21788289

  8. Heterosexism, homonegativity, and the sociopolitical dangers of orthodox models of prejudice reduction.

    PubMed

    Langdridge, Darren

    2012-12-01

    Criticism of orthodox models of prejudice reduction is particularly relevant for lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals, particularly when considering stage models of coming-out. If social change is to be effected regarding endemic homonegativity and heterosexism, then it is argued that a radical rethink is needed to the understandable but misinformed desire to get us to like each other more. PMID:23164041

  9. About the Limited Benefit of Water Content and Temperature on Orthodox Seed Longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing water content and temperature increases the shelf life of orthodox seeds. A limit to these beneficial effects have been reported and debated over the last two decades, and guidelines for optimum seed storage remain unresolved. The central elements of the discussion are whether there are d...

  10. "Foundations of Orthodox Culture" in Russia: Confessional or Nonconfessional Religious Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willems, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    In April 2010 a new school subject group called "Foundations of Religious Cultures and Secular Ethics" (FRCSE) was introduced as an experiment in selected regions of Russia. It consists of six subjects, or "modules." One module is "Foundations of Orthodox Culture" (FOC). This article examines FOC within the context of religious education in Europe…

  11. Thinking about Science and Christian Orthodox Beliefs: A Survey Study of Teacher Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobern, William W.; Loving, Cathleen C.; Davis, Edward B.; Terpstra, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Since its origination in the late 19th Century, the warfare metaphor has been used to characterize the relationship between science and religion, especially orthodox Christianity. Though thoroughly discredited by historians of science, the ideological descendants of Thomas Huxley, who spoke of science in quasi-religious terms, have kept the…

  12. Fundamentals of Orthodox Culture (FOC): A New Subject in Russia's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willems, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    The question of religious education is one of the most controversial questions in the current discussions on religion and politics in Russia. Most notably a new subject, Fundamentals of Orthodox Culture (FOC), is of interest because it differs markedly from Western European approaches to religious education. Referring to "Culturology" FOC combines…

  13. Language Attitudes, Shift and the Ethnolinguistic Vitality of the Greek Orthodox Community in Istanbul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komondouros, Markos; McEntee-Atalianis, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The Greek Orthodox community of Istanbul has long existed as a bilingual Greek and Turkish grouping and remains largely unstudied. The sharp decrease in the size of this community to approximately 1000 members raises questions as to the maintenance of Greek in this setting. This study attempts to establish the current status of Greek in the…

  14. Language and Social Identity Construction: A Study of a Russian Heritage Language Orthodox Christian School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Ekaterina Leonidovna

    2012-01-01

    Grounded in discourse analytic and language socialization paradigms, this dissertation examines issues of language and social identity construction in children attending a Russian Heritage Language Orthodox Christian Saturday School in California. By conducting micro-analysis of naturally-occurring talk-in-interaction combined with longitudinal…

  15. Low on the London Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2013-09-01

    Until relatively recently, many authors have assumed that if extraterrestrial life is discovered it will be via the discovery of extraterrestrial intelligence: we can best try to detect life by adopting the SETI approach of trying to detect beacons or artefacts. The Rio Scale, proposed by Almár and Tarter in 2000, is a tool for quantifying the potential significance for society of any such reported detection. However, improvements in technology and advances in astrobiology raise the possibility that the discovery of extraterrestrial life will instead be via the detection of atmospheric biosignatures. The London Scale, proposed by Almár in 2010, attempts to quantify the potential significance of the discovery of extraterrestrial life rather than extraterrestrial intelligence. What might be the consequences of the announcement of a discovery that ranks low on the London Scale? In other words, what might be society's reaction if 'first contact' is via the remote sensing of the byproducts of unicellular organisms rather than with the products of high intelligence? Here, I examine some possible reactions to that question; in particular, I discuss how such an announcement might affect our views of life here on Earth and of humanity's place in the universe.

  16. Jewish Medical Students and Graduates at the Universities of Padua and Leiden: 1617–1740*

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The first Jewish medical graduates at the University of Padua qualified in the fifteenth century. Indeed, Padua was the only medical school in Europe for most of the medieval period where Jewish students could study freely. Though Jewish students came to Padua from many parts of Europe the main geographical sources of its Jewish students were the Venetian lands. However, the virtual Padua monopoly on Jewish medical education came to an end during the seventeenth century as the reputation of the Dutch medical school in Leiden grew. For aspiring medieval Jewish physicians Padua was, for around three hundred years, the first, simplest, and usually the only choice. PMID:23908853

  17. School Improvement in London: A Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleavy, Tony; Elwick, Alex

    2016-01-01

    This report considers how successful London's schools have been over the past decade and identifies potentially transferable components of the success story. There is much to be learned from the transformation undergone in London that is relevant to policymakers and educationalists worldwide, working in both high-income and low-income countries.…

  18. Jack London: The Paradox of Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deane, Paul

    1968-01-01

    Because of their interest in naturalism and socialism, critics often overlook the major intellectual conflict in Jack London's work: the paradox of individualism. London regards society as affecting the individual in two ways: it either promotes individuality or it demands a conformity that undermines individualism. When society fails Buck in "The…

  19. Impact of Disability Awareness and Self-Efficacy on Preschool Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion in Orthodox Jewish Day Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Wendy Devorah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between preschool teachers' awareness of disabilities, their exposure to disabilities, and their self-efficacy in a classroom, and how they affect teachers' attitudes toward inclusion. Another purpose was to investigate the extent to which class composition (all boys, all girls,…

  20. Differences in Math Achievement between Boys and Girls in 4th and 8th Grade in Coeducational Orthodox Jewish Day Schools in the New York Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witty, Emily Amie

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences in mathematics have been of particular interest over the past decades. Research has shown a disparity in mathematical proficiency between boys and girls depending on the area of mathematics tested, the age and grade of the student, and the structure of the test question (i.e., how the question is posed). Although, much of the…

  1. Risky Treatments: A Jewish Medical Ethics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    The Jewish principle concerning a decision with regard to a dangerous treatment is as following: A patient who is estimated to die within 12 months because of a fatal illness is permitted to undergo a treatment that on the one hand may extend his life beyond 12 months, but on the other hand may hasten his death. There are, however, several limitations to this ruling related to the chances of success with the proposed treatment, the nature of the treatment, whether it is intended to be curative or merely to postpone the danger and death, whether the treatment is absolutely necessary, and others. One is not obligated to undergo a dangerous treatment, but one is permitted to do so. The permissibility to forfeit a short life expectancy in order to achieve more prolonged life applies only with the patient’s consent. That consent is valid and is not considered a form of attempted suicide. Neither is a refusal to submit to treatment considered an act of suicide; the patient has the right to refuse a dangerous procedure. In all situations where a permissive ruling is granted for a patient to endanger his short life expectancy, the ruling should be arrived at after careful reflection and with the approval of the rabbinic authorities acting on the recommendation of the most expert physicians. PMID:26241221

  2. The population genetics of the Jewish people.

    PubMed

    Ostrer, Harry; Skorecki, Karl

    2013-02-01

    Adherents to the Jewish faith have resided in numerous geographic locations over the course of three millennia. Progressively more detailed population genetic analysis carried out independently by multiple research groups over the past two decades has revealed a pattern for the population genetic architecture of contemporary Jews descendant from globally dispersed Diaspora communities. This pattern is consistent with a major, but variable component of shared Near East ancestry, together with variable degrees of admixture and introgression from the corresponding host Diaspora populations. By combining analysis of monoallelic markers with recent genome-wide variation analysis of simple tandem repeats, copy number variations, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at high density, it has been possible to determine the relative contribution of sex-specific migration and introgression to map founder events and to suggest demographic histories corresponding to western and eastern Diaspora migrations, as well as subsequent microevolutionary events. These patterns have been congruous with the inferences of many, but not of all historians using more traditional tools such as archeology, archival records, linguistics, comparative analysis of religious narrative, liturgy and practices. Importantly, the population genetic architecture of Jews helps to explain the observed patterns of health and disease-relevant mutations and phenotypes which continue to be carefully studied and catalogued, and represent an important resource for human medical genetics research. The current review attempts to provide a succinct update of the more recent developments in a historical and human health context. PMID:23052947

  3. Problems and Prospects of Jewish Education for Intelligent Citizenship in a Post-Everything World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    Judaism, Jewish life, the Jewish people--indeed, almost all facets of the Jewish experience--are in a postmodern, post-denominational, post-ethnic, post-Zionist, post-diaspora, or what may simply be called a "post-everything" age. Studies show that post-everything youth in general are less concerned with national/ethnic/religious identification…

  4. What To Do with Death: The End of Life in Reform Jewish Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorr, Alan

    1990-01-01

    After interviewing Jewish teenagers about death, finds Reform Judaism teachers teach about love and marriage but not death. Observes students know little of Jewish customs related to death. Notes Jewish doctrine focuses on the needs of the living. Considers elements that will be necessary to provide for effective death education in Reform Jewish…

  5. Practitioners and Practices in Museum Education: The Case of Three Jewish Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moghadam, Yaara Shteinhart

    2011-01-01

    As Jewish museums are witnessing a rapid numerical rise in the United States and beyond, the professional and academic literature on Jewish museum education lags behind. This dissertation is aimed to help narrow this gap by examining how the education departments of Jewish museums in the United States conceptualize, promote, and conduct programs…

  6. Help-Seeking Attitudes among Arab and Jewish Adolescents in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilat, Itzhak; Ezer, Hanna; Sagee, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This study set out to explore the impact of ethnicity, gender, age and subjective well-being on help-seeking attitudes among Arab and Jewish adolescents in Israel. The sample comprised 395 Arab and 360 Jewish 7th- and 11th-grade pupils who were selected from six Arab and six Jewish schools in the north of Israel. The participants completed a…

  7. 3 CFR 8379 - Proclamation 8379 of May 12, 2009. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8379 of May 12, 2009. Jewish American... 12, 2009 Proc. 8379 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2009By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation The Jewish American tradition exemplifies the strength of the American...

  8. The theory of evolution - a jewish perspective.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Avraham

    2010-07-01

    All possible pro and con arguments regarding the theory of evolution have been discussed and debated in the vast literature-scientific, religious, and lay-in the past 150 years. There is usually great zealotry in all debating parties, with mutual intolerance of ideas and concepts, disrespect toward opposing opinions and positions, and usage of very harsh language. This prejudiced approach usually does not allow for a reasonable debate. It is important to look at the facts, assumptions, and beliefs of the theory of evolution in a more calm and humble way. In this article a comparative analysis is offered between the scientific aspects of the theory of evolution and a Judaic approach to these aspects. The two sets of human thought-religion and science-are fundamentally different in their aims and purposes, in their methods of operation, in their scope of interest and issues, and in their origin and ramifications. Whenever science surpasses its limits, or religion exceeds its boundaries, it actually is a form of an abuse of both. This has happened to the theory of evolution in a more powerful mode than any other interaction between science and religion. The agenda of many scientists who promote the theory of evolution is to achieve the goal of understanding the existence of the universe as a random, purposeless, natural development, evolved slowly over billions of years from a common ancestor by way of natural selection, devoid of any supernatural metaphysical power. JEWISH FAITH PERCEIVES THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE UNIVERSE IN A DIFFERENT WAY: God created the world, with a purpose known to Him; He established natural laws that govern the world; and He imposed a moral-religious set of requirements upon Man. The discussion and comparative analysis in this article is based upon the current neo-Darwinian theory, although it seems almost certain that even the new and modern assumptions and speculations will continue to be challenged, changed, and revised as new scientific

  9. The Theory of Evolution - A Jewish Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    All possible pro and con arguments regarding the theory of evolution have been discussed and debated in the vast literature—scientific, religious, and lay—in the past 150 years. There is usually great zealotry in all debating parties, with mutual intolerance of ideas and concepts, disrespect toward opposing opinions and positions, and usage of very harsh language. This prejudiced approach usually does not allow for a reasonable debate. It is important to look at the facts, assumptions, and beliefs of the theory of evolution in a more calm and humble way. In this article a comparative analysis is offered between the scientific aspects of the theory of evolution and a Judaic approach to these aspects. The two sets of human thought—religion and science—are fundamentally different in their aims and purposes, in their methods of operation, in their scope of interest and issues, and in their origin and ramifications. Whenever science surpasses its limits, or religion exceeds its boundaries, it actually is a form of an abuse of both. This has happened to the theory of evolution in a more powerful mode than any other interaction between science and religion. The agenda of many scientists who promote the theory of evolution is to achieve the goal of understanding the existence of the universe as a random, purposeless, natural development, evolved slowly over billions of years from a common ancestor by way of natural selection, devoid of any supernatural metaphysical power. Jewish faith perceives the development of the universe in a different way: God created the world, with a purpose known to Him; He established natural laws that govern the world; and He imposed a moral-religious set of requirements upon Man. The discussion and comparative analysis in this article is based upon the current neo-Darwinian theory, although it seems almost certain that even the new and modern assumptions and speculations will continue to be challenged, changed, and revised as new

  10. With Doug: an Eastern Orthodox--Gestalt framework for pastoral psychotherapy in the armed forces.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David

    2013-01-01

    In military behavioral healthcare, a short-term, solutions-focused system often privileges cognitive techniques over existential, affective, or psychodynamic approaches to care. Pastoral psychotherapy, which often privileges existential and person-centered care, has the potential to prove a pivotal complement in treating the whole person. This article offers an existential approach to pastoral psychotherapy in the military using integrated concepts and applications from Gestalt Therapy and Eastern Orthodox pastoral care. PMID:24720246

  11. Jewish pediatricians in Nazi Germany: victims of persecution.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Paul

    2006-05-01

    The plight and fate of German Jewish pediatricians during the Nazi period in Europe has not received much attention, yet the narratives of the victims still resonate today and they deserve to be remembered. The stories of two women serve as examples of the fateful turns taken by the lives of many German Jewish pediatricians between 1933 and 1945. The two women, Dr. Luci Adelsberger and Dr. Lilli Jahn, illustrate both the ordeals endured and the disparate ways the Nazi policies ultimately spared or ended lives. PMID:16805231

  12. Religion, genetics, and sexual orientation: the Jewish tradition.

    PubMed

    Davis, Dena S

    2008-06-01

    This paper probes the implications of a genetic basis for sexual orientation for traditional branches of Judaism, which are struggling with how accepting to be of noncelibate gays and lesbians in their communities. The paper looks at the current attitudes toward homosexuality across the different branches of Judaism; social and cultural factors that work against acceptance; attitudes toward science in Jewish culture; and the likelihood that scientific evidence that sexual orientation is at least partly genetically determined will influence Jewish scholars' and leaders' thinking on this issue. PMID:18610782

  13. Probabilistic Feasibility of the Reconstruction Process of Russian-Orthodox Churches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhova, M.; Brunn, A.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    The cultural human heritage is important for the identity of following generations and has to be preserved in a suitable manner. In the course of time a lot of information about former cultural constructions has been lost because some objects were strongly damaged by natural erosion or on account of human work or were even destroyed. It is important to capture still available building parts of former buildings, mostly ruins. This data could be the basis for a virtual reconstruction. Laserscanning offers in principle the possibility to take up extensively surfaces of buildings in its actual status. In this paper we assume a priori given 3d-laserscanner data, 3d point cloud for the partly destroyed church. There are many well known algorithms, that describe different methods of extraction and detection of geometric primitives, which are recognized separately in 3d points clouds. In our work we put them in a common probabilistic framework, which guides the complete reconstruction process of complex buildings, in our case russian-orthodox churches. Churches are modeled with their functional volumetric components, enriched with a priori known probabilities, which are deduced from a database of russian-orthodox churches. Each set of components represents a complete church. The power of the new method is shown for a simulated dataset of 100 russian-orthodox churches.

  14. Train up a Child: On the "Maskilic" Attempt to Change the Habitus of Jewish Children and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavit, Zohar

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Jewish Enlightenment movement and Jewish financial entrepreneurs undertook an active, conscious project to effect significant transformations in the Jewish habitus in German-speaking areas during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. A symbiotic relationship allowed these groups to disseminate a new vision of Jewish society…

  15. Designing an Education for Life in Two Worlds: The Founding of the Bureau of Jewish Education of New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumberg, Stephen F.

    The Bureau of Jewish Education, founded in 1910 as part of the Kehillah (Jewish Community) of New York City, had a seminal and lasting influence on the education of Jews in America. The New Jewish Educators trained at the Bureau stressed the cultural breadth and historical depth of Judaism while emphasizing that Jewish education was supplementary…

  16. 12. Photo copy of drawing, May 21, 1963. NEW LONDON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photo copy of drawing, May 21, 1963. NEW LONDON LEDGE LIGHT STATION LIGHTING. Drawing no. 03-2730, U.S. Coast Guard Civil Engineering Unit, Warwick, Rhode Island. - New London Ledge Lighthouse, Long Island Sound, East of main harbor channel, New London, New London County, CT

  17. Social Work in Jewish Community Centers: A Question of Compatibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweifach, Jay

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the Jewish community center (JCC) as a host setting for social work practice. Findings of a national study of JCC professional staff designed to explore the degree of congruence between social work values and JCC practice are presented. The findings have implications for other sectarian and nonsectarian host settings…

  18. What Research Teaches about the Possibility of Reinventing Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Reinventing Jewish education is not about tinkering at the surface level but at creating deep change, a new paradigm. Superficial change is built on existing models, but deep change dramatically breaks with the past and challenges current models, norms, values, and beliefs. A paradigm shift is a radical move and, as many have discovered, it is…

  19. Discovering Jewish Studies Collections in Academic Libraries: A Practical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taler, Izabella

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. colleges and universities offering non-sectarian educational programs in Jewish Studies rely on the support of their academic libraries for research materials and library services. For college libraries which use Library of Congress Classification scheme, it is a common practice to integrate "studies" resources into their…

  20. Cultural Transitioning of Jewish Immigrants: Education, Employment and Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinacore, Ada; Mikhail, Anne-Marie; Kassan, Anusha; Lerner, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the cultural transitioning process that immigrants undergo in order to attain educational, occupational, and social integration within Canadian society. Results of this phenomenological study examining 31 Jewish immigrants from Argentina, Israel, France and the Former Soviet Union, reveal that lack of educational equivalency…

  1. 76 FR 25517 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-11063 Filed 5-4-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8660 of April 29, 2011 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2011 By the President of... commitment to building a more just world. This month, we embrace and celebrate the vast contributions...

  2. 77 FR 26905 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-11134 Filed 5-4-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... 7, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8813--Jewish American Heritage Month, 2012 Proclamation 8814--National Foster Care Month, 2012 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0;...

  3. The Effects of Denomination on Religious Socialization for Jewish Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Anthony G.; Lester, Ashlie M.; Brooks, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The transmission model of religious socialization was tested using a sample of American Jewish parents and adolescents. The authors expected that measures of religiousness among parents would be associated with those among their children. Interaction effects of denominational membership were also tested. Data were collected from a sample of 233…

  4. Jewish medical ethics: monetary compensation for donating kidneys.

    PubMed

    Grazi, Richard V; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2004-03-01

    The Israel Health Ministry is preparing legislation that would allow a person to receive monetary compensation in exchange for donating a kidney for a lifesaving transplant. Such a bill would be the first of its kind, and would seem to establish a policy that is in contrast with both existing international professional ethics and major Christian and Islamic religious ethics. In an attempt to investigate the extent to which such a bill would be consistent with traditional Jewish ethics, we reviewed the opinions of major traditional Jewish ethicists/halakhists, with emphasis on contemporary opinions, and found that compensating an organ donor for his or her time, discomfort, inconvenience, and recovery is fully consistent with traditional Jewish law and ethics. While non-altruistic sale of kidneys might be theoretically ethical from a Jewish perspective, ultimately its ethical status is inextricably connected to solving a series of pragmatic issues, such as creating a system that insures that potential vendors/donors are properly informed and not exploited, controlling and supervising medical screening and support of the donors to insure that their health is not permanently endangered, protecting minors and incompetents, and regulating payments so that they reasonably reflect compensation for pain and suffering. PMID:15055281

  5. Changing Stereotype of Jewish Women in the Popular Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Judith; Mirsky, Norman

    The stereotype of the Jewish woman as presented in the media--either a female who controls through guilt and is overly concerned with food, or a woman who is an exotic, seductive individual torn between devotion to family and pursuit of private romantic goals--is discussed in this paper. Books by Norman Mailer, John Updike, Erica Jong and Philip…

  6. The Learning of Arabic by Israeli Jewish Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Rabia, Salim

    1998-01-01

    Examines the learning of Arabic by Israeli Jewish children. Finds that children displayed negative attitudes toward learning Arabic, but had positive attitudes toward the classroom situation. Also finds that classroom situation was the best predictor of learning success. Suggests that children are influenced more by classroom environment than by…

  7. The Origins of Jewish Guilt: Psychological, Theological, and Cultural Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The idea that guilt and Judaism are closely interlinked has a long historical legacy. After discussing recent work on anthropology and emotion focusing on shame and guilt, we examine three theories purporting to account for this link: psychoanalytic, theological, and guilt as a cultural stereotype particularly the notion of the Jewish mother. PMID:26425245

  8. Identity and Inter Religious Understanding in Jewish Schools in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipgrave, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This article sets up a dialogue between "auto"-referential (looking to self) and "allo"-referential (looking to the other) approaches to religious difference and applies these to education for inter religious understanding in Jewish schools. It begins by arguing that the multiculturalism of the 1980s and 1990s set up a duality…

  9. Jewish Holocaust Histories and the Work of Chronological Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Jordana

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the ways that, in Holocaust education in Jewish schools in Melbourne and New York at the beginning of the 21st century, knowledge of the Holocaust is transferred to students in chronological form. It begins by asking: What work do chronological narratives do within the Holocaust historical narratives offered within Jewish…

  10. Breaking through the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy about Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geffen, Rela Mintz

    2005-01-01

    Jewish education needs a philosophy if its practitioners are to be considered part of a "real" profession and its professors are to be thought of as having mastered a legitimate academic discipline. A strong cadre of researchers who have produced a valid and reliable body of research also is required to earn a respected place in the academy. Until…

  11. A Movie Case Study of Anemic Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, David

    2011-01-01

    "Keeping Up with the Steins" (2006) is the first Hollywood film to focus on the Bar Mitzvah ceremony in its family, congregational, and Jewish community context. The film demonstrates how popular culture reflects community values, but may also shape them. The hero is alienated both from the synagogue service and his mega-Bar Mitzvah party. In line…

  12. Reinventing Religion: Jewish Religion Textbooks in Russian Gymnasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Eliyana R.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines 10 textbooks used in Jewish religion classes in Russian high schools in the final decades of the 19th century. The textbooks reveal an expectation of a low level of Hebrew background, an interest in promoting the practice of prayer, and two distinct approaches to teaching Judaism. While some of the books introduce students to…

  13. Religious Education and Community Involvement among Jewish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasson, Uzi; Sasson, Ayelet

    2009-01-01

    Religious Education is one way to increase and maintain community involvement among teenagers. In many Jewish communities across the United States, participation in religious activities and religious youth movements have decreased. As research in this area is limited, this study sets out to identify the curricula that are more effective in…

  14. Infertility evaluation and treatment according to Jewish law.

    PubMed

    Schenker, J G

    1997-02-01

    The Jewish attitude toward infertility can be learned from the fact that the first commandment of God to Adam was "be fruitful and multiply". When evaluating an infertile couple according to the Halakha (Hebrew law), one should first evaluate the female factor. If pathology is found, one may proceed to investigate the male factor, inadequate or abnormal production, ejaculation, or deposition of spermatozoa. The basic fact that allows in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo transfer (ET) to be considered in the rabbinical literature at all is that the oocyte and the sperm originate from the wife and the husband, respectively. For many centuries Jewish religious authorities have discussed the principle involved in artificial insemination from a donor. The discussions are based on ancient sources in the Talmud and the codes of Jewish law is prohibited for a variety of reasons e.g. incest, lack of genealogy, and the problem of inheritance. In the case of egg donation the problem that arises is who should be considered the mother, the donor of the oocyte or the one in whose uterus the embryo develops, the one who gives birth. Jewish law states that the child is related to the woman who finished its formation, the one who gave birth. The Jewish religion does not forbid the practice of surrogate motherhood in the case of full surrogacy. From the religious point of view, the child will belong to the father who gave the sperm and to the woman who gave birth. Creating and inducing a preimplantation in embryo in vitro for fertility research should be allowed if there is a real chance that the sperm owner may benefit and have a child as a result of this research. Nowadays, assisted reproductive technology is a common practice in the treatment of infertility. Nevertheless, different religious arguments of the world's religions impose limitations on the therapeutic approach to infertility. PMID:9138953

  15. American Jewish Year Book, 1982: A Record of Events and Trends in American and World Jewish Life. Volume 82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelfarb, Milton, Ed.; And Others

    This 1982 yearbook reviews developments in areas of concern to Jews around the world. The volume features an essay that provides a comprehensive chronicle of American Jews from the perspectives of both Jewish history and American history. Developments in the United States are examined in articles that discuss civil and political issues that affect…

  16. Teaching Approaches of Beginning Teachers for Jewish Studies in Israeli "Mamlachti" Schools: A Case Study of a Jewish Education Teachers' Training Program for Outstanding Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzin, Ori

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from a longitudinal qualitative study that examined teaching approaches of neophyte teachers in Israel during their 4-year exclusive teachers' training program for teaching Jewish subjects and first two years of teaching. The program wanted to promote change in secular pupils' attitudes toward Jewish subjects. We…

  17. Fritz London's Legacy at Duke University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Horst

    2006-03-01

    When 3He became available in small quantities after WWII Fritz London, Professor at Duke University since 1939, became very interested in its properties in the liquid and solid phases, as contrasted with those of 4He. His influence and that of his colleague Walter Gordy led to the appointment of William Fairbank in 1952, who was able to verify experimentally the prediction on the Fermi degeneracy of liquid 3He below 1K, a few weeks before London's death in 1954. With his students and associates, Fairbank carried out a number of important experiments which became classics, several of which will be described. At Duke he also started planning other experiments inspired by London's predictions. After W. Fairbank's departure for Stanford in 1959, further research on liquid and solid 3He and 3He-4He mixtures was carried out by his successors at Duke University and some of the results in the sixties will be briefly described.

  18. Suicide on the London Underground System.

    PubMed

    Farmer, R; O'Donnell, I; Tranah, T

    1991-09-01

    Over the past 50 years there has been an increase in the numbers of people jumping/falling in front of trains on the London Underground system. Case-fatality rates have fallen from 70% in the 1950s to 55% today. The proportion certified as suicide has fallen while the proportions certified as accidents or open verdicts have risen. There is unusual clustering of events at some stations which are adjacent to psychiatric units. The hypothesis that ease of access to London Underground stations may sometimes be a determinant of suicide is investigated. PMID:1955255

  19. Effects of age and gender on elderly suicide rates in Catholic and Orthodox countries: an inadvertent neglect?

    PubMed

    Pritchard, C; Baldwin, D

    2000-10-01

    When compared to suicide rates in the general population, it may be expected that elderly suicide rates would be lower in Catholic and Orthodox societies than in non-Catholic or non-Orthodox countries because of religious affiliations and extended family traditions. National suicide rates in the general population were compared with rates in the sub-population of those aged over 75 years. Proportionately, there are significantly higher suicide rates in elderly men in Catholic and Orthodox countries, compared to rates in other countries, with a trend for similar findings among women. There may be important implications on health and social policy and clinical practice in the efforts to reduce suicide rates among elderly people. PMID:11044872

  20. Reflections on Palliative Care from the Jewish and Islamic Tradition

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Michael; Baddarni, Kassim; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2012-01-01

    Spiritual care is a vital part of holistic patient care. Awareness of common patient beliefs will facilitate discussions about spirituality. Such conversations are inherently good for the patient, deepen the caring staff-patient-family relationship, and enhance understanding of how beliefs influence care decisions. All healthcare providers are likely to encounter Muslim patients, yet many lack basic knowledge of the Muslim faith and of the applications of Islamic teachings to palliative care. Similarly, some of the concepts underlying positive Jewish approaches to palliative care are not well known. We outline Jewish and Islamic attitudes toward suffering, treatment, and the end of life. We discuss our religions' approaches to treatments deemed unnecessary by medical staff, and consider some of the cultural reasons that patients and family members might object to palliative care, concluding with specific suggestions for the medical team. PMID:22203878

  1. [Criteria for determining death in the Jewish religion].

