Science.gov

Sample records for long-term hydrologic monitoring

  1. Combining satellite precipitation and long-term ground observations for hydrological monitoring in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Tang, Qiuhong

    2015-07-01

    Satellite real-time precipitation enables hydrological monitoring in China where the near-real-time ground observations are not readily available. However, the inconsistency between the real-time satellite precipitation and gauge-based retrospective data may introduce large systematic bias in near-real-time hydrological monitoring. Here we attempted to integrate the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) real-time precipitation (3B42RTV7) into a 62 year gauge-based retrospective product, the IGSNRR (Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research) dataset through matching their cumulative probability functions toward a near-real-time hydrological monitoring consistent with the long-term retrospective simulations. A nearly 11 year period from March 2000 to December 2010 was taken as the training period to establish the satellite-gauge precipitation relationship, which was employed in the period of 2011-2013 to evaluate the performance of the adjustment. The results show that the adjusted 3B42RTV7 matches well with IGSNRR precipitation, while the unadjusted data tend to overestimate precipitation. Forced by the adjusted 3B42RTV7, the Variable Infiltration Capacity model can reproduce the IGSNRR-derived hydrographs and high/low flows better than the model forced by the unadjusted data. The percentiles of the adjusted hydrological estimates in the 62 year estimates from IGSNRR are used for near-real-time assessment of hydrological extremes. The hydrological monitoring assisted by the adjusted satellite precipitation, which enables the employment of the long-term ground observations, is able to capture more detailed drought information than that before adjustment. Our experiment suggests that the satellite real-time precipitation, after adjustment, can generate the current hydrological conditions which can be directly compared with the long-term climatology, and thus facilitates near-real-time diagnosis and detection of hydrological extremes.

  2. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2008

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado site, for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 12, and 13, 2008. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and tritium using the conventional and enriched methods

  3. Rio Blanco, Colorado, Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site, for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 13 and 14, 2009. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

  4. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 10 and 11, 2010. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, analyzed the samples. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and for tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

  5. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 11 and 12, 2009. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and for tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

  6. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program, Gnome site, Eddy County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The Gnome site is located in Eddy County, approximately 31 miles southeast of the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. Project Gnome, with a yield of 3.1 kilotons, was detonated December 10, 1961. It was the first nuclear detonation designed specifically for peaceful purposes and the first underground event of the Plowshare Program to take place outside the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program at the Gnome site is to obtain data that will assure the public safety; inform the public, the news media, and the scientific community relative to radiological contamination; and to document compliance with federal, state, and local antipollution requirements. The Gnome site geographical setting, climate, geology, and hydrology are described. Site history, including Gnome event information and pre- and post-Gnome monitoring by the US Public Health Service and the USGS, is described. Site cleanups of 1968 and 1979 are described. Postoperational surveys indicate that the Gnome site is well below the established decontamination criteria and that no hazard exists or will likely occur during public use of the surface of the Gnome site. The Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program for the Gnome site is described.

  7. Gasbuggy, New Mexico Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    This report summarizes an evaluation of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) that has been conducted since 1972 at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico underground nuclear detonation site. The nuclear testing was conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission under the Plowshare program, which is discussed in greater detail in Appendix A. The detonation at Gasbuggy took place in 1967, 4,240 feet below ground surface, and was designed to fracture the host rock of a low-permeability natural gas-bearing formation in an effort to improve gas production. The site has historically been managed under the Nevada Offsites Project. These underground nuclear detonation sites are within the United States but outside of the Nevada Test Site where most of the experimental nuclear detonations conducted by the U.S. Government took place. Gasbuggy is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM ).

  8. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011 at Rulison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 18, 2011. The samples were shipped to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed, with the exception of the determination of tritium concentration by the enrichment method. The laboratory no longer provides that service. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional method. Starting in 2012, DOE will retain a different laboratory that provides the enriched tritium analysis service.

  9. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2012 at Rulison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 8, 2012. The samples were shipped to GEL Laboratories in Charleston, South Carolina, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry; tritium was analyzed using two methods. The conventional tritium method has a detection limit on the order of 400 pCi/L, and a select set of samples was analyzed for tritium using the enriched method, which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L.

  10. Long-term hydrologic monitoring program. Rulison Event Site, Grand Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Hydrologic Program Advisory Group reviewed the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program proposed for the Rulison site at their December 12, 1971, meeting. Samples are collected annually, at about the same dates each year. The hydraulic head, temperature in /sup 0/C, pH, and electrical conductance are recorded at the time of sample collection. Prior to October 1, 1979, each sample was analyzed for gamma emitters and tritium. Gross alpha and beta radioactivity measurements were made on all samples collected. After October 1, 1979, these analyses were discontinued in favor of high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a GeLi detector. For each sample location, samples of raw water and filtered and acidified watar are collected. The raw water samples are analyzed for tritium by the conventional method. Those samples with concentrations that are below the detection level for this method are then analyzed by the enrichment method. Portions of the filtered and acidified samples are analyzed for gamma emitters.

  11. 2015 Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results Report for Project Rulison, Co

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, Rick; Kautsky, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 20–22 and 27, 2015. Several of the land owners were not available to allow access to their respective properties, which created the need for several sample collection trips. This report documents the analytical results of the Rulison monitoring event and includes the trip report and the data validation package (Appendix A). The groundwater and surface water monitoring were shipped to the GEL Group Inc. laboratories for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high- resolution gamma spectrometry. Tritium was analyzed using two methods, the conventional tritium method, which has a detection limit on the order of 400 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), and the enriched method (for selected samples), which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L.

  12. 2015 Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results at Rio Blanco, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, Rick; Kautsky, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 20–21, 2015. This report documents the analytical results of the Rio Blanco annual monitoring event, the trip report, and the data validation package. The groundwater and surface water monitoring samples were shipped to the GEL Group Inc. laboratories for conventional analysis of tritium and analysis of gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry. A subset of water samples collected from wells near the Rio Blanco site was also sent to GEL Group Inc. for enriched tritium analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were collected from a total of four onsite wells, including two that are privately owned. Samples were also collected from two additional private wells at nearby locations and from nine surface water locations. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry, and they were analyzed for tritium using the conventional method with a detection limit on the order of 400 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Four locations (one well and three surface locations) were analyzed using the enriched tritium method, which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L. The enriched locations included the well at the Brennan Windmill and surface locations at CER-1, CER-4, and Fawn Creek 500 feet upstream.

  13. Impacts of ditch blocking on peatland hydrology - the benefits of long-term monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Joseph; Green, Sophie; Baird, Andy; Chapman, Pippa; Evans, Chris; Grayson, Richard

    2016-04-01

    A long-term field trial was conducted on a blanket peatland in North Wales. Twelve ditches were studied. After an initial monitoring period, eight of the ditches had peat dams installed a few metres apart along their entire length (dammed), four of these ditches were also partially infilled through bank reprofiling (reprofiled). Four ditches were left open with no dams or reprofiling (open). These 12 ditches and the surrounding peat were then monitored for a further 4 years. The effect of ditch blocking on local water tables was spatially highly variable but small overall (of the order of 2-3 cm) because the site, despite having ditches, already had relatively shallow water tables (medians within the upper 10 cm of the peat profile). An initial five-fold reduction in discharge occurred in ditches that had been dammed or reprofiled. However, there was evidence of a slow change over time in ditch flow at the site in subsequent years, with the overall volume of water leaving the dammed or reprofiled ditch weirs increasing per unit of rainfall to around twice that which occurred in the first year after the restoration. These changes were not observed in the open ditches. There was therefore clear evidence of the benefits of long-term monitoring as hydrological impacts in the first year after ditch blocking were very different from those in later years as the site conditions gradually changed. The additional water that flowed in later periods of the study from the blocked ditch catchments occurred in the form of a more continuously-flowing baseflow with fewer dry periods. The cause of this increase was related to changes in subsurface flow pathways in the peat in the aftermath of re-wetting. We show that these subsurface pathways mean that even in sloping blanket peatlands, the catchment areas for peatland ditches may be very different from that expressed by surface topography alone. Therefore, peatland studies that have estimated aerially-weighted water or carbon

  14. Long-term monitoring programme of the hydrological variability in the Mediterranean Sea: a first overview of the HYDROCHANGES network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, K.; Millot, C.; Bengara, L.; Ben Ismail, S.; Bensi, M.; Borghini, M.; Budillon, G.; Cardin, V.; Coppola, L.; Curtil, C.; Drago, A.; El Moumni, B.; Font, J.; Fuda, J. L.; García-Lafuente, J.; Gasparini, G. P.; Kontoyiannis, H.; Lefevre, D.; Puig, P.; Raimbault, P.; Rougier, G.; Salat, J.; Sammari, C.; Sánchez Garrido, J. C.; Sanchez-Roman, A.; Sparnocchia, S.; Tamburini, C.; Taupier-Letage, I.; Theocharis, A.; Vargas-Yáñez, M.; Vetrano, A.

    2013-03-01

    The long-term monitoring of basic hydrological parameters (temperature and salinity), collected as time series with adequate temporal resolution (i.e. with a sampling interval allowing the resolution of all important timescales) in key places of the Mediterranean Sea (straits and channels, zones of dense water formation, deep parts of the basins), constitute a priority in the context of global changes. This led CIESM (The Mediterranean Science Commission) to support, since 2002, the HYDROCHANGES programme (http//www.ciesm.org/marine/programs/hydrochanges.htm), a network of autonomous conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensors, deployed on mainly short and easily manageable subsurface moorings, within the core of a certain water mass. The HYDROCHANGES strategy is twofold and develops on different scales. To get information about long-term changes of hydrological characteristics, long time series are needed. But before these series are long enough they allow the detection of links between them at shorter timescales that may provide extremely valuable information about the functioning of the Mediterranean Sea. The aim of this paper is to present the history of the programme and the current set-up of the network (monitored sites, involved groups) as well as to provide for the first time an overview of all the time series collected under the HYDROCHANGES umbrella, discussing the results obtained thanks to the programme.

  15. Contradictory hydrological impacts of afforestation in the humid tropics evidenced by long-term field monitoring and simulation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Guillaume; Ribolzi, Olivier; de Rouw, Anneke; Pierret, Alain; Latsachak, Keoudone; Silvera, Norbert; Pham Dinh, Rinh; Orange, Didier; Janeau, Jean-Louis; Soulileuth, Bounsamai; Robain, Henri; Taccoen, Adrien; Sengphaathith, Phouthamaly; Mouche, Emmanuel; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Tran Duc, Toan; Valentin, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The humid tropics are exposed to an unprecedented modernisation of agriculture involving rapid and mixed land-use changes with contrasted environmental impacts. Afforestation is often mentioned as an unambiguous solution for restoring ecosystem services and enhancing biodiversity. One consequence of afforestation is the alteration of streamflow variability which controls habitats, water resources, and flood risks. We demonstrate that afforestation by tree planting or by natural forest regeneration can induce opposite hydrological changes. An observatory including long-term field measurements of fine-scale land-use mosaics and of hydrometeorological variables has been operating in several headwater catchments in tropical southeast Asia since 2000. The GR2M water balance model, repeatedly calibrated over successive 1-year periods and used in simulation mode with the same year of rainfall input, allowed the hydrological effect of land-use change to be isolated from that of rainfall variability in two of these catchments in Laos and Vietnam. Visual inspection of hydrographs, correlation analyses, and trend detection tests allowed causality between land-use changes and changes in seasonal streamflow to be ascertained. In Laos, the combination of shifting cultivation system (alternation of rice and fallow) and the gradual increase of teak tree plantations replacing fallow led to intricate streamflow patterns: pluri-annual streamflow cycles induced by the shifting system, on top of a gradual streamflow increase over years caused by the spread of the plantations. In Vietnam, the abandonment of continuously cropped areas combined with patches of mix-trees plantations led to the natural re-growth of forest communities followed by a gradual drop in streamflow. Soil infiltrability controlled by surface crusting is the predominant process explaining why two modes of afforestation (natural regeneration vs. planting) led to opposite changes in streamflow regime. Given that

  16. Understanding Biogeochemical and Hydrological Processes in a Reservoir, Kentucky Lake (USA), Using Long-term Monitoring and Real-time Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, S. P.; White, D.; Williamson, M.; Hooks, R.

    2010-12-01

    . Additional real-time monitoring sites will be located in each stream. We presently are evaluating calibration needs, issues, and performance in a continuous-measurement environment. Continuous, high-resolution water quality and meteorological data coupled with the long-term (16-day interval over 22 years) water quality monitoring program will be extremely valuable in helping us understand constituent and hydrological fluxes within Kentucky Lake and the influence of contrasting land-use watersheds in the Tennessee River basin.

  17. LONG TERM HYDROLOGICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (LTHIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    LTHIA is a universal Urban Sprawl analysis tool that is available to all at no charge through the Internet. It estimates impacts on runoff, recharge and nonpoint source pollution resulting from past or proposed land use changes. It gives long-term average annual runoff for a lan...

  18. Hydrological Interpretation of ERT Monitoring Data on active landslides by implementation of numerical modelling at sites of the LAMOND Long-Term Landslide Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Stefan; Ottowitz, David; Supper, Robert; Jochum, Birgit; Riegler, Monika; Scolobig, Anna; Pfeiler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Five landslides are monitored in the framework of the LAMOND Network using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), three of these are located in Austria, one in Italy and one in France. Hydrological interpretation of the collected ERT data is typically carried out qualitatively on a visual basis. In this study, numerical modelling in combination with parameter estimation is implemented to build a basis for an enhanced interpretation. Parameter estimation is carried out by Comsol Multiphysics using Richard's equation and the Optimization module. The result of the forward model (water saturation) is compared to the ERT section (resistivity) using Archies law. The study LAMOND is funded by the Austrian Academy of sciences.

  19. Development of a Long-term Sampling Network to Monitor Restoration Success in the Southwest Coastal Everglades: Vegetation, Hydrology, and Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Thomas J., III

    2004-01-01

    Introduction and History Hurricane Andrew, a Category 5 storm, crossed the southern Florida peninsula on the morning of August 24, 1992 (Fig. 1). Following the storm, the National Park Service conducted an environmental damage assessment to gauge the storm's impacts on the natural resources of south Florida Park Service holdings (Pimm et al., 1994). Although hurricanes have impacted Park Service lands such as the Everglades in the past (Houston and Powell, 2003), no systematic, permanent sampling scheme has been established to monitor long-term recovery (or lack thereof) following disturbance. In October 1992, vegetation monitoring plots were established in heavily damaged areas of mangrove forest on the southwest coast of the Everlgades, along the Lostmans and Broad Rivers (Smith et al., 1994, see Fig. 2). As the permanent plot network was being established, funding was awarded for the South Florida Global Climate Change project (SOFL-GCC). This led to the establishment of a network of hydrological monitoring stations (Anderson and Smith, 2004). Finally, sediment elevation tables (SETs) were installed at many locations. SETs provide the means to measure very small changes (2 mm) in the sediment surface elevation accurately over time (Cahoon et al., 2002). We also set up marker horizons to measure accretion of sediment at each site (Smith and Cahoon, 2003). Sampling sites were located along three transects extending from upstream freshwater wetlands to downstream saltwater wetlands along the Shark, Lostmans and Chatham Rivers in Everglades National Park (Fig. 2). While we were developing our sampling network for basic scientific research needs, concern mounted over the health of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem and in particular over the influence of decreased freshwater flows (Smith et al., 1989). Ecosystem restoration planning was begun, resulting in the multi-agency, $8 billion Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). Our co-located sampling networks

  20. Long-term intracranial pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    de Jong, D A; Maas, A I; den Ouden, A H; de Lange, S A

    Continuous or intermittent measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is important in patients at risk for raised ICP. Indications exist for short- and long-term measurements. The various methods used for short-term monitoring are discussed with their relative advantages and disadvantages. For long-term measurements of ICP use of a completely implantable telemetric epidural pressure transducer is indicated. No such device is commercially available. We have developed an inexpensive passive telemetric transducer for this purpose. Results obtained up till now have demonstrated its reliability for measurements of two to three months duration. The life span of the device is limited by degrading of the epoxy utilized for sealing of the titanium pressure sensing part to the radiolucent ceramic cap of the transducer, causing leakage of water into the transducer and false low measurements. Because of these problems new hermetic sealing techniques were tested. Both active metal brazing and glass bonding yielded good results and hermetic sealing could be obtained. The metal to ceramic bonding presented is generally applicable within the design of implants. Besides the technical progress reported, the experience with clinical use in 12 patients is presented. PMID:6674738

  1. LONG-TERM MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Farrington; John W. Haas; Neal Van Wyck

    2003-10-16

    Long-term monitoring (LTM) associated with subsurface contamination sites is a key element of Long Term Stewardship and Legacy Management across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. However, both within the DOE and elsewhere, LTM is an expensive endeavor, often exceeding the costs of the remediation phase of a clean-up project. The primary contributors to LTM costs are associated with labor. Sample collection, storage, preparation, analysis, and reporting can add a significant financial burden to project expense when extended over many years. Development of unattended, in situ monitoring networks capable of providing quantitative data satisfactory to regulatory concerns has the potential to significantly reduce LTM costs. But survival and dependable operation in a difficult environment is a common obstacle to widespread use across the DOE complex or elsewhere. Deploying almost any sensor in the subsurface for extended periods of time will expose it to chemical and microbial degradation. Over the time-scales required for in situ LTM, even the most advanced sensor systems may be rendered useless. Frequent replacement or servicing (cleaning) of sensors is expensive and labor intensive, offsetting most, if not all, of the cost savings realized with unattended, in situ sensors. To enable facile, remote monitoring of contaminants and other subsurface parameters over prolonged periods, Applied Research Associates, Inc has been working to develop an advanced LTM sensor network consisting of three key elements: (1) an anti-fouling sensor chamber that can accommodate a variety of chemical and physical measurement devices based on electrochemical, optical and other techniques; (2) two rapid, cost effective, and gentle means of emplacing sensor packages either at precise locations directly in the subsurface or in pre-existing monitoring wells; and (3) a web browser-based data acquisition and control system (WebDACS) utilizing field-networked microprocessor-controlled smart

  2. Robotics for Long-Term Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, Sarkis; Duran, Celso

    2002-07-01

    While long-term monitoring and stewardship means many things to many people, DOE has defined it as The physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where DOE has completed or plans to complete cleanup (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, and facility stabilization). Across the United States, there are thousands of contaminated sites with multiple contaminants released from multiple sources where contaminants have transported and commingled. The U.S. government and U.S. industry are responsible for most of the contamination and are landowners of many of these contaminated properties. These sites must be surveyed periodically for various criteria including structural deterioration, water intrusion, integrity of storage containers, atmospheric conditions, and hazardous substance release. The surveys, however, are intrusive, time-consuming, and expensive and expose survey personnel to radioactive contamination. In long-term monitoring, there's a need for an automated system that will gather and report data from sensors without costly human labor. In most cases, a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) unit is used to collect and report data from a remote location. A SCADA unit consists of an embedded computer with data acquisition capabilities. The unit can be configured with various sensors placed in different areas of the site to be monitored. A system of this type is static, i.e., the sensors, once placed, cannot be moved to other locations within the site. For those applications where the number of sampling locations would require too many sensors, or where exact location of future problems is unknown, a mobile sensing platform is an ideal solution. In many facilities that undergo regular inspections, the number of video cameras and air monitors required to eliminate the need for human inspections is very large and far too costly. HCET's remote harsh

  3. Afforestation by natural regeneration or by tree planting: examples of opposite hydrological impacts evidenced by long-term field monitoring in the humid tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, G.; Ribolzi, O.; de Rouw, A.; Pierret, A.; Latsachak, K.; Silvera, N.; Pham Dinh, R.; Orange, D.; Janeau, J.-L.; Soulileuth, B.; Robain, H.; Taccoen, A.; Sengphaathith, P.; Mouche, E.; Sengtaheuanghoung, O.; Tran Duc, T.; Valentin, C.

    2015-12-01

    The humid tropics are exposed to an unprecedented modernization of agriculture involving rapid and highly-mixed land-use changes with contrasted environmental impacts. Afforestation is often mentioned as an unambiguous solution for restoring ecosystem services and enhancing biodiversity. One consequence of afforestation is the alteration of streamflow variability controlling habitats, water resources and flood risks. We demonstrate that afforestation by tree planting or by natural forest regeneration can induce opposite hydrological changes. An observatory including long-term field measurements of fine-scale land-use mosaics and of hydro-meteorological variables has been operating in several headwater catchments in tropical Southeast Asia since 2001. The GR2M water balance model repeatedly calibrated over successive 1 year periods, and used in simulation mode with specific rainfall input, allowed the hydrological effect of land-use change to be isolated from that of rainfall variability in two of these catchments in Laos and Vietnam. Visual inspection of hydrographs, correlation analyses and trend detection tests allowed causality between land-use changes and changes in seasonal flows to be ascertained. In Laos, the combination of shifting cultivation system (alternation of rice and fallow) and the gradual increase of teak tree plantations replacing fallow, led to intricate flow patterns: pluri-annual flow cycles induced by the shifting system, on top of a gradual flow increase over years caused by the spread of the plantation. In Vietnam, the abandonment of continuously cropped areas mixed with patches of tree plantations led to the natural re-growth of forest communities followed by a gradual drop in streamflow. Soil infiltrability controlled by surface crusting is the predominant process explaining why two modes of afforestation (natural regeneration or planting) led to opposite changes in flow regime. Given that commercial tree plantations will continue to

  4. Long-term ozone monitoring from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Johnson, J.; Serafino, G.; McPeters, R.

    Ultraviolet Spectrometer (SBUV), are archived at the Goddard DAAC and are freely available to the public. Standard products from TOMS include daily global total ozone and effective UV reflectivity of the earth-atmosphere system. Data products from future upper atmospheric research missions, e.g., the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) aboard Aura, will also be archived at the Goddard DAAC. For ozone trend analysis, a long-term data set consisting of over twenty years of ozone measurements from space and some value added research products have been produced by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scientists (Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Branch/ Code 916) and are made available to the research community (http://code916.gsfc.nasa.gov). Examples of some of these research products are:1) daily erythermal UV exposure -estimates of harmful UV-B radiation at the surface, 2) an index to track the global transport of ash and sulfur dioxide resulting from volcanic eruptions, 3) another index to track smoke emanating from large fires and dust plumes originating from desert regions, 4) aerosol optical depth, 5) tropospheric ozone obtained from cloud-slicing techniques, and 6) a merged total ozone data product consisting of monthly mean ozone merged from six satellite instruments. The Upper Atmospheric Data Support Team has been providing science and data support to assist users in accessing and using the upper atmospheric data products. A number of tools for data access, subsetting, reprojection and mapping of orbital (Level-2) products, visualization of global gridded (Level-3) products, and data analysis have been developed at the Goddard DAAC and are freely available to the data user (http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov) This presentation will provide highlights of the standard and value-added ozone and ancillary products, and the data services provided by the DAAC Upper Atmosphere Data Support Team.

  5. Long-term Ozone monitoring from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Johnson, J.; Serafino, G.; McPeters, R.

    Ultraviolet Spectrometer (SBUV), are archived at the Goddard DAAC and are freely available to the public. Standard products from TOMS include daily global total ozone and effective UV reflectivity of the earth-atmosphere system. Data products from future upper atmospheric research missions, e.g., the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) aboard Aura, will also be archived at the Goddard DAAC. For ozone trend analysis, a long-term data set consisting of over twenty years of ozone measurements from space and some value added research products have been produced by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scientists (Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Branch/ Code 916) and are made available to the research community (http://code916.gsfc.nasa.gov). Examples of some of these research products are:1) daily erythermal UV exposure -estimates of harmful UV-B radiation at the surface, 2) an index to track the global transport of ash and sulfur dioxide resulting from volcanic eruptions, 3) another index to track smoke emanating from large fires and dust plumes originating from desert regions, 4) aerosol optical depth, 5) tropospheric ozone obtained from cloud-slicing techniques, and 6) a merged total ozone data product consisting of monthly mean ozone merged from six satellite instruments. The Upper Atmospheric Data Support Team has been providing science and data support to assist users in accessing and using the upper atmospheric data products. A number of tools for data access, subsetting, reprojection and mapping of orbital (Level-2) products, visualization of global gridded (Level-3) products, and data analysis have been developed at the Goddard DAAC and are freely available to the data user (http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov) This presentation will provide highlights of the standard and value-added ozone and ancillary products, and the data services provided by the DAAC Upper Atmosphere Data Support Team.

  6. Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J. (Editor); Rossow, W. (Editor); Fung, I. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    A workshop on Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks was held February 3-4, 1992, at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies to discuss the measurements required to interpret long-term global temperature changes, to critique the proposed contributions of a series of small satellites (Climsat), and to identify needed complementary monitoring. The workshop concluded that long-term (several decades) of continuous monitoring of the major climate forcings and feedbacks is essential for understanding long-term climate change.

  7. Characterizing long-term hydrologic-response and sediment-transport for the R-5 catchment.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Christopher S; Loague, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Recently there have been several calls to establish long-term data collection networks to monitor near-surface hydrologic response and landscape evolution. The focus of this paper is a long-term dataset from the International Hydrologic Decade (1965-1974). The small upland catchment, known as R-5, located near Chickasha, Olahoma, has been the subject of considerable attention within the event-based hydrologic modeling community for more than 30 yr. Here, for the first time, 8 yr of continuous near-surface hydrologic-response and sediment-transport data are analyzed to show trends in the catchment's long-term behavior. The datasets include precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, soil-water content, infiltration, water discharge, and sediment discharge. Potential and actual evapotranspiration rates were estimated and used to calculate an average annual water balance for the catchment. Findings include, for example, that rainfall intensity rarely exceeds the threshold for Horton-type runoff, soil-water content is both spatially and temporally variable, and the water and sediment discharge rates are positively correlated. The R-5 data provide a unique opportunity to test (and refine) process-based models of continuous hydrologic response and sediment transport at the catchment scale for applications in the emerging fields of hydroecology and hydrogeomorphology. PMID:18948471

  8. Long-Term Monitoring of Permeable Reactive Barriers - Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, L.

    2001-04-12

    The purpose of this project is to conduct collaborative research to evaluate and maximize the effectiveness of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with a broad-based working group including representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) and its project partner, Battelle, are leading the DoD effort with funding from DoD's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) and Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is coordinating the DOE effort with support from Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA), a research program under DOEs Office of Science and Technology. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is leading EPA's effort. The combined effort of these three agencies allows the evaluation of a large number of sites. Documents generated by this joint project will be reviewed by the participating agencies' principal investigators, the Permeable Barriers Group of the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF), and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC). The technical objectives of this project are to collect and review existing field data at selected PRB sites, identify data gaps, conduct additional measurements, and provide recommendations to DOE users on suitable long-term monitoring strategies. The specific objectives are to (1) evaluate geochemical and hydraulic performance of PRBs, (2) develop guidelines for hydraulic and geochemical characterization/monitoring, and (3) devise and implement long-term monitoring strategies through the use of hydrological and geochemical models. Accomplishing these objectives will provide valuable information regarding the optimum configuration and lifetime of barriers at specific sites. It will also permit

  9. Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007

    SciTech Connect

    T. Haney R. VanHorn

    2007-07-31

    This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

  10. Long-term source monitoring with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Harmon, B. A.; Finger, M. H.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    The uncollimated Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) large area detectors (LADs) are well suited to nearly continuous monitoring of the stronger hard x-ray sources, and time series analysis for pulsars. An overview of the analysis techniques presently being applied to the data are discussed, including representative observations of the Crab Nebula, Crab pulsar, and summaries of the sources detected to data. Results of a search for variability in the Crab Pulsar pulse profile are presented.

  11. Infrastructure and Components of a Long Term Hydrologic Observing System for the Susquehanna River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. A.; Barron, E. J.; Duffy, C. J.

    2001-12-01

    A number of recent Federal studies have expressed the need for new approaches to the study of environmental systems with an emphasis on developing regional approaches that include integrated environmental process monitoring, modeling, analysis, and information systems. Successful integrated environmental research requires a well-developed supporting infrastructure that provides a coordinated set of well-placed and well-timed observations, a carefully-designed research program focused on a the key issues in the region, and a comprehensive information system that allows access to observations and process study results. The recent formation of organizations like the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science (CUAHSI) is indicative of this trend and provides a starting point for the development of the scientific infrastructure required to support integrated regional environmental research. CUAHSI is proposing to initiate the development of scientific infrastructure in three main areas: long term hydrologic observatories, hydrologic information systems, and hydrologic measurement technologies. This poster describes a conceptual approach for the implementation of a long-term hydrologic observatory in the Susquehanna River Basin that will combine the elements noted above into an integrated regional hydrologic science program. The SRB is the largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay and drains an area of 27,510 square miles in New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. The impact of SRB water quality on the Chesapeake Bay environment as well as the unique hydrologic regime of the river basin has made it a focus of much environmental research in the past century, including a long-term study (the Susquehanna River Basin Experiment (SRBEX)) of the basin and its hydrologic and climatologic characteristics as part of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS). The SRB is a heavily human-impacted basin with significant water quality issues arising from agricultural

  12. Common Calibration Source for Monitoring Long-term Ozone Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalewski, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Accurate long-term satellite measurements are crucial for monitoring the recovery of the ozone layer. The slow pace of the recovery and limited lifetimes of satellite monitoring instruments demands that datasets from multiple observation systems be combined to provide the long-term accuracy needed. A fundamental component of accurately monitoring long-term trends is the calibration of these various instruments. NASA s Radiometric Calibration and Development Facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center has provided resources to minimize calibration biases between multiple instruments through the use of a common calibration source and standardized procedures traceable to national standards. The Facility s 50 cm barium sulfate integrating sphere has been used as a common calibration source for both US and international satellite instruments, including the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments, Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV), Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) (ESA), Scanning Imaging SpectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) (ESA), and others. We will discuss the advantages of using a common calibration source and its effects on long-term ozone data sets. In addition, sphere calibration results from various instruments will be presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the long-term characterization of the source itself.

  13. Instrumentation of bridges for long-term performance monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Maria Q.; Kim, Doo-Kie; Sheng, Li-Hong; Fiji, Leonard M.; Kim, Yoo J.

    2001-08-01

    As the state of the art in bridge design is advancing toward the performance-based design, it becomes increasingly important to monitor and evaluate the long-term structural performance of bridges, including strains in critical structural members, soil pressures on the abutment back walls and footings, accelerations on the decks and bents, etc. Such information is essential in developing new performance criteria for design. In this research, sensor systems for long-term structural performance monitoring have been installed on two new highway bridges on Orange County, California: the Jamboree Road Overcrossing and the West Street On-Ramp.

  14. FRESHWATER POTOMAC LONG-TERM BENTHIC MONITORING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Maryland Department of the Environments Freshwater Potomac Long-Term Benthic Monitoring Program provides seasonal information on abundance and composition for the benthic fauna of the freshwater portion of the Potomac River for use in recommendations to State agencies accordi...

  15. Long-term Ecological Monitoring in Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doberski, Julian; Brodie, Iain D. S.

    1991-01-01

    The value and difficulties of long-term ecological monitoring studies undertaken in schools and colleges are reviewed. Rookeries, stream ecology, sand dune succession, fish population, and seed production and survival are presented as examples of successful studies. This is followed by a discussion of points to consider when setting up a long-term…

  16. PLUME-SCALER-EVALUATING LONG-TERM MONITORING WELL NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is developing a new computer application called PLUME-SCALER to evaluate long term monitoring well networks using typically available historical site water level data. PLUME-SCALER can be used to determine if there are enough ...

  17. Long-Term Monitoring Research Needs: A DOE Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, B.; Davis, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is responsible for dealing with the nation's legacy of Cold War radioactive and hazardous waste and contamination. Major efforts are underway to deal with this legacy; these are expected to last up to decades and cost up to billions of dollars at some sites. At all sites, however, active remediation must eventually cease; if hazards then remain, the site must enter into a long-term stewardship mode. In this talk we discuss aspects of long-term monitoring pertinent to DOE sites, focusing on challenges to be faced, specific goals or targets to be met, and research needs to be addressed in order to enable DOE to meet its long-term stewardship obligations. DOE LTM research needs fall into three major categories: doing what we can do now much more efficiently; doing things we cannot do now; and proving the validity of our monitoring programs. Given the enormity of the DOE obligations, it will be highly desirable to develop much more efficient monitoring paradigms. Doing so will demand developing autonomous, remote monitoring networks of in situ sensors capable of replacing (or at least supplementing to a large extent) conventional groundwater and soil gas sampling and analysis programs. The challenges involved range from basic science (e.g., inventing in situ sensors for TCE that do not demand routine maintenance) to engineering (attaining superior reliability in data reporting in remote networks) to ergonomics (developing decent ways of selecting and presenting the "right" information from the monitoring network) to regulatory affairs (presenting convincing evidence that the more efficient systems actually provide superior monitoring). We explore these challenges in some detail, focusing on the "long" in long-term monitoring as it applies to DOE sites. Monitoring system performance validation and, ultimately, regulator and stakeholder acceptance of site closure and long-term stewardship plans depend

  18. Lena Delta hydrology and geochemistry: long-term hydrological data and recent field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, I.; Chetverova, A.; Bolshiyanov, D.; Makarov, A.; Boike, J.; Heim, B.; Morgenstern, A.; Overduin, P. P.; Wegner, C.; Kashina, V.; Eulenburg, A.; Dobrotina, E.; Sidorina, I.

    2015-01-01

    The Lena River forms one of the largest deltas in the Arctic. We compare two sets of data to reveal new insights into the hydrological, hydrochemical, and geochemical processes within the delta: (i) long-term hydrometric observations at the Khabarova station at the head of the delta from 1951 to 2005; (ii) field hydrological and geochemical observations carried out within the delta since 2002. Periods with differing relative discharge and intensity of fluvial processes were identified from the long-term record of water and sediment discharge. Ice events during spring melt (high water) reconfigured branch channels and probably influenced sediment transport within the delta. Based on summer field measurements during 2005-2012 of discharge and sediment fluxes along main delta channels, both are increased between the apex and the front of the delta. This increase is to a great extent connected with an additional influx of water from tributaries, as well as an increase of suspended and dissolved material released from the ice complex. Summer concentrations of major ion and biogenic substances along the delta branches are partly explained by water sources within the delta, such as thawing ice complex waters, small Lena River branches and estuarine areas.

  19. Sensors for environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David Russell; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Davis, Mary Jo

    2004-09-01

    This report surveys the needs associated with environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship. Emerging sensor technologies are reviewed to identify compatible technologies for various environmental monitoring applications. The contaminants that are considered in this report are grouped into the following categories: (1) metals, (2) radioisotopes, (3) volatile organic compounds, and (4) biological contaminants. Regulatory drivers are evaluated for different applications (e.g., drinking water, storm water, pretreatment, and air emissions), and sensor requirements are derived from these regulatory metrics. Sensor capabilities are then summarized according to contaminant type, and the applicability of the different sensors to various environmental monitoring applications is discussed.

  20. Long-term remote monitoring of salt marsh biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, M. F.; Klemas, V.; Hardisky, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    Methods developed for monitoring salt-marsh biomass remotedly are considered in the framework of NASA's Biospheric Research Program. Satellite-derived estimates of the aboveground biomass is considered, and it is noted that a long-term program for long-term remote monitoring is only practical if the relationship between biomass and spectral data remains essentially constant from year to year. Emphasis is placed on ground-based sampling, satellite measurements of mean marsh live aboveground biomass, the spatial distribution of biomass within the marsh, and changes in marsh hydrography as seen from a satellite. Linking aboveground and belowground biomass is discussed, as well as the problem with obtaining cloud-free images and measuring dead biomass.

  1. Detecting long-term hydrological patterns at Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.L.; Silsbee, D.G.; Redmond, Kelly T.

    1999-01-01

    Tree-ring chronologies for mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) were used to reconstruct the water level of Crater Lake, a high-elevation lake in the southern Cascade Range of Oregon. Reconstructions indicate that lake level since the late 1980s has been lower than at any point in the last 300 years except the early 1930s to mid 1940s. Lake level was consistently higher during the Little Ice Age than during the late 20th century; during the late 17th century, lake level was up to 9 m higher than recent (1980s and 1990s) low levels, which is consistent with paleoclimalic reconstructions of regional precipitation and atmospheric pressure. Furthermore, instrumental data available for the 20th century suggest that there are strong teleconnections among atmospheric circulation (e.g., Pacific Decadal Oscillation), tree growth, and hydrology in southern Oregon. Crater Lake is sensitive to interannual, interdecadal and intercentenary variation in precipitation and atmospheric circulation, and can be expected to track both short-term and longterm variation in regional climatic patterns that may occur in the future.

  2. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead

  3. Long-Term Photometric Monitoring of Two Redback Pulsar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Rodrigo Alberto; Roberts, Mallory; Russell, Dave

    2016-06-01

    Redback systems consist of an eclipsing millisecond pulsar in a short period orbit (< 1 day) around a non-degenerate companion. These systems can potentially transition from their current state where they are ablating their companion to an accreting state. How such a transition can take place is poorly understood. Long-term monitoring of their optical orbital light-curves are important to answer questions about their evolution as well as to catch transitions between states. The orbital light curves can be used to infer the systems’ inclination angle, necessary to measure component masses, the effects of the pulsar heating on the atmosphere of the companion, and long term trends in the light curve may give some clue to the mechanism by which they transition. In this poster we present preliminary photometric light-curves of two binary, redback pulsar systems: PSR J2215+5135 and PSR J1628-3205. These data were taken in 2015 and 2016 with the 1m telescopes of the LCOGT observatory in several standard SDSS filter bands. We will compare the resulting light-curves with previous work on these systems to refine models of the light curves and to look for any long term trends in the optical emission such has been seen in the redback system PSR J2129-0429.

  4. Long-term monitoring FBG-based cable load sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhichun; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Chuan; Ou, Jinping

    2006-03-01

    Stay cables are the main load-bearing components of stayed-cable bridges. The cables stress status is an important factor to the stayed-cable bridge structure safety evaluation. So it's very important not only to the bridge construction, but also to the long-term safety evaluation for the bridge structure in-service. The accurate measurement for cable load depends on an effective sensor, especially to meet the long time durability and measurement demand. FBG, for its great advantage of corrosion resistance, absolute measurement, high accuracy, electro-magnetic resistance, quasi-distribution sensing, absolute measurement and so on, is the most promising sensor, which can cater for the cable force monitoring. In this paper, a load sensor has been developed, which is made up of a bushing elastic supporting body, 4 FBGs uniformly-spaced attached outside of the bushing supporting body, and a temperature compensation FBG for other four FBGs, moreover a cover for protection of FBGs. Firstly, the sensor measuring principle is analyzed, and relationship equation of FBG wavelength shifts and extrinsic load has also been gotten. And then the sensor calibration experiments of a steel cable stretching test with the FBG load sensor and a reference electric pressure sensor is finished, and the results shows excellent linearity of extrinsic load and FBG wavelength shifts, and good repeatability, which indicates that such kind of FBG-based load sensor is suitable for load measurement, especially for long-term, real time monitoring of stay-cables.

  5. Bridge condition assessment based on long-term strain monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, LiMin; Sun, Shouwang

    2011-04-01

    In consideration of the important role that bridges play as transportation infrastructures, their safety, durability and serviceability have always been deeply concerned. Structural Health Monitoring Systems (SHMS) have been installed to many long-span bridges to provide bridge engineers with the information needed in making rational decisions for maintenance. However, SHMS also confronted bridge engineers with the challenge of efficient use of monitoring data. Thus, methodologies which are robust to random disturbance and sensitive to damage become a subject on which many researches in structural condition assessment concentrate. In this study, an innovative probabilistic approach for condition assessment of bridge structures was proposed on the basis of long-term strain monitoring on steel girder of a cable-stayed bridge. First, the methodology of damage detection in the vicinity of monitoring point using strain-based indices was investigated. Then, the composition of strain response of bridge under operational loads was analyzed. Thirdly, the influence of temperature and wind on strains was eliminated and thus strain fluctuation under vehicle loads is obtained. Finally, damage evolution assessment was carried out based on the statistical characteristics of rain-flow cycles derived from the strain fluctuation under vehicle loads. The research conducted indicates that the methodology proposed is qualified for structural condition assessment so far as the following respects are concerned: (a) capability of revealing structural deterioration; (b) immunity to the influence of environmental variation; (c) adaptability to the random characteristic exhibited by long-term monitoring data. Further examination of the applicability of the proposed methodology in aging bridge may provide a more convincing validation.

  6. Cost considerations for long-term ecological monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caughlan, L.; Oakley, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    For an ecological monitoring program to be successful over the long-term, the perceived benefits of the information must justify the cost. Financial limitations will always restrict the scope of a monitoring program, hence the program's focus must be carefully prioritized. Clearly identifying the costs and benefits of a program will assist in this prioritization process, but this is easier said than done. Frequently, the true costs of monitoring are not recognized and are, therefore, underestimated. Benefits are rarely evaluated, because they are difficult to quantify. The intent of this review is to assist the designers and managers of long-term ecological monitoring programs by providing a general framework for building and operating a cost-effective program. Previous considerations of monitoring costs have focused on sampling design optimization. We present cost considerations of monitoring in a broader context. We explore monitoring costs, including both budgetary costs--what dollars are spent on--and economic costs, which include opportunity costs. Often, the largest portion of a monitoring program budget is spent on data collection, and other, critical aspects of the program, such as scientific oversight, training, data management, quality assurance, and reporting, are neglected. Recognizing and budgeting for all program costs is therefore a key factor in a program's longevity. The close relationship between statistical issues and cost is discussed, highlighting the importance of sampling design, replication and power, and comparing the costs of alternative designs through pilot studies and simulation modeling. A monitoring program development process that includes explicit checkpoints for considering costs is presented. The first checkpoint occur during the setting of objectives and during sampling design optimization. The last checkpoint occurs once the basic shape of the program is known, and the costs and benefits, or alternatively the cost

  7. Long-term monitoring of marine gas leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spickenbom, Kai; Faber, Eckhard; Poggenburg, Jürgen; Seeger, Christian; Furche, Markus

    2010-05-01

    The sequestration of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations is one of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies currently under study. Although offshore operations are significantly more expensive than comparable onshore operations, the growing public resistance against onshore CCS projects makes sub-seabed storage a promising option. Even after a thorough review of the geological setting, there is always the possibility of leakage from the reservoir. As part of the EU-financed project CO2ReMoVe (Research, Monitoring, Verification), which aims to develop innovative research and technologies for monitoring and verification of carbon dioxide geological storage, we are working on the development of submarine long-term gas flow monitoring systems. The basic design of the monitoring system builds on our experience in volcano monitoring. Early prototypes were composed of a raft floating on the surface of a mud volcano, carrying sensors for CO2 flux and concentration, data storage and transmission, and power supply by battery-buffered solar panels. The system was modified for installation in open sea by using a buoy instead of a raft and a funnel on the seafloor to collect the gas, connected by a flexible tube. This setup provides a cost-effective solution for shallow waters. However, a buoy interferes with ship traffic, and it is also difficult to adapt this design to greater water depths. These requirements can best be complied by a completely submersed system. A system for unattended long-term monitoring in a marine environment has to be extremely durable. Therefore, we focussed on developing a mechanically and electrically as simple setup as possible, which has the additional advantage of low cost. The system consists of a funnel-shaped gas collector, a sensor head and pressure housings for electronics and power supply. Since this setup is inexpensive, it can be deployed in numbers to cover larger areas. By addition of multi-channel data loggers, data

  8. Monitor the Long-Term Stability of FGS 3 Revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferys, William

    1992-06-01

    THIS PROPOSAL CONTAINS A SUBSET OF THE LONG-TERM STABILITY TEST. THIS PROPOSAL IS NOT TO BE RUN ON THE SPACECRAFT IN THIS FORM. THE TARGET LIST AND EXPOSURE LOGSHEET CONTAIN THE ASTROMETRYPART OF THIS TEST. THE REMAINDER OF THE PROPOSAL IS ADUMMY TO ALLOW IT TO PASS THROUGH RPSS VALIDATION. The goal of these measurements is to monitor the internal positional stability of the FGSs by measuring many stars in the M35 check field repeatedly over a one year period. The results of these measurements are the stability characteristics of the FGS to allow an estimate of differential corrections to OFAD and Plate Scale. This is an ecliptic field. During each of two primary orientations, we will secure observations over a 130 day span, roughly every 30 days. THIS IS AN FGS 3 TEST

  9. Long-Term Multiwaveband Monitoring of Selected Blazars (core Program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The investigators request RXTE time to continue their long-term monitoring of the blazars 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, BL Lac, and 3C 273 2-3 times per week at radio, mm, IR, optical, X-ray, and, with the advent of GLAST, gamma-ray wavelengths. These, plus an added 5th object, CTA102, include blazars bright enough to detect strongly with RXTE and GLAST as well as to measure polarization on 7 mm VLBA images and at optical bands. By matching polarized features on VLBA images with variable polarization at optical bands and by associating X-ray and gamma-ray flares with similar events at these longer wavelengths, the investigators will locate where in the jet the emission occurs at all these wavebands. The relative timing of flares as a function of wavelength will overconstrain emission models.

  10. Long-term spectropolarimetric monitoring of the cool supergiant betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedecarrax, I.; Petit, P.; Aurière, M.; Grunhut, J.; Wade, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Donati, J.-F.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Perrin, G.

    2013-05-01

    We report on a long-term monitoring of the cool supergiant Betelgeuse, using the NARVAL and ESPaDOnS high-resolution spectropolarimeters, respectively installed at Telescope Bernard Lyot (Pic du Midi Observatory, France) and at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii). The data set, constituted of circularly polarized (Stokes V) and intensity (Stokes I) spectra, was collected between 2010 and 2012. We investigate here the temporal evolution of magnetic field, convection and temperature at photospheric level, using simultaneous measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field component, the core emission of the Ca II infrared triplet, the line-depth ratio of selected photospheric lines and the radial velocity of the star.

  11. Long-term monitoring of OJ287: new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Hudec, L.; Sillanpää, A.; Takalo, L.; Kroll, P.

    2001-09-01

    The blazar OJ287 has been monitored very intensively during recent years but elder data are relatively rare. On the other hand, these data are of great scientific value since there are hints for periodicity in the historical light curve of the object, which could definitely confirm the binary black hole nature of the central object for the first time. We present preliminary results of the analyses of the long-term optical behavior of the object based on Sonneberg Sky Patrol plates. The magnitude of the object has been measured on nearly 400 plates covering the time period 1928 to 1980. These results confirm the importance of scientific results for blazars and other high energy sources, which can be drawn from astronomical plate archives.

  12. Future Research Needs for Long-Term Monitoring Program Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, B. S.; Dougherty, D. E.; Williams, G.; Davis, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    An ASCE Task Committee is preparing a manual of practice on long-term monitoring (LTM) program design for groundwater (including vadose) systems. The committee has identified several areas for future research and technology transfer that will improve LTM design. LTM is an on-going activity aimed at assessing remediation performance, containment integrity, and/or continued non-contamination of the subsurface and groundwater. LTM has different goals and needs than site characterization, so data collection, analysis, and modeling approaches must evolve to meet these new needs. Many new sensors and field measurement methods for LTM are under development, and research is needed to develop methods to integrate these data sources with more traditional samples drawn from wells to maximize the information extracted from the data. These new methods need to be able to provide information to assess performance of waste management activities and to understand long-term behavior by optimizing the collection and analysis of multiple data types. The effects of different sampling and measurement methods on monitoring results and their implications for the design of LTM programs also require study. Additional research needs include development of methods to assess flow control strategies, to identify monitoring redundancy in fractured media, and to better incorporate uncertainty into the LTM design process. Well-tested, documented, and open datasets are needed to validate and compare the performance of methods. Technology transfer activities must address the need for evolution of regulatory guidance to encompass the types of data analysis that are needed to assess remediation or containment performance, to identify appropriate LTM plans, and to incorporate novel data collection methods that may support better decision quality through the use of more extensive measurements with lower individual precisions than traditional measurements or may measure an indicator parameter rather than

  13. Medical monitoring in long-term space missions.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, A I; Egorov, A D

    1997-01-01

    The following principles, derived from the experience of medical support during past spaceflights, can provide a basis for a system of health monitoring and diagnosis during long-term and interplanetary missions: a system of preflight medical screening; medical screening on a systemic basis, which may include purposeful diagnosis in subsystems following the method of hierarchic structure; use of an individual approach; correction of the medical program with respect to the space crew status; assessment of the interrelations of the entire complex of parameters; utilization of the methods of correlation, classification and identification to elicit interrelations between different functions; evaluation of shifts in body functions and their adequacy to ambient conditions; continuity of medical examinations during all pre-flight stages, during flight and after completion of flight; analysis of information and anamnestic data by means of data bases; confidentiality of medical conclusions. Discussed are a classification of unfavorable microgravity-related syndromes, possible impairments due to abnormal situations, and some approaches to the prediction of the risk of various diseases, in relation to the construction of a conceptual diagnostic model for interplanetary missions. In the interest of medical monitoring special significance is attributed to the knowledge of individual norms for each crew member and of his unique peculiarities. Such data can be compiled by means of statistical analysis (single and multidimensional analysis) of the results of medical examinations and of observations during selection, training and tests. Selection of necessary physiological parameters, functional loads and data processing techniques which can be used in combination with other data sources for inflight diagnosis should be based on the following principles: the use of informative, non-invasively registered parameters and functional tests to reveal adverse states or most probable

  14. 7 CFR 1944.689 - Long-term monitoring by grantee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Long-term monitoring by grantee. 1944.689 Section 1944... (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.689 Long-term monitoring by grantee. (a) The grantee is required to perform long-term monitoring on any...

