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Sample records for long-gap esophageal atresia

  1. Restoring esophageal continuity following a failed colonic interposition for long-gap esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Dionigi, Beatrice; Bairdain, Sigrid; Smithers, Charles Jason; Jennings, Russell W.; Hamilton, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The Foker process is a method of esophageal lengthening through axial tension-induced growth, allowing for subsequent primary reconstruction of the esophagus in esophageal atresia (EA). In this unique case, the Foker process was used to grow the remaining esophageal segment long enough to attain esophageal continuity following failed colonic interpositions for long-gap esophageal atresia (LGEA). Initially developed for the treatment of LGEA in neonates, this case demonstrates that (i) an active esophageal lengthening response may still be present beyond the neonate time-period; and, (ii) the Foker process can be used to restore esophageal continuity following a failed colonic interposition if the lower esophageal segment is still present. PMID:25907539

  2. Associated congenital anomalies between neonates with short-gap and long-gap esophageal atresia: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Aslanabadi, Saeid; Ghabili, Kamyar; Rouzrokh, Mohsen; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Jamshidi, Masoud; Adl, Farzad Hami; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Predicting the presence of long-gap esophageal atresia (EA) prior to the surgery is of clinical importance. No comparison between short-gap and long-gap EA for the prevalence of VACTERL and non-VACTERL-type anomalies has yet been performed. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare VACTERL and non-VACTERL-type anomalies between patients with short-gap and long-gap EA. Methods: Retrospectively, medical records of all newborns managed for EA/tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) in Tabriz Children’s Hospital and Tehran Mofid Hospital between 2007 and 2010 were evaluated. Demographic data and associated anomalies including both the VACTERL and non-VACTERL-type defects were listed. The VACTERL spectrum defects covered vertebral/costal, anorectal, cardiovascular, TEF, and renal- or radial-type limb anomalies. The non-VACTERL-type anomalies included hydrocephalus, orofacial defects, respiratory system anomalies, gastrointestinal anomalies, genital anomalies, and non-VACTERL limb defects. Demographic data, and the VACTERL and non-VACTERL-type anomalies were compared among children with long-gap EA and those with short-gap EA. Results: Two hundred and seventy-six children were included in the study: 230 (83.3%) in the short-gap EA group and 46 (16.7%) in the long-gap EA group. Although prevalence of the VACTERL spectrum anomalies did not differ between the two groups, the non-VACTERL anomaly was more common in the long-gap EA group (P = 0.02). Among the VACTERL-type defects, TEF was detected in 30 (65.2%) and 218 (94.7%) patients in long-gap and short-gap EA groups, respectively (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: The non-VACTERL-type anomalies, but not the VACTERL spectrum defects, are more frequent in patients with long-gap EA than those with short-gap EA. PMID:21760750

  3. Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... Return to Web version Esophageal Atresia and Tracheoesophageal Fistula Overview What is esophageal atresia? In babies who ... gets into the stomach. What is a tracheoesophageal fistula? A fistula (say “fist-you-lah”) is a ...

  4. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported. PMID:26197921

  5. Short-gap Isolated Esophageal Atresia Causing Stridor Due to Compression of the Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Sekmenli, Tamer; Ciftci, İlhan; Sivri, Mesut; Koplay, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Isolated esophageal atresias are reported always to be associated with long gap in the literature. In this manuscript, we aimed to discuss the imaging and surgical treatment methods of an isolated esophageal atresia case with ‘short gap’ who had stridor due to compression of the trachea by dilated upper esophageal pouch and had not identified previously in the literature. PMID:26843741

  6. A new approach for the management of esophageal atresia without tracheo-esophageal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Nandini K.; Grewal, Alka G.; Rathore, Shubhra; George, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Long gap esophageal atresia (OA) is a challenging condition. While discussing the various methods of management available to us, we report the use of magnetic resonance imaging in a case of pure OA to judge the gap between two ends of the esophagus. PMID:27365910

  7. A new approach for the management of esophageal atresia without tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Nandini K; Grewal, Alka G; Rathore, Shubhra; George, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Long gap esophageal atresia (OA) is a challenging condition. While discussing the various methods of management available to us, we report the use of magnetic resonance imaging in a case of pure OA to judge the gap between two ends of the esophagus. PMID:27365910

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J; Tobias, V; Sugo, E; Varjavandi, V; Lemberg, D; Day, A; Bohane, T; Ledder, O; Jiwane, A; Adams, S; Henry, G; Dilley, A; Shi, E; Krishnan, U

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has only rarely been reported in esophageal atresia (EA) patients. A retrospective case analysis of all EA patients born at our center between January 1999 and April 2012 was performed. A total of 113 of patients were identified; 10 patients were excluded as a result of inadequate data. Eighteen patients (17%) were diagnosed with EoE. The average number of eosinophilis was 30/high-power field (HPF) (19/HPF-80/HPF). The median age for diagnosis of EoE was 1 year and 6 months (8 months-8 years and 7 months). Children with EoE had a significantly greater incidence of reflux symptoms, dysphagia, tracheomalacia, and 'hypoxic spells' (P < 0.05). EoE patients also underwent significantly more surgery including fundoplication and aortopexy when compared with those without EoE (P < 0.0001). Although the incidence of gastrostomy was greater in the EoE group (33% vs. 13%), this was not statistically significant. Half of the EoE patients had a coexisting atopic condition at time of diagnosis. The commonest condition was asthma 7/18 (38%) followed by specific food allergy 6/18 (33%). EoE was treated in 11 patients with either swallowed fluticasone or budesonide slurry. All improved clinically. Histologically, five had complete resolution and six had partial improvement. Six children with EoE were treated with acid suppression alone. All improved clinically, and 5/6 had subsequent histological resolution. One child who received acid suppression and an exclusion diet also improved. Seven patients (38%) had an esophageal stricture at time of EoE diagnosis. Five were dilated at time of the initial endoscopy, prior to the diagnosis of EoE being available. Two patients had resolution of their strictures on medical treatment of their EoE alone and did not require further dilatation. EoE was seen in 17% of children with EA in this study. EoE should be considered in EA patients with persistent symptoms on standard reflux treatment, increasing

  9. Esophageal atresia and anal atresia in a newborn with heterotaxia combined with other congenital defects

    PubMed Central

    Smigiel, Robert; Misiak, Blazej; Golebiowski, Waldemar; Lebioda, Arleta; Dorobisz, Urszula; Zielinska, Marzena; Patkowski, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Heterotaxia (HTX) is a heterogeneous group of laterality defects characterized by abnormal discordance of asymmetric thoracic and abdominal organs. Esophageal anomalies occur rarely in HTX cases although additional defects associated with esophageal atresia are common. We report on a rare case of a neonate with HTX and multiple congenital malformations as well as specific facial dysmorphism, corresponding only to a few cases described in literature. Clinical examination of the proband revealed esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula, anal atresia, abdominal situs inversus, dextrocardia with complex congenital heart defect and left lung agenesis. A complex genetic analysis revealed no genetic abnormalities. Despite extensive diagnostic procedures, the cause of the laterality sequence disruption remains unclear, indicating its multifactorial etiology.

  10. Motility, digestive and nutritional problems in Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Gottrand, Madeleine; Michaud, Laurent; Sfeir, Rony; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is a rare congenital malformation. Digestive and nutritional problems remain frequent in children with EA both in early infancy and at long-term follow-up. These patients are at major risk of presenting with gastroesophageal reflux and its complications, such as anastomotic strictures. Esophageal dysmotility is constant, and can have important consequences on feeding and nutritional status. Patients with EA need a systematic follow-up with a multidisciplinary team. PMID:26752295

  11. Long Upper Pouch in Esophageal Atresia: A Rare Variant

    PubMed Central

    Yhoshu, Enono; Mahajan, Jai Kumar; Dash, Vedarth

    2016-01-01

    The earliest clinical sign of esophageal atresia (EA) is excessive salivation and the diagnosis is made by failure to pass an infant feeding tube (IFT) into the stomach. The diagnostic errors may occur due to presence of an unusually long upper pouch, when the IFT seems to pass into the stomach. We describe one such case and review the relevant literature. PMID:26793598

  12. [Esophageal atresia: oral behavior in the neonatal period].

    PubMed

    Lecoufle, A

    2012-09-01

    The term "abnormal oral behavior" is now frequently used for very different entities. In esophageal atresia, oral behavior can be altered by esophageal dysfunction, but many other mechanisms can be involved. In this respect, the main goal is to prevent these abnormal oral behaviors: how can the early consequences of treatment of esophageal atresia on oral behavior be minimized? How can hospital care be improved? Our goal is to restore to the mouth its fundamental role of giving pleasure despite intrusive treatments, to set up early multidisciplinary preventive actions around orality, and to organize a longitudinal follow-up of speech therapy for these children, in order to be able to help them in the different oral and feeding stages. PMID:22885002

  13. Management of patients with combined tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and duodenal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Nabzdyk, Christoph S.; Chiu, Bill; Jackson, Carl-Christian; Chwals, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patients with combined esophageal atresia (EA), tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and duodenal atresia (DA) pose a rare management challenge. PRESENTATION OF CASE Three patients with combined esophageal atresia (EA), tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and duodenal atresia safely underwent a staged approach inserting a gastrostomy tube and repairing the EA/TEF first followed by a duodenoduodenostomy within one week. None of the patients suffered significant pre- or post-operative complications and our follow-up data (between 12 and 24 months) suggest that all patients eventually outgrow their reflux and respiratory symptoms. DISCUSSION While some authors support repair of all defects in one surgery, we recommend a staged approach. A gastrostomy tube is placed first for gastric decompression before TEF ligation and EA repair can be safely undertaken. The repair of the DA can then be performed within 3–7 days under controlled circumstances. CONCLUSION A staged approach of inserting a gastrostomy tube and repairing the EA/TEF first followed by a duodenoduodenostomy within one week resulted in excellent outcomes. PMID:25460495

  14. Ultrastructural Changes of the Smooth Muscle in Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shraim, Mubarak M; Eid, Refaat A; Musalam, Adel Osman; Radad, Khaled; Ibrahim, Ashraf H M; Malki, Talal A

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF) is a relatively rare congenital anomaly. Despite the advances in the management techniques and neonatal intensive care, esophageal dysmotility remains a very common problem following EA/TEF repair. Our current study aimed to describe the most significant ultrastructural changes of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) trying to highlight some of the underlying mechanisms of esophageal dysmotility following EA/TEF repair. Twenty-three biopsies were obtained from the tip of the lower esophageal pouch (LEP) of 23 patients during primary repair of EA/TEF. Light microscopic examination was performed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), and Van Gieson's stains. Ultrastructural examination was done using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histopathological examination showed distortion of smooth muscle layer and deposition of an abundant amount of fibrous tissue in-between smooth muscles. Using TEM, SMCs exhibited loss of the cell-to-cell adhesion, mitochondrial vacuolation, formation of myelin figures, and apoptotic fragmentation. There were also plasmalemmal projections and formation of ghost bodies. Interestingly, SMCs were found extending pseudopodia-like projections around adjacent collagen fibers. Engulfed collagen fibers by SMCs underwent degradation within autophagic vacuoles. Degeneration of SMCs and deposition of abundant extracellular collagen fibers are prominent pathological changes in LEP of EA/TEF. These changes might contribute to the pathogenesis of esophageal dysmotility in patients who have survived EA/TEF. PMID:26548437

  15. Tracheal Atresia with Segmental Esophageal Duplication: An Unusual Anatomic Arrangement.

    PubMed

    Gaerty, Kirsten; Thomas, Joseph T; Petersen, Scott; Tan, Edwin; Kumar, Sailesh; Gardener, Glenn; Armes, Jane

    2016-01-01

    An unusual anatomic configuration of segmental tracheal agenesis/atresia with esophageal duplication on autopsy in a fetus that demised in utero at 29 weeks is reported. The mother was scanned initially for a cardiac anomaly at 20 weeks and on follow-up scan at 27 weeks had polyhydramnios and underwent amnioreduction. The final autopsy diagnosis was vertebral, ano-rectal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb malformations (VACTERL). We discuss the autopsy findings along with the embryological mechanisms and compare the configuration with Floyd's classification for tracheal agenesis. The difficulties in prenatal diagnosis are discussed. PMID:26367770

  16. Repair of esophageal atresia with proximal fistula using endoscopic magnetic compression anastomosis (magnamosis) after staged lengthening.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Robert M; Vali, Kaveh; Harmon, Carroll M; Zaritzky, Mario; Bass, Kathryn D

    2016-05-01

    We describe the treatment of a patient with long-gap esophageal atresia with an upper pouch fistula, mircogastria and minimal distal esophageal remnant. After 4.5 months of feeding via gastrostomy, a proximal fistula was identified by bronchoscopy and a thoracoscopic modified Foker procedure was performed reducing the gap from approximately 7-5 cm over 2 weeks of traction. A second stage to ligate the fistula and suture approximate the proximal and distal esophagus resulted in a gap of 1.5 cm. IRB and FDA approval was then obtained for endoscopic placement of 10-French catheter mounted magnets in the proximal and distal pouches promoting a magnetic compression anastomosis (magnamosis). Magnetic coupling occurred at 4 days and after magnet removal at 13 days an esophagram demonstrated a 10 French channel without leak. Serial endoscopic balloon dilation has allowed drainage of swallowed secretions as the baby learns bottling behavior at home. PMID:27012861

  17. Persistent bronchography in a newborn with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    De Bernardo, Giuseppe; Sordino, Desiree; Giordano, Maurizio; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with tracheoesophageal fistula occurs in about 1:2,500 births. We report a case of persistent bronchography in a newborn with EA and distal tracheoesophageal fistula. A large amount of barium sulfate was injected for mistake by a tube directly in the right bronchus to evaluate the patency of the esophagus. The infant showed signs of respiratory distress; he was intubated and transported at children's Hospital Santobono Pausilipon. Here, it was performed a chest X-ray that confirmed the opacification of the right bronchial tree, and it was suspected an EA type 3b. The literature recommends that: evaluation of the patency of the esophagus, with an iodinate contrast medium, should be done in a pediatric specialized center for high risk of lung aspiration. PMID:27257464

  18. Posttraumatic Stress Reactions in Parents of Children Esophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Le Gouëz, Morgane; Alvarez, Luis; Rousseau, Véronique; Hubert, Philippe; Abadie, Véronique; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Kermorvant-Duchemin, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate psychological stress in parents of children with esophageal atresia and to explore factors associated with the development of Posttraumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). Design Self-report questionnaires were administered to parents of children with EA. Domains included: (1) sociodemographic data, current personal difficulties, assessment scales for the quality of life and for the global health status of the child (2) French-validated versions of the Perinatal Posttraumatic Stress disorder Questionnaire and of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Associations between PTSD and severity of the neonatal course, presence of severe sequelae at 2 years of age, and quality of life and global health status of children according to their parents’ perception were studied. Setting A Tertiary care University Hospital Results Among 64 eligible families, 54 parents of 38 children (59%) participated to the study. PTSD was present in 32 (59%) parents; mothers were more frequently affected than fathers (69 vs 46%, p = 0.03). Four mothers (8%) had severe anxiety. PTSD was neither associated with neonatal severity nor with severe sequelae at 2 years. Parents with PTSD rated their child’s quality of life and global health status significantly lower (7.5 vs 8.6; p = 0.01 and 7.4 vs 8.3; p = 0.02 respectively). Conclusions PTSD is frequent in parents of children with esophageal atresia, independently of neonatal severity and presence of severe sequelae at 2 years of age. Our results highlight the need for a long-term psychological support of families. PMID:26953589

  19. [Succesful management of esophageal banding and gastrostomy for esophageal atresia in a trisomy 18 child with complex cardiac malformation].

    PubMed

    Osaka, Yoshimune; Ando, Takeshi; Kozono, Yuuki; Saito, Ikue; Saito, Rie; Shimada, Muneaki

    2014-11-01

    Trisomy 18 is one of the congenital disorders caused by a chromosomal abnormality. Ninety percent of fetuses with trisomy 18 have various other malformations. The present patient had heart failure due to a complex cardiac malformation and a Gross C type esophageal atresia. Before the esophageal banding, ventilation of the lungs was impossible and respiratory condition was unstable. Considering that direction of the shunt can easily change by hyperventilation and high oxygen concentration, we employed the lowest oxygen concentration and ventilation as possible. In the present case, it was necessary to provide respiratory care for both esophageal atresia and complex cardiac malformation. PMID:25731061

  20. Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia with a distal fistula – lessons from the first 10 operations

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowska, Kamila; Rogowski, Błażej; Kalińska, Anita; Nosek, Marzena; Golonka, Anna; Lesiuk, Witold; Obel, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thoracoscopic esophageal atresia (EA) repair was first performed in 1999, but still the technique is treated as one of the most complex pediatric surgical procedures. Aim The study presents a single-center experience and learning curve of thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal (distal) fistula. Material and methods From 2012 to 2014, 10 consecutive patients with esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula were treated thoracoscopically in our center. There were 8 girls and 2 boys. Mean gestational age was 36.5 weeks and mean weight was 2230 g. Four children had associated anomalies. The surgery was performed after stabilization of the patient between the first and fourth day after birth. Five patients required intubation before surgery for respiratory distress. Bronchoscopy was not performed before the operation. Results In 8 patients, the endoscopic approach was successfully used thoracoscopically, while in 2 patients conversion to an open thoracotomy was necessary. In all patients except 1, the anastomosis was patent, with no evidence of leak. One patient demonstrated a leak, which did not resolve spontaneously, necessitating surgical repair. In long-term follow-up, 1 patient required esophageal dilatation of the anastomosis. All patients are on full oral feeding. Conclusions The endoscopic approach is the method of choice for the treatment of esophageal atresia in our center because of excellent visualization and precise atraumatic preparation even in neonates below a weight of 2000 g. PMID:25960794

  1. Dysphagia among adult patients who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Trudeau, Valérie; Maynard, Stéphanie; Terzic, Tatjana; Soucy, Geneviève; Bouin, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies. OBJECTIVE: To determine the motor and anatomical causes of dysphagia. METHODS: A total of 41 adults, followed at the Esophageal Atresia Clinic at Hôpital Saint-Luc (Montreal, Quebec), were approached to particpate in the present prospective study. Evaluation was completed using upper endoscopy, manometry and barium swallow for the participants who consented. The medical charts of respondents were systematically reviewed from the neonatal period to 18 years of age to assess medical and surgical history. RESULTS: All 41 patients followed at the clinic consented and were included in the study. Dysphagia was present in 73% of patients. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 32 patients: hiatal hernia was present in 62% (n=20); esophageal diverticulum in 13% (n=4); macroscopic Barrett esophagus in 31% (n=10); and esophagitis in 19% (n=6). Histological esophagitis was present in 20% and intestinal metaplasia in 10%. There were no cases of dysplagia or adenocarcinoma. Esophageal manometry was performed on 56% of the patients (n=23). Manometry revealed hypomotility in 100% of patients and included an insufficient number of peristaltic waves in 96%, non-propagating peristalsis in 78% and low-wave amplitude in 95%. Complete aperistalsis was present in 78%. The lower esophageal sphincter was abnormal in 12 (52%) patients, with incomplete relaxation the most common anomaly. Of the 41 patients, 29 (71%) consented to a barium swallow, which was abnormal in 13 (45%). The anomalies found were short esophageal dilation in 28%, delay in esophageal emptying in 14

  2. Primary intrathoracic gastric volvulus in the neonatal period: a differential diagnosis of esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    El Azzouzi, Driss

    2014-01-01

    Intrathoracic gastric volvulus in the neonatal period is a rare surgical emergency. Delays in diagnosis and treatment are life-threatening due to progressive deterioration of the gastric walls. Presentation in this period can be confused with the possibility of esophageal atresia or esophageal web. The upper gastrointestinal tract contrast study is diagnostic in this disease. The authors report a case of acute intrathoracic gastric volvulus diagnosis by radiologic-contrast-study in 1-day-old girl that was confirmed at surgery. The physiopathology, classification and different presentations of this entity are briefly reviewed. PMID:25309661

  3. Added Value of pH Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance in Adults Operated for Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Gatzinsky, Vladimir; Andersson, Olof; Eriksson, Anders; Jönsson, Linus; Abrahamsson, Kate; Sillén, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and dysphagia are common following repaired esophageal atresia (EA). The risk of esophagitis and Barrett esophagus is increased compared with the general population. As yet, the causes are not fully explained. Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate how GER, measured by pH multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII), is correlated to the esophageal symptoms and histological findings. Methods Twenty-nine adult subjects operated for EA in Gothenburg from 1968 to 1983 were evaluated with pH-MII, manometry, and gastroscopy. Results pH-MII was performed in 15, manometry in 19, and gastroscopy in 24 subjects. Eleven subjects displayed pathological reflux parameters of any kind, mainly nonacid reflux (10/15). Dysphagia correlated to the number of weakly acidic reflux episodes. Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) incompetence, which correlated to a pathological number of acid reflux episodes (p = 0.012), was noted in 21/24 subjects, but the majority had a normal resting pressure. Esophagitis was present in 14/24, two of whom had Barrett esophagus. Histological changes correlated to the reflux index and the number of weakly acidic reflux episodes (p = 0.028 and 0.040) and tended to correlate to dysphagia (p = 0.052). Conclusion pH-MII adds further information when it comes to explaining what causes symptoms and esophageal histological changes in adults operated for EA. PMID:25643247

  4. Thoracoscopic Esophageal Atresia with Tracheoesophageal Fistula Repair: The First Iranian Group Report, Passing the Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Hiradfar, Mehran; Gharavifard, Mohammad; Shojaeian, Reza; Joodi, Marjan; Nazarzadeh, Reza; Sabzevari, Alireza; Yal, Nazila; Eslami, Reza; Mohammadipour, Ahmad; Azadmand, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracoscopic treatment of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA+TEF) is accepted as a superior technique at least in cosmetic point of view but it is considered as an advance endoscopic procedure that needs a learning curve to be performed perfectly. This is the first report of Iranian group pediatric surgeons in thoracoscopic approach to EA. Methods and Materials: Since 2010, twenty four cases with EA+TEF underwent thoracoscopic approach in Sarvar Children Hospital (Mashhad -Iran). During the first 6 months, thoracoscopic approach to 6 cases of EA+TEF was converted to open procedure because of technical and instrumental problems. The first case of successful thoracoscopic EA repair was accomplished in 2010 and since then, 10 cases of EA+ TEF among 18 patients were treated successfully with thoracoscopic approach Results: Overall conversion rate was 58.3% but conversion rate after the primary learning curve period, was 35.7%. The main conversion causes include difficulties in esophageal anastomosis, limited exposure and deteriorating the patient's condition. Anastomotic leak and stenosis were observed in 20% and 40% respectively. Overall mortality rate was 4.2%. Conclusion: Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia seems feasible and safe with considerable superiorities to the conventional method although acceptable results needs a prolonged learning curve and advanced endoscopic surgical skill. Clear judgment about the best surgical intervention for EA according to all cosmetic and functional outcomes needs further studies. PMID:27471677

  5. Treatment of colon conduit redundancy in a child with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Glasser, James G; Reddy, P Prithvi; Adkins, E Stanton

    2006-03-01

    We recently revised a redundant colon conduit in a boy who was born with isolated esophageal atresia. In view of the paucity of reports dealing with correction of this common complication of esophageal replacement, it seemed appropriate to report our experience. Because of effective medical therapy of acid peptic disease, patients who formerly required conduit replacement may now be candidates for revision; however, the medical literature does not specify when conduit revision, as opposed to conduit replacement, is indicated; also, no guidance is provided regarding what constitutes effective operative revision. Innovative techniques that stretch and elongate the atretic esophagus will likely lessen the use of conduits in esophageal atresia; nevertheless, colon conduits are useful in many other clinical situations and will remain an essential part of the armamentarium of pediatric, general, and thoracic surgeons. This report highlights the DeMeester and Tannuri technique, whereby a colon conduit is prepared like a Roux limb. The mesentery is divided only once; the conduit's blood supply is not severed from the distal mesocolon. This innovation improves a conduit's blood supply and lessens its attendant complications. Lastly, we describe a muscle splitting, posterolateral thoracotomy technique that is simpler than the alternatives and is useful in a variety of clinical situations. PMID:16553129

  6. Esophageal atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ... G Lee, MD, MSc, IBCLC, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Medical University of ...