    PubMed

    Poliwoda, S

    1992-04-01

    In accordance with Jewish thinking, life ends with the last breath. Analogous to the beginning of life, two leading principles are important for the bioethical assessment of the end of life: the sanctity of life and the fundamental importance of this world. Thus the criteria for the definition of death are the following, which have consequences for the questions of euthanasia, organ-transplantation, autopsies and the status of the dead. PMID:1604878

  2. Knives and Other Weapons in London Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, S. R. St. J.

    2005-01-01

    London schools operate in an area where crime rates, including violent crime, is statistically more frequent than the average for the whole of England and Wales (Moore and Yeo 2004). Violent crime in the capital increased (though not to a statistically significant extent) between 2002/3 and 2003/4 (Moore and Yeo 2004b). This has led to a…

  3. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  4. Stage Voice Training in the London Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lucille S.

    This report is the result of a six-week study in which the voice training offerings at four schools of drama in London were examined using interviews of teachers and directors, observation of voice classes, and attendance at studio presentations and public performances. The report covers such topics as: textbooks and references being used; courses…

  5. The Compact Route from Boston to London.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Brian

    1988-01-01

    The author describes the development and implementation of a business/secondary school compact in East London, based on the original Boston Compact. This cooperative relationship helps disadvantaged students attain employability skills and work experience, while employers gain a trained labor force for their entry-level jobs. (CH)

  6. Jack London and the San Francisco earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sachs, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    After it was over, it seemed to many, and especially to eyewitnesses like Jack London, that the earthquake and fire had devastated San Francisco. However people were confident that, like the phoeniz, San Francisco would rise from the ashes and regain her palce as the "Imperial City of the West." 

  7. Preventing suicide on the London Underground.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R V; Poyner, B

    1994-02-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the possibility of preventing suicide on the London Underground. Four groups of potentially valuable measures were identified with the objectives of: (i) reducing public access to the tracks; (ii) improving surveillance by station staff; (iii) facilitating emergency stops; and (iv) reducing injury. These strategies are discussed. PMID:8153749

  8. Ensuring equine biosecurity at London 2012.

    PubMed

    Slater, Josh

    2013-02-01

    The London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Equestrian Games were the highest profile event in the 2012 equestrian calendar and were the culmination of four years of detailed and meticulous biosecurity planning to ensure that all horses arrived, competed and returned home safely and in good health. Josh Slater, Anthony Greenleaves and Andy Paterson describe how this was achieved. PMID:23378308

  9. High mammographic density in women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and is known to be approximately 60% heritable. Here we report a finding of an association between genetic ancestry and adjusted PMD. Methods We selected self-identified Caucasian women in the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute Cohort whose screening mammograms placed them in the top or bottom quintiles of age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Our final dataset included 474 women with the highest adjusted PMD and 469 with the lowest genotyped on the Illumina 1 M platform. Principal component analysis (PCA) and identity-by-descent analyses allowed us to infer the women's genetic ancestry and correlate it with adjusted PMD. Results Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, as defined by the first principal component of PCA and identity-by-descent analyses, represented approximately 15% of the sample. Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, defined by the first principal component of PCA, was associated with higher adjusted PMD (P = 0.004). Using multivariate regression to adjust for epidemiologic factors associated with PMD, including age at parity and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, did not attenuate the association. Conclusions Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, based on genetic analysis, are more likely to have high age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Ashkenazi Jews may have a unique set of genetic variants or environmental risk factors that increase mammographic density. PMID:23668689

  10. The status of the mentally ill in Jewish law.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Y A

    1993-01-01

    The Jewish law goes into great detail discussing the status of the mentally ill. There are many aspects to this question over and above the legal aspects of such a person's rights, obligations, doing business, etc. What is the Halachic approach to a mentally ill person in general? Is this person subject to the code of Jewish law the same as the normal Jew? Should we make an effort to help this type of person fulfil the commandments and prevent him or her from transgressing them or perhaps since such a person is incapable of controlling his or her behaviour, there is no purpose in these efforts? Marriage and divorce are other serious issues to which the Jewish law gives special attention in this context. Marriage must be entered into by a rational and judicious person or the act will not be valid. A very serious problem arises when a husband is mentally ill and due to that halachically cannot divorce his wife and she remains an Agunah. The situation is more complicated as the definition of mentally ill encompasses a broader spectrum of cases. Which psychiatric disorders come under the definition of a mentally ill person who is unable to control his or her behaviour? Which symptoms attest the inability of a person to enter into marriage or to grant a divorce? The Talmud discusses these matters in several places and the Halacha bases its rulings on their conclusions. PMID:8231701

  11. Alcohol and Substance Use in the Jewish Community: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, Melanie; Benarroch, Abraham; Rockman, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    Awareness of addictions in the Jewish community is becoming increasingly prevalent, and yet, a gap exists in the literature regarding addictions in this community. Knowledge about the prevalence of addictions within Jewish communities is limited; some believe that Jews cannot be affected by addictions. To address this gap, a pilot study was conducted to gather preliminary evidence relating to addictions and substance use in the Jewish community. Results indicate that a significant portion of the Jewish community knows someone affected by an addiction and that over 20% have a family history of addiction. Future research needs are discussed. PMID:26161279

  12. HLA polymorphism in a Majorcan population of Jewish descent: comparison with Majorca, Minorca, Ibiza (Balearic Islands) and other Jewish communities.

    PubMed

    Crespí, C; Milà, J; Martínez-Pomar, N; Etxagibel, A; Muñoz-Saa, I; Priego, D; Luque, A; Pons, J; Picornell, A; Ramon, M; Castro, J A; Matamoros, N

    2002-10-01

    'Chueta' was the name given to the Catholic descendants of Jewish victims of the last Spanish Inquisition process in Majorca Island in the western Mediterranean. We have studied the allele distribution of HLA-A, -B, -Cw, -DRB1 and -DQB1 loci of 103 random, healthy, unrelated individuals belonging to the ancient Majorcan Jewish community, known locally as Chuetas, and 589 individuals from the Balearic population selected because of their typical Balearic - Majorca, Minorca or Ibiza - lineages and according to their ancestor's place of birth. Our aim was to establish the genetic relationship between Majorcan Chuetas, and Balearic and other Jewish and Mediterranean populations. Our results have shown that, to a remarkable extent, they have retained their biological identity, with a unique pattern, in terms of gene and haplotype frequencies, separate from the other populations of Majorca. The Chuetas were found to be more related to Moroccan and Libyan Jews than other Majorcans. Characteristic Jewish haplotypes, A26-B38-DRB1*13, A24-B38-DRB1*11, A1-B52-DRB1*15/16, were found in our study. Some peculiarities were observed in the distribution of common haplotypes among the three main Balearic Islands. The Ibizan population was genetically different from the other Balearic populations, with a high frequency of some haplotypes, for example, A29-Cw*16-B44-DRB1*07-DQB1*03; A1-Cw*07-B8-DRB1*03-DQB1*02. We also found a new haplotype, A25-Cw*12-B39-DRB1*11-DQB1*03(3.5%), in Ibizans and a more limited variability in the HLA alleles that were expressed, perhaps because of genetic isolation. The genetic diversity of the populations from Majorca and Minorca were similar and more related to the mainland Spanish population. PMID:12472657

  13. 114. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  14. 113. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. 112. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  16. 33 CFR 110.52 - Thames River, New London, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Thames River, New London, Conn... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.52 Thames River, New London, Conn. (a) Area No... Academy, New London, Connecticut....

  17. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  18. Recognising and Developing Urban Teachers: Chartered London Teacher Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubb, Sara; Porritt, Vivienne

    2008-01-01

    Chartered London Teacher (CLT) status is a unique scheme designed by London Challenge to recognise and reward teachers' achievements and provide a framework for professional development. As well as having the prestige of being a Chartered London Teacher for life, educators receive a one-time payment of 1,000 British pounds from the school budget…

  19. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  20. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  1. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  2. 33 CFR 110.52 - Thames River, New London, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Thames River, New London, Conn... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.52 Thames River, New London, Conn. (a) Area No... Academy, New London, Connecticut....

  3. 33 CFR 110.52 - Thames River, New London, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Thames River, New London, Conn... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.52 Thames River, New London, Conn. (a) Area No... Academy, New London, Connecticut....

  4. 32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONN. OCTOBER 3, 1932. COMPLETION OF ERECTION OF STEELWORK FOR ELEVATOR. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  5. 30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF PHOTO CAPTIONED 'SUBMARINE BASE, NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT. 2 JUNE 1930. SUBMARINE TRAINING TANK - STEELWORK 98% COMPLETE; BRICKWORK 95% COMPLETE, PIPING 10% IN PLACE. LOOKING NORTH. CONTRACT NO. Y-1539-ELEVATOR, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TANK.' - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  6. Extermination of the Jewish mentally-ill during the Nazi era--the "doubly cursed".

    PubMed

    Strous, Rael

    2008-01-01

    In Nazi Germany, physicians initiated a program of sterilization and euthanasia directed at the mentally-ill and physically disabled. Relatively little is known regarding the fate of the Jewish mentally-ill. Jewish mentally-ill were definitely included and targeted and were among the first who fell victim. They were systematically murdered following transfer as a specialized group, as well as killed in the general euthanasia program along with non-Jewish mentally ill. Their murder constituted an important link between euthanasia and the Final Solution. The targeting of the Jewish mentally-ill was comprised of four processes including public assistance withdrawal, hospital treatment limitations, sterilization and murder. Jewish "patients" became indiscriminate victims not only on the basis of psychiatric diagnosis, but also on the basis of race. The killing was efficiently coordinated with assembly in collection centers prior to being transferred to their deaths. The process included deceiving Jewish patients' family members and caregivers in order to extract financial support long after patients had been killed. Jewish patients were targeted since they were helpless and considered the embodiment of evil. Since nobody stood up for the Jews, the Nazis could treat the Jewish patients as they saw fit. Several differences existed between euthanasia of Jews and non-Jews, among which the Jewish mentally-ill were killed regardless of work ability, hospitalization length or illness severity. Furthermore, there was discrimination in the process leading up to killing (overcrowding, less food). For the Nazis, Jewish mentally-ill patients were unique among victims in that they embodied both "hazardous genes" and "racial toxins." For many years there has been silence relating to the fate of the Jewish mentally-ill. This deserves to be corrected. PMID:19439830

  7. Calling Integration into Question: A Discourse Analysis of English and "Humash" Classes at a Modern Orthodox Yeshiva High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Devra

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on discourse analysis and critical literacy, this study calls into question prevailing assumptions about integration by examining talk in English and "Humash" classrooms as windows into the two worlds of a Modern Orthodox high school. The study found that the two subjects presented very different models of teaching and learning. "Humash"…

  8. Seed Longevity and deterioration in orthodox seed: A perspective based on structural stability of Visco-Elastic Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longevity of orthodox seeds during storage under controlled conditions can be estimated by mathematical models describing general temperature and moisture responses and accounting for variation within species by the initial seed quality. Despite the well-known trends, longevity of a particular see...

  9. Limits of desiccation tolerance in developing embryos of Pritchardia remota (Arecaceae): the orthodox-recalcitrant seed paradigm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orthodox and recalcitrant seeds are distinguished by the ability of embryos to survive desiccation. Seeds of many palm species do not conform to the dichotomous classification and storage physiology is considered intermediate or ambiguous. We studied the acquisition of desiccation tolerance in embr...

  10. Are Londoners Prepared for an Emergency? A Longitudinal Study Following the London Bombings

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, James; Amlôt, Richard; Simpson, John; Wessely, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The UK government sees increasing individual preparedness as a priority, but the level of preparedness of people in the UK for a large-scale emergency is not known. The London bombings of July 7, 2005, affected many Londoners and may have altered their sense of vulnerability to a future terrorist attack. We used a longitudinal study design to assess individual preparedness within the same sample of Londoners at 2 points in time: immediately after the bombings (T1) and 7 to 8 months later (T2). A demographically representative sample of 1,010 Londoners participated in a phone interview at T1. Subsequently, at T2, 574 of the same people participated in a follow-up phone interview. At T1 51% of Londoners had made 4 or more relevant emergency plans; 48% had gathered 4 or more relevant supplies in case of emergency. There was evidence of increased preparedness at T2, by which time 90% had made 4 or more emergency plans. Ethnicity, low social status, and having felt a sense of threat during the bombings predicted increased preparedness between T1 and T2. Women in general, and women of low social status in particular, perceived themselves to be unprepared in the event of a future terrorist attack. In summary, Londoners show moderate levels of emergency preparedness, which increased following the London bombings. Although we cannot know whether this association is causal, the prospective nature of the study increases the likelihood that it is. However, preparedness is still patchy, and there are important demographic associations with levels of preparedness and perception of vulnerability. These findings have implications for future development of individual and community emergency preparedness policy. PMID:19117430

  11. The 2015 Pregnancy Summit, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Cherynne

    2016-03-01

    Pregnancy Summit, Cineworld, The O2, London, UK, 29 September to 1 October 2015 The 2015 Pregnancy Summit was held over 3 days from 29 September to 1 October at Cineworld, The O2, London, UK. The event brings together a multidisciplinary faculty of international researchers and clinicians to discuss both scientific and clinical aspects of pregnancy-related issues in an informal setting. The goal of the meeting was to provide delegates with an update of recent advances in management of pregnancy-related conditions, to present research data and to discuss the current attitudes and practices in relevant topics. An extensive range of topics were discussed, from preeclampsia and treatment of hypertension, to the psychological impact of termination of pregnancy and feticide. This report will summarize a selection of the lectures presented. PMID:26900652

  12. Good medicine and bad medicine: science to promote the convergence of "alternative" and orthodox medicine.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, John M

    2004-06-21

    A complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) system divorced from scientific medicine means that patients can only benefit from the best of both systems by dividing their care. Science must be used to stimulate convergence of complementary and traditional healthcare. First class research to examine the more interesting claims of the alternative health industry is essential to broaden the range of therapeutic options available, while minimising fraudulent, ill-informed and sometimes dangerous practices. Mutual respect and interest between orthodox and alternative practitioners is appropriate, but there can be no compromise involving unscientific approaches to care. Health departments must play a greater role in stopping fraudulent claims being publicised, and in warning consumers about such claims. PMID:15200367

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Major Phytochemicals in Orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis), Oxidized under Compressed Air Environment.

    PubMed

    Panda, Brajesh Kumar; Datta, Ashis Kumar

    2016-04-01

    This study describes major changes in phytochemical composition of orthodox tea (Camellia sinensis var. Assamica) oxidized under compressed air (CA). The experiments for oxidation were conducted under air pressure (101, 202, and 303 kPa) for 150 min. Relative change in the concentrations of caffeine, catechins, theaflavins (TF), and thearubigins (TR) were analyzed. Effect of CA pressure was found to be nonsignificant in regulating caffeine concentration during oxidation. But degradation in different catechins as well as formation of different TF was significantly affected by CA pressure. At high CA pressure, TF showed highest peak value. TR was found to have slower rate of formation during initial phase of oxidation than TF. Even though the rate of TR formation was significantly influenced by CA, a portion of catechins remained unoxidized at end of oxidation. Except caffeine, the percent change in rate of formation or degradation were more prominent at 202 kPa. PMID:26970442

  14. Bibliography on the Jewish Woman: A Comprehensive and Annotated Listing of Works Published 1900-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Aviva, Comp.

    This bibliography presents over 600 references to books, articles, essays, and journals which explore the history, values, problems, literature, and current life of Jewish women. The bibliography is designed to be used by researchers and teachers in Jewish and women's studies, sociology, history, and literature; by directors, workers, and members…

  15. The Challenge of Ethical Liberalism to Jewish Education in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to "Reinventing Jewish Education for the 21st Century" by Jonathan Woocher. The author agrees with Jonathan Woocher that American Jewish education in the 21st century requires change no less comprehensive than that initiated by Samson Benderly and his students around a century ago, and that this should…

  16. Jewish Youth in Texas: Toward a Multi-Methodological Approach to Minority Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Erik H.; Bar-Shalom, Yehuda

    2006-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative research methods are used to examine the religious and ethnic identity of youth attending a Jewish summer camp in Texas. A strong aspect of participants' Jewish identity is formulated in reaction to the surrounding Christian society, with which they negotiate a compromise to live relatively comfortably. The informal…

  17. Moral Courage from the Perspective of Arab Teachers in Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratz, Lea

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims to call attention to the phenomenon of female Muslim Arab teachers teaching in Israeli Jewish schools. The study examined the manner in which these female Muslim Arab teachers perceived their integration into the milieu of the Jewish schools, based on their descriptions of the various processes they experience when dealing…

  18. Examining Social Perceptions between Arab and Jewish Children through Human Figure Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yedidia, Tova; Lipschitz-Elchawi, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined social perceptions among 191 Arab and Jewish children who live in mixed neighborhoods in Israel. Human Figure Drawing assessment was used to examine the children's social perceptions. The drawings that the Jewish Israeli children created portrayed Arabs as the enemy, whereas the Arab Israeli children expressed a more positive…

  19. Values in Tension: Israel Education at a U.S. Jewish Day School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakai, Sivan

    2011-01-01

    The Naphtali Herz Imber Jewish Day School proudly proclaimed its commitment to Israel, yet many of its students experienced profound ambivalence toward the Jewish State. Why? The school was committed to a series of contradictory values which surfaced in its approach to Israel education. This article outlines three distinct yet interrelated…

  20. Case Studies of North American Jewish Educators: Attitudes Regarding Israel and Israel Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell-Kligler, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    The role of Israel in the identity of North American Jews is of concern and interest to community leaders, philosophers of Jewish education, and most important, practitioners in the field. Although there is an awareness of the need to help emerging Jewish educators grapple with the complex questions surrounding Israel engagement, little research…

  1. 3 CFR 8966 - Proclamation 8966 of April 30, 2013. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proclamation 8966 of April 30, 2013. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2013 8966 Proclamation 8966 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8966 of April 30, 2013 Proc. 8966 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2013By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation In his second year...

  2. Teaching "Teacha!" An Exploration of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    This case study examines the contours of culturally relevant pedagogy in an undergraduate preservice teacher education program for Jewish women. The case describes how the assigned reading of Albarelli's (2000) narrative of teaching in a Hasidic Jewish school, "Teacha! Stories from a Yeshiva", disrupts the classroom community,…

  3. The Challenges of Autonomy: Curricular Decisions in Reform Jewish Day Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeldin, Michael

    This study examined the process by which Reform Jewish day schools translate philosophy into curriculum. A Reform day school is defined as a full-time school that encompasses both secular and Jewish studies, extends at least from kindergarten through grade six, and is sponsored by one or more Reform congregations. Seven schools participated.…

  4. Self-Concept in Young Adults with a Learning Disability from the Jewish Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunning, Karen; Steel, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A small pilot study was conducted to explore the self-concept of young people with a learning disability from a Jewish community in an inner city area. Four young people participated in the project. All attended a college dedicated to the further education of people with special needs from the Jewish community. Semi-structured interviews were…

  5. Teachable Moments in Jewish Education: An Informal Approach in a Reform Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Erik H.; Bar-Shalom, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing "teachable moments" within daily situations to impart knowledge and transmit values is a type of informal education. In a structured camp environment, such teachable moments may be integrated into the educational curriculum. "Jewish teachable moments" may be used to address Judaism and Jewish Peoplehood holistically, as the educators and…

  6. 3 CFR 8513 - Proclamation 8513 of April 30, 2010. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Heritage Month, 2010 8513 Proclamation 8513 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8513 of April 30, 2010 Proc. 8513 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2010By the President of the United States of... maintained their own unique identity. During Jewish American Heritage Month we celebrate this proud...

  7. Pedagogies of Interpretation, Argumentation, and Formation: From Understanding to Identity in Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Lee S.

    2008-01-01

    The author summarizes current thinking about signature pedagogies in "learning to profess" and explores the extent to which these ideas apply to Jewish education. Three signature pedagogies for Jewish education are proposed: the d'var Torah, "chevruta", and pedagogies of argumentation ("machloket"). (Contains 1 figure.)

  8. Introducing a Brief Measure of Cultural and Religious Identification in American Jewish Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Friedman, Michelle L.; Miller, Matthew J.; Ellis, Michael V.; Friedlander, Lee K.; Mikhaylov, Vadim G.

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted 3 studies to develop and investigate the psychometric properties of the American Jewish Identity Scales (AJIS), a brief self-report measure that assesses cultural identification and religious identification. Study 1 assessed the content validity of the item pool using an expert panel. In Study 2, 1,884 Jewish adults completed…

  9. Seminary Education and Christian-Jewish Relations. A Curriculum and Resource Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Eugene J.

    Intended for use in Roman Catholic seminaries to educate in their ecumenical and interfaith responsibilities those in training to become priests, this handbook discusses the manifold implications of Jewish-Christian relations. It is recommended that the topic of Jewish-Christian relations be integrated into the existing areas of seminary study.…

  10. Intentions for Advice and Help Seeking among Jewish and Arab Youth in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Moshe; Karnieli-Miller, Orit

    2007-01-01

    This study dealt with advice and help-seeking intentions of Jewish and Arab youth in Israel toward family, friends, and professionals in relation to their interpersonal relationships with family and friends. The random sample consisted of 865 participants: 653 Jewish and 212 Arab youths. Four original instruments were used. The first consisted of…

  11. Attitudes toward Dating Violence among Jewish and Arab Youth in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to assess the attitudes toward dating violence among Jewish and Arab male and female adolescents in Israel. The random sample consisted of 1,357 participants from among 9th to 12th grade pupils enrolled in eight Arab and eight Jewish junior and senior high schools. The study assessed attitudes toward…

  12. 3 CFR 8660 - Proclamation 8660 of April 29, 2011. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the days of the American Revolution as devoted service members and chaplains, and they continue to... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Proclamation 8660 of April 29, 2011. Jewish American... 29, 2011 Proc. 8660 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2011By the President of the United States...

  13. Living Together Apart: Residential Segregation in Mixed Arab-Jewish Cities in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falah, Ghazi

    1996-01-01

    Examines features of residential segregation in five mixed Arab-Jewish cities in Israel and the role of ideology and state politics among the charter group (Jewish) as a dominant factor in this social process. Findings reveal all five cities exhibit high indices of segregation and hypersegregation--a situation of neighbors without neighborly…

  14. Building a Community of Young Leaders: Experiential Learning in Jewish Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lough, Benjamin J.; Thomas, Margaret M. C.

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether more frequent participation in Jewish activist learning events is associated with higher levels of engagement in social justice-related activities and conceptions of Jewish identity. The study design was cross-sectional and comparative. An online survey was completed by 165 participants in an activist learning program.…

  15. Jewish and Korean Merchants in African American Neighborhoods: A Comparative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Edward T.

    1993-01-01

    Compares the Jewish-African American conflicts of the 1960s with Korean-African American tensions of the 1980s and 1990s. Both relationships reflect a fundamental issue of economic exploitation of African-American residents by Jewish and Korean merchants. Class is another major element of interethnic relations. (SLD)

  16. Parental Coping with Developmental Disorders in Adolescents within the Ultraorthodox Jewish Community in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manor-Binyamini, Iris

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary study compares the coping strategies used by 100 ultraorthodox Jewish parents and 100 secular Jewish parents for dealing with adolescent children with developmental disorders. The parents completed two questionnaires on the sense of stress-related personal growth and the sense of coherence. The ultraorthodox parents reported a…

  17. Theorizing Psychosocial Processes in Canadian, Middle-Class, Jewish Mothers' School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine-Rasky, Cynthia; Ringrose, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a psychosocial analysis of interview data of three Canadian, middle-class, Jewish mothers engaged in processes and practices of "school choice". We consider how middle-class, white identity intersects with Jewish ethnicity. We also examine how commitments to Canadian ideals of multiculturalism sit in contradiction with…

  18. Opening Up Jewish Education to Inspection: The Impact of the OFSTED Inspection System in England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiner, Judy

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of the first government inspections of Jewish schools in England by the Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED) shows mismatches between the schools' declared aims for Jewish Studies, and their practices, as well as problems in the teaching of Hebrew. (SLD)

  19. Preparing Jewish Educators: The Research We Have, the Research We Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman-Nemser, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the research we have and the research we need in both general and Jewish teacher education. First, I discuss three recent efforts to synthesize and assess existing research in teacher education and to identify needed research. Next I review a handful of recent studies in Jewish teacher education which illustrate various…

  20. Designing a Curriculum Model for the Teaching of the Bible in UK Jewish Secondary Schools: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Eli

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the process of designing a curriculum model for Bible teaching in UK Jewish secondary schools. This model was designed over the period 2008-2010 by a team of curriculum specialists from the Jewish Curriculum Partnership UK in collaboration with a group of teachers from Jewish secondary schools. The paper first outlines the…

  1. The fate of Hungarian Jewish dermatologists during the Holocaust Part 1: Six refugees who fled.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Walter H C; Bock, Julia; Hoenig, Leonard J; Parish, Lawrence Charles

    2016-01-01

    From the times of Moritz Kaposi, Hungarian Jewish physicians have significantly contributed to the development of dermatology. Part 1 of this special report highlights some of the early Jewish dermatologists in Hungary. It also tells the stories of five Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who fled anti-Semitism in Hungary, or other European countries, between 1920 and 1941: Frederick Reiss, Emery Kocsard, Stephen Rothman, Peter Flesch, and George Csonka. A sixth Hungarian dermatologist, Tibor Benedek, was persecuted by the Nazis, because he had a Jewish wife, forcing the couple to flee Germany. Part 2 will focus on the ordeal faced by Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who did not leave their homeland during World War II. PMID:26903191

  2. March of the living, a holocaust educational tour: effect on adolescent Jewish identity.

    PubMed

    Nager, Alan L; Pham, Phung; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2013-12-01

    March of the Living (MOTL) is a worldwide two-week trip for high school seniors to learn about the Holocaust by traveling to sites of concentration/death camps and Jewish historical sites in Poland and Israel. The mission statement of MOTL International states that participants will be able to "bolster their Jewish identity by acquainting them with the rich Jewish heritage in pre-war Eastern Europe." However, this claim has never been studied quantitatively. Therefore, 152 adolescents who participated in MOTL voluntarily completed an initial background questionnaire, a Jewish Identity Survey and a Global Domains Survey pre-MOTL, end-Poland and end-Israel. Results suggest that Jewish identity did not substantially increase overall or from one time period to the next. PMID:23801019

  3. The Mass Campaign to Eradicate Ringworm Among the Jewish Community in Eastern Europe, 1921–1938

    PubMed Central

    Romem, Pnina; Romem, Yitzhak; Shani, Mordechai

    2013-01-01

    Between the years 1921 and 1938, 27 600 children were irradiated during a mass campaign to eradicate ringworm among the Jewish community in East Europe. The ringworm campaign was the initiative of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee together with the Jewish health maintenance organization OZE (The Society for the Protection of Jewish Health). We describe this campaign that used x-rays to eradicate ringworm and its mission to enhance public health among Jewish communities in Eastern Europe during the period between the world wars. We discuss the concepts behind the campaign, the primary health agents that participated in it, and the latent medical ramifications that were found among children treated for ringworm, many years after treatment—pathologies that can be linked to the irradiation they received as children. Our research is based on historical archival materials in the United States, Europe, and Israel. PMID:23409897

  4. [Jewish physicians and neophytes in Provence (1460-1525)].