  15. 7 CFR 1944.689 - Long-term monitoring by grantee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Long-term monitoring by grantee. 1944.689 Section... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.689 Long-term monitoring by grantee. (a) The grantee is required to perform long-term monitoring on any...

  16. 7 CFR 1944.689 - Long-term monitoring by grantee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Long-term monitoring by grantee. 1944.689 Section 1944... (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.689 Long-term monitoring by grantee. (a) The grantee is required to perform long-term monitoring on any...

  17. 7 CFR 1944.689 - Long-term monitoring by grantee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Long-term monitoring by grantee. 1944.689 Section... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.689 Long-term monitoring by grantee. (a) The grantee is required to perform long-term monitoring on any...

  18. 7 CFR 1944.689 - Long-term monitoring by grantee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Long-term monitoring by grantee. 1944.689 Section 1944... (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants § 1944.689 Long-term monitoring by grantee. (a) The grantee is required to perform long-term monitoring on any...

  19. Long-term monitoring of western aspen--lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Strand, E K; Bunting, S C; Starcevich, L A; Nahorniak, M T; Dicus, G; Garrett, L K

    2015-08-01

    Aspen woodland is an important ecosystem in the western United States. Aspen is currently declining in western mountains; stressors include conifer expansion due to fire suppression, drought, disease, heavy wildlife and livestock use, and human development. Forecasting of tree species distributions under future climate scenarios predicts severe losses of western aspen within the next 50 years. As a result, aspen has been selected as one of 14 vital signs for long-term monitoring by the National Park Service Upper Columbia Basin Network. This article describes the development of a monitoring protocol for aspen including inventory mapping, selection of sampling locations, statistical considerations, a method for accounting for spatial dependence, field sampling strategies, and data management. We emphasize the importance of collecting pilot data for use in statistical power analysis and semi-variogram analysis prior to protocol implementation. Given the spatial and temporal variability within aspen stem size classes, we recommend implementing permanent plots that are distributed spatially within and among stands. Because of our careful statistical design, we were able to detect change between sampling periods with desired confidence and power. Engaging a protocol development and implementation team with necessary and complementary knowledge and skills is critical for success. Besides the project leader, we engaged field sampling personnel, GIS specialists, statisticians, and a data management specialist. We underline the importance of frequent communication with park personnel and network coordinators. PMID:26215826

  20. Long-term flow monitoring of submarine gas emanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spickenbom, K.; Faber, E.; Poggenburg, J.; Seeger, C.

    2009-04-01

    One of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies currently under study is the sequestration of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations. Even after a thorough review of the geological setting, there is the possibility of leaks from the reservoirs. As part of the EU-financed project CO2ReMoVe (Research, Monitoring, Verification), which aims to develop innovative research and technologies for monitoring and verification of carbon dioxide geological storage, we are working on the development of submarine long-term gas flow monitoring systems. Technically, however, these systems are not limited to CO2 but can be used for monitoring of any free gas emission (bubbles) on the seafloor. The basic design of the gas flow sensor system was derived from former prototypes developed for monitoring CO2 and CH4 on mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan. This design was composed of a raft floating on the surface above the gas vent to collect the bubbles. Sensors for CO2 flux and concentration and electronics for data storage and transmission were mounted on the raft, together with battery-buffered solar panels for power supply. The system was modified for installation in open sea by using a buoy instead of a raft and a funnel on the seafloor to collect the gas, which is then guided above water level through a flexible tube. Besides some technical problems (condensed water in the tube, movement of the buoys due to waves leading to biased measurement of flow rates), this setup provides a cost-effective solution for shallow waters. However, a buoy interferes with ship traffic, and it is also difficult to adapt this design to greater water depths. These requirements can best be complied by a completely submersed system. To allow unattended long-term monitoring in a submarine environment, such a system has to be extremely durable. Therefore, we focussed on developing a mechanically and electrically as simple setup as possible, which has the additional advantage of low cost. The system

  1. A new indirect multi-step-ahead prediction model for a long-term hydrologic prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chun-Tian; Xie, Jing-Xin; Chau, Kwok-Wing; Layeghifard, Mehdi

    2008-10-01

    SummaryA dependable long-term hydrologic prediction is essential to planning, designing and management activities of water resources. A three-stage indirect multi-step-ahead prediction model, which combines dynamic spline interpolation into multilayer adaptive time-delay neural network (ATNN), is proposed in this study for the long term hydrologic prediction. In the first two stages, a group of spline interpolation and dynamic extraction units are utilized to amplify the effect of observations in order to decrease the errors accumulation and propagation caused by the previous prediction. In the last step, variable time delays and weights are dynamically regulated by ATNN and the output of ATNN can be obtained as a multi-step-ahead prediction. We use two examples to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model. One example is the sunspots time series that is a well-known nonlinear and non-Gaussian benchmark time series and is often used to evaluate the effectiveness of nonlinear models. Another example is a case study of a long-term hydrologic prediction which uses the monthly discharges data from the Manwan Hydropower Plant in Yunnan Province of China. Application results show that the proposed method is feasible and effective.

  2. Long-term monitoring for nanomedicine implants and drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michaela; Lynch, Iseult

    2016-03-01

    Increasing globalization means that traditional occupational epidemiological approaches may no longer apply, suggesting a need for an alternative model to assess the long-term impact of nanomaterial exposure on health.

  3. Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Looney, Brian B.; Seaman, John; Kmetz, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the

  4. The long-term hydrological effect of forest stands on the stability of slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaard, T. A.; Meng, W.; van Beek, L. P. H.

    2012-04-01

    Forest is widely known to improve slope stability as a result of mechanical and hydrological effects. While the mechanics underlying the stabilizing process of root reinforcement are well understood and quantified, the influence of forest on the occurrence of critical hydrological conditions in terms of suction or pore pressure remains uncertain. Due to seasonal and inter-annual fluctuations, the stabilizing influence of evaporation and transpiration is difficult to isolate from the overall noise of the hydrological signal. More long-term effects of forest stands on soil development are highly variable and thus difficult to observe and quantify. Often these effects are ambivalent, having potentially a stabilizing or destabilizing influence on a slope under particular conditions (e.g., more structured soils leading to both rapid infiltration and drainage). Consequently, it can be postulated that forests will hydrologically influence the magnitude-frequency distribution of landsliding, not only at the stand level but also on a regional scale through the groundwater system. The overall aim of this research is to understand and quantify the stabilizing hydrological effect of forests on potentially unstable slopes. To this end, we focus on the changes in the magnitude-frequency distribution of landsliding that arise as a result of variations in evapotranspiration losses over the life cycle of stands. Temporal variations in evapotranspiration comprise first of all the interception that can account for an important amount of evaporation from a forest, and that changes with seasonal and annual variations in the interception capacity of the canopy and forest floor. Transpiration also represents an important loss that varies over the various growth stages of a forest stand. Based on a literature review of water consumption by tree species and water balance studies of forested catchments we defined the potential transpiration for different growth stages. This information we

  5. Noncontact ECG system for unobtrusive long-term monitoring.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Neil J; Anumula, Harini A; Duff, Eric; Soussou, Walid

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes measurements made using an ECG system with QUASAR's capacitive bioelectrodes integrated into a pad system that is placed over a chair. QUASAR's capacitive bioelectrode has the property of measuring bioelectric potentials at a small separation from the body. This enables the measurement of ECG signals through fabric, without the removal of clothing or preparation of skin. The ECG was measured through the subject's clothing while the subject sat in the chair without any supporting action from the subject. The ECG pad system is an example of a high compliance system that places minimal requirements upon the subject and, consequently, can be used to generate a long-term record from ECG segments collected on a daily basis, providing valuable information on long-term trends in cardiac health. PMID:23366215

  6. Long-term monitoring of structures through point cloud analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Bahman; Khaloo, Ali; Lattanzi, David

    2016-04-01

    Modern remote sensing technologies have enabled the creation of high-resolution 3D point clouds of infrastructure systems. In particular, photogrammetric reconstructions using Dense-Structure-from-Motion algorithm can now yield point clouds with the necessary resolution to capture small-strain displacements. By tracking changes in these point clouds over time, displacements can be measured, leading to strain and stress estimates for long-term structural evaluations. This study determines the accuracy of a comparative point cloud analysis technique for measuring deflections in high-resolution point clouds of structural elements. Utilizing a combination of a recently developed point cloud generation process and localized nearest-neighbors cloud comparisons, the analytical technique is designed for long-term field scenarios and requires no artificial tracking, targets, and camera calibrations. A series of flexural laboratory experiments were performed in order to test the approach. The results indicate sub-millimeter accuracy in measuring the vertical deflection, making it suitable for the small-displacement analysis of a variety of large-scale infrastructure systems. Ongoing work seeks to extend this technique for comparison with as-built and finite element models.

  7. Long term (1921-2011) hydrological regime of Alpine catchments in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchiola, D.

    2014-08-01

    Long term (1921-2011) yearly and seasonal hydrological regime of 23 Alpine rivers in Northern Italy (ca. 102-104 km2) was investigated here. First, for regulated catchment, the potential effect of flow storage was investigated using an index of potential flow regulation, and pre and post reservoirs' installation flow analysis. For catchments displaying little regulation effect, non stationarity was studied using linear regression, including variable (segmented) slope analysis, and Mann Kendall test, traditional and progressive. The link of the observed trends against descriptive physiographic variables was then investigated, to highlight geographic and topographic patterns of changes of the hydrological cycle. Dependence upon global thermal and North Atlantic Oscillation NAO anomalies were analysed to highlight potential impact of large scale climate drivers against regional hydrological regimes. Also, the correlation between stream flows and climatic drivers of precipitation and temperatures in nearby stations was investigated, to highlight climate trends potentially driving hydrological changes, and potential changes in the nexus between climate and hydrology given by reservoirs' operation. The results display for several Alpine rivers here likelihood of significant changes of hydrological fluxes, notably during Winter, Spring and Summer. Winter discharges is decreasing on average, but decrease is seen below 1800 m a.s.l. or so, while increase is found above, and the more Northern the larger the increase. Discharges during Spring mostly decrease in time, and more so for increasing outlet altitude, while Summer specific discharges always decrease, and more notably with increasing altitude of the contributing catchment. NAO and global thermal anomalies are correlated against the rate of variation of hydrological fluxes, with the intensity of correlation linked to altitude, longitude, and basin's size. Specifically targeted studies are necessary to investigate the

  8. A long-term national-scale hydrological simulation of river flows across Great Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, Alison; Bell, Victoria; Kay, Alison; Davies, Helen

    2016-04-01

    The Centre for Ecology and Hydrology's national-scale hydrological model, Grid-to-Grid, can be used to estimate river flows and soil moisture across Great Britain. It is used operationally at the flood forecasting centre and there have been a number of studies on floods and climate change using this model, however to date, low flows and droughts have been comparatively neglected. The launch of a five-year NERC-funded interdisciplinary research programme "UK Droughts and Water Scarcity" is allowing us to address this. Our work on one of these projects, MaRIUS (Managing the Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties of droughts and water Scarcity), uses the model to identify drought periods. The model is driven by a new long-term (1890 - 2012) precipitation dataset (CEH-GEAR) and estimates of potential evaporation. Model performance is assessed against observed river flows for both high and low flows. Gridded time series of monthly mean river flow and soil moisture from the model have been analysed to identify historic hydrological droughts across Great Britain using concepts such as severity and duration. We also investigate how drought occurrence and severity have changed over the last 100 years and identify regions that have been particularly susceptible to drought.

  9. ULTRAHIGH SENSITIVITY HEAVY NOBLE GAS DETECTORS FOR LONG-TERM MONITORING AND MONITORING AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Georgia Institute of Technology/Argonne National Laboratory team will develop and demonstrate novel ultrahigh sensitivity heavy noble gas (krypton, xenon, and radon) detectors for long-term monitoring of spent fuel and TRU waste, as well as for distinguishing background radon a...

  10. Integration of Research with Long-Term Monitoring: Breeding Wood Ducks on the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kennamer, R.A.; Hepp, G.R.

    2000-10-01

    In 1981, long-term monitoring of breeding wood ducks was initiated. Females were marked and recaptured for 15 years and annual population parameters were developed. Precise parameter estimates were possible due to high capture rates. The results contribute to the long-term understanding of wood duck populations.

  11. Estimating long-term surface hydrological components by coupling remote sensing observation with surface flux model.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.

    2002-05-02

    A model framework for parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) has been applied to use satellite data, models, and routine surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture content and evapotranspiration rate with moderate spatial resolution within Walnut River Watershed in Kansas. Biweekly composite normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) data are derived from observations by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites. Local surface observations provide data on downwelling solar irradiance, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. Surface parameters including roughness length, albedo, surface water conductance, and the ratio of soil heat flux to net radiation are estimated; pixel-specific near-surface meteorological conditions such as air temperature, vapor pressure, and wind speed are adjusted according to local surface forcing. The PASS modeling system makes effective use of satellite data and can be run for large areas for which flux data do not exist and surface meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. The long-term surface hydrological budget is evaluated using radar-derived precipitation estimates, surface meteorological observations, and satellite data. The modeled hydrological components in the Walnut River Watershed compare well with stream gauge data and observed surface fluxes during 1999.

  12. Long-term environmental monitoring at Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.H.

    1990-11-01

    Environmental monitoring has been an ongoing activity on the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington for over 45 years. Objectives are to detect and assess potential impacts of Site operations (nuclear and nonnuclear) on air, surface and ground water, foodstuffs, fish, wildlife, soils and vegetation. Data from monitoring efforts are used to calculate the overall radiological dose to humans working onsite or residing in nearby communities. In 1988, measured Hanford Site perimeter concentrations of airborne radionuclides were below applicable guidelines. In addition to monitoring radioactivity in fish and wildlife, population numbers of key species are determined. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning in the Columbia River at Hanford has increased in recent years with a concomitant increase in winter roosting activity of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). An elk (Cervus elaphus) herd, established by immigration in 1972, is increasing. The Hanford Site also serves as a refuge for Canada good (Branta canadensis) and great blue heron (Ardea herodias), and various plants and other animals, e.g., (Odocoileus hemionus) and coyote (Canis latrans). 32 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Long term wireless ambient monitoring of heritage buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huayong; Pozzi, Matteo; Zonta, Daniele; Zanon, Paolo; Ceriotti, Matteo; Mottola, Luca; Picco, Gian Pietro; Murphy, Amy L.; Guna, Stefan; Corrà, Michele

    2010-04-01

    Motivated by the preservation of an artistic treasure, the fresco of the "Cycle of the Months" on the second floor in an historic tower, Torre Aquila, a wireless sensor network (WSN) has been developed and installed for permanent health monitoring. The monitoring scheme covers both static and dynamic evaluation of the tower structural integrity from local to global scale and consists of 17 nodes, including 2 long length fiber optic sensors (FOS), 3 accelerometers and 12 environmental nodes. The system has been working for 1.5 years and has been debugged and updated both as to hardware and software. This paper focuses mainly on the ambient vibration analysis used to investigate the performance of the sensor nodes and structural properties of the tower. Initial ambient vibration monitoring shows that cyclic environmental factors, such as traffic flow, are not the dominant cause of tower vibration; and the vibration levels of the tower in different axes are not large enough to be a critical issue calling for attention under current conditions. It proves that the WSN is an effective tool, capable of providing information relevant to safety assessment of the tower.

  14. Long term monitoring of landslide: observation gravitational slope cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palis, Edouard; Lebourg, Thomas; Vidal, Maurin

    2016-04-01

    Since several years of studies on landslides, we realized the role and subtle interactions that existed between the structural complexity, masses dynamics and complex internal circulation of fluids. Thus, to gain a better understanding of the processes taking place during the evolution of an unstable slope, an observational study is necessary. In this perspective, our team currently monitors slow moving landslide zones. The aim of such a monitoring is to gain a better knowledge of the links between external forcing (meteorological, seismological) and signals going out of the slope (kinematic, vibrations, electrical resistivity). In December 2000, a dramatic event affected the sandy/clayey landslide in the Southern Alpes Maritimes (France). A 10 meters high scarp appeared at the foot of the landslide and affected private yards nearby. This area then became a major concern for local authorities and understand the processes taking place, a scientific challenge. In order to understand the land-sliding reactivations and to quantify the natural cycles of deformations, we analyse the main factors of this complex system. After 10 years of observation we are now able to highlight some of the complex behaviours by the measurement of physical parameters (geophysical monitoring). A permanent 115 m ERT line (5 meters electrode spacing) has been installed and provides an acquisition daily since 2006. The daily acquisitions are now accompanied by continuous measurements from boreholes (thermometers, piezometers, tiltmeters) and pluviometry. We are able to control the whole monitoring from the lab, and all these data are transmitted in real time. The analysis of these large amounts of data over large time series allows the detection of seasonal cycles of surface activity. The deformation taking place can be assimilated to a near-elastic deformation and show a lateral decoupling on both sides of the fault cutting the landslide. These deformation cycles can be associated with the

  15. Long-term monitoring at two Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site was established in southeastern Washington during the 1940s to produce plutonium during World War 2. The Pantex Plant in the Texas Panhandle was originally used by the US Army for loading conventional ammunition shells and bombs. The Plant was rehabilitated and enhanced in the 1950s to assemble nuclear weapons. Environmental monitoring has been ongoing at both locations for several decades. Monitoring objectives are to detect and assess potential impacts of facility operations on air, surface and ground waters, foodstuffs, fish, wildlife, soils, and vegetation. Currently, measured concentrations of airborne radionuclides around the perimeters of both sites are below applicable guidelines. Concentrations of radionuclides and nonradiological water quality in the Columbia River at Hanford are in compliance with applicable standards. Radiological and nonradiological water quality in the Ogallala Aquifer beneath the Pantex Plant is also in compliance with applicable standards. Foodstuffs irrigated with river water downstream from the Hanford Site show levels of radionuclides that are similar to those found in foodstuffs from control areas. The low levels of {sup 137}Cs and {sup (90)}Sr in some onsite Hanford wildlife samples and concentrations of radionuclides in soils and vegetation from onsite and offsite at both locations are typical of those attributable to naturally occurring radioactivity and to worldwide fallout. The calculated dose potentially received by a maximally exposed individual (i.e., based on hypothetical, worst-case assumptions for all routes of exposure) at both sites in 1993 was {le} 0.03 mrem.

  16. AMMA-CATCH a Hydrological, Meteorological and Ecological Long Term Observatory on West Africa : Some Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galle, S.; Grippa, M.; Peugeot, C.; Bouzou Moussa, I.; Cappelaere, B.; Demarty, J.; Mougin, E.; Lebel, T.; Chaffard, V.

    2015-12-01

    AMMA-CATCH is a multi-scale observation system dedicated to long-term monitoring of the water cycle, the vegetation dynamics and their interaction with climate and water resources in West Africa. In the context of the global change, long-term observations are required to i) gain understanding in eco-hydrological processes over this highly contrasted region, ii) help their representation in Earth System Models, and iii) detect trends and infer their impacts on water resources and living conditions. It is made of three meso-scale sites (~ 1°x1°) in Mali, Niger and Benin, extending along the West African eco-climatic gradient. Within this regional window (5° by 9°), each of the three sites comprises a multi-scale set-up which helps documenting the components of the hydrologic budget and the evolutions of the surface conditions over a range of time scales: raingages, piezometers, river discharge stations, soil moisture and temperature profiles, turbulent fluxes measurements, LAI/biomass monitoring. This observation system has been continuously generating coherent datasets for 10 to 25 years depending on the datasets. It is jointly operated by French and African (Mali, Niger and Benin) research institutions. The data-base is available to the community through the website (www.amma-catch.org). AMMA-CATCH is a member of the French critical zone observatory network "Réseau des Bassins Versants", (RBV). AMMA-CATH participates to several global or regional observation networks, such as FluxNet, CarboAfrica, International Soil Moisture Networks (ISMN) and to calibration/validation campaigns for satellite missions such as SMOS (CNES, ESA), MEGHA-TROPIQUES (France/India) or SWAP(NASA). AMMA-CATCH fills a gap over a region, West Africa, where environmental data are largely lacking, and thus, it can usefully contribute to the international networking effort for environmental monitoring and research. Recent results on regional evolution of land cover, rainfall intensity and

  17. Long-term hydrological changes of the Aral Sea observed by satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Menghua; Guo, Wei

    2014-06-01

    The Aral Sea has been shrinking since the former Soviet Union constructed irrigation projects to divert water from its main rivers in the 1960s. The diminishing of the Aral Sea is "one of the worst environmental disasters in the world" (from United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon). In this study, 33 years of satellite observations from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and 21 years of satellite altimetry sea level data from TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and Jason-2 are used to quantify the long-term hydrological changes in the Aral Sea. A simple algorithm with AVHRR channels 1 and 2 albedo is developed to identify and discriminate the water pixels from land and cloud. Thus, monthly water coverage in the region can be reliably generated. The water coverage maps since 1981 show constant decline of the Aral Sea. The coverage dropped from ˜4.7-4.8 × 104 km2 in 1981 to about ¼ of this value in the recent years. In fact, drastic hydrological change was observed in the main Aral Sea during the 2000s. In the South Aral Sea, sea level shows a steady decrease from 35 m above sea level to <26 m since 1993. Total loss of water storage since 1993 is estimated to be ˜2.0 × 102 km3 for the South Aral Sea with a rate of ˜16-20 km3/yr before 2002, and a smaller value after 2002. In 1990, the North Aral Sea was observed to separate from the main Aral Sea. Water coverage, sea level, and total water storage were kept relatively stable for the period between 1993 and 2013 in the North Aral Sea. A water level increase and coverage expansion occurred during the 2005-2006 period when a dam was built in 2005 between the North Aral Sea and the South-East Aral Sea.

  18. Long-Term Stream Monitoring Programs in U.S. Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overholt, Erin; MacKenzie, Ann Haley

    2005-01-01

    The authors surveyed 15 secondary school teachers in 5 states about how they designed and implemented long-term stream monitoring in their classrooms and the problems and benefits they encountered. The authors surveyed students involved in the stream monitoring projects to obtain their perspective. Teachers reported that stream monitoring provided…

  19. 2011 Updates on the Long-term Glacier Monitoring Program in Denali National Park and Preserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, R. A.; Adema, G. W.; Herreid, S. J.; Arendt, A. A.; Larsen, C. F.

    2011-12-01

    The area of Denali National Park and Preserve (DENA) dominated by ice is vast, with glaciers covering 3,780 km^2, approximately one sixth of the park's area. They are integral components of the region's hydrologic, ecologic, and geologic systems - with changes to the glacier systems driving the dependent ecosystems. The National Park Service (NPS) conducts long term monitoring of glaciers in Denali with a variety of methods at a range of spatial and temporal scales. This includes seasonal mass balance and surface movement data collection, annual searches for surging glaciers, and decadal areal extent mapping and volume change estimates of all glaciers in the park. If a glacier surge is detected, the event is documented via photography and surface measurements, when possible. In addition, more intensive ground-based GPS surveys of termini and ice surface elevations are conducted on ten study glaciers every 5-10 years, on a rotating basis. Many of the glaciers are located in designated Wilderness, hence the use of mechanized transport is reduced as much as possible. Monitoring objectives are accomplished by park staff and with cooperative agreements with other agencies and universities. Research to understand the context of the long term data is encouraged and supported as much as possible by the NPS and has recently yielded significant results. The year 2011 marks the 20th anniversary of glacier mass balance monitoring on Kahiltna and Traleika Glaciers, located on the south and north sides of Mt. McKinley respectively. A single "index" site near the ELA of each glacier provides an index of winter, summer, and net balances each year as well as flow velocities and changes in surface elevation. Long-term net balance trends are positive from 1991-2003, and negative since 2003, including the 2009-2010 balance year. The average flow velocity at the Kahiltna index site is 200 +/- 21 m/year with a neutral to slightly negative trend, while on Traleika average velocity is 67

  20. Long term monitoring system integrated in an elevational gradient in NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilla, J.; Malizia, A.; Osinaga, O.; Blundo, C.; Grau, R.; Malizia, L.; Aráoz, E.

    2013-05-01

    Ecological trends and ranges of variability are poorly known in the tropical and subtropical Andes. Long term studies are powerful tools to detect the response of vegetation dynamics, biodiversity and hydrological cycle to these trends. We present a long term monitoring system in NW Argentinean mountains, including forest permanent plots at different elevations and high elevation grasslands, encompassing more than 3.000 m elevation range. Long term studies include: 1) 66 ha of mountain forest permanent plots along the Yungas elevational gradient from c. 400 to 2500 masl , and latitudinal gradient (22-28S) with 45 plots in mature forests and 28 in secondary forests originated in grazing, agriculture and selective logging. Some of these permanent plots have achieved 20 years of monitoring and all of them are included in the "Red de Bosques Andinos" a network created recently, together with c. 10 institutions and more than 130 (c. 120 ha) forest permanent plots from Argentina to Colombia Andes. 2) Two GLORIA (Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments) sites, above 4000 masl with more than 170 species recorded, including one re-measurement. This system is included in GLORIA network (www.gloria.ac.at) and in GLORIA Andes (http://www.condesan.org/gloria), and 3) more than 15 satellite monitored high Andean lakes and a wide extension of vegas (75800 ha in Argentinean puna). A digital database is being implemented to organize and provide access to the information generated by these three systems coordinated by the Instituto de Ecología Regional (http://www.iecologia.com.ar). These monitoring data are analyzed together with instrumental and dendrochronological data to describe the dynamics of these ecosystems over an area of 20 million hectares distributed between 22 and 28°S. Some of the most significant results to date include: 1) secondary mountain forests are expanding over grasslands and agriculture lands, and tend to converge toward mature forest

  1. Long-term Monitoring Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Ahmed E

    2004-01-01

    This report discusses the long-term monitoring strategy developed for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), where the Faultless underground nuclear test was conducted. It includes a thorough literature review of monitoring well network design. A multi-staged approach for development of the long-term monitoring well network for CNTA is proposed, incorporating a number of issues, including uncertainty of the subsurface environment, cost, selection of well locations, etc. The first stage is to use hydrogeologic expertise combined with model simulations and probability based approaches to select the first set of monitoring wells. The second stage will be based on an optimum design methodology that uses a suitable statistical approach, combined with an optimization approach, to augment the initial set of wells and develop the final long-term monitoring network.

  2. Long-Term Hydrological Changes of Coastal Arctic Tundra Ponds in Drained Thaw Lake Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, C. G.; Lougheed, V.

    2013-12-01

    Given the dominance of these ponds in the tundra landscape, documenting long-term changes in these aquatic systems is essential to understand carbon and energy balance, trophic energy flow, and biodiversity for the Arctic. The combination of remote sensing using historical imagery, as well as rare historical data from the International Biological Program, provides a unique opportunity for understanding long-term changes in hydrology, chemistry and biology of these significant freshwater environments. To assess the changes in pond area and abundance in 22 drained thaw-lake basins (DTLB) across the Barrow Peninsula over the past 60 years, we utilized historic aerial imagery from USGS archives (1948) and modern high-resolution Quickbird (2002, 2008, 2010). Age classification of DTLB was based on Hinkel et al 2003. We compared water temperature, active layer thickness, and aboveground biomass of these systems to historical datasets compiled in the Limnology of Tundra Ponds' by Hobbie et al 1975. We observed an overall decrease of 28% in pond area and 19% decrease in pond number, where smaller ponds (<100m2) had the highest change. These losses were coincident with significantly higher air and water temperature and reduced annual rainfall, which has decreased by 2.5 cm over the past 62 years (-0.4mm/yr). Active layer in ponds increased on average by 15cm. Aquatic grasses increased in density and cover in ponds over the past 40 years. Area and number of ponds loss was independent of DTLB age; however, medium-age DTLBs had significantly higher number of new ponds over old and ancient-age basins. While we observe new ponds due to thaw lake processes, climate seems to be having a stronger effect on these systems by reducing the overall inundated area and pond number in these basins. Increased evaporation due to warmer and longer summers, permafrost degradation, transpiration from encroaching aquatic grasses and changes in precipitation patterns are likely the current major

  3. Re-Evaluation of Development of the TMDL Using Long-Term Monitoring Data and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, A.; Rittenburg, R.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Since 1996, 47,979 Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) have been approved throughout the United States for impaired water bodies. TMDLs are set through the determination of natural background loads for a given water body which then estimate contributions from point and nonpoint sources to create load allocations and determine acceptable pollutant levels to meet water quality standards. Monitoring data and hydrologic models may be used in this process. However, data sets used are often limited in duration and frequency, and model simulations are not always accurate. The objective of this study is to retrospectively look at the development and accuracy of the TMDL for a stream in an agricultural area using long-term monitoring data and a robust modeling process. The study area is the Paradise Creek Watershed in northern Idaho. A sediment TMDL was determined for the Idaho section of Paradise Creek in 1997. Sediment TMDL levels were determined using a short-term data set and the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model. Background loads used for the TMDL in 1997 were from pre-agricultural levels, based on WEPP model results. We modified the WEPP model for simulation of saturation excess overland flow, the dominant runoff generation mechanism, and analyzed more than 10 years of high resolution monitoring data from 2001 - 2012, including discharge and total suspended solids. Results will compare background loading and current loading based on present-day land use documented during the monitoring period and compare previous WEPP model results with the modified WEPP model results. This research presents a reevaluation of the TMDL process with recommendations for a more scientifically sound methodology to attain realistic water quality goals.

  4. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE MONITORING: LONG-TERM TRENDS IN GEOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS AT TWO SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major goal of research on the long-term performance of subsurface reactive barriers is to identify standard ground water monitoring parameters that may be useful indicators of declining performance or impending system failure. Results are presented from ground water monitoring ...

  5. Early Monitoring and Long-Term College Success in Oklahoma. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the differences in early and long-term college outcomes for Oklahoma ACT-tested students between those who were monitored early with ACT Explore® and ACT Plan® and those who did not take these two assessments prior to taking the ACT® Test. Findings support that early monitoring of college and career readiness with ACT Explore…

  6. Long-term soil monitoring at U.S. Geological Survey reference watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHale, Michael R.; Siemion, Jason; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Mast, M. Alisa

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the environment by making repeated measurements through time is essential to evaluate and track the health of ecosystems (fig. 1). Long-term datasets produced by such monitoring are indispensable for evaluating the effectiveness of environmental legislation and for designing mitigation strategies to address environmental changes in an era when human activities are altering the environment locally and globally.

  7. Comprehensive evaluation of long-term hydrological data sets: Constraints of the Budyko framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Peter; Orlowsky, Boris; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2013-04-01

    An accurate estimate of the climatological land water balance is essential for a wide range of socio-economical issues. Despite the simplicity of the underlying water balance equation, its individual variables are of complex nature. Global estimates, either derived from observations or from models, of precipitation (P ) and especially evapotranspiration (ET) are characterized by high uncertainties. This leads to inconsistent results in determining conditions related to the land water balance and its components. In this study, we consider the Budyko framework as a constraint to evaluate long-term hydrological data sets within the period from 1984 to 2005. The Budyko framework is a well established empirically based relationsship between ET-P and Ep-P , with Ep being the potential evaporation. We use estimates of ET associated with the LandFlux-EVAL initiative (Mueller et. al., 2012), either derived from observations, CMIP5 models or land-surface models (LSMs) driven with observation-based forcing or atmospheric reanalyses. Data sets of P comprise all commonly used global observation-based estimates. Ep is determined by methods of differing complexity with recent global temperature and radiation data sets. Based on this comprehensive synthesis of data sets and methods to determine Ep, more than 2000 possible combinations for ET-P in conjunction with Ep-P are created. All combinations are validated against the Budyko curve and against physical limits within the Budyko phase space. For this purpose we develop an error measure based on the root mean square error which combines both constraints. We find that uncertainties are mainly induced by the ET data sets. In particular, reanalysis and CMIP5 data sets are characterized by low realism. The realism of LSMs is further not primarily controlled by the forcing, as different LSMs driven with the same forcing show significantly different error measures. Our comprehensive approach is thus suitable to detect uncertainties

  8. Soil physical and hydrological properties as affected by long-term addition of various organic amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Marie; Völkel, Jörg; Mercier, Vincent; Labat, Christophe; Houot, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    The use of organic residues as soil amendments in agriculture not only reduces the amount of waste needing to be disposed of; it may also lead to improvements in soil properties, including physical and hydrological ones. The present study examines a long-term experiment called "Qualiagro", run jointly by INRA and Veolia Environment in Feucherolles, France (near Paris). It was initiated in 1998 on a loess-derived silt loam (787 g/kg silt, 152 g/kg clay) and includes ten treatments: four types of organic amendments and a control (CNT) each at two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal (Nmin) and optimal (Nopt). The amendments include three types of compost and farmyard manure (FYM), which were applied every other year at a rate of ca. 4 t carbon ha-1. The composts include municipal solid waste compost (MSW), co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (GWS), and biowaste compost (BIO). The plots are arranged in a randomized block design and have a size of 450 m²; each treatment is replicated four times (total of 40 plots). Ca. 15 years after the start of the experiment soil organic carbon (OC) had continuously increased in the amended plots, while it remained stable or decreased in the control plots. This compost- or manure-induced increase in OC plays a key role, affecting numerous dependant soil properties like bulk density, porosity and water retention. The water holding capacity (WHC) of a soil is of particular interest to farmers in terms of water supply for plants, but also indicates soil quality and functionality. Addition of OC may affect WHC in different ways: carbon-induced aggregation may increase larger-pore volume and hence WHC at the wet end while increased surface areas may lead to an increased retention of water at the dry end. Consequently it is difficult to predict (e.g. with pedotransfer functions) the impact on the amount of water available for plants (PAW), which was experimentally determined for the soils, along with the entire range

  9. A Practical Data Recovery Technique for Long-Term Strain Monitoring of Mega Columns during Construction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Se Woon; Kwon, EunMi; Kim, Yousok; Hong, Kappyo; Park, Hyo Seon

    2013-01-01

    A practical data recovery method is proposed for the strain data lost during the safety monitoring of mega columns. The analytical relations among the measured strains are derived to recover the data lost due to unexpected errors in long-term measurement during construction. The proposed technique is applied to recovery of axial strain data of a mega column in an irregular building structure during construction. The axial strain monitoring using the wireless strain sensing system was carried out for one year and five months between 23 July 2010 and 22 February 2012. During the long-term strain sensing, three different types of measurement errors occurred. Using the recovery technique, the strain data that could not be measured at different intervals in the measurement were successfully recovered. It is confirmed that the problems that may occur during long-term wireless strain sensing of mega columns during construction could be resolved through the proposed recovery method. PMID:23966189

  10. Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.

    1992-09-01

    Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

  11. Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.

    1992-09-01

    Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

  12. Long-term in vivo glucose monitoring using fluorescent hydrogel fibers.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yun Jung; Shibata, Hideaki; Okitsu, Teru; Kawanishi, Tetsuro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2011-08-16

    The use of fluorescence-based sensors holds great promise for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in vivo, allowing wireless transdermal transmission and long-lasting functionality in vivo. The ability to monitor glucose concentrations in vivo over the long term enables the sensors to be implanted and replaced less often, thereby bringing CGM closer to practical implementation. However, the full potential of long-term in vivo glucose monitoring has yet to be realized because current fluorescence-based sensors cannot remain at an implantation site and respond to blood glucose concentrations over an extended period. Here, we present a long-term in vivo glucose monitoring method using glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel fibers. We fabricated glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogels in a fibrous structure because this structure enables the sensors to remain at the implantation site for a long period. Moreover, these fibers allow easy control of the amount of fluorescent sensors implanted, simply by cutting the fibers to the desired length, and facilitate sensor removal from the implantation site after use. We found that the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-bonded polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel fibers reduced inflammation compared with PAM hydrogel fibers, transdermally glowed, and continuously responded to blood glucose concentration changes for up to 140 days, showing their potential application for long-term in vivo continuous glucose monitoring. PMID:21808049

  13. Long-term in vivo glucose monitoring using fluorescent hydrogel fibers

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Yun Jung; Shibata, Hideaki; Okitsu, Teru; Kawanishi, Tetsuro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    The use of fluorescence-based sensors holds great promise for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in vivo, allowing wireless transdermal transmission and long-lasting functionality in vivo. The ability to monitor glucose concentrations in vivo over the long term enables the sensors to be implanted and replaced less often, thereby bringing CGM closer to practical implementation. However, the full potential of long-term in vivo glucose monitoring has yet to be realized because current fluorescence-based sensors cannot remain at an implantation site and respond to blood glucose concentrations over an extended period. Here, we present a long-term in vivo glucose monitoring method using glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel fibers. We fabricated glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogels in a fibrous structure because this structure enables the sensors to remain at the implantation site for a long period. Moreover, these fibers allow easy control of the amount of fluorescent sensors implanted, simply by cutting the fibers to the desired length, and facilitate sensor removal from the implantation site after use. We found that the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-bonded polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel fibers reduced inflammation compared with PAM hydrogel fibers, transdermally glowed, and continuously responded to blood glucose concentration changes for up to 140 days, showing their potential application for long-term in vivo continuous glucose monitoring. PMID:21808049

  14. Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Costs - 13422

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol A; Looney, Brian B.; Gaughan, Thomas; Kmetz, Thomas; Seaman, John

    2013-07-01

    A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the

  15. Assessing Watershed-Scale, Long-Term Hydrologic Impacts of Land-Use Change Using a GIS-NPS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra; Harbor, Jon; Engel, Bernie; Grove, Matt

    2000-12-01

    Land-use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, has a significant impact on water resources. This includes impacts on nonpoint source (NPS) pollution, which is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the United States. Traditional hydrologic models focus on estimating peak discharges and NPS pollution from high-magnitude, episodic storms and successfully address short-term, local-scale surface water management issues. However, runoff from small, low-frequency storms dominates long-term hydrologic impacts, and existing hydrologic models are usually of limited use in assessing the long-term impacts of land-use change. A long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) model has been developed using the curve number (CN) method. Long-term climatic records are used in combination with soils and land-use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. The model is linked to a geographic information system (GIS) for convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and advanced visualization of model results. The L-THIA/NPS GIS model was applied to the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Historical land-use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land-use change in the watershed and to assess impacts on annual average runoff and NPS pollution from the watershed and its five subbasins. For the entire watershed between 1973 and 1991, an 18% increase in urban or impervious areas resulted in an estimated 80% increase in annual average runoff volume and estimated increases of more than 50% in annual average loads for lead, copper, and zinc. Estimated nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) loads decreased by 15% mainly because of loss of agricultural areas. The L-THIA/NPS GIS model is a powerful tool for identifying environmentally sensitive areas in terms of NPS pollution potential and for evaluating alternative land use scenarios for NPS

  16. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE MONITORING: LONG-TERM TRENDS IN GEOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS AT TWO SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major goal of research on the long-term performance of subsurface reactive barriers is to identify standard ground-water monitoring parameters that may be useful indicators of declining performance or impending system failure. Results are presented from studies conducted over ...

  17. Changes in methodology for monitoring long-term vegetation quadrats on the Jornada Experimental Range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nearly 150 sq. mi. quadrats were established for long-term monitoring of vegetation dynamics on the Jornada Experimental Range in south central New Mexico in the early 1900s. Today, approximately 120 of those sites are revisited on a five year sampling rotation. Although some of the methods for data...

  18. Long-term monitoring of a large landslide by using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Gerald; Schraml, Klaus; Mansberger, Reinfried; Hübl, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Currently UAVs become more and more important in various scientific areas, including forestry, precision farming, archaeology and hydrology. Using these drones in natural hazards research enables a completely new level of data acquisition being flexible of site, invariant in time, cost-efficient and enabling arbitrary spatial resolution. In this study, a rotary-wing Mini-UAV carrying a DSLR camera was used to acquire time series of overlapping aerial images. These photographs were taken as input to extract Digital Surface Models (DSM) as well as orthophotos in the area of interest. The "Pechgraben" area in Upper Austria has a catchment area of approximately 2 km². Geology is mainly dominated by limestone and sandstone. Caused by heavy rainfalls in the late spring of 2013, an area of about 70 ha began to move towards the village in the valley. In addition to the urgent measures, the slow-moving landslide was monitored approximately every month over a time period of more than 18 months. A detailed documentation of the change process was the result. Moving velocities and height differences were quantified and validated using a dense network of Ground Control Points (GCP). For further analysis, 14 image flights with a total amount of 10.000 photographs were performed to create multi-temporal geodata in in sub-decimeter-resolution for two depicted areas of the landslide. Using a UAV for this application proved to be an excellent choice, as it allows short repetition times, low flying heights and high spatial resolution. Furthermore, the UAV acts almost weather independently as well as highly autonomously. High-quality results can be expected within a few hours after the photo flight. The UAV system performs very well in an alpine environment. Time series of the assessed geodata detect changes in topography and provide a long-term documentation of the measures taken in order to stop the landslide and to prevent infrastructure from damage.

  19. Long-term Monitoring Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    A. Hassan

    2003-09-02

    The groundwater flow and transport model of the Faultless underground nuclear test conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) was accepted by the state regulator and the environmental remediation efforts at the site have progressed to the stages of model validation and long-term monitoring design. This report discusses the long-term monitoring strategy developed for CNTA. Subsurface monitoring is an expensive and time-consuming process, and the design approach should be based on a solid foundation. As such, a thorough literature review of monitoring network design is first presented. Monitoring well networks can be designed for a number of objectives including aquifer characterization, parameter estimation, compliance monitoring, detection monitoring, ambient monitoring, and research monitoring, to name a few. Design methodologies also range from simple hydrogeologic intuition-based tools to sophisticated statistical- and optimization-based tools. When designing the long-term monitoring well network for CNTA, a number of issues are carefully considered. These are the uncertainty associated with the subsurface environment and its implication for monitoring design, the cost associated with monitoring well installation and operation, the design criteria that should be used to select well locations, and the potential conflict between different objectives such as early detection versus impracticality of placing wells in the vicinity of the test cavity. Given these considerations and the literature review of monitoring design studies, a multi-staged approach for development of the long-term monitoring well network for CNTA is proposed. This multi-staged approach will proceed in parallel with the validation efforts for the groundwater flow and transport model of CNTA. Two main stages are identified as necessary for the development of the final long-term monitoring well network for the site. The first stage is to use hydrogeologic expertise combined with model

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A LONG-TERM MONITORING SYSTEM TO EVALUATE COVER SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Kumthekar, U.; Chiou, J. D.; Prochaska, M.; Benson, C. H.

    2002-02-25

    Environmental remediation at the Fernald Environmental Management Project is nearing completion, but long-term technology needs continue to emerge at the site. Remote, real-time, autonomous monitoring technologies are needed to ensure the integrity of the site and its remedy systems once cleanup is complete. The Fernald Post Closure Stewardship Technology Project (PCSTP), through the work of the Integrating Stewardship Technology Team (ISTT), has selected technologies to address initial site needs. This paper will explore the monitoring requirements of the Fernald On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF), the parameters selected as critical for comprehensive long-term monitoring of the facility, and the process by which technologies were chosen to monitor those parameters.

  1. Andra Environmental Specimen Bank: archiving the environmental chemical quality for long-term monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Elisabeth; d'Arbaumont, Maëlle; Verron, Jean-Patrick; Goldstein, Céline; Cesar, Frédérique; Dewonck, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    Andra Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) was established in 2010 as a part of the Perennial Observatory of the Environment (OPE), ongoing Long-Term Environmental Research Monitoring and Testing System located next to the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at Bure, Meuse/Haute-Marne, France. The URL is used to study the deep geological disposal of high and intermediate level radioactive waste. Andra ESB is designed to archive during at least 100 years samples collected to define the initial state of environmental quality of the local area before the construction of industrial facilities and to ensure the traceability of long-term series of samples collected by the OPE ( http://www.andra.fr/ope ), using safe long-term conservation practices. Samples archived in the bank include some local food chain products (milk, cheese, honey, cereals, grass, cherry plum…) and specimen usually archived internationally to monitor the environmental quality (soil, sediment, water, fish, tree leaves, wild life, etc.). Regarding the different samples and analytical issues, three conservation modalities and facilities were designed: dry conservation under controlled temperature and humidity, cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen (LN2) vapor phase freezers (-150 °C) and in deep-freezing at -80 °C for temporary storage and raw samples before preparation. Andra ESB is equipped with a sample preparation clean room, certified ISO Class 5, dedicated to cryopreservation. This paper describes this first French experiment of long-term chemical quality monitoring and samples cryopreservation of different ecosystems and environmental compartments. PMID:24809491

  2. Long-term monitoring of local stress changes in 67km installed OPGW cable using BOTDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, L.; Sezerman, O.

    2015-09-01

    The initial results from continuing long-term monitoring of a 67 km of an aerial fiber optic cable installed on a 500 kV power line cable (total fiber length of 134km) using BOTDA are presented. The effects of thunderstorms and rime ice on the cable were identified by monitoring strain on OPGW fibers. Variations of strain between day and night on the OPGW cable were observed and can potentially be exploited.

  3. Database Structure for Long-Term Hydrologic Data in the Goodwater Creek Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the more valuable assets possessed by ARS is the long-term record from their permanent watershed network, several of which hold more than 30 years of data. However, these data have not always been adequately documented, nor made easily available to the public. This report describes ongoing re...

  4. Contributions of the SSBUV Experiment to Long-Term Ozone Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Cebula, R. P.; Bories, M. C.; Cerullo, J. J.; DeCamp, P. W.; Huang, L.-K.; Hui, C. N.; Janz, S. J.; Kelly, T. J.; McCullough, K. R.; Mederios J. J.; Riley, J. T.; Rice, B. K.; Thorpe, C. D.

    1996-01-01

    The SSBUV experiment flew eight Space Shuttle missions from October 1989 to January 1996 in conducted eight missions between October 1989 and support of the US long-term ozone monitoring program. Contributions of the SSBUV experiment are reviewed in this paper. SSBUV data are being used to provide and validate the absolute and long-term calibrations of multiple satellite-based ozone monitoring instruments. SSBUV observed a significant decrease in Northern hemisphere total ozone from the winter of 1992 to the following winter, and SSBUV data were combined with Nimbus-7 data to assess long-term ozone changes during the 1980's. SSBUV solar irradiance measurements are being used to determine the absolute solar spectral irradiance in the middle UV, validate solar data from two UARS instruments, and independently measure long-term solar change at wavelengths important for ozone photochemistry. SSBUV data where also used to study the effects of surface reflectivity and rotational Raman scattering on the ozone retrievals, determine the NO column amount and its altitude distribution, measure the UV lunar albedo, and assist in the optimization of wavelengths for new instruments.

  5. Flood effects on an Alaskan stream restoration project: the value of long-term monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Roseann V.; Karle, Kenneth F.

    2009-01-01

    On a nationwide basis, few stream restoration projects have long-term programs in place to monitor the effects of floods on channel and floodplain configuration and floodplain vegetation, but long-term and event-based monitoring is required to measure the effects of these stochastic events and to use the knowledge for adaptive management and the design of future projects. This paper describes a long-term monitoring effort (15 years) on a stream restoration project in Glen Creek in Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska. The stream channel and floodplain of Glen Creek had been severely degraded over a period of 80 years by placer mining for gold, which left many reaches with unstable and incised streambeds without functioning vegetated floodplains. The objectives of the original project, initiated in 1991, were to develop and test methods for the hydraulic design of channel and floodplain morphology and for floodplain stabilization and riparian habitat recovery, and to conduct research and monitoring to provide information for future projects in similar degraded watersheds. Monitoring methods included surveyed stream cross-sections, vegetation plots, and aerial, ground, and satellite photos. In this paper we address the immediate and outlying effects of a 25-year flood on the stream and floodplain geometry and riparian vegetation. The long-term monitoring revealed that significant channel widening occurred following the flood, likely caused by excessive upstream sediment loading and the fairly slow development of floodplain vegetation in this climate. Our results illustrated design flaws, particularly in regard to identification and analysis of sediment sources and the dominant processes of channel adjustment.