  7. Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula: Basics of technique and its nuances

    PubMed Central

    Kanojia, Ravi Prakash; Bhardwaj, Neerja; Dwivedi, Deepak; Kumar, Raj; Joshi, Saajan; Samujh, Ram; Rao, K. L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To review the technique of thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (TREAT) and results reported in literature and with authors’ experience. Patients and Methods: The technique of TREAT was reviewed in detail with evaluation in patients treated at authors’ institution. The patients were selected based on selection criteria and were followed postoperatively. The results available in literature were also reviewed. Results: A total of 29 patients (8 females) were operated by TREAT. Mean age was 2.8 days (range 2-6 days). Mean weight was 2.6 kg (range 1.8-3.2 kg). There was a leak in four patients, and two patients had to be diverted. They are now awaiting definitive repair. Twenty-one patients have completed a mean follow-up of 1.5 years and are doing well except for two patients who had a stricture and underwent serial esophageal dilatations. The results from current literature are provided in tabulated form. Conclusions: TREAT is now a well-established procedure and currently is the preferred approach wherever feasible. The avoidance of thoracotomy is a major advantage to the newborn and is proven to benefit the recovery in the postoperative patient. The technique demonstrated, and the tweaks reported make the procedure easy and is helpful to beginners. The outcome is very much comparable to the open repair as proven by various series. Various parameters like leak rate, anastomotic stricture are the same. The outcome is comparable if you TREAT these babies well. PMID:27365905

  8. Role of feeding jejunostomy in major anastomotic disruptions in esophageal atresia: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Monika; Menon, Prema; Mahajan, Jai K.; Peters, Nitin J.; Garge, Saurabh; Rao, K. L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the role of feeding jejunostomy (FJ) in patients of esophageal atresia with anastomotic leak (AL) to decrease the degree of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and its effect on anastomotic healing. Materials and Methods: Twenty neonates, with major AL and severe GER after primary repair were managed with decompressing gastrostomy and transgastric FJ and analyzed prospectively. Results: Male to female ratio was 1.7:1. Mean birth weight was 2.2 kg. Anastomotic gap ranged from 0 to 4 cm. The amount of leak was more than 20% of nasogastric feeds. Gastrostomy and FJ was done on an average of the 12th postoperative day, after observing the general condition, chest tube output, lung expansion, and ventilatory requirement. There was a drastic reduction in chest tube output and lung expanded in all patients. Average hospital stay was 36 days (8-80 days). Sixty percentage patients were discharged successfully on FJ. Esophagogram demonstrated healing and leak free patency after an average of 1.5 months. GER was noted in seven patients, four developed stricture, and one had pseudodiverticulum in follow-up. Conclusion: Decompressing gastrostomy and FJ can be an alternative to managing major ALs. It helps in healing of anastomotic dehiscence and in preserving the native esophagus. PMID:26862291

  9. Structural and numerical changes of chromosome X in patients with esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Erwin; de Jong, Elisabeth M; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Eussen, Bert H; D'haene, Barbara; De Baere, Elfride; Verdin, Hannah; Poddighe, Pino J; Galjaard, Robert-Jan; Gribnau, Joost; Brooks, Alice S; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) is a relatively common birth defect often associated with additional congenital anomalies such as vertebral, anal, cardiovascular, renal and limb defects, the so-called VACTERL association. Yet, little is known about the causal genetic factors. Rare case reports of gastrointestinal anomalies in children with triple X syndrome prompted us to survey the incidence of structural and numerical changes of chromosome X in patients with EA/TEF. All available (n=269) karyotypes of our large (321) EA/TEF patient cohort were evaluated for X-chromosome anomalies. If sufficient DNA material was available, we determined genome-wide copy number profiles with SNP array and identified subtelomeric aberrations on the difficult to profile PAR1 region using telomere-multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. In addition, we investigated X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) patterns and mode of inheritance of detected aberrations in selected patients. Three EA/TEF patients had an additional maternally inherited X chromosome. These three female patients had normal random XCI patterns. Two male EA/TEF patients had small inherited duplications of the XY-linked SHOX (Short stature HOmeoboX-containing) locus. Patients were small for gestational age at birth (

  10. An assessment of quality of life of operated cases of esophageal atresia in the community

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Harshjeet Singh; Sen, Sudipta; Karl, Sampath; Mathai, John; Thomas, Reju Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the outcome of the operated children of esophageal atresia (EA) focusing on their early and late morbidity and mortality and quality of life (QoL) of survivors. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional follow-up with retrospective analysis of available medical and surgical records of children who underwent repair for EA. Materials and Methods: The medical records of the children who underwent repair for EA during the period from 2000 to 2011 at the Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, were collected retrospectively. Patients with parents were invited to visit the hospital for follow-up and nutritional status, digestive and respiratory symptoms, status of associated anomalies and QoL assessment of children done. QoL assessment was done using the PedsQL™ 4.0 generic core scales questionnaire comprising 4 scale scores: physical, emotional, social functioning, and school functioning. Mean scores are calculated based on a 5-point response scale for each item and transformed to a 0-100 scale with a higher score representing better QoL. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 using Chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Results: Of 79 patients operated during the said period, there were 10 deaths and a total of 69 (87%) children survived. Of the 66 patients available for follow-up, we interviewed 30 parents and children while for the remaining 36 children, out-patients charts were reviewed retrospectively. Mean follow-up duration was 3.56 years. The height and weight for age measurement showed 47% and 56% of children respectively as below the 5th percentile. Main problems faced by operated EA children were of the respiratory (26%) and gastroesophageal (36%) tracts. In spite of the mentioned problems faced, the overall QoL of this group appeared good. In 23 of 30 patients, who answered PedsQL™, more than 70% had scores >85 out of 100 in QoL scoring. Conclusions: While survivals of the children born with

  11. Oto-facial syndrome and esophageal atresia, intellectual disability and zygomatic anomalies - expanding the phenotypes associated with EFTUD2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in EFTUD2 were proven to cause a very distinct mandibulofacial dysostosis type Guion-Almeida (MFDGA, OMIM #610536). Recently, gross deletions and mutations in EFTUD2 were determined to cause syndromic esophageal atresia (EA), as well. We set forth to find further conditions caused by mutations in the EFTUD2 gene (OMIM *603892). Methods and results We performed exome sequencing in two familial cases with clinical features overlapping with MFDGA and EA, but which were previously assumed to represent distinct entities, a syndrome with esophageal atresia, hypoplasia of zygomatic complex, microcephaly, cup-shaped ears, congenital heart defect, and intellectual disability in a mother and her two children [AJMG 143A(11):1135-1142, 2007] and a supposedly autosomal recessive oto-facial syndrome with midline malformations in two sisters [AJMG 132(4):398-401, 2005]. While the analysis of our exome data was in progress, a recent publication made EFTUD2 mutations highly likely in these families. This hypothesis could be confirmed with exome as well as with Sanger sequencing. Also, in three further sporadic patients, clinically overlapping to these two families, de novo mutations within EFTUD2 were identified by Sanger sequencing. Our clinical and molecular workup of the patients discloses a broad phenotypic spectrum, and describes for the first time an instance of germline mosaicism for an EFTUD2 mutation. Conclusions The clinical features of the eight patients described here further broaden the phenotypic spectrum caused by EFTUD2 mutations or deletions. We here show, that it not only includes mandibulofacial dysostosis type Guion-Almeida, which should be reclassified as an acrofacial dysostosis because of thumb anomalies (present in 12/35 or 34% of patients) and syndromic esophageal atresia [JMG 49(12). 737-746, 2012], but also the two new syndromes, namely oto-facial syndrome with midline malformations published by Mégarbané et al. [AJMG 132(4): 398

  12. Alternations in genes expression of pathway signaling in esophageal tissue with atresia: results of expression microarray profiling.

    PubMed

    Smigiel, R; Lebioda, A; Blaszczyński, M; Korecka, K; Czauderna, P; Korlacki, W; Jakubiak, A; Bednarczyk, D; Maciejewski, H; Wizinska, P; Sasiadek, M M; Patkowski, D

    2015-04-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is a congenital defect of the esophagus involving the interruption of the esophagus with or without connection to the trachea (tracheoesophageal fistula [TEF]). EA/TEF may occur as an isolated anomaly, may be part of a complex of congenital defects (syndromic), or may develop within the context of a known syndrome or association. The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of EA are poorly understood. It is supposed that a combination of multigenic factors and epigenetic modification of genes play a role in its etiology. The aim of our work was to assess the human gene expression microarray study in esophageal tissue samples. Total RNA was extracted from 26 lower pouches of esophageal tissue collected during thoracoscopic EA repair in neonates with the isolated (IEA) and the syndromic form (SEA). We identified 787 downregulated and 841 upregulated transcripts between SEA and controls, and about 817 downregulated and 765 upregulated probes between IEA and controls. Fifty percent of these genes showed differential expression specific for either IEA or SEA. Functional pathway analysis revealed substantial enrichment for Wnt and Sonic hedgehog, as well as cytokine and chemokine signaling pathways. Moreover, we performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction study in a group of SHH and Wnt pathways genes with differential expression in microarray profiling to confirm the microarray expression results. We verified the altered expression in SFRP2 gene from the Wnt pathway as well as SHH, GLI1, GLI2, and GLI3 from the Sonic hedgehog pathway. The results suggest an important role of these pathways and genes for EA/TEF etiology. PMID:24460849

  13. [Medium-term outcome, follow-up, and quality of life in children treated for type III esophageal atresia].

    PubMed

    Lepeytre, C; De Lagausie, P; Merrot, T; Baumstarck, K; Oudyi, M; Dubus, J-C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the medium-term outcome (health status, medical and surgical French National Health Authority-recommended follow-up, and quality of life) of children born with type III esophageal atresia (EA). Previous events (during the perinatal period, associated abnormalities, respiratory and digestive complications) of children treated for type III EA at the Marseille university hospitals between 1999 and 2009 were noted. Parents completed a standardized questionnaire concerning the health of their children during the previous year, and a quality-of-life questionnaire (PedsQL 4.0) was also completed by children aged more than 8 years. Among the 68 children treated, 44 responded to our solicitation (mean age, 7.6 years; range, 3-12.8 years). Previous important events were : pneumonia(s) (65%), asthma before the age of 3 years (66%), hospitalization for a respiratory event (45%), fundoplication (20%), and esophageal dilatation (45%). We noted current chronic cough (16%), asthma (30%), dysphagia (39%), and symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (9%). National guidelines were not respected, except for the surgical indications in children aged less than 6 years. The quality-of-life scores (n=43 children) were similar to healthy controls but were negatively influenced by a gastrostomy procedure (P=0.020), pneumonia (P=0.013), and hospitalization due to a respiratory event (P=0.006) or a digestive event (P=0.010), and also by current asthma (P=0.004). In conclusion, despite recurrent respiratory or digestive symptoms and inadequate recommended follow-up, the quality of life of children treated for type III of EA is good. PMID:23932659

  14. Tricuspid atresia

    MedlinePlus

    Tri atresia; Valve disorder - tricuspid atresia; Congenital heart - tricuspid atresia; Cyanotic heart disease - tricuspid atresia ... Tricuspid atresia is an uncommon form of congenital heart disease. It affects about 5 in every 100, ...

  15. Copy number detection in discordant monozygotic twins of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) and Esophageal Atresia (EA) cohorts.

    PubMed

    Veenma, Danielle; Brosens, Erwin; de Jong, Elisabeth; van de Ven, Cees; Meeussen, Connie; Cohen-Overbeek, Titia; Boter, Marjan; Eussen, Hubertus; Douben, Hannie; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies

    2012-03-01

    The occurrence of phenotypic differences between monozygotic (MZ) twins is commonly attributed to environmental factors, assuming that MZ twins have a complete identical genetic make-up. Yet, recently several lines of evidence showed that both genetic and epigenetic factors could have a role in phenotypic discordance after all. A high occurrence of copy number variation (CNV) differences was observed within MZ twin pairs discordant for Parkinson's disease, thereby stressing on the importance of post-zygotic mutations as disease-predisposing events. In this study, the prevalence of discrepant CNVs was analyzed in discordant MZ twins of the Esophageal Atresia (EA) and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) cohort in the Netherlands. Blood-derived DNA from 11 pairs (7 EA and 4 CDH) was screened using high-resolution SNP arrays. Results showed an identical copy number profile in each twin pair. Mosaic chromosome gain or losses could not be detected either with a detection threshold of 20%. Some of the germ-line structural events demonstrated in five out of eleven twin pairs could function as a susceptible genetic background. For example, the 177-Kb loss of chromosome 10q26 in CDH pair-3 harbors the TCF7L2 gene (Tcf4 protein), which is implicated in the regulation of muscle fiber type development and maturation. In conclusion, discrepant CNVs are not a common cause of twin discordancy in these investigated congenital anomaly cohorts. PMID:22071887

  16. Copy number detection in discordant monozygotic twins of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) and Esophageal Atresia (EA) cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Veenma, Danielle; Brosens, Erwin; de Jong, Elisabeth; van de Ven, Cees; Meeussen, Connie; Cohen-Overbeek, Titia; Boter, Marjan; Eussen, Hubertus; Douben, Hannie; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of phenotypic differences between monozygotic (MZ) twins is commonly attributed to environmental factors, assuming that MZ twins have a complete identical genetic make-up. Yet, recently several lines of evidence showed that both genetic and epigenetic factors could have a role in phenotypic discordance after all. A high occurrence of copy number variation (CNV) differences was observed within MZ twin pairs discordant for Parkinson's disease, thereby stressing on the importance of post-zygotic mutations as disease-predisposing events. In this study, the prevalence of discrepant CNVs was analyzed in discordant MZ twins of the Esophageal Atresia (EA) and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) cohort in the Netherlands. Blood-derived DNA from 11 pairs (7 EA and 4 CDH) was screened using high-resolution SNP arrays. Results showed an identical copy number profile in each twin pair. Mosaic chromosome gain or losses could not be detected either with a detection threshold of 20%. Some of the germ-line structural events demonstrated in five out of eleven twin pairs could function as a susceptible genetic background. For example, the 177-Kb loss of chromosome 10q26 in CDH pair-3 harbors the TCF7L2 gene (Tcf4 protein), which is implicated in the regulation of muscle fiber type development and maturation. In conclusion, discrepant CNVs are not a common cause of twin discordancy in these investigated congenital anomaly cohorts. PMID:22071887

  17. Myofibroblastic cell activation and neovascularization predict native liver survival and development of esophageal varices in biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Suominen, Janne S; Lampela, Hanna; Heikkilä, Päivi; Lohi, Jouko; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the relation between collagen 1, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and CD34 expression and the most essential portoenterostomy (PE) outcomes. METHODS: Liver specimens were obtained at PE from 33 biliary atresia (BA) patients for immunohistochemical analysis of collagen 1, α-SMA and CD34. Liver biopsies from 35 organ donors were used as controls. Expression patterns were related to clinical data including age at PE, serum total and conjugated bilirubin concentration at the time of PE and during follow-up, incidence of esophageal varices in follow-up upper gastrointestinal endoscopies, and native liver survival as well as to detailed histopathological findings. RESULTS: Collagen 1 (16.4% vs 4.5%, P < 0.0001), α-SMA (17.9% vs 4.6%, P < 0.0001) and CD34 (4.9% vs 3.8%, P = 0.017) were markedly overexpressed in BA patients compared with controls. Patients who underwent liver transplantation by age of two years had significantly higher expression of collagen 1 (18.6% vs 13.7%, P = 0.024), α-SMA (20.4% vs 15.4%, P = 0.009) and CD34 (5.9% vs 4.0%, P = 0.029) at PE compared with native liver survivors. CD34-positive microvessels were identified in the centrizonal region close to central vein in every BA patient. In majority of BA cases (56%) neovascularization was frequent as CD34-positive microvessels were observed in over half of the hepatic lobules. In controls, the CD34-positive microvessels were rare as they were completely absent in 40 % and were found in less than 5 % of the hepatic lobules in the rest. The difference between BA patients and controls was significant (P < 0.0001). Patients who developed esophageal varices by two years had significantly higher expression of CD34 at PE compared with patients without varices (5.6% vs 4.0%, P = 0.019). Expression of α-SMA (r = 0.758, P < 0.0001) and collagen 1 (r = 0.474, P = 0.016), and the amount of CD34-positive microvessels (r = 0.356, P = 0.047) were related to patient age at PE. CONCLUSION: Hepatic

  18. Evaluation of Gastroesophageal Reflux by Combined Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance and pH Monitoring and Esophageal Motility Patterns in Children with Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Tong, Stanley; Mallitt, Kylie-Ann; Krishnan, Usha

    2016-08-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal dysmotility are common in patients with esophageal atresia (EA). The aim of this study was to evaluate GERD and esophageal motility patterns in children with EA using combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) monitoring and high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM), respectively. The reflux patterns seen in EA patients were also compared with a control group of normal children with suspected GERD. Methods A retrospective chart review was done on 35 patients with EA and 35 age- and sex-matched normal controls with suspected GERD, who had undergone 24-hour MII-pH monitoring. Impedance data were compared between both cohorts. Eight of the EA patients also underwent HREM. Results In the EA cohort, the median age was 53 months, with 21 males, and 71.4% had Type C EA. A total of 85.7% of the EA cohort and 40% of the control group were on proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy during the MII-pH study. There was no significant difference in the total retrograde bolus movements (RBMs) between the EA cohort (1,457) and the control group (1,482). Acidic RBMs was significantly lower in the EA group (208) compared with the control group (689), p = 0.0008. Nonacid reflux index (NARI) was significantly higher in EA children (1.1; 0.0-7.8) compared with controls (0.6; 0.0-5.7), p = 0.0046. In EA patients, only 335/1,183 (28%) total symptom occurrences were associated with RBM. The mean distal baseline impedance (DBI) was significantly lower in EA (1,029.6 [410.9 SD] Ω) compared with controls (2,998.2 [1028.8 SD] Ω) with suspected GERD, p < 0.0001. By logistic regression, only PPI use had a significant effect on DBI, p < 0.0001. HREM was abnormal in all eight EA patients. Four out of eight EA patients had a different peristaltic pattern for their solid swallows compared with their liquid swallows in HREM. Conclusions MII-pH testing allowed increased detection of nonacid

  19. Tissue engineering: an option for esophageal replacement?

    PubMed

    Zani, Augusto; Pierro, Agostino; Elvassore, Nicola; De Coppi, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal replacement is required in several pediatric surgical conditions, like long-gap esophageal atresia. Although several techniques have been described to bridge the gap, all of them could be followed by postoperative complications. Esophageal tissue engineering could represent a valid alternative thanks to the recent advances in biomaterial science and cellular biology. Numerous attempts to shape a new esophagus in vitro have been described in the last decade. Herein, we review the main studies on the experimental use of nonabsorbable and absorbable materials as well as the development of cellularized patches. Furthermore, we describe the future perspectives of esophageal tissue engineering characterized by the use of stem cells seeded on new biopolymers. This opens to the construction of a functional allograft that could allow an anatomical replacement that grows with the children and does not severely impair their anatomy. PMID:19103424

  20. Determinants of gap length in esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula and the impact of gap length on outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rassiwala, Muffazzal; Choudhury, Subhasis Roy; Yadav, Partap Singh; Jhanwar, Praveen; Agarwal, Raghu Prakash; Chadha, Rajiv; Debnath, Pinaki Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed at identifying factors which may affect the gap length in cases of esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (EA-TEF) and whether gap length plays any role in determining the outcome. Materials and Methods: All consecutive cases of EA-TEF were included and different patient parameters were recorded. Plain radiographs with a nasogastric tube in the upper esophagus were taken. Patients were grouped into T1-T2; T2-T3; T3-T4; and T4 depending on the thoracic vertebral level of the arrest of the tube. During surgery, the gap length between the pouches was measured using a Vernier caliper and the patients were grouped into A, B, and C (gap length >2.1 cm; >1-≤2 cm and ≤1 cm). The operative gap groups were compared with the radiography groups and the other recorded parameters. Results: Total numbers of cases were 69. Birth weight was found to be significantly lower in Group A (mean = 2.14 kg) as compared to Group B (mean = 2.38 kg) and Group C patients (mean = 2.49 kg) (P = 0.016). The radiographic groups compared favorably with the intraoperative gap length groups (P < 0.001). The need for postoperative ventilation (70.83% in Group A vs. 36.84% in Group C, P = 0.032) and mortality (62.5%, 26.9% and 15.8% in Group A, B, and C, respectively, P = 0.003) co-related significantly with the gap length. Conclusion: Birth weight had a direct reciprocal relationship with the gap length. Radiographic assessment correlated with intraoperative gap length. Higher gap length was associated with increased need for postoperative ventilation and poor outcome. PMID:27365907

  1. Duodenal atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... would. Many infants with duodenal atresia also have Down syndrome. Duodenal atresia is often associated with other birth ... abnormality. Other problems (such as those related to Down syndrome) must be treated as appropriate.

  2. Duodenal atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... would. Many infants with duodenal atresia also have Down syndrome. Duodenal atresia is often associated with other birth ... abnormality. Other problems (such as those related to Down syndrome) must be treated as appropriate. Outlook (Prognosis) Recovery ...

  3. END-TO-END VERSUS END-TO-SIDE ANASTOMOSIS IN THE TREATMENT OF ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA OR TRACHEO-ESOPHAGEAL FISTULA

    PubMed Central

    ASKARPOUR, Shahnam; OSTADIAN, Nasrollah; PEYVASTEH, Mehran; ALAVI, Mostafa; JAVAHERIZADEH, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    Background : Dehiscence of esophageal anastomosis is frequent and there are still controversies which type of anastomosis is preferred to diminish its incidence Aim : To compare end-to-end anastomosis versus end-to-side anastomosis in terms of anastomotic leakage, esophageal stricture and gastroesophageal reflux symptom. Methods : This study was carried out for two year starting from 2012. End-to-side and end-to-side anastomosis were compared in terms of anastomotic leakage, esophageal stricture, gastroesophageal reflux symptom, length of surgery and pack cell infusion. Results : Respectively to end-to-end and end-to-side anastomosis, duration of surgery was 127.63±13.393 minutes and 130.29±10.727 minutes (p=0.353); esophageal stricture was noted in two (5.9%) and eight (21.1%) cases (p=0.09); gastroesophageal reflux disease was detected in six (15.8%) and three (8.8%) cases (p=0.485); anastomotic leakage was found in five (13.2%) and one (2.9%) cases (p=0.203); duration of neonatal intensive care unit admission was significantly shorter in end-to-end (11.05±2.438 day) compared to end-to-side anastomosis (13.88±2.306 day) (p<0.0001). Conclusion : There were no significant differences between end-to-end and end-to-side anastomosis except for length of neonatal intensive care unit admission which was significantly shorter in end-to-end anastomosis group. PMID:27120740

  4. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    Esophagitis is often caused by stomach fluid that flows back into the esophagus. The fluid contains acid which irritates the tissue. This problem is called gastroesophageal reflux . An autoimmune disorder called ...

  5. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling of the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube that leads from the back of the mouth to the stomach. Causes Esophagitis is often caused by stomach fluid that flows back into the esophagus. The fluid contains acid ...