    PubMed

    Iancu-Agou, D

    1998-11-01

    The legal archives of Provence (France) allows study of the lineage of Jewish physicians and their problems after their expulsion in 1501. This was possible because in Aix, there is much information on their community, trade, family and intellectual interests. Accordingly, we could follow the changes observed in the families of the physicians; these ilim judei who were leading citizens. They were also rationalist and often decided to adopt the religion of the majority. Was their medicine transmitted to the next generation? Which profession was chosen by their sons and their family? What was their heritage? PMID:11638860

  5. QA (Quality Assurance) role in advanced energy activities: Towards an /open quotes/orthodox/close quotes/ Quality Program: Canonizing the traditions at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.W.

    1988-02-01

    After a brief description of the goal of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) this paper poses and answers three questions related to Quality Assurance (QA) at the Laboratory. First, what is the difference between 'orthodox' and 'unorthodox' QA and is there a place for 'orthodox' QA at a laboratory like Fermilab. Second, are the deeper philosophical and cultural frameworks of high-energy physics acommodating or antagonistic to an 'orthodox' QA Program. Finally, faced with the task of developing an institutional QA program for Fermilab where does one begin. The paper is based on experience with the on-going development and implementation of an institutional QA Program at Fermilab. 10 refs.

  6. Goiter in portraits of Judith the Jewish heroine

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Davide; Castello, Manuel Francisco; Lippi, Donatella; Weisz, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Judith was a legendary Hebrew heroine who beheaded the general Holofernes and saved the children of Israel from destruction by the Assyrian army. In the Book of Judith, which is still present in the Catholic and Orthodox Christian Bibles, Judith is presented as an illustrious woman who defeated the enemy using her virtue and fortitude. The present investigation has revealed 24 portraits in which Judith has been depicted with variable grades of thyroid gland enlargement on the scene where she decapitates Holofernes. There is no doubt that the integration of a slight thyroid enlargement in the paintings is a stylistic hallmark that portrays an idealized female beauty with a balanced neck and graceful body. The large extended goiter was probably depicted by the artists as a symbol of a powerful masculine body and her courage, and at the same time, it probably also reflects better anatomic accuracy and knowledge of artists from that period. PMID:26904480

  7. Delivering Bad News: An Approach According to Jewish Scriptures

    PubMed Central

    Naimer, Sody A.; Prero, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Despite a preoccupation in the medical literature with developing an effective approach for breaking bad news, the sources are based on personal opinion alone and only in some instances on qualitative research. Recognizing the gravity of this topic coupled with respect for the wisdom of the written and oral Jewish scriptures, this work is an attempt to delve into the diverse ancient writings to draw conclusions regarding a recommended methodology to guide and inform this task. It is interesting to learn that most elements related to this topic have previously been raised in various forms in the scriptures. The issues range from where, when, and how the bearer of bad news should undertake this duty, to details such as the environment, the format, the speed, and depth of the details to be disclosed. The essence of this paper is to enrich the reader using both positive and negative examples found in the Jewish heritage. Adopting these principles will hopefully provide an effective method for performing this unpleasant obligation, with the goal of limiting harmful consequences as much as possible. PMID:25120920

  8. Skin lighteners, Black consumers and Jewish entrepreneurs in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lynn M

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the rise and decline of South Africa's lucrative and controversial skin-lighteners market through examination of the business history of the largest manufacturers, Abraham and Solomon Krok, and their evolving personas as millionaires and philanthropists. Such examination reveals how the country's skin-lighteners trade emerged as part of the broader growth of a black consumer market after the Second World War and how elements of that market became the target of anti-apartheid protests in subsequent decades. It also demonstrates how the Kroks' experiences as second-generation Jewish immigrants shaped their involvement in the trade and how, later, their self-identification as Jewish philanthropists informed their efforts to rehabilitate their reputations following South Africa's 1990 ban on all skin lighteners. Such efforts include the building of Johannesburg's highly acclaimed Apartheid Museum, modelled after the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. This article explores the profound ironies that some South Africans see in the fact that a museum dedicated to commemorating those who suffered under and, ultimately, triumphed against state racism was financed by a family fortune generated through the sale of skin lighteners to black consumers. PMID:22830098

  9. Delivering bad news: an approach according to jewish scriptures.

    PubMed

    Naimer, Sody A; Prero, Moshe

    2014-07-01

    Despite a preoccupation in the medical literature with developing an effective approach for breaking bad news, the sources are based on personal opinion alone and only in some instances on qualitative research. Recognizing the gravity of this topic coupled with respect for the wisdom of the written and oral Jewish scriptures, this work is an attempt to delve into the diverse ancient writings to draw conclusions regarding a recommended methodology to guide and inform this task. It is interesting to learn that most elements related to this topic have previously been raised in various forms in the scriptures. The issues range from where, when, and how the bearer of bad news should undertake this duty, to details such as the environment, the format, the speed, and depth of the details to be disclosed. The essence of this paper is to enrich the reader using both positive and negative examples found in the Jewish heritage. Adopting these principles will hopefully provide an effective method for performing this unpleasant obligation, with the goal of limiting harmful consequences as much as possible. PMID:25120920

  10. Presence of Legionella in London's water supplies.

    PubMed

    Colbourne, J S; Trew, R M

    1986-09-01

    Legionella occurs frequently (52 to 54%) in domestic water and cooling water inside commercial, industrial and health care buildings, and these types of water systems are now regarded as a normal habitat for Legionella. The factors that predispose a particular water system to colonization by these organisms are ill-defined, although it is fairly certain that biological and physicochemical environmental factors play an important role in allowing Legionella to multiply in the circulating water. It has been postulated that the organism may gain access to water systems inside buildings by one of three routes: contact with air through open points such as uncovered storage tanks or vents, ingress of soil or surface water during construction or repair, or intermittent seeding with organisms present in low numbers in the public water supply. Three studies in the USA have found Legionella in 0.4 to 8.8% of drinking-water samples, but these were not representative of the public supply network as a whole. The aim of this study was to determine, over a period of 1 year, the frequency of Legionella in London's drinking water--from the treatment plant through to the consumer's tap. To date, Legionella has not been isolated from raw river water entering London's treatment works or from treated water entering the distribution network. Sixty-two monitoring taps in buildings located in 21 supply areas have been sampled twice for Legionella; only 2 (2.4%) have proved positive during the autumn and winter of 1985/86. The strain found was L. pneumophila serotype 1, subgroup Olda, and the numbers ranged from 10(2) to 10(4)/l. Although the survey is incomplete, it is already clear that the public water supplies in London are not a source of strains of Legionella associated with disease. PMID:3793445

  11. The worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London.

    PubMed

    Hunting, P

    2004-01-01

    The Society of Apothecaries is both a City livery company and an examining authority for the medical profession. Founded in 1617 by the royal apothecary Gideon de Laune leading a breakaway group from the Grocers' Company, the Society was instrumental in raising the status of apothecaries as general practitioners. Under the Apothecaries' Act (1815) the Society examined for the LSA and it now awards the LMSSA (Licence in Medicine and Surgery of the Society of Apothecaries) and postgraduate diplomas, while maintaining the civic, charitable, and ceremonial traditions of a livery company of the City of London. PMID:14760181

  12. Ritual encounters of the queer kind: a political analysis of jewish lesbian ritual innovation.

    PubMed

    Brettschneider, Marla

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY Jewish feminist and queer engagement in Jewish life and Judaism are transforming the practices and foundational orientations of traditional modes. Jewish feminist, queer ritual innovation in particular is inspired by an array of secular and radical critical theories as much as it is by the historic concrete experiences of a diversity of Jews in different Jewish communities. It is important to hold all of us who are involved in religious ritual innovation responsible to the knowledges we have developed and learned in critical theory or we risk, even with the best of intentions and creativity, re-inscribing some of the very problems of traditional ontological norms that we might have originally sought to disrupt and subvert. This article looks specifically at examples of new "coming out" rituals for Jewish queers explored over time in the Jewish Queer Think Tank: honoring them as well as offering tools from secular critical theory to assist our work in keeping them accountable to our aspirations to both love and fundamentally transform Jewishness. Here I redefine the function of religious ritual itself in political terms as an identity-producing performance. As such I utilize social constructionist queer theories (i.e., Shane Phelan and Judith Butler), anarchists (i.e., Emma Goldman), and those involved in radical theatre (i.e., Augusto Boal) to articulate the revolutionary potential of ritual innovation. PMID:24815893

  13. Social psychological origins of conspiracy theories: the case of the jewish conspiracy theory in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined correlates of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory among Malays in Malaysia, a culture in which state-directed conspiracism as a means of dealing with perceived external and internal threats is widespread. In Study 1, 368 participants from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, completed a novel measure of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory, along with measures of general conspiracist ideation, and anomie. Initial analysis showed that the novel scale factorially reduced to a single dimension. Further analysis showed that belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory was only significantly associated with general conspiracist ideation, but the strength of the association was weak. In Study 2, 314 participants completed the measure of belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory, along with measures of general conspiracist ideation, and ideological attitudes. Results showed that belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory was associated with anti-Israeli attitudes, modern racism directed at the Chinese, right-wing authoritarianism, and social dominance orientation. General conspiracist ideation did not emerge as a significant predictor once other variables had been accounted for. These results suggest that there may be specific cultural and social psychological forces that drive belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory within the Malaysian context. Specifically, belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory among Malaysian Malays appears to serve ideological needs and as a mask for anti-Chinese sentiment, which may in turn reaffirm their perceived ability to shape socio-political processes. PMID:22888323

  14. Social Psychological Origins of Conspiracy Theories: The Case of the Jewish Conspiracy Theory in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Viren

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined correlates of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory among Malays in Malaysia, a culture in which state-directed conspiracism as a means of dealing with perceived external and internal threats is widespread. In Study 1, 368 participants from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, completed a novel measure of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory, along with measures of general conspiracist ideation, and anomie. Initial analysis showed that the novel scale factorially reduced to a single dimension. Further analysis showed that belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory was only significantly associated with general conspiracist ideation, but the strength of the association was weak. In Study 2, 314 participants completed the measure of belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory, along with measures of general conspiracist ideation, and ideological attitudes. Results showed that belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory was associated with anti-Israeli attitudes, modern racism directed at the Chinese, right-wing authoritarianism, and social dominance orientation. General conspiracist ideation did not emerge as a significant predictor once other variables had been accounted for. These results suggest that there may be specific cultural and social psychological forces that drive belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory within the Malaysian context. Specifically, belief in the Jewish conspiracy theory among Malaysian Malays appears to serve ideological needs and as a mask for anti-Chinese sentiment, which may in turn reaffirm their perceived ability to shape socio-political processes. PMID:22888323

  15. Experiential Approaches to the Global City: London as Social Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gristwood, Anthony; Woolf, Michael

    2011-01-01

    London is the paramount example of a city that is not bounded by its geography and cannot be grasped in isolation. The U.K.'s national capital and the prime focus for business, finance and creative industries, London also transcends the U.K.'s borders as a hub of the world economy. This paper argues that London, a city riddled by the socioeconomic…

  16. Studies on quality of orthodox teas made from anthocyanin-rich tea clones growing in Kangra valley, India.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Robin; Rana, Ajay; Gulati, Ashu

    2015-06-01

    Recently anthocyanin-rich purple tea varieties have been developed. The quality of these new purple tea varieties developed in Kangra valley was assessed, and compared with the quality of tea from standard Kangra clone. Purple tea shoots (PL) recorded higher amount of polyphenols compared to standard green tea shoot (GL) while epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) recorded higher levels in GL. Higher levels of theaflavins were recorded in orthodox black tea from purple shoots (BTP) compared to black tea (BT) made from green shoots. Both theanine and caffeine recorded higher levels in GL. Volatile flavour profiles of these teas showed qualitative and quantitative differences. Aroma extract dilution assay showed higher dilution factors in BTP than BT. Orthodox teas from purple shoots exhibited higher antioxidant activity compared to standard black tea. Strong correlation of total quality scores with aroma and infusion colour was observed. Tea from anthocyanin-rich cultivars can become specialty teas with high antioxidant activity. PMID:25624244

  17. Teacher Perceptions about the Importance of Parental Involvement for Included Students with Learning Disabilities in New York Metropolitan Area Orthodox Yeshivas and Day Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Goldie Eichorn

    2010-01-01

    The population of students attending Jewish day schools includes an increasing number of students with exceptional needs. How Jewish schools meet the needs of these students is an important question. Inclusive education is a service model predicated on legal and philosophical mores as well as pedagogical and psychological findings. The quality of…

  18. On a Resolution Concept Concerning the Calendar Reform submitted to the Pan-Orthodox Congress in Constantinople in 1923

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajkovska, V.; Ninkovic, S.

    2008-10-01

    The present paper deals with a document concerning the calendar reform which was addressed to the Pan-Orthodox Conference in Constantinople in 1923. The document was written in German using the Gothic letters and the author's name is Gustav Baron Bedeus from Hermannstadt (today Sibiu, Romania). Independently of the proposal he considers that the task of calendar regulating belongs to a state and for this reason a world conference gathering all states and churches aimed at calendar reform could be organized.

  19. The interactions between an orthodox Christian worldview and environmental attitudes and beliefs; for the purpose of developing better instructional practice in support of environmental/ecological attitudes and knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keys, Robert S.

    Students bring with them to the classroom a wide variety of beliefs and attitudes about the environment and its associated issues. One worldview belief structure prominently discussed in ecological discussions is the worldview of orthodox Christianity. This study uses both quantitative and qualitative measures to analyze the degree to which the orthodox Christian worldview of students influences their environmental attitudes and beliefs. Surveys were conducted with 281 undergraduate pre-service elementary teaching students enrolled in a science methods course to determine the degree to which orthodox Christian worldviews and ecological worldviews interact with one another. From this pool of students, 16 students representing both positive and neutral-negative orthodox Christian worldviews and ecological worldviews were interviewed to determine how orthodox Christian students may differ from non-orthodox Christian students in their attitudes and beliefs about the environment. Analysis revealed that students with orthodox Christian worldview beliefs do not as a general rule use their orthodox Christian worldview beliefs in the discussion of their environmental beliefs and attitudes. Exceptions to this may occur when environmental issues touch on orthodox Christian worldview beliefs which have a bearing on matters of origin, life purpose, or destiny. These interactions between ecological and orthodox Christian worldviews have implications for the teaching of environmental issues to students in that the orthodox Christian worldview of students is not likely to hinder the appropriation of concepts associated with environmental issues. However, moving students with an orthodox Christian worldview to a view where they become actively involved in environmental issue resolution may require educators to situate curriculum in such a way as to invoke the students' orthodox Christian worldview beliefs.

  20. Fractionation and identification of minor and aroma-active constituents in Kangra orthodox black tea.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Robin; Gulati, Ashu

    2015-01-15

    The aroma constituents of Kangra orthodox black tea were isolated by simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE), supercritical fluid extraction and beverage method. The aroma-active compounds were identified using gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry. Geraniol, linalool, (Z/E)-linalool oxides, (E)-2-hexenal, phytol, β-ionone, hotrienol, methylpyrazine and methyl salicylate were major volatile constituents in all the extracts. Minor volatile compounds in all the extracts were 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, ethylpyrazine, 2-6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone, acetylfuran, hexanoic acid, dihydroactinidiolide and (E/Z)-2,6-nonadienal. The concentrated SDE extract was fractionated into acidic, basic, water-soluble and neutral fractions. The neutral fraction was further chromatographed on a packed silica gel column eluted with pentane and diethyl ether to separate minor compounds. The aroma-active compounds identified using gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry were 2-amylfuran, (E/Z)-2,6-nonadienal, 1-pentanol, epoxylinalool, (Z)-jasmone, 2-acetylpyrrole, farnesyl acetone, geranyl acetone, cadinol, cubenol and dihydroactinidiolide. AEDA studies showed 2-hexenal, 3-hexenol, ethylpyrazine, (Z/E)-linalool oxides, linalool, (E/Z)-2,6-nonadienal, geraniol, phenylethanol, β-ionone, hotrienol and dihydroactinidiolide to be odour active components. PMID:25148991

  1. [The organization of Jewish dentists in pre-Israel Palestine].

    PubMed

    Keren-Kratz, M

    2016-04-01

    The first modern dental institutes were established in Europe and in the USA during the 1840s. At that period there wasn't a single qualified doctor in Palestine, not to mention a professional dentist. A couple of decades later, as the number of Christian pilgrims grew, some modern hospitals were established and a few non-Jewish dentists opened their clinics in Jerusalem, which was then and in the following decades, the region's largest city. In Europe, dentistry became a popular profession among Jews in general and among Jewish women in particular. The first Jewish dentist settled in Jerusalem in the mid-1880s. Other dentists were slow to arrive and their number began to grow only after the turn of the 20th century. Their professional education varied from those who were trained as apprentices by other dentists to those which studied a couple of years in an academic dental school. The devastation caused by WWI prompted American-Zionist organizations to send a special medical unit to Palestine in 1918. Along medical supplies it also brought a small group of doctors and dentists. The two American dentists that decided to remain in Palestine took upon themselves to spread their medical and scientific knowledge. They also organized the dentists, whose number grew considerably during the 1920s, and called the authorities to regulate the dental profession. In 1926 the British authorities issued a decree regulating all medical professions. It demanded that dental practitioners will be licensed after proving their previous studies and professional knowledge. In 1931, local dentists' organizations decided to establish the Palestine Dental Association. Five years later it was accepted as a member by the International Dental Federation (FDI) and was recognized by the local authorities. Since the 1930s, prominent Jewish dentists from abroad were invited to come to Palestine to lecture, and local dentists participated in international conferences. This prompted the first

  2. Pig organs for transplantation into humans: a Jewish view.

    PubMed

    Rosner, F

    1999-01-01

    In view of the shortage of human organs for transplantation, intense interest has focused on the use of pig organs. Although the early rejection of pig organs by a human recipient has not yet been overcome, scientists are actively seeking to solve this problem. If and when xenotransplantation from pigs or other animals becomes scientifically feasible, Judaism will look with favor upon this procedure to prolong or save the life of a human being who is ill or dying from organ failure. Although Jewish law forbids Jews to raise or eat pigs, no such prohibition exists for the use of pigs to cure human illness or to save human lives by xenotransplantation. PMID:10618731

  3. To clone or not to clone--a Jewish perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, J H

    1999-01-01

    Many new reproductive methods such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation, freezing of human embryos, and surrogate motherhood were at first widely condemned but are now seen in Western society as not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children. The idea of human cloning was also quickly condemned but debate is now emerging. This article examines cloning from a Jewish perspective and finds evidence to support the view that there is nothing inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. A hypothesis is also advanced suggesting that even if a body was cloned, the brain, which is the essence of humanity, would remain unique. This author suggests that the debate should be changed from "Is cloning wrong?" to "When is cloning wrong?". PMID:10226913

  4. [Dr. Gustav Feldmann (1872-1947)--promoter of Jewish nursing in Germany].

    PubMed

    Kolling, H

    2000-10-01

    The origins of Jewish nursing in Germany date back to the last part of the 19th Century. In the wake of national socialism tyranny (NS-Zeit), the existence of Jewish nursing was completely destroyed. Regarding establishment and solicitous development for Jewish women, owing to a Jewish doctor living in Stuttgart Dr. Gustav Feldmann (1872-1947) whose contribution to developing new profession in the first quarter of the 20th century was not without merit. Up to now, he was hardly recognized by medical history and historical research. The following contribution serves to get a better view of his life and activities; most importantly to introduce his published work to a wide readership. PMID:11194337

  5. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE NEW LONDON HARBOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A radiological survey done to assess levels of environmental radioactivity in and around navy harbor facilities located on the Thames River near New London, Connecticut. These facilities include the New London Submarine Base at Groton, the Electric Boat Company at Groton, Sound ...

  6. Alternative Spaces of Learning in East London: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneddon, Raymonde; Martin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article emerges from an ongoing exploration into how British minority ethnic communities in the London area create spaces in community-based programs to maintain or develop their languages and literacies. In London, more than one-third of the 850,000 school children speak a language other than English at home (Baker & Eversley, 2000). This…

  7. Education in a Global City: Essays from London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brighouse, Tim, Ed.; Fullick, Leisha, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This collection of essays by academic and policy experts brings together a wide range of data to offer a clear picture of London's changing education scene. Its mapping of new and developing strategies for successful urban education will be useful to educators and policymakers not only in London but also in other cities operating in similar…

  8. Changing the Subject: English in London, 1945-1967

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yandell, John

    2014-01-01

    Two recent books, "English Teachers in a Postwar Democracy: Emerging Choice in London Schools, 1945-1965" and "The London Association for the Teaching of English, 1947-67: A History," explore an important period in the development of English as a school subject and in the remaking of the professional identity of English…

  9. Practicing Reflexivity in the Study of Italian Migrants in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seganti, Francesca Romana

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the centrality of reflexivity in qualitative research through examples from my study on the role new media play in the lives of Italians in London. My hypothesis was that Italians were "in transit" in London and they were using new media to build "temporary" communities. I conducted in-depth interviews with members of the…

  10. London in Space and Time: Peter Ackroyd and Will Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the treatment of London by two authors who are profoundly influenced by the concept of the power of place and the nature of urban space. The works of Peter Ackroyd, whose writings embody, according to Onega (1997, p. 208) "[a] yearning for mythical closure" where London is "a mystic centre of…

  11. "A Dream Not Quite Come True:" Reassessing the Benderly Era in Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Miriam Heller

    2004-01-01

    "What is Jewish education [?] I have been trying for 32 years to find out what it is, but I am still looking." In 1931 these were humble words from the mouth of Samson Benderly, one of the leading thinkers and actors in American Jewish education of his time and of the twentieth century overall--someone whom one might presume had all of the answers…

  12. Mitochondrial DNA reveals distinct evolutionary histories for Jewish populations in Yemen and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Non, Amy L; Al-Meeri, Ali; Raaum, Ryan L; Sanchez, Luisa F; Mulligan, Connie J

    2011-01-01

    Southern Arabia and the Horn of Africa are important geographic centers for the study of human population history because a great deal of migration has characterized these regions since the first emergence of humans out of Africa. Analysis of Jewish groups provides a unique opportunity to investigate more recent population histories in this area. Mitochondrial DNA is used to investigate the maternal evolutionary history and can be combined with historical and linguistic data to test various population histories. In this study, we assay mitochondrial control region DNA sequence and diagnostic coding variants in Yemenite (n = 45) and Ethiopian (n = 41) Jewish populations, as well as in neighboring non-Jewish Yemeni (n = 50) and Ethiopian (previously published Semitic speakers) populations. We investigate their population histories through a comparison of haplogroup distributions and phylogenetic networks. A high frequency of sub-Saharan African L haplogroups was found in both Jewish populations, indicating a significant African maternal contribution unlike other Jewish Diaspora populations. However, no identical haplotypes were shared between the Yemenite and Ethiopian Jewish populations, suggesting very little gene flow between the populations and potentially distinct maternal population histories. These new data are also used to investigate alternate population histories in the context of historical and linguistic data. Specifically, Yemenite Jewish mitochondrial diversity reflects potential descent from ancient Israeli exiles and shared African and Middle Eastern ancestry with little evidence for large-scale conversion of local Yemeni. In contrast, the Ethiopian Jewish population appears to be a subset of the larger Ethiopian population suggesting descent primarily through conversion of local women. PMID:20623605

  13. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome haplotype motifs as diagnostic markers of Jewish ancestry: a reconsideration

    PubMed Central

    Tofanelli, Sergio; Taglioli, Luca; Bertoncini, Stefania; Francalacci, Paolo; Klyosov, Anatole; Pagani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have proposed haplotype motifs based on site variants at the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to trace the genealogies of Jewish people. Here, we analyzed their main approaches and test the feasibility of adopting motifs as ancestry markers through construction of a large database of mtDNA and NRY haplotypes from public genetic genealogical repositories. We verified the reliability of Jewish ancestry prediction based on the Cohen and Levite Modal Haplotypes in their “classical” 6 STR marker format or in the “extended” 12 STR format, as well as four founder mtDNA lineages (HVS-I segments) accounting for about 40% of the current population of Ashkenazi Jews. For this purpose we compared haplotype composition in individuals of self-reported Jewish ancestry with the rest of European, African or Middle Eastern samples, to test for non-random association of ethno-geographic groups and haplotypes. Overall, NRY and mtDNA based motifs, previously reported to differentiate between groups, were found to be more represented in Jewish compared to non-Jewish groups. However, this seems to stem from common ancestors of Jewish lineages being rather recent respect to ancestors of non-Jewish lineages with the same “haplotype signatures.” Moreover, the polyphyly of haplotypes which contain the proposed motifs and the misuse of constant mutation rates heavily affected previous attempts to correctly dating the origin of common ancestries. Accordingly, our results stress the limitations of using the above haplotype motifs as reliable Jewish ancestry predictors and show its inadequacy for forensic or genealogical purposes. PMID:25431579

  14. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome haplotype motifs as diagnostic markers of Jewish ancestry: a reconsideration.

    PubMed

    Tofanelli, Sergio; Taglioli, Luca; Bertoncini, Stefania; Francalacci, Paolo; Klyosov, Anatole; Pagani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have proposed haplotype motifs based on site variants at the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to trace the genealogies of Jewish people. Here, we analyzed their main approaches and test the feasibility of adopting motifs as ancestry markers through construction of a large database of mtDNA and NRY haplotypes from public genetic genealogical repositories. We verified the reliability of Jewish ancestry prediction based on the Cohen and Levite Modal Haplotypes in their "classical" 6 STR marker format or in the "extended" 12 STR format, as well as four founder mtDNA lineages (HVS-I segments) accounting for about 40% of the current population of Ashkenazi Jews. For this purpose we compared haplotype composition in individuals of self-reported Jewish ancestry with the rest of European, African or Middle Eastern samples, to test for non-random association of ethno-geographic groups and haplotypes. Overall, NRY and mtDNA based motifs, previously reported to differentiate between groups, were found to be more represented in Jewish compared to non-Jewish groups. However, this seems to stem from common ancestors of Jewish lineages being rather recent respect to ancestors of non-Jewish lineages with the same "haplotype signatures." Moreover, the polyphyly of haplotypes which contain the proposed motifs and the misuse of constant mutation rates heavily affected previous attempts to correctly dating the origin of common ancestries. Accordingly, our results stress the limitations of using the above haplotype motifs as reliable Jewish ancestry predictors and show its inadequacy for forensic or genealogical purposes. PMID:25431579

  15. The London low emission zone baseline study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank; Armstrong, Ben; Atkinson, Richard; Anderson, H Ross; Barratt, Ben; Beevers, Sean; Cook, Derek; Green, Dave; Derwent, Dick; Mudway, Ian; Wilkinson, Paul

    2011-11-01

    On February 4, 2008, the world's largest low emission zone (LEZ) was established. At 2644 km2, the zone encompasses most of Greater London. It restricts the entry of the oldest and most polluting diesel vehicles, including heavy-goods vehicles (haulage trucks), buses and coaches, larger vans, and minibuses. It does not apply to cars or motorcycles. The LEZ scheme will introduce increasingly stringent Euro emissions standards over time. The creation of this zone presented a unique opportunity to estimate the effects of a stepwise reduction in vehicle emissions on air quality and health. Before undertaking such an investigation, robust baseline data were gathered on air quality and the oxidative activity and metal content of particulate matter (PM) from air pollution monitors located in Greater London. In addition, methods were developed for using databases of electronic primary-care records in order to evaluate the zone's health effects. Our study began in 2007, using information about the planned restrictions in an agreed-upon LEZ scenario and year-on-year changes in the vehicle fleet in models to predict air pollution concentrations in London for the years 2005, 2008, and 2010. Based on this detailed emissions and air pollution modeling, the areas in London were then identified that were expected to show the greatest changes in air pollution concentrations and population exposures after the implementation of the LEZ. Using these predictions, the best placement of a pollution monitoring network was determined and the feasibility of evaluating the health effects using electronic primary-care records was assessed. To measure baseline pollutant concentrations before the implementation of the LEZ, a comprehensive monitoring network was established close to major roadways and intersections. Output-difference plots from statistical modeling for 2010 indicated seven key areas likely to experience the greatest change in concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) (at least 3

  16. The mental health benefits and costs of Sabbath observance among Orthodox Jews.

    PubMed

    Dein, Simon; Loewenthal, Kate M

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the perceived psychological costs and benefits of Sabbath (Shabbos) observance among 13 practising Jews, 9 UK residents and 4 US residents. Emerging themes were as follows: Shabbos as a special day, giving time to contemplate on profound issues, withdrawal and rest from mundane concerns, and deepening relationships. These aspects can potentially improve feelings of mental well-being, and were indeed often said to do so. Some difficulties were described: some found they were prone to worry more on Shabbos because of the freedom from distractions, and there were reports of the difficulties of explaining to non-Jewish work colleagues the religious need to be free from work commitments. These findings were related to the literature on religious ritual observance and generally accord with other work in anthropology and psychology of religion examining the psychological impact of ritual. Work on the mental health implications of ritual observance needs to be expanded. It has received only limited attention, and understanding has been constrained by a misleading confusion between ritual and obsessionality. Other impacts of religion on mental health are better documented and understood, and religious ritual and its impact needs further documentation and attention. PMID:23867919

  17. Teaching the History of Astronomy On Site in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    In the autumn of 2014, the author had the opportunity to teach a class on the history of astronomy in England as part of a study abroad experience for students at Illinois Wesleyan University. The philosophy of the program is to use the rich cultural environment of London as a setting for active learning. In the classroom, students read and discussed selected works by Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Herschel. We visited Stonehenge, the Royal Greenwich Observatory, the London Science Museum, the London Monument, and the library of the Royal Astronomical Society. Lessons learned from the experience will be shared.