  6. Long-term dynamics emerging in floodplains and deltas from the interactions between hydrology and society in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Viglione, Alberto; Yan, Kun; Brandimarte, Luigia; Blöschl, Günter

    2014-05-01

    Economic losses and fatalities associated to flood events have increased dramatically over the past decades. This situation might worsen in the near future because of rapid urbanization of many floodplains and deltas, along with enhancement of flood water levels as a result of human interventions, climate variability or sea level rise. To explore future dynamics, we developed a novel approach, which takes into account the dynamic nature of flood risk by an explicit treatment of the interactions and feedbacks between the hydrological and social components of flood risk (i.e. probability of flooding, and potential adverse consequences). In particular, we developed a socio-hydrological model that allows considering how the frequency and magnitude of flooding shapes the evolution of societies, while, at the same time, dynamic societies shape the frequency and magnitude of flooding. We then use this model to simulate long-term dynamics of different types of societies under hydrological change, e.g. increasing flood frequency. Based on the study of long-term dynamics of different floodplains and deltas around the world (e.g. Netherlands, Bangladesh), we identify two main typologies of flood-shaped societies: i) techno-societies, which "fight floods", and typically deal with risk by building and strengthening flood protection structures, such as levees or dikes; and ii) green-societies, which "lives with floods", and mainly cope with risk via adaptation measures, such as resettling out of flood prone areas. The outcomes of this study are relevant for the management of deltas and floodplains as they allow a comparison of long-term dynamics between diverse types of societies in terms of robustness to hydrological change.

  7. Long-term gage reliability for structural health monitoring of steel bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, Vasilis A.; Fasl, Jeremiah; Reichenbach, Matt; Helwig, Todd; Wood, Sharon; Frank, Karl

    2012-04-01

    Real-time monitoring of fracture critical steel bridges can potentially enhance inspection practices by tracking the behavior of the bridge. Significant advances have occurred in recent years on the development of robust hardware for field monitoring applications. These systems can monitor, process, and store data from a variety of sensors (e.g. strain gages, crack propagation gages etc.) to track changes in the behavior of the bridge. Thus, for a long-term monitoring system to be successful, the reliability of gages that are to be monitored for several years is very important. This paper focuses on the results of a research study focused on developing a wireless monitoring system with a useful life of more than 10 years. An important aspect of the study is to identify strain gages and installation procedures that result in long lives as well as characterizing the effect of temperature fluctuations and other environmental factors on the sensor drift and noise. In long-term monitoring applications, slight sensor drift and noise can build up over time to produce misleading results. Thus, a wide variety of gages that can be used to monitor bridges have been tested for over a year through environmental tests. The environmental tests were developed to determine the durability of the gages and their protective coatings (e.g. zinc-based spray, wax and silicon, etc.) against humidity, sun exposure and other environmental effects that are expected in long-term bridge monitoring applications. Moreover, fatigue tests were performed to determine the fatigue category of the weldable gages and to reveal any debonding issues of the bondable gages. This paper focuses on the results of laboratory tests on gage durability that were conducted as part of a research project sponsored by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  8. Using remote sensing and spatial analysis of trees characteristics for long-term monitoring in arid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Sivan; Blumberg, Dan G.; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Ephrath, Jhonathan E.; Maman, Shimrit

    2016-04-01

    Trees play a significant role in the desert ecosystem by moderating the extreme environmental conditions including radiation, temperature, low humidity and small amount of precipitation. Trees In arid environments such an Acacia are considered to be `keystone species', because they have major influence over both plants and animal species. Long term monitoring of acacia tree population in those areas is thus essential tool to estimate the overall ecosystem condition. We suggest a new remote sensing data analysis technique that can be integrated with field long term monitoring of trees in arid environments and improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal changes of these populations. In this work we have studied the contribution of remote sensing methods to long term monitoring of acacia trees in hyper arid environments. In order to expand the time scope of the acacia population field survey, we implemented two different approaches: (1) Trees individual based change detection using Corona satellite images and (2) Spatial analysis of trees population, converting spatial data into temporal data. A map of individual acacia trees that was extracted from a color infra-red (CIR) aerial photographs taken at 2010 allowed us to examine the distribution pattern of the trees size and foliage health status (NDVI). Comparison of the tree sizes distribution and NDVI values distribution enabled us to differentiate between long-term (decades) and short-term (months to few years) processes that brought the population to its present state. The spatial analysis revealed that both tree size and NDVI distribution patterns were significantly clustered, suggesting that the processes responsible for tree size and tree health status (i.e., flash-floods spatial spreading) have a spatial expression. The distribution of the trees in the Wadi (ephemeral river) was divided into three distinct parts: large trees with high NDVI values, large trees with low NDVI values and small trees with

  9. Evaluating the long-term hydrology of an evapotranspiration-capillary barrier with a 1000 year design life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. Fred

    2016-06-01

    A surface barrier is a commonly used technology for isolation of subsurface contaminants. Surface barriers for isolating radioactive waste are expected to perform for centuries to millennia, yet there are very few data for field-scale surface barriers for periods approaching a decade or longer. The Prototype Hanford Barrier (PHB) with a design life of 1000 years was constructed over an existing radioactive waste site in 1994 to demonstrate its long-term performance. The primary element of the PHB is an evapotranspiration-capillary (ETC) barrier in which precipitation water is stored in a fine-textured soil layer and later released to the atmosphere via evapotranspiration. To address the barrier performance under extreme conditions, this study included an enhanced precipitation stress test from 1995 to 1997 to determine barrier response to extreme precipitation events. During this period a 1000 year 24 h return rainstorm was simulated in March every year. The loss of vegetation on barrier hydrology was tested with a controlled fire test in 2008. The 19 year monitoring record shows that the store-and-release mechanism worked as well as or better than the design criterion. Average drainage from the ETC barrier amounted to an average of 0.005 mm yr-1, which is well below the design criterion of 0.5 mm yr-1. After a simulated wildfire, the naturally reestablished vegetation and increased evaporation combined to release the stored water and summer precipitation to the atmosphere such that drainage did not occur in the 5 years subsequent to the fire.

  10. Long-term ex vivo and in vivo monitoring of tumor progression by using dual luciferases.

    PubMed

    Morita, Naoki; Haga, Sanae; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Michitaka

    2016-03-15

    We propose a new concept of tumor progression monitoring using dual luciferases in living animals to reduce stress for small animals and the cost of luciferin. The secreted Cypridina luciferase (CLuc) was used as an ex vivo indicator to continuously monitor tumor progression. On the other hand, the non-secreted firefly luciferase was used as an in vivo indicator to analyze the spatial distribution of the tumor at suitable time points indicated by CLuc. Thus, the new monitoring systems that use dual luciferases are available, allowing long-term bioluminescence imaging under minimal stress for the experimental animals. PMID:26717897

  11. 3D Holographic Observatory for Long-term Monitoring of Complex Behaviors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Santosh; Sun, Yaning; Zou, Sige; Hong, Jiarong

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila is an excellent model organism towards understanding the cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration in humans. The effects of aging and other long-term dynamics on the behavior serve as important biomarkers in identifying such changes to the brain. In this regard, we are presenting a new imaging technique for lifetime monitoring of Drosophila in 3D at spatial and temporal resolutions capable of resolving the motion of limbs and wings using holographic principles. The developed system is capable of monitoring and extracting various behavioral parameters, such as ethograms and spatial distributions, from a group of flies simultaneously. This technique can image complicated leg and wing motions of flies at a resolution, which allows capturing specific landing responses from the same data set. Overall, this system provides a unique opportunity for high throughput screenings of behavioral changes in 3D over a long term in Drosophila. PMID:27605243

  12. 3D Holographic Observatory for Long-term Monitoring of Complex Behaviors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S. Santosh; Sun, Yaning; Zou, Sige; Hong, Jiarong

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila is an excellent model organism towards understanding the cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration in humans. The effects of aging and other long-term dynamics on the behavior serve as important biomarkers in identifying such changes to the brain. In this regard, we are presenting a new imaging technique for lifetime monitoring of Drosophila in 3D at spatial and temporal resolutions capable of resolving the motion of limbs and wings using holographic principles. The developed system is capable of monitoring and extracting various behavioral parameters, such as ethograms and spatial distributions, from a group of flies simultaneously. This technique can image complicated leg and wing motions of flies at a resolution, which allows capturing specific landing responses from the same data set. Overall, this system provides a unique opportunity for high throughput screenings of behavioral changes in 3D over a long term in Drosophila. PMID:27605243

  13. New system for long-term monitoring of sperm motility: EDTA effect on semen.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y L; Tzeng, W L; Chiang, H K; Ni, R F; Lee, T C; Young, S T

    1998-01-01

    Many drugs act as sperm stimulants and are of clinical value for male infertility. Current research deals with the physiological mechanisms of sperm motility/sperm stimulation and how long the effect lasts. For such a study, long-term monitoring of sperm motility becomes essential for traditional semen evaluation. A new system was designed to deal with the microscopic images of semen. Its performance was evaluated by studying the effect of EDTA on sperm motility. EDTA increased sperm curvilinear velocity (Vcl) and straight-line velocity (Vsl) by 31 and 20%. EDTA also prolonged the duration of motility by 68 and 61%, respectively. However, EDTA had less effect on the linearity of forward progression (Lin). The proposed system can analyze semen and does well at monitoring sperm motility for short term and long term. It may be valuable to test the possible role of sperm stimulation for male infertility and assisted reproduction. PMID:9730441

  14. Using larval fish community structure to guide long-term monitoring of fish spawning activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritt, Jeremy J.; Roseman, Edward F.; Ross, Jason E.; DeBruyne, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Larval fishes provide a direct indication of spawning activity and may therefore be useful for long-term monitoring efforts in relation to spawning habitat restoration. However, larval fish sampling can be time intensive and costly. We sought to understand the spatial and temporal structure of larval fish communities in the St. Clair–Detroit River system, Michigan–Ontario, to determine whether targeted larval fish sampling can be made more efficient for long-term monitoring. We found that larval fish communities were highly nested, with lower river segments and late-spring samples containing the highest genus richness of larval fish. We created four sampling scenarios for each river system: (1) using all available data, (2) limiting temporal sampling to late spring, (3) limiting spatial sampling to lower river segments only, and (4) limiting both spatial and temporal sampling. By limiting the spatial extent of sampling to lower river sites and/or limiting the temporal extent to the late-spring period, we found that effort could be reduced by more than 50% while maintaining over 75% of the observed and estimated total genus richness. Similarly, limiting the sampling effort to lower river sites and/or the late-spring period maintained between 65% and 93% of the observed richness of lithophilic-spawning genera and invasive genera. In general, community composition remained consistent among sampling scenarios. Targeted sampling offers a lower-cost alternative to exhaustive spatial and temporal sampling and may be more readily incorporated into long-term monitoring.

  15. Artifact reduction in long-term monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinette, Sarah A.; Dunn, Jeff F.; Slone, Edward; Federico, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging technique used to assess cerebral hemodynamics. Its portability, ease of use, and relatively low operational cost lend itself well to the long-term monitoring of hemodynamic changes, such as those in epilepsy, where events are unpredictable. Long-term monitoring is associated with challenges including alterations in behaviors and motion that can result in artifacts. Five patients with epilepsy were assessed for interictal hemodynamic changes and alterations in behavior or motion. Based on this work, visual inspection was used to identify NIRS artifacts during a period of interest, specifically prior to seizures, in four patients. A motion artifact reduction algorithm (MARA, also known as the spline interpolation method) was tested on these data. Alterations in the NIRS measurements often occurred simultaneously with changes in motion and behavior. Occasionally, sharp shift artifacts were observed in the data. When artifacts appeared as sustained baseline shifts in the data, MARA reduced the standard deviation of the data and the appearance improved. We discussed motion and artifacts as challenges associated with long-term monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics in patients with epilepsy and our group’s approach to circumvent these challenges and improve the quality of the data collected. PMID:26158008

  16. Changes in the long-term hydrological regimes and the impacts of human activities in the main Wei River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Huang, Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Gu, Lei; Chen, Keyu; Yu, Qijun

    2016-03-01

    Under the combined influence of climate changes and human activities, the hydrological regime of the Wei River shows remarkable variations which have caused many issues in the Wei River in recent decades, such as a lack of freshwater, water pollution, disastrous flooding and channel sedimentation. Hence, hydrological regime changes and potential human-induced impacts have been drawing increasing attention from local government and hydrologists. This study investigates hydrological regime changes in the natural and measured runoff series at four hydrological stations on the main Wei River and quantifies features of their long-term change by analysing their historical annual and seasonal runoff data using several approaches, i.e., continuous wavelet transform, cross-wavelet, wavelet coherence, trend-free pre-whitening Mann-Kendall test and detrended fluctuation analysis. By contrasting two different analysis results between natural and measured river runoff series, the impacts of human activities on the long-term hydrological regime were investigated via the changes of spatio-temporal distribution in dominant periods, the trends and long-range memory of river runoff. The results show : (a) that periodic properties of the streamflow changes are the result of climate, referring to precipitation changes in particular, while human activities play a minor role; (b) a significant decreasing trend can be observed in the natural streamflow series along the entire main stream of the Wei River and the more serious decrease emerging in measured flow should result from human-induced influences in recent decades; and (c) continuous decreasing streamflow in the Wei River will trigger serious shortages of freshwater in the future, which may challenge the sustainability and safety of water resources development in the river basin, and should be paid great attention before 2020.

  17. Hydrological modelling of alpine headwaters using centurial glacier evolution, snow and long-term discharge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Irene; Vis, Marc; Freudiger, Daphné; Seibert, Jan; Weiler, Markus; Stahl, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    The response of alpine streamflows to long-term climate variations is highly relevant for the supply of water to adjacent lowlands. A key challenge in modelling high-elevation catchments is the complexity and spatial variability of processes, whereas data availability is rather often poor, restricting options for model calibration and validation. Glaciers represent a long-term storage component that changes over long time-scales and thus introduces additional calibration parameters into the modelling challenge. The presented study aimed to model daily streamflow as well as the contributions of ice and snow melt for all 49 of the River Rhine's glaciated headwater catchments over the long time-period from 1901 to 2006. To constrain the models we used multiple data sources and developed an adapted modelling framework based on an extended version of the HBV model that also includes a time-variable glacier change model and a conceptual representation of snow redistribution. In this study constraints were applied in several ways. A water balance approach was applied to correct precipitation input in order to avoid calibration of precipitation; glacier area change from maps and satellite products and information on snow depth and snow covered area were used for the calibration of each catchment model; and finally, specific seasonal and dynamic aspects of discharge were used for calibration. Additional data like glacier mass balances were used to evaluate the model in selected catchments. The modelling experiment showed that the long-term development of the coupled glacier and streamflow change was particularly important to constrain the model through an objective function incorporating three benchmarks of glacier retreat during the 20th Century. Modelling using only streamflow as calibration criteria had resulted in disproportionate under and over estimation of glacier retreat, even though the simulated and observed streamflow agreed well. Also, even short discharge time

  18. Benefits of a Biological Monitoring Program for Assessing Remediation Performance and Long-Term Stewardship - 12272

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark

    2012-07-01

    The Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) is a long-running program that was designed to evaluate biological conditions and trends in waters downstream of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. BMAP monitoring has focused on aquatic pathways from sources to biota, which is consistent with the sites' clean water regulatory focus and the overall cleanup strategy which divided remediation areas into watershed administrative units. Specific programmatic goals include evaluating operational and legacy impacts to nearby streams and the effectiveness of implemented remediation strategies at the sites. The program is characterized by consistent, long-term sampling and analysis methods in a multidisciplinary and quantitative framework. Quantitative sampling has shown conclusively that at most Oak Ridge stream sites, fish and aquatic macro-invertebrate communities have improved considerably since the 1980s. Monitoring of mercury and PCBs in fish has shown that remedial and abatement actions have also improved stream conditions, although in some cases biological monitoring suggests further actions are needed. Follow-up investigations have been implemented by BMAP to identify sources or causes, consistent with an adaptive management approach. Biological monitoring results to date have not only been used to assess regulatory compliance, but have provided additional benefits in helping address other components of the DOE's mission, including facility operations, natural resource, and scientific goals. As a result the program has become a key measure of long-term trends in environmental conditions and of high value to the Oak Ridge environmental management community, regulators, and the public. Some of the BMAP lessons learned may be of value in the design, implementation, and application of other long-term monitoring and stewardship programs, and assist environmental managers in the assessment and prediction of the effectiveness of remedial

  19. 2009 DOE-EM LONG-TERM MONITORING TECHNICAL FORUM SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.

    2009-09-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has the responsibility for cleaning up 60 sites in 22 states that were associated with the legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and other research and development activities. These sites are unique and many of the technologies needed to successfully disposition the associated wastes have yet to be developed or would require significant re-engineering to be adapted for future EM cleanup efforts. In 2008, the DOE-EM Engineering and Technology Program (EM-22) released the Engineering and Technology Roadmap in response to Congressional direction and the need to focus on longer term activities required for the completion of the aforementioned cleanup program. One of the strategic initiatives included in the Roadmap was to enhance long term performance monitoring as defined by 'Develop and deploy cost effective long-term strategies and technologies to monitor closure sites (including soil, groundwater, and surface water) with multiple contaminants (organics, metals and radionuclides) to verify integrated long-term cleanup performance'. To support this long-term monitoring (LTM) strategic initiative, EM 22 and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) organized and held an interactive symposia, known as the 2009 DOE-EM Long-Term Monitoring Technical Forum, to define and prioritize LTM improvement strategies and products that could be realized within a 3 to 5 year investment time frame. This near-term focus on fundamental research would then be used as a foundation for development of applied programs to improve the closure and long-term performance of EM's legacy waste sites. The Technical Forum was held in Atlanta, GA on February 11-12, 2009, and attended by 57 professionals with a focus on identifying those areas of opportunity that would most effectively advance the transition of the current practices to a more effective strategy for the LTM paradigm. The meeting format

  20. Monitoring and modeling of long-term settlements of an experimental landfill in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Simões, Gustavo Ferreira; Catapreta, Cícero Antônio Antunes

    2013-02-01

    Settlement evaluation in sanitary landfills is a complex process, due to the waste heterogeneity, time-varying properties and influencing factors and mechanisms, such as mechanical compression due to load application and creep, and physical-chemical and biological processes caused by the wastes decomposition. Many empirical models for the analysis of long-term settlement in landfills are reported in the literature. This paper presents the results of a settlement monitoring program carried out during 6 years in Belo Horizonte experimental landfill. Different sets of field data were used to calibrate three long-term settlement prediction models (rheological, hyperbolic and composite). The parameters obtained in the calibration were used to predict the settlements and to compare with actual field data. During the monitoring period of 6 years, significant vertical strains were observed (of up to 31%) in relation to the initial height of the experimental landfill. The results for the long-term settlement prediction obtained by the hyperbolic and rheological models significantly underestimate the settlements, regardless the period of data used in the calibration. The best fits were obtained with the composite model, except when 1 year field data were used in the calibration. The results of the composite model indicate settlements stabilization at larger times and with larger final settlements when compared to the hyperbolic and rheological models. PMID:23177019

  1. Low-power sensor module for long-term activity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Kaspar; Gassert, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Wearable sensor modules are a promising approach to collecting data on functional motor activities, both for repeated and long-term assessments, as well as to investigate the transfer of therapy to activities of daily living at home, but have so far either had limited sensing capabilities, or were not laid out for long-term monitoring. This paper presents ReSense, a miniature sensor unit optimized for long-term monitoring of functional activity. Inertial MEMS sensors capture accelerations along six degrees of freedom and a barometric pressure sensor serves as a precise altimeter. Data is written to an integrated memory card. The realized module measures Ø25 × 10 mm, weighs 10 g and can record continuously for 27 h at 25 Hz and over 22 h at 100 Hz. The integrated power-management system detects inactivity and extends the operating time by about a factor of two, as shown by initial 24 h recordings on five energetic healthy adults. The integrated barometric pressure sensor allowed to identify activities incorporating a change in altitude, such as going up/down stairs or riding an elevator. By taking into account data from the inertial sensors during the altitude changes, it becomes possible to distinguish between these two activities. PMID:22254785

  2. Long-term monitoring dataset of fish assemblages impinged at nuclear power plants in northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hungyen; Liao, Yun-Chih; Chen, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Jeng-I; Chen, Lee-Sea; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2015-01-01

    The long-term species diversity patterns in marine fish communities are garnering increasing attention from ecologists and conservation biologists. However, current databases on quantitative abundance information lack consistent long-term time series, which are particularly important in exploring the possible underlying mechanism of community changes and evaluating the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation measures. Here we describe an impinged fish assemblage dataset containing 1, 283, 707 individuals from 439 taxa. Once a month over 19 years (1987-1990 and 2000-2014), we systematically collected the fish killed by impingement upon cooling water intake screens at two nuclear power plants on the northern coast of Taiwan. Because impingement surveys have low sampling errors and can be carried out over many years, they serve as an ideal sampling tool for monitoring how fish diversity and community structure vary over an extended period of time. PMID:26647085

  3. Long-term monitoring dataset of fish assemblages impinged at nuclear power plants in northern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hungyen; Liao, Yun-Chih; Chen, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Jeng-I; Chen, Lee-Sea; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2015-01-01

    The long-term species diversity patterns in marine fish communities are garnering increasing attention from ecologists and conservation biologists. However, current databases on quantitative abundance information lack consistent long-term time series, which are particularly important in exploring the possible underlying mechanism of community changes and evaluating the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation measures. Here we describe an impinged fish assemblage dataset containing 1, 283, 707 individuals from 439 taxa. Once a month over 19 years (1987–1990 and 2000–2014), we systematically collected the fish killed by impingement upon cooling water intake screens at two nuclear power plants on the northern coast of Taiwan. Because impingement surveys have low sampling errors and can be carried out over many years, they serve as an ideal sampling tool for monitoring how fish diversity and community structure vary over an extended period of time. PMID:26647085

  4. Improving Long-term Post-wildfire hydrologic simulations using ParFlow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, S. R.; Kinoshita, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires alter the natural hydrologic processes within a watershed. After vegetation is burned, the combustion of organic material and debris settles into the soil creating a hydrophobic layer beneath the soil surface with varying degree of thickness and depth. Vegetation regrowth rates vary as a function of radiative exposure, burn severity, and precipitation patterns. Hydrologic models used by the Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams use input data and model calibration constraints that are generally either one-dimensional, empirically-based models, or two-dimensional, conceptually-based models with lumped parameter distributions. These models estimate runoff measurements at the watershed outlet; however, do not provide a distributed hydrologic simulation at each point within the watershed. This work uses ParFlow, a three-dimensional, distributed hydrologic model to (1) correlate burn severity with hydrophobicity, (2) evaluate vegetation recovery rate on water components, and (3) improve flood prediction for managers to help with resource allocation and management operations in burned watersheds. ParFlow is applied to Devil Canyon (43 km2) in San Bernardino, California, which was 97% burned in the 2003 Old Fire. The model set-up uses a 30m-cell size resolution over a 6.7 km by 6.4 km lateral extent. The subsurface reaches 30 m and is assigned a variable cell thickness. Variable subsurface thickness allows users to explicitly consider the degree of recovery throughout the stages of regrowth. Burn severity maps from remotely sensed imagery are used to assign initial hydrophobic layer parameters and thickness. Vegetation regrowth is represented with satellite an Enhanced Vegetation Index. Pre and post-fire hydrologic response is evaluated using runoff measurements at the watershed outlet, and using water component (overland flow, lateral flow, baseflow) measurements.

  5. Physics-Based Continuous Simulation of Long-Term Near-Surface Hydrologic Response for the Coos Bay Experimental Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, B. A.; Loague, K.; Montgomery, D. R.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2007-12-01

    The study reported here employed the physics-based InHM to simulate continuous hydrologic response from 1990 through 1996 for the Coos Bay (CB1) experimental catchment. InHM dynamically simulates 3D variably- saturated subsurface flow using Richards equation and 2D surface and open channel flow using the diffusion- wave approximation to the depth-integrated shallow-water equations. The uniqueness of the boundary-value problem (BVP) used in a previous study to successfully simulate three sprinkling experiments was assessed, via model performance evaluation against piezometric and discharge data, for 33 events extracted from the seven- year continuous record. The simulations conducted in this effort suggest the potential for interaction between the deeper water table and near-surface hydrologic response, which is in agreement with the detailed field observations made during the CB1 sprinkling experiments. The InHM simulations could not adequately reproduce the observed pore-water pressures, suggesting that detailed characterization of the locations and connectivities of bedrock fractures would be necessary to simulate distributed hydrologic response at locations where bedrock fracture flow is important. The results from this study suggest that uniqueness is a problem for physics-based models when employing a BVP used successfully for smaller magnitude storms to simulate larger storms. The long-term simulations conducted here, combined with previous event-based hydrologic- response simulations and field-based observations, highlight the challenges in characterizing / simulating fractured bedrock flow at small catchments like CB1.

  6. Long-term surface EMG monitoring using K-means clustering and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present an advanced K-means clustering algorithm based on Compressed Sensing theory (CS) in combination with the K-Singular Value Decomposition (K-SVD) method for Clustering of long-term recording of surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The long-term monitoring of sEMG signals aims at recording of the electrical activity produced by muscles which are very useful procedure for treatment and diagnostic purposes as well as for detection of various pathologies. The proposed algorithm is examined for three scenarios of sEMG signals including healthy person (sEMG-Healthy), a patient with myopathy (sEMG-Myopathy), and a patient with neuropathy (sEMG-Neuropathr), respectively. The proposed algorithm can easily scan large sEMG datasets of long-term sEMG recording. We test the proposed algorithm with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Correlation Coefficient (LCC) dimensionality reduction methods. Then, the output of the proposed algorithm is fed to K-Nearest Neighbours (K-NN) and Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) classifiers in order to calclute the clustering performance. The proposed algorithm achieves a classification accuracy of 99.22%. This ability allows reducing 17% of Average Classification Error (ACE), 9% of Training Error (TE), and 18% of Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). The proposed algorithm also reduces 14% clustering energy consumption compared to the existing K-Means clustering algorithm.

  7. Establishing a Long Term High-Altitude Soil Moisture Monitoring Network at the Watershed Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.; Osenga, E. C.; Jack-Scott, E.; Arnott, J. C.; Katzenberger, J.

    2015-12-01

    The interactive Roaring Fork Observation Network (iRON) was established in the Roaring Fork Valley of Colorado in 2012 with the vision of a long-term monitoring project of benefit to both the research community and local land managers. Long-term research on high elevation precipitation patterns and soil moisture has been limited in the intermountain West of the United States. This information can provide increasingly valuable insight into ecosystem dynamics at high elevations, especially in light of climate change projections for the region and montane areas in general. The network currently ranges in elevation from roughly 1,980m to 2,700m with additional stations slated for installation this summer that will broaden that range from 1,880m to 3,000m elevation. Stations take measurements every 20 minutes on soil moisture at three depths, air temperature, relative humidity, rain, and soil temperature. Data from these stations are publicly shared on an interactive, educational website that offers context for observed changes in the local watershed, as well as opportunities for feedback and inquiry. Not only will these data have value for local land management and restoration decisions, they also will be distributed to regional, national, and international research communities as a valuable data set on long term soil moisture trends across an elevational-gradient. Collaborators include, towns, counties, non-profits and the private sector. It is intended that this data set will be continuously collected over the span of coming decades.

  8. Long-term post-wildfire monitoring of phenology and recovery using a MODIS time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, S.; Hargrove, W. W.; Spruce, J.

    2012-12-01

    Disturbance severity in forests or grasslands is generally conceptualized as the difference between the state before and immediately after a disturbance event. This approach fails to capture slow-acting disturbances that take years to materialize, secondary disturbance effects such as delayed mortality, or variable rates of recovery. Remotely sensed data can provide a multi-seasonal baseline and long-term post-disturbance record of recovery that also captures associated disturbances, such as post event salvage logging or restoration efforts. Here we track the MODIS satellite-based Normalized Difference Vegetation Index or NDVI of several large wildfires that occurred early in the last decade to measure fire and associated disturbance severity with multi-seasonal and multi-year contexts. Large fires analyzed included Oregon's Biscuit Fire, Colorado's Hayman Fire, Arizona's Rodeo-Chediski Fire, and Georgia's Okefenokee Fire among others. Short-term results were generally consistent with prior post-fire estimates of short-term wildfire severity, but long-term fire effects diversified. Both short and long-term severity varied by topography and vegetation types, as measured by changes in seasonal NDVI, not just single-season NDVI. This broadened monitoring technique provides a moderate resolution record of recovery that can inform questions related to cumulative impacts and ecological resilience.

  9. Regional and temporal differences in nitrate trends discerned from long-term water quality monitoring data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, Edward G.; Kelly, Valerie J.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Riverine nitrate (NO3) is a well-documented driver of eutrophication and hypoxia in coastal areas. The development of the elevated river NO3 concentration is linked to anthropogenic inputs from municipal, agricultural, and atmospheric sources. The intensity of these sources has varied regionally, through time, and in response to multiple causes such as economic drivers and policy responses. This study uses long-term water quality, land use, and other ancillary data to further describe the evolution of river NO3 concentrations at 22 monitoring stations in the United States (U.S.). The stations were selected for long-term data availability and to represent a range of climate and land-use conditions. We examined NO3 at the monitoring stations, using a flow-weighting scheme meant to account for interannual flow variability allowing greater focus on river chemical conditions. River NO3 concentration increased strongly during 1945-1980 at most of the stations and have remained elevated, but stopped increasing during 1981-2008. NO3 increased to a greater extent at monitoring stations in the Midwest U.S. and less so at those in the Eastern and Western U.S. We discuss 20th Century agricultural development in the U.S. and demonstrate that regional differences in NO3 concentration patterns were strongly related to an agricultural index developed using principal components analysis. This unique century-scale dataset adds to our understanding of long-term NO3 patterns in the U.S.

  10. WRF-HMS, a fully-coupled regional atmospheric-hydrological modeling system for long-term scale applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sven; Fersch, Benjamin; Yuan, Fei; Yu, Zhongbo; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Feedback among the atmosphere, land surface and subsurface is important to understand the non-linear connections within the hydrological cycle. Investigations of climate and land-use changes on the regional water balance require fully-coupled atmospheric-hydrological modeling systems, which describe such feedback mechanisms and allow long-term simulations at climate-relevant scales. We have developed such a fully-coupled, meso-scale modeling system extending the atmospheric model WRF-ARW with the hydrological model HMS, which includes lateral water fluxes at the land surface and subsurface. Both models are bound to the Noah land surface model (Noah-LSM) and share compatible water and energy flux formulations. In addition, two-way interaction between the saturated and the unsaturated zone is implemented by replacing the free drainage bottom boundary of the Noah-LSM with two approaches, a Fixed-head boundary condition assuming an equilibrium soil moisture distribution or a Darcy-flux at the boundary assuming a quasi-steady-state moisture profile below the LSM. The comparatively small additional computational demand of this coupled model system allows long-term simulations. A first application of the fully-coupled modeling system was performed for the Poyang Lake basin (160,000 km²) in Southern China for the years 1979-1986. For the WRF model, a double-nesting approach is applied covering East Asia at 30 km resolution and the Poyang Lake basin at 10 km using ERA Interim data as global forcing. The HMS and fully-coupled simulations are performed on the 10 km grid. The performance of the stand-alone and the fully coupled simulations are presented. Furthermore, the impact of groundwater coupling on soil moisture, evapotranspiration, temperature and precipitation is investigated.

  11. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology for Long Term High Precision Deformation Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Vezočnik, Rok; Ambrožič, Tomaž; Sterle, Oskar; Bilban, Gregor; Pfeifer, Norbert; Stopar, Bojan

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a new methodology for high precision monitoring of deformations with a long term perspective using terrestrial laser scanning technology. In order to solve the problem of a stable reference system and to assure the high quality of possible position changes of point clouds, scanning is integrated with two complementary surveying techniques, i.e., high quality static GNSS positioning and precise tacheometry. The case study object where the proposed methodology was tested is a high pressure underground pipeline situated in an area which is geologically unstable. PMID:22303152

  12. Inkjet printed ECG electrodes for long term biosignal monitoring in personalized and ubiquitous healthcare.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, John C; Casson, Alexander J

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates the performance of inkjet printed electrodes for electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring in personalized and ubiquitous healthcare. As a rapid prototyping, additive manufacturing approach, inkjet printing can allow personalization of electrode sizes and shapes and can be used with a range of substrates to achieve good long term connections to the skin. We compare the performance of two types of inkjet electrodes printed using different substrates. Results demonstrate that both new electrodes can record ECG information, with comparable signal-to-noise ratios to conventional Ag/AgCl electrodes. The time-frequency decomposition of the collected signals is also explored. PMID:26737174

  13. Long-term ecosystem monitoring and assessment of the Detroit River and Western Lake Erie.

    PubMed

    Hartig, J H; Zarull, M A; Ciborowski, J J H; Gannon, J E; Wilke, E; Norwood, G; Vincent, A N

    2009-11-01

    Over 35 years of US and Canadian pollution prevention and control efforts have led to substantial improvements in environmental quality of the Detroit River and western Lake Erie. However, the available information also shows that much remains to be done. Improvements in environmental quality have resulted in significant ecological recovery, including increasing populations of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), peregrine falcons (Falco columbarius), lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), walleye (Sander vitreus), and burrowing mayflies (Hexagenia spp.). Although this recovery is remarkable, many challenges remain, including population growth, transportation expansion, and land use changes; nonpoint source pollution; toxic substances contamination; habitat loss and degradation; introduction of exotic species; and greenhouse gases and global warming. Research/monitoring must be sustained for effective management. Priority research and monitoring needs include: demonstrating and quantifying cause-effect relationships; establishing quantitative endpoints and desired future states; determining cumulative impacts and how indicators relate; improving modeling and prediction; prioritizing geographic areas for protection and restoration; and fostering long-term monitoring for adaptive management. Key management agencies, universities, and environmental and conservation organizations should pool resources and undertake comprehensive and integrative assessments of the health of the Detroit River and western Lake Erie at least every 5 years to practice adaptive management for long-term sustainability. PMID:18850284

  14. Noise Reduction in Long-term Self-potential Monitoring with Travelling Electrode Referencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Pant, Surendra Raj

    2005-01-01

    The long-term monitoring of the electric self-potential (SP) in geophysical systems is affected by electrode degradation and drift. This error contribution can be reduced if the electrodes of measuring dipoles are referenced to the same accessory electrode, moved in turn at each pole. The benefit of this travelling electrode referencing scheme (TER) has been evaluated in a dedicated experiment performed from March 2000 to March 2001 at Tribhuvan University, Nepal. Two prototype monitoring points separated by 55 m have been instrumented with pairs of lead-lead chloride Petiau electrodes, installed in buckets filled with salted bentonite at a depth of 1 and 2 meters. The electrical potential at 1 and 2 meters depth was also accessible from the surface by pipes filled with salted bentonite. Over one year, the measurement error, defined as the standard deviation of the difference between the measured potential and the true SP at a given time, is estimated to be 5 mV. This error value is reduced to less than 1 mV with TER. After correction, a smooth annual variation with amplitude of 10 to 15 mV is observed and is interpreted as streaming potentials associated with the monsoon and subsequent drying. These results provide significant guidelines for precision long-term SP monitoring, in particular in tropical volcanic or tectonically active regions.

  15. Long-term monitoring at the New Bedford Harbor marine Superfund site: Phase 4 -- Data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.G.; Bergen, B.J.; Morrison, G.; Copeland, J.

    1995-12-31

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, is a marine Superfund site due to severely PCB-contaminated sediments. Recently, the first phase of remediation was completed; dredging of a five acre ``Hot Spot``. Prior to remediation, a comprehensive 30 year long-term monitoring program was developed and implemented at this site that incorporated a systematic, probabilistic, hexagonal grid sampling design, and an information management system similar to that used by the EPA`s Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program. Pre-remedial baseline sediment sampling consisted of quantifying a suite of exposure indicators (PCBs, metals, sediment toxicity), habitat indicators (TOC, AVS, grain size) and ecological indicators (benthic community indices) at each of 72 stations along a gradient from the severely contaminated upper estuary to Buzzards Bay. Analyses of these data, presented in GIS format, focused on the relationships between total and bioavailable contaminant concentrations (PCBs and metals), bioavailable contaminants and sediment toxicity, bioavailable contaminants and benthic community structure, and a comparison between standard short-term sediment toxicity (10-day test) and longer-term benthic community structure. Results of these and subsequent analyses will be used to modify the sampling efforts during the course of the 30 year long-term monitoring plan.

  16. Design and Field Test of a WSN Platform Prototype for Long-Term Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Lazarescu, Mihai T.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term wildfire monitoring using distributed in situ temperature sensors is an accurate, yet demanding environmental monitoring application, which requires long-life, low-maintenance, low-cost sensors and a simple, fast, error-proof deployment procedure. We present in this paper the most important design considerations and optimizations of all elements of a low-cost WSN platform prototype for long-term, low-maintenance pervasive wildfire monitoring, its preparation for a nearly three-month field test, the analysis of the causes of failure during the test and the lessons learned for platform improvement. The main components of the total cost of the platform (nodes, deployment and maintenance) are carefully analyzed and optimized for this application. The gateways are designed to operate with resources that are generally used for sensor nodes, while the requirements and cost of the sensor nodes are significantly lower. We define and test in simulation and in the field experiment a simple, but effective communication protocol for this application. It helps to lower the cost of the nodes and field deployment procedure, while extending the theoretical lifetime of the sensor nodes to over 16 years on a single 1 Ah lithium battery. PMID:25912349

  17. Long term adjustment of canopy root depth and strength: Implications catchment hydrology and slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, T. C.; Taehee, H.; Band, L.; Vose, J.

    2007-12-01

    The species composition of southern Appalachian forests is changing rapidly due to fire suppression, residential expansion and introduced parasites, such as the woody adelgid. Changes in the distribution and age of tree and understory species cause changes in rooting characteristics and therefore the stability of slopes. Roots increase soil cohesive strength and fail in tension during debris flows. The amount of root reinforcement to the soil mass is dependent on the number, size and tensile strength of the roots. We have characterized how changes in the composition of southern Appalachian forests, particularly the expansion of Rhododenron maximum due to fire suppression, may affect the potential for slope failure. We measured the vertical distribution and tensile strength of roots for fifteen individual trees and two mixed species locations in the Coweeta Hydrological Laboratory, North Carolina. The individual pits were chosen to capture variations in species (10 species total), topographic position (nose, side slope, hollow), and age (a range of DBH between 5 cm and 60 cm). Root tensile strengths from different hardwood species were very similar, while rhododendron, a woody shrub, has considerably weaker roots. Roots are concentrated close to the soil surface (at least 70% of biomass occurs within 50 cm of the surface) and variations in this pattern occur primarily as a function of age. R. maximum roots are shallower and weaker than tree roots, which when coupled with low transpiration rates, lowers the total cohesive strength and makes them susceptible to high pore pressure events. We have investigated the potential for mapping R. maximum based on the ratio of near-infrared to red within leaf-off color infrared images. When we combine the remotely-sensed distribution of R. maximum with the root cohesion data from individual pits, we can produce a realistic spatial distribution of root cohesion for southern Appalachian forests. The spatial distribution of root

  18. A Concept for a Long Term Hydrologic Observatory in the South Platte River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    patterns in the region. Government programs, to help manage natural resources in the region, have fractured jurisdiction over the area. With a detailed integration of data sets the South Platte Hydrologic Observatory will address the above water issues, which are representative of many of the scientific hydrologic issues facing the Rocky Mountain/Great Plains interface watersheds, advancing the science of hydrology and producing sound science findings to assist natural resource decision making in the region.

  19. The value of long-term environmental monitoring programs: an Ohio River case study.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Timothy W; Dixon, Douglas A

    2013-11-01

    As a subset of environmental monitoring, fish sampling programs have been an important part of assessing the potential impacts of water withdrawals and effluent discharges on fish populations for many years. New environmental regulations often require that adverse environmental impacts to fish populations be minimized. Without long-term field data, population evaluations may incorrectly indicate adverse impacts where none exist or no impact where one is likely to occur. Several electric utility companies have funded the Ohio River Ecological Research Program, which has been in existence for over 40 years and consists of fish, habitat, and water quality studies at multiple power plant sites on the mainstem Ohio River. Sampling includes seasonal night-time electrofishing and daytime beach seining at three upstream and three downstream locations near each plant. The long-term nature of the program allows for the establishment of aquatic community indices to support evaluations of technology performance, the collaborative development of compliance metrics, and the assessment of fish population trends. Studies have concluded that the Ohio River fish community has improved in response to better water quality and that power plant fish entrainment and impingement and thermal discharges have had little or no measureable impact. Through collaboration and the use of long-term data, $6.3 million in monitoring costs have been saved during recent fish impingement studies. The ability to access a multiyear fish abundance database, with its associated data on age, growth, and fecundity, improves the quality of such evaluations and reduces the need for extensive field sampling at individual locations. PMID:23715733

  20. The Role of Global Hydrologic Processes in Interannual and Long-Term Climate Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.

    1997-01-01

    The earth's climate and its variability is linked inextricably with the presence of water on our planet. El Nino / Southern Oscillation-- the major mode of interannual variability-- is characterized by strong perturbations in oceanic evaporation, tropical rainfall, and radiation. On longer time scales, the major feedback mechanism in CO2-induced global warming is actually that due to increased water vapor holding capacity of the atmosphere. The global hydrologic cycle effects on climate are manifested through influence of cloud and water vapor on energy fluxes at the top of atmosphere and at the surface. Surface moisture anomalies retain the "memory" of past precipitation anomalies and subsequently alter the partitioning of latent and sensible heat fluxes at the surface. At the top of atmosphere, water vapor and cloud perturbations alter the net amount of radiation that the earth's climate system receives. These pervasive linkages between water, radiation, and surface processes present major complexities for observing and modeling climate variations. Major uncertainties in the observations include vertical structure of clouds and water vapor, surface energy balance, and transport of water and heat by wind fields. Modeling climate variability and change on a physical basis requires accurate by simplified submodels of radiation, cloud formation, radiative exchange, surface biophysics, and oceanic energy flux. In the past, we m safely say that being "data poor' has limited our depth of understanding and impeded model validation and improvement. Beginning with pre-EOS data sets, many of these barriers are being removed. EOS platforms with the suite of measurements dedicated to specific science questions are part of our most cost effective path to improved understanding and predictive capability. This talk will highlight some of the major questions confronting global hydrology and the prospects for significant progress afforded by EOS-era measurements.

  1. Long-term linkages between glaciers, permafrost and hydrology at two glacierized watersheds in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaedeke, A.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Gatesman, T.; Campbell, S. W.; Hock, R.; Oneel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate warming is expected to have considerable impact on the regional water balance of high latitude Arctic and sub-Arctic glacerized watersheds. In this study we combine field observations and the physically based Water Balance Simulation Model WaSiM to refine our understanding of the linkages between glaciers, permafrost and hydrology at two nearby basins with contrasting precipitation regimes: Jarvis Cr. watershed (630 km2) on the north (rain-shadow) side of Eastern Alaska Range and the south facing Phelan Cr. (32 km2), which include the US Geological Survey benchmark site Gulkana Glacier. Both are characterized by a semi-arid climate and are sub-watersheds of the Tanana River basin (12,000 km2). Our research questions include: How has glacier water storage and release varied in the past and how are they expected to change in the future? And what are the subsequent effects on lowland runoff and regional groundwater recharge? Our analyses show i) an increase in air temperature and summer warmth index (the sum of all mean monthly air temperature above 0 °C) in recent decades and ii) a continued negative glacier mass balance. Our findings suggest that, on the larger spatial scale (Tanana River basin), the reduced glacier coverage and increased glacier wastage has, in combination with limited changes in precipitation, lead to (i) increased mean annual and (ii) late winter (March) runoff. We postulate that this is due to increased groundwater recharge, which has been fueled by the 20% reduction in glacier coverage of the Tanana River basin. Here we aim to assess the combined effect of climate change, glacier shrinkage and thawing permafrost on the regional sub-arctic mountain- to lowland hydrologic system, which may transition into a regime with less surface and more subsurface water availability.

  2. Long-term temperature monitoring at the biological community site on the Nankai accretionary prism off Kii Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, S.; Hamamoto, H.; Yamano, M.; Kinoshita, M.; Ashi, J.

    2008-12-01

    Nankai subduction zone off Kii Peninsula is one of the most intensively surveyed areas for studies on the seismogenic zone. Multichannel seismic reflection surveys carried out in this area revealed the existence of splay faults that branched from the subduction zone plate boundary [Park et al., 2002]. Along the splay faults, reversal of reflection polarity was observed, indicating elevated pore fluid pressure along the faults. Cold seepages with biological communities were discovered along a seafloor outcrop of one of the splay faults through submersible observations. Long-term temperature monitoring at a biological community site along the outcrop revealed high heat flow carried by upward fluid flow (>180 mW/m2) [Goto et al., 2003]. Toki et al. [2004] estimated upward fluid flow rates of 40-200 cm/yr from chloride distribution of interstitial water extracted from sediments in and around biological community sites along the outcrop. These observation results suggest upward fluid flow along the splay fault. In order to investigate hydrological nature of the splay fault, we conducted long-term temperature monitoring again in the same cold seepage site where Goto et al. [2003] carried out long-term temperature monitoring. In this presentation, we present results of the temperature monitoring and estimate heat flow carried by upward fluid flow from the temperature records. In this long-term temperature monitoring, we used stand-alone heat flow meter (SAHF), a probe-type sediment temperature recorder. Two SAHFs (SAHF-3 and SAHF-4) were used in this study. SAHF-4 was inserted into a bacterial mat, within several meters of which the previous long-term temperature monitoring was conducted. SAHF-3 was penetrated into ordinary sediment near the bacterial mat. The sub-bottom temperature records were obtained for 8 months. The subsurface temperatures oscillated reflecting bottom- water temperature variation (BTV). For sub-bottom temperatures measured with SAHF-3 (outside of

  3. Ultrahigh sensitivity heavy noble gas detectors for long-term monitoring and for monitoring air. Technical status report

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, J.D.

    1999-01-31

    The primary objective of this research project is to develop heavy noble gas (krypton, xenon, and radon) detectors for (1) long-term monitoring of transuranic waste, spent fuel, and other uranium and thorium bearing wastes and (2) alpha particle air monitors that discriminate between radon emissions and other alpha emitters. A University of Cincinnati/Argonne National Laboratory (UC/ANL) Team was assembled to complete this detector development project. DOE needs that are addressed by this project include improved long-term monitoring capability and improved air monitoring capability during remedial activities. Successful development and implementation of the proposed detection systems could significantly improve current capabilities with relatively simple and inexpensive equipment.

  4. Enhanced semipermanent dialysis samplers for long-term environmental monitoring in saturated sediments.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Luke H; Paull, Jeffery S; Jaffé, Peter R

    2013-05-01

    The ability to sample in situ natural environmental processes has proven to be challenging when working with redox-sensitive contaminates in saturated sediments in wetland systems, especially within the rhizosphere, where sharp redox gradients are common. Many traditional approaches are invasive and disturb natural sediment chemistry. Through laboratory and field studies, the work presented in this study demonstrates a novel semipermanent dialysis sampler that allows for long-term, anaerobic monitoring of shallow sediments. Dialysis samplers were deployed and tested for over 1 year while being exposed to extremes in climate. These newly designed devices produce statistically reproducible data and capture sensitive redox trends. Results from the newly designed samplers were compared to conventional samplers. Initially, both the new and old designs yielded statistically similar data, but these data diverged over a period of months. The new devices are less invasive, so data gathered from these devices are more likely to be a closer representation of true conditions in the subsurface. By giving reliable data from a consistent location in space, these new samplers represent a significant step forward in capturing spatial and temporal variability in wetland redox chemistry during long-term monitoring. PMID:22890868

  5. Analysis options for estimating status and trends in long-term monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bart, Jonathan; Beyer, Hawthorne L.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes methods for estimating long-term trends in ecological parameters. Other chapters in this volume discuss more advanced methods for analyzing monitoring data, but these methods may be relatively inaccessible to some readers. Therefore, this chapter provides an introduction to trend analysis for managers and biologists while also discussing general issues relevant to trend assessment in any long-term monitoring program. For simplicity, we focus on temporal trends in population size across years. We refer to the survey results for each year as the “annual means” (e.g. mean per transect, per plot, per time period). The methods apply with little or no modification, however, to formal estimates of population size, other temporal units (e.g. a month), to spatial or other dimensions such as elevation or a north–south gradient, and to other quantities such as chemical or geological parameters. The chapter primarily discusses methods for estimating population-wide parameters rather than studying variation in trend within the population, which can be examined using methods presented in other chapters (e.g. Chapters 7, 12, 20). We begin by reviewing key concepts related to trend analysis. We then describe how to evaluate potential bias in trend estimates. An overview of the statistical models used to quantify trends is then presented. We conclude by showing ways to estimate trends using simple methods that can be implemented with spreadsheets.