  6. Pulmonary Atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to repair the defect. Return to main topic: Congenital Heart Disease See on other sites: MedlinePlus https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001091.htm Pulmonary atresia American Heart Association www. ...

  7. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow from the right ventricle (right side pumping chamber) to the lungs. In pulmonary atresia, a ... Reconstructing the heart as a single ventricle (1 pumping chamber instead of 2) Heart transplant

  8. Tricuspid atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... of heart disease that is present at birth ( congenital heart disease ), in which the tricuspid heart valve is missing ... Tricuspid atresia is an uncommon form of congenital heart disease that ... with this condition will also have other heart problems. ...

  9. Choanal atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition is the most common nasal abnormality in newborn infants. Females get this condition about twice as often ... Newborns generally prefer to breathe through their nose. Typically, ... Babies with choanal atresia have difficulty breathing unless ...

  10. Surgical management of oesophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Teague, Warwick J; Karpelowsky, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    There have been major advances in the surgery for oesophageal atresia (OA) and tracheo-oesophageal fistula(TOF) with survival now exceeding 90%. The standard open approach to OA and distal TOF has been well described and essentially unchanged for the last 60 years. Improved survival in recent decades is most attributable to advances in neonatal anaesthesia and perioperative care. Recent surgical advances include the use of thoracoscopic surgery for the repair of OA/TOF and in some centres isolated OA, thereby minimising the long term musculo-skeletal morbidity associated with open surgery. The introduction of growth induction by external traction (Foker procedure) for the treatment of long-gap OA has provided an important tool enabling increased preservation of the native oesophagus. Despite this, long-gap OA still poses a number of challenges, and oesophageal replacement still may be required in some cases. PMID:27217220

  11. Successful Use of Esophageal Stent Placement to Treat a Postoperative Esophageal Stricture in a Toddler.

    PubMed

    Gebrail, Rami; Absah, Imad

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is the most common type of gastrointestinal atresia. The most common variant (type C) consists of a blind esophageal pouch with a fistula between the trachea and the distal esophagus. Surgical repair can be complicated by the development of benign stricture. Most strictures are amenable to dilation, but refractory strictures may require surgical intervention. A 24-month-old boy born with tracheoesophageal fistula and EA underwent surgical repair on day 1 of life. He developed esophageal stricture that responded to esophageal stent placement. Endoscopic biliary accessories can be safely used to dilate refractory esophageal strictures in children, and should be considered prior to seeking other complex alternatives. PMID:26157909

  12. The effects of acute tension increase on rat esophageal muscle contractions: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Tutku; Kalkışım, Said; Yalcin, Sule; Müderrisoğlu, Ahmet; Taş, Sadık Taşkın; Tanyel, Feridun Cahit; Ertunç, Mert; Sara, Yıldırım

    2015-10-01

    In long-gap esophageal atresia surgeries, anastomoses can be tensioned by several traction methods in order to establish esophageal continuity. It is unclear whether the etiology of esophageal dysmotility after traction is related with esophageal atresia itself or tensioned esophagus. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of acute in vitro esophageal tension application on esophageal muscle contractility in rats. 26 Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were included to the study. After diethyl ether anesthesia, proximal segment (PS) and distal segment (DS) of esophagus were removed and suspended in an isolated organ bath kept at 37°C, Krebs-Henseleit solution. Rats were enrolled into four groups including control group (CG, n=14) without tension, 5 g (5G, n=4), 15 g (15G, n=4) and 25 g (25G, n=4) tension groups. In all groups, contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS), carbachol and KCl, and relaxation responses to serotonin were obtained. In CG, higher contractile responses were obtained in PS than DS after EFS. Both PS and DS showed higher contractile amplitudes in 5G with respect to that of CG, 15G and 25G (p<0.05). In 5G, contractile responses to carbachol were significantly increased in both PS and DS with respect to CG (p<0.05). However, contractile amplitudes in response to carbachol were decreased in PS when tension was increased to 15 g and 25 g. In DS, contractile responses in 15G and 25G were lower than 5G, and still higher than CG. Serotonin relaxation responses in PS were decreased when compared to CG at tension levels of 5 g, 15 g and 25 g (p<0.05). In DS, responses to serotonin were also decreased in tension groups. PS had higher contraction amplitudes than DS when contractile responses were obtained by high K(+) (p<0.05). Tension groups of both PS and DS showed increased contractions to high K(+) compared to CG (p<0.05). Increased esophageal tension led to increase in cholinergic responses of smooth muscles as well as in EFS

  13. Biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Chardot, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease characterised by a biliary obstruction of unknown origin that presents in the neonatal period. It is the most frequent surgical cause of cholestatic jaundice in this age group. BA occurs in approximately 1/18,000 live births in Western Europe. In the world, the reported incidence varies from 5/100,000 to 32/100,000 live births, and is highest in Asia and the Pacific region. Females are affected slightly more often than males. The common histopathological picture is one of inflammatory damage to the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts with sclerosis and narrowing or even obliteration of the biliary tree. Untreated, this condition leads to cirrhosis and death within the first years of life. BA is not known to be a hereditary condition. No primary medical treatment is relevant for the management of BA. Once BA suspected, surgical intervention (Kasai portoenterostomy) should be performed as soon as possible as operations performed early in life is more likely to be successful. Liver transplantation may be needed later if the Kasai operation fails to restore the biliary flow or if cirrhotic complications occur. At present, approximately 90% of BA patients survive and the majority have normal quality of life. PMID:16872500

  14. Genetics of gastrointestinal atresias.

    PubMed

    Celli, Jacopo

    2014-08-01

    Gastrointestinal atresias are a common and serious feature within the spectrum of gastrointestinal malformations. Atresias tend to be lethal, although, now-days surgery and appropriate care can restore function to the affected organs. In spite of their frequency, their life threatening condition and report history gastrointestinal atresias' etiology remains mostly unclarified. Gastrointestinal atresias can occur as sporadic but they are more commonly seen in association with other anomalies. For the syndromic cases there is mounting evidence of a strong genetic component. Sporadic cases are generally thought to originate from mechanical or vascular incidents in utero, especially for the atresias of the lower intestinal tract. However, recent data show that a genetic component may be present also in these cases. Embryological and genetic studies are starting to uncover the mechanism of gastrointestinal development and their genetic components. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge of gastrointestinal atresias, their syndromic forms and the genetic pathways involved in gastrointestinal malformation. PMID:25019371

  15. Tracheoesophageal fistula and esophageal atresia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... the chest wall) to drain fluids from the space between the outside of the lung and the inside of the chest cavity. Intravenous (IV) fluids, including nutrition Oxygen Pain medicines as needed If both the TEF and EA ...

  16. Facts about Pulmonary Atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Multimedia and Tools Links to Other Websites Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Pulmonary Atresia Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Click here to view a ...

  17. Congenital intestinal atresia.

    PubMed

    Davenport, M; Bianchi, A

    1990-09-01

    Surgery for infants with intestinal atresia has evolved along with the development of specialized neonatal surgical units. This once fatal condition now carries a better than 85% chance of survival and an excellent long-term prognosis. Recent advances in bowel preservation techniques have reduced morbidity and improved gut function in both the long and the short term. PMID:2257399

  18. Embryology of oesophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Ioannides, Adonis S.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia (OA) and tracheo-oesophageal fistula (TOF) are important human birth defects of unknown aetiology. The embryogenesis of OA/TOF remains poorly understood mirroring the lack of clarity of the mechanisms of normal tracheo-oesophageal development. The development of rat and mouse models of OA/TOF has allowed the parallel study of both normal and abnormal embryogenesis. Although controversies persist, the fundamental morphogenetic process appears to be a rearrangement of the proximal foregut into separate respiratory (ventral) and gastrointestinal (dorsal) tubes. This process depends on the precise temporal and spatial pattern of expression of a number of foregut patterning genes. Disturbance of this pattern disrupts foregut separation and underlies the development of tracheo-oesophageal malformations. PMID:19103415

  19. Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kasper S.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease and the leading indication for pediatric liver transplantation. Affected infants exhibit evidence of biliary obstruction within the first few weeks after birth. Early diagnosis and successful surgical drainage of bile are associated with greater survival with the child’s native liver. Unfortunately, because noncholestatic jaundice is extremely common in early infancy, it is difficult to identify the rare infant with cholestatic jaundice who has biliary atresia. Hence, the need for timely diagnosis of this disease warrants a discussion of the feasibility of screening for biliary atresia to improve outcomes. Herein, newborn screening for biliary atresia in the United States is assessed by using criteria established by the Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children. Published analyses indicate that newborn screening for biliary atresia by using serum bilirubin concentrations or stool color cards is potentially life-saving and cost-effective. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and costs of potential screening strategies for early identification of biliary atresia in the United States. PMID:26620065

  20. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  1. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  2. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  3. Congenital Atresia of Wharton's Duct.

    PubMed

    Hseu, Anne; Anne, Premchand; Anne, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    This is a case report of a three-month-old male who presented to clinic with a cystic lesion under the tongue. On clinical examination, a cystic lesion was observed in the, floor-of-mouth. The patient was referred to Paediatric Otorhinolaryngology service for further management. The differential diagnoses for floor-of-mouth lesions should be reviewed with primary focus on the Wharton's duct atresia and its management. It is crucial to recognize submandibular duct atresia in the primary Paediatric clinic in order to expedite management of lesion before complications arise including infection, enlargement of cyst, and feeding and breathing difficulties. PMID:27042492

  4. The Combination of Gastroschisis, Jejunal Atresia, and Colonic Atresia in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Zachary; Nanagas, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We encountered a rare case of gastroschisis associated with jejunal atresia and colonic atresia. In our case, the jejunal atresia was not discovered for 27 days after the initial abdominal wall closure. The colonic atresia was not discovered for 48 days after initial repair of the gastroschisis secondary to the rarity of the disorder. Both types of atresia were repaired with primary hand-sewn anastomoses. Other than the prolonged parenteral nutrition and hyperbilirubinemia, our patient did very well throughout his hospital course. Based on our case presentation, small bowel atresia and colonic atresia must be considered in patients who undergo abdominal wall closure for gastroschisis with prolonged symptoms suggestive of bowel obstruction. Our case report also demonstrates primary enteric anastomosis as a safe, well-tolerated surgical option for patients with types of intestinal atresia. PMID:26180651

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Saurabh; Baruah, Bhaskar Jyoti; Makharia, Govind; Ahuja, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity characterised by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilia on esophageal mucosal biopsies in the absence of other causes of esophageal eosinophilia. It is a chronic inflammatory condition of esophagus often characterized by refractory reflux symptoms in children and dysphagia in adults. It occurs as a result of Th2 inflammatory response to environmental triggers (food antigens) in genetically predisposed individuals. The diagnostic criteria include symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, esophageal eosinophilia (> 15/hpf), and a PPI trial (persistent eosinophilia after 8 weeks of PPI). Mainstay of treatment at present is topical steroids and dietary therapy. Maintenance treatment should be considered to prevent long term complications. PMID:27522734

  6. Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Benjamin R; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-09-01

    Esophageal cancer carries a poor prognosis among gastrointestinal malignancies. Although esophageal squamous cell carcinoma predominates worldwide, Western nations have seen a marked rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma that parallels the obesity epidemic. Efforts directed toward early detection have been difficult, given that dysplasia and early cancer are generally asymptomatic. However, significant advances have been made in the past 10 to 15 years that allow for endoscopic management and often cure in early stage esophageal malignancy. New diagnostic imaging technologies may provide a means by which cost-effective, early diagnosis of dysplasia allows for definitive therapy and ultimately improves the overall survival among patients. PMID:27546839

  7. Herpetic esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-12-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium.

  8. Oesophageal atresia: Diagnosis and prognosis in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Mbaye; Mbaye, Papa Alassane; Horace, Haingonirina Joelle; Wellé, Ibrahima Bocar; Lo, Faty Balla; Traore, Mamadou Mour; Diop, Marie; Ndour, Oumar; Ngom, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oesophageal atresia is a neonatal emergency surgery whose prognosis has improved significantly in industrialised countries in recent decades. In sub-Saharan Africa, this malformation is still responsible for a high morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to analyse the diagnostic difficulties and its impact on the prognosis of this malformation in our work environment. Patients and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study over 4 years on 49 patients diagnosed with esophageal atresia in the 2 Paediatric Surgery Departments in Dakar. Results: The average age was 4 days (0-10 days), 50% of them had a severe pneumonopathy. The average time of surgical management was 27 h (6-96 h). In the series, we noted 10 preoperative deaths. The average age at surgery was 5.7 days with a range of 1-18 days. The surgery mortality rate is 28 patients (72%) including 4 late deaths. Conclusion: The causes of death were mainly sepsis, cardiac decompensation and anastomotic leaks. PMID:26612124

  9. Genetics Home Reference: esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases of isolated EA/TEF , no specific genetic changes or environmental factors have been conclusively determined to be the cause. Non-isolated or syndromic forms of EA/TEF can be caused by changes in single genes or in chromosomes, or they ...

  10. Tricuspid atresia. A review of 68 cases.

    PubMed

    Shariatzadeh, A N; King, H; Girod, D; Shumacker, H B

    1977-04-01

    Sixty-eight patients with tricuspid atresia were seen at Indiana University during the past 30 years. Long term survivors treated without operation emerged from our review. In these, there was a combination of tricuspid atresia and transposition of the great vessels. PMID:856550

  11. Gallbladder Duplication Associated with Gastro-Intestinal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rahul; Gupta, Shilpi; Sharma, Pramila; Bhandari, Anu; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Mathur, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder duplication in association with other GIT anomalies is a rare entity. We report two neonates; one with duodenal atresia and the other newborn with pyloric atresia, ileal atresia and colonic atresia, both were associated with gallbladder duplication which has not been reported earlier. PMID:27123398

  12. Gallbladder Duplication Associated with Gastro-Intestinal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rahul; Gupta, Shilpi; Sharma, Pramila; Bhandari, Anu; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Mathur, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder duplication in association with other GIT anomalies is a rare entity. We report two neonates; one with duodenal atresia and the other newborn with pyloric atresia, ileal atresia and colonic atresia, both were associated with gallbladder duplication which has not been reported earlier. PMID:27123398

  13. Laparoscopic duodenoduodenostomy for duodenal atresia.

    PubMed

    Bax, N M; Ure, B M; van der Zee, D C; van Tuijl, I

    2001-02-01

    A 3,220-g newborn baby with trisomy 21 presented with duodenal atresia. No other congenital malformations were diagnosed. Informed consent for a laparoscopic approach was obtained. The child was placed in a supine, head-up position slightly rotated to the left at the end of a shortened operating table. The surgeon stood at the bottom end with the cameraperson to his left and the scrub nurse to his right. The screen was at the right upper end. Open insertion of a cannula for a 5-mm 30 degrees telescope through the inferior umbilical fold was performed. A carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum with a pressure of 8 mmHg and a flow of 2l/min was established. Two 3.3-mm working cannulas were inserted; one in the left hypogastrium and one pararectally on the right at the umbilical level. Two more such cannulas were inserted; one under the xyphoid for a liver elevator and one in the right hypogastrium for a sucker. Mobilization of the dilated upper and collapsed lower duodenum was easy. After transverse enterotomy of the upper duodenum and longitudinal enterotomy of the distal duodenum, a diamond-shaped anastomosis with interrupted 5 zero Vicryl sutures were performed. The absence of air in the bowel beyond the atresia increased the working space and greatly facilitated the procedure. The technique proved to be easy, and the child did very well. Laparoscopic bowel anastomosis in newborn babies had not been described previously. Recently, a diamond-shaped duodenoduodenostomy for duodenal atresia was performed. The technique proved to be simple and is described in detail. The child did very well. PMID:12200660

  14. Current Updates on Choanal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Kelvin M.

    2015-01-01

    Choanal atresia (CA) is a relatively uncommon but well-recognized condition characterized by the anatomical closure of the posterior choanae in the nasal cavity. Since the original description back in the early eighteenth century, there have been controversies regarding its exact pathogenesis, the optimal surgical approach, and the use of adjunct treatments such as post-surgical stenting and anti-neoplastic agents, despite of abundant literature available. The emergence and development of new technologies play a significant role in the management of this condition. This review provides a comprehensive clinical update on CA and identifies areas for future study based on the existing available literature. PMID:26106591

  15. [Echographic signs of biliary atresia].

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, B A; Iaremenko, V V; Babko, S A; Klimenko, E F; Medvedenko, G F

    2004-10-01

    The assessment of echographic features of biliary atresia was conducted in 65 newborn children ageing up to 3 mo. Their characteristic variants were revealed: the absence or reduction in size of gall-bladder, the presence of hyperechogenic triangular formation in V. portae bifurcation (the symptom of "triangular cicatrix"); the thickening of anterior wall of V. portae right branch. The timely and correct establishment of the diagnosis permits a child to survive and serve the hepatic fibrosis prophylaxis. Echohepatography is a sufficiently trustful method of investigation. PMID:15628232

  16. Esophageal manometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... its ability to move food toward the stomach ( achalasia ) A weak LES, which causes heartburn (GERD) Abnormal contractions of the esophagus muscles that do not effectively move food to the stomach ( esophageal spasm )

  17. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... for infection-causing germs in a sample of tissue from the esophagus. ... Culture - esophageal ... A sample of tissue from your esophagus is needed. The sample is ... or viruses. Other tests may be done to determine what medicine ...

  18. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    ... system Organisms (germs) that cause esophagitis include fungi, yeast, and viruses. Common organisms include: Candida albicans Cytomegalovirus ( ... Difficulty swallowing and painful swallowing Fever and chills Yeast infection of the tongue and lining of the ...

  19. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... release mucus and other fluids. Smoking and heavy alcohol use increase the risk of esophageal squamous cell ...

  20. Esophageal perforation

    MedlinePlus

    ... object or caustic chemicals, such as household cleaners, disk batteries, and battery acid Trauma or injury to ... may have esophageal perforation. Prevention These injuries are hard to prevent. Alternative Names Perforation of the esophagus ...

  1. Isolated Vaginal Agenesis Associated with Multiple Gastrointestinal Anomalies: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Angotti, R; Molinaro, F; Bulotta, AL; Ferrara, F; Sica, M; Bindi, E; Messina, M

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of infants with esophageal atresia have associated anomalies. We present a case report of a 46XX neonate with long-gap esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF), anorectal malformation, bowel duplication and vaginal agenesis. This is an unusual association of abnormalities which had not yet described in literature. PMID:27433450

  2. Esophageal Microbiome in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Kirk; Fang, Rui; Wagner, Brandie D.; Choe, Ha Na; Kelly, Caleb J.; Schroeder, Shauna; Moore, Wendy; Stevens, Mark J.; Yeckes, Alyson; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F.; Zalewski, Angelika; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Henry, Lauren N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Robertson, Charles E.; Leung, Donald Y.; Pace, Norman R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Fillon, Sophie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis. Design In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST). Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease. Results Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects. Conclusions Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD. PMID:26020633

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anand R; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition, it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modifications, topical corticosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination. PMID:19115464

  4. Sirenomelia with oesophageal atresia: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Pragati Aditya; Ghodke, Ratnaprabha Kundlikrao; Kandalkar, Bhuvaneshwari Mahendra

    2014-02-01

    We are reporting a rare case of sirenomelia with oesophageal atresia. Sirenomelia is a lethal sporadic defect of which lower gastrointestinal tract anomalies are characteristic findings. Respiratory and upper gastrointestinal tract malformations like oesophageal atresia occur in about 20-35% of cases. Though its occurrence has been described, it has been reported only rarely. This report aims at describing this uncommon association along with its histological features. PMID:24701519

  5. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  6. Biliary atresia: the animal models.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Claus

    2012-08-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive fibrosing process of the neonatal biliary tree and liver, of unknown origin, and an as-yet unexplained pathologic mechanism. The crucial point is to elucidate the origin of this rare disease to change palliative surgery to etiology-related procedures. Patient-based research can only begin at the time of the Kasai procedure and does not allow retracing of the pathology back to its origin. Basic research has focused on similar diseases in the veterinary literature and started to simulate BA in animal models. Unfortunately, even after 50 years of research, no knowledge has been gained from such models, which has led to a single clinical application. This article reviews BA in the context of the animal models available and discusses whether future studies are promising or futile. PMID:22800971

  7. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Glenn T.; Katzka, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Once considered a rare condition, eosinophilic esophagitis is now one of the most common conditions diagnosed during the assessment of feeding problems in children and during the evaluation of dysphagia and food impaction in adults.1 The entity exists worldwide but has been most extensively studied in Western countries, where its prevalence has been estimated to be 0.4% among all children and adults.2 Whether eosinophilic esophagitis is truly a new disease or simply a recently recognized one is uncertain.3 In this review, we consider the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiological and clinical features, and treatment of this increasingly prevalent disease. PMID:26488694

  8. Esophageal perforation

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus into the space around the lungs Collapsed lung. X-rays taken after you drink a non-harmful dye can help pinpoint the location of the perforation. You may also have chest CT scan look for an abscess in the chest or esophageal cancer.

  9. [Eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Rodrigues, Susana; Piedade, Susana; Gaspar, Ângela; Morais-Almeida, Mário; Macedo, Guilherme

    2011-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by significant and isolated infiltration of the esophageal mucosa by eosinophils, associated with clinical symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, affecting children and adults. It is an increasingly frequent cause of symptoms similar to gastroesophageal reflux disease but refractory to anti-acid therapeutic. It is commonly associated with food allergies or other atopic diseases. Since there are no symptoms, signs, serological biomarkers or endoscopic findings pathognomonic of EE, the diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion; moreover, due to its chronic relapsing nature the potential to cause major esophageal structural changes, its early recognition and close cooperation between gastroenterologists and immunoallergologists is essential for the timely institution of appropriate therapy. The treatment is based on two main strategies: diet and / or pharmacotherapy, depending on the co-existence of sensitization to food allergens. It is our aim to review this issue, considering recent guidelines, as well as propose a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm. PMID:22863504

  10. Magnamosis: a novel technique for the management of rectal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Katie W; Rollins, Michael D; Feola, G Peter; Scaife, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of rectal atresia treated using magnets to create a rectal anastomosis. This minimally invasive technique is straightforward and effective for the treatment of rectal atresia in children. PMID:25096648

  11. The use of ileocolic segment for esophageal replacement in children

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Harshjeet Singh; Sen, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate and describe the procedure and outcome of ileocolic replacement of esophagus. Materials and Methods: We review 7 children with esophageal injuries, who underwent esophageal replacement using ileocolic segment in Christian Medical College, Vellore, India between 2006 and 2014. Results: The ileocolic segment was used in 7 children with scarred or inadequate esophagus. There were 4 girls and 3 boys, who underwent esophageal replacement using isoperistaltic ileocolic segment in this period. Age at presentation varied from 1 month to 14 years with an average of 4.6 years. The indications for ileocolic replacements were corrosive strictures in 5, failed esophageal atresia repair in one and gastric volvulus related esophageal stricture in another. The average follow-up duration was 37 months. One child with corrosive stricture lost to follow-up and died 2 years later in another center. Other 6 children were free of dysphagia till the last follow-up. Conclusions: Although the ileocolic segment is not commonly used for esophageal substitution, it can be useful in special situations where the substitution needs to reach the high cervical esophagus and also where the stomach is scarred and not suitable for gastric pull-up. PMID:27365904

  12. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  13. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  14. Rectal atresia: a rare cause of failure to pass meconium

    PubMed Central

    Laamrani, Fatima Zahrae; Dafiri, Rachida

    2014-01-01

    Rectal atresia or stenosis is an extremely rare anorectal malformation associating a normal anal canal with a stricture or a complete rectal atresia. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn female presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. PMID:25821541

  15. Angiographic Findings in Biliary Atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Uflacker, Renan Pariente, Daniele M.