  18. Lidar Observations of Pollution Transport From London to Rural Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Hugo; Vaughan, Geraint; Wareing, David

    2016-06-01

    The Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) Project took place in and around London, United Kingdom. The aim of the project was to learn how both atmospheric dynamics and chemistry affect air pollution in the south east of England. During the winter and summer of 2012 many different types of instrument including lidars were deployed throughout London city centre, suburbs and into rural areas. Amongst these instruments was the Boundary Layer Aerosol/Ozone Lidar owned by the National Centre for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) in the United Kingdom. Ozone and aerosol data are presented from data collected during July and August 2012 and compared to back trajectories to identify their origins.

  19. The super-indeterminism in orthodox quantum mechanics does not implicate the reality of experimenter free will

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walleczek, J.

    2016-03-01

    The concept of ‘super-indeterminism’ captures the notion that the free choice assumption of orthodox quantum mechanics necessitates only the following requirement: an agent's free-choice performance in the selection of measurement settings must not represent an exception to the rule of irreducible quantum indeterminism in the physical universe (i.e, “universal indeterminism”). Any additional metaphysical speculation, such as to whether quantum indeterminism, i.e., intrinsic randomness, implicates the reality of experimenter “freedom”, “free will”, or “free choice”, is redundant in relation to the predictive success of orthodox quantum mechanics. Accordingly, super-indeterminism views as redundant also, from a technical standpoint, whether an affirmative or a negative answer is claimed in reference to universal indeterminism as a necessary precondition for experimenter freedom. Super-indeterminism accounts, for example, for the circular reasoning which is implicit in the free will theorem by Conway and Kochen [1,2]. The concept of super-indeterminism is of great assistance in clarifying the often misunderstood meaning of the concept of “free variables” as used by John Bell [3]. The present work argues that Bell sought an operational, effective free will theorem, one based upon the notion of “determinism without predetermination”, i.e., one wherein “free variables” represent universally uncomputable variables. In conclusion, the standard interpretation of quantum theory does not answer, and does not need to answer in order to ensure the predictive success of orthodox theory, the question of whether either incompatibilism or compatibilism is valid in relation to free-will metaphysics and to the free-will phenomenology of experimenter agents in quantum mechanics.

  20. LEA polypeptide profiling of recalcitrant and orthodox legume seeds reveals ABI3-regulated LEA protein abundance linked to desiccation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hundertmark, Michaela; Buitink, Julia

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to orthodox seeds that acquire desiccation tolerance during maturation, recalcitrant seeds are unable to survive drying. These desiccation-sensitive seeds constitute an interesting model for comparative analysis with phylogenetically close species that are desiccation tolerant. Considering the importance of LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins as protective molecules both in drought and in desiccation tolerance, the heat-stable proteome was characterized in cotyledons of the legume Castanospermum australe and it was compared with that of the orthodox model legume Medicago truncatula. RNA sequencing identified transcripts of 16 homologues out of 17 LEA genes for which polypeptides are detected in M. truncatula seeds. It is shown that for 12 LEA genes, polypeptides were either absent or strongly reduced in C. australe cotyledons compared with M. truncatula seeds. Instead, osmotically responsive, non-seed-specific dehydrins accumulated to high levels in the recalcitrant cotyledons compared with orthodox seeds. Next, M. truncatula mutants of the ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) gene were characterized. Mature Mtabi3 seeds were found to be desiccation sensitive when dried below a critical water content of 0.4g H2O g DW–1. Characterization of the LEA proteome of the Mtabi3 seeds revealed a subset of LEA proteins with severely reduced abundance that were also found to be reduced or absent in C. australe cotyledons. Transcripts of these genes were indeed shown to be ABI3 responsive. The results highlight those LEA proteins that are critical to desiccation tolerance and suggest that comparable regulatory pathways responsible for their accumulation are missing in both desiccation-sensitive genotypes, revealing new insights into the mechanistic basis of the recalcitrant trait in seeds. PMID:24043848

  1. Counting the Founders: The Matrilineal Genetic Ancestry of the Jewish Diaspora

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Doron M.; Metspalu, Ene; Kivisild, Toomas; Rosset, Saharon; Tzur, Shay; Hadid, Yarin; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Rosengarten, Dror; Pereira, Luisa; Amorim, Antonio; Kutuev, Ildus; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Villems, Richard; Skorecki, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The history of the Jewish Diaspora dates back to the Assyrian and Babylonian conquests in the Levant, followed by complex demographic and migratory trajectories over the ensuing millennia which pose a serious challenge to unraveling population genetic patterns. Here we ask whether phylogenetic analysis, based on highly resolved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenies can discern among maternal ancestries of the Diaspora. Accordingly, 1,142 samples from 14 different non-Ashkenazi Jewish communities were analyzed. A list of complete mtDNA sequences was established for all variants present at high frequency in the communities studied, along with high-resolution genotyping of all samples. Unlike the previously reported pattern observed among Ashkenazi Jews, the numerically major portion of the non-Ashkenazi Jews, currently estimated at 5 million people and comprised of the Moroccan, Iraqi, Iranian and Iberian Exile Jewish communities showed no evidence for a narrow founder effect, which did however characterize the smaller and more remote Belmonte, Indian and the two Caucasus communities. The Indian and Ethiopian Jewish sample sets suggested local female introgression, while mtDNAs in all other communities studied belong to a well-characterized West Eurasian pool of maternal lineages. Absence of sub-Saharan African mtDNA lineages among the North African Jewish communities suggests negligible or low level of admixture with females of the host populations among whom the African haplogroup (Hg) L0-L3 sub-clades variants are common. In contrast, the North African and Iberian Exile Jewish communities show influence of putative Iberian admixture as documented by mtDNA Hg HV0 variants. These findings highlight striking differences in the demographic history of the widespread Jewish Diaspora. PMID:18446216

  2. Implications for health and disease in the genetic signature of the Ashkenazi Jewish population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Relatively small, reproductively isolated populations with reduced genetic diversity may have advantages for genomewide association mapping in disease genetics. The Ashkenazi Jewish population represents a unique population for study based on its recent (< 1,000 year) history of a limited number of founders, population bottlenecks and tradition of marriage within the community. We genotyped more than 1,300 Ashkenazi Jewish healthy volunteers from the Hebrew University Genetic Resource with the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad platform. Comparison of the genotyping data with that of neighboring European and Asian populations enabled the Ashkenazi Jewish-specific component of the variance to be characterized with respect to disease-relevant alleles and pathways. Results Using clustering, principal components, and pairwise genetic distance as converging approaches, we identified an Ashkenazi Jewish-specific genetic signature that differentiated these subjects from both European and Middle Eastern samples. Most notably, gene ontology analysis of the Ashkenazi Jewish genetic signature revealed an enrichment of genes functioning in transepithelial chloride transport, such as CFTR, and in equilibrioception, potentially shedding light on cystic fibrosis, Usher syndrome and other diseases over-represented in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Results also impact risk profiles for autoimmune and metabolic disorders in this population. Finally, residual intra-Ashkenazi population structure was minimal, primarily determined by class 1 MHC alleles, and not related to host country of origin. Conclusions The Ashkenazi Jewish population is of potential utility in disease-mapping studies due to its relative homogeneity and distinct genomic signature. Results suggest that Ashkenazi-associated disease genes may be components of population-specific genomic differences in key functional pathways. PMID:22277159

  3. Living and Dying in the Jewish Way: Secular Rights and Religious Duties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    1993-01-01

    Compares American secular emphasis on individual rights and autonomous decision-making in "right to die" context with traditional emphasis on obligation in Orthodox Judaism. Explicates approach of Conservative and Reform Judaism to decision-making about life-sustaining medical treatments and considers proper balance and relative influence of…

  4. London 2012: prescribing for athletes in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, R G H; Thomas, G P L; Potter, M J; Norris, J H

    2012-01-01

    Aims Prescribing for athletes requires an up-to-date knowledge of the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of prohibited substances. As the London 2012 Olympic Games attract athletes from around the world, we review the current guidelines with respect to all medications licensed for ophthalmic use in the United Kingdom. We describe the process that an ophthalmologist can use to check for permissible medications and also highlight treatments that are contraindicated. Methods We systematically reviewed all 77 drugs listed in Section 11 of the British National Formulary (Issue 63) for use in the treatment of ophthalmic conditions, and referenced these against the 2012 Prohibited List published by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Results The majority of ophthalmic preparations are suitable for use in- and out-of-competition. Some preparations, such as glucocorticoids, are prohibited when administered systemically but permitted for topical administration. Beta-blockers are prohibited in-competition and oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are prohibited in- and out-of competition. Conclusion The 2012 Prohibited List has important implications for the pharmacological treatment of ophthalmic conditions in athletes. Clinicians prescribing for athletes have a duty to familiarise themselves with the list in order to avoid causing significant damage to their patient's career and reputation. PMID:22744394

  5. The Jewish-Arab divide in life expectancy in Israel.

    PubMed

    Chernichovsky, Dov; Anson, Jon

    2005-03-01

    Life expectancy at birth in Israel in 2001 was 77.7 years for males and 81.6 years for females among Jews, and 74.5 and 77.8 years for males and females, respectively, among Israeli Arabs. In spite of vast improvements in health conditions of the two populations since Israel's statehood in 1948, persistent disparities in life expectancy between the two groups have challenged the Israeli socialized health care system. These disparities are influenced primarily by differences between the two population groups in infant and child mortality rates. This early study suggests that the distribution of life expectancy across localities in Israel reflects the distribution of those localities' socio-economic condition index (not including health and medical care), and the distribution of medical services. The positive association between life expectancy and the index is pronounced, however, only within the Jewish population but not among Arabs. While there may be no significant difference in life expectancy among Jews and Arabs living in poorer communities, there are fewer Arabs living in relatively affluent communities. Thus, persistent higher concentration of poverty among Arabs than among Jews has sufficed to maintain the gap in life expectancy between them. In addition, however, there are population-specific effects: wealth and education are more protective among Jews than among Arabs, while medical services are more protective among Arabs. PMID:15722265

  6. Genetic architecture of prostate cancer in the Ashkenazi Jewish population

    PubMed Central

    Vijai, J; Kirchhoff, T; Gallagher, D; Hamel, N; Guha, S; Darvasi, A; Lencz, T; Foulkes, W D; Offit, K; Klein, R J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recently, numerous prostate cancer risk loci have been identified, some of which show association in specific populations. No study has yet investigated whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with prostate cancer in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population. Methods: A total of 29 known prostate cancer risk SNPs were genotyped in 963 prostate cancer cases and 613 controls of AJ ancestry. These data were combined with data from 1241 additional Ashkenazi controls and tested for association with prostate cancer. Correction for multiple testing was performed using the false discovery rate procedure. Results: Ten of twenty-three SNPs that passed quality control procedures were associated with prostate cancer risk at a false discovery rate of 5%. Of these, nine were originally discovered in studies of individuals of European ancestry. Based on power calculations, the number of significant associations observed is not surprising. Conclusion: We see no convincing evidence that the genetic architecture of prostate cancer in the AJ population is substantively different from that observed in other populations of European ancestry. PMID:21829199

  7. The anatomist Hans Elias: A Jewish German in exile.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, S

    2012-04-01

    Hans Elias (1907 to 1985) was an anatomist, an educator, a mathematician, a cinematographer, a painter, and a sculptor. Above all, he was a German of Jewish descent, who had to leave his home country because of the policies of the National Socialist (NS) regime. He spent his life in exile, first in Italy and then in the United States. His biography is exemplary for a generation of younger expatriates from National Socialist Germany who had to find a new professional career under difficult circumstances. Elias was a greatly productive morphologist whose artistic talent led to the foundation of the new science of stereology and made him an expert in scientific cinematography. He struggled hard to fulfill his own high expectations of himself in terms of his effectiveness as a scientist, educator, and politically acting man in this world. Throughout his life this strong-willed and outspoken man never lost his great fondness for Germany and many of its people, while reserving some of his sharpest criticism for fellow anatomists who were active in National Socialist Germany, among them his friend Hermann Stieve, Max Clara, and Heinrich von Hayek. Hans Elias' life is well documented in his unpublished diaries and memoirs, and thus allows fresh insights into a time period when some anatomists were among the first victims of NS policies and other anatomists became involved in the execution of such policies. PMID:22038841

  8. 122. Four Blade Semaphore Tower. Groton, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. Four Blade Semaphore Tower. Groton, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 124.60. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. Infant mortality in London, 1538-1850: a methodological study.

    PubMed

    Razzell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A review of evidence on infant mortality derived from the London bills of mortality and parish registers indicates that there were major registration problems throughout the whole of the parish register period. One way of addressing these problems is to carry out reconstitution studies of individual London parishes, but there are a number of problems with reconstitution methodology, including the traffic in corpses between parishes both inside and outside of London and the negligence of clergymen in registering both baptisms and burials. In this paper the triangulation of sources has been employed to measure the adequacy of burial registration, including the comparison of data from bills of mortality, parish registers and probate returns, as well as the use of the same-name technique. This research indicates that between 20 and 40 per cent of burials went unregistered in London during the parish register period. PMID:22397160

  10. 124. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 132.16. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. 123. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. Mystic River Bridge. Mystic, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4215, MP 132.16. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. Dystonia gene in Ashkenazi Jewish population is located on chromosome 9q32-34.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P L; de Leon, D; Ozelius, L; Risch, N; Bressman, S B; Brin, M F; Schuback, D E; Burke, R E; Kwiatkowski, D J; Shale, H

    1990-02-01

    Idiopathic torsion dystonia (ITD) is a neurological disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions that appear as twisting movements of the limbs, trunk, and/or neck, which can progress to abnormal postures. Most familial forms of ITD follow autosomal dominant transmission with reduced penetrance. The frequency of ITD in the Ashkenazi Jewish population is five to ten times greater than that in other groups. Recently, a gene for ITD (DYT1) in a non-Jewish kindred was located on chromosome 9q32-34, with tight linkage to the gene encoding gelsolin (GSN). In the present study linkage analysis using DNA polymorphisms is used to locate a gene responsible for susceptibility to ITD in 12 Ashkenazi Jewish families. This dystonia gene exhibits close linkage with the gene encoding argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), and appears by multipoint analysis to lie in the q32-34 region of chromosome 9, a region that also contains the loci for gelsolin and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. The same gene may be responsible for ITD both in the non-Jewish kindred mentioned above and in the Ashkenazi Jewish families presented here. However, because there is substantial difference between the penetrance of the dominant allele in these two groups, two different mutations may be operating to produce susceptibility to this disease in the two groups. PMID:2317008

  13. Chemically assembled double-dot single-electron transistor analyzed by the orthodox model considering offset charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shinya; Maeda, Kosuke; Tanaka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    We present the analysis of chemically assembled double-dot single-electron transistors using orthodox model considering offset charges. First, we fabricate chemically assembled single-electron transistors (SETs) consisting of two Au nanoparticles between electroless Au-plated nanogap electrodes. Then, extraordinary stable Coulomb diamonds in the double-dot SETs are analyzed using the orthodox model, by considering offset charges on the respective quantum dots. We determine the equivalent circuit parameters from Coulomb diamonds and drain current vs. drain voltage curves of the SETs. The accuracies of the capacitances and offset charges on the quantum dots are within ±10%, and ±0.04e (where e is the elementary charge), respectively. The parameters can be explained by the geometrical structures of the SETs observed using scanning electron microscopy images. Using this approach, we are able to understand the spatial characteristics of the double quantum dots, such as the relative distance from the gate electrode and the conditions for adsorption between the nanogap electrodes.

  14. Chemically assembled double-dot single-electron transistor analyzed by the orthodox model considering offset charge

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Shinya; Maeda, Kosuke; Majima, Yutaka; Tanaka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2015-10-07

    We present the analysis of chemically assembled double-dot single-electron transistors using orthodox model considering offset charges. First, we fabricate chemically assembled single-electron transistors (SETs) consisting of two Au nanoparticles between electroless Au-plated nanogap electrodes. Then, extraordinary stable Coulomb diamonds in the double-dot SETs are analyzed using the orthodox model, by considering offset charges on the respective quantum dots. We determine the equivalent circuit parameters from Coulomb diamonds and drain current vs. drain voltage curves of the SETs. The accuracies of the capacitances and offset charges on the quantum dots are within ±10%, and ±0.04e (where e is the elementary charge), respectively. The parameters can be explained by the geometrical structures of the SETs observed using scanning electron microscopy images. Using this approach, we are able to understand the spatial characteristics of the double quantum dots, such as the relative distance from the gate electrode and the conditions for adsorption between the nanogap electrodes.

  15. London Tideway Tunnels: tackling London's Victorian legacy of combined sewer overflows.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G B; Crawford, D

    2011-01-01

    It takes a few millimetres of rainfall to cause the 34 most polluting combined sewer overflows (CSOs) to discharge into the River Thames. Currently, in a typical year, spillages to the tidal reaches of the River Thames occur about 60 times, with an estimated spill volume of 39 million cubic metres. Both the UK Government and the European Union have determined that the CSO discharges have an adverse environmental impact on fish species, introduce unacceptable aesthetics and elevate the health risks for recreational users of the Thames, with a frequency of discharge which is in breach of the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive. Studies have established that the environmental objectives can be fully met on the most cost-effective basis by completing both quality improvements to treatment works and by the provision of a storage and transfer tunnel to intercept unsatisfactory CSOs. Extensive modelling has been undertaken to develop an optimised solution. In parallel with the design development a rigorous and comprehensive site selection methodology has been established to select sites and consult stakeholders and the public on the preferred sites and scheme, with the first stage of public consultation planned for later in 2010. The London Tideway Tunnels are an essential part of the delivery of improvements to the water quality of the tidal River Thames, and this ambitious, historic scheme represents a vital strategic investment in London's infrastructure. PMID:21245557

  16. Leadership for Equity and Social Justice in Arab and Jewish Schools in Israel: Leadership Trajectories and Pedagogical Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arar, Khalid Husny

    2015-01-01

    The research investigated how principals in Israel's Jewish and Arab school systems perceive and practice their role in promoting equitable education to bridge socio-economic and pedagogic gaps. It asked how Jewish and Arab principals understand the concept of social justice and what they do in order to promote social justice reality in their…

  17. Attitudes towards Bilingual Arab-Hebrew Education in Israel: A Comparative Study of Jewish and Arab Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azaiza, Faisal; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Shoham, Meyrav; Amara, Muhammad; Mor-Sommerfeld, Aura; 'Ali, Nohad

    2011-01-01

    This study examines attitudes towards bilingual Jewish-Arab education among Jewish and Arab adults in Israel. The sample consisted of 1014 respondents who participated in a national phone survey in late 2006. Results indicate that Arabs are significantly more supportive of bilingual education in Israel than Jews. Positive attitudes regarding the…

  18. Multiple Identities of Jewish Immigrant Adolescents from the Former Soviet Union: An Exploration of Salience and Impact of Ethnic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birman, Dina; Persky, Irena; Chan, Wing Yi

    2010-01-01

    The current paper explores the salience and impact of ethnic and national identities for immigrants that are negotiating more than two cultures. Specifically, we were interested in the ways in which Jewish immigrant adolescents from the former Soviet Union integrate their Russian, Jewish, and American identities, and to what extent identification…

  19. A Culturally Appropriate School Wellness Initiative: Results of a 2-Year Pilot Intervention in 2 Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamins, Maureen R.; Whitman, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Background: Despite the growing number of school-based interventions designed to reduce childhood obesity or otherwise promote health, no models or materials were found for Jewish schools. The current study describes an effort within a Jewish school system in Chicago to create, implement, and evaluate a school-based intervention tailored to the…

  20. The Art of Living Together: Reducing Stereotyping and Prejudicial Attitudes through the Arab-Jewish Class Exchange Program (CEP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Rony; Abu-Raiya, Hisham; Gelkopf, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a newly developed Arab-Jewish Class Exchange Program (CEP) in reducing stereotyping and prejudicial attitudes between Israeli-Jewish and Israeli-Palestinian children. The CEP builds on the core principles of contact theory and is designed to help participants cultivate empathy and tolerance toward the other.…

  1. Parenting Style as a Moderator of Effects of Political Violence: Cross-Cultural Comparison of Israeli Jewish and Arab Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slone, Michelle; Shechner, Tomer; Farah, Oula Khoury

    2012-01-01

    This study examined cross-cultural differences in the moderating function of authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive parenting styles for Jewish and Arab Israeli children exposed to political violence. Respondents were parents and children aged 10-11 from 94 families (42 Arab, 52 Jewish). Parents completed the Parenting Styles and Dimensions…

  2. A man of his country and his time: Jewish influences on Lev Semionovich Vygotsky's world view.

    PubMed

    Kotik-Friedgut, Bella; Friedgut, Theodore H

    2008-02-01

    Lev Semionovich Vygotsky created the cultural-historical school of psychology, yet all too few of those writing about his work take into account the family, education, and cultural tradition from which he came. The authors contend that the Jewish nature of these elements was of some importance in forming his personality and his consciousness. The 1st part of the article traces his early upbringing, describes the Jewishness of his environment, notes 3 instances in which his "otherness" was imprinted on his consciousness, and points to the sources of his determination to forge a harmonious synthesis with his environment. The 2nd part examines his writings, both earlier journalistic and mature psychological, and points to evidence of the influence of his Jewish upbringing and environment on his work. PMID:19048956

  3. A Genome-Wide Search for Greek and Jewish Admixture in the Kashmiri Population

    PubMed Central

    Tashi, Tsewang; Lorenzo, Felipe Ramos; Feusier, Julie Ellen; Mir, Hyder

    2016-01-01

    The Kashmiri population is an ethno-linguistic group that resides in the Kashmir Valley in northern India. A longstanding hypothesis is that this population derives ancestry from Jewish and/or Greek sources. There is historical and archaeological evidence of ancient Greek presence in India and Kashmir. Further, some historical accounts suggest ancient Hebrew ancestry as well. To date, it has not been determined whether signatures of Greek or Jewish admixture can be detected in the Kashmiri population. Using genome-wide genotyping and admixture detection methods, we determined there are no significant or substantial signs of Greek or Jewish admixture in modern-day Kashmiris. The ancestry of Kashmiri Tibetans was also determined, which showed signs of admixture with populations from northern India and west Eurasia. These results contribute to our understanding of the existing population structure in northern India and its surrounding geographical areas. PMID:27490348

  4. Premigration ethnic and national identities: Jewish adolescents planning emigration from Russia and Ukraine to Israel.