  6. Long-Term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Synthesis and Environmental Management Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Mark J.; Efroymson, Rebecca A.; Adams, S. Marshall

    2011-06-01

    The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

  7. Long-Term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications for Environmental Management [Special Issue

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Marshall; Brandt, Craig C; Christensen, Sigurd W; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Ham, Kenneth; Kszos, Lynn A; Loar, James M; McCracken, Kitty; Morris, Gail Wright; Peterson, Mark J; Ryon, Michael G; Smith, John G; Southworth, George R; Stewart, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

  8. Long-term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Synthesis and Environmental Management Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark J; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Adams, Marshall

    2011-01-01

    The long-term ecological recovery of an impaired stream in response to an industrial facility's pollution abatement actions and the implications of the biological monitoring effort to environmental management is the subject of this special issue of Environmental Management. This final article focuses on the synthesis of the biological monitoring program's components and methods, the efficacy of various biological monitoring techniques to environmental management, and the lessons learned from the program that might be applicable to the design and application of other programs. The focus of the 25-year program has been on East Fork Poplar Creek, an ecologically impaired stream in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with varied and complex stressors from a Department of Energy facility in its headwaters. Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and instream communities (including periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish). Key parallel components of the program include water chemistry sampling and data management. Multiple lines of evidence suggested positive ecological responses during three major pollution abatement periods. Based on this case study and the related literature, effective environmental management of impaired streams starts with program design that is consistent across space and time, but also adaptable to changing conditions. The biological monitoring approaches used for the program provided a strong basis for assessments of recovery from remedial actions, and the likely causes of impairment. This case study provides a unique application of multidisciplinary and quantitative techniques to address multiple and complex regulatory and programmatic goals, environmental stressors, and remedial actions.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging: opportunities for rheumatoid arthritis disease assessment and monitoring long-term treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) combined with early initiation of an appropriate treatment regimen is acknowledged as an important factor in improving clinical outcomes in patients with RA. Early diagnosis allows treatment intervention to occur sooner in order to inhibit the progression of structural joint damage as well as providing improved patient quality of life. Unfortunately, early diagnosis has been challenging due to the non-specific signs and symptoms associated with many polyarthropathies and the lack of accurate definitive diagnostic tests that can accurately classify RA at presentation. The emphasis on early diagnosis has fueled the need for powerful, sensitive, non-invasive imaging techniques that not only accurately define RA and give an indication of prognosis, but can also serve as a tool to monitor long-term treatment outcomes. This article reviews the potential uses of magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for the classification, documentation, and clinical monitoring of RA. PMID:12110151

  10. Automatic modal identification of cable-supported bridges instrumented with a long-term monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. Q.; Fan, K. Q.; Zheng, G.; Chan, T. H. T.; Ko, J. M.

    2003-08-01

    An automatic modal identification program is developed for continuous extraction of modal parameters of three cable-supported bridges in Hong Kong which are instrumented with a long-term monitoring system. The program employs the Complex Modal Indication Function (CMIF) algorithm to identify modal properties from continuous ambient vibration measurements in an on-line manner. By using the LabVIEW graphical programming language, the software realizes the algorithm in Virtual Instrument (VI) style. The applicability and implementation issues of the developed software are demonstrated by using one-year measurement data acquired from 67 channels of accelerometers deployed on the cable-stayed Ting Kau Bridge. With the continuously identified results, normal variability of modal vectors caused by varying environmental and operational conditions is observed. Such observation is very helpful for selection of appropriate measured modal vectors for structural health monitoring applications.

  11. Design and long-term monitoring of DSC/CIGS tandem solar module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vildanova, M. F.; Nikolskaia, A. B.; Kozlov, S. S.; Shevaleevskiy, O. I.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the design and development of tandem dye-sensitized/Cu(In, Ga)Se (DSC/CIGS) PV modules. The tandem PV module comprised of the top DSC module and a bottom commercial 0,8 m2 CIGS module. The top DSC module was made of 10 DSC mini-modules with the field size of 20 × 20 cm2 each. Tandem DSC/CIGS PV modules were used for providing the long-term monitoring of energy yield and electrical parameters in comparison with standalone CIGS modules under outdoor conditions. The outdoor test facility, containing solar modules of both types and a measurement unit, was located on the roof of the Institute of Biochemical Physics in Moscow. The data obtained during monitoring within the 2014 year period has shown the advantages of the designed tandem DSC/CIGS PV-modules over the conventional CIGS modules, especially for cloudy weather and low-intensity irradiation conditions.

  12. Long-term magnetic monitoring of 19 Sun-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, A.; Petit, P.; Morin, J.; Aurière, M.; Dintrans, B.

    2011-12-01

    A sample of 19 Sun-like stars, probing masses between 0.7 and 1.4 solar mass and rotation rates between 1 and 3 solar rotation rate, was regularly observed using the NARVAL spectropolarimeter at Telescope Bernard Lyot (Pic du Midi, France) since 2006. The data sets enable us to monitor the rotational and long-term evolution of indirect activity indicators such as the width of several magnetically-sensitive spectral lines, the radial velocities, the line asymmetry of intensity line profiles and the chromospheric emission in the cores of the Ca II H and Halpha lines. In the same time, the Zeeman-Doppler Imaging allowed us to study the reconstructed large-scale photospheric magnetic field. I will present the main results of this monitoring, which includes the observations of several polarity reversals and magnetic cycles, and the highlight of links between some of our computed quantities and some fundamental parameters of the stars.

  13. Highly Resolved Long-term 3D Hydrological Simulation of a Forested Catchment with Litter Layer and Fractured Bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Bogena, H. R.; Kollet, S. J.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water content plays a key role in the water and energy balance in soil, vegetation and atmosphere systems. According to Wood et al. (2011) there is a grand need to increase global-scale hyper-resolution water-energy-biogeochemistry land surface modelling capabilities. However, such a model scheme should also recognize the epistemic uncertainties, as well as the nonlinearity and hysteresis in its dynamics. Unfortunately, it is not clear how to parameterize hydrological processes as a function of scale and how to test deterministic models with regard to epistemic uncertainties. In this study, high resolution long-term simulations were conducted in the highly instrumented TERENO hydrological observatory, the Wüstebach catchment. Soil hydraulic parameters were derived using inverse modeling with the Hydrus-1D model using the global optimization scheme SCE-UA and soil moisture data from a wireless soil moisture sensor network. The estimated parameters were then used for 3D simulations using the integrated parallel simulation platform ParFlow-CLM. The simulated soil water content, as well as evapotranspiration and runoff, were compared with long-term field observations to illustrate how well the model was able to reproduce the water budget dynamics. With variable model setup scenarios in boundary conditions and anisotropy of hydraulic conductivity, we investigated how lateral flow processes above the underlying fractured bedrock affects the simulation results. Furthermore, we explored the importance of the litter layer and the heterogeneity of the forest soil in the simulation of flow processes and model performance. For the analysis of spatial patterns of simulated and observed soil water content we applied the method of empirical orthogonal function (EOF). The results suggest that strong anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity may be the reason for the fast lateral flow observed in Wüstebach. Introduction of heterogeneity in the hydraulic properties in the

  14. Long-term Monitoring Plan for the Shoal Underground Nuclear Test

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed Hassan

    2005-02-01

    The flow and transport model of Shoal is used to design a three-well monitoring network to be part of the long-term monitoring network for the site and achieve two objectives: (1) detect the presence of radionuclides in case they migrate to the monitoring well locations, and (2) provide field data to compare with model predictions as part of the model validation process. Using three different quantitative approaches and the numerical groundwater flow and transport model developed for Shoal, three new monitoring well locations were identified from 176 different networks. In addition to the quantitative analyses using the numerical model, the development of the monitoring network for Shoal will also be subject to qualitative hydrogeologic interpretation during implementation. information will only be available during the fieldwork, it will be incorporated in the monitoring well design at the time of well installation. Finally, it should be noted that the CADD-CAP for Shoal, including the compliance boundary, is not yet approved. Should the compliance boundary change from the 1,000-year MCL contaminant boundary, well locations may also need to change. However, the analysis reported here provides a number of alternatives with reasonable detection efficiency.

  15. Resilience changes in watershed systems: A new perspective to quantify long-term hydrological shifts under perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Man; Feng, Meili; Sun, Tao; Yang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Natural hydrological regimes are essential to the stability of river basins. While numerous efforts have been put forth to characterize flow regime alterations driven by climate change and human activities, few approaches have been proposed to explore changes in watershed resilience. The present study attempted to introduce a systematic approach that can be used to identify the resilience change of river basins based on annual river discharge through the application of a convex model and the principle of critical slowing down. Specifically, a resilience indicator (pi) that reflects streamflow autocorrelation at a given time was proposed to represent the temporal variation of the system resilience, and annual water discharge at representative hydrological stations located in upstream, midstream, and downstream regions of a river basin was used to reflect alterations in long-term hydrological processes and the stability of river basins. The application of this method to the Yellow River basin and Yangtze River basin indicated that the system resilience was lower in downstream regions compared to upstream regions. The Yellow River basin has suffered a decrease in resilience in its lower reaches since 1971, which extended to the middle reaches in 1987 and upper reaches in 1990. Similarly, recent observation of the resilience change in the Yangtze River basin indicated that resilience in its lower reaches has likely decreased since 2002, and this low resilience extended to the middle reaches in 2005. Overall, our study presents a new method to predict potential decreases of resilience in complex large scale watershed systems where mechanistic insight is insufficient to build reliable basin-scale hydrological, climate, ecosystem integrated models.

  16. Long-term limnological research and monitoring at Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.; Collier, R.; Buktenica, M.

    2007-01-01

    Crater Lake is located in the caldera of Mount Mazama in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. The lake has a surface area of about 53 km2at an elevation of 1882 m and a maximum depth of 594 m. Limited studies of this ultraoligotrophic lake conducted between 1896 and 1981, lead to a 10-year limnological study to evaluate any potential degradation of water quality. No long-term variations in water quality were observed that could be attributed to anthropogenic activity. Building on the success of this study, a permanent limnological program has been established with a long-term monitoring program to insure a reliable data base for use in the future. Of equal importance, this program serves as a research platform to develop and communicate to the public a better understanding of the coupled biological, physical, and geochemical processes in the lake and its surrounding environment. This special volume represents our current state of knowledge of the status of this pristine ecosystem including its special optical properties, algal nutrient limitations, pelagic bacteria, and models of the inter-relationships of thermal properties, nutrients, phytoplankton, deep-water mixing, and water budgets. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  17. Long-term bridge health monitoring focusing on the Mahalanobis Distance of modal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul-Woo; Morita, Tomoaki; Wang, Ziran; Sugiura, Kunitomo

    2015-07-01

    Maintaining civil infrastructure, including bridges, has been a keen technical issue in developed countries and will surely be one in developing countries in the near future. An effective maintenance strategy strongly depends on timely decisions on the health condition of the structure. Bridge health monitoring (BHM) using vibration data is widely recognized to be one of the effective technologies that aid decision-making on bridge maintenance. This research focuses on long-term BHM expecting that changes in physical properties of the bridge subject to aged-deterioration progress slowly. In the practical application of the long-term BHM, one of the difficulties is that the observed vibration data includes environmental influences such as temperature change. In order to achieve high accuracy in evaluating modal parameters of the bridge, other influencing variables have to be taken into consideration. In this study, temperature is considered as the main environmental factor by means of a regression analysis. The Mahalanobis distance (MD), a multivariate statistical distance, is adopted to emphasize potential changes in the identified modal parameters. The validity of the proposed approach is investigated utilizing vibration data measured at a real bridge in service.

  18. Revisiting hydraulic hysteresis based on long-term monitoring of hydraulic states in lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannes, M.; Wollschläger, U.; Wöhling, T.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2016-05-01

    Hysteretic processes have been recognized for decades as an important characteristic of soil hydraulic behavior. Several studies confirmed that wetting and drying periods cannot be described by a simple functional relationship, and that some nonequilibrium of the water retention characteristics has to be taken into account. A large number of models describing the hysteresis of the soil water retention characteristic were successfully tested on soil cores under controlled laboratory conditions. However, its relevance under field conditions under natural forcings has rarely been investigated. In practice, the modeling of field soils usually neglects the hysteretic nature of soil hydraulic properties. In this study, long-term observations of water content and matric potential in lysimeters of the lysimeter network TERENO-SoilCan are presented, clearly demonstrating the hysteretic behavior of field soils. We propose a classification into three categories related to different time scales. Based on synthetic and long-term monitoring data, three different models of hysteresis were applied to data sets showing different degrees of hysteresis. We found no single model to be superior to the others. The model ranking depended on the degree of hysteresis. All models were able to reflect the general structure of hysteresis in most cases but failed to reproduce the detailed trajectories of state variables especially under highly transient conditions. As an important result we found that the temporal dynamics of wetting and drying significantly affects these trajectories which should be accounted for in future model concepts.

  19. Continuous fatigue crack monitoring of bridges: Long-Term Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (LTEFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshier, Monty A.; Nelson, Levi; Brinkerhoff, Ryan; Miceli, Marybeth

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue cracks in steel bridges degrade the load-carrying capacity of these structures. Fatigue damage accumulation caused by the repetitive loading of everyday truck traffic can cause small fatigue cracks initiate. Understanding the growth of these fatigue cracks is critical to the safety and reliability of our transportation infrastructure. However, modeling fatigue in bridges is difficult due to the nature of the loading and variations in connection integrity. When fatigue cracks reach critical lengths failures occur causing partial or full closures, emergency repairs, and even full structural failure. Given the aging US highway and the trend towards asset management and life extension, the need for reliable, cost effective sensors and monitoring technologies to alert bridge owners when fatigue cracks are growing is higher than ever. In this study, an innovative Long-Term Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (LTEFS) has been developed and introduced to meet the growing NDT marketplace demand for sensors that have the ability to continuously monitor fatigue cracks. The performance of the LTEFS has been studied in the laboratory and in the field. Data was collected using machined specimens with different lengths of naturally initiated fatigue cracks, applied stress levels, applied stress ratios, and for both sinusoidal and real-life bridge spectrum type loading. The laboratory data was evaluated and used to develop an empirically based algorithm used for crack detection. Additionally, beta-tests on a real bridge structure has been completed. These studies have conclusively demonstrated that LTEFS holds great potential for long-term monitoring of fatigue cracks in steel structures

  20. Rangeland monitoring reveals long-term plant responses to precipitation and grazing at the landscape scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, Seth M.; Duniway, Michael C.; Johanson, Jamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Managers of rangeland ecosystems require methods to track the condition of natural resources over large areas and long periods of time as they confront climate change and land use intensification. We demonstrate how rangeland monitoring results can be synthesized using ecological site concepts to understand how climate, site factors, and management actions affect long-term vegetation dynamics at the landscape-scale. Forty-six years of rangeland monitoring conducted by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) on the Colorado Plateau reveals variable responses of plant species cover to cool-season precipitation, land type (ecological site groups), and grazing intensity. Dominant C3 perennial grasses (Achnatherum hymenoides, Hesperostipa comata), which are essential to support wildlife and livestock on the Colorado Plateau, had responses to cool-season precipitation that were at least twice as large as the dominant C4 perennial grass (Pleuraphis jamesii) and woody vegetation. However, these C3 perennial grass responses to precipitation were reduced by nearly one-third on grassland ecological sites with fine- rather than coarse-textured soils, and there were no detectable C3 perennial grass responses to precipitation on ecological sites dominated by a dense-growing shrub, Coleogyne ramosissima. Heavy grazing intensity further reduced the responses of C3 perennial grasses to cool-season precipitation on ecological sites with coarse-textured soils and surprisingly reduced the responses of shrubs as well. By using ecological site groups to assess rangeland condition, we were able to improve our understanding of the long-term relationships between vegetation change and climate, land use, and site characteristics, which has important implications for developing landscape-scale monitoring strategies.

  1. On the need to manage long-term diffuse memory controls of hydrological mass loads and water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destouni, G.; Cvetkovic, V.

    2011-12-01

    Water management requires understanding and handling of water quality changes and their cause-effect relations, including the source inputs in and hydrological mass transport through catchments that load tracers, nutrients, pollutants and other anthropogenic and geogenic constituents to downstream waters and ecosystems. Costly abatement is often required to protect water resources and ecosystems from excessive nutrient and pollutant loads, and to maintain and restore good ecological status and vital ecosystem services of water systems. But what controls then the magnitudes and dynamics of the hydrological mass loads to the downstream waters and ecosystems? Erroneous understanding of these controls may undermine and mislead resource demanding water management efforts. To support and improve this understanding we have analyzed data from 15-23 year time series of chloride, commonly used as an effective chemical tracer of water movement, in daily rainfall and runoff of two comparative Swedish catchments. We show that long-term catchment memory in form of diffuse internal subsurface sources that have developed from earlier mass inputs controls current load dynamics. In the chloride tracer example the internal memory sources contribute 75-90% of the total stream load, while contemporary source inputs at the surface contribute only 10-25%, with these ranges being consistently determined from scenario analysis of chloride travel time distributions in both catchment cases. While the loading from contemporary surface inputs is hydrologically controlled and dependent on the variability of transport pathways and travel times through a catchment, the average net mass release rate from internal memory sources depends primarily on mean travel time. For the chloride tracer example the release rate is in the range of 1.3*10E-4 - 4.5*10E-3 g/m2/day in both catchment cases. The present quantification approach provides a relatively simple, testable and general management tool for

  2. Long-Term Monitoring of Mini-Split Ductless Heat Pumps in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Loomis, H.

    2015-06-01

    Transformations, Inc. has extensive experience building their high performance housing at a variety of Massachusetts locations, in both a production and custom home setting. The majority of their construction uses mini-split heat pumps (MSHPs) for space conditioning. This research covered the long-term performance of MSHPs in Zone 5A; it is the culmination of up to 3 years' worth of monitoring in a set of eight houses. This research examined electricity use of MSHPs, distributions of interior temperatures and humidity when using simplified (two-point) heating systems in high-performance housing, and the impact of open-door/closed-door status on temperature distributions. The use of simplified space conditioning distribution (through use of MSHPs) provides significant first cost savings, which are used to offset the increased investment in the building enclosure.

  3. An RFID-based on-lens sensor system for long-term IOP monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shun-Hsi; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Liao, Yu-Te; Yang, Tzu-Sen; Kuei, Cheng-Kai; Wu, Tsung-Wei; Huang, Yu-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an RFID-based on-lens sensor system is proposed for noninvasive long-term intraocular pressure monitoring. The proposed sensor IC, fabricated in a 0.18um CMOS process, consists of capacitive sensor readout circuitry, RFID communication circuits, and digital processing units. The sensor IC is integrated with electroplating capacitive sensors and a receiving antenna on the contact lens. The sensor IC can be wirelessly powered, communicate with RFID compatible equipment, and perform IOP measurement using on-lens capacitive sensor continuously from a 2cm distance while the incident power from an RFID reader is 20 dBm. The proposed system is compatible to Gen2 RFID protocol, extending the flexibility and reducing the self-developed firmware efforts. PMID:26738033

  4. Long-term monitoring of the Sedlec Ossuary - Analysis of hygrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlík, Zbyšek; Balík, Lukáš; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The Sedlec Ossuary is one of the twelve UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the Czech Republic. Although the ossuary is listed among the most visited Czech tourist attractions, its technical state is almost critical and a radical renovation is necessary. On this account, hygrothermal performance of the ossuary is experimentally researched in the presented paper in order to get information on moisture sources and to get necessary data for optimized design of renovation treatments and reconstruction solutions that will allow preserve the historical significance of this attractive heritage site. Within the performed experimental analysis, the interior and exterior climatic conditions are monitored over an almost three year period together with relative humidity and temperature profiles measured in the most damage parts of the ossuary chapel. On the basis of measured data, the long-term hygrothermal state of the ossuary building is accessed and the periods of possible surface condensation are identified.

  5. A Microfluidic Platform for Long-Term Monitoring of Algae in a Dynamic Environment.

    PubMed

    Luke, Chung Sze; Selimkhanov, Jangir; Baumgart, Leo; Cohen, Susan E; Golden, Susan S; Cookson, Natalie A; Hasty, Jeff

    2016-01-15

    Culturing cells in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" devices for time lapse microscopy has become a valuable tool for studying the dynamics of biological systems. Although microfluidic technology has been applied to culturing and monitoring a diverse range of bacterial and eukaryotic species, cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae present several challenges that have made them difficult to culture in a microfluidic setting. Here, we present a customizable device for the long-term culturing and imaging of three well characterized strains of cyanobacteria and microalgae. This platform has several advantages over agarose pads and demonstrates great potential for obtaining high quality, single-cell gene expression data of cyanobacteria and algae in precisely controlled, dynamic environments over long time periods. PMID:26332284

  6. INTEGRAL long-term monitoring results on persistently bright NS LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savolainen, P.; Hannikainen, D. C.; Paizis, A.; Farinelli, R.; Kuulkers, E.; Vilhu, O.

    2010-07-01

    We present long-term spectral and timing results from an INTEGRAL monitoring program of persistently bright neutron star Low-Mass X-ray Binaries, i.e. the three bright Atoll sources GX 3+1, GX 9+1 and GX 9+9, and the Z sources GX 5-1, GX 17+2, GX 340+0 and GX 349+2. From the available observing periods between 2003 and 2009, each lasting ~2 months, we have selected a few sample periods for each source, and analyzed all JEM-X and IBIS/ISGRI data with offsets <4 degrees. We seek an explanation for the dichotomy between the hard X-ray tails or lack thereof in the (otherwise very similar) X-ray spectra of Z sources and bright Atolls, respectively.

  7. Long-term monitoring of the gamma Cassiopeiae star V 568 Cygni = HD 197419

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, C.; Mammamo, A.; Margoni, R.; Stagni, R.; Munari, U.; Baratta, G. B.; Coluzzi, R.; Croce, V.

    1990-04-01

    Results are presented of a long-term spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of V 568 Cyg, a Be formerly indicated by Blaauw (1961) to be a runaway star, a classification not coinciding with that by Gies and Bolton (1986). Analysis of the strong fading around JD 2446641.6, reported by Blanco et al. (1987), seems to exclude the suggested eclipse scenario. This photometric fading event occurred during a phase of maxima in the equivalent widths of metallic absorption lines. The periodicity predicted by Blanco et al. (1987) is not confirmed by the new data presented here. A few hundredths of magnitude modulation in the U light curve, and less in the B and V ones, appears correlated to a period P = 43.846 days, inferred by coupling nine new radial velocities with the 19 ones published by Gies and Bolton (1986).

  8. Fault tree analysis for data-loss in long-term monitoring networks.

    PubMed

    Dirksen, J; ten Veldhuis, J A E; Schilperoort, R P S

    2009-01-01

    Prevention of data-loss is an important aspect in the design as well as the operational phase of monitoring networks since data-loss can seriously limit intended information yield. In the literature limited attention has been paid to the origin of unreliable or doubtful data from monitoring networks. Better understanding of causes of data-loss points out effective solutions to increase data yield. This paper introduces FTA as a diagnostic tool to systematically deduce causes of data-loss in long-term monitoring networks in urban drainage systems. In order to illustrate the effectiveness of FTA, a fault tree is developed for a monitoring network and FTA is applied to analyze the data yield of a UV/VIS submersible spectrophotometer. Although some of the causes of data-loss cannot be recovered because the historical database of metadata has been updated infrequently, the example points out that FTA still is a powerful tool to analyze the causes of data-loss and provides useful information on effective data-loss prevention. PMID:19700829

  9. In vivo wireless biodiagnosis system for long-term bioactivity monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Wen-Jong; Yu, Shih-An; Huang, Jhen-Gang; Lin, Yun-Han; Chen, Yih-Fan; Jin, Ming-Hui; Wen, Chih-Min; Kao, Cheng-Yan; Lin, Shi-Ming; Lu, Shey-Shi; Lin, Chii-Wann; Yen, Jia-Yush; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chen, Chi-An; Liao, Fang-Jen; Chiu, Nan-Fu; Chien, Chia-Nan; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2004-07-01

    Attempts to develop a Wireless Health Advanced Mobile Bio-diagnostic System (abbreviated as WHAM-BioS) have arisen from the need to monitor the health status of patients under long-term care programs. The proposed WHAM-BioS as presented here was developed by integrating various technologies: nano/MEMS technology, biotechnology, network/communication technology, and information technology. The biochips proposed not only detect certain diseases but will also report any abnormal status readings on the patient to the medical personnel immediately through the network system. Since long-term home care is typically involved, the parameters monitored must be analyzed and traced continuously over a long period of time. To minimize the intrusion to the patients, a wireless sensor embedded within a wireless network is highly recommended. To facilitate the widest possible use of various biochips, a smart sensor node concept was implemented. More specifically, various technologies and components such as built-in micro power generators, energy storage devices, initialization processes, no-waste bio-detection methodologies, embedded controllers, wireless warning signal transmissions, and power/data management were merged and integrated to create this novel technology. The design methodologies and the implementation schemes are detailed. Potential expansions of this newly developed technology to other applications regimes will be presented as well.

  10. Wilson Corners SWMU 001 2014 Annual Long Term Monitoring Report Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langenbach, James

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the findings of the 2014 Long Term Monitoring (LTM) that was completed at the Wilson Corners site, located at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The goals of the 2014 annual LTM event were to evaluate the groundwater flow direction and gradient and to monitor the vertical and downgradient horizontal extent of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater at the site. The LTM activities consisted of an annual groundwater sampling event in December 2014, which included the collection of water levels from the LTM wells. During the annual groundwater sampling event, depth to groundwater was measured and VOC samples were collected using passive diffusion bags (PDBs) from 30 monitoring wells. In addition to the LTM sampling, additional assessment sampling was performed at the site using low-flow techniques based on previous LTM results and assessment activities. Assessment of monitoring well MW0052DD was performed by collecting VOC samples using low-flow techniques before and after purging 100 gallons from the well. Monitoring well MW0064 was sampled to supplement shallow VOC data north of Hot Spot 2 and east of Hot Spot 4. Monitoring well MW0089 was sampled due to its proximity to MW0090. MW0090 is screened in a deeper interval and had an unexpected detection of trichloroethene (TCE) during the 2013 LTM, which was corroborated during the March 2014 verification sampling. Monitoring well MW0130 was sampled to provide additional VOC data beneath the semi-confining clay layer in the Hot Spot 2 area.

  11. Long Term Geoelectrical Monitoring of Deep-water Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenan, J. W.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Ross, C.; Nolan, J. T.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    In the aftermath of the catastrophic Deep-water Horizon (DWH) spill in the Gulf Coast, opportunities exist to study the evolution of fresh crude oil contamination in beach sediments and marshes. Grand Terre 1 Island, off the coast of Grand Isle in southern Louisiana, is an uninhabited barrier island, heavily impacted by the DWH spill, and ideal for undisturbed long term monitoring of crude oil degradation processes. A 10 channel Syscal-Pro resistivity / IP instrument (IRIS Instruments, France) is the heart of the fully autonomous geoelectrical monitoring system; the system, which is housed in a weatherproof container, relies solely on solar power, is controlled by an energy efficient PC and can be accessed remotely via web tools. The monitoring scheme involves collecting bi-daily resistivity measurements from surface and shallow boreholes, ranging from January 2011 to the present; environmental parameters, such as T, are continuously recorded at several depths. During regular field trips we perform larger scale geophysical surveys, and geochemical measurements (pH, DO, T, fluid C) to support the continuous geophysical monitoring. The contaminated layer on site is a visually distinctive layer of crude oil, isolated by cleaner sands above and below which is identified by a clear and obvious resistive anomaly in preliminary surveys. Early results show a decrease in average of the resistance values of each dataset over time. Further processing of the data yields a linearly shaped resistive anomaly, which coincides with the location of the oil layer. The changes in subsurface resistivity appear to be focused within this anomaly. Time filtering of the data by the time that they were collected, morning or evening, reveals a diurnal variation. While both time frames follow the same overall trend, the measurements in the morning are slightly more resistive than those in the evening. This indicates that there are environmental factors, such as temperature, that need to be

  12. Long-term and real-time monitoring system of the East/Japan sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kuh; Kim, Yun Bae; Park, Jong Jin; Nam, Sunghyun; Park, Kyung-Ae; Chang, Kyung-Il

    2005-03-01

    Long-term, continuous, and real-time ocean monitoring has been undertaken in order to evaluate various oceanographic phenomena and processes in the East/Japan Sea. Recent technical advances combined with our concerted efforts have allowed us to establish a real-time monitoring system and to accumulate considerable knowledge on what has been taking place in water properties, current systems, and circulation in the East Sea. We have obtained information on volume transport across the Korea Strait through cable voltage measurements and continuous temperature and salinity profile data from ARGO floats placed throughout entire East Sea since 1997. These ARGO float data have been utilized to estimate deep current, inertial kinetic energy, and changes in water mass, especially in the northern East Sea. We have also developed the East Sea Real-time Ocean Buoy (ESROB) in coastal regions and made continual improvements till it has evolved into the most up-to-date and effective monitoring system as a result of remarkable technical progress in data communication systems. Atmospheric and oceanic measurements by ESROB have contributed to the recognition of coastal wind variability, current fluctuations, and internal waves near and off the eastern coast of Korea. Long-term current meter moorings have been in operation since 1996 between Ulleungdo and Dokdo to monitor the interbasin deep water exchanges between the Japanese and Ulleung Basins. In addition, remotely sensed satellite data could facilitate the investigation of atmospheric and oceanic surface conditions such as sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height, near-surface winds, oceanic color, surface roughness, and so on. These satellite data revealed surface frontal structures with a fairly good spatial resolution, seasonal cycle of SST, atmospheric wind forcing, geostrophic current anomalies, and biogeochemical processes associated with physical forcing and processes. Since the East Sea has been recognized as a

  13. Assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of Lake Nasser and related irrigation projects in southwestern Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Sultan, M.; Environmental Research

    2002-05-10

    A two-dimensional groundwater flow model was constructed to investigate the long-term hydrologic impacts of Lake Nasser and the major land reclamation projects that use excess lake water in southwest Egypt. Egypt constructed (1964-1971) the Aswan High Dam, creating the Lake Nasser reservoir (length: 500 km; average width: 12 km) and is constructing the Tushka Canal to channel 5.0x10{sup 9} m{sup 3}/yr of Lake Nasser water to reclaim 0.5x10{sup 6} acres of desert lands. The model, constrained by regional-scale groundwater flow and near-lake head data, was successfully calibrated to temporal-observation heads from 1970 to 2000 that reflect variations in lake levels. Predictive analyses for the subsequent 50-yr period were conducted by employing the calibrated model. Simulations of long-term effects, beyond year 2000, of Lake Nasser on recharge and temporal groundwater head (base case scenario) show that recharge from the lake will continue at a much slower rate than during the 30-yr period of 1970-2000 (with approximately 86% reduction in 30-yr recharge). The modest projected pumping and injection activities in the study area are not expected to cause major deviation in the overall head distribution compared to the base case scenario. The investigation of effects of the new irrigation land development on the Nubian aquifer indicated that many of the proposed irrigation areas, especially those with small aquifer thickness, will become fully saturated with introduced water, resulting in potential flooding and salinization.

  14. Distributed simulation of long-term hydrological processes in a medium-sized periurban catchment under changing land use and rainwater management.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labbas, Mériem; Braud, Isabelle; Branger, Flora; Kralisch, Sven

    2013-04-01

    Growing urbanization and related anthropogenic processes have a high potential to influence hydrological process dynamics. Typical consequences are an increase of surface imperviousness and modifications of water flow paths due to artificial channels and barriers (combined and separated system, sewer overflow device, roads, ditches, etc.). Periurban catchments, at the edge of large cities, are especially affected by fast anthropogenic modifications. They usually consist of a combination of natural areas, rural areas with dispersed settlements and urban areas mostly covered by built zones and spots of natural surfaces. In the context of the European Water Framework Directive (2000) and the Floods Directive (2007), integrated and sustainable solutions are needed to reduce flooding risks and river pollution at the scale of urban conglomerations or whole catchments. Their thorough management requires models able to assess the vulnerability of the territory and to compare the impact of different rainwater management options and planning issues. To address this question, we propose a methodology based on a multi-scale distributed hydrological modelling approach. It aims at quantifying the impact of ongoing urbanization and stormwater management on the long-term hydrological cycle in medium-sized periurban watershed. This method focuses on the understanding and formalization of dominant periurban hydrological processes from small scales (few ha to few km2) to larger scales (few hundred km2). The main objectives are to 1) simulate both urban and rural hydrological processes and 2) test the effects of different long-term land use and water management scenarios. The method relies on several tools and data: a distributed hydrological model adapted to the characteristics of periurban areas, land use and land cover maps from different dates (past, present, future) and information about rainwater management collected from local authorities. For the application of the method, the

  15. Simulating future uncertainty to guide the selection of survey designs for long-term monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garman, Steven L.; Schweiger, E. William; Manier, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    A goal of environmental monitoring is to provide sound information on the status and trends of natural resources (Messer et al. 1991, Theobald et al. 2007, Fancy et al. 2009). When monitoring observations are acquired by measuring a subset of the population of interest, probability sampling as part of a well-constructed survey design provides the most reliable and legally defensible approach to achieve this goal (Cochran 1977, Olsen et al. 1999, Schreuder et al. 2004; see Chapters 2, 5, 6, 7). Previous works have described the fundamentals of sample surveys (e.g. Hansen et al. 1953, Kish 1965). Interest in survey designs and monitoring over the past 15 years has led to extensive evaluations and new developments of sample selection methods (Stevens and Olsen 2004), of strategies for allocating sample units in space and time (Urquhart et al. 1993, Overton and Stehman 1996, Urquhart and Kincaid 1999), and of estimation (Lesser and Overton 1994, Overton and Stehman 1995) and variance properties (Larsen et al. 1995, Stevens and Olsen 2003) of survey designs. Carefully planned, “scientific” (Chapter 5) survey designs have become a standard in contemporary monitoring of natural resources. Based on our experience with the long-term monitoring program of the US National Park Service (NPS; Fancy et al. 2009; Chapters 16, 22), operational survey designs tend to be selected using the following procedures. For a monitoring indicator (i.e. variable or response), a minimum detectable trend requirement is specified, based on the minimum level of change that would result in meaningful change (e.g. degradation). A probability of detecting this trend (statistical power) and an acceptable level of uncertainty (Type I error; see Chapter 2) within a specified time frame (e.g. 10 years) are specified to ensure timely detection. Explicit statements of the minimum detectable trend, the time frame for detecting the minimum trend, power, and acceptable probability of Type I error (

  16. Long-term and transient forcing of the low ionosphere monitored by SAVNET

    SciTech Connect

    Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Bertoni, Fernando C. P.; Gavilan, Hernan R.; Samanes, Jorge C.

    2010-10-20

    In this paper we present the main findings obtained by the South America VLF NETwork since its installation in the South America territory. In particular we show the capability of the VLF technique to monitor the long-term solar activity and transient solar and geomagnetic disturbances. On long timescales they are indices on the possibility of monitoring the Lyman-{alpha} solar radiation. On shorter timescales we show that the VLF technique is a very sensitive mean of detecting solar X-ray flares. Those small events with a peak power {>=}5x10{sup -7} W/m{sup 2} are detected with a 100% probability. A lower limit for the X-ray power of {approx}2.7 10{sup -7} W/m{sup 2} has been found in order to produce a ionospheric disturbance, and we confirm the important role of the Lyman-{alpha} radiation to form and maintain the low ionospheric D-region. SAVNET has also observed for the first time the ionospheric disturbances produced by outbursts from the magnetar SGR 1550-5408. This genuine detection suggests the possibility of monitoring on a routine basis these objects of fundamental importance in high-energy astrophysics. Finally, we show that SAVNET is well suited for participating to the search for seismo-ionospheric disturbances in order to study the possibility of earthquake events prediction.

  17. Long term SAR interferometry monitoring for assessing changing levels of slope instability hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowski, J.; Ferretti, A.

    The population growth with increasing impact of man on the environment and urbanisation of areas susceptible to slope failures coupled with the ongoing change in climate patterns will require a shift in the approaches to landslide hazard reduction Indeed there is evidence that landslide activity and related socio-economic loss are increasing in both rich and less developed countries throughout the world Because of this and because the urbanisation of hillside and mountain slopes prone to failure will likely continue in the future the protection of new and pre-existing developed areas via traditional engineering stabilisation works and in situ monitoring is not considered economically feasible Furthermore in most cases the ground control systems are installed post-factum and for short term monitoring and hence their role in preventing disasters is limited Considering the global dimension of the slope instability problem a sustainable road to landslide hazard reduction seems to be via exploitation of EO systems with focus on early detection long term monitoring and early warning Thanks to the wide-area coverage regular schedule and improving resolution of space-borne sensors the EO can foster the auspicious shift from a culture of repair to a culture of awarness and prevention Under this scenario the space-borne synthetic aperture radar differential interferometry DInSAR is attractive because of its capability to provide both wide-area and spatially dense information on surface displacements Since the presence of movements represents a direct evidence of

  18. Integrating Data Sources to Optimize Long-Term Monitoring and Management: A Machine Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, W. J.; Tcheng, D. K.; Minsker, B. S.; Valocchi, A. J.; Quinn, J. J.; Williams, G. P.

    2002-05-01

    As the groundwater remediation field matures and the installation of remediation systems are completed, it is becoming clear that long-term monitoring and management of these systems will comprise a significant portion of future expenditures. The University of Illinois and Argonne National Laboratory have collaborated to demonstrate how integrating all available site data can improve decision making and provide cost savings. A learning machine is used to integrate historic and current data from the 317/319 Area phytoremediation site at Argonne National Lab-East (ANL-E) to provide a better understanding of site processes and direct future data collection. Site data used in this study include: hourly head measurements from a subset of seven monitoring wells and quarterly from the remaining wells. The learning machine uses these data and daily weather data (to account for the impact of recharge on the groundwater regime) to forecast groundwater head levels. The performance of the model built by the learning machine is assessed by comparing predictions from previous monitoring periods to the most recently available data. By comparing predictive performance using different combinations of datasets, the most relevant data are identified to guide future sampling efforts. Combining non-traditional data sets and optimizing the value of current data as demonstrated in this paper will improve predictions so that the most useful data can be collected efficiently and cost-effectively.

  19. Long-term Monitoring of Spawning Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in a Regulated River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, J. M.; Brasington, J.; Darby, S. E.; Merz, J.; Pasternack, G.; Sear, D.; Vericat, D.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring geomorphic changes in response to river restoration interventions through the use of repeat topographic surveying is becoming more common in long-term monitoring programs. Repeat montitoring surveys are often preformed before and immediately following construction, and then on some defined interval (typically annually) or event-basis. How uncertainties in these surveys are managed to decipher what changes can be taken as meaningful adjustments of the project and/or geomorphic changes versus just noise in the data requires careful consideration. Moreover, once the reliability of the data is reasonably well understood, how to interpret the changes and segregate the resulting sediment budgets has not received adequate attention in the literature. Here, eight repeat topographic surveys from four different spawning habitat rehabilitation projects on the heavily Mokelumne River of California, are used to demonstrate the utility of applying some new methods for accounting for DEM reliability uncertainties and budget segregation techniques. The significance of recorded geomorphic changes are related to spawning and incubating Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytsch) to explore questions such as: 1) the impact of a large flood on incubating salmonids embryos; 2) the influence of high-flow dam releases on physical habitat quality; and 3) documenting changes that took place specifically where salmon spawned. The results highlight some simple but interpretively powerful techniques for linking ecohydraulic and geomorphic field monitoring data at a scale relevant to salmon.

  20. Lessons learned from long-term ecosystem research and monitoring in alpine and subalpine basins of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Long-term ecosystem research and monitoring was begun in the Loch Vale watershed of Rocky Mountain National Park in 1983, after extensive survey work to identify the best location. Then, as now, our scientific objectives were to understand natural biogeochemical cycles and variability, so that we could differentiate ecosystem changes from human-caused disturbances, such as atmospheric deposition of pollutants and climate change. We have learned many lessons, often through our mistakes, that are worth passing on. Clear scientific objectives, even for long-term monitoring, are essential. Standardized methods, including rigorous quality assurance procedures should be adhered to from the beginning of the program. All data, even those collected routinely for background records, should be scrutinized and summarized at least once a year. Freely share basic information such as weather, hydrologic, chemical, and descriptive records with other researchers who can build upon your efforts. Use many tools when asking complex ecological questions, in order to minimize bias toward specific results. Publish frequently; long-term studies do not imply there are no interim conclusions or interesting findings. Interpret findings frequently to policy makers and citizens; increased understanding of the environment and human-caused changes may improve natural resource management, and build support for ecological research. And finally, be persistent. Long-term ecological research can be frustrating and difficult to maintain, yet is often the best way to observe and understand ecological change on a meaningful time scale.

  1. Stable microwave radiometry system for long term monitoring of deep tissue temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Rodriques, Dario B.; Salahi, Sara; Topsakal, Erdem; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Prakash, Aniruddh; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Reudink, Douglas; Snow, Brent W.; Maccarini, Paolo F.

    2013-02-01

    Background: There are numerous clinical applications for non-invasive monitoring of deep tissue temperature. We present the design and experimental performance of a miniature radiometric thermometry system for measuring volume average temperature of tissue regions located up to 5cm deep in the body. Methods: We constructed a miniature sensor consisting of EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip antenna with high gain onaxis and integrated high-sensitivity 1.35GHz total power radiometer with 500 MHz bandwidth. We tested performance of the radiometry system in both simulated and experimental multilayer phantom models of several intended clinical measurement sites: i) brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots within 2cm of the skin surface, ii) 3-5cm deep kidney, and iii) human brain underlying intact scalp and skull. The physical models included layers of circulating tissue-mimicking liquids controlled at different temperatures to characterize our ability to quantify small changes in target temperature at depth under normothermic surface tissues. Results: We report SAR patterns that characterize the sense region of a 2.6cm diameter receive antenna, and radiometric power measurements as a function of deep tissue temperature that quantify radiometer sensitivity. The data demonstrate: i) our ability to accurately track temperature rise in realistic tissue targets such as urine refluxed from prewarmed bladder into kidney, and 10°C drop in brain temperature underlying normothermic scalp and skull, and ii) long term accuracy and stability of +0.4°C over 4.5 hours as needed for monitoring core body temperature over extended surgery or monitoring effects of brown fat metabolism over an extended sleep/wake cycle. Conclusions: A non-invasive sensor consisting of 2.6cm diameter receive antenna and integral 1.35GHz total power radiometer has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to track clinically significant changes in temperature of deep tissue targets underlying normothermic surface

  2. Stable Microwave Radiometry System for Long Term Monitoring of Deep Tissue Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Rodriques, Dario B.; Salahi, Sara; Topsakal, Erdem; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Prakash, Aniruddh; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Reudink, Douglas; Snow, Brent W.; Maccarini, Paolo F.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are numerous clinical applications for non-invasive monitoring of deep tissue temperature. We present the design and experimental performance of a miniature radiometric thermometry system for measuring volume average temperature of tissue regions located up to 5cm deep in the body. Methods We constructed a miniature sensor consisting of EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip antenna with high gain on-axis and integrated high-sensitivity 1.35GHz total power radiometer with 500 MHz bandwidth. We tested performance of the radiometry system in both simulated and experimental multilayer phantom models of several intended clinical measurement sites: i) brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots within 2cm of the skin surface, ii) 3–5cm deep kidney, and iii) human brain underlying intact scalp and skull. The physical models included layers of circulating tissue-mimicking liquids controlled at different temperatures to characterize our ability to quantify small changes in target temperature at depth under normothermic surface tissues. Results We report SAR patterns that characterize the sense region of a 2.6cm diameter receive antenna, and radiometric power measurements as a function of deep tissue temperature that quantify radiometer sensitivity. The data demonstrate: i) our ability to accurately track temperature rise in realistic tissue targets such as urine refluxed from prewarmed bladder into kidney, and 10°C drop in brain temperature underlying normothermic scalp and skull, and ii) long term accuracy and stability of ∓0.4°C over 4.5 hours as needed for monitoring core body temperature over extended surgery or monitoring effects of brown fat metabolism over an extended sleep/wake cycle. Conclusions A non-invasive sensor consisting of 2.6cm diameter receive antenna and integral 1.35GHz total power radiometer has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to track clinically significant changes in temperature of deep tissue targets underlying normothermic surface

  3. Long-term autonomous resistivity monitoring of oil-contaminated sediments from the Deepwater Horizon spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenan, J. W.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Ross, C.; Nolan, J. T.; Atekwana, E. A.; Werkema, D. D.; Fathepure, B.

    2012-12-01

    outside of the contaminated location exhibit relatively uniform resistivity or show clear evidence of seasonal effect. Temperature-corrected resistivity changes show no direct correlation with pore fluid specific conductance changes, suggesting that specific conductance changes (e.g. due to tides) have little influence on imaged resistivity structure. Microbial data suggest that resistivity changes within the contaminated location resulted from biodegradation, showing the presence of native populations capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons at salinities ranging from 6 to 15 % NaCl within the contaminated location. Aqueous geochemical measurements performed on samples from the site further indicate that at depth intervals coincident with the resistivity anomaly, marked increases in the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were observed suggesting biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon although other DIC generating processes such as organic matter degradation coupled to sulfate and iron reduction were also prominent. This experiment demonstrates the potential viability of long-term autonomous electrical monitoring as a means of decreasing the frequency of more costly and invasive chemical analysis of natural attenuation.

  4. Long-term Ks-band photometric monitoring of L dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Martí, B.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Ultracool dwarfs (≲2500 K) are known to display photometric variability in short timescales (hours to days), which has usually been related to rotation-modulated dust cloud patterns, or to unresolved companions. Aims: We perform photometric time-series analysis of a sample of ten early to mid-L dwarfs in the field over three years of Ks-band observations with the OMEGA 2000 infrared camera of the 3.5 m telescope on Calar Alto Observatory between January 2010 and December 2012. This study represents the first systematic long-term photometric monitoring of this kind of object to date. Methods: We perform Ks-band differential photometry of our targets (with typical errors of ±15-30 mmag at the 1σ level) by subtracting a reference flux from each photometric measurement. This reference flux is computed using three nearby, probably constant stars in the target's field-of-view. We then construct and visually inspect the light curves to search for variability, and use four different periodogram algorithms to look for possible periods in our photometric data. Results: Our targets do not display long-term variability over 1σ compared to other nearby stars of similar brightness, nor do the periodograms unveil any possible periodicity for these objects, with two exceptions: 2MASS J02411151-0326587 and G196-3B. In the case of 2MASS J02411151-0326587 (L0), our data suggest a tentative period of 307±21 days, at 40% confidence level, which seems to be associated with peak-to-peak variability of 44±10 mmag. This object may also display variability in timescales of years, as suggested by the comparison of our Ks-band photometry with 2MASS. For G196-3B (L3), we find peak-to-peak variations of 42±10 mmag, with a possible photometric period of 442±7 days, at 95% confidence level. This is roughly the double of the astrometric period reported by Zapatero Osorio et al. (2014, A&A, 568, A6). Given the significance of these results, further photometric data are required to

  5. Flank instability of Stromboli volcano detected by long-term GB-InSAR monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrieri, Emanuele; Di Traglia, Federico; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Gigli, Giovanni; Mugnai, Francesco; Luzi, Guido; Casagli, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Stromboli is a volcanic island in Southern Italy characterized by explosions of variable energy every 10-20 minutes and periodically interrupted by more energetic blasts emitting large volumes of material. The pressurization of volatile-poor, high-porphyritic magma column that is gas-recharged by the deep-seated, volatile-rich, low-porphyritic magma precedes such events and produces deformations on the NW flank of the volcano, called Sciara del Fuoco. By integrating geomorphological observations with long-term deformations measured by a ground-based interferometric radar since December 2007, we managed to map two landslides whose movements are strongly related with volcanic activity. Deformation patterns obtained through a novel long-term analysis of GB-InSAR data, usually exploited for real time monitoring and early warning of slope with high risk, permitted us to hypothesize the type of movement and depth for both landslides. During the last 5 years their deformation velocity reached a maximum of more than 2 mm/day. Furthermore their position allowed us to affirm that the effusive vent formed in 2007 at 400 m a.s.l., was the result of the deflection of a feeder dike operated by landslide fractures, thus showing the important role of geomorphological discontinuities in volcanic environments. The study of slope instability of the Sciara del Fuoco is also relevant with reference to tsunami risk, especially considering that mass movements similar to those detected may take place also in other portions of the volcano flank not visible by the current installation.