    2004-09-15

    We present the angiographic findings of 46 patients with biliary atresia (BA). There were 25 males and 21 females, with a mean age of 22.5 months (range - 1.5 to 141 months). Hepatic and mesenteric angiography were obtained as part of a liver transplantation work-up or as part of the treatment of clinical events. All patients had a histological diagnosis of BA. The portal vein was patent in 43 patients, with a mean size of 4.1 mm, using the arterial catheter as comparison. Portal hepatopetal flow was observed in 20 patient and hepatofugal flow was observed in 21 patients. Presence of gastroesophageal varices was observed in 41 patients. The hepatic artery was enlarged in all patients. In all 46 patients studied, the intrahepatic peripheral hepatic artery branches presented with irregularities in contour, including encasement, strictures, dilatation and angulation, and images suggestive of peripheral occlusion. Angiographic vascular 'tuft-like' blush surrounding the irregular or occluded peripheral arterial segments was observed in 40 patients. The injection of Microfil (registered) in one case showed a marked vascular proliferation within the portal tract, apparently derived from arterial and portal connections, filling the entire portal space. We conclude that the presence of angiographically demonstrable perivascular arterial tufts in the periphery of the hepatic arterial circulation is a common finding in cases of BA, and may be a characteristic diagnostic angiographic finding.

  16. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Merves, Jamie; Muir, Amanda; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Cianferoni, Antonella; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the understanding of the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and the role of the immune system in the disease process. Data Sources Peer-reviewed articles on EoE from PubMed searching for “Eosinophilic Esophagitis and fibrosis” in the period of 1995 to 2013. Study Selection Studies on the clinical and immunologic features, pathogenesis, and management of EoE. Results Recent work has revealed that thymic stromal lymphopoietin and basophil have an increased role in the pathogenesis of disease. Additional understanding on the role of fibrosis in EoE is emerging. Conclusion The incidence of EoE is increasing like most atopic disease. Similar to other allergic diseases, EoE is treated with topical steroids and/or allergen avoidance. PMID:24566295

  17. Radiation esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Murro, Diana; Jakate, Shriram

    2015-06-01

    The esophagus is frequently exposed to radiation during treatment of advanced stages of common cancers such as lung, breast, and esophagus. However, symptomatic radiation esophagitis requiring endoscopic and histologic evaluation occurs quite rarely, affecting less than 1% of patients receiving radiation treatment. Symptoms occur acutely, generally within the first 2 months. Patients typically present with nonspecific symptoms such as dysphagia and odynophagia. Endoscopic changes such as erythema and ulceration are also nonspecific and nondiagnostic. Biopsies from affected areas show variable inflammatory changes and radiation-related atypia of endothelial and stromal cells. Such atypia mimics cytomegalovirus cytopathic changes, which are ruled out through absence of immunostaining. Radiation esophagitis is thus clinically unsuspected and endoscopically and histologically quite different from the more common and familiar radiation proctitis for which angioectasia is the predominant finding. PMID:26030254

  18. Congenital Atresia of Wharton’s Duct

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, Anne; Anne, Premchand

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of a three-month-old male who presented to clinic with a cystic lesion under the tongue. On clinical examination, a cystic lesion was observed in the, floor-of-mouth. The patient was referred to Paediatric Otorhinolaryngology service for further management. The differential diagnoses for floor-of-mouth lesions should be reviewed with primary focus on the Wharton’s duct atresia and its management. It is crucial to recognize submandibular duct atresia in the primary Paediatric clinic in order to expedite management of lesion before complications arise including infection, enlargement of cyst, and feeding and breathing difficulties. PMID:27042492

  19. Tricuspid atresia and pulmonary atresia in a child with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Geddes, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is a well-characterized condition causing distinctive physical characteristics, intellectual disability, and multiple congenital malformations. Cardiac abnormalities are found in a third of individuals with this condition and usually consist of isolated septal defects or patent ductus arteriosus, although more complex congenital lesions have been described. We present the first reported case of tricuspid atresia and pulmonary atresia with hypoplasia of the right ventricle in the setting of Rubenstein-Taybi syndrome. PMID:26085772

  20. Tricuspid atresia and pulmonary atresia in a child with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Loomba, Rohit S; Geddes, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is a well-characterized condition causing distinctive physical characteristics, intellectual disability, and multiple congenital malformations. Cardiac abnormalities are found in a third of individuals with this condition and usually consist of isolated septal defects or patent ductus arteriosus, although more complex congenital lesions have been described. We present the first reported case of tricuspid atresia and pulmonary atresia with hypoplasia of the right ventricle in the setting of Rubenstein-Taybi syndrome. PMID:26085772

  1. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... esophagitis You may need to have the following tests if your doctor suspects esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  2. Review of esophageal injuries and stenosis: Lessons learn and current concepts of management

    PubMed Central

    Ramareddy, Raghu Sampalli; Alladi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To review the patients with esophageal injuries and stenosis with respect to their etiology, clinical course, management, and the lessons learnt from these. Materials and Methods: Retrospective descriptive observation review of children with esophageal injuries and stenosis admitted between January 2009 and April 2015. Results: Eighteen children with esophageal injuries of varied etiology were managed and included, seven with corrosive injury, five with perforation due to various causes, three with mucosal erosion, two with trachea esophageal fistula (TEF), and one wall erosion. The five children who had perforation were due to poststricture dilatation in a child with esophageal atresia and secondary to foreign body impaction or its attempted retrieval in four. Alkaline button cell had caused TEF in two. Three congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) had presented with dysphagia and respiratory tract infection. Six corrosive stricture and two CES responded to dilatation alone and one each of them required surgery. Four of the children with esophageal perforation were detected early and required drainage procedure (1), diversion (1), and medical management (2). Pseudo diverticulum was managed expectantly. Among TEF, one had spontaneous closure and other one was lost to follow-up. All the remaining nineteen children have recovered well except one CES had mortality. Conclusion: Esophageal injuries though rare can be potentially devastating and life-threatening. PMID:27365909

  3. Bridging long gap peripheral nerve injury using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro

    2014-07-15

    Long gap peripheral nerve injuries usually reulting in life-changing problems for patients. Skeletal muscle derived-multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs) can differentiate into Schwann and perineurial/endoneurial cells, vascular relating pericytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle cells in the damaged peripheral nerve niche. Application of the Sk-MSCs in the bridging conduit for repairing long nerve gap injury resulted favorable axonal regeneration, which showing superior effects than gold standard therapy--healthy nerve autograft. This means that it does not need to sacrifice of healthy nerves or loss of related functions for repairing peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25221587

  4. Improved results with hepatic portoenterostomy: a reassessment of its value in the treatment of biliary atresia.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E I; Carson, J A; Tunell, W P; Hitch, D C; Pysher, T J

    1982-01-01

    As reported in 1974, the initial experience at the Oklahoma Children's Memorial Hospital with the Kasai procedure for biliary atresia was unsatisfactory. A subsequent series of 20 patients, in which 50% of the patients are alive and improved and 25% jaundice-free, is described. Modifications of the initial operative technique have been utilized. Postoperative complications in the ten children with sustained bile flow included cholangitis in five, hyponatremia in four, esophageal variceal hemorrhage in two, stomal bleeding in two, and gallbladder conduit malfunction in two patients. The improved outcome is attributed to earlier diagnosis and correction, attention to operative details, intensive postoperative nutritional support, and prompt recognition and management of complications. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7A. Fig. 7B. PMID:6805444

  5. A Rare Case of Jejunal Atresia Due to Intrauterine Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sanjeev B; Kinhal, Vidyadhar; Desai, Mahesh; Tilak; Choudhari, Fazal Ur Rehman

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal atresia is generally caused by intrauterine vascular obstructions involving mesenteric vessels. Intrauterine intussusceptions (IUI) are one of these disruptive events. Intestinal intussusceptions affects children commonly between 3 months and 3 years of age, but it rarely affects in intrauterine life. The relationship between intrauterine intussusception and intestinal atresia has been demonstrated by few cases in literature, suggesting intrauterine intussusception as a rare cause of intestinal atresia. We report a 7-day-old full term neonate presenting with intrauterine intussusceptions (jejuno-jejunal) resulting in jejunal atresia. PMID:26500958

  6. Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis Complicating Bronchial Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qadi, Mazen O.; Reddy, Dereddi Raja S.; Larsen, Brandon T.; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2014-01-01

    Bronchial atresia is a rare pulmonary developmental anomaly characterized by the presence of a focal obliteration of a segmental or lobar bronchial lumen. The lung distal to the atretic bronchus is typically emphysematous along with the presence of mucus filled ectatic bronchi (mucoceles). BA is usually asymptomatic but pulmonary infections can rarely develop in the emphysematous lung distal to the atretic bronchus. We present a unique case of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) in a patient with BA with no evidence of immune dysfunction. The patient was treated initially with voriconazole and subsequently underwent surgical excision of the involved area. On follow-up, she has done extremely well with no evidence for recurrence. In summary, we describe the first case of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient with bronchial atresia. PMID:25587281

  7. Pulmonary atresia with double ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Tevfik F; Rigby, Michael; Rubens, Michael B; Nicol, Edward

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a neonate with pulmonary atresia and persistent bilateral patent ductus arteriosus imaged by gated multidetector CT. Traditionally, these patients have been assessed preoperatively with invasive angiocardiography or with cardiovascular magnetic resonance under sedation. Our case illustrates that contemporary cardiovascular CT techniques can now be used for preoperative evaluation with minimal radiation penalty, obviating the risks of sedation or cardiac catheterization. PMID:25977110

  8. Bone conduction hearing in congenital aural atresia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichun; Gao, Na; Yin, Yanbo; Yang, Lin; Xie, Youzhou; Chen, Ying; Dai, Peidong; Zhang, Tianyu

    2016-07-01

    Previous researches focusing on BC hearing mechanisms proved that the two routes, (1) EAC sound radiation and (2) inertial of ossicular chain, partially contribute to normal BC hearing. Therefore, the BC hearing for those patients with congenital aural atresia should partially decrease theoretically due to their abnormal anatomy. However, there are not many studies which mention these patients' BC hearing up till now. The objective of this study is to investigate congenital aural atresia patient's BC hearing by analysis of pre-surgical audiogram and to study their potential BC hearing mechanisms using animal modeling and their ABR measurements. The study methoed involves analyzing 75 patients' pre-operative audiogram. Then we produced an animal model by surgery to measure their BC hearing threshold changes. Clinical data showed that those patients had some BC hearing loss; and there were 25 cases (25/75, 33.3 %) which present with typical Carhart's Notch. The animal experiments proved that inertia of ossicular chain contribute to partial BC hearing, which demonstrated that the inertia produced more affects on high frequencies by comparing with low frequencies. The patients with congenital aural atresia present BC hearing loss, which could be mainly ascribed to the absence of inertia of ossicular chain. PMID:26205153

  9. Endoscopic management of esophageal stenosis in children: New and traditional treatments

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Oglio, Luigi; Caldaro, Tamara; Foschia, Francesca; Faraci, Simona; Federici di Abriola, Giovanni; Rea, Francesca; Romeo, Erminia; Torroni, Filippo; Angelino, Giulia; De Angelis, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Post-esophageal atresia anastomotic strictures and post-corrosive esophagitis are the most frequent types of cicatricial esophageal stricture. Congenital esophageal stenosis has been reported to be a rare but typical disease in children; other pediatric conditions are peptic, eosinophilic esophagitis and dystrophic recessive epidermolysis bullosa strictures. The conservative treatment of esophageal stenosis and strictures (ES) rather than surgery is a well-known strategy for children. Before planning esophageal dilation, the esophageal morphology should be assessed in detail for its length, aspect, number and level, and different conservative strategies should be chosen accordingly. Endoscopic dilators and techniques that involve different adjuvant treatment strategies have been reported and depend on the stricture’s etiology, the availability of different tools and the operator’s experience and preferences. Balloon and semirigid dilators are the most frequently used tools. No high-quality studies have reported on the differences in the efficacies and rates of complications associated with these two types of dilators. There is no consensus in the literature regarding the frequency of dilations or the diameter that should be achieved. The use of adjuvant treatments has been reported in cases of recalcitrant stenosis or strictures with evidence of dysphagic symptoms. Corticosteroids (either systemically or locally injected), the local application of mitomycin C, diathermy and laser ES sectioning have been reported. Some authors have suggested that stenting can reduce both the number of dilations and the treatment length. In many cases, this strategy is effective when either metallic or plastic stents are utilized. Treatment complications, such esophageal perforations, can be conservatively managed, considering surgery only in cases with severe pleural cavity involvement. In cases of stricture relapse, even if such relapses occur following the execution of well

  10. Endoscopic management of esophageal stenosis in children: New and traditional treatments.

    PubMed

    Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Caldaro, Tamara; Foschia, Francesca; Faraci, Simona; Federici di Abriola, Giovanni; Rea, Francesca; Romeo, Erminia; Torroni, Filippo; Angelino, Giulia; De Angelis, Paola

    2016-02-25

    Post-esophageal atresia anastomotic strictures and post-corrosive esophagitis are the most frequent types of cicatricial esophageal stricture. Congenital esophageal stenosis has been reported to be a rare but typical disease in children; other pediatric conditions are peptic, eosinophilic esophagitis and dystrophic recessive epidermolysis bullosa strictures. The conservative treatment of esophageal stenosis and strictures (ES) rather than surgery is a well-known strategy for children. Before planning esophageal dilation, the esophageal morphology should be assessed in detail for its length, aspect, number and level, and different conservative strategies should be chosen accordingly. Endoscopic dilators and techniques that involve different adjuvant treatment strategies have been reported and depend on the stricture's etiology, the availability of different tools and the operator's experience and preferences. Balloon and semirigid dilators are the most frequently used tools. No high-quality studies have reported on the differences in the efficacies and rates of complications associated with these two types of dilators. There is no consensus in the literature regarding the frequency of dilations or the diameter that should be achieved. The use of adjuvant treatments has been reported in cases of recalcitrant stenosis or strictures with evidence of dysphagic symptoms. Corticosteroids (either systemically or locally injected), the local application of mitomycin C, diathermy and laser ES sectioning have been reported. Some authors have suggested that stenting can reduce both the number of dilations and the treatment length. In many cases, this strategy is effective when either metallic or plastic stents are utilized. Treatment complications, such esophageal perforations, can be conservatively managed, considering surgery only in cases with severe pleural cavity involvement. In cases of stricture relapse, even if such relapses occur following the execution of well

  11. Biliary atresia: an update on our understanding of the disorder.

    PubMed

    Narkewicz, M R

    2001-10-01

    Biliary atresia is the leading cause of cholestasis in infants younger than 3 months. It is also the leading indication for liver transplantation in children. This review focuses on recent advances in the etiology, diagnosis, and management of biliary atresia. PMID:11801889

  12. Near Total Jejuno-Ileal Atresia: A Management Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sham, Minakshi; Singh, Dasmit

    2013-01-01

    A 2-day-old female neonate with the clinical picture of proximal small bowel atresia, on exploration, turned out to have intestinal atresia of a rare variety, i.e., a near-total jejuno-ileal atresia. The baby had total small bowel length of less than 10 cm. She survived for 3 months on enteral feeding after end-to-back duodeno-ileal anastomosis and thereafter succumbed to septicemia. The case is presented for it's extreme rarity and consideration of this extreme form of small bowel atresia as an offshoot of the existing classifications of jejuno-ileal atresia since it has dismal prognosis and presents as a management challenge even today. PMID:24049756

  13. Biliary atresia: From Australia to the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Mark

    2016-02-01

    This review is based upon an invited lecture for the 52nd Annual Meeting of the British Association of Paediatric Surgeons, July 2015. The aetiology of biliary atresia (BA) is at best obscure, but it is probable that a number of causes or pathophysiological mechanisms may be involved leading to the final common phenotype we recognise clinically. By way of illustration, similar conditions to human BA are described, including biliary agenesis, which is the normal state and peculiar final pattern of bile duct development in the jawless fish, the lamprey. Furthermore, there have been remarkable outbreaks in the Australian outback of BA in newborn lambs whose mothers were exposed to and grazed upon a particular plant species (Dysphania glomulifera) during gestation. More recent work using a zebrafish model has isolated a toxic isoflavonoid, now named Biliatresone, thought to be responsible for these outbreaks. Normal development of the bile ducts is reviewed and parallels drawn with two clinical variants thought to definitively have their origins in intrauterine life: Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation syndrome (BASM) and Cystic Biliary Atresia (CBA). For both variants there is sufficient clinical evidence, including associated anomalies and antenatal detection, respectively, to warrant their aetiological attribution as developmental BA. CMV IgM +ve associated BA is a further variant that appears separate with distinct clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical features. In these it seems possible that this involves perinatal obliteration of a normally formed duct system. Although still circumstantial, this evidence appears convincing enough to perhaps warrant a different treatment strategy. This then still leaves the most common (more than 60% in Western series) variant, now termed Isolated BA, whereby origins can only be alluded to. PMID:26653951

  14. Diet and esophageal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fagundes, Renato B.; Jacobson, Brian C.; Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Paski, Shirley; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on macronutrients, dietary patterns, and risk of adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus; micronutrients, trace elements, and risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the role of mate consumption in the development of squamous cell carcinoma; the relationship between energy excess and development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; and the nutritional management of the esophageal cancer patient. PMID:25266021

  15. Histomorphological Features of Intestinal Atresia and its Clinical Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Meeta; Khurana, Nita; Sathish, Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal atresia accounts for approximately one third of all cases of neonatal intestinal obstruction. There is controversy regarding pathogenesis of congenital atresia and stenosis of small bowel. Studies regarding clinical manifestations and specific histopathological features of neonatal intestinal atresia are scarce in Indian literature. Aim To understand the histomorphological features and thus suggest pathophysiology of cases with Intestinal Atresia. Materials and Methods Out of 147 cases, of intestinal obstruction in newborn studied over a period of 5 years, 39 cases of intestinal atresia were found. Their histomorphological details with clinical manifestations were studied. Results Type II was the commonest type of atresia. Associated anomalies noted were gastroschisis, volvulus, anal stenosis, microcolon, annular pancreas, meconium cyst and duplication cyst. Histological changes observed were ulceration, flattening, abnormal villous configuration, luminal obliteration, narrowing, haemangiomatous proliferation of blood vessels, fibrosis, haemorrhage, calcification, and mesenchymal condensation around the blood vessels. Gangrene and perforation has also noted in some cases. Conclusion An intrauterine intestinal ischemia due to vascular pathology followed by resorption of the bowel is the possible explanation for the development of intestinal atresia. PMID:26674207

  16. Esophageal lichen planus*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Janine Pichler; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. PMID:26131872

  17. Structural changes occurring during atresia in sheep ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Hay, M R; Cran, D G; Moor, R M

    1976-07-01

    The structural changes that characterize primary, secondary and tertiary atresia in sheep Graafian follicles have been studied by means of histological, histochemical and ultrastructural techniques. In primary atresia vacuoles representing swollen endoplasmic reticulum are prominent along the antral border together with disorganized granulosa cells containing pyknotic nuclei. Phagocytic cells, which increase in number as atresia progresses, were seen within the membrana granulosa and are considered to be transformed granulosa cells. Even in follicles classified as nonatretic, a few antral vacuoles and occasional pyknotic nuclei are present. During secondary atresia there is a large increase in the number of cells with pyknotic nuclei; many of these nuclei had been extruded and had fused to form the characteristic Feulgen-positive atretic bodies found along the edge of the antral cavity. These bodies usually have a diameter of up to 15 mum but occasionally reached as much as 400 mum. A second area of degeneration is frequently present in the membrana granulosa, two or three cell layers from the basal lamina, and it is at this level that exfoliation of granulosa cells occurs in tertiary atresia. In contrast to the membrana granulosa, there are during secondary atresia, only slight indications of degeneration in the cumulus. In tertiary atresia the membrana granulosa is highly disorganized; the atretic bodies are often fewer in number than at earlier stages. The basal lamina remains essentially intact. It is at this stage that the first clear signs of degeneration occur in the theca interna. Despite some disintegration of the cumulus, the integrity of the oocyte is maintained and its nucleus remains vesicular. Changes in the thecal microcirculation may plan a key role in atresia: adjacent to the basal lamina of non-atretic follicles, there is a well-developed capillary network which is significantly reduced as atresia progresses. PMID:991198

  18. Fetal cardiac circulation in isolated aortic atresia assessed with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sayit, Aslı Tanrıvermiş; Ipek, Ali; Kurt, Aydın; Aghdasi, Bayan G; Arslan, Halil; Gümüş, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are common, with an incidence of more than 8 in 1000 live births. Aortic atresia is a rare diagnosis and its prognosis is very poor. In this article, we present a case of isolated aortic atresia, a very rare cardiovascular anomaly, and its fetal ultrasound findings which include blood flow at foramen ovale from left to right, right deviation of the interventricular septum, dysfunction of the mitral valve and cardiomegaly. Aortic stenosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aortic atresia. However, in the case of severe aortic stenosis and/or accompanying ventricular septal defect, differential diagnosis may not be done. PMID:24592058

  19. Functional esophageal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Clouse, R; Richter, J; Heading, R; Janssens, J; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    The functional esophageal disorders include globus, rumination syndrome, and symptoms that typify esophageal diseases (chest pain, heartburn, and dysphagia). Factors responsible for symptom production are poorly understood. The criteria for diagnosis rest not only on compatible symptoms but also on exclusion of structural and metabolic disorders that might mimic the functional disorders. Additionally, a functional diagnosis is precluded by the presence of a pathology-based motor disorder or pathological reflux, defined by evidence of reflux esophagitis or abnormal acid exposure time during ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. Management is largely empirical, although efficacy of psychopharmacological agents and psychological or behavioral approaches has been established for serveral of the functional esophageal disorders. As gastroesophageal reflux disease overlaps in presentation with most of these disorders and because symptoms are at least partially provoked by acid reflux events in many patients, antireflux therapy also plays an important role both in diagnosis and management. Further understanding of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for symptoms is a priority for future research efforts, as is the consideration of treatment outcome in a broader sense than reduction in esophageal symptoms alone. Likewise, the value of inclusive rather than restrictive diagnostic criteria that encompass other gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal symptoms should be examined to improve the accuracy of symptom-based criteria and reduce the dependence on objective testing.