    PubMed

    Tartakovsky, Eugene

    2011-10-01

    The ethnic and national identities of Jewish high-school adolescents planning emigration from Russia and Ukraine to Israel were investigated about six months before their emigration. The national identities of adolescent emigrants (n = 243) were compared with those of non-emigrant Russian and Ukrainian adolescents (n = 740). The emigrants' attitude to their country of origin was less positive and their identification with Russians and Ukrainians was weaker as compared with the non-emigrant adolescents. In addition, the attitude of the emigrants towards Israel was more positive than their attitude to Russia or Ukraine. Finally, the emigrants' strongest identification was with the Jewish people, followed by identification with Israelis, while their weakest identification was with Russians and Ukrainians. Israeli and Jewish identities of the emigrant adolescents were positively correlated, and they were independent of the Russian and Ukrainian identities. Perceived discrimination was negatively correlated with the emigrants' attitude to Russia or Ukraine, and it was positively correlated with the emigrants' identification with Israelis and with the Jewish people. Jewish ethnicity was correlated with identification with Jewish people; however, it was not correlated with any component of the Israeli or Russian/Ukrainian identities. The study results indicate that in the premigration period emigrants form a multidimensional system of ethnic and national identities, which reflects their partial detachment from their homeland and affiliation with the country of provisional immigration. This premigration identity system may be termed "anticipatory" (cf. Merton, 1968), because it is not based on real contact with the country of provisional immigration, but rather on the emigrants' expectations. On the other hand, the premigration identities are reactive, in the sense that they reflect the emigrants' reaction to the perceived discrimination they experience in their

  5. The Genetics of Bene Israel from India Reveals Both Substantial Jewish and Indian Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Natalie R.; Billing-Ross, Paul; Dubrovsky, Maya; Campbell, Christopher L.; Oddoux, Carole; Friedman, Eitan; Atzmon, Gil; Halperin, Eran; Ostrer, Harry; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The Bene Israel Jewish community from West India is a unique population whose history before the 18th century remains largely unknown. Bene Israel members consider themselves as descendants of Jews, yet the identity of Jewish ancestors and their arrival time to India are unknown, with speculations on arrival time varying between the 8th century BCE and the 6th century CE. Here, we characterize the genetic history of Bene Israel by collecting and genotyping 18 Bene Israel individuals. Combining with 486 individuals from 41 other Jewish, Indian and Pakistani populations, and additional individuals from worldwide populations, we conducted comprehensive genome-wide analyses based on FST, principal component analysis, ADMIXTURE, identity-by-descent sharing, admixture linkage disequilibrium decay, haplotype sharing and allele sharing autocorrelation decay, as well as contrasted patterns between the X chromosome and the autosomes. The genetics of Bene Israel individuals resemble local Indian populations, while at the same time constituting a clearly separated and unique population in India. They are unique among Indian and Pakistani populations we analyzed in sharing considerable genetic ancestry with other Jewish populations. Putting together the results from all analyses point to Bene Israel being an admixed population with both Jewish and Indian ancestry, with the genetic contribution of each of these ancestral populations being substantial. The admixture took place in the last millennium, about 19–33 generations ago. It involved Middle-Eastern Jews and was sex-biased, with more male Jewish and local female contribution. It was followed by a population bottleneck and high endogamy, which can lead to increased prevalence of recessive diseases in this population. This study provides an example of how genetic analysis advances our knowledge of human history in cases where other disciplines lack the relevant data to do so. PMID:27010569

  6. The Genetics of Bene Israel from India Reveals Both Substantial Jewish and Indian Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Yedael Y; Biddanda, Arjun; Davidson, Natalie R; Billing-Ross, Paul; Dubrovsky, Maya; Campbell, Christopher L; Oddoux, Carole; Friedman, Eitan; Atzmon, Gil; Halperin, Eran; Ostrer, Harry; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The Bene Israel Jewish community from West India is a unique population whose history before the 18th century remains largely unknown. Bene Israel members consider themselves as descendants of Jews, yet the identity of Jewish ancestors and their arrival time to India are unknown, with speculations on arrival time varying between the 8th century BCE and the 6th century CE. Here, we characterize the genetic history of Bene Israel by collecting and genotyping 18 Bene Israel individuals. Combining with 486 individuals from 41 other Jewish, Indian and Pakistani populations, and additional individuals from worldwide populations, we conducted comprehensive genome-wide analyses based on FST, principal component analysis, ADMIXTURE, identity-by-descent sharing, admixture linkage disequilibrium decay, haplotype sharing and allele sharing autocorrelation decay, as well as contrasted patterns between the X chromosome and the autosomes. The genetics of Bene Israel individuals resemble local Indian populations, while at the same time constituting a clearly separated and unique population in India. They are unique among Indian and Pakistani populations we analyzed in sharing considerable genetic ancestry with other Jewish populations. Putting together the results from all analyses point to Bene Israel being an admixed population with both Jewish and Indian ancestry, with the genetic contribution of each of these ancestral populations being substantial. The admixture took place in the last millennium, about 19-33 generations ago. It involved Middle-Eastern Jews and was sex-biased, with more male Jewish and local female contribution. It was followed by a population bottleneck and high endogamy, which can lead to increased prevalence of recessive diseases in this population. This study provides an example of how genetic analysis advances our knowledge of human history in cases where other disciplines lack the relevant data to do so. PMID:27010569

  7. Jewish Family and Children's Services: a pioneering human service organization (1850-2008).

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Jewish Family and Children's Services of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin, and Sonoma Counties is a pioneering nonprofit human service organization that has delivered services for 157 years. Over the course of its history, the organization has transformed itself from an all-volunteer agency delivering aid to immigrant families during the Gold Rush era to a $30 million nonprofit human service organization offering a full-range of services to adults, children, and families. The history of Jewish Family and Children's Services sheds light on the importance of strong leadership, strategic planning, external relationships, and strong donor support. PMID:21416438

  8. "Tell Me What You Speak and I'll Tell You...": Exploring Attitudes to Languages in the Ultra-Orthodox Community in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannenbaum, Michal; Ofner, Hannah Esther

    2008-01-01

    This paper article on a study focusing on Israel's Haredi (ultra-Orthodox Jews) community, exploring its members' perceptions of Hebrew, Yiddish and English in terms of the language's importance, usage, holiness and related emotions. Questionnaires were distributed to 180 participants from five prominent subgroups within the community. Analysis…

  9. "A disease of frozen feelings": ethically working on emotional worlds in a Russian Orthodox Church drug rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Zigon, Jarrett

    2010-09-01

    In a Russian Orthodox Church drug rehabilitation program in St. Petersburg, drug addiction was often described as a disease of frozen feelings. This image suggests that rehabilitation is a process of thawing emotional worlds and, thus, allows the emotions to flow once again. In this article I argue that "frozen feelings" is better understood as the unsocial emotional worlds many drug users experience, and that rehabilitation in this church-run program particularly focuses on the cultivation of an emotional world that supports sociality. This is done, I argue, by means of ethically training rehabilitants to learn how to control and manage their emotional worlds, and in so doing, rehabilitants become new moral persons better able to live in the social world. PMID:20949839

  10. [The features of studies on cold pathogenic diseases in Yi zong jin jian (Golden mirror of orthodox medicine)].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai

    2003-01-01

    As a voluminous work compiled and published by the Qing palace, Yi zong jin jian (Golden Mirror of Orthodox medicine) contains a "Revised Complete Book of Zhongjing" as its first volume which is very unique, systematic, and comprehensive. It re-categorizes the entries of the original Shang han lun (Treatiseon cold Tathogenic Diseases) based on its sections and chapters. and reasonably incorporates entries with similar contents. It also reasonably annotates those complex entries, boldly revises the wrong and missing entries, and applies the theories of "tripartite 3 outlines" as the basis for compiling the chapters and sections of Taiyang diseases, and as the tools for explaining the entries. Among them, some are compiled in verses for easy memory. PMID:12921589

  11. Multifractal to monofractal evolution of the London street network.

    PubMed

    Murcio, Roberto; Masucci, A Paolo; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We perform a multifractal analysis of the evolution of London's street network from 1786 to 2010. First, we show that a single fractal dimension, commonly associated with the morphological description of cities, does not suffice to capture the dynamics of the system. Instead, for a proper characterization of such a dynamics, the multifractal spectrum needs to be considered. Our analysis reveals that London evolves from an inhomogeneous fractal structure, which can be described in terms of a multifractal, to a homogeneous one, which converges to monofractality. We argue that London's multifractal to monofractal evolution might be a special outcome of the constraint imposed on its growth by a green belt. Through a series of simulations, we show that multifractal objects, constructed through diffusion limited aggregation, evolve toward monofractality if their growth is constrained by a nonpermeable boundary. PMID:26764655

  12. Multifractal to monofractal evolution of the London street network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcio, Roberto; Masucci, A. Paolo; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We perform a multifractal analysis of the evolution of London's street network from 1786 to 2010. First, we show that a single fractal dimension, commonly associated with the morphological description of cities, does not suffice to capture the dynamics of the system. Instead, for a proper characterization of such a dynamics, the multifractal spectrum needs to be considered. Our analysis reveals that London evolves from an inhomogeneous fractal structure, which can be described in terms of a multifractal, to a homogeneous one, which converges to monofractality. We argue that London's multifractal to monofractal evolution might be a special outcome of the constraint imposed on its growth by a green belt. Through a series of simulations, we show that multifractal objects, constructed through diffusion limited aggregation, evolve toward monofractality if their growth is constrained by a nonpermeable boundary.

  13. The epidemiology of suicide on the London Underground.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Farmer, R D

    1994-02-01

    A database containing details of every incident of suicidal behaviour on the London Underground railway system between 1940 and 1990 was assembled from the records of London Underground Ltd and the British Transport Police. The total number of cases was 3240. The mean annual number of suicidal acts on the London Underground system increased from 36.1 (1940-1949) to 94.1 (1980-1989). There were significantly fewer incidents on Sundays than on the other days of the week and the daily rate was highest in the spring. 64% of incidents involved males and the peak age group for both sexes was 25-34 yr. Suicide verdicts were returned for a greater proportion of women than men. Overall case fatality was 55%. However, case fatality rates differed between stations, environmental factors appearing to influence survival. Possible strategies to prevent railway suicides and reduce the lethality of this method are discussed. PMID:8153744

  14. Soil-Transmitted Helminths and Schistosoma mansoni Infections in Ethiopian Orthodox Church Students around Lake Tana, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Afework Bitew, Aschalew; Abera, Bayeh; Seyoum, Walle; Endale, Befekadu; Kiber, Tibebu; Goshu, Girma; Admass, Addiss

    2016-01-01

    Background Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) and Schistosoma mansoni infections are the major neglected tropical diseases that result in serious consequences on health, education and nutrition in children in developing countries. The Ethiopian Orthodox church students, who are called Yekolotemari in Amharic, live in areas with poor sanitation and hygiene. Moreover, they are not included in the national STH control programs. Thus, STH and S. mansoni infections prevalence is unknown. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 384 students in June 2014 to determine STH and S. mansoni infections prevalence. Moreover, the knowledge of students about STH and S. mansoni was assessed. Data on knowledge and clinical symptoms were collected using structured questionnaires via face to face interview. Stool specimens were examined by formol-ether concentration method. Results The overall prevalence of intestinal helminths infections was 85.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 82.1–89%). STHs infections prevalence was 65.6% (95% CI: 60.7–70.2%). The prevalence of hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura were 31.8% (95% CI: 27.3–36.6%), 29.4% (25–31%) and 3.1% (1.8–5.4%), respectively. On the other hand, S. mansoni prevalence was 14.3% (95% CI: 11.1–18.1%). Majority of students infected with S. mansoni had bloody stool with crud odds-ratio of 2.9 (95% CI: 1.5–5.5). Knowledge assessment showed that 50 (13%) and 18 (4.9%) of the respondents knew about transmission of STH and S. mansoni, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of STH and S. mansoni infections were high thus de-worming program should include the students of Ethiopian Orthodox churches. Furthermore, provision and use of sanitary facilities, health education for students to create awareness of parasitic infections and improved personal hygiene should be in place. PMID:27203749

  15. Retrocausal Effects As A Consequence of Orthodox Quantum Mechanics Refined To Accommodate The Principle Of Sufficient Reason

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2011-11-01

    The principle of sufficient reason asserts that anything that happens does so for a reason: no definite state of affairs can come into being unless there is a sufficient reason why that particular thing should happen. This principle is usually attributed to Leibniz, although the first recorded Western philosopher to use it was Anaximander of Miletus. The demand that nature be rational, in the sense that it be compatible with the principle of sufficient reason, conflicts with a basic feature of contemporary orthodox physical theory, namely the notion that nature's response to the probing action of an observer is determined by pure chance, and hence on the basis of absolutely no reason at all. This appeal to pure chance can be deemed to have no rational fundamental place in reason-based Western science. It is argued here, on the basis of the other basic principles of quantum physics, that in a world that conforms to the principle of sufficient reason, the usual quantum statistical rules will naturally emerge at the pragmatic level, in cases where the reason behind nature's choice of response is unknown, but that the usual statistics can become biased in an empirically manifest way when the reason for the choice is empirically identifiable. It is shown here that if the statistical laws of quantum mechanics were to be biased in this way then the basically forward-in-time unfolding of empirical reality described by orthodox quantum mechanics would generate the appearances of backward-time-effects of the kind that have been reported in the scientific literature.

  16. A New Heuristic Device for the Analysis of Israel Education: Observations from a Jewish Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Alex

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I propose some new terminology and analytic tools that help us reflect on Israel educational activities with more sophistication. I analyze data from a four-week observation of a Jewish summer camp and new terminology is proposed from the analysis of the data collected during that observation. I argue that we may view Israel…

  17. Digital Dreams: The Potential in a Pile of Old Jewish Newspapers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson, Rebecca; Taylor, Laurie; Santamaria-Wheeler, Lourdes

    2012-01-01

    To celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica at the University of Florida, the Price Library launched the first stage of a project to digitize an important, special collection of anniversary editions of Jewish newspapers from around the world. This article provides the history of the collection, need for…

  18. Ethnic Variations in Family Power Relations: Part I--Jewish American Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victor, Jeffrey S.

    Roles in the Jewish-American family system tend to be flexible, without a clearly defined division of labor or hierarchy of authority. Husband-father and wife-mother roles tend to be somewhat interchangeable and androgynous. Because role expectations constantly change to fit changing circumstances, ambiguity in each member's perception of…

  19. Culture and Character Education in a Jewish Day School: A Case Study of Life and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roso, Calvin G.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses how to teach character comprehensively by studying ways a school's concurrent curricula (the official curriculum, the operational curriculum, the extra curriculum, and the hidden curriculum) can be used to teach character to students. A single case study analyzes the curriculum at a Jewish day school by examining school…

  20. Stuck in the Middle with Jews: Religious Privilege and Jewish Campus Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goren, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Many scholars have examined religious privilege in society and on campus, evidencing the privileged place Christianity generally enjoys and the marginalization that Jews often encounter, regardless of the school they attend. That said, in considering the Jewish higher education experience, something else is at play here. When juxtaposed with…

  1. [The Jewish Hospital in Budapest under the Nazi occupation (1944-1945)].

    PubMed

    Weisskopf, Varda

    2008-01-01

    On March 19, 1944 the German army invaded and occupied Hungary. The Waffen-SS soldiers captured the buildings of the Jewish community in Budapest, including the famous and important Jewish hospital on Szabolcs Street, founded in 1802. The Jewish hospital moved into a school belonging to the Jewish community on 44 Wesselényi Street. The hospital personnel managed to smuggle out medical equipment, and operating rooms were transferred into this central, temporary medical location. Other hospitals were founded, some inside the ghetto, others outside. The Judenrat supplied these hospitals with medical equipment obtained through contributions from Jews. The temporary hospitals admitted sick patients and a great number of those injured as a result of the war in Budapest. These hospitals operated with poor equipment. Surgeries were sometimes performed on kitchen tables, and medical equipment was sterilized by burning the synagogue's benches and library books. As of December 1944, there was no electricity in the hospitals. Thus doctors were forced to operate by the light of candles and flashlights. Nevertheless, they managed to save numerous lives. In spite of the terrible conditions under which the medical staff worked, they were committed to their mission, and their courage deserves appreciation. Ghetto Budapest was liberated by the Red army on 18th January, 1945. Thousands of Jews were released from the temporary hospitals. PMID:18300630

  2. Significance of a Bar/Bat Mitzvah Ceremony for Parents of Jewish Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Gila; Reiter, Shunit

    2004-01-01

    In the Jewish religion, a bar or bat mitzvah ceremony is the rite of passage from childhood towards adulthood. Twenty-one youngsters who attended two special education schools in Israel participated in group bar/bat mitzvah ceremonies. Parents were interviewed both before the learning process and after the ceremony. Findings showed that the…

  3. Providing Optimal Jewish Experiences: The Case of Camp Ramah in Wisconsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    How do Jewish residential summer camps provide campers and staff with opportunities to learn and grow as Jews? Sales and Saxe (2004) have viewed this growth through the lens of their socialization theory. This article asks: Can there be more to the camp experience than being socialized into the norms and values of a well-aligned Jewish…

  4. In Search of the Orange Blossom and the Olive Branch: Reflections on Latin American Jewish Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agosin, Marjorie

    1999-01-01

    Reflects on the traditions of Jewish Latin American literature, with its roots in the culture of Sephardic Jews who left Europe. One of the central themes of this literature, which is frequently written in the traditional Judeo-Spanish "ladino," is migration. (SLD)

  5. Shalom. Salaam. Peace Child Uses Theatre To Bring Israeli Arab and Jewish Teenagers Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Ezra

    2003-01-01

    Describes a drama written by students that helps them achieve an understanding and an empathy that eludes most of the inhabitants of Israel. Discusses how Arab and Jewish students collaborate to compose their drama. Concludes that at its best, the teenage participants in Peace Child Israel find that delicate balance point between using theatre to…

  6. Making Sense of Social Justice in Education: Jewish and Arab Leaders' Perspectives in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arar, Khalid Husny; Oplatka, Izhar

    2016-01-01

    The research aimed to understand the way in which high school principals' perceptions of social justice (SJ) are implemented in their daily educational work. A qualitative study employed in-depth semi-structured interviews to collect the narratives of two high school principals in Israel--one Arab-Muslim and one Jewish. The interview transcripts…

  7. Tradition versus Egalitarianism in the Thinking of Jewish-American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charme, Stuart Z.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes results from interviews with Jewish teenagers about the tension between adherence to tradition and commitment to egalitarianism in relation to issues like women in the rabbinate, women wearing ritual garments like "kipot" and "talitot", and gender separation at the Western Wall in Jerusalem. For many teens, egalitarian…

  8. "By the Rivers of Babylon": Deterritorialization and the Jewish Rhetorical Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard-Donals, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The position of the excluded other, it seems to the author, is the position that has characterized Jews since antiquity: exiled from the nation and dispersed to other nations, Jewish participation in civic life has been defined, even in modernity, by its marginalization and precariousness. The Jew, in other words, provides a salient example of the…

  9. The effect of constant threat of terror on Israeli Jewish and Arab adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Miri; Eid, Jawdat

    2007-03-01

    The effect on Israeli Jewish and Arab adolescents of living under constant threat of terrorist attacks was assessed in a sample of 346 adolescents. The study probed their direct and indirect exposure to terrorist attacks, avoidance of public centers, sharing feelings with significant others, and stress reaction symptoms. The adolescents showed mild to low levels of stress symptoms in reaction to terrorist attacks in Israel, with no significant differences between Jews and Arabs. The Jewish adolescents reported knowing more people involved in terror attacks and being more informed by their parents about them. Demographic and exposure variables explained 39% of the variance of stress reaction symptoms. Being female, knowing someone injured, having parents who discuss terrorist attacks or forbid going out, and more sharing of feelings were significantly related to higher stress symptoms. For Jewish adolescents, greater levels of sharing of feelings were related to higher distress. Jewish and Arab adolescents proved to be similarly affected by the threat of terror but were also resilient even in highly unusual circumstances. PMID:17999214

  10. Jewish Ethnicity and Educational Opportunities in Israel: Evidence from a Curricular Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feniger, Yariv

    2015-01-01

    Based on a 20% representative sample of all high school students in Israel in the mid-1990s, this study explores a reform implemented in low socio-economic status (SES) state religious high schools. Most of their students were from the disadvantaged Jewish ethnic group in Israel, Mizrachim. Perceived as unable to meet the requirements of academic…

  11. Creation of a National, At-home Model for Ashkenazi Jewish Carrier Screening.

    PubMed

    Grinzaid, Karen Arnovitz; Page, Patricia Zartman; Denton, Jessica Johnson; Ginsberg, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    Ethnicity-based carrier screening for the Ashkenazi Jewish population has been available and encouraged by advocacy and community groups since the early 1970's. Both the American College of Medical Genetics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend carrier screening for this population (Obstetrics and Gynecology, 114(4), 950-953, 2009; Genetics in Medicine, 10(1), 55-56, 2008). While many physicians inquire about ethnic background and offer appropriate carrier screening, studies show that a gap remains in implementing recommendations (Genetic testing and molecular biomarkers, 2011). In addition, education and outreach efforts targeting Jewish communities have had limited success in reaching this at-risk population. Despite efforts by the medical and Jewish communities, many Jews of reproductive age are not aware of screening, and remain at risk for having children with preventable diseases. Reaching this population, preferably pre-conception, and facilitating access to screening is critically important. To address this need, genetic counselors at Emory University developed JScreen, a national Jewish genetic disease screening program. The program includes a national marketing and PR campaign, online education, at-home saliva-based screening, post-test genetic counseling via telephone or secure video conferencing, and referrals for face-to-face genetic counseling as needed. Our goals are to create a successful education and screening program for this population and to develop a model that could potentially be used for other at-risk populations. PMID:25502003

  12. Developing a measure of cultural-, maturity-, or esteem-driven modesty among Jewish women.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Caryn Scheinberg

    2014-01-01

    Understanding modesty and how it relates to religiosity among Jewish women was relatively unexplained, and as part of a larger study, a measure was needed. The purpose of this article is to report on three studies which represent the three stages of instrument development of a measure of modesty among Jewish women, "Your Views of Modesty": (a) content/concept definition; (b) instrument development; and (c) evaluation of the psychometric properties of the instrument: reliability and validity. In Study I, Q methodology was used to define the domain and results suggesting that modesty has multidimensions. In Study II, an instrument was developed based on distinctive perspectives from each group or what was important and not so important. This formed a 25-item Likert scale. In Study III, a survey of 300 Jewish women revealed internal consistency estimates with Cronbach's alpha 0.92, indicating high degree of internal consistency reliability for "Your Views of Modesty." For construct validity, four factors were found explaining 55% of the variance of modesty: (a) religion-driven, (b) maturity-driven, (c) esteem-driven, and (d) public-based modesty was identified. "Your Views of Modesty" shows good evidence for reliability and validity in this Jewish population. PMID:24772606

  13. A Student's Guide to Jewish American Genealogy. Oryx American Family Tree Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleifer, Jay

    This book provides a step-by-step guide to genealogical research in the United States and other countries for Jewish Americans. The book also contains information on the history of the Jews, including the Diaspora, the Holocaust, immigration to the United States, and the establishment of the modern state of Israel. Chapters include: (1) "The Box…

  14. Values as Protective Factors against Violent Behavior in Jewish and Arab High Schools in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knafo, Ariel; Daniel, Ella; Khoury-Kassabri, Mona

    2008-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that values, abstract goals serving as guiding life principles, become relatively important predictors of adolescents' self-reported violent behavior in school environments in which violence is relatively common. The study employed a students-nested-in-schools design. Arab and Jewish adolescents (N = 907, M age =…

  15. Alike and Different: Parenting a Child with Special Needs in the Jewish Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhrman, Abigail L.

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is limited research examining the parenting experiences of parents with a child with special needs, and there is virtually no research on the experience of these parents in the Jewish community. In addressing this gap in the scholarship, this study describes the experiences of parents with a child with special needs and explores the…

  16. Philosophical Approaches of Religious Jewish Science Teachers toward the Teaching of "Controversial" Topics in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodick, Jeff; Dayan, Aliza; Orion, Nir

    2010-01-01

    This research examines the problems that religious Jewish science teachers in Israeli high schools have in coping with science subjects (such as geological time) which conflict with their religious beliefs. We do this by characterizing the philosophical approaches within Judaism that such teachers have adopted for dealing with such controversy.…

  17. A Case Study in Jewish Moral Education: (Non-)Rape of the Beautiful Captive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, David

    2004-01-01

    The challenge of teaching classic religious texts with flawed moral messages from a contemporary point of view is examined in the case of the Beautiful Captive of War (Deuteronomy 21:10-14). A moral dilemma is generated by contradictory ethical stands within the Jewish tradition, between which students have to choose. This dilemma is explored in…

  18. The Contribution of Jewish Professional People to the Education of Hearing Impaired Children in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewe, Armin

    This paper summarizes the contributions of Jewish professional and lay people to the education of children with hearing impairments over the past 250 years throughout Europe. It begins with the contributions of Jacob Rodriguez Pereira in the 18th century in France, an oral teacher of the deaf and the inventor of a phoneme-transmitting manual…

  19. Environmental Projects of Jewish and Arab Youth in Israel: The Adult Leaders' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkaher, Iris; Tal, Tali

    2011-01-01

    Socio-environmental projects involving Arab and Jewish youth in Israel are uncommon. In this study, we interviewed 16 adult leaders of two projects that were carried out in the Galilee in northern Israel, to better understand the views of the leaders and their motives. The two projects focused on mutual environmental issues and dealt with social,…

  20. Jewish Israeli Social Work Students' Attitudes to the Prospect of Being Assigned an Israeli Arab Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Nehami

    2010-01-01

    This study attempts to examine implications of political conflicts in social work with clients from the rival group. Using an anonymous, open-ended questionnaire, this study examines responses of 78 Jewish Israeli social work students to the hypothetical prospect of treating an Israeli Arab client. The vast majority expected cultural and political…

  1. Forgiveness, Reconciliation, and Mechila: Integrating the Jewish Concept of Forgiveness into Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkin, Richard S.; Freeman, Stephen J.; Lyman, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    The professional literature diverges in defining the role of forgiveness and reconciliation in counseling regarding how forgiveness and reconciliation are conceptualized from a professional and secular perspective. The Jewish conceptualization of forgiveness is multifaceted; mechila, the forgiveness of debt, is particularly important in providing…

  2. The Angelina Jolie Effect in Jewish Law: Prophylactic Mastectomy and Oophorectomy in BRCA Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Sharon Galper

    2015-01-01

    Background Following the announcement of actress Angelina Jolie’s prophylactic bilateral mastectomies and subsequent prophylactic oophorectomy, there has been a dramatic increase in interest in BRCA testing and prophylactic surgery. Objective To review current medical literature on the benefits of prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy among BRCA-positive women and its permissibility under Jewish law. Results Recent literature suggests that in BRCA-positive women who undergo prophylactic oophorectomy the risk of dying of breast cancer is reduced by 90%, the risk of dying of ovarian cancer is reduced by 95%, and the risk of dying of any cause is reduced by 77%. The risk of breast cancer is further reduced by prophylactic mastectomy. Prophylactic oophorectomy and prophylactic mastectomy pose several challenges within Jewish law that call into question the permissibility of surgery, including mutilation of a healthy organ, termination of fertility, self-wounding, and castration. A growing number of Jewish legal scholars have found grounds to permit prophylactic surgery among BRCA carriers, with some even obligating prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy. Conclusion Current data suggest a significant reduction in mortality from prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy in BRCA carriers. While mutilation of healthy organs is intrinsically forbidden in Jewish law, the ability to preserve human life may contravene and even mandate prophylactic surgery. PMID:26886774

  3. The Possibility of a New Critical Language from the Sources of Jewish Negative Theology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gur-Ze'ev, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    A new critical language is possible yet its becoming is not guaranteed. Its roots and sources should be diverse, universal and Diasporic. Jewish negative theology is ultimately Diasporic and could become one of its edifying sources. Diaspora is not only an intellectual state, not necessarily collective but communal. One of the things that makes…

  4. Once Upon a Time: How Jewish Children's Stories Impact Moral Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deitcher, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Research studies demonstrate the efficacy of the story-sharing experience on children's moral development. This article explores how the triadic relationship between a Jewish children's story, the child, and the parent storyteller can impact the youngster's moral growth. Using examples from two leading projects in Jewish…

  5. A Linguistic Analysis of the Role of Israel in American Jewish Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chazan, Barry

    2015-01-01

    This essay analyzes the place of Israel in American Jewish schooling from the beginning of the 20th century until the early years of the 21st century. It utilizes curricula, textbooks, and instructional units, as well as other primary and secondary sources to delineate four distinct periods of Israel education. The subject of Teaching Israel is…

  6. Religion as a Source of Stress, Coping, and Identity among Jewish Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubow, Eric F.; Pargament, Kenneth I.; Boxer, Paul; Tarakeshwar, Nalini

    This study examined the degree to which religion is perceived as a source of stress and as a coping resource among Jewish students. Subjects, 75 sixth- through eighth-grade students in a Midwestern city, completed a survey in Sunday school. Twenty of the students also responded to a structured interview about their stressors and coping strategies.…

  7. Formulating a Curriculum Framework for Bible Study: Creating Course Objectives for Bible Curriculum in Jewish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Eli; Goldstein, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Bible teachers worldwide lack a shared language with which to describe expectations of what pupils will learn at various stages of their schooling. This article attempts such a language. If defines a framework, formulated with the assistance of twenty-five Bible teachers in Jewish schools in the United Kingdom. It is hoped that this article will…

  8. Developing an Active Media Center in a Jewish Day School K-8 through Creative Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Rhona

    The practicum described in this report was designed to create a dynamic, functional media center with an interdisciplinary library skills program for students in kindergarten to grade 8 in a private Jewish day school in a residential neighborhood in a southeast coastal city enrolling 300 students. An additional goal was to use volunteers to…

  9. 3 CFR 8813 - Proclamation 8813 of May 2, 2012. Jewish American Heritage Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... way for millions to follow. During the next three centuries, Jews around the world set out to build..., and uphold the ideal of “tikkun olam”—our obligation to repair the world. Jewish Americans have served... for a people that had been tested from the moment they came together and professed their faith....