  6. Long-term monitoring studies of pollutants on public lands: Bald Eagles in the Midwest

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, W.W.

    1995-12-31

    The role of public agencies to monitor the populations of wildlife species with protected status is paramount to the recovery of these species. Since the early 1960s, the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) populations within the Midwest have been monitored to determine number of breeding pairs, nest occupancy, and success rates. In addition to the reproductive outcome studies, abandoned eggs, blood samples, and feather samples have been collected to determine concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and heavy metals. These surveys give an actual measure of population dynamics of a top-predator species in aquatic systems that integrates the effects of many different environmental pollutants. As concentrations of the organochlorine compounds have declined, bald eagle populations have increased in numbers and their reproductive success has improved. The recovery of this species has not been uniform however. In regions where DDT and PCB concentrations are still above thresholds associated with reproductive impairment, eagles still have impaired reproduction. These areas include the shorelines of the Great Lakes and Voyageurs National Park. Some areas such as the Chippewa National Forest have begun to show declines in reproduction due to density dependent factors. Recent proposals for ecosystem management and reclassification of the bald eagle have led to reduced emphasis for maintaining these long-term data sets. The utility and importance of maintaining surveys of top-predators that can give a measure of population-level effects of pollutants rather than an index will be discussed using examples from the Midwest.

  7. A New Framework for Adaptive Sampling and Analysis During Long- Term Monitoring and Remedial Action Management

    SciTech Connect

    Minsker, Barbara

    2003-06-01

    The Argonne team has gathered available data on monitoring wells and measured hydraulic heads from the Argonne 317/319 site and sent it to UIUC. Xiaodong Li, a research assistant supported by the project, has reviewed the data and is beginning to fit spatiotemporal statistical models to it. Another research assistant, Yonas Demissie, has gotten the site's Modflow model working and is developing a transport model that will be used to generate artificial data. Abhishek Singh, a third research assistant supported by the project, has performed a literature review on inverse modeling and is receiving training on the software that will be used in this project (D2K). He has also created two models of user preferences and successfully implemented them with an interactive genetic algorithm on test functions. Meghna Babbar, the fourth research assistant supported by the project, has created an interactive genetic algorithm code and initial user interface in D2K. Gayathri Gopalakrishnan, the last research assistant who is partially supported by the project, has collected and analyzed data from the phytoremediation systems at the 317/319 site. She has found good correlations between concentrations in the ground water and in branches of the trees, which indicates excellent promise for using the trees as cost-effective long-term monitoring of the contaminants.

  8. Long Term Remote Monitoring of TCE Contaminated Groundwater at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, C.; Gudavalli, R.; Lagos, L.; Tansel, B.; Varona, J.; Allen, M.

    2004-10-06

    The purpose of this study was to develop a mobile self powered remote monitoring system enhanced for field deployment at Savannah River Site (SRS). The system used a localized power source with solar recharging and has wireless data collection, analysis, transmission, and data management capabilities. The prototype was equipped with a Hydrolab's DataSonde 4a multi-sensor array package managed by a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system, with an adequate pumping capacity of water samples for sampling and analysis of Trichloroethylene (TCE) in contaminated groundwater wells at SRS. This paper focuses on a study and technology development efforts conducted at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) to automate the sampling of contaminated wells with a multi-sensor array package developed using COTS (Commercial Off The shelf) parts. Bladder pumps will pump water from different wells to the sensors array, water quality TCE indicator parameters are measured (i.e. pH, redox, ORP, DO, NO3 -, Cl-). In order to increase user access and data management, the system was designed to be accessible over the Internet. Remote users can take sample readings and collect data remotely over a web. Results obtained at Florida International University in-house testing and at a field deployment at the Savannah River Site indicate that this long term monitoring technique can be a feasible solution for the sampling of TCE indicator parameters at remote contaminated sites.

  9. Long-term monitoring of change in Tropical grasslands- GLORIA network in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, F. X.; Muriel, P.; Halloy, S.; Beck, S.; Meneses, R. I.; Irazabal, J.; Aguirre, N.; Viñas, P.; Suarez, D.; Becerra, M. T.; Gloria-Andes Network

    2013-05-01

    It has been shown that predicted warming and increased frequency of extreme weather events increase with altitude in the Andean mountains. Combined with enormous topographic (and hence precipitation) heterogeneity, poverty and intensive land use, creates in the region a situation of high vulnerability to global change. Since 2005 the network Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environment (GLORIA) sites have been progressively installed in Andean countries to monitor changes, document the type and magnitude of impacts and provide guidance to develop adaptation strategies for biodiversity, humans, and productive systems. We report the preliminary results from 10 of those sites, in addition to new sites planned in South America. These sites provide baseline data and identify processes and patterns in plant biodiversity across different geographic contexts. These preliminary results show the tremendous singularity of the vegetation and flora patterns in the study sites, suggesting high sensitivity of these ecosystems to climate anomalies. It is expected that the consolidation of this network will support and strengthen long-term observation and monitoring research programs to enable the documentation and understanding of climate change impacts on the Andean biota. Our research considers complementary modules of investigation (e.g. carbon stocks and fluxes, plant responses to experimental manipulation) that contextualize the challenges and opportunities of adaptation for biodiversity and socio-economic components, providing measures of trends as well as effectiveness of adaptive management strategies.

  10. Long-Term Monitoring of Molecular Masers in IRAS 18566+0408

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbe, Daniel Michael; Araya, Esteban; Hofner, Peter; Linz, Hendrik; Olmi, Luca; Kurtz, Stan

    2016-01-01

    We report results of a long-term monitoring study of 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO),6.035 GHz hydroxyl (OH), and 6.7 GHz methanol (CH3OH) masers in the young high-mass protostellar object IRAS 18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20). This is the only high-mass star forming region where correlated variability of three different maser species has been reported. The observations were conducted with the 305m Arecibo Radio Telescope and the Very Large Array. Together with data from the literature, we present H2CO flux density measurements from 2002 to 2014, CH3OH data from 2006 to 2015, and OH observations from 2008 to 2015. Our extended monitoring observations of the H2CO maser agree with quasi-periodic variability and exponential flux density decrease during the quiescent and flare states as proposed by Araya and collaborators in 2010. We also confirm the occurrence of 6.035 GHz OH flares and a time delay with respect to the H2CO flares (first reported by Al-Marzouk and collaborators in 2012). An analysis of the variability behavior of different CH3OH velocity components and the H2CO maser suggests that multiple variability mechanisms may be responsible for the CH3OH flux density changes.

  11. Long-term monitoring of stable isotopic compositions of precipitation over volcanic island, Jeju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Hee; Koh, Dong-Chan; Park, Won-Bae; Bong, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Lee, Jeonghoon

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of precipitation can be widely used to understand moisture transport in the atmosphere, proxies for paleoclimate and interactions between groundwater and precipitation. Over Jeju volcanic island, located southwest of the Korean Peninsula, precipitation penetrated directly into the highly permeable aquifer is the main source of groundwater. In this study, long-term stable isotopic compositions of precipitation over Jeju Island are characterized to describe spatial and temporal patterns for hydrology and paleoclimate. At fifteen sites from September 2000 to December 2003, precipitation samples were collected and analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer at the Korea Basic Science Institute. Compared to Lee et al. (2003), the two seasonal local meteoric water lines widen, which may change the relative contributions of winter and summer season precipitation to the groundwater recharge. The precipitation isotopes are inversely correlated with precipitation amount in summer, whereas they do not show a strong correlation with surface air temperature. The precipitation isotopes monthly averaged relatively show a periodic function (R2=0.63 and 0.40 for hydrogen and oxygen, respectively), and deuterium excess (d-excess=δD-8×δ18O) shows a strong pattern of quadratic function (R2=0.97), which is related to a seasonal change of air masses. Altitude effect of precipitation isotopes, which can be a clue to reveal sources of groundwater, can be observed in every aspect of the volcanic island (for the oxygen isotope, -0.14‰ for east and west, -0.18‰ for north and -0.085‰ for south per 100 m). Our analysis of precipitation isotopes will be helpful to provide limitations and opportunities for paleoclimate reconstruction using isotopic proxies and water movement from atmosphere to subsurface.

  12. Wilson Corners SWMU 001 2015 Annual Long Term Monitoring Report Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the findings of the 2015 Long Term Monitoring (LTM) that was completed at the Wilson Corners site, located at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The objectives of the 2015 LTM event were to evaluate the groundwater flow direction and gradient, to monitor the vertical and horizontal extent of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs; including the upgradient and sidegradient extents, which are monitored every five years), and to monitor select locations internal to the dissolved groundwater plume. The 2015 LTM event included several upgradient and sidegradient monitoring wells that are not sampled annually to verify the extent of VOCs in this portion of the site. The December 2015 LTM groundwater sampling event included, depth to groundwater measurements, 40 VOC samples collected using passive diffusion bags, and one VOC sample collected using low-flow techniques. Additionally, monitoring well MW0052DD was overdrilled and abandoned using rotasonic drilling techniques. The following conclusions can be made based on the 2015 LTM results: groundwater flow is generally to the west with northwest and southwest flow components from the water table to approximately 55 feet below land surface (ft BLS); peripheral monitoring wells generally delineate VOCs to groundwater cleanup target levels (GCTLs) except for monitoring wells MW0088, MW0090, MW0095, and NPSHMW0039, which had vinyl chloride (VC) concentrations near the GCTL and MW0062, which had trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethenen (cDCE), and VC concentrations above natural attenuation default concentrations (NADCs); VOCs in interior downgradient wells generally fluctuate within historic ranges except for monitoring wells in the north-northwest portion of the site, which have increasing VC concentrations indicating potential plume migration and expansion; Historically, the vertical extents of the VOCs were delineated by monitoring wells

  13. Individual based, long term monitoring of acacia trees in hyper arid zone: Integration of a field survey and a remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Sivan; Blumberg, Dan G.; Ginat, Hanan; Shalmon, Benny

    2013-04-01

    Vegetation in hyper arid zones is very sparse as is. Monitoring vegetation changes in hyper arid zones is important because any reduction in the vegetation cover in these areas can lead to a considerable reduction in the carrying capacity of the ecological system. This study focuses on the impact of climate fluctuations on the acacia population in the southern Arava valley, Israel. The period of this survey includes a sequence of dry years with no flashfloods in most of the plots that ended in two years with vast floods. Arid zone acacia trees play a significant role in the desert ecosystem by moderating the extreme environmental conditions including radiation, temperature, humidity and precipitation. The trees also provide nutrients for the desert dwellers. Therefore, acacia trees in arid zones are considered to be `keystone species', because they have major influence over both plants and animal species, i.e., biodiversity. Long term monitoring of the acacia tree population in this area can provide insights into long term impacts of climate fluctuations on ecosystems in arid zones. Since 2000, a continuous yearly based survey on the three species of acacia population in seven different plots is conducted in the southern Arava (established by Shalmon, ecologist of the Israel nature and parks authority). The seven plots representing different ecosystems and hydrological regimes. A yearly based population monitoring enabled us to determine the mortality and recruitment rate of the acacia populations as well as growing rates of individual trees. This survey provides a unique database of the acacia population dynamics during a sequence of dry years that ended in a vast flood event during the winter of 2010. A lack of quantitative, nondestructive methods to estimate and monitor stress status of the acacia trees, led us to integrate remote sensing tools (ground and air-based) along with conventional field measurements in order to develop a long term monitoring of acacia

  14. Highly Sensitive and Long Term Stable Electrochemical Microelectrodes for Implantable Glucose Monitoring Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Liangliang

    A miniature wireless implantable electrochemical glucose system for continuous glucose monitoring with good selectivity, sensitivity, linearity and long term stability was developed. First, highly sensitive, long-term stable and reusable planar H2O2 microelectrodes have been fabricated by microlithography. These electrodes composed of a 300 nm Pt black layer situated on a 5 um thick Au layer, provide effective protection to the underlying chromium adhesion layer. Using repeated cyclic voltammetric sweeps in flowing buffer solution, highly sensitive Pt black working electrodes were realized with five-decade linear dynamic range and low detection limit (10 nM) for H2O2 at low oxidation potentials. Second, a highly sensitive, low cost and flexible microwire biosensor was described using 25-mum thick gold wire as working electrode together with 125-mum thick Pt/Ir and Ag wires as counter and reference electrode, embedded within a PDMS-filled polyethylene tube. Surface area and activity of sensor was enhanced by converting gold electrode to nanoporous configuration followed by electrodeposition of platinum black. Glucose oxidase based biosensors by electrodeposition of poly(o-phenylenediamine) and glucose oxidase on the working electrode, displayed a higher glucose sensitivity (1.2 mA mM-1 cm-2) than highest literature reported. In addition it exhibits wide detection range (up to 20 mM) and selectivity (>95%). Third, novel miniaturized and flexible microelectrode arrays with 8 of 25 mum electrodes displayed the much needed 3D diffusion profiles similar to a single 25 mum microelectrode, but with one order increase in current levels. These microelectrode arrays displayed a H2O2 sensitivity of 13 mA mM-1 cm-2, a wide dynamic range of 100 nM to 10 mM, limit of detection of 10 nM. These microwire based edge plane microsensors incorporated flexibility, miniaturization and low operation potential are an promising approach for continuous in vivo metabolic monitoring. Fourth

  15. An Optical Oxygen Sensor for Long-Term Continuous Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen in Perfused Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, F. G.; Jeevarajan, A. S.; Anderson, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    For long-term growth of man1ITlalian cells in perfused bioreactors, it is essential to monitor the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) present in the culture medium to quantitate and control level of DO. Continuous measurement of the amount of DO in the cell culture medium in-line under sterile conditions in NASA's perfused bioreactor requires that the oxygen sensor provide increased sensitivity and be sterilizable and nontoxic. Additionally, long-term cell culture experiments require that the calibration be maintained several weeks or months. Although there are a number of sensors for dissolved oxygen on the market and under development elsewhere, very few meet these stringent conditions. An optical oxygen sensor (BOXY) based on dynamic fluorescent quenching and a pulsed blue LED light source was developed in our laboratory to address these requirements. Tris( 4,7 -diphenyl-l, 1 O-phenanthroline )ruthenium(II) chloride is employed as the fluorescent dye indicator. The sensing element consists of a glass capillary (OD 4.0 mm; ID 2.0 mm) coated internally with a thin layer of the fluorescent dye in silicone matrix and overlayed with a black shielding layer. Irradiation of the sensing element with blue light (blue LED with emission maximum at 475 nm) generates a red fluorescence centered at 626 nm. The fluorescence intensity is correlated to the concentration of DO present in the culture medium, following the modified non-linear Stern-Volmer equation. By using a pulsed irradiating light source, the problem of dye-bleaching, which is often encountered in long-term continuous measurements of tIns type, 'is minimized. To date we achieved sensor resolution of 0.3 mmHg at 50 mmHg p02, and 0.6 mmHg at 100 mmHg p02, with a response time of about one minute. Calibration was accomplished in sterile phosphate-buffered saline with a blood-gas analyzer (BGA) measurement as reference. Stand-alone software was also developed to control the sensor and bioreactor as well as to

  16. Life+ EnvEurope DEIMS - improving access to long-term ecosystem monitoring data in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliment, Tomas; Peterseil, Johannes; Oggioni, Alessandro; Pugnetti, Alessandra; Blankman, David

    2013-04-01

    Long-term ecological (LTER) studies aim at detecting environmental changes and analysing its related drivers. In this respect LTER Europe provides a network of about 450 sites and platforms. However, data on various types of ecosystems and at a broad geographical scale is still not easily available. Managing data resulting from long-term observations is therefore one of the important tasks not only for an LTER site itself but also on the network level. Exchanging and sharing the information within a wider community is a crucial objective in the upcoming years. Due to the fragmented nature of long-term ecological research and monitoring (LTER) in Europe - and also on the global scale - information management has to face several challenges: distributed data sources, heterogeneous data models, heterogeneous data management solutions and the complex domain of ecosystem monitoring with regard to the resulting data. The Life+ EnvEurope project (2010-2013) provides a case study for a workflow using data from the distributed network of LTER-Europe sites. In order to enhance discovery, evaluation and access to data, the EnvEurope Drupal Ecological Information Management System (DEIMS) has been developed. This is based on the first official release of the Drupal metadata editor developed by US LTER. EnvEurope DEIMS consists of three main components: 1) Metadata editor: a web-based client interface to manage metadata of three information resource types - datasets, persons and research sites. A metadata model describing datasets based on Ecological Metadata Language (EML) was developed within the initial phase of the project. A crosswalk to the INSPIRE metadata model was implemented to convey to the currently on-going European activities. Person and research site metadata models defined within the LTER Europe were adapted for the project needs. The three metadata models are interconnected within the system in order to provide easy way to navigate the user among the related

  17. Long Term Monitoring of Greenhouse Gases at NOAA - a Forty Year Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory and its precursor organizations have been monitoring trends and distributions of greenhouse gases and other climatically relevant constituents in the atmosphere for over 40 years (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd). The focus of these measurements has been to obtain reliable records of global trends and distributions, but the experimental design and use of these measurements have advanced over time with evolving scientific questions. In earlier days, measurements and data products were global in nature (e.g., Annual Greenhouse Gas Index, http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/aggi). Later, they addressed intra-hemispheric properties, continental contributions, and eventually regional sources and sinks (e.g., http://CarbonTracker.noaa.gov). Today, and into this century, scientific questions continue to progress and the observation systems will need to progress accordingly. Critical questions likely will center on greenhouse gas emission reduction efforts, ecosystem feedbacks, and climate surprises. Regional information will become increasingly important for supporting greenhouse gas emission reduction efforts, and this information must be accurate, precise, and without bias. With emerging diverse, regionalized efforts to monitor greenhouse gases, comparability of measurements and measurement systems becomes more important than ever. NOAA, with its long-standing networks and its role as the WMO Central Calibration Laboratory for the major greenhouse gases, is well positioned to provide the linkages necessary to assure that regional measurements are comparable. Policy-makers, businesses, and regulatory organizations will need the best information available for decision-making. This presentation will identify major, climate-relevant findings that have come from NOAA's networks and those of others over the past several decades and will address the long-term monitoring needs to support decision-making over the next decades as society begins to

  18. A long-term Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent data record for climate studies and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estilow, T. W.; Young, A. H.; Robinson, D. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the long-term, satellite-based visible snow cover extent National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) climate data record (CDR) currently available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation. This environmental data product is developed from weekly Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent data that have been digitized from snow cover maps onto a Cartesian grid draped over a polar stereographic projection. The data have a spatial resolution of 190.6 km at 60° latitude, are updated monthly, and span the period from 4 October 1966 to the present. The data comprise the longest satellite-based CDR of any environmental variable. Access to the data is provided in Network Common Data Form (netCDF) and archived by NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) under the satellite Climate Data Record Program (doi:10.7289/V5N014G9). The basic characteristics, history, and evolution of the data set are presented herein. In general, the CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability to its widely used predecessor product. Key refinements included in the CDR improve the product's grid accuracy and documentation and bring metadata into compliance with current standards for climate data records.

  19. Long term monitoring for oil in the Exxon Valdez spill region.

    PubMed

    Payne, James R; Driskell, William B; Short, Jeffrey W; Larsen, Marie L

    2008-12-01

    In the aftermath of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, a Long Term Environmental Monitoring Program (LTEMP) has been regularly sampling mussels (and some sediments) for polycyclic aromatic and saturated hydrocarbons (PAH and SHC) at sites in Port Valdez, Prince William Sound, and the nearby Gulf of Alaska region. After 1999, a decreasing trend appears in total PAH (TPAH) in tissues at all sites with current values below 100 ng/g dry weight (many below 50 ng/g). Currently, most samples reflect a predominantly dissolved-phase signal. This new low in TPAH likely represents ambient background levels. Synchrony in TPAH time-series and similarities in the hydrocarbon signatures portray regional-scale dynamics. The five inner Prince William Sound sites show similar composition and fluctuations that are different from the three Gulf of Alaska sites. The two Port Valdez sites represent a unique third region primarily influenced by the treated ballast water discharge from the Alyeska Marine Terminal. Prince William Sound has reverted to a stable environment of extremely low level contamination in which local perturbations are easily detected. PMID:18835610

  20. Passive sampler for combined chemical and toxicological long-term monitoring of groundwater: the ceramic toximeter.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Stephanie K; McLachlan, Michael S; Schirmer, Kristin

    2007-10-01

    We present the development of a passive sampling device that combines chemical with biological assessment of water following time-integrating, long-term sampling. The new device, which was designated the Ceramic Toximeter, brings together the simplicity of the Ceramic Dosimeter as a ceramic membrane-based, solid-sorbent sampler and the uniqueness of a recently developed solid-phase, solvent-free bioassay. In this bioassay, Biosilon, i.e., polystyrene polymer beads, is used to present sorbed contaminants to vertebrate cells that adhere to the contaminant-loaded Biosilon and respond. Focusing on Biosilon as sorbent, its ability to accumulate 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was explored. When tested up to 42 days in the laboratory or 1 year in groundwater at a contaminated gasworks site, Biosilon-filled Ceramic Toximeters yielded back-calculated time-weighted average aqueous PAH concentrations that agreed well with concentrations obtained by frequent snapshot sampling. The chosen bioassay response, the induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, was as predicted in the laboratory setting but could only partly be explained by the analyzed PAHs in the field. Based on this first assessment, the Ceramic Toximeter emerges as a resource efficient water monitoring device with a variety of potential future applications. PMID:17969708

  1. Developing a Long-term Monitoring Program with Undergraduate Students in Marine Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, T. M.; Boryta, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    A goal of our growing marine geoscience program at Mt. San Antonio College is to involve our students in all stages of developing and running an undergraduate research project. During the initial planning phase, students develop and test their proposals. Instructor-set parameters were chosen carefully to help guide students toward manageable projects but to not limit their creativity. Projects should focus on long-term monitoring of a coastal area in southern California. During the second phase, incoming students will critique the initial proposals, modify as necessary and continue to develop the project. We intend for data collection opportunities to grow from geological and oceanographic bases to eventually include other STEM topics in biology, chemistry, math and GIS. Questions we will address include: What makes this a good research project for a community college? What are the costs and time commitments involved? How will the project benefit students and society? Additionally we will share our initial results, challenges, and unexpected pitfalls and benefits.

  2. Low-complexity detection of atrial fibrillation in continuous long-term monitoring.

    PubMed

    Petrėnas, Andrius; Marozas, Vaidotas; Sörnmo, Leif

    2015-10-01

    This study describes an atrial fibrillation (AF) detector whose structure is well-adapted both for detection of subclinical AF episodes and for implementation in a battery-powered device for use in continuous long-term monitoring applications. A key aspect for achieving these two properties is the use of an 8-beat sliding window, which thus is much shorter than the 128-beat window used in most existing AF detectors. The building blocks of the proposed detector include ectopic beat filtering, bigeminal suppression, characterization of RR interval irregularity, and signal fusion. With one design parameter, the performance can be tuned to put more emphasis on avoiding false alarms due to non-AF arrhythmias or more emphasis on detecting brief AF episodes. Despite its very simple structure, the results show that the detector performs better on the MIT-BIH Atrial Fibrillation database than do existing detectors, with high sensitivity and specificity (97.1% and 98.3%, respectively). The detector can be implemented with just a few arithmetical operations and does not require a large memory buffer thanks to the short window. PMID:25666902

  3. Long-term arsenic monitoring with an Enterobacter cloacae microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Michelle; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-12-01

    A microbial fuel cell was constructed with biofilms of Enterobacter cloacae grown on the anode. Bioelectrocatalysis was observed when the biofilm was grown in media containing sucrose as the carbon source and methylene blue as the mediator. The presence of arsenic caused a decrease in bioelectrocatalytic current. Biofilm growth in the presence of arsenic resulted in lower power outputs whereas addition of arsenic showed no immediate result in power output due to the short term arsenic resistance of the bacteria and slow transport of arsenic across cellular membranes to metabolic enzymes. Calibration curves plotted from the maximum current and maximum power of power curves after growth show that this system is able to quantify both arsenate and arsenate with low detection limits (46 μM for arsenate and 4.4 μM for arsenite). This system could be implemented as a method for long-term monitoring of arsenic concentration in environments where arsenic contamination could occur and alter the metabolism of the organisms resulting in a decrease in power output of the self-powered sensor. PMID:25862430

  4. Long-Term Marine Traffic Monitoring for Environmental Safety in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakopoulos, T.; Gyftakis, S.; Charou, E.; Perantonis, S.; Nivolianitou, Z.; Koromila, I.; Makrygiorgos, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Aegean Sea is characterized by an extremely high marine safety risk, mainly due to the significant increase of the traffic of tankers from and to the Black Sea that pass through narrow straits formed by the 1600 Greek islands. Reducing the risk of a ship accident is therefore vital to all socio-economic and environmental sectors. This paper presents an online long-term marine traffic monitoring work-flow that focuses on extracting aggregated vessel risks using spatiotemporal analysis of multilayer information: vessel trajectories, vessel data, meteorological data, bathymetric / hydrographic data as well as information regarding environmentally important areas (e.g. protected high-risk areas, etc.). A web interface that enables user-friendly spatiotemporal queries is implemented at the frontend, while a series of data mining functionalities extracts aggregated statistics regarding: (a) marine risks and accident probabilities for particular areas (b) trajectories clustering information (c) general marine statistics (cargo types, etc.) and (d) correlation between spatial environmental importance and marine traffic risk. Towards this end, a set of data clustering and probabilistic graphical modelling techniques has been adopted.

  5. Robust cardiac event change detection method for long-term healthcare monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Satija, Udit; Ramkumar, Barathram; Manikandan, M Sabarimalai

    2016-06-01

    A long-term continuous cardiac health monitoring system highly demands more battery power for real-time transmission of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals and increases bandwidth, treatment costs and traffic load of the diagnostic server. In this Letter, the authors present an automated low-complexity robust cardiac event change detection (CECD) method that can continuously detect specific changes in PQRST morphological patterns and heart rhythms and then enable transmission/storing of the recorded ECG signals. The proposed CECD method consists of four stages: ECG signal quality assessment, R-peak detection and beat waveform extraction, temporal and RR interval feature extraction and cardiac event change decision. The proposed method is tested and validated using both normal and abnormal ECG signals including different types of arrhythmia beats, heart rates and signal quality. Results show that the method achieves an average sensitivity of 99.76%, positive predictivity of 94.58% and overall accuracy of 94.32% in determining the changes in heartbeat waveforms of the ECG signals. PMID:27382480

  6. Long-term air quality monitoring at the South Pole by the NOAA program Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, E.; Rodhaine, B.A.; Komhyr, W.D.; Oltmans, S.J.; Steele, L.P.

    1988-02-01

    The objectives of the NOAA program of Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change (GMCC) for the South Pole include measurements of atmospheric changes which can potentially impact climate. This paper discusses the long-term GMCC South Pole air chemistry data for carbon dioxide, total ozone, surface ozone, methane, halocarbons, nitrous oxide, and aerosol concentrations, comparing the findings with GMCC data for other regions. Special consideration is given to the results of recent GMCC ozonesonde operations and to an asessment of Dobson ozone spectrophotometer data taken at South Pole by NOAA since 1964. Data are discussed in the framework of Antarctic ozone hole phenomenon. 49 references.

  7. Simulation and Optimization of Large Scale Subsurface Environmental Impacts; Investigations, Remedial Design and Long Term Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Deschaine, L.M.

    2008-07-01

    accuracy of them. The uncertainty and sparse nature of information in earth science simulations necessitate stochastic representations. For discussion purposes, the solution to these site-wide challenges is divided into three sub-components; plume finding, long term monitoring, and site-wide remediation. Plume finding is the optimal estimation of the plume fringe(s) at a specified time. It is optimized by fusing geo-stochastic flow and transport simulations with the information content of data using a Kalman filter. The result is an optimal monitoring sensor network; the decision variable is location(s) of sensor in three dimensions. Long term monitoring extends this approach concept, and integrates the spatial-time correlations to optimize the decision variables of where to sample and when to sample over the project life cycle. Optimization of location and timing of samples to meet the desired accuracy of temporal plume movement is accomplished using enumeration or genetic algorithms. The remediation optimization solves the multi-component, multiphase system of equations and incorporates constraints on life-cycle costs, maximum annual costs, maximum allowable annual discharge (for assessing the monitored natural attenuation solution) and constraints on where remedial system component(s) can be located, including management overrides to force certain solutions to be chosen are incorporated for solution design. It uses a suite of optimization techniques, including the outer approximation method, Lipchitz global optimization, genetic algorithms, and the like. The automated optimal remedial design algorithm requires a stable simulator be available for the simulated process. This is commonly the case for all above specifications sans true three-dimensional multiphase flow. Much work is currently being conducted in the industry to develop stable 3D, three-phase simulators. If needed, an interim heuristic algorithm is available to get close to optimal for these conditions. This

  8. Implementing CUAHSI and SWE observation data models in the long-term monitoring infrastructure TERENO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J. F.; Stender, V.; Schroeder, M.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO) is an interdisciplinary and long-term research project spanning an Earth observation network across Germany. It includes four test sites within Germany from the North German lowlands to the Bavarian Alps and is operated by six research centers of the Helmholtz Association. The contribution by the participating research centers is organized as regional observatories. The challenge for TERENO and its observatories is to integrate all aspects of data management, data workflows, data modeling and visualizations into the design of a monitoring infrastructure. TERENO Northeast is one of the sub-observatories of TERENO and is operated by the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ in Potsdam. This observatory investigates geoecological processes in the northeastern lowland of Germany by collecting large amounts of environmentally relevant data. The success of long-term projects like TERENO depends on well-organized data management, data exchange between the partners involved and on the availability of the captured data. Data discovery and dissemination are facilitated not only through data portals of the regional TERENO observatories but also through a common spatial data infrastructure TEODOOR. TEODOOR bundles the data, provided by the different web services of the single observatories, and provides tools for data discovery, visualization and data access. The TERENO Northeast data infrastructure integrates data from more than 200 instruments and makes the data available through standard web services. Data are stored following the CUAHSI observation data model in combination with the 52° North Sensor Observation Service data model. The data model was implemented using the PostgreSQL/PostGIS DBMS. Especially in a long-term project, such as TERENO, care has to be taken in the data model. We chose to adopt the CUAHSI observational data model because it is designed to store observations and descriptive information (metadata

  9. Long term monitoring of leachate flux into drainage pipes of MSW landfills.

    PubMed

    Münnich, Kai; Bauer, Jan; Fricke, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of leachate quality and quantity is an essential part of the monitoring of landfills in the different phases during their lifespan. These measurements allow the evaluation of the decomposition processes in the landfill and the efficiency of technical installations for the reduction of the leachate generation. Normally the measurements are made at the outlet of larger sections of the landfill or at the overall landfill. An identification of smaller parts with different biological or hydraulic behaviour within the landfill section is not possible in that case. In the framework of a long-term research project concerning the monitoring of landfills, different devices for small-scale identification of the leachate discharge were developed at the Technical University of Braunschweig. The device allows a measurement of the leachate discharge inside a single drainage pipe having a length up to 375  m. The measurements showed the influence of changes in operation. It was found that the discharge in the pipes and the efficiency of the drainage system was strongly influenced by deformations and torsion of the high-density polyethylene pipes and unequal settlements of the subsoil. The discharge of leachate in the drainage system was, as expected, very non-uniform and in parts the leachate was not flowing inside the pipes, but rather in the surrounding gravel layer. Furthermore, large differences in leachate quality may occur, whereas the differences in discharge volume are small. With the developed system it is possible to control the efficiency and the functioning of top cover systems for landfills. PMID:21030425

  10. Long-term Multi-band Photometric Monitoring of Blazar S5 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ben-zhong; Zeng, Wei; Jiang, Ze-jun; Fan, Zhong-hui; Hu, Wen; Zhang, Peng-fei; Yang, Qing-yun; Yan, Da-hai; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Li

    2015-06-01

    We present long-term optical multi-band photometric monitoring of blazar S5 0716+714, from 2004 January 11 to 2012 November 4, with high temporal resolution of approximately 15 minutes in the BVRI bands. The source was in an active state during the whole monitoring campaign, showing intraday variability in 11 of 72 days. The average magnitudes in each band were B = 14.398, V = 13.821, R = 13.255, and I = 12.885. The overall variability amplitudes were {Δ }B=1\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.}834, {Δ }V=2\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.}167, {Δ }R=2\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.}148, and {Δ }I=1\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.}912. The structure function showed that typical timescales for intraday variability were between approximately 2 and 7.5 hr. The intraday variability amplitudes were from a few percent to approximately 30%. We found typical variation rates of approximately 0.05 mag hr-1 in both the rising and falling phases, with a minimal variability timescale of 130 minutes. A 10 day period short-term variability was observed simultaneously in the BVRI bands. The discrete correlation function suggests that there is significant correlated variability between the B- and I-band light curves. However, no significant time lags were detected. The spectral behaviors in the different variability episodes were studied, and our observations show bluer-when-brighter behavior on long, short, and intraday timescales for the blazar S5 0716+714. The variability and relevant spectral trends can be explained by the shock-in-jet scenario.

  11. Long-term monitoring of rock mass properties in the underground excavation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2015-04-01

    It is generally agreed today that hazardous waste should be placed in repositories hundreds of meters below the Earth's surface. In our research we deal with the long-term monitoring of the underground excavation by seismic and electrical resistivity measurements. Permanent measuring system was developed and installed at the Bedřichov gallery test site (northern Bohemia). The gallery was excavated using TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) in granitic rocks. Realized repeated measurements include ultrasonic time of flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The seismic measurements are performed by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock wall using one seismic source and three receivers in the distances of 1, 2 and 3 m. The main emphasis is devoted to P-waves; however, recording of full waveform enables analyzing of S- waves and other types of waves as well. The comparison of repeated measurements is used for an assessment of changes in seismic velocities with very high-accuracy. The repetition rate of measurements can be selected from seconds; however such fast changes in the rock mass are unexpected. The ERT measurement is performed on the same rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes is 20 centimeters. The conductivity of undisturbed granitic rocks is extremely low. Therefore the observed local increase of conductivity can be associated with joints and fractures saturated with water, resulting in their ionic conductivity. Repeated ERT measurement can reveal some changes in the rock mass. Due to time requirements of ERT measurement the repetition rate can be about three hours. The data collected by measuring system is transferred by means of computer network and can be accessed via internet. This contribution deals with preliminary results gained so far during the testing of developed monitoring system. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA

  12. Long-Term Monitoring of Dzanga Bai Forest Elephants: Forest Clearing Use Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Turkalo, Andrea K.; Wrege, Peter H.; Wittemyer, George

    2013-01-01

    Individual identification of the relatively cryptic forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) at forest clearings currently provides the highest quality monitoring data on this ecologically important but increasingly threatened species. Here we present baseline data from the first 20 years of an individually based study of this species, conducted at the Dzanga Clearing, Central African Republic. A total of 3,128 elephants were identified over the 20-year study (1,244 adults; 675 females, 569 males). It took approximately four years for the majority of elephants visiting the clearing to be identified, but new elephants entered the clearing every year of the study. The study population was relatively stable, varying from 1,668 to 1,864 individuals (including juveniles and infants), with increasingly fewer males than females over time. The age-class distribution for females remained qualitatively unchanged between 1995 and 2010, while the proportion of adult males decreased from 20% to 10%, likely reflecting increased mortality. Visitation patterns by individuals were highly variable, with some elephants visiting monthly while others were ephemeral users with visits separated by multiple years. The number of individuals in the clearing at any time varied between 40 and 100 individuals, and there was little evidence of a seasonal pattern in this variation. The number of elephants entering the clearing together (defined here as a social group) averaged 1.49 (range 1–12) for males and 2.67 (range 1–14) for females. This collation of 20 years of intensive forest elephant monitoring provides the first detailed, long term look at the ecology of bai visitation for this species, offering insight to the ecological significance and motivation for bai use, social behavior, and threats to forest elephants. We discuss likely drivers (rainfall, compression, illegal killing, etc.) influencing bai visitation rates. This study provides the baseline for future demographic and behavioral

  13. Long term monitoring of water basin of an abandoned copper open pit mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, H.; Borisova, D.

    2012-04-01

    Nonoperating open pit mines, very often as a matter of fact abandoned, create serious ecological risk for the region of their location especially for the quality of the water since the rainfall fills the bottom of the pit forming water body having different depth. This water as a rule has very high concentration of the metals in it and is highly toxic. One example for such opencast, idle copper mine is Medet located in the central part of Bulgaria who was started for exploitation in 1964 and at that moment being the largest in Europe for production of copper concentrate. In the vicinity of it after autumn and spring rains there are many cases reported for water contamination by heavy metals such as arsenic, copper, cadmium in the rivers running close to this open pit mine. This justifies the need for long term and sustainable monitoring of the area of the water basin of this idle mine in order to estimate its acid drainage and imaging spectroscopy combined with is-situ investigations is proved to provide reliable results about the area of the water table. In the course of this study we have investigated historical data gathered by remote sensing which allowed us to make conclusions about the year behavior of this area. Our expectations are that the results of this research will help in the rehabilitation process of this idle mine and will provide the local authorities engaged in water quality monitoring with a tool to estimate the possible damage caused to the local rivers and springs. With this research we also would like to contribute to the fulfillment of the following EU Directives: Directive 2006/21/°C on the Management of Waste from the Extractive Industries and Directive 2004/35/ °C on Environmental Liability with regard to the Prevention and Remedying of Environmental Damage.

  14. From hydrodynamic to hydrological modelling: Investigating long-term hydrological regimes of key wetlands in the Macquarie Marshes, a semi-arid lowland floodplain in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Li; Macdonald, Rohan; Morrison, Tim; Hameed, Tahir; Saintilan, Neil; Ling, Joanne

    2013-09-01

    The Macquarie Marshes is an intermittently flooded wetland complex covering nearly 200,000 ha. It is one of the largest semi-permanent wetland systems in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia, and portions of the Marshes are listed as internationally important under the Ramsar Convention. Previous studies indicate that the Marshes have undergone accelerated ecological degradation since the 1980s. The ecological degradation is documented in declining biodiversity, encroaching of terrestrial species, colonisation of exotic species, and deterioration of floodplain forests. There is strong evidence that reduction in river flows is the principal cause of the decrease in ecological values. Although the streams are relatively well gauged and modelled, the lack of hydrological records within the Marshes hampers any attempts to quantitatively investigate the relationship between hydrological variation and ecosystem integrity. To enable a better understanding of the long-term hydrological variations within the key wetland systems, and in particular, to investigate the impacts of the different water management policies (e.g. environmental water) on wetlands, a river system model including the main wetland systems was needed. The morphological complex nature of the Marshes means that the approximation of hydrological regimes within wetlands using stream hydrographs would have been difficult and inaccurate. In this study, we built a coupled 1D/2D MIKE FLOOD floodplain hydrodynamic model based on a 1 m DEM derived from a LiDAR survey. Hydrological characteristics of key constituent wetlands such as the correlation between water level and inundation area, relationships between stream and wetlands and among wetlands were estimated using time series extracted from hydrodynamic simulations. These relationships were then introduced into the existing river hydrological model (IQQM) to represent the wetlands. The model was used in this study to simulate the daily behaviours of inflow

  15. Searching for a Relationship Between Forest Water Use and Increasing Atmospheric CO2 Concentration with Long-Term Hydrologic Data from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Amthor, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Increases in atmospheric C02 concentration from mid-1956 through mid-1997 were compared with hydrologic records from five forested, gaged watersheds in the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire, U.S.A. The purpose of the comparison was to assess whether a relationship between increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and whole-ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET) could be determined. The HBEF is particularly well suited to this type of study because of the length of the hydrologic record and the physical properties of the watersheds. This analysis is based on HBEF water years (which begin 1 June and end the following 31 May) rather than calendar years. Hydrologic records from individual watersheds used in this analysis ranged from 28 to 41 water years. During the full 41-water-year period, it is estimated that water-year mean atmospheric CO2 concentration increased more than 15% (from about 314 to 363 ppm). In one south-facing watershed (i.e., HBEF watershed 3), there was a statistically significant negative relationship between atmospheric C02 concentration and ET. This translated into a nearly 77 rnndyear reduction in ET as a result of a 50 ppm increase in atmospheric C02 concentration, a result of practical significance. Evapotranspiration from the other watersheds was also negatively related to atmospheric CO2 concentration, but with smaller (and statistically insignificant) magnitudes. Evapotranspiration from the three south-facing (but not the two north-facing) watersheds included in the analysis was "abnormally" low during the most recent 2 years (i.e., water years beginning in 1995 and 1996), and this affected the trends in ET. This recent and abrupt, reduction in ET deserves further analysis, most importantly by an extension of the hydrologic record through continued long-term monitoring in the HBEF (which is ongoing). If ET remains relatively low during the coming years in south-facing watersheds, studies of the physical and/or biological

  16. State-of-the-art in Methodologies for Long-term Ground-water Monitoring Design and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiciga, H. A.

    2002-05-01

    Optimal long-term ground-water monitoring design can be accomplished using a variety of different approaches. The relative merits and pertinence of the general approaches and techniques depend on several factors, among which one can cite: (1) the scale of the monitoring program (local, intermediate, or regional scale), (2) the objective of the monitoring program (ambient monitoring, detection monitoring, compliance monitoring, definitive-action monitoring, or remedial monitoring), (3) the type of available data (such as subsurface stratigraphy, water levels, and ground-water chemistry), (4) the nature of the contaminant process (consider, for example, transport and fate of chemicals in the vadose and saturated zones); (5) the steady-state vs. transient nature of ground-water quality properties; and (6) the changing goals of a long-term monitoring program. Institutional, legal, and other site-specific considerations may also bear on long-term monitoring requirements. We have identified four major approaches to design new and to refine existing ground-water monitoring networks: rule-based methods, statistically-based methods, probabilistic methods, and mathematical optimization methods. We provide a guided tour through these methods, citing areas in which they have been particularly helpful in practical and theoretical contexts.

  17. Strategy for Long-Term Stewardship and Monitoring of Amchitka Island - 12190

    SciTech Connect

    Kautsky, Mark; Nguyen, Jason; Darr, Paul S.; Picel, Mary

    2012-07-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan (LTSMP) for Amchitka details how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to fulfill its mission to maintain protection of human health and the environment at and around the sites on Amchitka Island. The LTSMP calls for monitoring to be performed every 5 years, at least in the initial phase of the project. The purpose of the monitoring is to develop a baseline of activity concentrations for selected radionuclides in biota, water, and soil, both on Amchitka and at the reference location on Adak Island, approximately 322 km (200 miles) northeast of Amchitka. Data compiled by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP, 2006) are being included as part of the baseline data set. The specific biological, water, and sediment samples collected during the 2011 sampling event were developed through close coordination with the primary stakeholders, including the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Amchitka is managed by the USFWS as part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Two plans were developed to address specific needs of the biological- and the terrestrial-monitoring programs. Results from these monitoring programs will help determine whether the environment is being impacted by radionuclide migration and uptake, and if subsistence and commercial-catch seafood is safe for human consumption. The RESRAD-BIOTA code is being used to evaluate ecological health relative to the radionuclide levels determined from this sampling event. The samples were sent to three laboratories for analysis. With the exception of the seawater samples, most of the samples were sent to the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A smaller subset of rock-weed samples, Star reindeer lichen samples, and soil samples collected from beneath the lichen were sent

  18. The Salcher landslide observatory: a new long-term monitoring site in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canli, Ekrem; Engels, Alexander; Glade, Thomas; Schweigl, Joachim; Bertagnoli, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Landslides pose a significant hazard in the federal district of Lower Austria. The Geological Survey of Lower Austria is responsible for detailed site investigations as well as the planning and installation of protective measures. The most landslide prone area in Lower Austria is within the Rhenodanubian Flyschzone whose materials consist of alterations of fine grained layers (clayey shales, silty shales, marls) and sandstones. It exhibits over 6200 landslides within an area of approx. 1300 km². For areas susceptible to landsliding, protection works are not feasible or simply too costly. Therefore, monitoring systems have been installed in the past, most of them, however, are not operated automatically and require field visits for data readouts. Thus, it is difficult to establish any relation between initiating and controlling factors to gain a comprehensive understanding of the underlying process mechanism that is essential for any early warning applications. In this presentation, we present the design and first results of an automated landslide monitoring system in Gresten (Lower Austria). The deep-seated, slow moving Salcher landslide extends over approx. 8000 m² and is situated adjacent to residential buildings and infrastructure. This monitoring setup is designed to run for at least a decade to account for investigations of long term sliding dynamics and pattern. Historically the Salcher landslide has shown shorter phases with accelerated movements followed by longer phases with barely any movements. Those periods of inactivity commonly exceed regular project durations, thus it is important to cover longer periods. Such slope dynamics can be investigated throughout many parts in the world, thus this monitoring might allow to understand better also landslides with infrequent movement patterns. The monitoring setup consists of surface as well as subsurface installations. All installations are connected to permanent power supply, are taking the respective

  19. Long-term Monitoring Program Optimization for Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compound Plume, Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderone, G. M.

    2006-12-01

    A long-term monitoring program was initiated in 1995 at 6 sites at NAS Brunswick, including 3 National Priorities List (Superfund) sites. Primary contaminants of concern include chlorinated volatile organic compounds, including tetrachloroethane, trichloroethene, and vinyl chloride, in addition to metals. More than 80 submersible pumping systems were installed to facilitate sample collection utilizing the low-flow sampling technique. Long-term monitoring of the groundwater is conducted to assess the effectiveness of remedial measures, and monitor changes in contaminant concentrations in the Eastern Plume Operable Unit. Long-term monitoring program activities include quarterly groundwater sampling and analysis at more than 90 wells across 6 sites; surface water, sediment, seep, and leachate sampling and analysis at 3 sites; landfill gas monitoring; well maintenance; engineering inspections of landfill covers and other sites or evidence of stressed vegetation; water level gauging; and treatment plant sampling and analysis. Significant cost savings were achieved by optimizing the sampling network and reducing sampling frequency from quarterly to semi- annual or annual sampling. As part of an ongoing optimization effort, a geostatistical assessment of the Eastern Plume was conducted at the Naval Air Station, Brunswick, Maine. The geostatistical assessment used 40 monitoring points and analytical data collected over 3 years. For this geostatistical assessment, EA developed and utilized a database of analytical results generated during 3 years of long-term monitoring which was linked to a Geographic Information System to enhance data visualization capacity. The Geographic Information System included themes for groundwater volatile organic compound concentration, groundwater flow directions, shallow and deep wells, and immediate access to point-specific analytical results. This statistical analysis has been used by the site decision-maker and its conclusions supported a

  20. Net Carbon Uptake by Terrestrial Ecosystems in the Han River Basin, Korea Derived from a Long-Term Hydrologic Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Lee, D.; Woo, N.; Kim, Y.

    2004-05-01

    Recently, water and carbon cycles have been investigated for a few large drainage basins in North America based on stable isotope ratios of water and the 'Water Use Efficiency' concept. This approach is best suited to derive Net Primary Productivity (NPP) averaged for years to decades depending on the residence time of water, as it is based on a long-term hydrologic budget of the study area. Using the same method, we attempt to constrain the carbon cycling in the Han river basin, Korea and evaluate its applicability and reliability. On the basis of hydrologic data measured from 1965 to 1969, the mean annual input of water (33.9 km3) in the basin (i.e., precipitation) is balanced by the annual discharge (18.9 km3) and the annual evapotranspiration (15.0 km3). The evapotranspiration flux consists of the mean annual evaporation of 6.1 km3 derived from an isotope mass balance relation, the interception of 6.9 km3 estimated from the vegetation structure in the area and the transpiration of 1.8 km3. With the representative water use efficiency of 899.6 moles H2O/moles CO2 for the study area, the transpiration flux is translated into a NPP of 1.3 X 1012 g Carbon/y (51.4 g Carbon/m2/y). The estimated NPP in the study area is relatively low compared to those reported for other regions in the world with similar environmental conditions and to the heterotrophic soil respiration flux for the area estimated from the empirical relation by Raich and Potter (1995). The result is sensitive to the variability of the major input parameters such as the amount of precipitation and discharge. Therefore, the uncertainty in estimating various water fluxes needs to be verified for a proper evaluation of the role of terrestrial ecosystems of the Han river basin in atmospheric carbon cycling. A detailed temporal variation of NPP, which is often masked in this type of studies due to an averaging effect, may be examined by constraining the residence time of water and a secular variation of

  1. Short-term and long-term Vadose zone monitoring: Current technologies, development, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, Boris

    1999-05-01

    At Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), and other DOE sites, field vadose zone observations have shown complex water seepage and mass transport behavior in a highly heterogeneous, thick vadose zone on a variety of scales. Recent investigation showed that severe contamination of soils and groundwater by organic contaminant and nuclear waste occurred because of water seepage and contaminant transport along localized, preferential, fast flow within the heterogeneous vadose zone. However, most of the existing characterization and monitoring methods are not able to locate these localized and persistent preferential pathways associated with specific heterogeneous geologic features, such as clastic dikes, caliche layers, or fractures. In addition, changes in the chemical composition of moving and indigenous solutes, particularly sodium concentration, redox conditions, biological transformation of organic materials, and high temperature, may significantly alter water, chemicals, and bio-transformation exchange between the zones of fast flow and the rest of the media. In this paper, using the data from Hanford and INEEL sites, we will (1) present evidence that central problems of the vadose zone investigations are associated with preferential, fast flow phenomena and accelerated migration of organic and radioactive elements, (2) identify gaps in current characterization and monitoring technologies, and (3) recommend actions for the development of advanced vadose zone characterization and monitoring methods using a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and geophysical techniques.