Keywords: globus; rumination; chest pain; esophageal motility disorders; esophageal spasm; gastroesophageal reflux disease; Rome II PMID:10457042

  20. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an autoimmune esophageal disorder.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neha; Levine, Jeremiah

    2014-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) represents a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal inflammatory disease associated with esophageal dysfunction resulting from severe inflammation. The incidence and prevalence of EoE have been increasing in the past decade; however, the reason for this increase is unclear. There is a chronic inflammatory infiltrate that is present in EoE which promotes inflammation, symptoms, and dysfunction. In addition to eosinophils, interleukin (IL)-5 expressing T cells, B cells, eotaxin-3, IL-13, and IgE-bearing mast cells are present in EoE and are thought to contribute to the disease process. Eosinophils are pro-inflammatory and modulate multiple aspects of the immune response. Eosinophils produce a wide range of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factors, and tumor necrosis factors. Once activated, eosinophils release granule components, which are toxic to a variety of tissues. Transforming growth factor β1 is a pro-fibrotic molecule produced by epithelial and inflammatory cells, is overexpressed in EoE, and plays a role in esophageal remodeling. Fibrous remodeling in EoE could be associated with symptoms of dysphagia and may explain and predict future esophageal strictures and dysmotility. EoE is a complex disease involving multiple activation pathways, a large number of cells, and various inflammatory molecules. It, along with other atopic disease, is becoming increasingly prevalent and has an important genetic load and may represent as an immunological tolerance disorder of the GI tract. PMID:25499460

  1. Atresia revisited: two basic patterns of atresia of bovine antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Irving-Rodgers, H F; van Wezel, I L; Mussard, M L; Kinder, J E; Rodgers, R J

    2001-11-01

    Our observations of bovine follicles indicated that the original histological classifications of atresia were inaccurate. A detailed histological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study of antral follicles from bovine ovaries collected from an abattoir and from animals whose large follicles had been monitored by ultrasonography was conducted to investigate this further. Nidogen and CD68 were immunolocalized to observe the follicular basal lamina and macrophages, respectively. In randomly collected ovaries, approximately one quarter of all antral follicles were undergoing antral atresia, as designated in this study. Antral atresia was characterized by early destruction of the layers of the membrana granulosa closest to the antrum, whereas the most basal cells remained intact. Numerous pyknotic nuclei were observed in the most antral layers and in the antrum close to the membrana granulosa. This is the classic description of atretic follicles and was observed at all sizes of follicle development and almost universally in large follicles (> 5 mm in diameter), including dominant follicles. Basal atretic follicles, as designated in this study, were almost as prevalent as the antral atretic follicles, and were characterized by initial destruction of the most basal layer of granulosa cells, whereas the cells in the most antral layers remained associated with each other and were predominantly healthy. Pyknotic nuclei and the nuclei of dying basal cells budded into apoptotic bodies were observed rarely. The basal lamina of basal atretic follicles was often breached by macrophages, which were phagocytosing dying basal granulosa cells. The theca was characterized by an increased deposition of collagen, and the cells were orientated randomly, rather than lying parallel to the membrana granulosa as in healthy follicles. Basal atresia occurred in small (< 5 mm in diameter) follicles only. Importantly, these basal atretic follicles were originally identified incorrectly in

  2. Atresia of the Colon Associated with Hirschsprung's Disease.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Diana N; Eftekhari, Kambiz

    2015-05-01

    Atresia of the colon is a rare anomaly with an incidence of between 1:20,000 and 1:66,000 live births being reported. Hirschsprung's disease association with Colonic atresia is usually diagnosed after several failures of intestinal anastomoses. We herein report one of the first patients in the literature diagnosed before a therapeutic challenge. A 2-day-old female was admitted with severe abdominal distention, bilious vomiting and failure to pass meconium. A distended abdomen accompanied by hypoactive bowel sounds was also observed. Abdominal X-ray revealed increased intestinal gas, mainly in the colon. Type IIIa atresia of the colon at the level of the splenic flexure was found at laparotomy. A temporary double-barrel colostomy was completed, and she was discharged from hospital on the tenth day after operation without any complications. At the age of 3 months, due to the aspect of the distal colon, a rectal biopsy was performed and aganglionosis was confirmed. The combination of intestinal aganglionosis and colonic atresia is extremely rare.  The concomitance of colonic atresia and aganglionosis is calculated to be in 1 in 10 million live births. Wilson, et al. claims that 80 percent of infants with colonic atresia have associated gastrointestinal anomalies. These defects include rotation and fixation anomalies. However, aganglionosis and intestinal neuronal dysplasia should be taken into account as well. When both diseases are combined, the etiology is still uncertain and several etiologies have been suggested. The association should be suspected in all cases of colonic atresia and rectal biopsies are advocated at the primary operation in patients with atresia of the colon. PMID:25959916

  3. Epidermolysis bullosa and congenital pyloric atresia

    PubMed Central

    Mithwani, Anwar Adil; Hashmi, Asif; Adil, Salman

    2013-01-01

    The association between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and pyloric atresia (PA) is rare but well documented. Herein, we report a case of EB associated with congenital PA. A female baby, weighing 1480 g, was born vaginally to a 31-year-old gravida 7 lady at 33 weeks of gestation. Polyhydramnios was detected on antenatal assessment. The parents were non-consanguineous Saudis with no family history of significant illness. At birth, well-demarcated areas of peeled skin were present over knees, left leg and periumbilical region. Systemic examination revealed no other abnormality. On second day, the patient developed recurrent vomiting and abdominal distension. An abdominal X-ray revealed a single gastric gas bubble suggesting pyloric obstruction. Following gastroduodenostomy, the baby developed severe sepsis with multiorgan dysfunction and expired on 25th day of life. Skin biopsy showed cleavage within lamina lucida. PMID:24068383

  4. Is AMH a regulator of follicular atresia?

    PubMed

    Seifer, David B; Merhi, Zaher

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the hypothesis that AMH is an intraovarian regulator that inhibits follicular atresia within the human ovary. Several indirect lines of evidence derived from clinical and basic science studies in a variety of different patient populations and model systems collectively support this hypothesis. Evidence presented herein include 1) timing of onset of menopause in women with polycystic ovary syndrome, 2) site of cellular origin and timing of AMH production, 3) AMH's influence on other critical growth factors and enzymes involved in folliculogenesis, and 4) AMH's inhibition of granulosa apoptosis. If this hypothesis is true, it may provide insight for treatment strategies for prevention and treatment of premature ovarian insufficiency, slowing natural ovarian aging, and/or delaying eventual ovarian failure. Such findings may lead to the development of 1) AMH agonists for retarding the onset of menopause and/or as a chemoprotectant prior to cancer therapy and 2) AMH antagonists for the treatment of PCOS. PMID:25193290

  5. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  6. Report on a case of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome associated with esophageal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Polese, L; Merigliano, S; Mungo, B; Pennelli, G; Norberto, L

    2011-11-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis. While its incidence is unknown, approximately 300 cases have been reported in the literature. The syndrome typically presents with a characteristic facial rash (poikiloderma), its diagnostic hallmark, and heterogeneous clinical features including congenital skeletal abnormalities, sparse hair distribution, juvenile cataracts, and a predisposition to osteosarcoma. Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as pyloric stenosis, anal atresia, annular pancreas, and rectovaginal fistula, have also been reported sporadically. This is a report describing a patient diagnosed with RTS referred to us because of dysphagia caused by esophageal stenosis. Long-term results of endoscopic dilation are also presented. PMID:21951866

  7. Esophageal stricture - benign

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines) can keep a peptic stricture from returning. Surgery is rarely needed. If you have eosinophilic esophagitis, you may need to take medicines or make changes to your diet to reduce the inflammation. In some cases, dilation is done.

  8. [Esophageal motor disturbances in sclerodermia].

    PubMed

    Stanciu, C; Cijevschi, C; Dobrescu, A; Petrescu, Z

    1981-01-01

    By the manometric method the esophageal motility in 14 patients with sclerodermia was studied. All patients presented an esophageal motor dysfunction characterized by the decrease in amplitude of the spohageal contractions, presence of aperistaltic contractions, decrease of basal pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter and its incomplete relaxation at deglutition. These esophageal motor disturbances may appear in association or separately in the same patient. The pathogenesis of the esophageal motor dysfunction in sclerodermia is not yet fully understood. Besides the theoretical interest, the knowledge of the esophageal motor dysfunction in sclerodermia has also a practical value in respect of the tretment which is to be set up. PMID:25528800

  9. Biliary Atresia: 50 Years after the First Kasai

    PubMed Central

    Wildhaber, Barbara E.

    2012-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a rare neonatal disease of unknown etiology, where obstruction of the biliary tree causes severe cholestasis, leading to biliary cirrhosis and death in the first years of life, if the condition is left untreated. Biliary atresia is the most frequent surgical cause of cholestatic jaundice in neonates and should be evoked whenever this clinical sign is associated with pale stools and hepatomegaly. The treatment of biliary atresia is surgical and currently recommended as a sequence of, eventually, two interventions. During the first months of life a hepatoportoenterostomy (a “Kasai,” modifications of which are discussed in this paper) should be performed, in order to restore the biliary flow to the intestine and lessen further damage to the liver. If this fails and/or the disease progresses towards biliary cirrhosis and life-threatening complications, then liver transplantation is indicated, for which biliary atresia represents the most frequent pediatric indication. Of importance, the earlier the Kasai is performed, the later a liver transplantation is usually needed. This warrants a great degree of awareness of biliary atresia, and the implementation of systematic screening for this life-threatening pathology. PMID:23304557

  10. Changes of smooth muscle contractile filaments in small bowel atresia

    PubMed Central

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Fiegel, Henning; Ramachandran, Priya; Rolle, Udo; Metzger, Roman

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate morphological changes of intestinal smooth muscle contractile fibres in small bowel atresia patients. METHODS: Resected small bowel specimens from small bowel atresia patients (n = 12) were divided into three sections (proximal, atretic and distal). Standard histology hematoxylin-eosin staining and enzyme immunohistochemistry was performed to visualize smooth muscle contractile markers α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and desmin using conventional paraffin sections of the proximal and distal bowel. Small bowel from age-matched patients (n = 2) undergoing Meckel’s diverticulum resection served as controls. RESULTS: The smooth muscle coat in the proximal bowel of small bowel atresia patients was thickened compared with control tissue, but the distal bowel was unchanged. Expression of smooth muscle contractile fibres SMA and desmin within the proximal bowel was slightly reduced compared with the distal bowel and control tissue. There were no major differences in the architecture of the smooth muscle within the proximal bowel and the distal bowel. The proximal and distal bowel in small bowel atresia patients revealed only minimal differences regarding smooth muscle morphology and the presence of smooth muscle contractile filament markers. CONCLUSION: Changes in smooth muscle contractile filaments do not appear to play a major role in postoperative motility disorders in small bowel atresia. PMID:22791945

  11. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  12. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the stomach. It is a test for gastroesophageal reflux disease ( GERD ). In infants, this test is also ... to: Barrett's esophagus Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) Esophageal scarring Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) Heartburn Reflux esophagitis You may need ...

  13. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  14. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Esophageal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. Retrospective Study of a Series of Choanal Atresia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Manica, Denise; Schweiger, Cláudia; Netto, Cátia C Saleh; Kuhl, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although it has been more than 250 years since the first description of choanal atresia (CA), there are still doubts about this abnormality. The differences between unilateral and bilateral forms are seldom discussed. Objectives Aggregate data from patients diagnosed with CA, grouping patients with unilateral and bilateral forms. Methods Retrospective study. Results Eighteen patients were included: 12 (66.6%) presented bilateral atresia, of which 77.8% were mixed bony-membranous type and 22.2% were pure bony type. From the 12 patients with bilateral atresia, 10 presented related malformations, 3 of whom had CHARGE syndrome (coloboma, heart defects, choanal atresia, retardation of growth and development, genitourinary problems, ear abnormalities). From the remaining 6 patients with unilateral atresia, only 2 showed malformations, 1 renal and 1 cardiac. All patients with unilateral atresia needed only 1 surgical procedure, and patients with the bilateral form needed a median of 2.85 interventions (p = 0.003). The median age of surgical procedure in the unilateral group was 6 years, ranging from 6 months to 18 years, and in the bilateral group was 25 days, ranging from 6 days to 6 years (p = 0.003). The median interval between diagnosis and surgery was 9 months in the unilateral group, ranging from 1 month to 18 years, and in the bilateral group was 1 day, ranging from 1 day to 2 months (p = 0.001). Discussion and Conclusions Success rates with the endoscopic approach vary from 62 to 100%. Nonetheless, most of these reports present results without considering the number of compromised sides. In our opinion, unilateral and bilateral cases involve distinct patients (taking into account the related malformations), have diverging clinical presentations, and show discrepant restenosis rates and therefore could be considered in different groups of analysis. PMID:25992054

  16. Atresia ani in the dog: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Maria L; Tobias, Karen M

    2005-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the rectum and anus are rare in dogs. The most frequently reported anomaly is atresia ani. Four types of atresia ani have been reported, including congenital anal stenosis (Type I); imperforate anus alone (Type II) or combined with more cranial termination of the rectum as a blind pouch (Type III); and discontinuity of the proximal rectum with normal anal and terminal rectal development (Type IV). An increased incidence was found in females and in several breeds, including miniature or toy poodles and Boston terriers. Surgical repair is the treatment of choice, but postoperative complications can occur, including fecal incontinence and colonic atony secondary to prolonged preoperative distension. PMID:16141183

  17. Atresia of the right atrioventricular orifice with atrioventricular concordance.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D F; Wilkinson, J L; Smith, A; Anderson, R H

    1979-01-01

    Three hearts are described in which a fibrous membrane was interposed between the right atrium and a formed but hypoplastic right ventricle, which possessed recognisable inlet, trabecular, and infundibular components. In these hearts the distribution of the conducting tissue was as expected for concordant atrioventricular connections, and contrasts with that seen in the classical type of 'tricuspid atresia'. The distinctive morphological and histological features of these specimens lend further support to our view that the majority of cases of atresia of the right atrioventricular orifice should be regarded as coming within the designation of 'the univentricular heart'. Images PMID:475940

  18. Congenital bronchial atresia: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqi; Dai, Weimin; Sun, Yu'e; Chu, Xiangyang; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively summarize the clinical signs, diagnosis, and treatment of congenital bronchial atresia (CBA) in 12 patients. Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) images of 12 patients with CBA treated in the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital were reviewed. Analysis of chest radiographs revealed ten patients had hilar mass-like shadows and two had pneumonia-like shadows; most patients (n = 8) showed hyperlucency of the peripheral lung fields. CT revealed a mucocele in all the patients (n = 12); the mucoceles were round in four patients and club-like in eight. In 80% of the cases (n = 10), associated anomalies, including occlusions of the bronchus central to the mucocele, emphysematous changes of the peripheral lung fields, bronchogenic cyst, and anomalous branching of the bronchial tree and vascular structure were observed. CBA was detected in the right lobe in eight patients and the left lobe in the remaining four. No surgical intervention was performed in 5 CBA patients and the remaining 7 patients underwent surgery, including lobectomy in 5 patients and local resection in 2 patients. Among these 7 patients, 3 had a preoperative diagnosis of malignant disease, and the remaining 4 had severe clinical symptoms that could not be effectively treated by medicines. All patients were followed up, and none experienced obvious discomfort. CBA is a relatively rare and benign malformation disease. Chest CT is the procedure of choice for diagnosis. The presence of a bronchocele and surrounding emphysematous changes are typical radiologic findings in CBA. Surgery should be reserved only for patients with serious complications secondary to the atretic bronchus. PMID:22408569

  19. Congenital Bronchial Atresia: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqi; Dai, Weimin; Sun, Yu'e; Chu, Xiangyang; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively summarize the clinical signs, diagnosis, and treatment of congenital bronchial atresia (CBA) in 12 patients. Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) images of 12 patients with CBA treated in the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital were reviewed. Analysis of chest radiographs revealed ten patients had hilar mass-like shadows and two had pneumonia-like shadows; most patients (n = 8) showed hyperlucency of the peripheral lung fields. CT revealed a mucocele in all the patients (n = 12); the mucoceles were round in four patients and club-like in eight. In 80% of the cases (n = 10), associated anomalies, including occlusions of the bronchus central to the mucocele, emphysematous changes of the peripheral lung fields, bronchogenic cyst, and anomalous branching of the bronchial tree and vascular structure were observed. CBA was detected in the right lobe in eight patients and the left lobe in the remaining four. No surgical intervention was performed in 5 CBA patients and the remaining 7 patients underwent surgery, including lobectomy in 5 patients and local resection in 2 patients. Among these 7 patients, 3 had a preoperative diagnosis of malignant disease, and the remaining 4 had severe clinical symptoms that could not be effectively treated by medicines. All patients were followed up, and none experienced obvious discomfort. CBA is a relatively rare and benign malformation disease. Chest CT is the procedure of choice for diagnosis. The presence of a bronchocele and surrounding emphysematous changes are typical radiologic findings in CBA. Surgery should be reserved only for patients with serious complications secondary to the atretic bronchus. PMID:22408569

  20. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow’s relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:27499977

  1. Rectovaginal fistula with anal atresia in 5 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Sheila C.; Vicente, Cristiane S.; Mortari, Ana C.; Mamprim, Maria J.; Caporalli, Evelyn H.G.

    2007-01-01

    Five dogs with rectovaginal fistula and atresia ani that had been treated by surgical correction of the malformations were studied retrospectively. Ages at presentation varied from 1 to 3 months and weight from 350 g to 7.5 kg. The histories included voiding of feces through the vulva, with or without tenesmus, usually observed after weaning. Atresia ani, presence of feces in the vaginal canal, abdominal distention, and discomfort on abdominal palpation were observed during clinical examination. Also, 3 dogs had partial tail agenesis. In all dogs, the rectovaginal fistula was isolated and transected, the vulvar and rectal defects were closed separately, and the atresia ani was repaired. Normal defecation was restored, but 1 dog had fecal incontinence that subsequently resolved. One dog died 2.5 months postoperatively, and follow-up was done on the others for periods ranging from 1.6 year to 7.7 years. Surgical correction in dogs with rectovaginal fistula and atresia ani may result in a favorable outcome, if it is done early. PMID:17824325

  2. Theca interna: the other side of bovine follicular atresia.

    PubMed

    Clark, Leigh J; Irving-Rodgers, Helen F; Dharmarajan, Arun M; Rodgers, Raymond J

    2004-10-01

    Currently, histological classifications of ovarian follicular atresia are almost exclusively based on the morphology of the membrana granulosa without reference to the theca interna. Atresia in the bovine small antral ovarian follicle has been redefined into antral or basal atresia where cell death commences initially within antral or basal regions of the membrana granulosa, respectively. To examine cell death in the theca interna in the two types of atretic follicles, bovine ovaries were collected and processed for immunohistochemistry and light microscopy. Follicles were classified as healthy, antral atretic, or basal atretic. Follicle diameter was recorded and sections stained with lectin from Bandeiraea simplicifolia to identify endothelial cells or with an antibody to cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage to identify steroidogenic cells and combined with TUNEL labeling to identify dead cells. The numerical density of steroidogenic cells within the theca interna was significantly reduced (P < 0.001) in basal atretic follicles in comparison with other follicles. Cell death was greater in both endothelial cells (P < 0.05) and steroidogenic cells (P < 0.01) of the theca interna of basal atretic follicles compared with healthy and antral atretic follicles. Thus, we conclude that the theca interna is susceptible to cell death early in atresia, particularly in basal atretic follicles. PMID:15175236

  3. Pediatric esophageal substitution by gastric pull-up and gastric tube

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Subhasis Roy; Yadav, Partap Singh; Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Shah, Shalu; Debnath, Pinaki Ranjan; Kumar, Virendra; Chadha, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to report the results of pediatric esophageal substitution by gastric pull-up (GPU) and gastric tube (GT) from a tertiary care pediatric center. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of the surgical techniques, results, complications, and final outcome of all pediatric patients who underwent esophageal substitution in a single institution was performed. Results: Twenty-four esophageal substitutions were performed over 15-year period. The indications were pure esophageal atresia (EA)-19, EA with distal trachea-esophageal fistula-2, EA with proximal pouch fistula-1, and esophageal stricture in two patients. Mean age and weight at operation were 17 months and 9.5 kg, respectively. GPU was the most common procedure (19) followed by reverse GT (4) and gastric fundal tube (1). Posterior mediastinal and retrosternal routes were used in 17 and 7 cases, respectively. Major complications included three deaths in GPU cases resulting from postoperative tachyarrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest, cervical anastomotic leak-17, and anastomotic stricture in six cases. Perioperative tachyarrhythmias (10/19) and transient hypertension (2/19) were observed in GPU patients, and they were managed with beta blocker drugs. Postoperative ventilation in Intensive Care Unit was performed for all GPU, but none of the GT patients. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 15 years that showed short-term feeding difficulties and no major growth-related problems. Conclusions: Perioperative tachyarrhythmias are common following GPU which mandates close intensive care monitoring with ventilation and judicious use of beta blocking drugs. Retrosternal GT with a staged neck anastomosis can be performed without postoperative ventilation. PMID:27365902

  4. Health Related Quality of Life in Patients with Biliary Atresia Surviving with their Native Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Shikha S.; Alonso, Estella M.; Haber, Barbara; Magee, John C.; Fredericks, Emily; Kamath, Binita; Kerkar, Nanda; Rosenthal, Philip; Shepherd, Ross; Limbers, Christine; Varni, James W.; Robuck, Patricia; Sokol, Ronald J.; Liver, Childhood

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To quantify health related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with biliary atresia with their native livers and compare them with healthy children and patients with biliary atresia post-liver transplant (LT) and to examine the relationship between HRQOL and medical variables. Study design A cross-sectional HRQOL study of patients with biliary atresia with their native livers (ages 2-25 years) was conducted and compared with healthy and post-LT biliary atresia samples using PedsQL™ 4.0 child self and parent proxy reports, a validated measure of physical/psychosocial functioning. Results 221 patients with biliary atresia with native livers (54% female, 67% white) were studied. patient self and parent proxy reports showed significantly poorer HRQOL than healthy children across all domains (p < 0.001), particularly in emotional and psychosocial functioning. Child self and parent proxy HRQOL scores from patients with biliary atresia with their native livers and post-LT biliary atresia were similar across all domains (p=NS). Child self and parent proxy reports showed moderate agreement across all scales, except social functioning (poor to fair agreement). On multivariate regression analysis, black race and elevated total bilirubin were associated with lower Total and Psychosocial HRQOL summary scores. Conclusions HRQOL in patients with biliary atresia with their native livers is significantly poorer than healthy and similar to post-LT biliary atresia children. These findings identify significant opportunities to optimize the overall health of patients with biliary atresia. PMID:23746866

  5. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  6. Esophagitis in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    Esophagitis is the end result of a variety of insults to epithelial homeostasis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a manifestation of non-IgE-mediated food allergy that most commonly affects the esophagus of males who have other atopic phenomena. Reflux esophagitis reflects repeated exposure to acidic gastric contents because of failure of the normal protections afforded by the LES. Because certain histologic features can be present in either condition, endoscopic biopsy alone does not distinguish them. Their symptoms overlap, but the treatment options are very different, such that making a formal diagnosis by following consensus guidelines is essential. A treatment protocol designed to manage the inflammation by controlling the provocative factors (acid for GERD and food antigens for EoE) or suppressing the inflammation (ie, topical steroids for EoE) should result in normalization of the mucosa and resolution of symptoms. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic condition that rarely remits spontaneously, so any therapeutic modality will need to be continued indefinitely. PMID:27363230

  7. Clinical and etiological heterogeneity in patients with tracheo-esophageal malformations and associated anomalies.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Erwin; Ploeg, Mirjam; van Bever, Yolande; Koopmans, Anna E; IJsselstijn, Hanneke; Rottier, Robbert J; Wijnen, Rene; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies

    2014-08-01

    Esophageal Atresia (EA) is a severe developmental defect of the foregut that presents with or without a Tracheo-Esophageal Fistula (TEF). The prevalence of EA/TEF over time and around the world has been relatively stable. EA/TEF is manifested in a broad spectrum of anomalies: in some patients it manifests as an isolated atresia or fistula, but in over half it affects several organ systems. While the associated malformations are often those of the VACTERL spectrum (Vertebral, Anorectal, Cardiac, Tracheo-Esophageal, Renal and Limb), many patients are affected by other malformations, such as microcephaly, micrognathia, pyloric stenosis, duodenal atresia, a single umbilical artery, and anomalies of the genitourinary, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. Though EA/TEF is a genetically heterogeneous condition, recurrent genes and loci are sometimes affected. Tracheo-Esophageal (TE) defects are in fact a variable feature in several known single gene disorders and in patients with specific recurrent Copy Number Variations and structural chromosomal aberrations. At present, a causal genetic aberration can be identified in 11-12% of patients. In most, EA/TEF is a sporadic finding; the familial recurrence rate is low (1%). As this suggests that epigenetic and environmental factors also contribute to the disease, non-syndromic EA/TEF is generally believed to be a multifactorial condition. Several population-based studies and case reports describe a wide range of associated risks, including age, diabetes, drug use, herbicides, smoking and fetal alcohol exposure. The phenotypical and genetic heterogeneity seen in EA/TEF patients indicates not one underlying cause, but several. Unraveling the complex multifactorial and heterogeneous etiology of EA/TEF and associated features will require large cohorts of patients. Combined statistical analysis of component findings, genome sequencing, and genome wide association studies will elucidate new causal genetic defects and