  10. Intergenerational Transmission of Parenting Style among Jewish and Arab Mothers in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasternak, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Parental modeling of behavior has long been considered a major socialization process for children. In this piece, the author explores how parenting behavior is passed from one generation to the next, focusing on parenting styles among Jewish and Muslim mothers in Israel. The results indicate that young mothers tend to reproduce their parents'…

  11. Research and Reflections on the Spiritual Development of Young Jewish Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schein, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    This article is about spiritual development for early childhood Jewish education. Findings from a research study defines the spiritual development of young children as an integration of deep connections, basic dispositions (strengthened from experiences of wonderment, awe, joy, inner peace), and complex dispositions (displayed through acts of…

  12. Aging among Jewish Americans: Implications for Understanding Religion, Ethnicity, and Service Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glicksman, Allen; Koropeckyj-Cox, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article challenges popular conceptions of the nature of ethnicity and religiousness in the gerontological literature. Using the example of older Jewish Americans, the authors argue for more nuanced definitions and usage of terms such as "religion" and "ethnicity" in order to begin to understand the complex interweaving of these two…

  13. Knowledge and Action, Reason and Habit, in Jewish and Muslim Philosophies of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolow, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Jewish and Muslim philosophers, alike, regarded the formation of proper habits to be the key to effective education. They also considered rational acceptance of religious obligation to be mandatory for successful observance. This essay examines the relationship between these two dimensions of religious education: knowledge and reason on the one…

  14. Attitudes and Psycholinguistic Aspects of First Language Maintenance among Russian-Jewish Immigrants in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Rabia, Salim

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the social attitudes toward the Hebrew language and Israeli society and the academic skills in Russian and Hebrew of 60 Russian-Jewish immigrant high school students in Northern Israel. Addresses the linguistic social context in Israel and provides a literature review. Presents and discusses the results. Includes references. (CMK)

  15. Fearful Symmetry: Palestinian and Jewish Teachers Confront Contested Narratives in Integrated Bilingual Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekerman, Zvi; Zembylas, Michalinos

    2010-01-01

    The present paper deals with Jewish and Palestinian teachers who work in an integrated school in Israel, and shows the challenges and possibilities from examining these teachers' powerful historical narratives in the context of in-service training sessions. It is shown how these teachers essentially remain firmly rooted in the hegemonic historical…

  16. The Stories of Our National Past: History and Heritage in a Jewish High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakai, Sivan

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the teaching of history (the academic study of the past) and the teaching of heritage (meaningful stories tying people to a collective past). The research was conducted in a Jewish high school whose explicit mission involves teaching history through a US history course and heritage through an Israeli…

  17. Experiential Learning of History through Youth Journeys to Poland: Israeli Jewish Youth and the Holocaust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romi, Shlomo; Lev, Michal

    2007-01-01

    National history and collective memory and their impact on adolescents' knowledge and attitudes are the topic of this article. A follow-up study, it examines the long-term impact of a journey to historical monuments. Israeli Jewish high-school students have the option of experiential study, visiting cities and death camps in Poland. The first…

  18. The Attitudes of Israeli Arab and Jewish High School Students towards Extrinsic and Intrinsic Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Zehavit

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the attitudes of Israeli Arab (n = 259) and Jewish (n = 259) high school students toward extrinsic and intrinsic values. A questionnaire, which consisted of eight value scales in two groups--extrinsic and intrinsic values--was administered. Participants were asked to state whether they agreed or…

  19. Dilemmas and Strategies in the Counselling of Jewish and Palestinian Arab Children in Israeli Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Moshe; Horenczyk, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    In semi-structured interviews, Jewish and Palestinian Arab counselors were asked about their views regarding roles of the educational system and counselors vis-a-vis the ongoing conflict. While all respondents argue that schools and counselors need to address the conflict and its consequences, Palestinian Arabs and Jews differed in views as to…

  20. Individualism, Nationalism, and Universalism: The Educational Ideals of Mordecai M. Kaplan's Philosophy of Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Ari

    2008-01-01

    This article will examine educational ideals by exploring the relation between the individual, the collective, and humanity in Kaplan's Jewish and educational philosophy. Generally the goals of individualism, nationalism, and universalism are seen as mutually exclusive. By contrast, Kaplan argues for the symbiotic relationship between…

  1. The Guide with the Tourist Gaze: Jewish Heritage Travel to Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Sharon Kangisser

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, travel to Poland for youth and young adults has become increasingly popular, to the extent that it is even seen as a "rite of passage" for members of many Jewish communities. For these groups, the accompanying guides or educators are central to their educational experience. Based on a series of interviews…

  2. Crisis and Response: The Emergence of Modern Jewish Politics in Russia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritterband, Paul

    This collection of documents examines the response of the Jewish people--primarily in Russia but also in the West--to the sociological and political crises of Tsarist Russia between the years 1800 and 1914. It emphasizes in particular the emergence and interaction of the two ideologies which formulated the most radical solutions to the Jewish…

  3. What Do We Mean by Jewish Education in Professional Development for Early Childhood Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tal, Clodie

    2013-01-01

    In this study we investigated the perceptions and interpretations of 14 various stakeholders in the field of teacher preparation and early childhood education regarding what and how Jewish education should be learned and taught, in general, and to preschool children in contemporary Israel, in particular. The present study, carried out in the…

  4. Separate Education and Hegemonic Domination: Civil Society Challenges in the Arab-Jewish City of Jaffa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payes, Shany

    2013-01-01

    The case of education in the mixed Arab-Jewish city of Jaffa, Israel, demonstrates the dialectical role of education in conflict-affected societies. As scholars of transformative education and critical pedagogy have noted, education tends to serve as an instrument of the dominant ideology of social and political elites, yet it is also a…

  5. Making Pedagogical Decisions to Address Challenges of Joint Jewish-Bedouin Environmental Projects in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkaher, Iris; Tal, Tali

    2016-01-01

    This interpretive study identifies challenges of working with Bedouin and Jewish Israeli youth in two multicultural projects: education for sustainability and place-conscious education. It also describes the ways the adult project leaders addressed these challenges and their views on the effectiveness of their decisions. Participants comprised 16…

  6. Rethinking the Education of Cultural Minorities to and from Assimilation: A Perspective from Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levisohn, Jon A.

    2013-01-01

    Education and assimilation seem intimately connected; education either supports assimilation or thwarts it. But these paradigms assume a model of cultural vitality that depends on what one scholar aptly terms "tenacious adherence," over time, to an unchanging cultural or religious tradition. Taking the example of the Jewish community and Jewish…

  7. No Religion Is an Island: Teaching World Religions to Adolescents in a Jewish Educational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    What is the place of teaching about other world religions in a Jewish educational curriculum for adolescents? This article explores a course in world religions that has been taught at the Genesis Program at Brandeis University since 2001. Based on a participant observational study during 2002 and 2012, the author traces how the teachers construct…

  8. The Destruction of Jewish Libraries and Archives in Cracow during World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroka, Marek

    2003-01-01

    Examines the loss of various collections, especially school libraries and the Ezra Library, in Cracow (Poland) during World War II. Highlights include Nazi policies toward Cracow's Jews; the destruction of libraries, archives, and collections; Jewish book collections in the Staatsbibliotek Krakau (state library); and the removal of books by Jewish…

  9. A Doubled Heterotopia: Shifting Spatial and Visual Symbolism in the Jewish Museum Berlin's Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saindon, Brent Allen

    2012-01-01

    This essay considers the rhetoric of space in a rapidly transforming culture. Using Michel Foucault's concept of "heterotopias" to understand the rhetorical power of a building's disposition, it is argued that the Jewish Museum Berlin contains two heterotopias, one within the other. The first is Daniel Libeskind's original building design in…

  10. Sources and contributions of wood smoke during winter in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crilley, Leigh; Bloss, William; Yin, Jianxin; Beddows, David; Harrison, Roy; Zotter, Peter; Prevot, Andre; Green, David

    2014-05-01

    Determining the contribution of wood smoke in large urban centres such as London is becoming increasingly important with the changing nature of domestic heating partly due to the installation of biomass burning heaters to meet renewable energy targets imposed by the EU and also a rise in so-called recreational burning for aesthetic reasons (Fuller et al., 2013). Recent work in large urban centres (London, Paris and Berlin) has demonstrated an increase in the contribution of wood smoke to ambient particles during winter that can at times exceed traffic emissions. In Europe, biomass burning has been identified as a major cause of exceedances of European air quality limits during winter (Fuller et al., 2013). In light of the changing nature of emissions in urban areas there is a need for on-going measurements to assess the impact of biomass burning in cities like London. Therefore we aimed to determine quantitatively the contribution of biomass burning in London and surrounding rural areas. We also aimed to determine whether local emissions or regional sources were the main source of biomass burning in London. Sources of wood smoke during winter in London were investigated at an urban background site (North Kensington) and two surrounding rural sites (Harwell and Detling) by analysing selected wood smoke chemical tracers. Concentrations of levoglucosan, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and K+ were generally well correlated, indicating a similar source of these species at the three sites. Based on the conversion factor for levoglucosan, mean wood smoke mass at Detling, North Kensington and Harwell was 0.78, 0.87 and 1.0 µg m-3, respectively. At all the sites, biomass burning was found to be a source of OC and EC, with the largest source of OC and EC found to be secondary organic aerosols and traffic emissions, respectively. Peaks in levoglucosan concentrations at the sites were observed to coincide with low ambient temperature, suggesting domestic heating as

  11. Parish apprenticeship and the old poor law in London1

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Alysa

    2010-01-01

    This article offers an examination of the patterns and motivations behind parish apprenticeship in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century London. It stresses continuity in outlook from parish officials binding children, which involved placements in both the traditional and industrializing sectors of the economy. Evidence on the ages, employment types, and locations of 3,285 pauper apprentices bound from different parts of London between 1767 and 1833 indicates a variety of local patterns. The analysis reveals a pattern of youthful age at binding, a range of employment experiences, and parish-specific links to particular trades and manufactures. PMID:20939134

  12. Germline mutations in BRIP1 and PALB2 in Jewish high cancer risk families.

    PubMed

    Catucci, Irene; Milgrom, Roni; Kushnir, Anya; Laitman, Yael; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Volorio, Sara; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Friedman, Eitan; Peterlongo, Paolo

    2012-09-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for ~30 % of inherited breast cancer. BRIP1 and PALB2 are likely genes for breast cancer susceptibility, based on their roles in maintaining cellular integrity. Indeed, few pathogenic germline mutations in both genes are reported in ethnically diverse breast cancer families. There is a paucity of data on the putative contribution of both genes to inherited breast cancer in Jewish high risk families. High risk Jewish women, none of whom was a carrier of the predominant Jewish mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2, were screened for BRIP1 germline mutations by combined denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, high resolution melting and sequencing. Direct sequencing of exons and flanking intronic sequences was used for PALB2 mutational analysis. Overall, 149 women, all of high risk, cancer prone families of Ashkenazi origin, were genotyped for BRIP1 mutations: 127 with breast cancer, 22 with ovarian cancer. No truncating mutations were noted and one novel (p.Ala745Thr) and two previously described missense mutations were detected. For PALB2, 93 women were genotyped (87 with breast cancer) of Ashkenazi (n = 32) and non Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Fifteen sequence variants were detected, of these, none was truncating, four were not previously reported, and two (p.Asp871Gly and p.Leu1119Pro) were seemingly pathogenic based on the PolyPhen2 protein prediction algorithm. These missense mutations were not detected in any of 113 healthy Ashkenazi and 109 Moroccan, cancer free controls. In conclusion, germline mutations in BRIP1 and PALB2 contribute marginally to breast cancer susceptibility in ethnically diverse, Jewish high risk families. PMID:22692731

  13. [Medicine, physicians and medical ethics in Jewish tradition through the ages].

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Zlotnick, Eitan; Steinberg, Avraham

    2014-08-01

    Medicine has always had a place of honor in the Jewish heritage. Since Biblical times, the sources of Judaism have valued the physician's activities and seen them as a partnership with God's deeds. Later, in the times of the Mishna and the Talmud, a model of scholars evolved who were not only learned sages but also had extensive medical and scientific knowledge. Their dealings with various issues in medical ethics were the basis for deliberation on questions that appeared throughout history on the advancement of medical science. The various sources from this period show the sages' sensitivity regarding the subject of human life, saving lives and the importance of the availability of medicine for all segments of the population. During the years following the completion of the Talmud, the medical profession was common among the Jews and they excelled in this field. Jewish doctors left behind a Legacy of values in medicine. Hebrew was considered a significant Language in the medical field and was cited in various medical texts such as in the book written by Vesalius, the "father" of modern anatomy. The rapid progress of medicine poses new challenges in bioethics. There is a need for physicians with extensive medical knowledge along with an understanding of ethical issues in order to offer solutions to new situations. Knowledge of the Jewish literature throughout the ages on a variety of subjects and the essential values which are their foundation can contribute to the modern discussion on biomedical questions. This is even more important in Israeli society where many of the laws are formed based on Jewish values. Engagement with Jewish medical ethics can help in educating physicians to have the ability to contribute to public debate and legislation in a way that would balance between the values and needs which an ethical issue raises. PMID:25286644

  14. Moral judgments about Jewish-Arab intergroup exclusion: The role of cultural identity and contact

    PubMed Central

    Brenick, Alaina; Killen, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Prejudice and discrimination as justifications for social exclusion are often viewed as violations of the moral principles of welfare, justice, and equality but intergroup exclusion can also often be viewed as a necessary and legitimate means to maintain group identity and cohesion (Rutland, Killen, & Abrams, 2010). The current study was guided by the Social Reasoning Developmental perspective (Killen & Rutland, 2011) to examine the moral judgments of social exclusion encounters, and the degree to which cultural identity and actual contact with members of other cultural groups is related to social evaluations. Surprisingly, no research has examined how intergroup contact bears on moral judgments about Jewish-Arab encounters in the U.S. The present study surveyed 241 Jewish and 249 non-Arab/non-Jewish (comparison group) 14 and 17 year olds to assess their cultural identification, intergroup contact, and moral judgments regarding intergroup peer social exclusion situations between Jewish and Arab youth in peer, home, and community contexts. Participants overwhelmingly rejected exclusion of an outgroup member explicitly because of their group membership, though male and Jewish participants were more accepting of such exclusion and less accepting of including an outgroup member. Context effects emerged, and exclusion was rated as most acceptable in the community context and least acceptable in the peer context. Three factors of identity (i.e., exploration, commitment, and concern for relationships) were explored. Generally, higher identity commitment and lower identity concern for relationships were related to more inclusive evaluations. Interactions between the identity factors and intergroup contact and cultural group, however, differentially predicted evaluations of intergroup exclusion. PMID:24188040

  15. Autistic Disorder in Nineteenth-Century London. Three Case Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltz, Mitzi; Shattock, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the existence, description, perception, treatment, and outcome of symptoms consistent with autistic disorder in nineteenth-century London, England, based on case histories from the notes of Dr William Howship Dickinson at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children. Three cases meeting the DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder…

  16. Exploring the Impact of Aspects of the London Leadership Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sammons, Pam; Matthews, Peter; Day, Christopher; Gu, Qing

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the methodology adopted for the formative evaluation of aspects of the London Leadership Strategy (LLS). The LLS is an ambitious example of a program designed and supported by the National College of School Leadership in England (NCSL) to enhance leadership and management so as to improve the quality of education and raise…

  17. In London, a Working-Class University Wrestles with Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    Patrick McGhee, vice chancellor of the University of East London, has a lot in common with many of the 28,000 students at the large urban institution he leads. He was the first in his family to attend university. And he dislikes much about the government's higher-education reform efforts, which he has deemed "misguided, premature, unproven and…

  18. Battersea: Education in a London Parish since 1750

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the development of educational institutions and buildings in one slice of a big city over a long timescale. The city is London and the slice Battersea, an inner suburb of mixed character and volatile fortunes. The narrative explores the shifts and interactions between state and voluntary provision, local community needs and…

  19. Connecting Londoners with Their City through Digital Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Frazer

    2013-01-01

    London is one of the most complex, dynamic and diverse cities in the world, with 8 million residents, over 300 languages spoken in its schools, and some 30 million overseas visitors every year. Reaching out to and connecting all these people with the city's heritage while catering to their many interests, motivations and learning needs is a huge…

  20. Case Study: North Laurel High School, London, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    When North Laurel High School, London, Kentucky, opened in Fall 1992, students and teachers entered a new facility and a new era of commitment to excellence for all students. In Spring 1993, North Laurel joined the Southern Regional Education Board's High Schools That Work initiative. The new school replaced the general track and raised graduation…

  1. Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1654): London's first general practitioner?

    PubMed

    Farthing, Michael J G

    2015-08-01

    Nicholas Culpeper is often regarded as an ill-disciplined, maverick, mid-17th century herbalist and the father of contemporary alternative medicine. There are elements of this statement that have some truth but to dismiss his contribution to the development of health provision in London at the time would be a great injustice. Culpeper did not complete his apprenticeship as an apothecary and was not a formally trained physician, but he developed a clinical practice for the poor of London, indistinguishable from the role of the present day general practitioner. Observers at the time recognised his concern and compassion and his commitment to treat the whole patient and not just the disease. His enduring contribution was his translation from Latin of the physicians' Pharmacopoeia Londinensis which could be regarded as the first major step towards the demystification of medicine. Culpeper's London Dispensatory and the many other medical treatises that followed were affordable and widely available to the common man. Culpeper antagonised both apothecaries and physicians because he breached the regulations of the day by accepting patients directly. So perhaps Culpeper was, de facto, London's first general practitioner, at least 150 years before the role was formally recognised in the Apothecaries Act 1815. PMID:24585603

  2. The University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Bartrip, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This research note gives details of 2 releases of audio recordings available from speakers who stutter that can be accessed on the Web. Method: Most of the recordings are from school-age children. These are available on the University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS) Web site, and information is provided about how to…

  3. Microform Applications Within the City of London Polytechnic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Alan

    A review is made of the possible applications within the libraries of the City of London Polytechnic of the three basic types of microforms--microfilm, microfiche, and microopaques. Major uses outlined involve: 1) the exploitation of existing data bases; 2) the storage of back issues of periodicals; 3) the presentation of programed instruction; 4)…

  4. Intergenerational Learning between Children and Grandparents in East London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenner, Charmian; Ruby, Mahera; Jessel, John; Gregory, Eve; Arju, Tahera

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the learning exchange between three- to six-year-old children and their grandparents, in Sylheti/Bengali-speaking families of Bangladeshi origin and monolingual English-speaking families living in east London. The following concepts from sociocultural theory are applied to this new area of intergenerational learning:…

  5. Gender Politics and Privatization in the London Borough of Camden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Lisa D.

    1986-01-01

    This article examines the differential impact of the privatization of social services on women in the London borough of Camden. Concludes that women will suffer greater decline than men in employment, wages, and status as a result of the privatization taking place in Great Britain. (JDH)

  6. Developing an Integrated Institutional Repository at Imperial College London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afshari, Fereshteh; Jones, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to demonstrate how a highly integrated approach to repository development and deployment can be beneficial in producing a successful archive. Design/methodology/approach: Imperial College London undertook a significant specifications process to gather and formalise requirements for its repository system. This was done…

  7. Amputations at the London Hospital 1852-1857

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, E J; Flora, H S; Ham, R J

    2001-01-01

    Between 1852 and 1857 at the London Hospital, 142 amputations were performed in 136 patients. The most common indication was an injury sustained at work. Overall mortality was 46% and the death rate was especially high for lower-limb amputations. Most deaths were due to postoperative sepsis. Those who received chloroform anaesthesia did worse than those who received ether. PMID:11461989

  8. Martha Whiteley of Imperial College, London: A Pioneering Woman Chemist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Rafaelle M.; Nicholson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Martha Whiteley (1866-1956) was one of the most important women chemists in the United Kingdom in the first half of the 20th century. In a male-dominated field, she was an academic on the staff of a co-educational university, Imperial College, London, where she carried out research of her own choosing, rather than assisting a male professor. She…

  9. A fatal case of Lassa fever in London, January 2009.

    PubMed

    Kitching, A; Addiman, S; Cathcart, S; Bischop, L; Krahé, D; Nicholas, M; Coakley, J; Lloyd, G; Brooks, T; Morgan, D; Turbitt, D

    2009-02-12

    In January 2009, the eleventh [corrected] case of Lassa fever imported to the United Kingdom was diagnosed in London. Risk assessment of 328 healthcare contacts with potential direct exposure to Lassa virus - through contact with the case or exposure to bodily fluids - was undertaken. No contacts were assessed to be at high risk of infection and no secondary clinical cases identified. PMID:19215723

  10. Deaths of cyclists in london: trends from 1992 to 2006

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cycling is an increasingly important mode of transport for environmental and health reasons. Cycling fatalities in London were previously investigated in 1994 using routinely collected data. Since then, there have been shifts in the modes of transport used, and in transport policies. We sought to replicate the previous work using data on cyclist deaths in London between 1992 and 2006, specifically investigating whether heavy goods vehicles continued to pose a threat. Methods Observational study based on analysis of time series of police road casualties data, 1992 to 2006, in London, UK. The main outcome measures were cyclists killed in road traffic collisions. Poisson regression and chi-squared test for homogeneity were used to assess time effects. Travel flow data was then used to estimate annual fatality rates per 100,000 cyclists per kilometre. Results From 1992 to 2006 there was a mean of 16 cycling fatalities per year (range 8-21). 146 deaths (60%) were in inner London and 96 in outer London. There was no evidence for a decline over time (p = 0.7) other than a pronounced dip in 2004 when there were 8 fatalities. Freight vehicles were involved in 103 of 242 (43%) of all incidents and the vehicle was making a left turn in over half of these (53%). The fatality rate ranged from 20.5 deaths in 1992 to 11.1 deaths in 2006 per 100,000 estimated cyclists per kilometre (rate ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.28 to 1.03). Conclusions There is little evidence fatality rates have fallen. Freight vehicles over 3.5 tonnes continue to present a disproportionate threat; they should be removed from urban roads and more appropriate means of delivery of essential goods found. PMID:21078190

  11. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 442: Preconception and prenatal carrier screening for genetic diseases in individuals of Eastern European Jewish descent.

    PubMed

    2009-10-01

    Certain autosomal recessive disease conditions are more prevalent in individuals of Eastern European Jewish (Ashkenazi) descent. Previously, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommended that individuals of Eastern European Jewish ancestry be offered carrier screening for Tay-Sachs disease, Canavan disease, and cystic fibrosis as part of routine obstetric care. Based on the criteria used to justify offering carrier screening for Tay-Sachs disease, Canavan disease, and cystic fibrosis, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on Genetics recommends that couples of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry also should be offered carrier screening for familial dysautonomia. Individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent may inquire about the availability of carrier screening for other disorders. Carrier screening is available for mucolipidosis IV, Niemann-Pick disease type A, Fanconi anemia group C, Bloom syndrome, and Gaucher disease. PMID:19888064

  12. Jewish and non-Jewish World War II child and adolescent survivors at 60 years after war: effects of parental loss and age at exposure on well-being.

    PubMed

    Lis-Turlejska, Maja; Luszczynska, Aleksandra; Plichta, Anna; Benight, Charles C

    2008-07-01

    The study investigated the effects of World War II (WWII) on psychological and social functioning of Jewish and non-Jewish survivors 60 years after the war. The authors hypothesized that the level of posttraumatic symptoms, depression, and social isolation of survivors who were at least 5 years old (but younger than 18) in the last year of WWII would be predicted by the extent of traumatic loss, (i.e., death of parent[s]) and age at the end of WWII. Data were collected from 211 individuals living in Poland, ages 66-80; 30% were Jewish Holocaust survivors. Current posttraumatic stress disorder was almost 2 times higher for Jewish (55.6%) than for non-Jewish survivors (30.9%), whereas no differences were found for depression and social isolation. Parental loss during the war predicted a global decrement of well-being (across measured outcome indices). For certain subgroups (e.g., Jewish survivors who had not lost their parents during WWII), war trauma may have less profound effects if most of the trauma exposure occurred during an earlier age (i.e., <5 years). PMID:19123756

  13. London Challenge: Surveys of Pupils and Teachers, 2005. Research Report RR718

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridley, Kate; Knight, Sarah; Scott, Emma; Benton, Tom; Woodthorpe, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    The London Challenge is a Department for Education and Skills (DfES) initiative, which aims to raise levels of attainment in London secondary schools and to create a world class education system in the capital. In 2005, London Challenge commissioned the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to carry out a survey of Year 7 pupils,…

  14. 33 CFR 165.140 - New London Harbor, Connecticut-security zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New London Harbor, Connecticut... London Harbor, Connecticut—security zone. (a) Security zones—(1) Security Zone A. The waters of the..., west of the Naval Submarine Base, New London, CT, enclosed by a line beginning at a point on...

  15. 33 CFR 165.140 - New London Harbor, Connecticut-security zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New London Harbor, Connecticut... London Harbor, Connecticut—security zone. (a) Security zones—(1) Security Zone A. The waters of the..., west of the Naval Submarine Base, New London, CT, enclosed by a line beginning at a point on...

  16. Inner London's Education Authority: Reflections on ILEA Twenty-Five Years after Closure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    It is 25 years since the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) was abolished and management of education in central London transferred to 13 London boroughs. The author reflects on the experience of being an ex-ILEA head teacher, and of managing one of the new local education authorities in the immediate post-ILEA period. He begins by commenting…

  17. Building a Hypertextual Digital Library in the Humanities: A Case Study on London.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Gregory; Smith, David A.; Wulfman, Clifford E.

    This paper describes the creation of a new humanities digital library collection: 11,000,000 words and 10,000 images representing books, images, and maps on pre-twentieth century London and its environs. The London collection contained far more dense and precise information than the materials from the Greco-Roman world. The London collection thus…

  18. London through Rose-Colored Graphics: Visual Rhetoric and Information Graphic Design in Charles Booth's Maps of London Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Miles A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I examine a historical information graphic--Charles Booth's maps of London poverty (1889-1902)--to analyze the cultural basis of ideas of transparency and clarity in information graphics. I argue that Booth's maps derive their rhetorical power from contemporary visual culture as much as from their scientific authority. The visual…

  19. Screening Jews and genes: a consideration of the ethics of genetic screening within the Jewish community: challenges and responses.