  2. Long-Term Monitoring of Post-Aquifer Flushing With Cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanford, W. J.; Hinrichs, R. M.; Brusseau, M. L.; McCray, J. E.; Boving, T.

    2003-12-01

    Cyclodextrins are benign sugar solutions that have been shown at numerous DoD sites to be effective in removing many different types of organic compounds from aquifers through flushing. Cyclodextrins enhance the solubility of many organic contaminants because the interior cavity of the toroidal shaped molecule has favorable conditions for inclusion of low-polarity compounds. They are also effective for aquifer flushing because the outside of the molecule is highly polar resulting in a high aqueous solubility. Their feasibility as a remedial alternative for many sites is dependent on whether unrecovered cyclodextrin mass left in the aquifer after active remediation leads to adverse results. The potential adverse results could include enhanced potential for spreading of hydrophobic contaminant and complications resulting from biodegradation of large quantities of cyclodextrin altering geochemical conditions. In the summer of 2002, a pilot test was performed at a military base in the Norfolk area of Virginia. Through funding by the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program within the DoD, hydroxyl-propyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) flushing was evaluated as a remedial technique for a chlorinated solvent contaminated aquifer. At the hazardous waste site there is a trichloroethylene (TCE) and sewage contaminated surficial sand aquifer. During the four months of field activities, tens of thousands of gallons of 20 percent wt./vol. HPCD solution were flushed through the aquifer. During and for 1.5 years after the cessation of flushing activities, the concentration of HPCD, TCE, dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate, sulfate, and iron were monitored within the aquifer by sampling from the high density of monitoring wells at the site. The results of long-term monitoring have found that HPCD concentration continues to linger above 0.5 percent wt./vol. at the site. But, TCE levels have rebounded only slightly from post-flushing levels. Background dissolved oxygen is low

  3. Long-Term Monitoring of Water Dynamics in the Sahel Region Using the Multi-Sar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, A.; Wendleder, A.; Schmitt, A.; Huber, M.

    2016-06-01

    Fresh water is a scarce resource in the West-African Sahel region, seasonally influenced by droughts and floods. Particularly in terms of climate change, the importance of wetlands increases for flora, fauna, human population, agriculture, livestock and fishery. Hence, access to open water is a key factor. Long-term monitoring of water dynamics is of great importance, especially with regard to the spatio-temporal extend of wetlands and drylands. It can predict future trends and facilitate the development of adequate management strategies. Lake Tabalak, a Ramsar wetland of international importance, is one of the most significant ponds in Niger and a refuge for waterbirds. Nevertheless, human population growth increased the pressure on this ecosystem, which is now degrading for all uses. The main objective of the study is a long-term monitoring of the Lake Tabalak's water dynamics to delineate permanent and seasonal water bodies, using weather- and daytime-independent multi-sensor and multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data available for the study area. Data of the following sensors from 1993 until 2016 are used: Sentinel-1A, TerraSARX, ALOS PALSAR-1/2, Envisat ASAR, RADARSAT-1/2, and ERS-1/2. All SAR data are processed with the Multi-SAR-System, unifying the different characteristics of all above mentioned sensors in terms of geometric, radiometric and polarimetric resolution to a consistent format. The polarimetric representation in Kennaugh elements allows fusing single-polarized data acquired by older sensors with multi-polarized data acquired by current sensors. The TANH-normalization guarantees a consistent and therefore comparable description in a closed data range in terms of radiometry. The geometric aspect is solved by projecting all images to an earth-fixed coordinate system correcting the brightness by the help of the incidence angle. The elevation model used in the geocoding step is the novel global model produced by the TanDEM-X satellite

  4. Difference of Ecosystem and Hydrological control on Long-term water quality between adjacent subcatchments in a forested catchment in central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuyama, M.; Iwasaki, K.; Nagano, R.; Takaki, K.; Tanaka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We have been monitoring the water quality in the Kiryu Experimental Watershed (KEW; 5.99 ha), Japan, and four subcatchments for more than 20 years. The climate of KEW is warm temperate. The artificially planted Japanese Cypress around 1960 covers whole of the KEW. The geology of KEW is weathered granite. The concentrations of SiO2 and Na, which are mainly supplied from weathering processes, in streamwater were different between the catchments, and the difference was controlled by hydrological conditions in each catchment; in the catchment where shallow groundwater contribution to the streamflow is large, the concentrations were lower. Conversely, in the catchment where deep, bedrock groundwater contribution is large, these concentrations were higher. The K+ concentration which cycles between soil and plants showed clear seasonal variations and the differences between the catchments were small. Considering the long-term trend of streamwater chemistry, the electric conductivity (EC), Cl-, and SO42- concentrations have been gradually decreasing during recent 10 years in all catchments. On the other hand, the NO3- concentration has been commonly increasing in recent 5 years in all catchment. The difference of concentrations between the catchments were depending on the difference of the redox condition caused by soil sediment. One of the subcatchments experienced the disturbance in early 90's and subsequent increase of NO3- concentration, and the residence tine distribution shows the effects of the disturbance is still remaining. Recently, the disturbance is expanding in another subcatchment, and one of the reason of the disturbance is soil erosion. Moreover, the streamwater NO3- concentrations are also gradually increasing even in undisturbed catchments. These facts imply that this 50-year-old unmanaged artificial forest may start degrading, and the biogeochemical cycle may start changing. The long-term dynamics of streamwater chemistry is a good diagnosis tool of the

  5. Usefulness of Long-term Urban Greenhouse Gas monitoring: the London record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisbet, E. G.; Lowry, D.; Fisher, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Long-term monitoring of CH4 at Egham, SW London, shows reduction in the source input since the mid 1990s. There is a distinct seasonal cycle, in part reflecting background variation, tracked by comparison with the Mace Head Atlantic record. Local emissions, led by higher fossil fuel consumption in the winter months, also contribute to the cycle. Inter-annual variability is in part meteorological. The urban increment can be estimated by comparing specific wind sectors (e.g. incoming SSW Atlantic air compared to easterly urban air). Ratios of CH4 to CO2, calculated from the continuous records, allow relative emissions of CH4 and CO2 to be quantified, providing immediate tests of inventories. Ratios of excess over background of CH4 to CO2 for periods of 7 consecutive days of easterly air flow to the Egham site (from London) indicate a reduction in CH4 emissions of 11% relative to CO2 over the period 1999-2007. Isotopes discriminate sharply between methane sources. Diurnal (Keeling plot) δ13CCH4 campaigns identify source mixes. For London, both CO2 and CH4 annual emissions are cited to 0.1 ton (i.e. to 9 significant figures of CO2, and to 6 figures for methane). However, it can be difficult to reconcile isotopic measurements of local methane increments with declared emissions budgets (Lowry et al., 2001). Rapid, inexpensive, small-sample isotopic techniques (Fisher et al., 2006) allow simple tests of the veracity of emissions declarations. Local emissions can be detected, by geographic location, given known background patterns. Moreover, seasonal variation can be tracked. This makes it potentially possible cheaply to audit emissions in populated areas. Lowry, D., et al. (2001) J. Geophys. Res., 106, 7427-48 Fisher, R., et al. (2006) Rapid Comm. Mass Spectrometry, 20, 200-208.

  6. Long-Term Monitoring of Glacier Change at GÖSSNITZKEES (austria) Using Terrestrial Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, V.; Seier, G.

    2016-06-01

    Gössnitzkees is a small heavily debris-covered cirque glacier (49.8 ha) located in the Schober Mountains, Hohe Tauern Range, Austrian Alps. Glacier nourishment is mainly due to avalanches descending from its surrounding headwalls. Gössnitzkees is the largest glacier in the Schober Mountains and is highly representative of the other 25 glaciers of this mountain group. All glaciers of this mountain group have receded continuously since 1850. Ongoing atmospheric warming sustains excessive glacier melt. In 1988 a long-term monitoring program was started at Gössnitzkees using terrestrial photogrammetry in order to document and quantify glacier change. The surveys have been repeated from time to time using different types of cameras. Recent surveys date from 2009, 2012, and 2015. The aim of this paper is twofold: firstly, to investigate whether or not the rather complex photogrammetric evaluation process using a conventional photogrammetric workstation (mostly with a limited degree of automation for terrestrial applications) can be replaced by modern fully automated Structure-from-Motion (SfM) based approaches, and secondly, to document and quantify the glacier change at Gössnitzkees based on available information augmented by results obtained from the most recent surveys mentioned. Over the last 27 years (1988-2015) the terminus of Gössnitzkees has receded by 179 m and the glacier ice has melted at a mean annual rate of about 1.5 m/year. The Schober Mountains are in the process of deglaciation and the glaciers will likely disappear within the next two decades. Based on our practical investigations we found out that SfM-based software is in general capable of handling terrestrial photographs in a fully automatic mode supporting challenging glacier studies.

  7. In Vivo Long-Term Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cells Fluctuation during Medical Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Siegel, Eric R.; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Cai, Chengzhong; Menyaev, Yulian A.; Suen, James Y.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this research was to study the long-term impact of medical interventions on circulating tumor cell (CTC) dynamics. We have explored whether tumor compression, punch biopsy or tumor resection cause dissemination of CTCs into peripheral blood circulation using in vivo fluorescent flow cytometry and breast cancer-bearing mouse model inoculated with MDA-MB-231-Luc2-GFP cells in the mammary gland. Two weeks after tumor inoculation, three groups of mice were the subject of the following interventions: (1) tumor compression for 15 minutes using 400 g weight to approximate the pressure during mammography; (2) punch biopsy; or (3) surgery. The CTC dynamics were determined before, during and six weeks after these interventions. An additional group of tumor-bearing mice was used as control and did not receive an intervention. The CTC dynamics in all mice were monitored weekly for eight weeks after tumor inoculation. We determined that tumor compression did not significantly affect CTC dynamics, either during the procedure itself (P = 0.28), or during the 6-week follow-up. In the punch biopsy group, we observed a significant increase in CTC immediately after the biopsy (P = 0.02), and the rate stayed elevated up to six weeks after the procedure in comparison to the tumor control group. The CTCs in the group of mice that received a tumor resection disappeared immediately after the surgery (P = 0.03). However, CTC recurrence in small numbers was detected during six weeks after the surgery. In the future, to prevent these side effects of medical interventions, the defined dynamics of intervention-induced CTCs may be used as a basis for initiation of aggressive anti-CTC therapy at time-points of increasing CTC number. PMID:26367280

  8. Long-term, high-frequency water quality monitoring in an agricultural catchment: insights from spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Alice; Kirchner, James; Faucheux, Mikael; Merot, Philippe; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2013-04-01

    The choice of sampling frequency is a key issue in the design and operation of environmental observatories. The choice of sampling frequency creates a spectral window (or temporal filter) that highlights some timescales and processes, and de-emphasizes others (1). New online measurement technologies can monitor surface water quality almost continuously, allowing the creation of very rich time series. The question of how best to analyze such detailed temporal datasets is an important issue in environmental monitoring. In the present work, we studied water quality data from the AgrHys long-term hydrological observatory (located at Kervidy-Naizin, Western France) sampled at daily and 20-minute time scales. Manual sampling has provided 12 years of daily measurements of nitrate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chloride and sulfate (2), and 3 years of daily measurements of about 30 other solutes. In addition, a UV-spectrometry probe (Spectrolyser) provides one year of 20-minute measurements for nitrate and DOC. Spectral analysis of the daily water quality time series reveals that our intensively farmed catchment exhibits universal 1/f scaling (power spectrum slope of -1) for a large number of solutes, confirming and extending the earlier discovery of universal 1/f scaling in the relatively pristine Plynlimon catchment (3). 1/f time series confound conventional methods for assessing the statistical significance of trends. Indeed, conventional methods assume that there is a clear separation of scales between the signal (the trend line) and the noise (the scatter around the line). This is not true for 1/f noise, since it overestimates the occurrence of significant trends. Our results raise the possibility that 1/f scaling is widespread in water quality time series, thus posing fundamental challenges to water quality trend analysis. Power spectra of the 20-minute nitrate and DOC time series show 1/f scaling at frequencies below 1/day, consistent with the longer-term daily

  9. DATA LOGGING SYSTEMS FOR MONITORING LONG-TERM RADON MITIGATION EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS IN SCHOOLS AND OTHER LARGE BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses data logging systems for monitoring long-term radon mitigation experimental programs in schools and other large buildings. Several mitigation systems have been installed in schools as part of a mitigation research program conducted by the U.S. EPA. ach install...

  10. Full Aquifer Characterization Combining Thermal Data and Long Term Well Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, M.; Cornet, F. H.

    2005-12-01

    In order to study in-situ the coupling between fluid pressure and fault mechanics, a geophysical laboratory was installed in the Corinth Rift, central Greece. A major element of this European project is the 1000 m borehole crossing the Aigio fault. Its permanent instrumentation allows the continuous monitoring of fluid pressure around the fault. The borehole is cased down to 708m. The fault is intersected at 760m. It is impervious and separates two independent aquifers. The upper one is an artesian fractured aquifer, with an overpressure of 0.5MPa. The lower one is a karst. It is also artesian with a larger overpressure of 0.9MPa. During a production test, the outflow from the karst appeared to be limited by the well tubing, so that only a minimal permeability value could be estimated. Also, we need to know the extension of the aquifers and its poroelastic properties in order to interpret correctly the numerous hydraulic anomalies recorded by the instrumentation. To retreive these information, we used (1) tidal analysis (2) thermal profiles (3) long term pressure behavior. The sensors installed in the borehole exhibit excellent resolution on tides and seasonal variations. Tide analysis quantifies the poroelastic response of the medium. We developped an analytical model to interpret phase lag of the pressure response to the oceanic load and constrain the permeability of the karst. A pressure drop arises from the opening of communication between the two aquifers surrounding the fault. We developped special numerical technique to model this transient, and found consistency only with models involving confined aquifers. This is confirmed by the absence of seasonal variations and the persistance of the pressure anomaly. The geometry of the aquifer was further refined using thermal measurements collected inside the borehole. The value of 50±10 mW/m2 is one of the first measurements obtained inside the Rift. The consistency of the data also proves that no horizontal flow

  11. Long-term monitoring of a cable stayed bridge using a SCADA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbol, Marco; Kim, Sehwan; Shinozuka, Masanobu

    2012-04-01

    DuraMote is a MEMS-based remote sensing system, which is developed for the NIST TIP project, Next Generation SCADA for Prevention and Mitigation of Water System Infrastructure Disaster. It is designed for supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) of pipe ruptures in water distribution systems. In this project, a method is developed to detect the pipe ruptures by analyzing the acceleration data gathered by DuraMote which consists of two primary components; the first, "Gopher" contains the accelerometers and are attached to the water pipe surface noninvasively, and the second, "Roocas" is placed above ground supplying the power to, and retrieving the data from the multiple Gophers, and then transmit the data through Wi-Fi to a base station. The relays support the Wi-Fi network to facilitate the transmission. A large scale bridge provides an ideal test-bet to validate the performance of such a complex monitoring system as DuraMote for its accuracy, reliability, robustness, and user friendliness. This is because a large bridge is most of the time subjected to susceptible level of ambient vibration due to passing loads, wind, etc. DuraMote can record the acceleration time history arising from the vibration making it possible to estimate the frequency values of various bridge vibration modes. These estimated frequency values are then compared with the values computed from analytical model of the bridge for the verification of the accuracy of DuraMote. It is noted that such a verification method cannot be used practically by deploying DuraMote on a water distribution network since the dynamic behavior of a pipe network, either above or underground, is too complex to model analytically for this purpose, and in addition, the network generally lacks conveniently recordable ambient vibration. In this experiment, the performance of DuraMote system was tested being installed on the Hwamyung Bridge, a 500 m long RC cable stayed bridge in Korea for long term monitoring. In

  12. Long term in situ monitoring of total dissolved iron concentrations on the MoMAR observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laes-Huon, Agathe; Legrand, Julien; Tanguy, Virginie; Cathalot, Cecile; Blandin, Jérôme; Rolin, Jean-Francois; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays the scientific community wants relevant monitoring with an increase in spatial and temporal distribution of key chemicals. The hydrothermal ecosystems characterized by strong physico-chemical gradients are also of particular interest as they present an unique fauna, sustained by microbial chemosynthesis. The characterization of the chemical environment in the hydrothermal vent ecosystems implies the use of in situ instrumentation which is a serious challenge in the marine environment (Prien et al. 2007). The CHEMINI (CHEmical MINIaturised analyser), presented here, is a chemical in situ analyser specialized for deep sea uses (Vuillemin et al. 2007). It was first deployed on the autonomous deep sea observatory MoMAR (Monitoring of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, FIXO3, Fixed point Open Ocean Observatories) in 2010. The first part of the presentation will focus on the description of the CHEMINI, then on the results obtained on the MoMAR observatory during the last 4 years. CHEMINI, implemented on the TEMPO ecological module determined total dissolved iron concentrations associated with an optode and a temperature probe. Several months of total iron concentrations, of T°C and videos were recorded permitting the study of the temporal dynamics of faunal assemblages and their habitat on the Lucky strike vent (-1700m, Cuvelier et al. 2011). Long term in situ analysis of total dissolved iron (31st of August 2013 - 23rd of February 2014, [DFe] = 7.12 +- 2.11 µmol L-1, n = 519) at the Eiffel Tower edifice is presented in details. The daily analyzed in situ standard (25µmol.L-1) showed an excellent reproducibility (1.07%, n=522). CHEMINI was reliable, robust over time for in situ analysis. The averaged total dissolved iron concentrations for the 6 months period remain low but they correlated significantly with temperature showing a spectra frequency with a maximal contribution around 4-5 days for both variables. The analytical results will be commented and the future

  13. Designing Long-term Monitoring Networks for Water Quality in Large Watersheds with Simulation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S.; Shoemaker, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel methodology for selecting and evaluating alternative long-term watershed monitoring networks that integrate spatially distributed flow, water quality and rain gauging devices. The approach is to assess alternative networks designs based on the value of the network to produce data that yields an excellent calibration of a forecasting watershed simulation model (SWAT). The focus of previous studies has been primarily on the selection of monitoring locations for one type of gauge. In this study, we look at the concurrent selection of multiple types of gauges: flow, water quality and rain. We assess the alternative network configurations in the Cannonsville watershed in upstate New York by evaluating their performance with a simulation model over a wide range of weather conditions (created by a weather generator based on statistical analysis of historical data). At each in-stream gauge point, flow and water quality are measured. The alternative configurations for in-stream monitoring include different numbers of gauges at different locations. Rain gauge networks are chosen using three different methods: a) by random sampling and ranking by MSE as defined in (c), b) a deterministic selection method that takes into account elevation and distance of the candidate rain gauge location, and c) a Tabu search algorithm by optimizing the MSE between the predicted mean rainfall by the gauge network and the actual mean rainfall calculated over all the potential rain gauge locations. Once a candidate gauge network consisting of rain and in-stream gauges has been selected, SWAT is calibrated to the observations from the network. The performance of each candidate gauge network is then evaluated using a modified sum of squared errors (mSSE), which is related to the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency measure. We further expand the analysis by breaking the mSSE into its three components (suggested in literature): the relative variability, α which describes the

  14. Early experiences of the use of remote patient monitoring for the long term management of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Malcolm; Fursse, Joanna; Jones, Russell W

    2008-01-01

    We describe our experiences of using remote patient monitoring to support the long term management and clinical intervention in patients with chronic disease. Within the project we developed new algorithms to determine from vital signs collected on a daily basis, those patients requiring clinical investigation for their condition. Our aim was for patients to achieve and sustain clinically recommended values for parameters. In our study, the telemonitoring prompted clinical intervention in 37% of patients. Our approach proved particularly effective for the newly diagnosed, and for those with long term issues of management. PMID:19164051

  15. Long term structural health monitoring by distributed fiber-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichetti, G.; Minardo, A.; Testa, G.; Bernini, R.

    2012-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems allow to detect unusual structural behaviors that indicate a malfunction in the structure, which is an unhealthy structural condition. Depending on the complexity level of the SHM system, it can even perform the diagnosis and the prognosis steps, supplying the required information to carry out the most suitable actuation. While standard SHM systems are based on the use of point sensors (e.g., strain gauges, crackmeters, tiltmeters, etc.), there is an increasing interest towards the use of distributed optical fiber sensors, in which the whole structure is monitored by use of a single optical fiber. In particular, distributed optical fiber sensors based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) permit to detect the strain in a fully distributed manner, with a spatial resolution in the meter or submeter range, and a sensing length that can reach tens of km. These features, which have no performance equivalent among the traditional electronic sensors, are to be considered extremely valuable. When the sensors are opportunely installed on the most significant structural members, this system can lead to the comprehension of the real static behaviour of the structure rather than merely measuring the punctual strain level on one of its members. In addition, the sensor required by Brillouin technology is an inexpensive, telecom-grade optical fiber that shares most of the typical advantages of other fiber-optic sensors, such as high resistance to moisture and corrosion, immunity to electromagnetic fields and potential for long-term monitoring. In this work, we report the result of a test campaign performed on a concrete bridge. In particular, the tests were performed by an portable prototype based on Brillouin Optical Time-Domain Analysis (BOTDA) [1,2]. This type of analysis makes use of a pulsed laser light and a frequency-shifted continuous-wave (CW) laser light, launched simultaneously at the two opposite ends of an optical fiber

  16. A Framework for Long-term Monitoring and Research for Agricultural Sustainability in the Lower Mississippi River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, J.; Locke, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Lower Mississippi River Basin (LMRB) is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the United States and has recently become a member of the USDA-ARS Long-term Agricultural Research (LTAR) Network. As the hydrologic gateway to the Gulf of Mexico, the LMRB links agricultural practices and associated runoff and nutrient loads from the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio basins with the ecology of the Gulf of Mexico. We review the major challenges for agricultural sustainability in the region and outline a long-term research program within the LTAR Network to address these challenges. Despite the humid climate of the region, water quantity and quality issues are integral to the sustainability of the region. The geography of water-use in the region, current research at plot- to watershed-scales, and knowledge gaps that must be addressed to meet growing production demand will be displayed.

  17. LABORATORY METHODS FOR SOIL AN FOLIAR ANALYSIS IN LONG-TERM ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal objective of this methods manual is to present methods for the analysis of soil and plant tissue samples taken as part of a long-term environmental study to evaluate the effects of acid rain on terrestrial systems. hrough the use of these standardized methods, it is...

  18. Long Term Monitoring of Tribolium castaneum in Two Flour Mills: Seasonal Patterns and Impact of Fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from long-term Tribolium castaneum pheromone trapping programs in two flour mills was used to evaluate the impact of structural fumigations (n=23) on pest populations. The two mills differed in mean number of beetles captured and proportion of traps with captures of one or more beetles, but in...

  19. Long-term results from an urban CO2 monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehleringer, J.; Pataki, D. E.; Lai, C.; Schauer, A.

    2009-12-01

    High-precision atmospheric CO2 has been monitored in several locations through the Salt Lake Valley metropolitan region of northern Utah over the past nine years. Many parts of this semi-arid grassland have transitioned into dense urban forests, supported totally by extensive homeowner irrigation practices. Diurnal changes in fossil-fuel energy uses and photosynthesis-respiration processes have resulted in significant spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric CO2. Here we present an analysis of the long-term patterns and trends in midday and nighttime CO2 values for four sites: a midvalley residential neighborhood, a midvalley non-residential neighborhood, an undeveloped valley-edge area transitioning from agriculture, and a developed valley-edge neighborhood with mixed residential and commercial activities; the neighborhoods span an elevation gradient within the valley of ~100 m. Patterns in CO2 concentrations among neighborhoods were examined relative to each other and relative to the NOAA background station, a desert site in Wendover, Utah. Four specific analyses are considered. First, we present a statistical analysis of weekday versus weekend CO2 patterns in the winter, spring, summer, and fall seasons. Second, we present a statistical analysis of the influences of high-pressure systems on the elevation of atmospheric CO2 above background levels in the winter versus summer seasons. Third, we present an analysis of the nighttime CO2 values through the year, relating these patterns to observed changes in the carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric CO2. Lastly, we examine the rate of increase in midday urban CO2 over time relative to regional and global CO2 averages to determine if the amplification of urban energy use is statistically detectable from atmospheric trace gas measurements over the past decade. These results show two important patterns. First, there is a strong weekday-weekend effect of vehicle emissions in contrast to the temperature

  20. The New Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA) for Remote and Long-Term Coastal Ecosystem Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Mànuel, Antoni; Condal, Fernando; Guillén, Jorge; Nogueras, Marc; del Rio, Joaquin; Costa, Corrado; Menesatti, Paolo; Puig, Pere; Sardà, Francesc; Toma, Daniel; Palanques, Albert

    2011-01-01

    A suitable sampling technology to identify species and to estimate population dynamics based on individual counts at different temporal levels in relation to habitat variations is increasingly important for fishery management and biodiversity studies. In the past two decades, as interest in exploring the oceans for valuable resources and in protecting these resources from overexploitation have grown, the number of cabled (permanent) submarine multiparametric platforms with video stations has increased. Prior to the development of seafloor observatories, the majority of autonomous stations were battery powered and stored data locally. The recently installed low-cost, multiparametric, expandable, cabled coastal Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA), located 4 km off of Vilanova i la Gertrú, Barcelona, at a depth of 20 m, is directly connected to a ground station by a telecommunication cable; thus, it is not affected by the limitations associated with previous observation technologies. OBSEA is part of the European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory (EMSO) infrastructure, and its activities are included among the Network of Excellence of the European Seas Observatory NETwork (ESONET). OBSEA enables remote, long-term, and continuous surveys of the local ecosystem by acquiring synchronous multiparametric habitat data and bio-data with the following sensors: Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) sensors for salinity, temperature, and pressure; Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) for current speed and direction, including a turbidity meter and a fluorometer (for the determination of chlorophyll concentration); a hydrophone; a seismometer; and finally, a video camera for automated image analysis in relation to species classification and tracking. Images can be monitored in real time, and all data can be stored for future studies. In this article, the various components of OBSEA are described, including its hardware (the sensors and the network of marine and land nodes

  1. The new Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA) for remote and long-term coastal ecosystem monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Mànuel, Antoni; Condal, Fernando; Guillén, Jorge; Nogueras, Marc; del Rio, Joaquin; Costa, Corrado; Menesatti, Paolo; Puig, Pere; Sardà, Francesc; Toma, Daniel; Palanques, Albert

    2011-01-01

    A suitable sampling technology to identify species and to estimate population dynamics based on individual counts at different temporal levels in relation to habitat variations is increasingly important for fishery management and biodiversity studies. In the past two decades, as interest in exploring the oceans for valuable resources and in protecting these resources from overexploitation have grown, the number of cabled (permanent) submarine multiparametric platforms with video stations has increased. Prior to the development of seafloor observatories, the majority of autonomous stations were battery powered and stored data locally. The recently installed low-cost, multiparametric, expandable, cabled coastal Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA), located 4 km off of Vilanova i la Gertrú, Barcelona, at a depth of 20 m, is directly connected to a ground station by a telecommunication cable; thus, it is not affected by the limitations associated with previous observation technologies. OBSEA is part of the European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory (EMSO) infrastructure, and its activities are included among the Network of Excellence of the European Seas Observatory NETwork (ESONET). OBSEA enables remote, long-term, and continuous surveys of the local ecosystem by acquiring synchronous multiparametric habitat data and bio-data with the following sensors: Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) sensors for salinity, temperature, and pressure; Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) for current speed and direction, including a turbidity meter and a fluorometer (for the determination of chlorophyll concentration); a hydrophone; a seismometer; and finally, a video camera for automated image analysis in relation to species classification and tracking. Images can be monitored in real time, and all data can be stored for future studies. In this article, the various components of OBSEA are described, including its hardware (the sensors and the network of marine and land nodes

  2. Long-term NO2 monitoring by satellite in the Pearl River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Shi, Runhe; Liu, Pudong; Zhang, Jie

    2013-09-01

    Recently, the air quality has been continuing to deteriorate and threaten public health in the Pearl River Delta. China, the host country for the 2010 Asian Games, faced the great challenge of air quality issues, particularly in the Pearl River Delta, where the Asian Games were held. The major aim of this study is to reveal the spatial and temporal characteristics of NO2 in the Pearl River Delta during October 2004 to December 2010. The long-term characteristics and variations of the NO2 column concentration before and during the 2010 Asian Games were analyzed by using the NO2 product OMNO2e from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Results show that the annual average of the NO2 column concentration has a significant downward trend from 2005 to 2010 in the Pearl River Delta: the total column concentration of NO2 (TotNO2) in the atmosphere decreased from 9.207×1015 molec/cm2 to 8.173×1015 molec/cm2, with an average annual rate of -2.247%; the tropospheric column concentration of NO2 (TropNO2)decreased from 6.685×1015 molec/cm2 to 5.646×1015 molec/cm2, with an average annual rate of -3.109%. The ratio TropNO2/TotNO2 indicating the amount of NO2 exhausted by human activities also decreased from 0.726 in 2005 to 0.691 in 2010. During the 2010 Asian Games, the weekly average of the TropNO2 in Pearl River Delta was maintained at a low level. The NO2 average distribution in the Pearl River Delta is characterized by the maximum in the geometric center, outwardly smaller, and the shrinking areas with high TropNO2 concentration from 2005 to 2010. Foshan, Jiangmen and Kwangchowan were severely polluted cities during the Games. However, the air quality of the Pearl River Delta was improved compared to its historical periods due to governmental preventive/control measures during the 2010 Asian Games.

  3. IN-SITU, LONG-TERM MONITORING SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    James S. Durham; Stephen W.S. McKeever; Mark S. Akselrod

    2002-10-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the project entitled ''In-situ, Long-term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants.'' Phase one of this effort included four objectives, each with specific success criteria. The first objective was to produce dosimetry grade fibers and rods of aluminum oxide. The success criterion for this milestone was the production of aluminum oxide rods and fibers that have a minimum measurable dose (MMD) of 100 mrem or less. This milestone was completed and the MMD for the rods was measured to be 1.53 mrem. Based on the MMD, the ability of the sensor to measure {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, and {sup 99}Tc was evaluated. It was determined that the sensor can measure the release limit of these radionuclides (50 pCi/cm{sup 3}) in 150 h, 200 h, and 54,000 h, respectively. The monitor is adequate for measuring {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y but is unsuitable for measuring {sup 99}Tc in soil. The second objective was to construct a prototype sensor (dosimeter and fiber optic channel). There were three success criteria for this milestone: (1) Perform measurements with the sensor for both gamma and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 10% or less; (2) Demonstrate the ability of the sensor to discriminate between gamma and beta radiation; and (3) Obtain similar or relatable results for differing lengths of fiber optic cable. These milestones were met. The sensor was able to measure gamma radiation repeatedly with a standard deviation of 3.15% and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 2.85%. Data is presented that demonstrates that an end cap can be used to discriminate between beta plus gamma radiation using beta radiation from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source, and gamma radiation alone. It is shown that some amount of attenuation occurs in longer fiber optic cables, but it is unclear if the attenuation is due to poor alignment of the dosimeter and the cable. This issue will be investigated further when

  4. IN-SITU, LONG-TERM MONITORING SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    James S. Durham; Stephen W.S. McKeever; Mark S. Akselrod

    2002-10-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the project entitled ''In-situ, Long-term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants.'' Phase one of this effort included four objectives, each with specific success criteria. The first objective was to produce dosimetry grade fibers and rods of aluminum oxide. The success criterion for this milestone was the production of aluminum oxide rods and fibers that have a minimum measureable dose (MMD) of 100 mrem or less. This milestone was completed and the MMD for the rods was measured to be 1.53 mrem. Based on the MMD, the ability of the sensor to measure {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, and {sup 99}Tc was evaluated. It was determined that the sensor can measure the release limit of these radionuclides (50 pCi/cm{sup 3}) in 150 h, 200 h, and 54,000 h, respectively. The monitor is adequate for measuring {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y but is unsuitable for measuring {sup 99}Tc in soil. The second objective was to construct a prototype sensor (dosimeter and fiber optic channel). There were three success criteria for this milestone: (1) Perform measurements with the sensor for both gamma and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 10% or less; (2) Demonstrate the ability of the sensor to discriminate between gamma and beta radiation; and (3) Obtain similar or relatable results for differing lengths of fiber optic cable. These milestones were met. The sensor was able to measure gamma radiation repeatedly with a standard deviation of 3.15% and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 2.85%. Data is presented that demonstrates that an end cap can be used to discriminate between beta plus gamma and gamma radiation. It is shown that some amount of attenuation occurs in longer fiber optic cables, but it is unclear if the attenuation is due to poor alignment of the dosimeter and the cable. This issue will be investigated further when more dosimeters are available so that the dosimeters can be permanently

  5. Long-term geoelectrical monitoring of laboratory freeze-thaw experiments on bedrock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuras, Oliver; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Murton, Julian; Krautblatter, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Much attention has recently focussed on the continuous and near-real-time geophysical monitoring of permafrost-affected bedrock with permanently installed sensor arrays. It is hoped that such efforts will enhance process understanding in such environments (permafrost degradation, weathering mechanisms) and augment our capability to predict future instabilities of rock walls and slopes. With regard to electrical methods for example, recent work has demonstrated that temperature-calibrated electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is capable of imaging recession and re-advance of rock permafrost in response to the ambient temperature regime. However, field experience also shows that several fundamental improvements to ERT methodology are still required to achieve the desired sensitivity, spatial-temporal resolution and long-term robustness that must underpin continuous geophysical measurements. We have applied 4D geoelectrical tomography to monitoring laboratory experiments simulating permafrost growth, persistence and thaw in bedrock over a period of 26 months. Six water-saturated samples of limestone and chalk of varying porosity represented lithologies commonly affected by permafrost-related instability. Time-lapse imaging of the samples was undertaken during multiple successive freeze-thaw cycles, emulating annual seasonal change over several decades. Further experimental control was provided by simultaneous measurements of vertical profiles of temperature and moisture content within the bedrock samples. These experiments have helped develop an alternative methodology for the volumetric imaging of permafrost bedrock and tracking active layer dynamics. Capacitive resistivity imaging (CRI), a technique based upon low-frequency, capacitively-coupled measurements emulates ERT methodology, but without the need for galvanic contact on frozen rock. The latter is perceived as a key potential weakness, which could lead to significant limitations as a result of the variable

  6. Long-term electrical resistivity monitoring of recharge-induced contaminant plume behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hubbard, Susan S.; Watson, David B.; Baker, Gregory S.; Peterson, John E.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Smith, Meagan; Brooks, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Geophysical measurements, and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data in particular, are sensitive to properties that are related (directly or indirectly) to hydrological processes. The challenge is in extracting information from geophysical data at a relevant scale that can be used to gain insight about subsurface behavior and to parameterize or validate flow and transport models. Here, we consider the use of ERT data for examining the impact of recharge on subsurface contamination at the S-3 ponds of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Tennessee. A large dataset of time-lapse cross-well and surface ERT data, collected at the site over a period of 12 months, is used to study time variations in resistivity due to changes in total dissolved solids (primarily nitrate). The electrical resistivity distributions recovered from cross-well and surface ERT data agrees well, and both of these datasets can be used to interpret spatiotemporal variations in subsurface nitrate concentrations due to rainfall, although the sensitivity of the electrical resistivity response to dilution varies with nitrate concentration. Using the time-lapse surface ERT data interpreted in terms of nitrate concentrations, we find that the subsurface nitrate concentration at this site varies as a function of spatial position, episodic heavy rainstorms (versus seasonal and annual fluctuations), and antecedent rainfall history. These results suggest that the surface ERT monitoring approach is potentially useful for examining subsurface plume responses to recharge over field-relevant scales.

  7. A New Concept for an Ocean Bottom Pressure Meter for Precision Long-Term Monitoring in Marine Geodesy and Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villinger, H. W.; Gennerich, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term vertical seafloor displacements and geostrophic changes in the water column height could be easily monitored if pressure meters were less susceptible to drift. Currently, these signals, which have typical amplitudes from decimeters to less than 1 mm/yr, cannot be differentiated from instrumental drift. In this paper, we introduce and outline a new constructional concept for an ocean bottom pressure meter that aims for unequivocal detection and monitoring of long-term trends. The concept is based on a differential pressure sensor that measures the pressure difference between the environment and a reference pressure within a sealed volume. This sealed volume conserves the instantaneous pressure at the moment of its closure at the monitoring location in a temperature-compensated manner. Furthermore, the approach enables easy in situ calibration of the differential pressure gauge by simply opening the reference pressure chamber to the environment and checking the zero point offset.

  8. Long-Term Radial Velocity Monitoring of the HeI 6678 Line of zeta Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, E.

    2016-06-01

    With our investigation period of approximately 15 years we have been able to calculate a new long-term period of the HeI 6678 radial velocity (RV) of the binary system zeta Tau. Such a long investigation period was possible because we were able to combine RV data from Ruzdjak et al. (2009) with our own data of the ARAS group (http://www.astrosurf.com/aras/).

  9. GUMNET - A new long-term monitoring initiative in the Guadarrama Mountains, Madrid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Volker; Fidel González Rouco, J.; Yagüe Anguis, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    We are announcing a new monitoring network in the Guadarrama Mountains north of Madrid, which is planned to be operational in early 2015. This network integrates atmospheric measurements as well as subsurface observations. It aims at improving the characterization of atmosphere-ground interactions in mountainous terrain, the hydrometeorology of the region, climatic change, and related research lines. It will also provide the meteorological and climate data which form the necessary background information for biological, agricultural and hydrological investigations in this area. Currently, the initiative is supported by research groups from the Complutense and Polytechnical Universities of Madrid (UCM and UPM), the Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), the Spanish National Meteorological Agency (AEMET), and finally the Parque Nacional de la Sierra de Guadarrama (PNSG). This infrastructure forms part of the Campus of Excellence Moncloa, and is supposed to become a focus of local as well as of international research. However, it is not associated with a particular project: data will in principle be available to the scientific and public communities. Also, the integration of new instruments (long or short term) will be welcome. The starting setup is as following: A group of WMO-compatible meteorological station in the central area of the massif will be installed, which include also a subsurface component of boreholes (≡20 m depth), where temperature and moisture will be measured. This core group is complemented by a reference site near El Escorial (including a fixed and a mobile tower for micrometeorological investigations). This setup is embedded in a network of meteorological stations run partly by AEMET and partly by the PNSG, which will provide the information necessary for the characterization of regional meteorology and climate. Finally, part of the data will be made available quasi-online on a central web server in

  10. A capacitive, biocompatible and adhesive electrode for long-term and cap-free monitoring of EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jeong Hun; Byeon, Hang Jin; Choi, Yoon Young; Park, Kwang Suk; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring broadens EEG applications to various areas, but it requires cap-free recording of EEG signals. Our objective here is to develop a capacitive, small-sized, adhesive and biocompatible electrode for the cap-free and long-term EEG monitoring. Approach. We have developed an electrode made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and adhesive PDMS for EEG monitoring. This electrode can be attached to a hairy scalp and be completely hidden by the hair. We tested its electrical and mechanical (adhesive) properties by measuring voltage gain to frequency and adhesive force using 30 repeat cycles of the attachment and detachment test. Electrode performance on EEG was evaluated by alpha rhythm detection and measuring steady state visually evoked potential and N100 auditory evoked potential. Main results. We observed the successful recording of alpha rhythm and evoked signals to diverse stimuli with high signal quality. The biocompatibility of the electrode was verified and a survey found that the electrode was comfortable and convenient to wear. Significance. These results indicate that the proposed EEG electrode is suitable and convenient for long term EEG monitoring.

  11. Autonomous hydrophone array for long-term acoustic monitoring in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Eu, J.-F.; Brachet, C.; Goslin, J.; Royer, J.-Y.; Ammann, J.

    2009-04-01

    We are developing an array of new autonomous hydrophones, benefiting from a long-lasting collaboration with the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (NOAA and Oregon state University). The hydrophones are deployed on a mooring line anchored to the seafloor by an expendable anchor weight. The length of the line is adjusted so that the sensor (and buoy) lies in the middle of the SOFAR channel at about 1000m depth for mid-latitudes (depending on the speed-of-sound profile). The buoy at depth keeps the line under tension and prevents wave-motion noise from the sensor. The instrument continuously samples and records the acoustic signals at 240Hz for seismic studies, or 480Hz (or more) for marine mammal studies. The SOFAR channel acts as an acoustic wave-guide in the ocean so that acoustic waves can propagate with little attenuation over long distances. Autonomous hydrophones allow the detection and localization of the low-magnitude (Mw>2.5) seismic activity along oceanic ridges and in deformed intraplate areas, which remains generally undetected or poorly localized by land-based seismic networks. An array of hydrophones can monitor a much wider area (more than 1000 km across) than ocean-bottom seismometers, which suffer from the rapid attenuation of seismic waves in the crust and upper mantle. Arrays of autonomous hydrophones thus succeed in detecting and locating 30 to 50 times more earthquakes than those listed in the catalogs from land-based seismograph stations. Data are buffered on flash cards and then regularly stored on hard disks or on solid-state drives (e.g. 20Gb of data per year at 240Hz sampling rate). We use 24-bit sigma-delta converters with programmable gain amplifiers. As timing is a key issue for an accurate localisation of the seismic events, instruments are synchronized with GPS time and have a low-power, highly stable calibrated clock (10-8 drift). All electronics and batteries (Li or alcaline) are placed in titanium pressure cases for long-term

  12. Human Impacts to Coastal Ecosystems in Puerto Rico (HICE-PR): A Long-Term Remote Sensing, Hydrologic, Ecologic, and Socio-Economic Assessment with Management Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Perez, J. L.; Barreto-Orta, M.; Ortiz, J.; Santiago, L.; Setegn, S. G.; Guild, L. S.; Ramos-Scharron, C. E.; Armstrong, R.; Detres, Y.

    2014-12-01

    For several decades Puerto Rico's coastal and marine ecosystems (CMEs) have suffered the effects of anthropogenic stresses associated to population growth and varying land use. Coral reefs, for instance, have been impacted by sedimentation, increased eutrophication, and coastal water contamination. Here we present an overview of a new NASA project to study human impacts in two priority watersheds (Manatí and Guánica). The project uses an interdisciplinary approach that includes historic and recent remote sensing analysis and hydrological, ecological and socio-economic modeling to provide a multi-decadal assessment of change in coral reefs, seagrass beds, mangroves and sandy beaches. The project's main goal is to evaluate the impacts of land use/land cover changes on the quality and extent of CMEs in priority watersheds in the north and south coasts of Puerto Rico. Methods include assessments of coral reefs benthic communities cover, monitoring of short- and long-term beach geomorphological changes associated with riverine and sediment input, calculation of the economical value of selected CMEs, establish permanent monitoring transects in never before studied coral reef areas, provide recommendations to enhance current coastal policy management practices, and disseminate the results to local stakeholders. This project will include imagery from the Operational Land Imager of Landsat 8 to assess coastal ecosystems extent. Habitat and species distribution maps will be created by incorporating field and remotely-sensed data into an Ecological Niche Factor Analysis. The social component will allow us to study the valuation of specific CMEs attributes from the stakeholder's point of view. Our results and the generality of the methodology will provide for its application to other similar tropical locations.

  13. A Long-term Reach-Scale Monitoring Network for Riparian Evapotranspiration, Rock Creek, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, H.; Solis, J. A.; Whittemore, D. O.; Butler, J. J.; Reboulet, E.; Knobbe, S.; Dealy, M.

    2011-12-01

    Riparian evapotranspiration (RET) is an important component of basin-wide evapotranspiration (ET), especially in subhumid to semi-arid regions, with significant impact on water management and conservation. In narrow riparian zones, typical of much of the subhumid to semi-arid U.S., direct measurement of RET by eddy correlation is precluded by the limited fetch distance of riparian vegetation. Alternative approaches based on water balance analyses have a long history, but their accuracy is not well understood. Factors such as heterogeneity in soil properties and root distributions, and sparse measurements, introduce uncertainties in RET estimates. As part of a larger effort aimed at improving understanding of basin-wide RET using scaling theories, we installed a continuous monitoring system for water balance estimation at the scale of a single (~100 m long) reach along Rock Creek in the Whitewater Basin in central Kansas. The distinguishing features of this site include a vadose zone with fine-grained soils underlain by a phreatic zone of coarse gravel embedded in clay, overlying karst bedrock. Across the width (~40 m) of the riparian zone, we installed one transect of four wells screened at the bottom of the alluvium (6-7 m depth), each accompanied by a soil moisture profiler with capacitance sensors at 4 vertical levels above the local water-table elevation (~2.5 m depth) and a shallow well screened just below the water table. All wells were instrumented with pressure transducers for monitoring water levels. Additional sets of all sensors were installed at the upstream and downstream ends of the study reach. Initial results from the monitoring network suggest significant complexities in the behavior of the subsurface system at the site, including a high degree of heterogeneity. All deep wells show a rapid response to streamflow variations and nearby pumping. However, the shallow water-table wells do not respond rapidly to either. Both the shallow wells and soil

  14. Establishment of intravenous lines for long-term intravenous therapy and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Parsa, M H; Tabora, F

    1985-08-01

    Our experience at this institution indicates that the greater the individual and the institutional experience, the lower the complications of central venous lines. The techniques of double catheter insertions in one vein or region, as described, are safe, cost-effective, and useful. These catheters can remain in place for up to 8 weeks. Insertion of double catheters is ideal for intravenous feeding to avoid premixing amino acids and glucose, thus minimizing the hazards of contamination as well as saving time and cost for mixing. Special unconventional techniques for vascular access when indicated in patients who have limited accessible sites may be lifesaving. Except for fibrinous clots around the catheters, the complications in our series have diminished as our experience has grown. Vascular access techniques and long-term care should be formally taught to committed individuals. Well-trained, concerned, experienced personnel available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week is the most important factor in the reduction of complications of vascular access technique and the long-term maintenance of intravenous lines. PMID:3931265

  15. A long term monitoring of Net Ecosystem Exchanges of the chaparral ecosystem in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A.; Oechel, W. C.; Murphy, P.; Ikawa, H.; Sturtevant, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    Arid and semiarid woody shrublands represent approximately 35% of the global terrestrial surface area and 24% of the global soil organic carbon, and 16% of the global aboveground biomass (Atjay et al., 1979; Shmida, 1985). Therefore, these areas potentially have a large contribution to the global carbon budget. However, the assessment of carbon uptake for the old-growth shrubland has remained largely unexplored. Therefore, a long-term observation of CO2 flux with the eddy covariance technique has started since 1997 at Sky Oaks Field Station in Southern California. The research site is categorized at the climatic gradient between desert and semiarid area and that experiences a Mediterranean climate. The long term record of CO2 flux showed the area has been a sink of CO2 of up to -0.2 kgCm-2yr-1. In addition to evaluating vertical carbon fluxes, we initiated a project to evaluate lateral carbon transports using litter traps, sediment fences and two small weirs adjacent to the eddy covariance site in 2011. Preliminary results indicate that the lateral carbon efflux from the system may offset the vertical influx to the shrub ecosystem. However, it is still necessary to develop the methodology to compare vertical carbon flux and the lateral carbon fluxes more accurately.

  16. LONG-TERM TRENDS IN GROWTH OF PINUS PALUSTRIS AND PINUS ELLIOTTII GROWING ALONG A HYDROLOGICAL GRADIENT IN CENTRAL FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land-use change and urbanization has led to changes in the hydrologic regime in wet central Florida, with a trend toward lowered water table levels. These hydrologic changes are having environmental consequences in wetlands, where shifts in species composition and fire frequency...