  8. Left main coronary artery atresia in an infant with Shone's complex.

    PubMed

    Pizzuto, Matthew F; Zampi, Jeffrey D

    2016-06-01

    A 6-month-old infant with Shone's complex was found to have left main coronary artery atresia during evaluation for recurrent subaortic stenosis with depressed left ventricular function. The ventricular function improved after surgical subaortic resection without coronary re-vascularisation. This case demonstrates first the rare finding of left main coronary artery atresia and second that coronary re-vascularisation is not necessarily required in all cases of left main coronary artery atresia. PMID:26898109

  9. Association of Duodenal Atresia, Malrotation, and Atrial Septal Defect in a Down-Syndrome Patient

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, F; Sica, M; Mariscoli, F; Bindi, E; Mazzei, O; Ferrara, F; Messina, M

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal atresia is the frequent cause of neonatal intestinal obstruction. The association between duodenal atresia, intestinal malrotation, cardiac anomalies and Down syndrome is infrequently reported. We present a prenatally suspected case of duodenal atresia which was associated with malrotation and atrial septal defect in a patient of Down syndrome. Duodenotomy and resection of web was performed in addition to Ladd’s procedure. Postoperative course remained uneventful. PMID:27170921

  10. Association of Duodenal Atresia, Malrotation, and Atrial Septal Defect in a Down-Syndrome Patient.

    PubMed

    Angotti, R; Molinaro, F; Sica, M; Mariscoli, F; Bindi, E; Mazzei, O; Ferrara, F; Messina, M

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal atresia is the frequent cause of neonatal intestinal obstruction. The association between duodenal atresia, intestinal malrotation, cardiac anomalies and Down syndrome is infrequently reported. We present a prenatally suspected case of duodenal atresia which was associated with malrotation and atrial septal defect in a patient of Down syndrome. Duodenotomy and resection of web was performed in addition to Ladd's procedure. Postoperative course remained uneventful. PMID:27170921

  11. Choanal atresia in a patient with the deletion (9p) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Fryburg, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report on a child with choanal atresia and deletion 9p. A review of the literature documented one previous instance of choanal atresia in a patient with del(9p). Choanal atresia may be part of the spectrum of malformations in the deletion (9p) syndrome and its presence should prompt a search for this particular deletion as part of the differential diagnosis. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Appearances are Deceptive – Passing a Nasogastric Tube does Not Always Rule Out Oesophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia/trachea-Oesophageal fistula is commonly diagnosed in the newborn period by inability to pass a nasogastric tube (NGT). We present the instance of a newborn baby where the diagnosis of oesophageal atresia was delayed because of an apparent successful passage of nasogastric tube to the stomach. Failure to reinsert the NGT raised the suspicion of oesophageal atresia which was confirmed by contrast study showing blind upper oesophageal pouch. PMID:27190912

  13. Appearances are Deceptive - Passing a Nasogastric Tube does Not Always Rule Out Oesophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Thomas, Niranjan

    2016-04-01

    Oesophageal atresia/trachea-Oesophageal fistula is commonly diagnosed in the newborn period by inability to pass a nasogastric tube (NGT). We present the instance of a newborn baby where the diagnosis of oesophageal atresia was delayed because of an apparent successful passage of nasogastric tube to the stomach. Failure to reinsert the NGT raised the suspicion of oesophageal atresia which was confirmed by contrast study showing blind upper oesophageal pouch. PMID:27190912

  14. A Very Rare Cause of Anal Atresia: Currarino Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Parmaksiz, Mehmet Ergun; Cabalar, Esra; Karapur, Ali; Kaya, Cihat

    2016-01-01

    Currarino syndrome (triad) is an extremely rare condition characterized by presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and sacral bone deformation. The complete form of this syndrome displays all three irregularities. Herein, we report a male case who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of urinary system infection and persistent constipation 2 years after colostomy operation performed with the indication of rectovestibular fistula and anal atresia, diagnosed as Currarino syndrome based on imaging modalities. In a patient who was admitted because of the presence of anal atresia, in order to preclude potential complications, probable concomitancy of this syndrome should not be forgotten. Early diagnosis is important for the prevention of meningitis, urinary tract infections, and malignant change. PMID:27081429

  15. A Very Rare Cause of Anal Atresia: Currarino Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Parmaksiz, Mehmet Ergun; Cabalar, Esra; Karapur, Ali; Kaya, Cihat

    2016-05-01

    Currarino syndrome (triad) is an extremely rare condition characterized by presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and sacral bone deformation. The complete form of this syndrome displays all three irregularities. Herein, we report a male case who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of urinary system infection and persistent constipation 2 years after colostomy operation performed with the indication of rectovestibular fistula and anal atresia, diagnosed as Currarino syndrome based on imaging modalities. In a patient who was admitted because of the presence of anal atresia, in order to preclude potential complications, probable concomitancy of this syndrome should not be forgotten. Early diagnosis is important for the prevention of meningitis, urinary tract infections, and malignant change. PMID:27081429

  16. Anaesthesia for biliary atresia and hepatectomy in paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The scope of this article precludes an ‘in depth’ description of all liver problems and I will limit this review to anaesthesia for biliary atresia — a common hepatic problem in the very young — and partial hepatectomy in older children. I will not be discussing the problems of anaesthetising children with hepatitis, cirrhosis, congenital storage diseases or liver failure. Extrahepatic biliary obstruction is an obliterative cholangiopathy of infancy which is fatal if untreated. Diagnosis involves exclusion of other causes of neonatal jaundice and treatment involves a hepatico portoenterostomy carried out at the earliest. This is a review of current concepts in anaesthesia and postoperative management of neonates with extrahepatic biliary atresia. Anaesthesia for hepatic resection has seen great changes in recent times with the improvement in surgical techniques, technology and a better understanding of the underlying physiology. These are reviewed along with the problems of postoperative pain management. PMID:23293387

  17. Two Cases of Malleostapedotomy in Congenital Oval Window Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang Hyeon; Kim, Da Hee; Choi, Jae Young

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anomaly of the oval window with an abnormal facial nerve course is an uncommon embryological defect, which is related to the underdevelopment of second branchial arch derivatives. Some treatments for improving hearing levels are available; these include hearing aids, vestibulotomy, neo-oval window formation, and stapes surgeries, including incudostapedotomy and malleostapedotomy. However, surgery for congenital anomalies of the oval window has rarely been described, usually in very small series of patients. We describe two cases of congenital anomalies of the oval window with aberrant facial nerve courses. One was a 40-year-old male diagnosed with unilateral congenital oval window atresia; the other was a 10-year-old male diagnosed with bilateral congenital oval window atresia. We also describe the clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes of malleostapedotomy for congenital anomalies of the oval window with aberrant facial nerve courses. PMID:24653925

  18. Esophageal trichomoniasis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, D H; Bickford, A A; Charlton, B R; Cooper, G L

    1995-01-01

    Esophageal trichomoniasis has been rarely reported in chickens. At the California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System-Turlock Branch, this disease was recently diagnosed in two cases submitted from backyard chicken flocks. The esophageal lesions observed were similar to those seen in several other important diseases of chickens. The causative trichomonad organisms were readily demonstrated on wet smears and by histologic studies. In both cases, the investigated flocks were afflicted with several concurrent diseases. California has experienced an increase in the number of small nontraditional chicken production operations. These facilities are sometimes in close proximity to commercial poultry operations and biosecurity barriers occasionally fail. The poor husbandry practices often used in these small flocks make them a potential reservoir for rare diseases such as trichomoniasis and also for disease organisms that are devastating to commercial poultry. PMID:8719231

  19. Robotic approach to vaginal atresia repair in an adolescent girl

    PubMed Central

    Pushkar, Praveen; Rawat, Suresh Kumar; Chowdhary, Sujit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl presented to us, after failed perineal approach for vaginal atresia, with abdominal pain. She was thoroughly evaluated and contrast enhanced computed tomographic was done, which revealed absence of lower 1/3rd of vagina with normal uterus, fallopian tubes and ovaries. There was no associated anomaly. She was successfully managed by a combined robotic and perineal approach. Follow-up after 6 and 12 months revealed large capacious vagina with healthy mucocutaneous junction. PMID:26229336

  20. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  1. False Computed Tomography Findings in Bilateral Choanal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Elsheikh, Ezzeddin; El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Choanal atresia (CA) is a challenging surgical problem defined as a failure in the development of communication between the nasal cavity and nasopharynx. Objective The objective of this study is to describe computed tomography (CT) findings in cases with bilateral choanal atresia. Methods The study involved performing axial and coronal non-contrast CT scanning with 2–3 mm sections on14 neonates that had bilateral CA. We used fiberoptic nasal endoscopy to confirm the diagnosis. We evaluated coronal CT to study the skull base area in such neonates. Results This study included 14 neonates with bilateral CA; with mean age of 7 ± 3.5 days. Mixed atretic plates were found in 12 (85.7%) cases while two (14.3%) had pure bony atresia. Isolated CA was detected in 9 cases (64.3%) and 5 (35.7%) cases had associated anomalies. Coronal CT showed soft tissue density in the nasal cavity that appeared to extend through an apparent defect in the nasal roof (cribriform plate), falsely diagnosed by radiologists as associated encephalocele. At the time of surgical repair, all patients showed thick tenacious mucous secretions in both nasal cavities and revealed no encephalocele. Nasal roof remained intact in all cases. Conclusion The thick secretion of bilateral CA could give a false encephalocele appearance on the CT. It is highly recommended to perform proper suction of the nasal cavity of suspected CA cases just before CT scanning. PMID:27096022

  2. False Computed Tomography Findings in Bilateral Choanal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Elsheikh, Ezzeddin; El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Choanal atresia (CA) is a challenging surgical problem defined as a failure in the development of communication between the nasal cavity and nasopharynx. Objective The objective of this study is to describe computed tomography (CT) findings in cases with bilateral choanal atresia. Methods The study involved performing axial and coronal non-contrast CT scanning with 2-3 mm sections on14 neonates that had bilateral CA. We used fiberoptic nasal endoscopy to confirm the diagnosis. We evaluated coronal CT to study the skull base area in such neonates. Results This study included 14 neonates with bilateral CA; with mean age of 7 ± 3.5 days. Mixed atretic plates were found in 12 (85.7%) cases while two (14.3%) had pure bony atresia. Isolated CA was detected in 9 cases (64.3%) and 5 (35.7%) cases had associated anomalies. Coronal CT showed soft tissue density in the nasal cavity that appeared to extend through an apparent defect in the nasal roof (cribriform plate), falsely diagnosed by radiologists as associated encephalocele. At the time of surgical repair, all patients showed thick tenacious mucous secretions in both nasal cavities and revealed no encephalocele. Nasal roof remained intact in all cases. Conclusion The thick secretion of bilateral CA could give a false encephalocele appearance on the CT. It is highly recommended to perform proper suction of the nasal cavity of suspected CA cases just before CT scanning. PMID:27096022

  3. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: an "emerging disease"].

    PubMed

    Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Hervieu, Valérie; Scoazec, Jean-Yves

    2007-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a recently identified disease. The histological examination of esophageal biopsies is essential for its diagnosis, which is made with steadily increasing frequency. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an anatomoclinical entity, involving both children and adults, characterized by a dense and isolated infiltration of the esophageal mucosa by eosinophils, revealed by clinical symptoms of upper digestive tract origin and resistant to anti-acid treatment with IPP at high doses. Eosinophilic esophagitis is currently interpreted as an allergic disease, even though its pathogenesis remains unclear. The disease has a chronic course with persistent or relapsing symptoms, present with symptoms similar to those of gastro-esophageal reflux or with dysphagia. Endoscopic examination shows the presence of characteristic, but not pathognomonic, lesions (stenoses, strictures, circular rings, reduction of calibre, white specks, granularity of the mucosa). The histological diagnosis requires multiple biopsies taken all along the esophagus. The main sign is the presence of a dense eosinophilic infiltrate of the mucosa: a peak density of more than 15 eosinophils in at least one x400 field is the minimal criteria required for diagnosis. Associated lesions correspond to tissue damage and repair secondary to eosinophil activation (basal hyperplasia, microabscesses, fibrosis of the lamina propria). The treatment is based on dietary measures (allergen exclusion) and on the use of anti-inflammatory drugs, mainly corticoids. In conclusion, eosinophilic esophagitis is an emerging disease, important to identify, since it requires a specific treatment, different from that of reflux esophagitis. PMID:18554551

  4. Esophageal Manifestations of Multisystem Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mapp, Esmond

    1980-01-01

    The esophagus may be involved directly or indirectly by numerous disease conditions. On occasion, the esophageal process may be the key to the diagnosis. In some situations, the esophageal manifestation of a disease may be more immediately life-threatening than the primary process. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7310903

  5. [Endoscopic Therapy for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment for esophageal neoplasms includes endoscopic resection, argon plasma coagulation(APC), photodynamic therapy( PDT) and stent placement. Endoscopic resection is widely used as an effective, less invasive treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma in Japan. APC is considered to be safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma which cannot be resected endoscopically because of severe comorbidities, as well as for local recurrence after endoscopic resection or chemoradiotherapy. PDT is thought to be an effective option as salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy. Stent placement mainly using self-expanding metallic stents have been used as a minimally invasive and effective modality for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. Endoscopic treatment is expected to have more important role in the treatment of esophageal neoplasms in the future. PMID:27440040

  6. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Biology to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, a recently recognized and growing clinical disorder over the past decade, is characterized by antigen-driven eosinophil accumulation in the esophagus. Symptoms frequently mimic those of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) but the two diseases are quite distinct in terms of their histopathology, genetic signature, response to therapy, hereditary risk and association with allergy. Disease pathogenesis involves the interplay of external and genetic factors, particularly food antigens and the eosinophil chemoattractant eotaxin-3, respectively. Transcript signatures and animal models have uncovered the importance of adaptive T cell immunity involving IL-5 and IL-13 elicited esophageal epithelial cell responses. Notably, symptoms, dysregulated esophageal gene expression and pathology are largely reversible following reduction of specific food antigen exposure, as well as anti-inflammatory therapy, but chronic treatment is necessary to prevent relapse. As such, eosinophilic esophagitis is a disease with the unique features of chronic esophagitis, atopy, immune sensitization to oral antigens, reversibility and familial association. PMID:19596009

  7. Choanal atresia as a feature of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting (EEC) syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, J; McDougall, P N; Sheffield, L J

    1989-01-01

    We report here a father and daughter with digital abnormalities, nasolacrimal duct obstruction, and variable alopecia. The father had a cleft lip and palate and the daughter had choanal atresia. We propose they both have the EEC syndrome and show the variable expressivity of this disorder. Choanal atresia has not been previously reported in this condition. Images PMID:2553970

  8. Esophageal impacted dentures.

    PubMed Central

    Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G.; Onakoya, Paul A.; Sogebi, Olusola A.; Kokong, Daniel D.; Dosumu, Oluwole O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to highlight the problems associated with impacted acrylic dentures and proffers advice to check them. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of all cases of impacted acrylic dentures over a 16-year period. RESULTS: Twenty-two adults had impacted esophageal acrylic dentures of which 16 (72.7%) and six (27.3%) were males and females, respectively (M:F ratio = 2.7:1) with age range 23-77 years. Fourteen patients (63.6%) had worn their dentures for more than 10 years without check-up, and 54.5% presented within 48 hours of impaction. The common symptoms in all the patients were difficulty with swallowing, throat pain and discomfort, followed by tenderness in the neck in 15 (68.2%). Dentures were extracted through esophagoscopy (17 cases) and cervical (three cases) esophagotomy, respectively. Observed complications included pulmonary edema in one and esophageal perforation in five patients. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic extraction of dentures carries a high risk of perforation. Extraction of an impacted denture via esophagoscopy can be undertaken under direct vision and in an ideal situation with judicious use of the Shears forceps. In the absence of these, the safest option is an esophagotomy. Proper treatment planning in the fabrication of dentures with incorporation of radiopaque materials in the dental resins and adequate postdenture delivery instructions are necessary as preventive measures. PMID:15540888

  9. Esophageal Lipoma: A Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jeremy; Tejerina, Manfred; Hallowell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal lipomas are rare tumors, making up 0.4% of all digestive tract benign neoplasms. Most of these lesions are clinically silent as a result of their small size, however, the majority of lesions over 4 cm have been reported to cause dysphagia, regurgitation and/or epigastralgia. We report a case of a 53 year-old African American female who presented with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the chest and esophagram confirmed esophageal lipoma as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Accurately diagnosing an esophageal lipoma is crucial in order to rule out potential malignant lesions, relieve patient symptoms and plan the appropriate treatment. PMID:23365708

  10. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  11. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  12. Outcome of pregnancies in patients with complex pulmonary atresia.

    PubMed Central

    Neumayer, U.; Somerville, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of pregnancies in patients with complex pulmonary atresia, comparing those with and without previous radical surgical repair. DESIGN: A retrospective study of all pregnancies in women with complex pulmonary atresia registered on the Grown-up Congenital Heart Unit database between 1977 and 1994. SETTING: Referral centre for adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease. PATIENTS: Forty one pregnancies occurred in 15 patients. They were divided into two groups; group I, 26 pregnancies in nine patients before radical repair (cyanotic); group II, 15 pregnancies in seven women after radical surgical repair. RESULTS: In group I there were three terminations, 13 miscarriages, eight healthy children, and two neonatal deaths. Five children were born prematurely and all had low birthweights. In group II there were two miscarriages, 11 normal children, and two children with congenital heart disease. None was premature and all had normal birthweights. There were major complications in both groups: in group I there were two thromboembolic complications and one episode of heart failure; in group II there was one pulmonary embolism and one arrhythmic complication, five pregnancies in three patients were complicated by left ventricular failure that was persistent in one case and progressive in another, leading to death 13 months after delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with complex pulmonary atresia, with or without surgical repair, who have no or mild symptoms, can have successful pregnancies. Surgical repair decreases fetal complications significantly. In both groups thrombotic disorders and heart failure must be prevented. Patients with residual systemic-pulmonary collaterals after surgical repair are particularly at risk of left ventricular failure. PMID:9290396

  13. Aetiology of biliary atresia: what is actually known?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease of unknown etiology and unpredictable outcome, even when there has been timely diagnosis and exemplary surgery. It has been the commonest indication for liver transplantation during childhood for the past 20 years. Hence much clinical and basic research has been directed at elucidating the origin and pathology of BA. This review summarizes the current clinical variations of BA in humans, its occasional appearance in animals and its various manifestations in the laboratory as an experimental model. PMID:23987231

  14. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  15. Absent upper blind Pouch in a case of tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Harjai, Man Mohan; Badal, Sachendra; Khanna, Sangeeta; Singh, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A common upper airway and digestive tract is a rare congenital anomaly that is usually fatal and its exact incidence is not known. It is a diagnostic challenge as it requires high index of suspicion. It should be considered in a neonate with respiratory distress in a non-vigorous baby requiring endotracheal intubation, which is difficult even in expert hand. We present a newborn with suspected tracheo-esophageal fistula that was diagnosed intraoperatively to have absent upper blind pouch of the esophagus and on autopsy found to have laryngeal atresia with absent vocal cords and a common aerodigestive tract continuing distally with trachea. The neonate was ventilated with endotracheal tube (ETT) placement which in retrospect we came to know that it was in the esophagus. The neonate also had associated multiple congenital anomalies of VACTERL association. The importance of teamwork between neonatologist, pediatric surgeon, anesthesiologist, and radiologist is highlighted for diagnosis and management of such rare cases. PMID:25552830

  16. Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking maté, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  17. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  19. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future. PMID:26890720

  20. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:25216909

  1. Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease (EGID) can be classified as eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) when the eosinophilia is limited to the esophagus or as eosinophilic gastritis (EG) if it is limited to the gastric tract, eosinophilic colitis (EC) if it is limited to the colon, and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) if the eosinophilia involves one or more parts of the gastrointestinal tract. EoE is by far the most common EGID. It is a well-defined chronic atopic disease due to a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammation triggered often by food allergens. EoE diagnosis is done if an esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf). Globally accepted long-term therapies for EoE are the use of swallowed inhaled steroids or food antigen avoidance. The treatment of EoE is done not only to control symptoms but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EGE cause non-specific gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and are diagnosed if esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)/colonoscopy show eosinophilia in one or more parts of the GI tract. They are rare diseases with an unclear pathogenesis, and they are poorly defined in terms of diagnostic criteria and treatment. Before initiating treatment of any EGE, it is imperative to conduct a differential diagnosis to exclude other causes of hypereosinophilia with GI localization. EGE are often poorly responsive to therapy and there is no commonly accepted long-term treatment. EG has many characteristics similar to EoE, including the fact that it is often due to a food allergen-driven Th2 inflammation; transcriptome analysis however shows that it is more a systemic disease and has a different gene signature than EoE. EC is a benign form of delayed food allergy in infant and is instead a difficult-to-treat severe inflammatory condition in older children and adults. EC in the latter groups can be a manifestation of drug allergy or autoimmune disease. Overall EGE, EC, and EG are rare and

  2. Pathogenesis of biliary atresia: defining biology to understand clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Akihiro; Miethke, Alexander; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a severe cholangiopathy of early infancy that destroys extrahepatic bile ducts and disrupts bile flow. With a poorly defined disease pathogenesis, treatment consists of the surgical removal of duct remnants followed by hepatoportoenterostomy. Although this approach can improve the short-term outcome, the liver disease progresses to end-stage cirrhosis in most children. Further improvement in outcome will require a greater understanding of the mechanisms of biliary injury and fibrosis. Here, we review progress in the field, which has been fuelled by collaborative studies in larger patient cohorts and the development of cell culture and animal model systems to directly test hypotheses. Advances include the identification of phenotypic subgroups and stages of disease based on clinical, pathological and molecular features. Stronger evidence exists for viruses, toxins and gene sequence variations in the aetiology of biliary atresia, triggering a proinflammatory response that injures the duct epithelium and produces a rapidly progressive cholangiopathy. The immune response also activates the expression of type 2 cytokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production by nonparenchymal cells. These advances provide insight into phenotype variability and might be relevant to the design of personalized trials to block progression of liver disease. PMID:26008129

  3. Vibrant soundbridge in aural atresia: does severity matter?

    PubMed

    McKinnon, B J; Dumon, T; Hagen, R; Lesinskas, E; Mlynski, R; Profant, M; Spindel, J; Van Beek-King, J; Zernotti, M

    2014-07-01

    Congenital aural atresia (CAA) poses significant challenges to surgical remediation. Both bone anchored hearing aids (BAHA) and the Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) have been considered as alternatives or adjuncts to conventional atresiaplasty. A consensus statement on VSB implantation in children and adolescents recommended against implantation when the Jahrsdoerfer score was less than 8. More recent publications suggest that patients with Jahrsdoerfer scores between three and seven may benefit from VSB implantation. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the outcomes of VSB implantation in CAA. The study was a multi-center, retrospective review. A retrospective review of data (patient's demographic, clinical, implant and audiological information) from four collaborating centers that have performed VSB implantation in CAA was performed. Outcomes based on severity of the atresia using the Jahrsdoerfer and Yellon-Branstetter scoring systems were also evaluated. Data from 28 patients from the four centers revealed no iatrogenic facial nerve injuries or change in bone thresholds. Post-operative speech threshold and speech recognition was, respectively, 39 dB and 94%. Jahrsdoerfer and Yellon scores ranged from 4 to 9 and 4 to 12, respectively. The scores did not correlate to or predict outcomes. Three individual elements of the scores did correlate to initial, but not long-term outcomes. Atresiaplasty and BAHA in the management of CAA are not complete solutions. VSB may offer an alternative in these surgically complex patients for achieving amplification, though better metrics for patient selection need to be developed. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE : IV. PMID:24030853

  4. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  5. Constitution and in vivo test of micro-porous tubular scaffold for esophageal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Jin, Jiachang; Lv, Jingjing; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Yabin; Liu, Xingyu

    2015-11-01

    Current clinical techniques in treating long-gap esophageal defects often lead to complications and high morbidity. Aiming at long-gap synthetic esophageal substitute, we had synthesized a biodegradable copolymer, poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLLC), with low glass transition temperature. In this work, we developed a tubular PLLC porous scaffold using a self-designed tubular mold and thermal induced phase separation (TIPS) method. In order to enhance the interaction between tissue and scaffold, fibrin, a natural fibrous protein derived from blood fibrinogen, was coated on the scaffold circumferential surface. The fibrin density was measured to be 1.23 ± 0.04 mg/cm(2). Primary epithelial cell culture demonstrated the improved in vitro biocompatibility. In animal study with partial scaffold implantation, in situ mucosa regeneration was observed along the degradation of the scaffold. These indicate that fibrin incorporated PLLC scaffold can greatly improve epithelial regeneration in esophagus repair, therefore serve as a good candidate for long-term evaluation of post-implantation at excision site. PMID:26208515

  6. Hepatic portocholecystostomy for biliary atresia: a 25-year follow-up and review.

    PubMed

    Schecter, Samuel C; Courtier, Jesse; Cho, Soo-Jin; Saadai, Payam; Hirose, Shinjiro; Mackenzie, Tippi C; Miniati, Doug

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful salvage of a patient's native liver 25 years after hepatic portocholecystostomy for biliary atresia. Our case demonstrates the effectiveness of biliary specific, high-resolution CT imaging in the diagnosis of, and operative planning for complex cases of biliary obstruction. We also report the longest-term pathologic follow-up of biliary atresia after hepatic portocholecystostomy. Life-long follow-up of patients with biliary atresia is important to prevent life-threatening complications of biliary stasis/obstruction. PMID:23331828

  7. Congenital bilateral adult choanal atresia undiagnosed until the second decade: How we did it

    PubMed Central

    Lokesh, P.; Panda, Naresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bilateral congenital choanal atresia that presents in adulthood is rare. There are only eight reported cases in the literature. Method: We present a ninth case of adult bilateral choanal atresia diagnosed at the age of 20 years. Can a bilateral choanal atresia present so late in life when such a condition is considered incompatible with life? Results and conclusion: Clinical details, diagnosis, and surgical steps with a clear depiction of photographs and comparison with all other previously reported cases, which can help novel otolaryngologists in their clinical practice are discussed.