    PubMed

    Levin, M

    1999-01-01

    Screening for genetic disorders, particularly Tay-Sachs Disease, has been traditionally welcome by the Jewish community. I review the history of genetic screening among Jews and the views from the Jewish tradition on the subject, and then discuss ethical challenges of screening and the impact of historical memories upon future acceptance of screening programs. Some rational principles to guide future design of genetic screening programs among Jews are proposed. PMID:10464669

  20. Abraham's children in the genome era: major Jewish diaspora populations comprise distinct genetic clusters with shared Middle Eastern Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Atzmon, Gil; Hao, Li; Pe'er, Itsik; Velez, Christopher; Pearlman, Alexander; Palamara, Pier Francesco; Morrow, Bernice; Friedman, Eitan; Oddoux, Carole; Burns, Edward; Ostrer, Harry

    2010-06-11

    For more than a century, Jews and non-Jews alike have tried to define the relatedness of contemporary Jewish people. Previous genetic studies of blood group and serum markers suggested that Jewish groups had Middle Eastern origin with greater genetic similarity between paired Jewish populations. However, these and successor studies of monoallelic Y chromosomal and mitochondrial genetic markers did not resolve the issues of within and between-group Jewish genetic identity. Here, genome-wide analysis of seven Jewish groups (Iranian, Iraqi, Syrian, Italian, Turkish, Greek, and Ashkenazi) and comparison with non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive Jewish population clusters, each with shared Middle Eastern ancestry, proximity to contemporary Middle Eastern populations, and variable degrees of European and North African admixture. Two major groups were identified by principal component, phylogenetic, and identity by descent (IBD) analysis: Middle Eastern Jews and European/Syrian Jews. The IBD segment sharing and the proximity of European Jews to each other and to southern European populations suggested similar origins for European Jewry and refuted large-scale genetic contributions of Central and Eastern European and Slavic populations to the formation of Ashkenazi Jewry. Rapid decay of IBD in Ashkenazi Jewish genomes was consistent with a severe bottleneck followed by large expansion, such as occurred with the so-called demographic miracle of population expansion from 50,000 people at the beginning of the 15th century to 5,000,000 people at the beginning of the 19th century. Thus, this study demonstrates that European/Syrian and Middle Eastern Jews represent a series of geographical isolates or clusters woven together by shared IBD genetic threads. PMID:20560205

  1. Abraham's Children in the Genome Era: Major Jewish Diaspora Populations Comprise Distinct Genetic Clusters with Shared Middle Eastern Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Atzmon, Gil; Hao, Li; Pe'er, Itsik; Velez, Christopher; Pearlman, Alexander; Palamara, Pier Francesco; Morrow, Bernice; Friedman, Eitan; Oddoux, Carole; Burns, Edward; Ostrer, Harry

    2010-01-01

    For more than a century, Jews and non-Jews alike have tried to define the relatedness of contemporary Jewish people. Previous genetic studies of blood group and serum markers suggested that Jewish groups had Middle Eastern origin with greater genetic similarity between paired Jewish populations. However, these and successor studies of monoallelic Y chromosomal and mitochondrial genetic markers did not resolve the issues of within and between-group Jewish genetic identity. Here, genome-wide analysis of seven Jewish groups (Iranian, Iraqi, Syrian, Italian, Turkish, Greek, and Ashkenazi) and comparison with non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive Jewish population clusters, each with shared Middle Eastern ancestry, proximity to contemporary Middle Eastern populations, and variable degrees of European and North African admixture. Two major groups were identified by principal component, phylogenetic, and identity by descent (IBD) analysis: Middle Eastern Jews and European/Syrian Jews. The IBD segment sharing and the proximity of European Jews to each other and to southern European populations suggested similar origins for European Jewry and refuted large-scale genetic contributions of Central and Eastern European and Slavic populations to the formation of Ashkenazi Jewry. Rapid decay of IBD in Ashkenazi Jewish genomes was consistent with a severe bottleneck followed by large expansion, such as occurred with the so-called demographic miracle of population expansion from 50,000 people at the beginning of the 15th century to 5,000,000 people at the beginning of the 19th century. Thus, this study demonstrates that European/Syrian and Middle Eastern Jews represent a series of geographical isolates or clusters woven together by shared IBD genetic threads. PMID:20560205

  2. Carrier testing for Ashkenazi Jewish disorders in the prenatal setting: navigating the genetic maze.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Jose Carlos P; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole; Carter, Suzanne M; Klugman, Susan; Gregg, Anthony R; Gross, Susan J

    2014-09-01

    Exciting developments in the fields of genetics and genomics have facilitated the identification of the etiological basis of many Mendelian disorders. Several of the methods used in gene discovery have focused initially on homogeneous populations, including the Ashkenazi Jewish population. The founder effect is well recognized in this community, in which historical events and cultural behaviors have resulted in a limited number of mutations underlying genetic disorders with substantial health impact. New technologies have made it possible to rapidly expand the test panels, changing testing paradigms, and thereby creating challenges for the physician in deciphering the appropriate approach to genetic screening in this population. The goal of this review is to help primary obstetric health care providers navigate through this quickly moving field so as to better counsel and support their patients of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. PMID:24508465

  3. The impact of the Holocaust on the second generation: Norwegian Jewish Holocaust survivors and their children.

    PubMed

    Major, E F

    1996-07-01

    The entire population of Norwegian-born Jews who survived the German concentration camps and their children was examined, and compared to Norwegian-born Jews who escaped to Sweden, and their children. An attempt is made to look for the symptoms described as a "second generation syndrome" by several authors. The present findings do not support the presence of serious psychopathology among the children of Norwegian-born Jewish survivors as a group, but indicate a certain degree of psychological vulnerability among these children. As adults, they are more often engaged in health/social care professions and organizations and also show signs of greater assimilation to their non-Jewish surroundings than the comparison group. PMID:8827648

  4. Religious Coping Strategies and Mental Health Among Religious Jewish Gay and Bisexual Men.

    PubMed

    Shilo, Guy; Yossef, Ifat; Savaya, Riki

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of positive and negative religious coping strategies on the mental health of 113 Israeli gay and bisexual Jewish males with high levels of religiosity, and how sexual identity formation (internalized homophobia and coming out) and societal variables (family and friends' acceptance of sexual orientation and social connections within the LGBT community) mitigated the effects of religious coping strategies on mental health. Findings showed that when dealing with the stress arising from the conflict between religious and sexual identities, individuals used both positive and negative religious coping strategies, but only negative religious coping was associated with poorer mental health. In addition, only in the presence of social resources (social connections with the LGBT community and the acceptance of sexual orientation by friends), did the use of positive religious coping result in better mental health outcomes. These findings underlined the importance of these resilience social factors in the lives of religious Jewish gay and bisexual men. PMID:26324183

  5. Parental coping with developmental disorders in adolescents within the ultraorthodox Jewish community in Israel.

    PubMed

    Manor-Binyamini, Iris

    2012-05-01

    This preliminary study compares the coping strategies used by 100 ultraorthodox Jewish parents and 100 secular Jewish parents for dealing with adolescent children with developmental disorders. The parents completed two questionnaires on the sense of stress-related personal growth and the sense of coherence. The ultraorthodox parents reported a higher sense of growth and a higher sense of coherence than the secular parents. In addition, there were associations found between demographic characteristics. Gender differences between mothers and fathers in the sense of growth and community differences between ultraorthodox fathers and secular fathers in the sense of coherence are discussed. The study highlights the uniqueness of the religious point of view in dealing with adolescent children with developmental disorders. PMID:21695559

  6. Public health in the Vilna Ghetto as a form of Jewish resistance.

    PubMed

    Longacre, Mckenna; Beinfeld, Solon; Hildebrandt, Sabine; Glantz, Leonard; Grodin, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    We describe the system of public health that evolved in the Vilna Ghetto as an illustrative example of Jewish innovation and achievement during the Holocaust. Furthermore, we argue that by cultivating a sophisticated system of public health, the ghetto inmates enacted a powerful form of Jewish resistance, directly thwarting the intention of the Nazis to eliminate the inhabitants by starvation, epidemic, and exposure. In doing so, we aim to highlight applicable lessons for the broader public health literature. We hope that this unique story may gain its rightful place in the history of public health as an insightful case study of creative and progressive solutions to universal health problems in one of the most challenging environments imaginable. PMID:25521892

  7. Jewish gynecologists in Germany in the first half of the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Rudloff, Udo; Ludwig, Hans

    2005-10-01

    The political changes in Germany of 1933 led to discrimination, expulsion and emigration of Jewish doctors. This article addresses the memory of gynecologists who were eminent physicians or made fundamental discoveries. Short biographies of Ludwig Fraenkel, Selmar Aschheim, Bernhard Zondek, Ludwig Adler, Robert Meyer and Paul Ferdinand Strassmann highlight their work and their links to the Gynecological Society in Berlin and to the German Society of Gynecology, the foundation of the latter being inspired by Wilhelm Alexander Freund from Strasbourg. PMID:16086229

  8. [Urology and National Socialism. Paul Rosenstein 1875-1964, the disrupted biography of a Jewish urologist].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Krischel, M; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2011-09-01

    The biography of Paul Rosenstein (1875-1964) serves as an example of the fate of a Jewish scientist at the beginning of the twentieth century in an area of conflict between the development of urology as a specialty at greater urban hospitals, professional achievements as a surgeon and scientist, drastic breaks during Nazi era and escape from Nazi terror via New York to Brazil. PMID:21785886

  9. [Vladimir Zederbaum" (1883-1942): Physician, journalist, contributor to the Russian "Jewish, Encyclopedia". A research report].

    PubMed

    Antipova, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Vol. 15 o f the "Jewish Encyclopedia" (St. Petersburg 1908-1913) contains an article on Freud, signed by Vladimir Zederbaum. The data for the article were provided by Max Eitingon. This paper addresses the question of whether Zederbaum himself was Eitingon's contact. Several archives produced a lot of information about Zederbaum's medical and journalistic activities in St. Petersburg. However, to date no connection between the two men could be established. PMID:26939252

  10. Electrospray ionization linear trap quadrupole Orbitrap in analysis of old tempera paintings: application to nineteenth-century Orthodox icons.

    PubMed

    Tripković, T; Charvy, C; Alves, S; Lolić, A Đ; Baošić, R M; Nikolić-Mandić, S D; Tabet, J C

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic approach in combination with mass spectrometry demonstrates a great potential for identification of proteinaceous materials in works of art. In this study we used a linear trap quadrupole Orbitrap (LTQ-Orbitrap), a state-of-the-art mass spectrometer for parts per million accuracy analyses of peptides behind tryptic hydrolysis. After the efficiency of the proteomic method was confirmed for reference and model samples, micro-samples from historical paintings were for the first time analysed using this technique. Superior performances of the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach using a LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer allowed identification of egg yolk peptides in two samples from nineteenth-century Orthodox icons, indicating egg tempera as the painting technique. Accurate precursor ion masses, in the range of ±2 ppm, and retention times of tryptic peptides strengthen protein identification. Additionally, in all historical samples the presence of animal glues suggested that the ground layer was likely bound using bovine collagen. Comparing to results acquired using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry in our previous study, here we achieved higher ion scores and protein scores, better sequence coverage and more identified proteins. In fact, a combination of the two mass spectrometric techniques provided overlapping and complementary data, related to the detection of peptides with different physicochemical properties. PMID:26353990

  11. The corona of the daffodil Narcissus bulbocodium shares stamen-like identity and is distinct from the orthodox floral whorls.

    PubMed

    Waters, Mark T; Tiley, Anna M M; Kramer, Elena M; Meerow, Alan W; Langdale, Jane A; Scotland, Robert W

    2013-05-01

    The structural homology of the daffodil corona has remained a source of debate throughout the history of botany. Over the years it has been separately referred to as a modified petal stipule, stamen and tepal. Here we provide insights from anatomy and molecular studies to clarify the early developmental stages and position of corona initiation in Narcissus bulbocodium. We demonstrate that the corona initiates as six separate anlagen from hypanthial tissue between the stamens and perianth. Scanning electron microscope images and serial sections demonstrate that corona initiation occurs late in development, after the other floral whorls are fully developed. To define more precisely the identity of the floral structures, daffodil orthologues of the ABC floral organ identity genes were isolated and expression patterns were examined in perianth, stamens, carpel, hypanthial tube and corona tissue. Coupled with in situ hybridisation experiments, these analyses showed that the expression pattern of the C-class gene NbAGAMOUS in the corona is more similar to that of the stamens than that of the tepals. In combination, our results demonstrate that the corona of the daffodil N. bulbocodium exhibits stamen-like identity, develops independently from the orthodox floral whorls and is best interpreted as a late elaboration of the region between the petals and stamens associated with epigyny and the hypanthium. PMID:23406544

  12. Induction of Apoptosis and Cytotoxic Activities of Iranian Orthodox Black Tea Extract (BTE) Using in vitro Models

    PubMed Central

    Aghbali, Amirala; Moradi Abbasabadi, Faranak; Delazar, Abbas; Vosough Hosseini, Sepideh; Zare Shahneh, Fatemeh; Baradaran, Behzad; Janani, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Plant-derivate therapeutic agents can perform cancer chemotherapeutic activity through triggering apoptotic cell death. Our aim was to investigate the cytotoxic effects, induction of apoptosis, and the mechanism of cell death of Iranian orthodox black tea extracts (BTEs) and hydro methanolic purified fractions (40, 60, 80 and 100%) in KB cells (oral squamous cell carcinoma). Methods: In order to analyze the cytotoxic activity of the BTEs, MTT (3-(4, 5- dimetylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and Trypan-blue assays were performed in oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB). Furthermore, the apoptosis inducing action of the extracts was determined by TUNEL, DNA fragmentation and cell death detection analysis. Results: Dichloromethane BTE and hydro methanol fractions (40 and 60%) extract showed no cytotoxic effects; however, hydro methanol crude and hydro methanol fractions of BTE (80 and 100%) significantly inhibited cell growth and viability in a dose and time dependent manner. In addition, Cell death assay, TUNEL, and DNA fragmentation indicated induction of apoptosis by hydro methanol 80 and 100% fractions of BTE in KB cells. Statistical significance was determined by analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Duncan test and p value ≤0.05 was considered significant. Conclusion: The results from the present study suggests that the hydro methanol crude and hydro methanol fractions of BTE (80 and 100%) are significant source of compounds with the anti proliferative and cytotoxic activities, and this may be useful for developing potential chemo preventive substances. PMID:24754009

  13. [Self endangerment to save life--competing Jewish legal and moral obligations].

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Zlotnick, Eitan; Wygoda, Michael; Rosenzweig, Joshua P; Steinberg, Avraham

    2014-11-01

    The obligation to help others often involves personal risk. Consequently, the scope and boundaries of this obligation can present a complex dilemma, which has practical and moral implications, even in the world of medicine. In Jewish medical ethics, the dilemma stems from a confrontation between the duty to help others according to the biblical commandment: "Do not stand idly by your fellow's blood" on the one hand, and between the right and duty of man to defend himself, which is anchored in Jewish law. This article surveys the sources of this quandary in Jewish texts throughout the ages such as the Bible, Mishnah, Talmud, and responsa literature in various contexts. The discussion highlights the essential difference between the formal demands of the law, which protects human rights of self-preservation, and the moral requirement to help others even if it may include personal risk. The sources suggest distinguishing between various levels of risk ranging from high-risk to reasonable or low risk. In this way, the classic sources, provide the foundation and the tools for grappling with modern contemporary Halachic questions such as organ transplantation, and generate a Torah value-based framework to deal with new situations that may arise in the future. It is critical to assess the level of risk and the chances for success, along with other subjective considerations, in order to ensure the optimal ethical course of action. PMID:25563020

  14. Jewish children hidden in France between 1940 and 1944: an analysis of their narratives today.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Marion; Taïeb, Olivier; Moro, Marie Rose

    2010-10-01

    The psychology literature concerning Jewish children hidden during World War II appeared in 1991 and was predominantly American and Israeli. Nevertheless, few studies consider the specific and complex situation of the "hidden children." The present study broaches this theme. The aim of this research is to show the consequences of the cumulate trauma in adults whose trauma occurred when they were children; it also aims to show how the subjects cope with the trauma. This research used a qualitative methodology. A series of semistructured interviews on personal and psychological history was conducted with 35 Jewish people (21 women, 14 men; mean age = 74.9 years; range = 65-82 years) living in France and who had been hidden between 1940 and 1944 during the Occupation in France (except for 2 hidden in Belgium and the Netherlands). The current research identified specific traumas, intra- and intergenerational family disorders, and affiliation disturbances, as well as protective factors and ways of coping with the trauma. This research shows the impact of collective history on individual history, the experience of Jewish children who were hidden in France and who stayed in France following the Liberation presents specific features. PMID:20950295

  15. Spirituality, depression, and loneliness among Jewish seniors residing in New York City.

    PubMed

    Springer, Mychal B; Newman, Avraham; Weaver, Andrew J; Siritsky, Nadia; Linderblatt, Chaim; Flannelly, Kevin J; Naditch, Beth; VandeCreek, Larry

    2003-01-01

    This article reports the results of research that examined a randomized group of 118 Jewish seniors who were clients of one of three Jewish social service agencies in New York City. They were interviewed by four Clinical Pastoral Education residents at the Jewish Institute for Pastoral Care. During the interview, participants were asked to respond to the questions contained in the Brief Depression Scale, Version 3 of the UCLA Loneliness Scale, and the Index of Core Spiritual Experience--INSPIRIT. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the depression and loneliness scores, r(116) = .56, p < .001. Spirituality was not correlated with either of these scales. Both depression and loneliness were significantly higher among women, among people who had physical impairments and those who had been victims of Nazi persecution. Depression and loneliness were inversely related to participants' ability to venture out of their house and to their relationship with their families. Having a sense of meaning or purpose in life was also inversely related to depression and loneliness. Spirituality tended to be higher among women, those participants, with more years of religious education, and those with physical impairments, but only the gender effect was statistically significant. PMID:14579632

  16. Founder Fukutin mutation causes Walker-Warburg syndrome in four Ashkenazi Jewish families†

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wendy; Winder, Thomas L.; LeDuc, Charles A.; Simpson, Lynn L.; Millar, William S.; Dungan, Jeffrey; Ginsberg, Norman; Plaga, Stacey; Moore, Steven A.; Chung, Wendy K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a genetically heterogeneous congenital muscular dystrophy caused by abnormal glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) that is associated with brain malformations and eye anomalies. The Fukutin (FKTN) gene, which causes autosomal recessively inherited WWS is most often associated with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in Japan. We describe the clinical features of four nonconsanguinous Ashkenazi Jewish families with WWS and identify the underlying genetic basis for WWS. Method We screened for mutations in POMGnT1, POMT1, POMT2, and FKTN, genes causing WWS, by dideoxy sequence analysis. Results We identified an identical homozygous c.1167insA mutation in the FKTN gene on a common haplotype in all four families and identified 2/299 (0.7%) carriers for the c.1167insA mutation among normal American Ashkenazi Jewish adults. Conclusion These data suggest that the c.1167insA FKTN mutation described by us is a founder mutation that can be used to target diagnostic testing and carrier screening in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. PMID:19266496

  17. Pre-modern Islamic medical ethics and Graeco-Islamic-Jewish embryology.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, Mohammed

    2014-02-01

    This article examines the, hitherto comparatively unexplored, reception of Greek embryology by medieval Muslim jurists. The article elaborates on the views attributed to Hippocrates (d. ca. 375 BC), which received attention from both Muslim physicians, such as Avicenna (d. 1037), and their Jewish peers living in the Muslim world including Ibn Jumay' (d. ca. 1198) and Moses Maimonides (d. 1204). The religio-ethical implications of these Graeco-Islamic-Jewish embryological views were fathomed out by the two medieval Muslim jurists Shihāb al-Dīn al-Qarāfī (d. 1285) and Ibn al-Qayyim (d. 1350). By putting these medieval religio-ethical discussions into the limelight, the article aims to argue for a two-pronged thesis. Firstly, pre-modern medical ethics did exist in the Islamic tradition and available evidence shows that this field had a multidisciplinary character where the Islamic scriptures and the Graeco-Islamic-Jewish medical legacy were highly intertwined. This information problematizes the postulate claiming that medieval Muslim jurists were hostile to the so-called 'ancient sciences'. Secondly, these medieval religio-ethical discussions remain playing a significant role in shaping the nascent field of contemporary Islamic bioethics. However, examining the exact character and scope of this role still requires further academic ventures. PMID:23844565

  18. A syllabus for Jewish medical ethics in the context of general bioethics.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Shaham, Dorith

    2008-05-01

    Since the beginning of medical history, ethics has interested medical practitioners. The subject has become particularly important in recent years due to the huge advancements in medicine and medical technology and has elicited much public interest. While international ethical principles and guidelines have been established, classical Jewish tradition has always placed great emphasis on bioethics. Prof. Avraham Steinberg's monumental Encyclopedia of Jewish Medical Ethics presents the subject comprehensively and in depth. We propose a bioethics syllabus, to be integrated into the medical curriculum in three stages: i) preclinical - covering basic ethical concepts and principles, relevant history, and ethical codes; ii) clinical - covering bioethical topics relating to the human life cycle; iii) prior to students' final examinations and further specialization - covering bioethical topics relating to their personal interests. Steinberg's Encyclopedia is an ideal basis for the development of a professional course, including Jewish traditional aspects. Such a course would provide future physicians with a varied cultural and intercultural background, help shape their image, and improve the quality of medical care. PMID:18605372

  19. Erich Langer: the last Jewish dermatologist in Nazi Berlin. 532-41.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Walter H C; Hoenig, Leonard J; Plewig, Gerd; Kohl, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Nazi anti-Semitism had a considerable impact on dermatology during the period 1933 to 1945. Before World War II, dermatology in German-speaking lands was at the forefront of medicine, and about 25% of the dermatologists were Jewish. Many perished during the Holocaust; others emigrated from Germany and played a major role in advancing dermatology in their new homes, especially in the United States. Erich Langer (1891-1957) was almost unique, because he survived the entire period in Berlin. Langer had been chief of dermatology at Berlin-Britz, a large city hospital, before 1933 but was discharged almost immediately after the Nazi takeover because of his Jewish roots. In June 1945 he returned to his old department and resumed charge. He became one of the key figures in rebuilding German dermatology in the immediate postwar years. He served as first chair of dermatology at the new Free University in Berlin, started two journals, and wrote several books. Until recently, very little was known about Erich Langer's mysterious tale of survival and how he evaded Nazi roundups. Fortunately, we have discovered considerable archival material that has allowed us to piece together, for the first time, a detailed account of Langer's courageous and remarkable story as the last Jewish dermatologist inNazi Berlin. PMID:25144942

  20. A mathematical model of the London riots and their policing

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Toby P.; Fry, Hannah M.; Wilson, Alan G.; Bishop, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    In August 2011, several areas of London experienced episodes of large-scale disorder, comprising looting, rioting and violence. Much subsequent discourse has questioned the adequacy of the police response, in terms of the resources available and strategies used. In this article, we present a mathematical model of the spatial development of the disorder, which can be used to examine the effect of varying policing arrangements. The model is capable of simulating the general emergent patterns of the events and focusses on three fundamental aspects: the apparently-contagious nature of participation; the distances travelled to riot locations; and the deterrent effect of policing. We demonstrate that the spatial configuration of London places some areas at naturally higher risk than others, highlighting the importance of spatial considerations when planning for such events. We also investigate the consequences of varying police numbers and reaction time, which has the potential to guide policy in this area. PMID:23425781

  1. Rock and mineral physics at University College London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Paul; Meredith, Philip; Price, David

    The Department of Geological Sciences at University College London (UCL), has undergone a period of major expansion and growth as a result of the restructuring of geology departments within the University of London that was carried out in 1982. This exercise produced the amalgamation of selected parts of the Department of Geological Sciences of Queen Mary College and the Department of Geology, UCL, on the UCL site. The creation of this strengthened grouping has been successful in attracting a significant number of active researchers in the field of rock and mineral physics (RMP) to the new UCL department. As a result, the academic staff has more than douhled since 1982 and now stands at 31.

  2. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...°, 1,400 yards; 246°, 925 yards; 217°, 1,380 yards; and 235°, 1,450 yards. (2) Anchorage B. In the...,460 yards; 009°, 2,480 yards; 026°, 1,175 yards; and 008°, 1,075 yards. (3) Anchorage C. In the Thames River southward of New London Harbor, bounded by lines connecting a point bearing 100°, 450 yards...

  3. New series for agricultural prices in London, 1770–1914.

    PubMed

    Solar, Peter M; Klovland, Jan Tore

    2011-01-01

    New annual series for the prices of major agricultural commodities sold in London markets between 1770 and 1914 are presented. These series are based on bimonthly observations drawn from newspaper market reports. The products covered are wheat, barley (grinding and malting), oats, potatoes, hay, butter, beef, mutton, and pork. Annual prices are calculated for both calendar and production years. The new series are compared to existing series. PMID:21328804

  4. Modelling of hydrogen infrastructure for vehicle refuelling in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, D.; Hart, D.; Bauen, A.

    One of the principal barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen as a road transport fuel is the need for a refuelling infrastructure to be established. The lack of an adequate refuelling infrastructure would severely inhibit an uptake of hydrogen vehicles. On the other hand, without significant penetration of these vehicles, the demand for hydrogen would be insufficient to make a widespread conventional refuelling infrastructure economic. The infrastructure is likely to develop initially in cities, due to the high concentration of vehicles and the anticipated air quality benefits of a switch to hydrogen as a road transport fuel. While trial schemes such as the Clean Urban Transport for Europe (CUTE) bus project will establish initial hydrogen refuelling sites, it is not clear how a transition to a widespread refuelling infrastructure will occur. Indeed, the number of possible different ways and scales of producing and distributing hydrogen means that the possible configurations for such an infrastructure are almost endless. Imperial College London is examining transition strategies for a hydrogen infrastructure for vehicle refuelling in London under a project funded by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Imperial has five project partners from industry and local government to assist in this study: the Greater London Authority (GLA), BP, BOC, BMW and Air Products. This paper presents initial results from technical modelling of hydrogen infrastructure technologies and how they could be deployed to provide an initial facility for the refuelling of hydrogen fuel-cell buses in London. The results suggest that the choice of H 2 production technology can have significant effects on when the infrastructure would be installed, and the timing of hydrogen production, and bus refuelling.

  5. "Like a Distant Cousin": Bi-Cultural Negotiation as Key Perspective in Understanding the Evolving Relationship of Future Reform Rabbis with Israel and the Jewish People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muszkat-Barkan, Michal; Grant, Lisa D.

    2015-01-01

    This research explores the impact of a year studying in Israel on Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (HUC-JIR) rabbinical students' emotional connection toward and knowledge about the State of Israel and the Jewish People. We want to better understand the students' beliefs, ideas, and behaviors that emerge from their experience…

  6. Teachers' Perception of School Climate in Independent Jewish Day Schools in Relation to Change and Transition of Leadership Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knafo, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between turnover of school leadership personnel and school climate as perceived by teachers. The study focused on Jewish day schools in the United States in different cities and states. Fifty Jewish day schools (ranging from preschool age to high school) participated in the study with 200 teachers from these…

  7. Confronting the Languages of Statehood: Theoretical and Historical Frameworks for the Analysis of the Multilingual Identity of the Russian Jewish Intelligensia in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kheimets, Nina G.; Epstein, Alek D.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews sociological analysis of the transformation of the link between language and identity among Soviet Jewish immigrants in Israel, focusing on their common desire for Russian language maintenance after their immigration to Israel. Argues that although the immigrants acquire fast, the former Jewish intelligensia's perception of the dominant…

  8. Air pollution dispersion models for human exposure predictions in London.

    PubMed

    Beevers, Sean D; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Williams, Martin L; Kelly, Frank J; Ross Anderson, H; Carslaw, David C

    2013-01-01

    The London household survey has shown that people travel and are exposed to air pollutants differently. This argues for human exposure to be based upon space-time-activity data and spatio-temporal air quality predictions. For the latter, we have demonstrated the role that dispersion models can play by using two complimentary models, KCLurban, which gives source apportionment information, and Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ)-urban, which predicts hourly air quality. The KCLurban model is in close agreement with observations of NO(X), NO(2) and particulate matter (PM)(10/2.5), having a small normalised mean bias (-6% to 4%) and a large Index of Agreement (0.71-0.88). The temporal trends of NO(X) from the CMAQ-urban model are also in reasonable agreement with observations. Spatially, NO(2) predictions show that within 10's of metres of major roads, concentrations can range from approximately 10-20 p.p.b. up to 70 p.p.b. and that for PM(10/2.5) central London roadside concentrations are approximately double the suburban background concentrations. Exposure to different PM sources is important and we predict that brake wear-related PM(10) concentrations are approximately eight times greater near major roads than at suburban background locations. Temporally, we have shown that average NO(X) concentrations close to roads can range by a factor of approximately six between the early morning minimum and morning rush hour maximum periods. These results present strong arguments for the hybrid exposure model under development at King's and, in future, for in-building models and a model for the London Underground. PMID:23443237

  9. Space in Pentecostal healing practices among Ghanaian migrants in London.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    In this article I analyze different spatial practices related to Pentecostal healing, drawing on fieldwork with Pentecostal believers who have migrated from Ghana to London, UK. I explore the relationship between space and the manifestation of the Holy Spirit by looking at how points of contact with the divine are created in the personal life of people and at the sites where the casting out of demons takes place. Unlike in other spirit-centered healing traditions, the Christian Holy Spirit is not conceived of as embodied in specific places, but rather is spatially unbound. To manifest, however, the Holy Spirit requires specific spatial qualities and esthetics. PMID:24383751

  10. Prosecuting attempted suicides in London: 1891-1913.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2009-12-01

    A study of 30 cases of attempted suicide tried at the Old Bailey criminal court in London (England) from 1891 to 1913 indicated that having made prior attempts was the only predictor of the severity of the sentence. 22 individuals were tried for murdering or attempting to murder their child and also attempting suicide. None of the murderers but half of the attempted murderers were found not guilty, or guilty then released. Mothers used drowning more than did fathers and were more likely to be found not guilty. PMID:20099544

  11. Two daily smoke maxima in eighteenth century London air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. Giles

    Varied electrostatics experiments followed Benjamin Franklin's pioneering atmospheric investigations. In Knightsbridge, Central London, John Read (1726-1814) installed a sensing rod in the upper part of his house and, using a pith ball electrometer and Franklin chimes, monitored atmospheric electricity from 1789 to 1791. Atmospheric electricity is sensitive to weather and smoke pollution. In calm weather conditions, Read observed two daily electrification maxima in moderate weather, around 9 am and 7 pm. This is likely to represent a double diurnal cycle in urban smoke. Before the motor car and steam railways, one source of the double maximum smoke pattern was the daily routine of fire lighting for domestic heating.

  12. Lessons for climate policy from The Great Stink of London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuce, A.