  17. Development of Download System for Waveform Data Observed at Long-Term Borehole Monitoring System installed in the Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, H.; Takaesu, M.; Sueki, K.; Araki, E.; Sonoda, A.; Takahashi, N.; Tsuboi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough in southwest Japan is one of most active subduction zone in the world. Great mega-thrust earthquakes repeatedly occurred every 100 to 150 years in this area, it's anticipated to occur in the not distant future. For the purpose of elucidation of the history of mega-splay fault activity, the physical properties of the geological strata and the internal structure of the accretionary prism, and monitoring of diastrophism in this area, we have a plan, Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiments (NanTroSEIZE), as a part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP).We have a plan to install the borehole observation system in a few locations by the NanTroSEIZE. This system is called Long-Term Borehole Monitoring System, it consists of various sensors in the borehole such as a broadband seismometer, a tiltmeter, a strainmeter, geophones and accelerometer, thermometer array as well as pressure ports for pore-fluid pressure monitoring. The signal from sensors is transmitted to DONET (Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunamis) in real-time. During IODP Exp. 332 in December 2010, the first Long-Term Borehole Monitoring System was installed into the C0002 borehole site located 80 km off the Kii Peninsula, 1938 m water depth in the Nankai Trough.We have developed a web application system for data download, Long-Term Borehole Monitoring Data Site (*1). Based on a term and sensors which user selected on this site, user can download monitoring waveform data (e.g. broadband seismometer data, accelerometer data, strainmeter data, tiltmeter data) in near real-time. This system can make the arbitrary data which user selected a term and sensors, and download it simply. Downloadable continuous data is provided in seed format, which includes sensor information. In addition, before data download, user can check that data is available or not by data check function.In this presentation, we briefly introduce NanTroSEIZE and then show our web

  18. Results of long-term synoptic monitoring of Jupiter's decametric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    Results of the analysis of the large, homogeneous set of measurements of Jupiter's emission at 16.7 and 22.2 MHz for the apparitions during the period 1966-1974 were presented. An update of the radio rotation period determination which includes provision for beaming effects due to variations in the Jovicentric declination of the earth was presented. Some estimates of the magnitude of possible long-term variations in the rotation period were also discussed. The data clearly shows the Io-independent emission features associated with the System III central meridian longitudes of all three major Io-related source regions. There is also some evidence for heretofore unrecognized Io-related emission features which are apparently independent of the central meridian longitude. The possibility of three kinds of emission are suggested: (1) Io-stimulated, sharply beamed emission, (2) Io-independent, sharply beamed emission, and (3) Io-stimulated, broadly beamed emission.

  19. Publication of sensor data in the long-term environmental monitoring infrastructure TERENO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stender, V.; Schroeder, M.; Klump, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial Environmental Observatories (TERENO) is an interdisciplinary and long-term research project spanning an Earth observation network across Germany. It includes four test sites within Germany from the North German lowlands to the Bavarian Alps and is operated by six research centers of the Helmholtz Association. TERENO Northeast is one of the sub-observatories of TERENO and is operated by the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ in Potsdam. This observatory investigates geoecological processes in the northeastern lowland of Germany by collecting large amounts of environmentally relevant data. The success of long-term projects like TERENO depends on well-organized data management, data exchange between the partners involved and on the availability of the captured data. Data discovery and dissemination are facilitated not only through data portals of the regional TERENO observatories but also through a common spatial data infrastructure TEODOOR (TEreno Online Data repOsitORry). TEODOOR bundles the data, provided by the different web services of the single observatories, and provides tools for data discovery, visualization and data access. The TERENO Northeast data infrastructure integrates data from more than 200 instruments and makes data available through standard web services. TEODOOR accesses the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) interfaces offered by the regional observatories. In addition to the SWE interface, TERENO Northeast also publishes time series of environmental sensor data through the online research data publication platform DataCite. The metadata required by DataCite are created in an automated process by extracting information from the SWE SensorML to create ISO 19115 compliant metadata. The GFZ data management tool kit panMetaDocs is used to register Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) and preserve file based datasets. In addition to DOI, the International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSN) is used to uniquely identify research specimens.

  20. Long-term hydrometeorological trends in the Midwest region based on a century long gridded hydrometeorological dataset and simulations from a macro-scale hydrology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, C. M.; Hamlet, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is likely to impact the Great Lakes region and Midwest region via changes in Great Lakes water levels, agricultural impacts, river flooding, urban stormwater impacts, drought, water temperature, and impacts to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Self-consistent and temporally homogeneous long-term data sets of precipitation and temperature over the entire Great Lakes region and Midwest regions are needed to provide inputs to hydrologic models, assess historical trends in hydroclimatic variables, and downscale global and regional-scale climate models. To support these needs a new hybrid gridded meteorological forcing dataset at 1/16 degree resolution based on data from co-op station records, the U. S Historical Climatology Network (HCN) , the Historical Canadian Climate Database (HCCD), and Precipitation Regression on Independent Slopes Method (PRISM) has been assembled over the Great Lakes and Midwest region from 1915-2012 at daily time step. These data were then used as inputs to the macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model, implemented over the Midwest and Great Lakes region at 1/16 degree resolution, to produce simulated hydrologic variables that are amenable to long-term trend analysis. Trends in precipitation and temperature from the new meteorological driving data sets, as well as simulated hydrometeorological variables such as snowpack, soil moisture, runoff, and evaporation over the 20th century are presented and discussed.

  1. A comparison of the temporally integrated monitoring of ecosystems and Adirondack Long Term-Monitoring programs in the Adirondack Mountain region of New Yrok

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper compares lake chemistry in the Adirondack region of New York measured by the Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) and Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) programs by examining the data from six lakes common to both programs. Both programs were initi...

  2. Potentials, Limitations and Applications of long-term and mobile ad-hoc Wireless Sensor Networks for Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumberger, Jan; Mollenhauer, Hannes; Lapteva, Yulia; Hutschenreuther, Tino; Toepfer, Hannes; Dietrich, Peter

    2014-05-01

    To characterize environmental systems it is necessary to identify and describe processes with suitable methods. Environmental systems are often characterized by their high heterogeneity, so individual measurements for their complete representation are often not sufficient. The application of wireless sensor networks in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems offer significant benefits as a better consideration of the local test conditions becomes possible. This can be essential for the monitoring of heterogeneous environmental systems. Significant advantages in the application of mobile ad-hoc wireless sensor networks are their self-organizing behavior, resulting in a major reduction in installation and operation costs and time. In addition, a point measurement with a sensor is significantly improved by measuring at several points. It is also possible to perform analog and digital signal processing and computation on the basis of the measured data close to the sensor. Hence, a significant reduction of the data to be transmitted can be achieved which leads to a better energy management of sensor nodes. Furthermore, their localization via satellite, the miniaturization of the nodes and long-term energy self-sufficiency are current topics under investigation. The possibilities and limitations of the applicability of wireless sensor networks for long-term and mobile environmental monitoring are presented. A concepts and realization example are given in the field of micrometeorology and soil parameters for the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes .This long term monitoring is part of the Global Change Experimental Facility (GCEF), a large field-based experimental platform to assess the effects of climate change on ecosystem functions and processes under different land-use scenarios. Furthermore a mobile ad-hoc sensor network is presented for the monitoring of water induced mass wasting processes.

  3. Development of a cost-effective and flexible vibration DAQ system for long-term continuous structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Theanh; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Thambiratnam, David P.; King, Les

    2015-12-01

    In the structural health monitoring (SHM) field, long-term continuous vibration-based monitoring is becoming increasingly popular as this could keep track of the health status of structures during their service lives. However, implementing such a system is not always feasible due to on-going conflicts between budget constraints and the need of sophisticated systems to monitor real-world structures under their demanding in-service conditions. To address this problem, this paper presents a comprehensive development of a cost-effective and flexible vibration DAQ system for long-term continuous SHM of a newly constructed institutional complex with a special focus on the main building. First, selections of sensor type and sensor positions are scrutinized to overcome adversities such as low-frequency and low-level vibration measurements. In order to economically tackle the sparse measurement problem, a cost-optimized Ethernet-based peripheral DAQ model is first adopted to form the system skeleton. A combination of a high-resolution timing coordination method based on the TCP/IP command communication medium and a periodic system resynchronization strategy is then proposed to synchronize data from multiple distributed DAQ units. The results of both experimental evaluations and experimental-numerical verifications show that the proposed DAQ system in general and the data synchronization solution in particular work well and they can provide a promising cost-effective and flexible alternative for use in real-world SHM projects. Finally, the paper demonstrates simple but effective ways to make use of the developed monitoring system for long-term continuous structural health evaluation as well as to use the instrumented building herein as a multi-purpose benchmark structure for studying not only practical SHM problems but also synchronization related issues.

  4. A new technique to monitor the long-term stability of an optoelectronic oscillator.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Toan Thang; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Journet, Bernard; Vu, Van Yem

    2015-01-01

    The main advantage of an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) is the ability to synthesize directly very high spectral purity frequency in microwave domain. Beside applications in radar, telecommunication and satellite systems, OEO can also be used in sensor applications such as refractive index or distance measurements. However, the long-term stability of the OEO is easily affected by ambient environment variations. The optical fiber loop effective refractive index varies corresponding to its surrounding temperature changes. Consequently, it makes the optical transmission path inside the fiber loop differ from the initial state, leading to oscillation frequency changes. To stabilize the single loop OEO, it is essential to keep its high Q elements in a well-controlled thermal box as much as possible. Unfortunately, in the real implementation condition, this requirement is difficult to be satisfied. In this paper, we present a new technique to estimate the oscillation frequency variation under the room temperature by using a vector network analyzer (VNA). Experimental results show a good correlation between OEO oscillation frequency drift and the phase measured by the VNA. This technique can be implemented to apply corrections when using the OEO as a distance variation or a refractive index measurement tool. We also tracked the temperature of the fiber loop at the same time with the VNAbased experiment to compare two correlations of temperature and phase with OEO oscillation frequency.

  5. Reagent-free ultrasensitive spectroscopic probes for long term diabetes monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingari, N. C.; Barman, I.; Kang, J. W.; Horowitz, G.; Rao Dasari, Ramachandra

    2012-02-01

    Long-term glycemic control is essential in developing therapeutics for diabetics. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin have been increasingly accepted as a functional metric of glycemic control over the past two to three months and three weeks, respectively. In this talk, we present the first demonstration of non-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as a novel analytical method for quantitative detection of HbA1c and glycated albumin. Using the drop coating deposition Raman technique, we observe that the non-enzymatic glycosylation of these proteins results in subtle, but consistent, changes in vibrational features, which with the help of multivariate classification techniques can be used to discriminate the glycated proteins from their unglycated variants with 100%. Additionally, the developed multivariate calibration models show a high degree of prediction accuracy even at substantially lower concentrations than those typically encountered in clinical practice. The excellent accuracy and reproducibility achieved in this proof-of-concept study opens substantive avenues for basic investigations of glycated proteins as well as in high-throughput glycemic marker sensing in multi-component mixtures and potentially even in serum and whole blood samples.

  6. Effects of ungulate disturbance and weather variation on Pediocactus winkleri: insights from long-term monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Deborah J.; Clark, Thomas O.; Duniway, Michael C.; Flagg, Cody B.

    2015-01-01

    Population dynamics and effects of large ungulate disturbances on Winkler cactus (Pediocactus winkleri K.D. Heil) were documented annually over a 20-year time span at one plot within Capitol Reef National Park, Utah. This cactus species was federally listed as threatened in 1998. The study began in 1995 to gain a better understanding of life history aspects and threats to this species. Data were collected annually in early spring and included diameter, condition, reproductive structures, mortality, recruitment, and disturbance by large ungulates. We used odds ratio and probability model analyses to determine effects of large ungulate trampling and weather on these cacti. During the study, plot population declined by 18%, with trampling of cactus, low precipitation, and cold spring temperatures implicated as causal factors. Precipitation and temperature affected flowering, mortality, and recruitment. Large ungulate disturbances increased mortality and reduced the probability of flowering. These results suggest that large ungulate disturbances and recent climate regimes have had an adverse impact on long-term persistence of this cactus.

  7. A Wearable Cardiac Monitor for Long-Term Data Acquisition and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Winokur, Eric S.; Delano, Maggie K.; Sodini, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    A low-power wearable ECG monitoring system has been developed entirely from discrete electronic components and a custom PCB. This device removes all loose wires from the system and minimizes the footprint on the user. The monitor consists of five electrodes, which allow a cardiologist to choose from a variety of possible projections. Clinical tests to compare our wearable monitor with a commercial clinical ECG recorder are conducted on ten healthy adults under different ambulatory conditions, with nine of the datasets used for analysis. Data from both monitors were synchronized and annotated with PhysioNet's waveform viewer WAVE (physionet.org) [1]. All gold standard annotations are compared to the results of the WQRS detection algorithm [2] provided by PhysioNet. QRS sensitivity and QRS positive predictability are extracted from both monitors to validate the wearable monitor. PMID:22968205

  8. Correlations between short-term mobile monitoring and long-term passive sampler measurements of traffic-related air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Erin A.; Schaal, LaNae; Sasakura, Miyoko; Crampton, Robert; Gould, Timothy R.; Hartin, Kris; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Simpson, Christopher D.; Yost, Michael G.

    2016-05-01

    Mobile monitoring has provided a means for broad spatial measurements of air pollutants that are otherwise impractical to measure with multiple fixed site sampling strategies. However, the larger the mobile monitoring route the less temporally dense measurements become, which may limit the usefulness of short-term mobile monitoring for applications that require long-term averages. To investigate the stationarity of short-term mobile monitoring measurements, we calculated long term medians derived from a mobile monitoring campaign that also employed 2-week integrated passive sampler detectors (PSD) for NOx, Ozone, and nine volatile organic compounds at 43 intersections distributed across the entire city of Baltimore, MD. This is one of the largest mobile monitoring campaigns in terms of spatial extent undertaken at this time. The mobile platform made repeat measurements every third day at each intersection for 6-10 min at a resolution of 10 s. In two-week periods in both summer and winter seasons, each site was visited 3-4 times, and a temporal adjustment was applied to each dataset. We present the correlations between eight species measured using mobile monitoring and the 2-week PSD data and observe correlations between mobile NOx measurements and PSD NOx measurements in both summer and winter (Pearson's r = 0.84 and 0.48, respectively). The summer season exhibited the strongest correlations between multiple pollutants, whereas the winter had comparatively few statistically significant correlations. In the summer CO was correlated with PSD pentanes (r = 0.81), and PSD NOx was correlated with mobile measurements of black carbon (r = 0.83), two ultrafine particle count measures (r = 0.8), and intermodal (1-3 μm) particle counts (r = 0.73). Principal Component Analysis of the combined PSD and mobile monitoring data revealed multipollutant features consistent with light duty vehicle traffic, diesel exhaust and crankcase blow by. These features were more consistent

  9. Correlations between short-term mobile monitoring and long-term passive sampler measurements of traffic-related air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Erin A.; Schaal, LaNae; Sasakura, Miyoko; Crampton, Robert; Gould, Timothy R.; Hartin, Kris; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Simpson, Christopher D.; Yost, Michael G.

    2016-05-01

    Mobile monitoring has provided a means for broad spatial measurements of air pollutants that are otherwise impractical to measure with multiple fixed site sampling strategies. However, the larger the mobile monitoring route the less temporally dense measurements become, which may limit the usefulness of short-term mobile monitoring for applications that require long-term averages. To investigate the stationarity of short-term mobile monitoring measurements, we calculated long term medians derived from a mobile monitoring campaign that also employed 2-week integrated passive sampler detectors (PSD) for NOx, Ozone, and nine volatile organic compounds at 43 intersections distributed across the entire city of Baltimore, MD. This is one of the largest mobile monitoring campaigns in terms of spatial extent undertaken at this time. The mobile platform made repeat measurements every third day at each intersection for 6-10 min at a resolution of 10 s. In two-week periods in both summer and winter seasons, each site was visited 3-4 times, and a temporal adjustment was applied to each dataset. We present the correlations between eight species measured using mobile monitoring and the 2-week PSD data and observe correlations between mobile NOx measurements and PSD NOx measurements in both summer and winter (Pearson's r = 0.84 and 0.48, respectively). The summer season exhibited the strongest correlations between multiple pollutants, whereas the winter had comparatively few statistically significant correlations. In the summer CO was correlated with PSD pentanes (r = 0.81), and PSD NOx was correlated with mobile measurements of black carbon (r = 0.83), two ultrafine particle count measures (r = 0.8), and intermodal (1-3 μm) particle counts (r = 0.73). Principal Component Analysis of the combined PSD and mobile monitoring data revealed multipollutant features consistent with light duty vehicle traffic, diesel exhaust and crankcase blow by. These features were more

  10. LONG-TERM CONTINUOUS MONITOR DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM: COLUMBUS AND SOUTHERN OHIO ELECTRIC COMPANY, CONESVILLE UNIT 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a continuous monitoring demonstration at the Columbus and Southern Ohio Electric Company's Conesville Generating Station. The purpose of the demonstration was to determine the feasibility of the requirements for monitoring and control of SO2 emissions ...

  11. LONG-TERM WATER QUALITY MONITORING PROGRAM ON THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has primary responsibility within the U.S. for conducting surveillance monitoring of the offshore waters of the Great Lakes. This monitoring is intended to fulfill provis...

  12. Development of a long-term post-closure radiation monitor: Phase 2, Topical report, March 1994--July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S.E.

    1995-07-01

    The long-term monitoring of a hazardous waste site for migration of radionuclides requires installation of radiation sensors at a large number of subsurface locations. The concept under development employs a passive in-ground measurement probe which contains a scintillator coupled to an optical lightguide. The overall goal of the Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitor System (LPRMS) development program is to configure a long-term radiation monitor using commercially available, demonstrated components to the largest extent possible. The development program is planned as a three phase program spanning a total time of 53 months. The problems to be solved during Phase 1 were primarily those associated with selection of the most appropriate components (scintillator, coupling optics, optical fiber, and opto-electronics) to maximize the signal reaching the detectors and thereby minimizing the integration time required to obtain a reliable measure of radiation. Phase 2 (the current Phase) encompassed the fabrication and testing of the prototype LPRMS probe at a contaminated DOE site, the Fernald Environmental Management Project, in southwestern Ohio. Uranium isotopes are the primary contaminants of concern at this site. The single probe and opto-electronic device were used to made measurements in-situ at relatively shallow subsurface depths. The end objective of Phase 2 was the design of a full-scale prototype system which incorporates all the features expected to be necessary on a commercial system, including 50 meter depth of measurement, multiplexing of multiple probes, and remote transmission of data. This full-scale prototype will be fabricated and field tested for 12 months during Phase 3, and a commercial design will be developed based upon the data gathered and experience gained during the entire program.

  13. Meeting Report: Long Term Monitoring of Global Vegetation using Moderate Resolution Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morisette, Jeffrey; Heinsch, Fath Ann; Running, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    The international community has long recognized the need to coordinate observations of Earth from space. In 1984, this situation provided the impetus for creating the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), an international coordinating mechanism charged with coordinating international civil spaceborne missions designed to observe and study planet Earth. Within CEOS, its Working Group on Calibration and Validation (WGCV) is tasked with coordinating satellite-based global observations of vegetation. Currently, several international organizations are focusing on the requirements for Earth observation from space to address key science questions and societal benefits related to our terrestrial environment. The Global Vegetation Workshop, sponsored by the WGCV and held in Missoula, Montana, 7-10 August, 2006, was organized to establish a framework to understand the inter-relationships among multiple, global vegetation products and identify opportunities for: 1) Increasing knowledge through combined products, 2) Realizing efficiency by avoiding redundancy, and 3) Developing near- and long-term plans to avoid gaps in our understanding of critical global vegetation information. The Global Vegetation Workshop brought together 135 researchers from 25 states and 14 countries to advance these themes and formulate recommendations for CEOS members and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The eighteen oral presentations and most of the 74 posters presented at the meeting can be downloaded from the meeting website (www.ntsg.umt.edu/VEGMTG/). Meeting attendees were given a copy of the July 2006 IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing Special Issue on Global Land Product Validation, coordinated by the CEOS Working Group on Calibration and Validation (WGCV). This issue contains 29 articles focusing on validation products from several of the sensors discussed during the workshop.

  14. Comparison of low cost measurement techniques for long-term monitoring of atmospheric ammonia.

    PubMed

    Sutton, M A; Miners, B; Tang, Y S; Milford, C; Wyers, G P; Duyzer, J H; Fowler, D

    2001-10-01

    An inter-comparison of techniques for long-term sampling of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) was conducted with a view to establishing a national network with > 50 sites. Key requirements were for: a low cost system, simplicity and durability to enable a postal exchange with local site operators, a precision of < +/- 20% for monthly sampling at expected NH3 concentrations of 1-2 micrograms m-3, a detection limit sufficient to resolve the small NH3 concentrations (< 0.2 microgram m-3) expected in remote parts of the UK, and a quantitative means to establish quality control. Five sampling methods were compared: A, a commercially available membrane diffusion tube (exposed in triplicate), with membranes removed immediately after sampling; B, the above method, with the membranes left in place until analysis; C, open-ended diffusion tubes (exposed with 4 replicates); D, a new active sampling diffusion denuder system; and E, an active sampling bubbler system. Method D consisted of two 0.1 m acid coated glass denuders in series with sampling at approximately 0.3 l min-1. These methods were deployed at 6 locations in the UK and the Netherlands and compared against reference estimates. Method D was the most precise and sensitive of the techniques compared, with a detection limit of < 0.1 microgram m-3. The bubbler provided a less precise estimate of NH3 concentration, and also suffered several practical drawbacks. The diffusion tubes were found to correlate with the reference at high concentrations (> 3 micrograms m-3), but were less precise and overestimated NH3 at smaller concentrations. Of the passive methods, A was the most precise and C the least precise. On the basis of the results, method D has been implemented in the national network, together with application of method A to explore spatial variability in regions with expected high NH3 concentrations. PMID:11695110

  15. Long-term monitoring reveals carbon–nitrogen metabolism key to microcystin production in eutrophic lakes

    PubMed Central

    Beversdorf, Lucas J.; Miller, Todd R.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental drivers contributing to cyanobacterial dominance in aquatic systems have been extensively studied. However, understanding of toxic vs. non-toxic cyanobacterial population dynamics and the mechanisms regulating cyanotoxin production remain elusive, both physiologically and ecologically. One reason is the disconnect between laboratory and field-based studies. Here, we combined 3 years of temporal data, including microcystin (MC) concentrations, 16 years of long-term ecological research, and 10 years of molecular data to investigate the potential factors leading to the selection of toxic Microcystis and MC production. Our analysis revealed that nitrogen (N) speciation and inorganic carbon (C) availability might be important drivers of Microcystis population dynamics and that an imbalance in cellular C: N ratios may trigger MC production. More specifically, precipitous declines in ammonium concentrations lead to a transitional period of N stress, even in the presence of high nitrate concentrations, that we call the “toxic phase.” Following the toxic phase, temperature and cyanobacterial abundance remained elevated but MC concentrations drastically declined. Increases in ammonium due to lake turnover may have led to down regulation of MC synthesis or a shift in the community from toxic to non-toxic species. While total phosphorus (P) to total N ratios were relatively low over the time-series, MC concentrations were highest when total N to total P ratios were also highest. Similarly, high C: N ratios were also strongly correlated to the toxic phase. We propose a metabolic model that corroborates molecular studies and reflects our ecological observations that C and N metabolism may regulate MC production physiologically and ecologically. In particular, we hypothesize that an imbalance between 2-oxoglutarate and ammonium in the cell regulates MC synthesis in the environment. PMID:26029192

  16. Development of a novel ultrasonic temperature probe for long-term monitoring of dry cask storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, S.; Wang, K.; Elmer, T. W.; Koehl, E.; Raptis, A. C.

    2013-01-25

    With the recent cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository and the limited availability of wet storage utilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), more attention has been directed toward dry cask storage systems (DCSSs) for long-term storage of SNF. Consequently, more stringent guidelines have been issued for the aging management of dry storage facilities that necessitate monitoring of the conditions of DCSSs. Continuous health monitoring of DCSSs based on temperature variations is one viable method for assessing the integrity of the system. In the present work, a novel ultrasonic temperature probe (UTP) is being tested for long-term online temperature monitoring of DCSSs. Its performance was evaluated and compared with type N thermocouple (NTC) and resistance temperature detector (RTD) using a small-scale dry storage canister mockup. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the UTP system developed at Argonne is able to achieve better than 0.8 Degree-Sign C accuracy, tested at temperatures of up to 400 Degree-Sign C. The temperature resolution is limited only by the sampling rate of the current system. The flexibility of the probe allows conforming to complex geometries thus making the sensor particularly suited to measurement scenarios where access is limited.

  17. Development of a novel ultrasonic temperature probe for long-term monitoring of dry cask storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiari, S.; Wang, K.; Elmer, T. W.; Koehl, E.; Raptis, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository and the limited availability of wet storage utilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), more attention has been directed toward dry cask storage systems (DCSSs) for long-term storage of SNF. Consequently, more stringent guidelines have been issued for the aging management of dry storage facilities that necessitate monitoring of the conditions of DCSSs. Continuous health monitoring of DCSSs based on temperature variations is one viable method for assessing the integrity of the system. In the present work, a novel ultrasonic temperature probe (UTP) is being tested for long-term online temperature monitoring of DCSSs. Its performance was evaluated and compared with type N thermocouple (NTC) and resistance temperature detector (RTD) using a small-scale dry storage canister mockup. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the UTP system developed at Argonne is able to achieve better than 0.8 °C accuracy, tested at temperatures of up to 400 °C. The temperature resolution is limited only by the sampling rate of the current system. The flexibility of the probe allows conforming to complex geometries thus making the sensor particularly suited to measurement scenarios where access is limited.

  18. Plan for an integrated, long-term water-monitoring network for Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prepared by the Team for Evaluating the Wisconsin Water-Monitoring Network

    1998-01-01

    Wisconsin's water-monitoring network is in danger of losing critical ground-water, surface-water, and water-quality monitoring stations. Since 1995, the ground-water network has decreased by 43 observation wells, the surface-water network by 7 stations, and the surface-water- quality network by 30 stations. Reductions in Wisconsin's water-monitoring network could cause serious risk to the residents of Wisconsin. This reduction increases the uncertainty of water-resource plans and decisions, which ultimately could increase the potential for damages from extreme events and increase construction costs of water-related facilities.

  19. Report of the Director-General on the Long-Term Programme in the Field of Hydrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). General Conference.

    The report describes the principal orientations of the International Hydrological Programme, as well as the procedures suggested for its execution. The origin and justification of the programme are presented. The objectives of the 1975 programme are stated and the contents, which include the activities, themes, application of new techniques in…

  20. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Nutrient Limitation, Plant Biomass and Productivity, and Stream Metabolism Vary in Response to Short- and Long-Term Hydrological Regime Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, N. B.; Sabo, J. L.; Dong, X.; Ruhí, A.

    2014-12-01

    Climate and hydrology are strong drivers of ecosystem structure and function in arid landscapes. Arid regions are characterized by high interannual variation in precipitation, and these climate patterns drive the overall hydrologic disturbance regime (in terms of flooding and drying), which influences geomorphic structure, biotic distributions, and nutrient status of desert stream ecosystems. We analyzed the long-term pattern of discharge in a desert stream in Arizona to identify hydrologic regime shifts, i.e., abrupt transitions between sequences of floods and droughts at periods of months to decades. We used wavelet analysis to identify time intervals over a 50-year time series that were negatively correlated with one another, reflecting a shift from wet to dry phases. We also looked with finer resolution at the most recent 10-year period, when wetlands have come to dominate the ecosystem owing to a management change, and at individual flood and drought events within years. In space, there is high site fidelity of wetland plant cover, corresponding to reliable water sources. Comparing five-year patterns of plant distribution and stream metabolism between wet and dry years suggested the primacy of geomorphic controls in drought periods. Nutrient limitation of algal production varied from moderate to very strong N limitation, with only one year when there was a (weak) suggestion of secondary P limitation. Over the longer period of record, we identified times characterized by hydrological regime shifts and asked whether ecosystem variables would have changed over that time period. We hypothesized, in particular, that the changes in nutrient status of the stream ecosystem would result from these regime shifts. We used our most complete long-term dataset on stream nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and N:P ratios as a proxy for nutrient limitation. However, N:P varied primarily at fine scales in response to individual flood events.

  1. Developing a Framework for Testing Distributed Hydrologic Models at the Catchment Scale - Examples of Test Model Runs for Event Based and Long Term Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, N. C.; Kampf, S. K.; Mirus, B. B.; Loague, K.; Burges, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    We develop a testing framework for distributed hydrologic models at the catchment scale using the hypothetical reality concept. The hypothetical reality, considered an error-free hydrologic response modeled after the 10.5-ha Tarrawarra catchment in Australia, is generated using the sophisticated Integrated Hydrology Model (InHM) representing fully coupled 3D variably saturated subsurface and 2D surface flow with finite-element discretization. The hypothetical realty consists in a data set composed of two subsets designed to test long-term and event-based behavior of the test model. The first subset, a long term data set, comprises an 11-year variable time step time series of hydrograph output and head and saturation levels at 55 observation nodes as well as daily snapshots of head and saturation levels at all nodes in the domain. The second subset, short term data set, has the same type of output, but the domain snapshots are at a much finer time scale, every half hour for the selected rain events. Both data sets were obtained with the same InHM configuration but different output time steps. We use MODHMS (HydroGeoLogic, Inc.), a MODFLOW-based code that solves Richards equation for the 3-D variably saturated subsurface flow and the diffuse wave approximation 2D overland flow with finite differences in a coupled approach as the test model. We present examples of model testing scenarios with variations in spatial discretization, initial conditions, and representation of hydrologic processes. Future work includes testing of model parameters and soil characteristics, with the test model running first without any calibration and then with calibration against the hypothetical reality.

  2. Development of Download System for Waveform Data Observed at Long-Term Borehole Monitoring System installed in the Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Seiji; Horikawa, Hiroki; Takaesu, Morifumi; Sueki, Kentaro; Araki, Eiichiro; Sonoda, Akira; Takahashi, Narumi

    2016-04-01

    The Nankai Trough in southwest Japan is one of most active subduction zone in the world. Great mega-thrust earthquakes repeatedly occurred every 100 to 150 years in this area, it's anticipated to occur in the not distant future. For the purpose of elucidation of the history of mega-splay fault activity, the physical properties of the geological strata and the internal structure of the accretionary prism, and monitoring of diastrophism in this area, we have a plan, Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiments (NanTroSEIZE), as a part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). We have a plan to install the borehole observation system in a few locations by the NanTroSEIZE. This system is called Long-Term Borehole Monitoring System, it consists of various sensors in the borehole such as a broadband seismometer, a tiltmeter, a strainmeter, geophones and accelerometer, thermometer array as well as pressure ports for pore-fluid pressure monitoring. The signal from sensors is transmitted to DONET (Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunamis) in real time. During IODP Exp. 332 in December 2010, the first Long-Term Borehole Monitoring System was installed into the C0002 borehole site located 80 km off the Kii Peninsula, 1938 m water depth in the Nankai Trough. We have developed a web application system for data download, Long-Term Borehole Monitoring Data Site. Based on a term and sensors which user selected on this site, user can download monitoring waveform data (e.g. broadband seismometer data, accelerometer data, strainmeter data, tiltmeter data) in near real-time. This system can make the arbitrary data which user selected a term and sensors, and download it simply. Downloadable continuous data is provided in seed format, which includes sensor informations. In addition, before data download, user can check that data is abailable or not by data check function. In this presentation, we show our web application system and discuss our future plans for

  3. Long-term monitoring of the onboard aircraft exposure level with Si-diode based spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurny, F.; Dachev, T.

    The radiation fields on aircraft board are complex they contain the particles with energies up to few hundreds MeV. There are different methods used to characterise this field for radiation protection purposes. We tried to test for such purposes a spectrometer based on Si-diode. The spectrometer tested, MDU was originally developed and largely tested onboard of cosmic vehicles. The energy deposited in the detector by a particle is analysed, it permits to distinguish the contribution of different types of radiation to integral dosimetry quantities. The spectrometer was exposed in high-energy radiation reference fields, available at CERN. During 2001 year, the spectrometer was exposed during four long-term exposures (about 1400 hours) with about 100 flights during each of them. It was found out that the spectrum of energy deposition events is onboard of aircraft very similar to that registered in CERN high energy reference fields behind the concrete shield. We used this similarity to determine the correction factors to establish radiation protection quantities from the results of onboard measurements. All necessary flight parameters were acquired, it permitted to calculate the effective dose and/or ambient dose equivalent on board by means of CARI 6 and EPCARD codes and compared them with the results of treatment mentioned, based on measured data and CERN calibrations. It was found that the apparent ambient dose equivalent values (in terms of CERN reference fields) are in reasonable agreement with the results of calculation. Quantitative analysis of this agreement as a function of flight parameters (geomagnetic position, solar activity variations, etc.) is presented. During one of flights, an important solar event (GLE 60 at the 15t h April 2001) was registered by means of the spectrometer, in several cases the measurements during forbush decreases were also realized. Also these extremes were well registered by the equipment, the data obtained are analyzed. It was

  4. Long-term monitoring of nitrate transport to drainage from three agricultural clayey till fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstsen, V.; Olsen, P.; Rosenbom, A. E.

    2015-08-01

    The application of nitrogen (N) fertilisers to crops grown on tile-drained fields is required to sustain most modern crop production, but it poses a risk to the aquatic environment since tile drains facilitate rapid transport pathways with no significant reduction in nitrate. To maintain the water quality of the aquatic environment and the provision of food from highly efficient agriculture in line with the EU's Water Framework Directive and Nitrates Directive, field-scale knowledge is essential for introducing water management actions on-field or off-field and producing an optimal differentiated N-regulation in future. This study strives to provide such knowledge by evaluating on 11 years of nitrate-N concentration measurements in drainage from three subsurface-drained clayey till fields (1.3-2.3 ha) representing approximately 71 % of the surface sediments in Denmark dominated by clay. The fields differ in their inherent hydrogeological field settings (e.g. soil-type, geology, climate, drainage and groundwater table) and the agricultural management of the fields (e.g. crop type, type of N fertilisers and agricultural practices). The evaluation revealed three types of clayey till fields characterised by: (i) low net precipitation, high concentration of nitrate-N, and short-term low intensity drainage at air temperatures often below 5 °C; (ii) medium net precipitation, medium concentration of nitrate-N, and short-term medium-intensity drainage at air temperatures often above 5 °C; and (iii) high net precipitation, low concentration of nitrate-N and long-term high intensity drainage at air temperatures above 5 °C. For each type, on-field water management actions, such as the selection of crop types and introduction of catch crops, appeared relevant, whereas off-field actions only seemed relevant for the latter two field types given the temperature-dependent reduction potential of nitrate off-field. This initial well-documented field-scale knowledge from fields

  5. Assessing the Long-Term Hydrologic Impact of Land Use Change Using a GIS-NPS Model and the World Wide Web

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaduri, B.; Engel, B.; Harbor, J.; Jones, D.; Lim, K.J.

    1999-09-22

    Assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is important for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of land use changes such as urban sprawl, most planners, government agencies and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools that can be used with readily available data. Before investing in sophisticated analyses and customized data collection, it is desirable to be able to run initial screening analyses using data that are already available. In response to this need, we developed a long-term hydrologic impact assessment technique (L-THIA) using the popular Curve Number (CN) method that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data. Initially developed as a spreadsheet application, the technique allows a user to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Consequently, a NPS pollution module was incorporated to develop the L-THWNPS model. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GE by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is linked to a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. Manipulation of the land use layer, or provision of multiple land use layers (for different scenarios), allows for rapid and

  6. Long-term blood pressure changes induced by the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake: assessment by 24 h ambulatory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, Paolo; Striuli, Rinaldo; Petrarca, Marco; Petrazzi, Luisa; Pasqualetti, Paolo; Properzi, Giuliana; Desideri, Giovambattista; Omboni, Stefano; Parati, Gianfranco; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    An increased rate of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events has been described during and immediately after earthquakes. In this regard, few data are available on long-term blood pressure control in hypertensive outpatients after an earthquake. We evaluated the long-term effects of the April 2009 L'Aquila earthquake on blood pressure levels, as detected by 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Before/after (mean±s.d. 6.9±4.5/14.2±5.1 months, respectively) the earthquake, the available 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data for the same patients were extracted from our database. Quake-related daily life discomforts were evaluated through interviews. We enrolled 47 patients (25 female, age 52±14 years), divided into three groups according to antihypertensive therapy changes after versus before the earthquake: unchanged therapy (n=24), increased therapy (n=17) and reduced therapy (n=6). Compared with before the quake, in the unchanged therapy group marked increases in 24 h (P=0.004), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.02) systolic blood pressure were observed after the quake. Corresponding changes in 24 h (P=0.005), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.009) diastolic blood pressure were observed. Daily life discomforts were reported more frequently in the unchanged therapy and increased therapy groups than the reduced therapy group (P=0.025 and P=0.018, respectively). In conclusion, this study shows that patients with unchanged therapy display marked blood pressure increments up to more than 1 year after an earthquake, as well as long-term quake-related discomfort. Our data suggest that particular attention to blood pressure levels and adequate therapy modifications should be considered after an earthquake, not only early after the event but also months later. PMID:23595046

  7. Twenty years of long-term Atrazine monitoring in a shallow aquifer in Western Germany (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, H.; Vonberg, D.; Putz, T.; Vanderborght, J.

    2013-12-01

    Atrazine, one of the most frequent applied pesticides worldwide, was banned in Germany in 1991 due to exceeded threshold values in ground- and drinking waters. Monitoring of atrazine was hence introduced in the Zwischenscholle aquifer, exposed to intensive agricultural land use and susceptible to contaminants due to a shallow water table. In total 60 observation wells were monitored since 1991, of which 11 are sampled monthly today. Descriptive statistics of monitoring data were derived using the 'regression on order statistics' (ROS) data censoring approach, estimating values for nondetects. The monitoring data shows that even 20 years after the ban of atrazine, the concentrations in groundwater are on a constant level without any considerable decrease. The spatial distribution of atrazine concentrations is highly heterogeneous with observation wells exhibiting constantly concentrations above the threshold on the one hand and observation wells where concentrations are frequently below the limit of quantification (LOQ) on the other hand. A deethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratio (DAR) was used to distinguish between diffuse - and point-source contamination, with a global mean value of 0.84 indicating mainly diffuse contamination. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to the monitoring dataset and relationships of triazine compounds became obvious. Accordingly the metabolite desisopropylatrazine was exclusively associated with the occurrence of the parent compound simazine and not atrazine, whereas deethylatrazine was clearly related to atrazine.

  8. Intelligent monitoring system for long-term control of Sequencing Batch Reactors.

    PubMed

    Marsili-Libelli, S; Spagni, A; Susini, R

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the monitoring of a lab-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) treating nitrogen-rich wastewater (sanitary landfill leachate). The paper describes the implementation of a fuzzy inferential system to identify the correct switching sequence of the process and discusses the results obtained with six months of uninterrupted operation, during which the process conditions varied widely. The monitoring system proved capable of adjusting the process operation, in terms of phase length and external COD addition, to the varying environmental and loading conditions, with a percentage of correct phase recognition in excess of 95%. In addition, the monitoring system could be remotely operated through the internet via TCP/IP protocol. PMID:18309223

  9. Empirical evaluation of the conceptual model underpinning a regional aquatic long-term monitoring program using causal modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irvine, Kathryn M.; Miller, Scott; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Archer, Erik; Roper, Brett B.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual models are an integral facet of long-term monitoring programs. Proposed linkages between drivers, stressors, and ecological indicators are identified within the conceptual model of most mandated programs. We empirically evaluate a conceptual model developed for a regional aquatic and riparian monitoring program using causal models (i.e., Bayesian path analysis). We assess whether data gathered for regional status and trend estimation can also provide insights on why a stream may deviate from reference conditions. We target the hypothesized causal pathways for how anthropogenic drivers of road density, percent grazing, and percent forest within a catchment affect instream biological condition. We found instream temperature and fine sediments in arid sites and only fine sediments in mesic sites accounted for a significant portion of the maximum possible variation explainable in biological condition among managed sites. However, the biological significance of the direct effects of anthropogenic drivers on instream temperature and fine sediments were minimal or not detected. Consequently, there was weak to no biological support for causal pathways related to anthropogenic drivers’ impact on biological condition. With weak biological and statistical effect sizes, ignoring environmental contextual variables and covariates that explain natural heterogeneity would have resulted in no evidence of human impacts on biological integrity in some instances. For programs targeting the effects of anthropogenic activities, it is imperative to identify both land use practices and mechanisms that have led to degraded conditions (i.e., moving beyond simple status and trend estimation). Our empirical evaluation of the conceptual model underpinning the long-term monitoring program provided an opportunity for learning and, consequently, we discuss survey design elements that require modification to achieve question driven monitoring, a necessary step in the practice of

  10. Long-term changes in the benthic communities of the Sea of Azov related to the sedimentation and hydrological regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Shokhin, I. V.; Nabozhenko, M. V.; Pol'Shin, V. V.

    2008-06-01

    The following periods reflected in the composition and distribution of benthic communities are distinguished in the development of the Sea of Azov during the last 80 years: (1) prior to the regulation of the Don River discharge, (2) after its regulation, (3) stabilization of the Don River hydrological regime, and (4) desalination of the sea. The distribution of benthic communities in the Sea of Azov is characterized by concentric patterns, which are distorted due to the changes in the hydrological and oxygen regimes after oxygen depletion. The basic factors that influence the distribution of macrozoobenthic communities are the aeration regime of the sea and the character of the sediment accumulation. The steady distribution of benthic communities composed largely of euryhaline species adapted to the conditions of an unstable salinity in the Sea of Azov shows no correlation with the salinity fluctuations from 9 to 14‰ during the 80-year-long period.

  11. STATISTICAL INFERENCE PROCEDURES FOR PROBABILITY SELECTION FUNCTIONS IN LONG-TERM MONITORING PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report develops the theory and illustrates the use of selection functions to describe changes over time in the distributions of environmentally important variables at sites sampled as part of environmental monitoring programs. he first part of the report provides a review of...

  12. AUTOMATED LONG-TERM REMOTE MONITORING OF SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACIAL FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advective flux across the sediment-water interface is temporally and spatially heterogeneous in nature. For contaminated sediment sites, monitoring spatial as well as temporal variation of advective flux is of importance to proper risk management. This project was conducted to ...

  13. Developments toward a Low-Cost Approach for Long-Term, Unattended Vapor Intrusion Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, William K.

    2014-01-01

    There are over 450,000 sites contaminated by chemicals in the US. This large number of contaminated sites and the speed of subsurface migration of chemicals pose considerable risk to nearby residences and commercial buildings. The high costs for monitoring around these site stem from the labor involved in placing and replacing the passive sorbent vapor samplers and the resultant laboratory analysis. This monitoring produces sparse data sets that do not track temporal changes well. To substantially reduce costs and better track exposures, less costly, unattended systems for monitoring soil gases and vapor intrusion into homes and businesses are desirable to aid in the remediation of contaminated sites. This paper describes progress toward the development of an inexpensive system specifically for monitoring vapor intrusion; the system can operate repeatedly without user intervention with low detection limits (1 × 10−9, or 1 part-per-billion). Targeted analytes include chlorinated hydrocarbons (dichloroethylene, trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene) and benzene. The system consists of a trap-and-purge preconcentrator for vapor collection in conjunction with a compact gas chromatography instrument to separate individual compounds. Chemical detection is accomplished with an array of chemicapacitors and a metal-oxide semiconductor combustibles sensor. Both the preconcentrator and the chromatography column are resistively heated. All components are compatible with ambient air, which serves as the carrier gas for the gas chromatography and detectors. PMID:24903107

  14. Connecting long-term monitoring data from vegetation plots and remote sensing in the Southwestern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding vegetation response to changing climate patterns is an important element of rangeland management and supports the use and development of ecological site descriptions. Monitoring of rangeland conditions with remote sensing can be misleading if ground measurements are not used to interpr...

  15. Long term and seasonal ground deformation monitoring of Larissa Plain (Central Greece) by persistent scattering interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilopoulou, Spyridoula; Sakkas, Vasileios; Wegmuller, Urs; Capes, Ren

    2013-03-01

    The land subsidence which occurs at the Larissa Basin (Thessaly Plain, Central Greece) is due to various causes including aquifer system compaction. Deformation maps of high spatial resolution deduced by the Persistent Scattering Interferometry (PSI) technique (using radar scenes from ERS and ENVISAT satellites) for the period 1992-2006 were produced to study the spatial and temporal ground deformation. A developed GIS database (including geological, tectonic, morphological, hydrological, meteorological and watertable variation from wells in the area) offered the possibility of studying in detail the intense subsidence. The PSI based average deformation image clearly shows that subsidence generally takes place inside the Larissa Plain ranging from 5-250 mm. The largest amplitude rates (-25 mm/yr) are observed around the urban area of Larissa City (especially at Gianouli and Nikea villages), while the Larissa City center appears to be relatively stable with a tendency to subside. The rest of the plain regions seem to subside at moderate rates (about 5-10 mm/yr). The surrounding mountainous area is stable, or has slightly been uplifted with respect to the NE located reference point. It was found that there is a correlation between the seasonal water-table variation (deduced from wells data), the seasonal water demand for irrigation associated with specific types of cultivation (cotton fields), the monthly rainfall, and the observed subsidence rate in the rural regions of the Thessaly Plain.

  16. ASIM: a system for monitoring and evaluating the long-term care of the elderly and disabled.

    PubMed Central

    Lagergren, M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. A system for monitoring and evaluating the long-term care of the elderly and disabled is presented, and its problems of completeness, reliability, and validity are discussed. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. Half-yearly (before 1987) and yearly (after 1987) surveys were taken from 1984 to 1990 of all persons living in the city of Solna, Sweden, who at May 1 and November 1, or November 1, were receiving long-term care services from the municipality or county council, or both. STUDY DESIGN. Completeness of observations was studied by linking survey and admission/discharge observations and checking for breaks in the chain of care. Reliability was estimated by comparing involuntary double registrations. Validity of the chosen measures of need was tested by comparing them with the actual provision of care services. DATA COLLECTION. Registrations concerning actually provided services, assessed need, social environment, and disability were collected on a regular basis by the staff responsible for the care services. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Completeness was estimated to be more than 99 percent after a special procedure was carried out for filling in gaps in the "care chain." Reliability testing of the disability measures showed between .69 and .76 Kappa coefficient of agreement. Disability variables were shown to explain 56 percent of variance in the need measure "appropriate level of care." CONCLUSIONS. Tests of completeness, reliability, and validity showed satisfactory results with regard to the purpose of the monitoring system and the limitations inherent in a system intended for routine application. PMID:8463108

  17. Assessment of the usefulness of semipermeable membrane devices for long-term watershed monitoring in an urban slough system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, K.

    2006-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed at eight sites within the Buffalo Slough, near Portland, Oregon, to (1) measure the spatial and seasonal distribution of dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and organochlorine (OC) compounds in the slough, (2) assess the usefulness of SPMDs as a tool for investigating and monitoring hydrophobic compounds throughout the Columbia Slough system, and (3) evaluate the utility of SPMDs as a tool for measuring the long-term effects of watershed improvement activities. Data from the SPMDs revealed clear spatial and seasonal differences in water quality within the slough and indicate that for hydrophobic compounds, this time-integrated passive-sampling technique is a useful tool for long-term watershed monitoring. In addition, the data suggest that a spiking rate of 2-5 ??g/SPMD of permeability/performance reference compounds, including at least one compound that is not susceptible to photodegradation, may be optimum for the conditions encountered here. ?? Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  18. Quantification Method for Electrolytic Sensors in Long-Term Monitoring of Ambient Air Quality.

    PubMed

    Masson, Nicholas; Piedrahita, Ricardo; Hannigan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Traditional air quality monitoring relies on point measurements from a small number of high-end devices. The recent growth in low-cost air sensing technology stands to revolutionize the way in which air quality data are collected and utilized. While several technologies have emerged in the field of low-cost monitoring, all suffer from similar challenges in data quality. One technology that shows particular promise is that of electrolytic (also known as amperometric) sensors. These sensors produce an electric current in response to target pollutants. This work addresses the development of practical models for understanding and quantifying the signal response of electrolytic sensors. Such models compensate for confounding effects on the sensor response, such as ambient temperature and humidity, and address other issues that affect the usability of low-cost sensors, such as sensor drift and inter-sensor variability. PMID:26516860

  19. Embroidered Electrode with Silver/Titanium Coating for Long-Term ECG Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Weder, Markus; Hegemann, Dirk; Amberg, Martin; Hess, Markus; Boesel, Luciano F.; Abächerli, Roger; Meyer, Veronika R.; Rossi, René M.