  8. Intestinal atresia occurring in association with placental fetal thrombotic vasculopathy: a case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Lian, Derrick W Q; Lam, Joyce C M; Aung, Aye Chan Lwin; Li, Faye X; Chang, Kenneth T E

    2013-01-01

    Fetal thrombotic vasculopathy (FTV) is a thrombo-occlusive disorder of the placenta that has been reported in association with perinatal conditions such as cardiac abnormalities, neurological injury, and perinatal liver disease. These complications are related to fetal circulation vascular compromise. We herein report a previously undocumented association of congenital intestinal atresia and placental FTV. Vascular occlusion of the fetal mesenteric vessels has been hypothesized to result in congenital intestinal atresia. Our report provides support for this vascular hypothesis and illustrates the value of formal pathological examination of the placenta in explaining this occurrence of congenital intestinal atresia. PMID:22989172

  9. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Adolescent Patients Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as ( ... children may have vomiting and abdominal pain, and adolescents may complain of the feeling of food getting ...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  12. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  13. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  14. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai-yan; Ma, Xiu-mei; Ye, Ming; Hou, Yan-li; Xie, Hua-Ying; Bai, Yong-rui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (0–3 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ≤70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose >100 Gy (biologically effective dose−10), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. PMID:24914102

  15. Prevention and Treatment of Esophageal Stenosis after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Lu, Zhongsheng; Liu, Qingsen

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:25386186

  16. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  17. Management of congenital choanal atresia (CCA) after multiple failures: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Asma, A; Roslenda, A R; Suraya, A; Saraiza, A B; Aini, A A

    2013-01-01

    Nasal obstruction in neonates is a potentially fatal condition because neonates are obligatory nasal breathers. Bilateral choanal atresia is therefore a neonatal emergency. Several approaches for corrections of choanal atresia are available including the helium laser: YAG. A 5-year-old Chinese girl born with bilateral choanal atresia, had birth asphyxia that required intubation. She underwent multiple surgeries for correction of choanal atresia at other hospitals but failed to improve. She was referred to Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC) after presenting with intermittent respiratory distress and cyanosis following an upper respiratory tract infection. A repeat computed tomography (CT) scan done preoperatively showed complete bony stenosis over the left choana and finding was confirmed by examination under general anesthesia. She underwent endoscopic transnasal removal of left bony atretic plate. There was no intra or postoperative complications. During follow up 10 years later, the airway on both sides remains patent. PMID:23466775

  18. Distal ureteral atresia with ureteropelvic junction obstruction in a female child: a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuiqing; Xu, Ran; Zhu, Xuan; Zhao, Xiaokun

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes a distal ureteral atresia along with ureteropelvic junction obstruction which occurred in a 19-month-old female child. It is easily to be misdiagnosed as mere ureteropelvic junction obstruction and omitted the combined diagnosis of distal ureteral atresia. Dismembered pyeloplasty was done in local hospital after admission, however with the result of recurrent fever when clamp the left nephrostomy tube and Antegrade urography demonstrated distal ureteral atresia. After two months, boari flap reconstruction was performed for the patient in the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, and the child had good rehabilitation in the end. To our knowledge, this is the first case report on distal ureteral atresia associated with ureteropelvic junction obstruction. PMID:25785157

  19. Familial Apple Peel Jejunal Atresia with Helical Umbilical Cord Ulcerations in Three Consecutive Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Jaiman, Sunil; Gundabattula, Sirisha Rao; Ratha, Chinmayee

    2016-01-01

    Apple peel deformity is a rare form of upper intestinal atresia of unknown etiology. Umbilical cord ulcers can occur secondary to reflux of gastric juice and bile as a result of the atresia and can cause lethal intrauterine hemorrhage. The authors report 3 instances of congenital apple peel jejunal atresia with helical umbilical cord ulcers afflicting all female offspring in consecutive pregnancies in a single nonconsanguineous family. There was no hemorrhage from the cord ulcers, but all 3 pregnancies resulted in perinatal death. Although familial occurrence is known, our case series is probably the 1st from the Indian subcontinent and warrants further research into the genetic mechanisms and possible ethnic differences of congenital upper intestinal atresia. The causation of sudden fetal demise in the absence of antecedent cord hemorrhage remains elusive. PMID:26213797

  20. Trilogy of foregut, midgut and hindgut atresias presenting in reverse order

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramnik V; Jackson, Paul; De Coppi, Paolo; Pierro, Agostino

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of triple gut atresias (foregut, midgut and hindgut) with multiple congenital anomalies presenting as imperforate anus. Abdominal radiography showed the double bubble sign. Upper gastrointestinal study through a nasogastric tube confirmed duodenal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy, duodeno-duodenostomy for duodenal atresia and a left descending colostomy for anorectal malformation were performed. During extubation, the nasogastric tube came out and could not be reinserted by the anaesthetic team under laryngoscopic guidance. A chest radiograph showed the tube curled in the upper pouch. Bronchoscopy and oesophagoscopy confirmed oesophageal atresia (OA) with a distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TOF). The patient underwent right-sided extrapleural thoracotomy and division of the fistula with primary repair of OA uneventfully. Triple gut atresias presenting in reverse order with multiple anomalies is rare and passage of a nasogastric tube into the stomach in the presence of OA+TOF is exceptional. Alimentary tract obstruction should be corrected in proximal to distal direction. PMID:24835810

  1. Outcomes of esophageal surgery, especially of the lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; Siboni, Stefano; Saino, Greta I; Cavadas, Demetrio; Braghetto, Italo; Csendes, Attila; Korn, Owen; Figueredo, Edgar J; Swanstrom, Lee L; Wassenaar, Eelco

    2013-10-01

    This paper includes commentaries on outcomes of esophageal surgery, including the mechanisms by which fundoduplication improves lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure; the efficacy of the Linx™ management system in improving LES function; the utility of radiologic characterization of antireflux valves following surgery; the correlation between endoscopic findings and reported symptoms following antireflux surgery; the links between laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and decreased LES pressure, endoscopic esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the less favorable outcomes following fundoduplication among obese patients; the application of bioprosthetic meshes to reinforce hiatal repair and decrease the incidence of paraesophageal hernia; the efficacy of endoluminal antireflux procedures, and the limited efficacy of revisional antireflux operations, underscoring the importance of good primary surgery and diligent work-up to prevent the necessity of revisional procedures. PMID:24117632

  2. Esophageal fistula associated with intracavitary irradiation for esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1986-05-01

    Fifty-three patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation following external irradiation. Ten patients developed esophageal fistula. Perforations were found in the bronchus (four), major vessels (four), pericardium (one), and mediastinum (one). The frequency of fistula occurrence in these patients was not remarkably different from that in 30 other patients treated only with greater than or equal to 50 Gy external irradiation. From the time of the development of esophageal fistula, intracavitary irradiation did not seem to accelerate the development of fistula. The fistulas in our ten patients proved to be associated with tumor, deep ulcer (created before intracavitary irradiation), chemotherapy, infection, and trauma rather than the direct effect of intracavitary irradiation.

  3. The pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  4. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  5. Biventricular Repair of Pulmonary Atresia After Fontan Palliation.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Travis F; Samuel, Bennett P; Hillman, Neal D; Vettukattil, Joseph J; Haw, Marcus P

    2016-04-01

    Fontan palliation is used when biventricular repair (BVR) is not possible. Early outcomes are acceptable; however, the long-term sequelae include protein-losing enteropathy, declining functional status, increased pulmonary vascular resistance, heart failure, and hepatic and renal dysfunction. These adverse events are characteristic of persistent venous hypertension and may be avoided if restoring biventricular circulation is possible. Arrhythmias are a common adverse event, particularly in patients with an atriopulmonary connection, which may lead to acute decompensation and early death. We describe a 30-year-old woman who underwent successful BVR for pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum and demonstrate that where favorable anatomy exists with a failing Fontan, BVR should be considered. PMID:27000578

  6. Fetal lung growth in laryngeal atresia and tracheal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Scurry, J P; Adamson, T M; Cussen, L J

    1989-02-01

    Three cases of airway obstruction in fetuses born at 21, 32 and 40 weeks gestation are reported. The first had laryngeal atresia, cystic dysplastic kidneys, oligohydramnios and immense fluid-filled lungs. The second had upper tracheal agenesis, a tracheo-oesophageal fistula, a cystic dysplastic horseshoe kidney, oligohydramnios and normal-sized lungs. The third had a pin-hole mucosal tract through an otherwise atretic larynx, normal kidneys, no oligohydramnios and normal-sized lungs. Lung weight:body weight ratios, radial alveolar or radial canalicular counts and point-counting of sections of lungs in cases 1 and 2 show that laryngeal or tracheal obstruction may prevent or reduce the pulmonary hypoplasia associated with renal dysplasia, and in cases 2 and 3, that grossly enlarged, hyperplastic lungs may not be seen unless obstruction is complete. PMID:2730470

  7. Accelerating virtual surgery simulation for congenital aural atresia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Zigang; Smouha, Eric; Chen, Dongqing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new efficient implementation for simulation of surgery planning for congenital aural atresia. We first applied a 2-level image segmentation schema to classify the inner ear structures. Based on it, several 3D texture volumes were generated and sent to graphical pipeline on a PC platform. By exploiting the texturingmapping capability on the PC graphics/video board, a 3D image was created with high quality showing the accurate spatial relationships of the complex surgical anatomy of congenitally atretic ears. Furthermore, we exploited the graphics hardware-supported per-fragment function to perform the geometric clipping on 3D volume data to interactively simulate the procedure of surgical operation. The result was very encouraging.

  8. Ovarian Follicular Atresia of Ewes during Spring Puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Vlčková, Radoslava; Sopková, Drahomíra; Pošivák, Ján; Valocký, Igor

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of healthy and atretic follicles on the ovarian surface of improved Valachian ewes 17, 24, and 32 days postpartum is reported in this study. The number of healthy follicles was higher on day 24 postpartum and their mean diameter tended to increase to day 32 (P < 0.05) with the greatest diameter of 5 mm. 78–81% of atretic follicles ≥3 mm in diameter was observed where apoptosis began in the follicular cells situated at the follicular cavity. The early atretic follicles are characterized by the presence of mitotic pictures. In one ewe 24 days postpartum, small regressive follicular cysts were observed. Contracting atresia is characterized by thickening of the theca interna even to 190 μm. Progesterone and oestradiol-17β concentrations were maintained at relatively low levels, but with no significant difference between the days postpartum. PMID:22567543

  9. Spontaneous intramural esophageal dissection: an unusual onset of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sanz, Gemma; Rodríguez Alonso, Lorena; Romero Martínez, Natalia M

    2016-03-01

    A 35-year-old man, with a history of rhinitis, eczema and a dubious achalasia was admitted due to chest pain and sialorrhea. Upper endoscopy showed a little hole and a narrowing of the distal esophagus. A CT-scan with oral contrast exposed a discontinuity of the lumen of the middle third of the esophagus and a dissection of submucosal space 16 cm long. The patient recovered after parenteral nutrition. After four months, an esophageal endoscopic showed transient whitish exudates, longitudinal furrows and esophageal lacerations. The biopsies illustrated significant eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophilic microabscesses and basal cell hyperplasia. PMID:26949147

  10. The extended Kasai portoenterostomy for biliary atresia: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Priya; Safwan, Mohamed; Srinivas, Sankaranarayanan; Shanmugam, Naresh; Vij, Mukul; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In 1955, Professor Morio Kasai first performed a hepatic portoenterostomy. Since then, the procedure has changed the lives of children with biliary atresia (BA). We report our initial experience in performing “extended” Kasai portoenterostomy (KPE), a modification of the original procedure. Materials and Methods: Since 2013, we have used the technique of “extended KPE” and prospectively recorded data on all children undergoing this operation. Data on demographics, clinical features, liver function tests, and perioperative cholangiogram findings were collected. Outcome of KPE was measured by Jaundice Disappearance Rate (JDR) and Native Liver Survival Rate (NLSR). We present our preliminary results from a 30-month period (February 2013 to May 2015). Results: Thirty-one children underwent KPE during this period (19 males) and only 1 child had biliary atresia splenic malformation (BASM). The mean age at KPE was 73 ± 24 days. Five (16.1%) children were more than 90 days old at the time of KPE. Fourteen children cleared jaundice (JDR 45.2%). Eleven (35.5%) children developed episodes of cholangitis, of whom 8 had early cholangitis (within 3 months of the operation). The proportion of children who survived with their own liver 6 months after KPE (NLSR) was 84.2%. Of those children older than 90 days, 2 cleared jaundice and have survived with their native livers for more than 16 months. Conclusion: In our preliminary report of 31 children, we conclude that the extended KPE leads to increased jaundice clearance and improved NLSR in children with BA. PMID:27046977

  11. Glycomic analyses of ovarian follicles during development and atresia

    PubMed Central

    Hatzirodos, Nicholas; Nigro, Julie; Irving-Rodgers, Helen F.; Vashi, Aditya V.; Hummitzsch, Katja; Caterson, Bruce; Sullivan, Thomas R.; Rodgers, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    To examine the detailed composition of glycosaminoglycans during bovine ovarian follicular development and atresia, the specialized stromal theca layers were separated from the stratified epithelial granulosa cells of healthy (n = 6) and atretic (n = 6) follicles in each of three size ranges: small (3–5 mm), medium (6-9 mm) and large (10 mm or more) (n = 29 animals). Fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis analyses (on a per cell basis) and immunohistochemistry (n = 14) were undertaken. We identified the major disaccharides in thecal layers and the membrana granulosa as chondroitin sulfate-derived ∆uronic acid with 4-sulfated N-acetylgalactosamine and ∆uronic acid with 6-sulfated N-acetylgalactosamine and the heparan sulfate-derived Δuronic acid with N-acetlyglucosamine, with elevated levels in the thecal layers. Increasing follicle size and atresia was associated with increased levels of some disaccharides. We concluded that versican contains 4-sulfated N-acetylgalactosamine and it is the predominant 4-sulfated N-acetylgalactosamine proteoglycan in antral follicles. At least one other non- or 6-sulfated N-acetylgalactosamine proteoglycan(s), which is not decorin or an inter-α-trypsin inhibitor family member, is present in bovine antral follicles and associated with hitherto unknown groups of cells around some larger blood vessels. These areas stained positively for chondroitin/dermatan sulfate epitopes [antibodies 7D4, 3C5, and 4C3], similar to stem cell niches observed in other tissues. The sulfation pattern of heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans appears uniform across follicles of different sizes and in healthy and atretic follicles. The heparan sulfate products detected in the follicles are likely to be associated with perlecan, collagen XVIII or betaglycan. PMID:22057033

  12. A Treatment Option for Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Tyberg, Amy; Jodorkovsky, Daniela

    2014-04-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare condition often presenting with esophageal strictures. Treatment is often limited to endoscopic dilatation and treatment of the underlying esophageal pathology. We present a case of a patient with longstanding GERD on famotidine (she experienced anaphylaxis with proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]) who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. Work-up revealed a diagnosis of EIPD with a 5-mm mid-esophageal stricture. Therapy with dilatation was unsuccessful until the addition of sucralfate, after which dilatation was successful and symptoms resolved. In patients who are unable to take PPIs, the addition of sucralfate may enhance the success of dilatations of esophageal strictures and EIPD. PMID:26157852

  13. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  14. Neoadjuvant treatment of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Nicholas P; Villaflor, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    The management of esophageal cancer has been evolving over the past 30 years. In the United States, multimodality treatment combining chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) prior to surgical resection has come to be accepted by many as the standard of care, although debate about its overall effect on survival still exists, and rightfully so. Despite recent improvements in detection and treatment, the overall survival of patients with esophageal cancer remains lower than most solid tumors, which highlights why further advances are so desperately needed. The aim of this article is to provide a complete review of the history of esophageal cancer treatment with the addition of chemotherapy, RT, and more recently, targeted agents to the surgical management of resectable disease. PMID:20698042

  15. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Truskaite, Kotryna

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17–96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  16. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  17. Reslizumab for pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Garry M

    2010-07-01

    Pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis is an inflammatory condition associated with marked eosinophil accumulation in the mucosal tissues of the esophagus. Eosinophils are major proinflammatory cells thought to make a major contribution to allergic diseases that affect the upper and lower airways, skin and GI tract. IL-5 is central to eosinophil maturation and release from the bone marrow, and their subsequent accumulation, activation and persistence in the tissues. Reslizumab (Cinquil, Ception Therapeutics Inc., PA, USA) is a humanized monoclonal antibody with potent IL-5 neutralizing effects that represents a potential treatment for eosinophilic diseases. This article considers the current status of the clinical development of reslizumab for pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:20636000

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Jay A; Chehade, Mirna

    2012-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a clinicopathologic disease that can present with a constellation of upper gastrointestinal symptoms and endoscopic findings in conjunction with significant infiltration of the esophageal tissue with eosinophils. Clinical and histologic resolution of the disease can be seen with dietary restriction therapies and systemic and topical corticosteroids. Because most patients have an atopic background and the disease seems to have an underlying T-helper type 2 pathogenesis, allergists and gastroenterologists need to be familiar with the diagnosis and management of this disease. In this review, clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histologic findings, and available therapy options are discussed. PMID:22244233

  19. miR-26b Promotes Granulosa Cell Apoptosis by Targeting ATM during Follicular Atresia in Porcine Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fei; Li, Ran; Pan, Zeng xiang; Zhou, Bo; Yu, De bing; Wang, Xu guang; Ma, Xue shan; Han, Jing; Shen, Ming; Liu, Hong lin

    2012-01-01

    More than 99% of ovarian follicles undergo atresia in mammals, but the mechanism of follicular atresia remains to be elucidated. In this study, we explored microRNA (miRNA) regulation of follicular atresia in porcine ovary. A miRNA expression profile was constructed for healthy, early atretic, and progressively atretic follicles, and the differentially expressed miRNAs were selected and analyzed. We found that miR-26b, which was upregulated during follicular atresia, increased the number of DNA breaks and promoted granulosa cell apoptosis by targeting the ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene directly in vitro. PMID:22737216

  20. Imaging and Clinicopathologic Features of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Abbey J.; Gollub, Marc J.; Shia, Jinru; Antonescu, Christina; Bains, Manjit S.; Levine, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging and clinicopathologic characteristics of esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and to emphasize the features that differentiate esophageal GISTs from esophageal leiomyomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS A pathology database search identified all surgically resected or biopsied esophageal GISTs, esophageal leiomyomas, and esophageal leiomyosarcomas from 1994 to 2012. Esophageal GISTs were included only if imaging studies (including CT, fluoroscopic, or 18F-FDG PET/CT scans) and clinical data were available. RESULTS Nineteen esophageal mesenchymal tumors were identified, including eight esophageal GISTs (42%), 10 esophageal leiomyomas (53%), and one esophageal leiomyosarcoma (5%). Four patients (50%) with esophageal GIST had symptoms, including dysphagia in three (38%), cough in one (13%), and chest pain in one (13%). One esophageal GIST appeared on barium study as a smooth submucosal mass. All esophageal GISTs appeared on CT as well-marginated predominantly distal lesions, isoattenuating to muscle, that moderately enhanced after IV contrast agent administration. Compared with esophageal leiomyomas, esophageal GISTs tended to be more distal, larger, and more heterogeneous and showed greater IV enhancement on CT. All esophageal GISTs showed marked avidity (mean maximum standardized uptake value, 16) on PET scans. All esophageal GISTs were positive for c-KIT (a cell-surface transmembrane tyrosine kinase also known as CD117) and CD34. On histopathology, six esophageal GISTs (75%) were of the spindle pattern and two (25%) were of a mixed spindle and epithelioid pattern. Five esophageal GISTs had exon 11 mutations (with imatinib sensitivity). Clinical outcome correlated with treatment strategy (resection plus adjuvant therapy or resection alone) rather than risk stratification. CONCLUSION Esophageal GISTs are unusual but clinically important mesenchymal neoplasms. Although esophageal GISTs and

  1. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-09

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  2. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  3. Fecundity regulation by atresia in turbot Scophthalmus maximus in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Nissling, A; Thorsen, A; da Silva, F F G

    2016-04-01

    Down-regulation of fecundity through oocyte resorption was assessed in Baltic Sea turbot Scophthalmus maximus at three locations in the period from late vitellogenesis in April to spawning during June to July. The mean ± s.d. total length of the sampled fish was 32.7 ± 3.1 cm and mean ± s.d. age was 6.2 ± 1.5 years. Measurements of atresia were performed using the 'profile method' with the intensity of atresia adjusted according to the 'dissector method' (10.6% adjustment; coefficient of determination was 0.675 between methods). Both prevalence (portion of fish with atresia) and intensity (calculated as the average proportion of atretic cells in fish displaying atresia) of atresia were low in prespawning fish, but high from onset of spawning throughout the spawning period. Atretic oocytes categorized as in early alpha and in late alpha state occurred irrespective of maturity stage from late prespawning individuals up to late spawning fish, showing that oocytes may become atretic throughout the spawning period. Observed prevalence of atresia throughout the spawning period was almost 40% with an intensity of c. 20%. This indicates extensive down-regulation, i.e. considerably lower realized (number of eggs spawned) v. potential fecundity (number of developing oocytes), suggesting significant variability in reproductive potential. The extent of fecundity regulation in relation to fish condition (Fulton's condition factor) is discussed, suggesting an association between levels of atresia and fish condition. PMID:26928526