    2012-12-01

    A rapidly growing population and the introduction of the flush toilet in nineteenth-century London caused a crisis with sewage pollution in the River Thames (Halliday, 1999). There were decades of delays in implementing solutions owing to: inadequate governance institutions; political inertia; difficulties with financing; opposition from vested interests; scientific uncertainties; and technological challenges. Effective counter-measures were started only once the problem arose, quite literally, under the noses of parliamentarians. There are parallels, some of them pointed out earlier by Alley et al (2010), between the sewage crisis in Victorian London and the current problem with climate change. Both involve the unsustainable use of a common resource (a river, the atmosphere) for the unconstrained disposal of human waste products. Alley (2011) estimated that the costs of providing clean water and sanitation are comparable to the expected costs of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Despite the similarities, the climate change issue is actually much more difficult because of: a) the unequal and uncertain global distribution of cause and effect; b) its long, intergenerational time lines; c) the insufficiency of adequate institutions, conventions or the tools— political, moral or economic—for tackling the climate crisis. This analysis is consistent with the model proposed by Gardiner (2011) in his book A Perfect Moral Storm. The three "storms" he identifies, the global, intergenerational and theoretical storms, combine in a powerful synergy to create a challenge of unprecedented intractability, providing opportunities for what Gardiner calls moral corruption: the obscuring of the buck-passing and procrastination that characterizes climate policy today. In Victorian London, the crucial steps to solve the sewage crises were not taken until the stench from the River Thames during the hot summer of 1858 rendered the House of Commons uninhabitable. A greater stink of a

  13. Frontiers in cardiovascular biology: London 2012 - a scientific 'olympiad'.

    PubMed

    Harding, Sian E

    2012-09-01

    Imperial College London (UK) was the showcase for the second in the 'Frontiers in Cardiovascular Biology' series, a biennial meeting of the European Society of Cardiology Council on basic cardiovascular sciences, held from 30 March to 1 April 2012. The aim of this series is to bring researchers together to learn the very latest findings in cardiac and vascular sciences, and to see state-of-the-art and developing technologies that could impact cardiovascular research. Five keynote lectures, 25 scientific symposia and two translational lunchtime symposia were grouped around the central themes of bioimaging, degeneration and regeneration, and inflammation. PMID:23013121

  14. Contribution of wood burning to PM10 in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Gary W.; Tremper, Anja H.; Baker, Timothy D.; Yttri, Karl Espen; Butterfield, David

    2014-04-01

    Ahead of measures to incentivise wood heating, the current level of wood burning in London was assessed by two tracer methods; i) a six week campaign of daily measurements of levoglucosan along a 38 km transect across the city during winter 2010, ii) a three year (2009-2011) measurement programme of black carbon and particulate matter from wood burning using differential IR and UV absorption by Aethalometer. Mean winter levoglucosan concentrations were 160 ± 17 ng m-3 in central London and 30 ± 26 ng m-3 greater in the suburbs, with good temporal correlation (r2 = 0.68-0.98) between sampling sites. Sensitivity testing found that the aethalometer wood burning tracer method was more sensitive to the assumed value of the Ångström coefficient for fossil fuel black carbon than it was to the Ångström coefficient for wood burning PM, and that the model was optimised with Ångström coefficient for fossil fuel black carbon of 0.96. The aethalometer and levoglucosan estimates of mean PM from wood burning were in good agreement during the winter campaign; 1.8 μg m-3 (levoglucosan) and 2.0 μg m-3 (aethalometer); i.e. between 7% and 9% of mean PM10 across the London transect. Analysis of wood burning tracers with respect to wind speed suggested that wood burning PM was dominated by sources within the city. Concentrations of aethalometer and levoglucosan wood burning tracers were a greatest at weekends suggesting discretionary or secondary domestic wood burning rather than wood being used as a main heating source. Aethalometer wood burning tracers suggests that the annual mean concentration of PM10 from wood burning was 1.1 μg m-3. To put this in a policy context, this PM10 from wood burning is considerably greater than the city-wide mean PM10 reduction of 0.17 μg m-3 predicted from the first two phases of the London Low Emission Zone which was introduced to reduce PM from traffic sources.

  15. The Missing Link of Jewish European Ancestry: Contrasting the Rhineland and the Khazarian Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Elhaik, Eran

    2013-01-01

    The question of Jewish ancestry has been the subject of controversy for over two centuries and has yet to be resolved. The “Rhineland hypothesis” depicts Eastern European Jews as a “population isolate” that emerged from a small group of German Jews who migrated eastward and expanded rapidly. Alternatively, the “Khazarian hypothesis” suggests that Eastern European Jews descended from the Khazars, an amalgam of Turkic clans that settled the Caucasus in the early centuries CE and converted to Judaism in the 8th century. Mesopotamian and Greco–Roman Jews continuously reinforced the Judaized empire until the 13th century. Following the collapse of their empire, the Judeo–Khazars fled to Eastern Europe. The rise of European Jewry is therefore explained by the contribution of the Judeo–Khazars. Thus far, however, the Khazars’ contribution has been estimated only empirically, as the absence of genome-wide data from Caucasus populations precluded testing the Khazarian hypothesis. Recent sequencing of modern Caucasus populations prompted us to revisit the Khazarian hypothesis and compare it with the Rhineland hypothesis. We applied a wide range of population genetic analyses to compare these two hypotheses. Our findings support the Khazarian hypothesis and portray the European Jewish genome as a mosaic of Near Eastern-Caucasus, European, and Semitic ancestries, thereby consolidating previous contradictory reports of Jewish ancestry. We further describe a major difference among Caucasus populations explained by the early presence of Judeans in the Southern and Central Caucasus. Our results have important implications for the demographic forces that shaped the genetic diversity in the Caucasus and for medical studies. PMID:23241444

  16. Evaluation of a multi-disease carrier screening programme in Ashkenazi Jewish high schools.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, L; Massie, J; Lewis, S; Petrou, V; Gason, A; Metcalfe, S; Aitken, M A; Bankier, A; Delatycki, M B

    2010-07-01

    A screening programme for Tay Sachs disease (TSD) carrier status was introduced in high schools in Victoria, Australia in 1997, and was expanded to screen for six other genetic conditions common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population in 2008. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current programme and compare it with an evaluation of the programme when screening was offered for TSD alone. All students from Jewish high schools in Melbourne who offered the programme in 2009 were invited to participate in the study. A purpose-designed questionnaire explored the following domains: knowledge (disease and genetics), reasons for screening, anxiety, and predicted negative feelings if found to be a carrier. Two hundred and seventy-three students were offered screening, and 272 (99.6%) completed the questionnaire. Only two students chose not to have screening. Two hundred and seventy-one students were in the penultimate year of high school (99.6%) and 222 were of Ashkenazi Jewish descent (82.5%). The main reasons for choosing screening were the desire to know carrier status and convenience. Knowledge level decreased and negative feelings increased in the current cohort compared to that when screening was offered for TSD alone. We conclude that the current programme is efficient, although increasing the number of conditions resulted in a decrease in knowledge and increase in predicted negative feelings if found to be a carrier of one of the conditions. This has implications for multi-disease screening programmes that will increase in frequency as more conditions can be screened for and costs diminish. PMID:20597919

  17. Principles and concepts of brain death and organ donation: the Jewish perspective.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Z H; Rappaport, I T

    1998-08-01

    The harvesting of organs for transplantation is dependent on a stringent definition of brain death. Different societies have had to struggle with their cultural heritage, adapting their traditional attitudes to conform to the advances in medical science and the needs of the sick. In this article, the development of the concept of brain death as it applies to organ transplantation in Judaism is outlined. The ability of traditional Jewish values to address themselves to the challenges of modern medicine can serve as a basis for cultural cross-fertilization and comparison in modern societies. PMID:9753405

  18. Principles and concepts of brain death and organ donation: the Jewish perspective.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Z H; Rappaport, I T

    1999-01-01

    The harvesting of organs for transplantation is dependent on a stringent definition of brain death. Different societies have had to struggle with their cultural heritage, adapting it to conform to the advances in medical science and the need of the sick. In this article, the development of the concept of brain death as it applies to organ transplantation in Judaism is outlined. The ability of traditional Jewish values to address themselves to the challenges of modern medicine can serve as a basis for cultural cross-fertilization and comparison in modern societies. PMID:10549346

  19. Jewish children hidden in france (1940-1944): what outcomes for feelings of shame?

    PubMed

    Feldman, Marion; Mouchenik, Yoram; Moro, Marie Rose

    2012-12-01

    This article explores how shame affects individuals over time, from childhood to late adulthood. A series of semi-structured interviews was conducted with 35 aging hidden Jewish children (21 women, 14 men; mean age of 74.9 years, range: 65-82 years), living in France 65 years after the Holocaust. For most of them, shame repeatedly acts as an "alarm signal." For many, the transformation has been possible: creation, recognition by the social group. We also discuss the fact that shame can lead to psychic exhaustion as well as handing down to the next generation. This outcome can prove fatal. PMID:23253059

  20. Reconstituting a human brain in animals: a Jewish perspective on human sanctity.

    PubMed

    Loike, John D; Tendler, Moshe

    2008-12-01

    The potential use of stem cells in the treatment of a variety of human diseases has been a major driving force for embryonic stem cell research. Another productive area of research has been the use of human stem cells to reconstitute human organ systems in animals in an attempt to create new animal models for human diseases. However, the possibility of transplanting human embryonic brain cells or precursor brain cells into an animal fetus presents numerous ethical challenges. This paper examines, from a Jewish perspective on human dignity, several bioethical concerns related to the reconstitution of animal brains with human neurons. PMID:19143409

  1. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A R; Wagner, R; Khatri, K; Notani, G; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A; Yunis, E J

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes in 25 non-Jewish PV patients, DR4, DQw8 was found in 12 of the patients and DRw6, DQw5 was found in 15. Only 3 patients had neither. Only 1 of the DR4, DQw8 haplotypes was [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] and 2 were HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8; most were the presumed fragments (SC31, DR4, DQw8) or (SC21, DR4, DQw8) or DR4, DQw8 with some other complotype. Of the patients with DRw6, DQw5, all were DRw14, DQw5, and 6 had a rare Caucasian haplotype, HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5. Four of 6 of these were found in patients of Italian extraction, as was the 1 normal example. The non-Jewish patients were of more Southern European extraction than our controls. This suggests that there are two major MHC susceptibility alleles in American patients with PV. The more ancient apparently arose on a haplotype in the Jews, HLA-B38(35), SC21(SC31), DR4, DQw8, and spread to other populations largely as D-region segments. The other arose in or near Italy on the haplotype HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5 and has also partially fragmented so that many patients carry only DRw14, DQw5. The available data do not permit the specific localization of either the DR4, DQw8- or the DRw14, DQw5-linked susceptibility genes. Images PMID:1675792

  2. The Jewish psychiatric hospital, Zofiówka, in Otwock, Poland.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2015-03-01

    The T4 euthanasia programme within Nazi Germany has been well researched, but much less is known about the extermination of psychiatric patients in Nazi-occupied territories during the same period. In Poland 20,000 mentally ill patients were deliberately killed during the German occupation. This paper traces the history of one psychiatric hospital, Zofiówka, in Otwock, south-east of Warsaw. The hospital once served the Jewish population of Poland and was the largest, most prestigious neuropsychiatric centre in the country. It is now in ruins and said to be haunted by ghosts. PMID:25698689

  3. Public health assessment for US Naval Submarine Base, New London, Groton, New London County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD980906515. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-26

    The New London Submarine Base was divided by the town boundaries of Groton to the south and Ledyard to the north in New London County, Connecticut. In 1983, the Navy identified 16 potential source areas of environmental contamination during their investigations. The submarine base was listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List in August 1990 because of the potential for on-base groundwater contamination to migrate to off-base residential wells that are close to the New London Submarine Base.

  4. Molecular Self-Assembly Driven by London Dispersion Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guo; Cooper, Valentino R; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hongjun; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2011-01-01

    The nature and strength of intermolecular interactions are crucial to a variety of kinetic and dynamic processes at surfaces. Whereas strong chemisorption bonds are known to facilitate molecular binding, the importance of the weaker yet ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions remains elusive in most cases. Here we use first-principles calculations combined with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to unambiguously demonstrate the vital role that vdW interactions play in molecular self-assembly, using styrene nanowire growth on silicon as a prototypical example. We find that, only when the London dispersion forces are included, accounting for the attractive parts of vdW interactions, can the effective intermolecular interaction be reversed from being repulsive to attractive. Such attractive interactions, in turn, ensure the preferred growth of long wires under physically realistic conditions as observed experimentally. We further propose a cooperative scheme, invoking the application of an electric field and the selective creation of Si dangling bonds, to drastically improve the ordered arrangement of the molecular structures. The present study represents a significant step forward in the fundamental understanding and precise control of molecular self-assembly guided by London dispersion forces.

  5. Space-Time Analysis of Crime Patterns in Central London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Williams, D.

    2012-07-01

    Crime continues to cast a shadow over citizen well-being in big cities today, while also imposing huge economic and social costs. Timely understanding of how criminality emerges and how crime patterns evolve is crucial to anticipating crime, dealing with it when it occurs and developing public confidence in the police service. Every day, about 10,000 crime incidents are reported by citizens, recorded and geo-referenced in the London Metropolitan Police Service Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) database. The unique nature of this dataset allows the patterns to be explored at particularly fine temporal granularity and at multiple spatial resolutions. This study provides a framework for the exploratory spatio-temporal analysis of crime patterns that combines visual inquiry tools (interactive animations, space-time cubes and map matrices) with cluster analysis (spatial-temporal scan statistics and the self-organizing map). This framework is tested on the CAD dataset for the London Borough of Camden in March 2010. Patterns of crime through space and time are discovered and the clustering methods were evaluated on their ability to facilitate the discovery and interpretation of these patterns.

  6. Signatures of founder effects, admixture, and selection in the Ashkenazi Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Bray, Steven M; Mulle, Jennifer G; Dodd, Anne F; Pulver, Ann E; Wooding, Stephen; Warren, Stephen T

    2010-09-14

    The Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population has long been viewed as a genetic isolate, yet it is still unclear how population bottlenecks, admixture, or positive selection contribute to its genetic structure. Here we analyzed a large AJ cohort and found higher linkage disequilibrium (LD) and identity-by-descent relative to Europeans, as expected for an isolate. However, paradoxically we also found higher genetic diversity, a sign of an older or more admixed population but not of a long-term isolate. Recent reports have reaffirmed that the AJ population has a common Middle Eastern origin with other Jewish Diaspora populations, but also suggest that the AJ population, compared with other Jews, has had the most European admixture. Our analysis indeed revealed higher European admixture than predicted from previous Y-chromosome analyses. Moreover, we also show that admixture directly correlates with high LD, suggesting that admixture has increased both genetic diversity and LD in the AJ population. Additionally, we applied extended haplotype tests to determine whether positive selection can account for the level of AJ-prevalent diseases. We identified genomic regions under selection that account for lactose and alcohol tolerance, and although we found evidence for positive selection at some AJ-prevalent disease loci, the higher incidence of the majority of these diseases is likely the result of genetic drift following a bottleneck. Thus, the AJ population shows evidence of past founding events; however, admixture and selection have also strongly influenced its current genetic makeup. PMID:20798349

  7. Psychological distress among Ethiopian and Russian Jewish immigrants to Israel: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Ponizovsky, A; Ginath, Y; Durst, R; Wondimeneh, B; Safro, S; Minuchin-Itzigson, S; Ritsner, M

    1998-01-01

    A community survey was conducted examining the differences in levels of psychological distress and its symptomatology, comparing 110 Ethiopian-Jewish and 400 Russian-Jewish immigrants to Israel. Psychological distress was measured by the Talbieh Brief Distress Inventory. Russian immigrants were found to be more distressed than their Ethiopian counterparts and this between-group difference can be attributed to the greater relative number of females, older immigrants and those with longer duration of stay in Israel in the Russian sample. The highest levels of distress were observed for paranoid ideation in the Ethiopian sample and anxiety and hostility in the Russian sample. These symptoms were independent of gender and time since immigration. Russians with longer duration of stay demonstrated higher scores signifying adjustment difficulties than their Ethiopian counterparts. These results suggest that the differences in levels and symptom expression of psychological distress are determined, to a considerable extent, by demographic factors (sex, age) and the differing cultural backgrounds of the two immigrant groups. PMID:9574850

  8. Ashkenazi Jewish Centenarians Do Not Demonstrate Enrichment in Mitochondrial Haplogroup J

    PubMed Central

    Shlush, Liran I.; Atzmon, Gil; Weisshof, Roni; Behar, Doron; Yudkovsky, Guenady; Barzilai, Nir; Skorecki, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Background Association of mitochondrial haplogroup J with longevity has been reported in several population subgroups. While studies from northern Italy and Finland, have described a higher frequency of haplogroup J among centenarians in comparison to non-centenarian, several other studies could not replicate these results and suggested various explanations for the discrepancy. Methodology/Principal Findings We have evaluated haplogroup frequencies among Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians using two different sets of matched controls. No difference was observed in the haplogroup J frequencies between the centenarians or either matched control group, despite adequate statistical power to detect such a difference. Furthermore, the lack of association was robust to population substructure in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Given this discrepancy with the previous reported associations in the northern Italian and the Finnish populations, we conducted re-analysis of these previously published data, which supported one of several possible explanations: i) inadequate matching of cases and controls; ii) inadequate adjustment for multiple comparison testing; iii) cryptic population stratification. Conclusions/Significance There does not exist a universal association of mitochondrial haplogroup J with longevity across all population groups. Reported associations in specialized populations may reflect genetic or other interactions specific to those populations or else cryptic confounding influences, such as inadequate matching attributable to population substructure, which are of general relevance to all studies of the possible association of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups with common complex phenotypes. PMID:18923645

  9. The Digital Monument to the Jewish Community in the Netherlands: a meaningful, ritual place for commemoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faro, Laurie M. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Digital Monument to the Jewish Community in the Netherlands went online in 2005. This monument has been dedicated to preserve the memory of "all the men, women and children who were persecuted as Jews during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands, and did not survive the Shoah". In 2010 the Jewish Monument Community was linked to this virtual monument, this website Community offers the possibility to contribute additional information about individual victims remembered in the Digital Monument. The results of this research show that in comparison with commemoration at a traditional material monument, in particular the individual features of this new concept regarding commemoration are valued. Each individual victim may be commemorated and remembered in a very personal manner by telling who the victim was, and how he or she lived on the eve of deportation. The conclusion is that cyberspace may offer a significant and relevant place for, in this case, commemoration practices. Both Digital Monument and Community offer a meaningful place of commemoration of Dutch victims of the Shoah.

  10. The Jewish advantage and household security: life expectancy among 19th Century Sephardim of Gibraltar.

    PubMed

    Sawchuk, Lawrence A; Tripp, Lianne; Melnychenko, Ulianna

    2013-07-01

    Using the historical population of Gibraltar to examine the pattern of mortality of Jews and Roman Catholics revealed that: (1) the Jews exhibited a significantly better health status as measured by life expectancy at birth (47.66 and 47.56 for Jewish males and females vs. 38.10 and 40.89 for Catholics males and females, respectively), (2) most of the disparity is found in the very young age categories and (3) the significantly lower rates of deaths could be attributed to the diarrheal and nutritional complex. Stage two of the research involved the linkage of deaths over a 7-year period relative to their household context as of 1878. Being Jewish, having a servant, having access to a water well in the tenement and residing in a tenement only with other Jews, were all factors that contributed to a higher life expectancy. Our explanation for the enhanced survivorship among the Jews is grounded in economics as well as in an established welfare system, in religious precepts and in secular knowledge of health. One of the more notable and hitherto unobserved findings is that Roman Catholics residing in the same tenements with Jews enjoyed a distinct health advantage. This suggests that a positive amplification effect arose from their co-residence with the Jews. PMID:22664099

  11. Jewish immigrant encounters with Canada's Native Peoples: Yiddish writings on Tekahionwake.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    During the mass Jewish immigration of Eastern-European Jews to Canada in the first decades of the twentieth century, Yiddish publications offered a primary forum for a group of local writers to negotiate with their new identities as Canadian Jews. Within this wider process, Montreal writers H.M. Caiserman and B.G. Sack authored studies of Canadian literature in the early 1920s centred on Mohawk-English writer E. Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake). What these essays show is that, despite the long-standing association of Canada's Jewish population with the country's dominant English culture, their status as "other" impelled leading members of the local Yiddish cultural milieu to seek out literary models among other historically marginalized groups. For Caiserman and Sack, Johnson's Native heritage offered a model for resistance to assimilation into Canada's dominant culture. In contrast, the advent of literature responding to the Nazi Holocaust by A.M. Klein and Eli Mandel, Native peoples became a symbol of loss and vanished landscapes. PMID:20715329

  12. A pseudodeficiency allele common in non-Jewish Tay-Sachs carriers: Implications for carrier screening

    SciTech Connect

    Triggs-Raine, B.L.; Akerman, B.R.; Gravel, R.A. ); Mules, E.H.; Thomas, G.H.; Dowling, C.E. ); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, J.S.T. ); Natowicz, M.R. ); Grebner, E.E. ); Navon, R.R. ); Welch, J.P. ); Greenberg, C.R. )

    1992-10-01

    Deficiency of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) activity typically results in Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy subjects found to be deficient in Hex A activity (i.e., pseudodeficient) by means of in vitro biochemical tests have been described. The authors analyzed the HEXA gene of one pseudodeficient subject and identified both a C[sub 739]-to-T substitution that changes Arg[sub 247][yields]Trp on one allele and a previously identified Tay-Sachs disease mutation of the second allele. Six additional pseudodeficient subjects were found to have the C[sub 739]-to-T but for none of 36 Jewish enzyme-defined carries who did not have one of three known mutations common to this group. The C[sub 739]-to-T allele, together with a [open quotes]true[close quotes] Tay-Sachs disease allele, causes Hex A pseudodeficiency. Given both the large proportion of non-Jewish carriers with this allele and that standard biochemical screening cannot differentiate between heterozygotes for the C[sub 739]-to-T mutations and Tay-Sachs disease carriers, DNA testing for this mutation in at-risk couples is essential. This could prevent unnecessary or incorrect prenatal diagnoses. 40 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Ashkenazi Jewish population screening for Tay-Sachs disease: the international and Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Lew, Raelia M; Burnett, Leslie; Proos, Anné L; Barlow-Stewart, Kristine; Delatycki, Martin B; Bankier, Agnes; Aizenberg, Harry; Field, Michael J; Berman, Yemima; Fleischer, Ronald; Fietz, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Internationally, Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) preconception screening of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) individuals and couples has led to effective primary prevention of TSD. In Australia, adolescent preconception genetic screening programs operate mainly in Jewish community high schools. These existing programs offer an effective means of primary prevention of TSD, are cost effective and safe. However, in the broader Australian community TSD screening is not systematically performed and cases still occur in unscreened AJ individuals. In order to improve the effectiveness of Australian screening, there is a need for definitive guidelines for healthcare professionals to facilitate extension of the proven benefits of preconception TSD screening to all AJ individuals at risk. We performed a systematic review of the relevant literature relating to AJ pre-conception and antenatal screening for TSD. The evidence was assessed using an established National Health and Medical Research Council evidence grading system. Evaluations of efficacy of TSD screening programs design and execution, cost-benefit and cost-utility health economic evaluation, and population outcomes were undertaken. The results have been used to propose a model for universal AJ TSD preconception and antenatal screening for the primary care setting. PMID:24923490

  14. Echoes from Sepharad: signatures on the maternal gene pool of crypto-Jewish descendants

    PubMed Central

    Nogueiro, Inês; Teixeira, João; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The majority of genetic studies on Jewish populations have been focused on Ashkenazim, and genetic data from the Sephardic original source, the Iberian Peninsula, are particularly scarce. Regarding the mitochondrial genome, the available information is limited to a single Portuguese village, Belmonte, where just two different lineages (a single one corresponding to 93.3%) were found in 30 individuals. Aiming at disclosing the ancestral maternal background of the Portuguese Jewry, we enlarged the sampling to other crypto-Jewish descendants in the Bragança district (NE Portugal). Fifty-seven complete mtDNA genomes were newly sequenced and — in contrast with Belmonte — a high level of diversity was found, with five haplogroups (HV0b, N1, T2b11, T2e and U2e) being putatively identified as Sephardic founding lineages. Therefore — in sharp contrast with Belmonte — these communities have managed to escape the expected inbreeding effects caused by centuries of religious repression and have kept a significant proportion of the Sephardic founder gene pool. This deeper analysis of the surviving Sephardic maternal lineages allowed a much more comprehensive and detailed perspective on the origins and survival of the Sephardic genetic heritage. In line with previously published results on Sephardic paternal lineages, our findings also show a surprising resistance to the erosion of genetic diversity in the maternal lineages. PMID:25074462

  15. Secondary Guilt Syndrome May Have Led Nazi-persecuted Jewish Writers to Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Feelings of guilt have tormented Holocaust survivors, ranging from immediately after the liberation to later in life, for shorter or longer periods, and persisting for some throughout their entire post-war lives. Descriptions of the guilt experienced by survivors of the Nazi camps occupy an impressive amount of literature: “Why me?” was the question, when a younger and more able family member perished; “Why me?” when more productive members of the community perished; “Why me?” when a million and a half children were deprived of their lives. Many found the answer by retelling their stories, witnesses of what happened. This type of guilt is much different from the recently described phenomenon of survivor syndrome, namely the secondary guilt felt by Nazi-persecuted Jewish writers. Despite successes in all aspects of their life, these writers developed a self-incriminating guilt due to their perceived inadequacy of communicating, particularly in light of the resurging anti-Semitism worldwide. This paper deals with the survival and suicides of Nazi-persecuted Jewish writers and offers a possible explanation for their late self-destructive acts. PMID:26886769

  16. Secondary Guilt Syndrome May Have Led Nazi-persecuted Jewish Writers to Suicide.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2015-01-01

    Feelings of guilt have tormented Holocaust survivors, ranging from immediately after the liberation to later in life, for shorter or longer periods, and persisting for some throughout their entire post-war lives. Descriptions of the guilt experienced by survivors of the Nazi camps occupy an impressive amount of literature: "Why me?" was the question, when a younger and more able family member perished; "Why me?" when more productive members of the community perished; "Why me?" when a million and a half children were deprived of their lives. Many found the answer by retelling their stories, witnesses of what happened. This type of guilt is much different from the recently described phenomenon of survivor syndrome, namely the secondary guilt felt by Nazi-persecuted Jewish writers. Despite successes in all aspects of their life, these writers developed a self-incriminating guilt due to their perceived inadequacy of communicating, particularly in light of the resurging anti-Semitism worldwide. This paper deals with the survival and suicides of Nazi-persecuted Jewish writers and offers a possible explanation for their late self-destructive acts. PMID:26886769

  17. "Text-Books and Textpeople" (A. J. Heschel): What Is the Role of the Mehanekh in the Jewish Secular High School in Israel, and What Is the Place of Jewish Texts within That Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sela Kol, Aviva Helena

    2011-01-01

    My study concerns the teacher knowledge of "mehankhim," teachers in Israeli high schools entrusted to promote students' moral, civic, and social growth. It examines two "mehankhim" from a secular Israeli high school who participated in a long-term professional development program in secular Jewish education, centered by…

  18. Diversity in Adoption of Linguistic Features of London English by Chinese and Bangladeshi Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Martha C.; Lau, Lawrence; Sachdev, Itesh

    2011-01-01

    This comparative study, conducted in multicultural London, investigates the occurrence in interviews with a researcher and in constructed same-sex peer conversations of five linguistic features characteristic of London English in the speech of two groups of British-born adolescents: ethnic Bangladeshis and ethnic Chinese of Cantonese heritage. The…

  19. The Increasing Presence of Spanish-Speaking Latinos in London: An Emergent Community?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the number of Spanish-speaking Latinos in Britain and London has grown considerably. Estimates from different sources put the population in London as high as 300,000. Unfortunately, this growing ethnolinguistic group is an underresearched minority, and information of any kind is hard to come by. In this article, my aim is to…

  20. Engendering City Politics and Educational Thought: Elite Women and the London Labour Party, 1914-1965

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jane

    2008-01-01

    This article uses biographical approaches to recover the contribution of hitherto neglected figures in the history of education and the political history of the Left in London. Place and location are important since it is important to grasp the uniqueness of the London County Council within the framework of English local government and of the…