  4. Treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis by dilation.

    PubMed

    Schoepfer, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) include drugs, diets and esophageal dilation. Esophageal dilation can be performed using either through-the-scope balloons or wire-guided bougies. Dilation can lead to long-lasting symptom improvement in EoE patients presenting with esophageal strictures. Esophageal strictures are most often diagnosed when the 8- to 9-mm outer diameter adult gastroscope cannot be passed any further or only against resistance. A defined esophageal diameter to be targeted by dilation is missing, but the majority of patients have considerable symptomatic improvement when a diameter of 16-18 mm has been reached. A high complication rate, especially regarding esophageal perforations, has been reported in small case series until 2006. Several large series were published in 2007 and later that demonstrated that the complication risk (especially esophageal perforation) was much lower than what was reported in earlier series. The procedure can therefore be regarded as safe when some simple precautions are followed. It is noteworthy that esophageal dilation does not influence the underlying eosinophil-predominant inflammation. Patients should be informed before the procedure that postprocedural retrosternal pain may occur for some days, but that it usually responds well to over-the-counter analgesics such as paracetamol. Dilation-related superficial lacerations of the mucosa should not be regarded and reported as complications, but instead represent a desired effect of the therapy. Patient tolerance and acceptance for esophageal dilation have been reported to be good. PMID:24603396

  5. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  6. ESOPHAGEAL DYSMOTILITY IN CHILDREN WITH EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS. A STUDY USING PROLONGED ESOPHAGEAL MANOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Nurko, Samuel; Rosen, Rachel; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of dysphagia in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is unknown, but may be related to abnormal esophageal motor function. Symptoms rarely occur during stationary esophageal manometry so it has been difficult to establish an association between symptoms and motor events. Aim To evaluate esophageal motor function in children with EoE with the use of stationary manometry and ambulatory prolonged esophageal manometry and pH-metry (PEMP) Methods PEMP was performed in children with EoE, compared with controls and children with GERD. Effective peristalsis was considered when the esophageal contractions had a normal amplitude and propagation. Results expressed as mean ± S.E. Results Seventeen patients with EoE, 13 with GERD and 11 controls were studied. Values are expressed as mean ± se. Stationary manometry identified abnormal peristalsis in 41% of children with EoE. During PEMP, children with EoE had an increased number of isolated (16.7 ± 3.8 vs 9.5 ± 1.6 vs 6.5 ± 1.1 ; p< 0.03) and high amplitude contractions (4.1 ± 1.2 vs 1.8 ±0.8 vs 0.1 ± 0.1; p< 0.03), and more % ineffective peristalsis both during fasting (70.5% ± 2.5 vs 57.8% ± 3.0 vs 53.8% ± 1.9; p <0.05) and during meals (68.4 ± 3.4 vs 55.3 ± 2.8 vs 48.1 ± 2.8; p < 0.05) when compared with children with GERD and controls. Thirteen patients with EoE experienced 21 episodes of dysphagia and all correlated with simultaneous abnormal motor function. Conclusions PEMP allowed the detection of ineffective peristalsis in children with EoE. Symptoms observed in children with EoE may be related to esophageal motor dysfunction. PMID:19755968

  7. Immediate primary anastomosis for isolated oesophageal atresia: A single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Uygun, Ibrahim; Zeytun, Hikmet; Otcu, Selcuk

    2015-01-01

    Background: Isolated oesophageal atresia without tracheo-oesophageal fistula represents a major challenge for most paediatric surgeons. Here, we present our experience with six neonates with isolated oesophageal atresia who successfully underwent immediate primary anastomosis using multiple Livaditis circular myotomy. Materials and Methods: All six neonates were gross type A isolated oesophageal atresia (6%), from among 102 neonates with oesophageal atresia, treated between January 2009 and December 2013. Five neonates were female; one was male. The mean birth weight was 2300 (range 1700-3100) g. Results: All six neonates successfully underwent immediate primary anastomosis using multiple myotomies (mean 3; range 2-4) within 10 (median 3) days after birth. The gap under traction ranged from 6 to 7 cm. One neonate died of a major cardiac anomaly. Another neonate was lost to follow-up after being well for 3 months. Three anastomotic strictures were treated with balloon dilatation, and four anastomotic leaks were treated conservatively. The mean duration of follow-up was 33 months. Conclusions: To treat isolated oesophageal atresia, an immediate primary anastomosis can be achieved using multiple myotomies. Although, this approach is associated with high complication rates, as are other similar approaches, these complications can be overcome. PMID:26712295

  8. Long-term respiratory symptoms following oesophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Gatzinsky, Vladimir; Jönsson, Linus; Ekerljung, Linda; Friberg, Lars-Göran; Wennergren, Göran

    2011-01-01

    Background Oesophageal atresia (OA) is a congenital malformation that can lead to persistent respiratory symptoms in adulthood. Aim To describe the prevalence of respiratory symptoms in adulthood in a population-based study of patients with repaired OA and to compare this with the prevalence in the general population. Methods Of 80 patients operated for OA in Gothenburg in 1968–1983, 79 were located. The patients received a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms. Controls were 4979 gender- and age-matched subjects who answered the same questions. Results The questionnaire was answered by 73 of 79 (92%) patients. Physician-diagnosed asthma was reported by 30% in the OA group vs 10% in the control group (OR 4.1; 95% CI 2.4–6.8), and recurrent wheeze in 29% vs 5.5% (OR 6.9; 4.1–11.6). Also wheeze during the last year, asthma medication, a long-standing cough, cough with sputum production and chronic bronchitis were significantly more common among the patients with OA. In contrast, there was no significant difference regarding risk factors for asthma. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms did not appear to decrease with age. Conclusion A high prevalence of respiratory symptoms remains among adult patients with repaired OA. Many of the patients had an asthma diagnosis. However, asthma heredity or allergic rhinitis was not overrepresented. PMID:21418293

  9. Laparoscopic cystojejunostomy for type I cystic biliary atresia in children

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Alice; Hery, Géraldine; Colavolpe, Nathalie; Bevilacqua, Clemence; Guys, Jean-Michel; De Lagausie, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The use of laparoscopy in the treatment of biliary atresia (BA) is still debated. We report our strategy using laparoscopy in type I cystic BA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the records of patients treated for BA from 2002-2013. When the diagnosis was suspected, an ultrasound was performed. If it showed a cyst > 5 mm in the hilum with no patent gallbladder, we performed an initial explorative laparoscopy. In the case of a patent biliary tree above the cyst, a laparoscopic cystojejunostomy was performed. In cases of absent communication (type III), conversion and portoenterostomy were performed. Pre and postoperative data and overall survival rate with the native liver were reviewed. RESULTS: Forty-four children were treated for BA. Six presented with a cystic form diagnosed by US. Three children had type I BA; three had type III BA. No postoperative complications were noted. Median follow-up was 62.2 months (22.7-93.5). One patient died of a cardiac malformation. The five remaining patients are alive with their native liver. Of the 38 treated for noncystic BA, 16 were transplanted. CONCLUSION: We confirmed the prognosis of cystic BA, which is less severe than noncystic BA. Our strategy using laparoscopy allowed for the confirmation and qualification of the type of BA. In type I, complete treatment by laparoscopy has been performed safely. PMID:26622117

  10. The Sea Lamprey as an Etiological Model for Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chu-Yin; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive, inflammatory, and fibrosclerosing cholangiopathy in infants that results in obstruction of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts. It is the most common cause for pediatric liver transplantation. In contrast, the sea lamprey undergoes developmental BA with transient cholestasis and fibrosis during metamorphosis, but emerges as a fecund adult with steatohepatitis and fibrosis in the liver. In this paper, we present new histological evidence and compare the sea lamprey to existing animal models to highlight the advantages and possible limitations of using the sea lamprey to study the etiology and compensatory mechanisms of BA and other liver diseases. Understanding the signaling factors and genetic networks underlying lamprey BA can provide insights into BA etiology and possible targets to prevent biliary degeneration and to clear fibrosis. In addition, information from lamprey BA can be used to develop adjunct treatments for patients awaiting or receiving surgical treatments. Furthermore, the cholestatic adult lamprey has unique adaptive mechanisms that can be used to explore potential treatments for cholestasis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). PMID:26101777

  11. [Human papillomavirus, neonatal giant cell hepatitis and biliary duct atresia].

    PubMed

    Drut, R; Gómez, M A; Drut, R M; Cueto, R E; Lojo, M

    1998-01-01

    We previously recognized the presence of HPV-DNA in cases of idiopathic neonatal giant cell hepatitis (INGCH) and extrahepatic biliary duct atresia (EBDA) in archivated tissue using the PCR technique. In order to investigate a possible vertical transmission we looked for the presence of HPV-DNA in cervical swabs in the mothers along with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded hepatic tissue from 3 infants with INGCH and 4 patients with EBDA by nested-PCR. Cervical smears showed koilocytosis consistent with HPV infection in 2 cases. Delivery was vaginal except for one that was by cesarean section. All infants were males. Amplification of HPV-DNA was demonstrated in all cases, the types being concordant in infants and mothers. Although this is a small group, the findings appear in line with previous data. The presence of the same type of HPV-DNA in the infants' livers and their mothers' cervical swabs is another argument supporting the possibility of vertical transmission of the virus. PMID:9607071

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts in Children with Biliary Atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Huppert, Peter E.; Goffette, Pierre; Sokal, Emil M.; Schweizer, Paul; Claussen, Claus D.

    2002-12-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the technical and long-term clinical results of transjugularintrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) in children with portal hypertension and biliary atresia (BA). Methods: Nine children with BA and recurrent bleeding from esophagogastric and/or intestinal varices were treated by TIPS at the age of 34-156 months and followed-up in two centers. Different types of stents were used. Results: Shunt insertion succeeded in all patients, but in two a second procedure was necessary. Seven procedures lasted more than 3 hr, mainly due to difficult portal vein puncture.Variceal bleeding ceased in all patients; however, 16 reinterventions were performed in eight patients for clinical reasons (n =11) and sonographically suspected restenosis (n =5). Four patients underwent successful liver transplantation 4-51 months after TIPS and five are in good clinical conditions 64-75 months after TIPS. Conclusions: TIPS in children with BA is technically difficult, mainly due to periportal fibrosis and small portal veins. Frequency of reinterventions seems to be higher compared with adults.

  13. Identification of a plant isoflavonoid that causes biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Lorent, Kristin; Gong, Weilong; Koo, Kyung A; Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Karjoo, Sara; Zhao, Xiao; Sealy, Ian; Kettleborough, Ross N; Stemple, Derek L; Windsor, Peter A; Whittaker, Stephen J; Porter, John R; Wells, Rebecca G; Pack, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rapidly progressive and destructive fibrotic disorder of unknown etiology affecting the extrahepatic biliary tree of neonates. Epidemiological studies suggest that an environmental factor, such as a virus or toxin, is the cause of the disease, although none have been definitively established. Several naturally occurring outbreaks of BA in Australian livestock have been associated with the ingestion of unusual plants by pregnant animals during drought conditions. We used a biliary secretion assay in zebrafish to isolate a previously undescribed isoflavonoid, biliatresone, from Dysphania species implicated in a recent BA outbreak. This compound caused selective destruction of the extrahepatic, but not intrahepatic, biliary system of larval zebrafish. A mutation that enhanced biliatresone toxicity mapped to a region of the zebrafish genome that has conserved synteny with an established human BA susceptibility locus. The toxin also caused loss of cilia in neonatal mouse extrahepatic cholangiocytes in culture and disrupted cell polarity and monolayer integrity in cholangiocyte spheroids. Together, these findings provide direct evidence that BA could be initiated by perinatal exposure to an environmental toxin. PMID:25947162

  14. Identification of a plant isoflavonoid that causes biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Lorent, Kristin; Gong, Weilong; Koo, Kyung A.; Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Karjoo, Sara; Zhao, Xiao; Sealy, Ian; Kettleborough, Ross N.; Stemple, Derek L.; Windsor, Peter A.; Whittaker, Stephen J.; Porter, John R.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rapidly progressive and destructive fibrotic disorder of unknown etiology affecting the extrahepatic biliary tree of neonates. Epidemiological studies suggest that an environmental factor, such as a virus or toxin, is the cause of the disease, although none have been definitively established. Several naturally occurring outbreaks of BA in Australian livestock have been associated with the ingestion of unusual plants by pregnant animals during drought conditions. We used a biliary secretion assay in zebrafish to isolate a previously undescribed isoflavonoid, biliatresone, from Dysphania species implicated in a recent BA outbreak. This compound caused selective destruction of the extrahepatic, but not intrahepatic, biliary system of larval zebrafish. A mutation that enhanced biliatresone toxicity mapped to a region of the zebrafish genome that has conserved synteny with an established human BA susceptibility locus. The toxin also caused loss of cilia in neonatal mouse extrahepatic cholangiocytes in culture and disrupted cell polarity and monolayer integrity in cholangiocyte spheroids. Together, these findings provide direct evidence that BA could be initiated by perinatal exposure to an environmental toxin. PMID:25947162

  15. [Esophageal mucocele: report of 2 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Achour-Arifa, N; Tlili-Graiess, K; El Ouni, F; Mrad-Dali, K; Derbel, F; Yacoubi, M T; Gharbi-Jemni, H; Haj Hmida, R B; Jeddi, M

    2002-01-01

    Two cases of esophageal mucocele in pediatric patients are reported: two children of 5 and 9 years respectively underwent surgical isolation of the esophagus and esophagocoloplasty for caustic stenosis related to accidental ingestion of caustic soda. Clinical pattern of mediastinal compression was proved with cervical fistulous tract in one case. In both cases, thoracic computed tomography was a sensitive imaging method to demonstrate the mucocele and its extension. Esophageal mucocele is rarely described in children, especially following esophageal corrosive stricture. PMID:11965151

  16. Adenosine-induced activation of esophageal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Ru, F; Surdenikova, L; Brozmanova, M; Kollarik, M

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies implicate adenosine acting on esophageal nociceptive pathways in the pathogenesis of noncardiac chest pain originating from the esophagus. However, the effect of adenosine on esophageal afferent nerve subtypes is incompletely understood. We addressed the hypothesis that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Whole cell perforated patch-clamp recordings and single-cell RT-PCR analysis were performed on the primary afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus in the guinea pig. Extracellular recordings were made from the isolated innervated esophagus. In patch-clamp studies, adenosine evoked activation (inward current) in a majority of putative nociceptive (capsaicin-sensitive) vagal nodose, vagal jugular, and spinal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating the esophagus. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis indicated that the majority of the putative nociceptive (transient receptor potential V1-positive) neurons innervating the esophagus express the adenosine receptors. The neural crest-derived (spinal DRG and vagal jugular) esophageal nociceptors expressed predominantly the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes-derived vagal nodose nociceptors expressed the adenosine A(1) and/or A(2A) receptors. Consistent with the studies in the cell bodies, adenosine evoked activation (overt action potential discharge) in esophageal nociceptive nerve terminals. Furthermore, the neural crest-derived jugular nociceptors were activated by the selective A(1) receptor agonist CCPA, and the placodes-derived nodose nociceptors were activated by CCPA and/or the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor CGS-21680. In contrast to esophageal nociceptors, adenosine failed to stimulate the vagal esophageal low-threshold (tension) mechanosensors. We conclude that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Our data indicate that the esophageal neural crest-derived nociceptors can be activated via the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an immune-mediated esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Weinbrand-Goichberg, Jenny; Segal, Idit; Ovadia, Adi; Levine, Arie; Dalal, Ilan

    2013-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease defined by esophageal dysfunction, by typical endoscopic findings and by abnormal eosinophilic inflammation within the esophagus. Eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus occurs as a result of esophageal overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including T cells and mast cells, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-13, IL-5 and IL-15, as well as chemoattractants (eotaxin and transforming growth factor-β1, fibroblast growth factor and the newly characterized gene--thymic stromal lymphopoietin, which is a key regulator of allergic sensitization initiation). The role of allergy, particularly food allergy in EoE is indisputable, as elimination diet is a proven commonly used treatment for the disease. However, unlike classical immediate IgE-mediated reaction to allergen, EoE is associated with an altered immune response, characterized by a combination of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. In this review, we aim to discuss the many typical aspects of EoE as opposed to other entities involving the esophagus, with focusing on the aberrant immune-mediated key players contributing to the pathogenesis of this unique disease. PMID:23579771

  18. Corrosive Esophagitis Caused by Ingestion of Picosulfate

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Yong; Kang, Ho Suk; Kim, Seong Eun; Park, Ji Won; Moon, Sung Hoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Park, Choong Kee

    2015-01-01

    Corrosive esophagitis is characterized by caustic injury due to the ingestion of chemical agents, mainly alkaline substances such as detergents. Esophageal bleeding, perforation, or stricture can be worsened by high-degree corrosive esophagitis. Picosulfate is a commonly used laxative frequently administered for bowel preparation before colonoscopy or colon surgery. Picosulfate powder should be completely dissolved in water before ingestion because the powder itself may cause chemical burning of the esophagus and stomach. Here, we report a case of corrosive esophagitis due to the ingestion of picosulfate powder that was not completely dissolved in water. PMID:25674529

  19. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: a rare cause of dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Billot, D; Pernin, M; Pillot, C; Bredin, C; Hoeffler, P; Graffin, B; Rey, P

    2010-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is an unrecognized and emerging entity. Its incidence increases with allergic disorders. A 29-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of intermittent and paroxysmal dysphagia. The triad including allergy, young age, and impaction of foreign bodies, combined with a chronic dysphagia is almost pathognomonic of eosinophilic esophagitis. Endoscopic esophageal features can be diverse, so systematic esophageal biopsies are required. Diagnosis is established with the demonstration of an eosinophilic infiltrate with a cell count exceeding 15 eosinophils per high power field (×400). First line therapy includes swallowed topical corticosteroids and removal of an allergic cause, when it could be identified. PMID:20605659

  20. New techniques in measuring nonacidic esophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Vaezi, M F; Shay, S S

    2001-07-01

    New techniques in esophageal monitoring are allowing for better differentiation in the role of different gastric refluxates in esophageal mucosal damage and patient symptoms. The Bilitec 2001 (Synectics, Stockholm, Sweden) is a portable spectrophotometer that measures bilirubin as a surrogate marker for bile reflux and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) (Sandhill Scientific Inc, Highlands Ranch, CO) is a new technique allowing measurement of esophageal volume refluxate. Both techniques assess the role of nonacidic esophageal reflux. Despite their novel approach in assessing nonacid reflux, both methods have limitations. Future studies in this area, however, will prove beneficial in identifying their role in diagnosis and management of patients with suspected nonacid reflux disease. PMID:11568871

  1. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  2. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Ducassou, D.; Blanquet, P.

    1983-09-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods.

  3. Methoxychlor induces atresia by altering Bcl2 factors and inducing caspase activity in mouse ovarian antral follicles in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S.; Karman, Bethany N.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide widely used in many countries against various species of insects that attack crops and domestic animals. MXC reduces fertility by increasing atresia (death) of antral follicles in vivo. MXC also induces atresia of antral follicles after 96 h in vitro. The current work tested the hypothesis that MXC induces morphological atresia at early time points (24 and 48 h) by altering pro-apoptotic (Bax, Bok, Casp3, and caspase activity) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2 and Bcl-xL) factors in the follicles. The results indicate that at 24 h, MXC increased Bcl-xL and Bax mRNA levels and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl2. At 48–96 h, MXC induced morphological atresia. At 24–96 h, MXC increased caspase activities. These data suggest that MXC may induce atresia by altering Bcl2 factors and inducing caspase activities in antral follicles. PMID:23000595

  4. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Terashima, Kotaro; Matsuki, Takaomi; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  5. Rectal atresia-operative management with endoscopy and transanal approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stenström, Pernilla; Clementson Kockum, Christina; Arnbjörnsson, Einar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the technique and outcome of the management of a newborn child with rectal atresia. A girl born with rectal atresia was diagnosed during physical examination and confirmed with X-ray. The anatomic appearance of the external anus, and lower pelvis was normal. The rectal ending was located 2 cm cranial from the anus and the distance between the rectal endings was 2 cm. A colostomy was established. At the age of five months the child was operated on with a rectal anastomosis using the endoscopic and transanal approach. Closure of the colostomy was performed at the age of ten months. The rectal anastomosis was treated with rectal dilatation weekly in order to avoid stricture. The patient was faecally continent at followup one and three months postoperatively. In conclusion, the endoscopic and transanal approach is an alternative to other surgical techniques in the management of rectal atresia. PMID:22091364

  6. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  7. Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Synchronous Kartagener Syndrome and Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Kendigelen, Pınar; Tütüncü, Ayşe Çiğdem; Erbabacan, Şafak Emre; Kaya, Güner; Altındaş, Fatiş

    2015-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary ciliary dyskinesia accompanied by sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and situs inversus. Synchronous extrahepatic biliary atresia and Kartagener syndrome are very rare. During the preoperative preparation of patients with Kartagener syndrome, special attention is required for the respiratory and cardiovascular system. It is important to provide suitable anaesthetic management to avoid problems because of ciliary dysfunction in the perioperative period. Further, maintaining an effective pain control with regional anaesthetic methods reduces the risk of pulmonary complications. Infants with biliary atresia operated earlier have a higher chance of survival. Hepatic dysfunction and decrease in plasma proteins are important for the kinetics of drugs. In this presentation, the anaesthetic management of patients with synchronous Kartagener syndrome and biliary atresia, both of which are rare diseases, is evaluated. PMID:27366497

  8. Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Synchronous Kartagener Syndrome and Biliary Atresia.

    PubMed

    Kendigelen, Pınar; Tütüncü, Ayşe Çiğdem; Erbabacan, Şafak Emre; Kaya, Güner; Altındaş, Fatiş

    2015-06-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary ciliary dyskinesia accompanied by sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and situs inversus. Synchronous extrahepatic biliary atresia and Kartagener syndrome are very rare. During the preoperative preparation of patients with Kartagener syndrome, special attention is required for the respiratory and cardiovascular system. It is important to provide suitable anaesthetic management to avoid problems because of ciliary dysfunction in the perioperative period. Further, maintaining an effective pain control with regional anaesthetic methods reduces the risk of pulmonary complications. Infants with biliary atresia operated earlier have a higher chance of survival. Hepatic dysfunction and decrease in plasma proteins are important for the kinetics of drugs. In this presentation, the anaesthetic management of patients with synchronous Kartagener syndrome and biliary atresia, both of which are rare diseases, is evaluated. PMID:27366497

  9. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  10. [Surgical treatment of esophageal diverticula].

    PubMed

    Constantinoiu, S; Constantin, A; Predescu, D; Mates, I N; Mocanu, A; Gheorghe, M; Hoară, P; Achim, F; Cociu, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the methods and therapeutic principles of esophageal diverticula pathology. We analyze the main pathological mechanisms which establish the therapeutic attitude linked with a complex pretherapeutic evaluation. In our study we enrolled 12 patients operated between 2001-2009 for esophageal diverticula with different topography. In this period of time there were much more patients diagnosed with this pathology, but the need for surgery was establish very tight regarding the actual practical guide which impose the identification and interception of physiological mechanisms by the surgical procedure. We highlight the particular technical details, as well as the important differences of postoperatory complications according to the topography of the diverticula pouch. PMID:21523958