    2015-01-01

    For the long-time monitoring of electrocardiograms, electrodes must be skin-friendly and non-irritating, but in addition they must deliver leads without artifacts even if the skin is dry and the body is moving. Today's adhesive conducting gel electrodes are not suitable for such applications. We have developed an embroidered textile electrode from polyethylene terephthalate yarn which is plasma-coated with silver for electrical conductivity and with an ultra-thin titanium layer on top for passivation. Two of these electrodes are embedded into a breast belt. They are moisturized with a very low amount of water vapor from an integrated reservoir. The combination of silver, titanium and water vapor results in an excellent electrode chemistry. With this belt the long-time monitoring of electrocardiography (ECG) is possible at rest as well as when the patient is moving. PMID:25599424

  20. From single point of measurement to distributed sensing in long-term glacier monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesarini, Daniel; Jelicic, Vana; Bilas, Vedran; Avvenuti, Marco

    2013-06-01

    Glacial environment monitoring is a key task in understanding natural phenomena related to global warming. For the last 30 years, Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) have been spreading among the meteorological and geophysical community, and are on the way to become a de facto standard to perform long-lasting unattended data acquisitions in single localized points of interest. Sensor Networks (SNs), on the other hand, promise the possibility to perform measurements with a higher spatial density and lower cost. Designing and developing a SN for glacial environment face particular challenges for embedded electronics and sensor systems, which is why SNs are still under research and development in this field. This paper surveys the AWSs and SNs for glacial monitoring applications and compares their characteristics.

  1. Long-term monitoring and population dynamics of ixodid ticks in Tomsk city (Western Siberia).

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Vladimir; Leonovich, Sergei

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring of two tick species (Ixodes persulcatus Schulze 1930 and Ixodes pavlovskyi Pomerantsev) was performed in four city parks of Tomsk, Russia (Camp Garden, University Park, Southern Cemetery, and Polytechnic Stadium) and in a control wild biotope in city environs (Kolarovo) in 2002-2013. Ticks were collected by flagging repeatedly after each 10 ± 1 days, starting from the disappearance of the snow cover till the end of tick activity (April-August). Gradual penetration of both tick species into city parks was demonstrated. In the wild biotope, I. persulcatus dominated during the whole period of monitoring, forming about 95% of tick population, whereas in urban biotopes I. pavlovskyi became the dominant species. Two peaks of population density during each season of spring-summer activity were observed in both species. Possible explanations of the phenomena are discussed. PMID:25633264

  2. Long term application of bus monitoring system to short and medium span bridges and damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ayaho; Lúcio, Válter J. G.; Emoto, Hisao; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    In this study, as one solution to the problem for condition assessment of existing short and medium span reinforced/prestressed concrete bridges, a new monitoring method using a public bus as part of a public transit system (bus monitoring system) is proposed, along with safety indices, namely, characteristic deflection, which is relatively free from the influence of dynamic disturbances due to such factors as the roughness of the road surface, and a structural anomaly parameter. A basic study was conducted by using the results of technical verification experiments and numerical analysis simulation. This paper describes the details of not only how to assess the bridge condition by public bus vibration measured in operating on Ube City bus network as a specific example for verify the system but also what kind of consideration we need to apply the system to existing bridges in overseas country.

  3. Quantification Method for Electrolytic Sensors in Long-Term Monitoring of Ambient Air Quality

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Nicholas; Piedrahita, Ricardo; Hannigan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Traditional air quality monitoring relies on point measurements from a small number of high-end devices. The recent growth in low-cost air sensing technology stands to revolutionize the way in which air quality data are collected and utilized. While several technologies have emerged in the field of low-cost monitoring, all suffer from similar challenges in data quality. One technology that shows particular promise is that of electrolytic (also known as amperometric) sensors. These sensors produce an electric current in response to target pollutants. This work addresses the development of practical models for understanding and quantifying the signal response of electrolytic sensors. Such models compensate for confounding effects on the sensor response, such as ambient temperature and humidity, and address other issues that affect the usability of low-cost sensors, such as sensor drift and inter-sensor variability. PMID:26516860

  4. Embroidered electrode with silver/titanium coating for long-term ECG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Weder, Markus; Hegemann, Dirk; Amberg, Martin; Hess, Markus; Boesel, Luciano F; Abächerli, Roger; Meyer, Veronika R; Rossi, René M

    2015-01-01

    For the long-time monitoring of electrocardiograms, electrodes must be skin-friendly and non-irritating, but in addition they must deliver leads without artifacts even if the skin is dry and the body is moving. Today's adhesive conducting gel electrodes are not suitable for such applications. We have developed an embroidered textile electrode from polyethylene terephthalate yarn which is plasma-coated with silver for electrical conductivity and with an ultra-thin titanium layer on top for passivation. Two of these electrodes are embedded into a breast belt. They are moisturized with a very low amount of water vapor from an integrated reservoir. The combination of silver, titanium and water vapor results in an excellent electrode chemistry. With this belt the long-time monitoring of electrocardiography (ECG) is possible at rest as well as when the patient is moving. PMID:25599424

  5. Temperature effect on modal frequencies for a rigid continous bridge based on long term monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Hou, Jilin; Ou, Jinping

    2011-04-01

    Environment conditions such as temperature, humidity, traffic loadings and wind loadings cause changes in the identified dynamic properties of bridges, which will affect health diagnosis based on the mode frequencies in bridge structural health monitoring. This paper analyzed temperature effects on a rigid continuous bridge based on monitoring data from Aug. 2006 to Dec. 2006. First, temperature data calculating process from measured data is given and frequency time histories are graphed. Temperature effects on the bridge dynamic properties are divided into yearly temperature change and sunlight radiation. Then, theoretical eigenfrequency functions of a simply-supported uniform beam with and without axial force are provided to explain and distinguish temperature effects and constraints on characteristic frequencies. Relationship of measured temperature and frequencies data are drafted and linear correlations are found on the 1st and 3rd vertical frequencies. 2nd vertical frequency fluctuated cyclically in one day, caused by sunlight radiation and restrains.

  6. Long-Term Environmental Monitoring of an Operating Deep Geologic Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.; Kirchner, Th.; Monk, J.; Sage, S.

    2008-07-01

    In the present energy dilemma in which we find ourselves, the magnitude of humanity's energy needs requires that we embrace a multitude of various energy sources and applications. Nuclear energy must be a major portion of the distribution. One often-cited strategic hurdle to the commercial production of nuclear energy is the apparent lack of an acceptable nuclear waste repository. This issue has been quietly addressed at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP; see http://www.wipp.energy.gov), the closest population center of significant size being Carlsbad, New Mexico. WIPP has been operating for about nine years, disposing of over 250,000 drum-equivalents of nuclear waste. From the standpoint of addressing operational and environmental risk, as well as public fear, WIPP has had extensive human health and environmental monitoring. The Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center is in the Institute for Energy and the Environment, in the College of Engineering at New Mexico State University. Located in Carlsbad, NM, CEMRC has been the independent monitoring facility for the area around WIPP from 1993 to the present, i.e., from six years before disposal operations began to nine years of waste disposal operations (www.cemcr.org). Based on the radiological analyses of monitoring samples completed to date for area residents and site workers, and for selected aerosols, soils, sediments, drinking water and surface waters, there is no evidence of increases in radiological contaminants in the region of WIPP that could be attributed to releases from WIPP. Levels of radiological and non-radiological analytes measured since operations began in 1999 have been within the range of baseline levels measured previously, and are within the ranges measured by other entities at the State and local levels since well before disposal phase operations began in 1999. (authors)

  7. Results of a Long-Term Demonstration of an Optical Multi-Gas Monitor on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Previously at SAMAP we reported on the development of tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) based instruments for measuring small gas molecules in real time. TDLS technology has matured rapidly over the last 5 years as a result of advances in low power diode lasers as well as better detection schemes. In collaboration with two small businesses Vista Photonics, Inc. and Nanoracks LLC, NASA developed a 4 gas TDLS based monitor for an experimental demonstration of the technology on the International Space Station (ISS). Vista invented and constructed the core TDLS sensor. Nanoracks designed and built the enclosure, and certified the integrated monitor as a payload. The device, which measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor, is called the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM). MGM measures the 4 gases every few seconds and records a 30 second moving average of the concentrations. The relatively small unit draws only 2.5W. MGM was calibrated at NASA-Johnson Space Center in July 2013 and launched to ISS on a Soyuz vehicle in November 2013. Installation and activation of MGM occurred in February 2014, and the unit has been operating nearly continuously ever since in the Japanese Experiment Module. Data is downlinked from ISS about once per week. Oxygen and carbon dioxide data is compared with that from the central Major Constituents Analyzer. Water vapor data is compared with dew point measurements made by sensors in the Columbus module. The ammonia channel was tested by the crew using a commercial ammonia inhalant. MGM is remarkably stable to date. Results of 18 months of operation are presented and future applications including combustion product monitoring are discussed.

  8. Long-term Arrhythmia Monitoring in Cryptogenic Stroke: Who, How, and for How Long?

    PubMed

    Montalvo, Mayra; Ali, Rushna; Silver, Brian; Khan, Muhib

    2016-01-01

    Cryptogenic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) account for approximately one-third of stroke patients [1]. Paroxys-mal atrial fibrillation (PAF) has been suggested as a major etiology of these cryptogenic strokes [2, 3]. PAF can be difficult to diagnose because it is intermittent, often brief, and asymptomatic. PAF might be more prevalent than persistent atrial fibrillation in stroke and TIA patients, especially in younger populations [4, 5]. In patients with atrial fibrillation, anticoagulation provides significant risk reduction [6]. A new generation of oral anticoagulants has been approved for non-valvular atrial fibrillation, providing a variety of therapeutic options for patients with atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke [7]. Prior practice included an admission electrocardiogram (ECG) and continuous telemetry monitoring while in hospital [8]. However, this approach can lead to under-detection of brief asymptomatic events, which can occur at variable intervals, often outside of the hospital setting. Technological advancements have led to devices that can monitor cardiac rhythms outside of the hospital for longer durations resulting in higher yield of detection of atrial fibrillation events. Moreover, recent studies show that the normal monitoring time for arrhythmias may be shorter than ideal in order to detect atrial fibrillation, and increasing this interval could significantly improve detection of atrial fibrillation in these patients [9, 10]. The aim of this study is to review the literature in order to define what subgroup of patients, with what methodologies, and for how long monitoring for atrial fibrillation should occur in patients presenting with cryptogenic stroke. PMID:27347225

  9. Biological monitoring of iodine, a water disinfectant for long-term space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zareba, G.; Cernichiari, E.; Goldsmith, L. A.; Clarkson, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    In order to establish guidelines for exposure of astronauts to iodine, used as a water disinfectant in space, we studied the usefulness of hair, saliva, and urine for biological monitoring in humans and in the human hair/nude mouse model. The monitoring of iodine in patients that received 150 mCi of Na131I (carrier-free) showed similar patterns of elimination for blood, saliva, and urine. The mean correlation coefficient (r) between iodine elimination for blood/saliva was 0.99, for blood/urine, 0.95, and for saliva/urine, 0.97. The absolute value of iodine concentrations in urine revealed marked variability, which was corrected by adjusting for creatinine levels. The autoradiographic studies of human hair demonstrated that iodine is rapidly incorporated into external layers of the hair root and can be removed easily during washing. These data were confirmed after iodine exposure using the human hair/nude mouse model. Hair does not provide satisfactory information about exposure due to unstable incorporation of iodine. The most useful medium for biological monitoring of astronauts exposed to high doses of iodine in drinking water is urine, when adjusted for creatinine, and saliva, if quantitative evaluation of flow rate is provided.

  10. Experiences in long-term evaluation of mercury emission monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-Min Cheng; Hung-Ta Lin; Qiang Wang; Chien-Wei Chen; Chia-Wei Wang; Ming-Chung Liu; Chi-Kuan Chen; Wei-Ping Pan

    2008-09-15

    Six mercury continuous emission monitoring (CEM) systems provided by two leading mercury (Hg) CEM system manufacturers were tested at five coal combustion utilities. The linearity, response time, day-to-day stability, efficiency of the Hg speciation modules, and ease of use were evaluated by following procedures specified in the Code of Federal Regulation Title 40 Part 75 (40 CFR Part 75). Mercury monitoring results from Hg CEM systems were compared to an EPA-recognized reference method. A sorbent trap sampling system was also evaluated in this study to compare the relative accuracy to the reference method as well as to Hg CEM systems. A conceptual protocol proposed by U.S. EPA (Method 30A) for using an Hg CEM system as the reference method for the Hg relative accuracy (RA) test was also followed to evaluate the workability of the protocol. This paper discusses the operational experience obtained from these field studies and the remaining challenges to overcome while using Hg CEM systems and the sorbent trap method for continuous Hg emission monitoring. 3 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Long-term marine litter monitoring in the remote Great Australian Bight, South Australia.

    PubMed

    Edyvane, K S; Dalgetty, A; Hone, P W; Higham, J S; Wace, N M

    2004-06-01

    The Anxious Bay beach litter clearance is the longest running annual survey of ocean-based litter in Australia. It's remoteness from centres of human population and location (with respect to prevailing winds and currents) make it an ideal place for monitoring ocean or ship-based litter in Australia's southern oceans and particularly, the Great Australian Bight. Over the 1991-1999 period, a large but gradual decline in the amount of beach washed litter was recorded (with minor peaks recorded during the 1992 and 1994 surveys). Beach washed litter decreased by approximately 86%, from 344 kg recorded in 1991 (13.2 kg/km) to 49 kg in 1999 (i.e. 1.9 kg/km), reaching a maximum of 390 kg in 1992 (or 15 kg/km of beach). However, a sharp increase in litter was recorded in 2000 (i.e. 252 kg or 9.7 kg/km). This increase in litter yield in 2000 is probably due to stronger than average onshore surface flow (or Ekman Transport) in the western Eyre Peninsula and Bight region. Prior to the survey in 2000, the results appeared to indicate that ocean litter on Anxious Bay beach was beginning to level out at around 50-70 kg/year (i.e. 2-3 kg/km). As the beach surveys involve the assumption that the beach is completely cleared of litter, this may represent a baseline level for ocean-based litter in the region. The yields and type of litter collected from the annual survey indicates that the majority of litter washed ashore originates from commercial fishing activities within the Great Australian Bight. Most of the fishing-related litter was directly sourced to the Southern Rock Lobster Fishery (i.e. bait buckets, baskets, pots), the Great Australian Bight Trawl Fishery (i.e. codends, trawl nets) and the Southern Shark Fishery (i.e. monofilament gillnets and longlines). Between 1994 and 1999, large reductions were observed in the amount of bait straps (77% reduction), lobster bait baskets/buckets (86% reduction), nets/ropes (62% reduction) and floats/buoys (83% reduction). Significantly

  12. Spatio-temporal validation of long-term 3D hydrological simulations of a forested catchment using empirical orthogonal functions and wavelet coherence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhufeng; Bogena, Heye; Kollet, Stefan; Koch, Julian; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-10-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role in the water and energy balance in soil, vegetation and atmosphere systems. According to Wood et al. (2011) there is a grand need to increase global-scale hyper-resolution water-energy-biogeochemistry land surface modelling capabilities. These modelling capabilities should also recognize epistemic uncertainties, as well as the nonlinearity and hysteresis in its dynamics. Unfortunately, it is not clear how to parameterize hydrological processes as a function of scale, and how to test deterministic models with regard to epistemic uncertainties. In this study, high resolution long-term simulations were conducted in the highly instrumented TERENO hydrological observatory of the Wüstebach catchment. Soil hydraulic parameters were derived using inverse modelling with the Hydrus-1D model using the global optimization scheme SCE-UA and soil moisture data from a wireless soil moisture sensor network. The estimated parameters were then used for 3D simulations of water transport using the integrated parallel simulation platform ParFlow-CLM. The simulated soil moisture dynamics, as well as evapotranspiration (ET) and runoff, were compared with long-term field observations to illustrate how well the model was able to reproduce the water budget dynamics. We investigated different anisotropies of hydraulic conductivity to analyze how fast lateral flow processes above the underlying bedrock affect the simulation results. For a detail investigation of the model results we applied the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) and wavelet coherence methods. The EOF analysis of temporal-spatial patterns of simulated and observed soil moisture revealed that introduction of heterogeneity in the soil porosity effectively improves estimates of soil moisture patterns. Our wavelet coherence analysis indicates that wet and dry seasons have significant effect on temporal correlation between observed and simulated soil moisture and ET. Our study demonstrates the

  13. An electrical sensor for long-term monitoring of ultrafine particles in workplaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanki, Timo; Tikkanen, Juha; Janka, Kauko; Taimisto, Pekka; Lehtimäki, Matti

    2011-07-01

    Pegasor Oy Ltd. (Finland) has developed a diffusion charging measurement device that enables continuous monitoring of fine particle concentration at a low initial and lifecycle cost. The innovation, for which an international process and apparatus patent has been applied for, opens doors for monitoring nanoparticle concentrations in workplaces. The Pegasor Particle Sensor (PPS) operates by electrostatically charging particles passing through the sensor and then measuring the current caused by the charged particles as they leave the sensor. The particles never touch the sensor and so never accumulate on its surfaces or need to be cleaned off. The sensor uses an ejector pump to draw a constant sample flow into the sensing area where it is mixed with the clean, charged pump flow air (provided by an external source). The sample flow containing charged particles passes through the sensor. The current generated by the charge leaving the detection volume is measured and related to the particle surface area. This system is extremely simple and reliable - no contact, no moving parts, and all critical parts of the sensor are constantly cleaned by a stream of fresh, filtered air. Due to the ejector pump, the sample flow, and respectively the sensor response is independent of the flow and pressure conditions around the sampling inlet. Tests with the Pegasor Particle Sensor have been conducted in a laboratory, and at a workplace producing nanoparticles for glass coatings. A new measurement protocol has been designed to ensure that process workers are not exposed to unusually high nanoparticle concentrations at any time during their working day. One sensor is placed inside the process line, and a light alarm system indicates the worker not to open any protective shielding or ventilation systems before concentration inside has reached background levels. The benefits of PPS in industrial hygiene are that the same monitoring technology can be used at the source as well as at the

  14. Long Term Monitoring of the Io Plasma Torus During the Galileo Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    In the fall of 1999, the Galileo spacecraft made four passes into the Io plasma torus, obtaining the best in situ measurements ever of the particle and field environment in this densest region of the Jovian magnetosphere. Supporting observations from the ground are vital for understanding the global and temporal context of the in situ observations. We conducted a three-month-long Io plasma torus monitoring campaign centered on the time of the Galileo plasma torus passes to support this aspect of the Galileo mission. The almost-daily plasma density and temperature measurements obtained from our campaign allow the much more sparse but also much more detailed Galileo data to be used to address the issues of the structure of the Io plasma torus, the stability mechanism of the Jovian magnetosphere, the transport of material from the source region near Io, and the nature and source of persistent longitudinal variations. Combining the ground-based monitoring data with the detailed in situ data offers the only possibility for answering some of the most fundamental questions about the nature of the Io plasma torus.

  15. Molecular Tools to Monitor Microbial Contaminants During Long-Term Exploration Class Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larios-Sanz, M.; Kourentzi, K.; Willson, R.; Pierson, D.; Fox, G.

    Microbial contaminants will inevitably accompany a human crew in our adventures into space. Humans constantly shed large numbers of microorganisms into the environment, and during spaceflight some normally benign microbes may become pathogenic. Concerns about microbial disease during Exploration Class human space missions are particularly important in light of the clinically significant changes that the immune system undergoes during spaceflight. Additionally, increased microbial burdens on closed air and water systems may lead to disease and become dangerous sources of contamination for replacement crews. These microbes might also become a serious threat to regenerative life support systems. The development of a robust system to detect, identify and monitor these contaminants i therefore critical. Wes are currently developing a monitoring system that employs 16S ribosomal RNA sequence information to identify bacterial contaminants at the genus and species level. Despite extensive secondary structure, a large number of regions on the 16S rRNA molecule have been successfully targeted. Probes specific for certain groups, such as "all bacteria", "Gram positives", "Gram negatives", and "enterics", as well as some targeting specific genera and species have been designed and optimized. A set of working probes is now being tested in a variety of solution assays that exploit new and exciting technologies such as molecular beacons and DNA microarrays.

  16. Long-Term Structural Health Monitoring System for a High-Speed Railway Bridge Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ding, You-Liang; Wang, Gao-Xin; Sun, Peng; Wu, Lai-Yi; Yue, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nanjing Dashengguan Bridge, which serves as the shared corridor crossing Yangtze River for both Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway and Shanghai-Wuhan-Chengdu railway, is the first 6-track high-speed railway bridge with the longest span throughout the world. In order to ensure safety and detect the performance deterioration during the long-time service of the bridge, a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system has been implemented on this bridge by the application of modern techniques in sensing, testing, computing, and network communication. The SHM system includes various sensors as well as corresponding data acquisition and transmission equipment for automatic data collection. Furthermore, an evaluation system of structural safety has been developed for the real-time condition assessment of this bridge. The mathematical correlation models describing the overall structural behavior of the bridge can be obtained with the support of the health monitoring system, which includes cross-correlation models for accelerations, correlation models between temperature and static strains of steel truss arch, and correlation models between temperature and longitudinal displacements of piers. Some evaluation results using the mean value control chart based on mathematical correlation models are presented in this paper to show the effectiveness of this SHM system in detecting the bridge's abnormal behaviors under the varying environmental conditions such as high-speed trains and environmental temperature. PMID:26451387

  17. Long-Term Structural Health Monitoring System for a High-Speed Railway Bridge Structure.

    PubMed

    Ding, You-Liang; Wang, Gao-Xin; Sun, Peng; Wu, Lai-Yi; Yue, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nanjing Dashengguan Bridge, which serves as the shared corridor crossing Yangtze River for both Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway and Shanghai-Wuhan-Chengdu railway, is the first 6-track high-speed railway bridge with the longest span throughout the world. In order to ensure safety and detect the performance deterioration during the long-time service of the bridge, a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system has been implemented on this bridge by the application of modern techniques in sensing, testing, computing, and network communication. The SHM system includes various sensors as well as corresponding data acquisition and transmission equipment for automatic data collection. Furthermore, an evaluation system of structural safety has been developed for the real-time condition assessment of this bridge. The mathematical correlation models describing the overall structural behavior of the bridge can be obtained with the support of the health monitoring system, which includes cross-correlation models for accelerations, correlation models between temperature and static strains of steel truss arch, and correlation models between temperature and longitudinal displacements of piers. Some evaluation results using the mean value control chart based on mathematical correlation models are presented in this paper to show the effectiveness of this SHM system in detecting the bridge's abnormal behaviors under the varying environmental conditions such as high-speed trains and environmental temperature. PMID:26451387

  18. Long-term structural health monitoring of the 2006 Torino's Olympic pedestrian cabled-stayed bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, L. M.; De Stefano, A.

    2009-03-01

    The currently project is focused on monitoring the reliability, the static and dynamic conditions of the Pedestrian Olympic Bridge in Torino, Italy. Smart sensors based on fiber optic sensors, realized by University of Illinois at Chicago, were installed on the cables. In parallel new low-cost accelerometers and inclinometers sensors, realized by the ChiLab, Italy), were installed on the bridge deck to control statically but also dynamically its behaviour. Acquisition system to collect the data through a continuous monitoring platform, able to pre-process the data, was integrated to manage it locally or in remote way. The performance and reliability of civil infrastructure systems such as bridges are governed by a number of factors including the actual operating and loading environments, complex interactions between structural members and systems, and defect, deterioration and damage mechanisms. These factors are studied dynamically with structural identification of various levels of uncertainty which can be attributed to the fabricated-constructed-erected nature of these systems, variability in site characteristics and conditions, material properties and service loads, and direct exposure to the environment over long life-cycles that are often many decades in length.

  19. A Wearable Patch to Enable Long-Term Monitoring of Environmental, Activity and Hemodynamics Variables.

    PubMed

    Etemadi, Mozziyar; Inan, Omer T; Heller, J Alex; Hersek, Sinan; Klein, Liviu; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-04-01

    We present a low power multi-modal patch designed for measuring activity, altitude (based on high-resolution barometric pressure), a single-lead electrocardiogram, and a tri-axial seismocardiogram (SCG). Enabled by a novel embedded systems design methodology, this patch offers a powerful means of monitoring the physiology for both patients with chronic cardiovascular diseases, and the general population interested in personal health and fitness measures. Specifically, to the best of our knowledge, this patch represents the first demonstration of combined activity, environmental context, and hemodynamics monitoring, all on the same hardware, capable of operating for longer than 48 hours at a time with continuous recording. The three-channels of SCG and one-lead ECG are all sampled at 500 Hz with high signal-to-noise ratio, the pressure sensor is sampled at 10 Hz, and all signals are stored to a microSD card with an average current consumption of less than 2 mA from a 3.7 V coin cell (LIR2450) battery. In addition to electronic characterization, proof-of-concept exercise recovery studies were performed with this patch, suggesting the ability to discriminate between hemodynamic and electrophysiology response to light, moderate, and heavy exercise. PMID:25974943

  20. Implications of long-term land-use change for the hydrology and solute budgets of small catchments in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Sonja; Neill, Christopher; Vetter, Tobias; Chaves, Joaquín; Krusche, Alex V.; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    SummaryThe replacement of undisturbed tropical forest with cattle pasture has the potential to greatly modify the hydrology of small watersheds and the fluxes of solutes. We examined the fluxes of water, Cl -, NO3--N, SO42--S, NH4+-N, Na +, K +, Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ in different flow paths in ˜1 ha catchments of undisturbed open tropical rainforest and a 20 year-old pasture established from forest in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon state of Rondônia. Storm flow discharge was 18% of incident rainfall in pasture, but only 1% in forest. Quickflow predominated over baseflow in both catchments and in both wet and dry seasons. In the pasture, groundwater and quickflow were important flow paths for the export of all solutes. In the forest, quickflow was important for NO3--N export, but all other solutes were exported primarily by groundwater outflow. Both catchments were sinks for SO42--S and Ca 2+, and sources of Na +. The pasture catchment also lost K + and Mg 2+ because of higher overland flow frequency and volume and to cattle excrement. These results show that forest clearing dramatically influences small watershed hydrology by increasing quickflow and water export to streams. They also indicate that tropical forest watersheds are highly conservative for most solutes but that pastures continue to lose important cations even decades after deforestation and pasture establishment.

  1. Long-term Operation of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser-based Trace-gas Sensor for Building Air Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.

    2013-11-03

    We analyze the long-term performance and stability of a trace-gas sensor based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser using data collected over a one-year period in a building air monitoring application.

  2. Long-Term Optical Photopolarimetric Monitoring of Blazars at San Pedro Mártir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, E.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Agudo, I.; Cabrera, J. I.; Dultzin, D.; González, M. M.; López, J. M.; Mújica, R.; Nilsson, K.; Sacahui, R.; Sorcia, M.

    2011-10-01

    Variability of optical polarized light has result to be a powerful tool for studying Blazars, since it enable us to determine the strength and orientation of magnetic field associated with the relativistic jet. Also, polarized light is a valuable way of testing the location of the γ-ray emission, although the physical mechanisms responsible of its production remain unclear. Most importantly, since multi-wavelength campaigns typically concentrate on sources during highly active states, the characteristic polarimetric properties of Blazars in the pre-and post outbursts states are less known. Thus, we have started a dedicated monitoring program of Blazars from the GASP sample at San Pedro Mártir, in order to study their polarimetric variability properties. In this work we want to show the current status of the program presenting some preliminary results on the optical-polarimetric and γ-ray variability observed with Fermi-LAT on the blazar PKS 1510-089.

  3. Long-term monitoring of aldicarb residues in groundwater beneath a Canadian potato field.

    PubMed

    Priddle, M W; Mutch, J P; Jackson, R E

    1992-02-01

    Four shallow monitoring wells beneath a potato field to which Temik (active ingredient--aldicarb) had been applied were sampled up to 19 times over six years. These samples were regularly analyzed for aldicarb sulfoxide, aldicarb sulfone and nitrate and less frequently for major ions and for pH, EH, dissolved oxygen and alkalinity. Pesticide residue concentration in groundwater was related both to time after application and to the elevation of the water table, a measure of groundwater recharge. This dependence on recharge indicates storage in the unsaturated zone. The presence of relatively high residues four years after the last application is due to this storage phenomenon and to water and soil conditions, particularly low temperature, that inhibit the hydrolysis of the active species. PMID:1536598

  4. Long-term infrared monitoring of stellar sources from earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.; Heinsheimer, T. F.; Stocker, T. L.; Anand, S. P. S.; Chapman, R. D.; Hobbs, R. W.; Michalitsanos, A. G.; Wright, F. H.; Kipp, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    A program is discussed which involved monitoring the photometric activity of 18 bright variable IR stars at 2.7 microns with satellite- and rocket-borne instrumentation in the period from 1971 to 1975. The stellar sample includes 3 Lb variables, 8 semiregular variables, 5 Mira-type variables, and 2 previously unknown and unclassified IR variables. Detailed light curves of many of these stars were determined for intervals of 3 yr or more; spectra from 2.7 to 20 microns were constructed for nine of them using data obtained entirely with instruments above the atmosphere. Photometric IR light curves and other data are presented for SW Virginis, R Aquilae, S Scuti, IRC 00265, RT Hydrae, S Orionis, S Canis Minoris, Omicron Ceti, and R Leonis. Several hypotheses concerning the interpretation of the IR data are examined.

  5. Corsica: An Experiment for Long-Term Altimeter Calibration and Sea Level Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefond, P.; Exetier, P.; Laurain, O.; Lyard, F.; Bijac, S.; Cancet, M.; Chimot, J.; Femenias, P.

    2010-12-01

    In collaboration with the CNES and NASA oceanographic projects (TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason-1), the OCA (Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur) developed a verification site in Corsica since 1996. CALibration/VALidation embraces a wide variety of activities, ranging from the interpretation of information from internal-calibration modes of the sensors to validation of the fully corrected estimates of the Sea Surface Heights using in situ data. Now, Corsica is, like the Harvest platform (NASA side, [11]), an operating calibration site able to support a continuous monitoring with a high level of accuracy: thanks to the recent extension of the site to Ajaccio, we are able now to perform the absolute calibration for EnviSat with a standard deviation of 27 mm and a standard error of 5 mm.

  6. Long term monitoring of methane in the atmosphere by multiplex gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Jose R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Phillips, John B.

    1985-01-01

    Methane is of interest in the study of the Earth's atmosphere because of its implication in the future global warming of the surface. This warming is produced by the absorption of infrared energy by trace gases. It has been estimated that in the next 40 to 50 years, methane could contribute 20 to 25 pct. as much atmospheric warming as that expected from carbon dioxide increases. Studies to examine sources, sinks, and cycles of methane will require analytical methods capable of continuous unattended measurement with temporal resolution of an hour or less for weeks at a time. Gas chromatography (GC) is one of the most practical methods available to conduct the analysis of air, but limitations in this technique still exist which can be alleviated with multiplex GC (MGC). MGC is a technique where many samples are pseudo-randomly introduced to the chromatograph without regard to the length of time required for an analysis. The resulting data must then be reduced using computational methods such as cross correlation. In the technique reported, a tube packed with silver oxide was used at the inlet of the GC column to create concentration pulses of methane in a sample stream of air. By using only one carrier, i.e., ambient air, an effective and accurate method to monitor the variations in concentration of methane in the atmosphere over long periods of time was developed. Methane in ambient air was monitored for an eight day period and an interesting temporal variability was found. This work has shown the utility of a relatively simple MGC for the analysis of a real environmental sample.

  7. Long-term environmental monitoring at two US Department of Energy Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site was established in southeastern Washington during the 1940s to produce plutonium during World War II. The Pantex Plant in the Texas Panhandle was originally used by the U.S. Army for loading conventional ammunition shells and bombs. The Plant was rehabilitated and enhanced in the 1950s to assemble nuclear weapons. Environmental monitoring has been ongoing at both locations for several decades. Monitoring objectives are to detect and assess potential impacts of facility operations on air, surface and ground waters, foodstuffs, fish, wildlife, soils, and vegetation. Currently, measured concentrations of airborne radionuclides around the perimeters of both sites are below applicable guidelines. The low levels of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in some onsite Hanford wildlife samples and concentrations of radionuclides in soils and vegetation from onsite and offsite at both locations are typical of those attributable to naturally occurring radioactivity and to worldwide fallout. Ironically, by virtue of its size (1,450 km{sup 2} [560 mi{sup 2})], restricted public access, and conservative use of undeveloped land, the Hanford Site has provided a sanctuary for plant and animal populations that have been eliminated from, or greatly reduced on, surrounding agricultural and range lands. Ongoing studies will determine if this is also true at Pantex Plant. The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River and its islands and the Pantex Plant with its playas both serve as refuges for raptorial birds and migratory waterfowl. In addition, the Hanford Reach serves as a migration route for several species of salmon, and chinook salmon and steelhead trout spawn there. Bald eagles congregate along the Hanford Reach in the fall and winter to feed on the spawned-out carcasses of salmon and on wintering waterfowl.

  8. Long-term optical monitoring of η Carinae. Multiband light curves for a complete orbital period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Lajús, E.; Fariña, C.; Torres, A. F.; Schwartz, M. A.; Salerno, N.; Calderón, J. P.; von Essen, C.; Calcaferro, L. M.; Giudici, F.; Llinares, C.; Niemela, V.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The periodicity of 5.5 years for some observational events occurring in η Carinae manifests itself across a large wavelength range and has been associated with its binary nature. These events are supposed to occur when the binary components are close to periastron. To detect the previous periastron passage of η Car in 2003, we started an intensive, ground-based, optical, photometric observing campaign. Aims: We continued observing the object to monitor its photometric behavior and variability across the entire orbital cycle. Methods: Our observation program consisted of daily differential photometry from CCD images, which were acquired using a 0.8 m telescope and a standard BVRI filter set at La Plata Observatory. The photometry includes the central object and the surrounding Homunculus nebula. Results: We present up-to-date results of our observing program, including homogeneous photometric data collected between 2003 and 2008. Our observations demonstrated that η Car has continued increasing in brightness at a constant rate since 1998. In 2006, it reached its brightest magnitude (V ~ 4.7) since about 1860. The object then suddenly reverted its brightening trend, fading to V = 5.0 at the beginning of 2007, and has maintained a quite steady state since then. We continue the photometric monitoring of η Car in anticipation of the next “periastron passage”, predicted to occur at the beginning of 2009. Full Table 2 and Table 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/493/1093

  9. Measuring and Monitoring Long Term Disaster Recovery Using Remote Sensing: A Case Study of Post Katrina New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Reginald S.

    This research focuses on measuring and monitoring long term recovery progress from the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans, LA. Remote sensing has frequently been used for emergency response and damage assessment after natural disasters. However, techniques for analysis of long term disaster recovery using remote sensing have not been widely explored. With increased availability and lower costs, remote sensing offers an objective perspective, systematic and repeatable analysis, and provides a substitute to multiple site visits. In addition, remote sensing allows access to large geographical areas and areas where ground access may be disrupted, restricted or denied. This dissertation addressed the primary difficulties involved in the development of change detection methods capable of detecting changes experienced by disaster recovery indicators. Maximum likelihood classification and post-classification change detection were applied to multi-temporal high resolution aerial images to quantitatively measure the progress of recovery. Images were classified to automatically identify disaster recovery indicators and exploit the indicators that are visible within each image. The spectral analysis demonstrated that employing maximum likelihood classification to high resolution true color aerial images performed adequately and provided a good indication of spectral pattern recognition, despite the limited spectral information. Applying the change detection to the classified images was effective for determining the temporal trajectory of indicators categorized as blue tarps, FEMA trailers, houses, vegetation, bare earth and pavement. The results of the post classification change detection revealed a dominant change trajectory from bluetarp to house, as damaged houses became permanently repaired. Specifically, the level of activity of blue tarps, housing, vegetation, FEMA trailers (temporary housing) pavement and bare earth were derived from aerial image processing to

  10. Progress report: long-term benthic monitoring and assessment program for the Maryland portion of Chesapeake Bay (July 1986-October 1987). Volume 1. Text

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, A.F.; Shaughnessy, A.T.; Scott, L.C.; Dickens, V.A.; Ranasinghe, J.A.

    1988-05-01

    The long-term benthic monitoring and assessment study for the Maryland portion of Chesapeake Bay is an integral component of the interdisciplinary Chesapeake Bay monitoring and assessment program. The major long-term objectives of the program are to: (1) determine the effectiveness of Baywide pollution abatement programs; (2) measure the cumulative, long-term impacts of power plant operations on Bay benthic resources; and (3) assess the status and trends for Bay water quality and biological resources. Sampling of benthic communities, sediments, and water quality was conducted from July 1, 1984 through December 1987 at 70 stations in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.

  11. Development of an adaptive monitoring framework for long-term programs: An example using indicators of fish health.

    PubMed

    Arciszewski, Tim J; Munkittrick, Kelly R

    2015-10-01

    Detecting unwanted changes associated with localized human activities in aquatic ecosystems requires defining the value of an indicator expected at a site in the absence of development. Ideally, adequate and comparable baseline data will be collected at an exposure location before that development, but this is rarely done. Instead, comparisons are made using various designs to overcome the inadequate or missing baseline data. Commonly these comparisons are done over short periods, using information from local reference sites to estimate variability expected at the exposed site. Results of these truncated designs are often evaluated using p values that may have little bearing on ecologically relevant changes. To remedy the reliance of studies on small datasets collected at reference sites, other designs emphasize regional analyses, but these may be insensitive to site-specific changes. Some designs also may forego discussing the consequences of detecting any differences. A new monitoring framework has been proposed to use existing solutions, simplify analysis, and focus on the detection of meaningful changes. It is illustrated here by using data on fish health from a large-scale, long-term program in the Moose River basin in northern Ontario. This framework advocates interpretation of data at multiple scales: within-site, locally, and regionally. The primary focus is on estimating a range from a probability distribution of historical data collected at a specific location where 95% of future observations are predicted to occur. Changes at the exposed site are also compared with historical and contemporary expectations from proximate and regional reference sites. Critical effect sizes also can be derived from regional reference data to evaluate the magnitude of differences observed between any 2 sites. Any unexpected changes inform future monitoring decisions provided by a priori guidance. Adoption of this framework extends the utility of monitoring programs in which

  12. ECOLOGICALLY VALID LONG-TERM MOOD MONITORING OF INDIVIDUALS WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER USING SPEECH

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Zahi N.; Provost, Emily Mower; Singh, Satinder; Montgomery, Jennifer; Archer, Christopher; Harrington, Gloria; Mcinnis, Melvin G.

    2016-01-01

    Speech patterns are modulated by the emotional and neurophysiological state of the speaker. There exists a growing body of work that computationally examines this modulation in patients suffering from depression, autism, and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, the majority of the work in this area focuses on the analysis of structured speech collected in controlled environments. Here we expand on the existing literature by examining bipolar disorder (BP). BP is characterized by mood transitions, varying from a healthy euthymic state to states characterized by mania or depression. The speech patterns associated with these mood states provide a unique opportunity to study the modulations characteristic of mood variation. We describe methodology to collect unstructured speech continuously and unobtrusively via the recording of day-to-day cellular phone conversations. Our pilot investigation suggests that manic and depressive mood states can be recognized from this speech data, providing new insight into the feasibility of unobtrusive, unstructured, and continuous speech-based wellness monitoring for individuals with BP.

  13. Long term phytoplankton monitoring, including harmful algal blooms, in the Bay of Fundy, eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. L.; Hanke, A. R.; LeGresley, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    A monitoring program was initiated in May 1987 to study phytoplankton populations in the Bay of Fundy, southwest New Brunswick, eastern Canada. Samples are collected for phytoplankton distribution and abundance at five locations in the Bay of Fundy. Other parameters measured include plant nutrients (ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate and silicate), Secchi depth, and depth profiles for fluorescence, oxygen, temperature and salinity. Alexandrium fundyense abundance from the 5 sites and between years is compared to physical and chemical properties of seawater using principle component analyses (PCA) to identify factors showing the greatest amount of variance in temporal and spatial distribution patterns. Analysis of A. fundyense abundance over the 19-year period 1987-2005 indicates that cell abundance from one year does not reflect the following year's phytoplankton concentration, and nitrate values and cell densities appear to have a negative relationship. A further comparison between the 2 years 2004 and 2005 (years with very different intensities of A. fundyense maximum cell concentrations) further supported these findings. Preliminary analyses indicate that many species abundances and intensities appear to be more climate or weather related than nutrient flux related. Examination of relationships between harmful algal bloom (HAB) cell density, nutrients and environmental variables indicates that there is no evidence that HABs are linked to eutrophication processes at the temporal and spatial scales of the study.

  14. Long term monitoring of extragalactic sources in the framework of the Gaia ESA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TARIS, François

    2015-08-01

    The Gaia astrometric mission of the European Space Agency has been launched the 19th December 2013. It will provide an astrometric catalogue of 500.000 extragalactic sources that could be the basis of a new optical reference frame after the Hipparcos satellite one. On the other hand, the current International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) is based on the observations of extragalactic sources at radio wavelength. The astrometric coordinates of sources in these two reference systems will have roughly the same uncertainty. It is then mandatory to observe a set of common targets at both optical and radio wavelength to link the ICRF with what could be called the GCRF (Gaia Celestial Reference Frame).This poster presents the set of optical telescopes used to observe the targets chosen for the link of the two reference systems.It also presents some results obtained with the Lomb-Scargle method and CLEAN algorithm applied to optical magnitude monitoring of extragalactic sources suitable for the GCRF-ICRF link. These two methods allow to show that some periodic (or quasi-periodic) phenomena could be present and could be at the origin of the observed light curves. This could have an important impact on the photocenter's position of a particular target which is relevant for the link of the reference systems.

  15. [Individual peculiarities of adaptation to long-term space flights: 24-hour heart rhythm monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baevskii, R. M.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Gol'dberger, A. L.; Nikulina, G. A.; Charl'z, D. B.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator); Charles, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Presented are results of studying 24-hr variability of the cardiac rhythm which characterizes individual difference in reactions of two crew members to the same set of stresses during a 115-day MIR mission. Spacelab (USA) cardiorecorders were used. Data of monitoring revealed significantly different baseline health statuses of the cosmonauts. These functional differences were also observed in the mission. In one of the cosmonauts, the cardiac regulation changed over to a more economic functioning with the autonomous balance shifted towards enhanced sympathetic activity. After 2-3 months on mission he had almost recovered pre-launch level of regulation. In the other, the regulatory system was appreciably strained at the beginning of the mission as compared with preflight baseline. Later on, on flight months 2-3, this strain kept growing till a drastic depletion of the functional reserve. On return to Earth, this was manifested by a strong stress reaction with a sharp decline in power of high-frequency and grow in power of very low frequency components of the heart rhythm. The data suggest that adaptation to space flight and reactions in the readaptation period are dependent on initial health status of crew members, and functional reserve.

  16. Monitoring the Long-Term Degradation Behavior of Biomimetic Bioadhesive using Wireless Magnetoelastic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng-Hsien; Anderson, Jonathan; Pinnaratip, Rattapol; Meng, Hao; Konst, Shari; DeRouin, Andrew J.; Rajachar, Rupak

    2015-01-01

    The degradation behavior of a tissue adhesive is critical to its ability to repair a wound while minimizing prolonged inflammatory response. Traditional degradation tests can be expensive to perform, as they require large numbers of samples. The potential for using magnetoelastic resonant sensors to track bioadhesive degradation behavior was investigated. Specifically, biomimetic poly(ethylene glycol)- (PEG-) based adhesive was coated onto magnetoelastic (ME) sensor strips. Adhesive-coated samples were submerged in solutions buffered at multiple pH levels (5.7, 7.4 and 10.0) at body temperature (37°C) and the degradation behavior of the adhesive was tracked wirelessly by monitoring the changes in the resonant amplitude of the sensors for over 80 days. Adhesive incubated at pH 7.4 degraded over 75 days, which matched previously published data for bulk degradation behavior of the adhesive while utilizing significantly less material (~103 times lower). Adhesive incubated at pH 10.0 degraded within 25 days while samples incubated at pH 5.7 did not completely degrade even after 80 days of incubation. As expected, the rate of degradation increased with increasing pH as the rate of ester bond hydrolysis is higher under basic conditions. As a result of requiring a significantly lower amount of samples compared to traditional methods, the ME sensing technology is highly attractive for fully characterizing the degradation behavior of tissue adhesives in a wide range of physiological conditions. PMID:26087077

  17. Ichthyoplankton abundance and variance in a large river system concerns for long-term monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland-Bartels, Leslie E.; Dewey, Michael R.; Zigler, Steven J.

    1995-01-01

    System-wide spatial patterns of ichthyoplankton abundance and variability were assessed in the upper Mississippi and lower Illinois rivers to address the experimental design and statistical confidence in density estimates. Ichthyoplankton was sampled from June to August 1989 in primary milieus (vegetated and non- vegetated backwaters and impounded areas, main channels and main channel borders) in three navigation pools (8, 13 and 26) of the upper Mississippi River and in a downstream reach of the Illinois River. Ichthyoplankton densities varied among stations of similar aquatic landscapes (milieus) more than among subsamples within a station. An analysis of sampling effort indicated that the collection of single samples at many stations in a given milieu type is statistically and economically preferable to the collection of multiple subsamples at fewer stations. Cluster analyses also revealed that stations only generally grouped by their preassigned milieu types. Pilot studies such as this can define station groupings and sources of variation beyond an a priori habitat classification. Thus the minimum intensity of sampling required to achieve a desired statistical confidence can be identified before implementing monitoring efforts.

  18. Sewer infiltration/inflow: long-term monitoring based on diurnal variation of pollutant mass flux.

    PubMed

    Bares, V; Stránský, D; Sýkora, P

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with a method for quantification of infiltrating groundwater based on the variation of diurnal pollutant load and continuous water quality and quantity monitoring. Although the method gives us the potential to separate particular components of wastewater hygrograph, several aspects of the method should be discussed. Therefore, the paper investigates the cost-effectiveness, the relevance of pollutant load from surface waters (groundwater) and the influence of measurement time step. These aspects were studied in an experimental catchment of Prague sewer system, Czech Republic, within a three-month period. The results indicate high contribution of parasitic waters on night minimal discharge. Taking into account the uncertainty of the results and time-consuming maintenance of the sensor, the principal advantages of the method are evaluated. The study introduces a promising potential of the discussed measuring concept for quantification of groundwater infiltrating into the sewer system. It is shown that the conventional approach is sufficient and cost-effective even in those catchments, where significant contribution of foul sewage in night minima would have been assumed. PMID:19587396

  19. Long-Term Exposure to High Altitude Affects Response Inhibition in the Conflict-monitoring Stage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hailin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jianhui; Luo, Ping; Han, Buxin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of high-altitude exposure on response inhibition, event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were measured in Go/NoGo task. The participants included an ‘immigrant’ high-altitude group (who had lived at high altitude for three years but born at low altitude) and a low-altitude group (living in low altitude only). Although the behavioural data showed no significant differences between the two groups, a delayed latency of NoGo-N2 was found in the high-altitude group compared to the low-altitude group. Moreover, larger N2 and smaller P3 amplitudes were found in the high-altitude group compared to the low-altitude group, for both the Go and NoGo conditions. These findings suggest that high-altitude exposure affects response inhibition with regard to processing speed during the conflict monitoring stage. In addition, high altitude generally increases the neural activity in the matching step of information processing and attentional resources. These results may provide some insights into the neurocognitive basis of the effects on high-altitude exposure on response inhibition. PMID:26324166

  20. Long term Combination of Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Analysis Center Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teferle, F. N.; Hunegnaw, A.

    2015-12-01

    The International GNSS Service (IGS) Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Working Group (WG) has recently finallized their reprocessing campaign, using all relevant Global Positioning System (GPS) observations from 1995 to 2014. This re-processed dataset will provide high quality estimates of land motions, enabling regional and global high-precision geophysical/geodeticstudies. Several of the individual TIGA Analysis Centers (TACs) have completed processing the full history of GPS observations recorded by the IGS global network, as well as, many other GPS stationsat or close to tide gauges, which are available from the TIGA data centre at the University of La Rochelle (www.sonel.org). The TAC solutions contain a total of over 700 stations. Following the recentimprovements in processing models and strategies, this is the first complete reprocessing attempt by the TIGA WG to provide homogeneous position time series. The TIGA Combination Centre (TCC) atthe University of Luxembourg (UL) has computed a first multi-year weekly combined solution using two independent combination software packages: CATREF and GLOBK. These combinations allow anevaluation of any effects from the combination software and of the individual TAC contributions and their influences on the combined solution. In this study we will present the first UL TIGA multi-yearcombination results and discuss these in terms of geocentric sea level changes.

  1. Building an End-to-end System for Long Term Soil Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlavecz, K.; Terzis, A.; Musaloiu-E., R.; Cogan, J.; Szalay, A.; Gray, J.

    2006-05-01

    We have developed and deployed an experimental soil monitoring system in an urban forest. Wireless sensor nodes collect data on soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, and light. Data are uploaded into a SQL Server database, where they are calibrated and reorganized into an OLAP data cube. The data are accessible on-line using a web services interface with various visual tools. Our prototype system of ten nodes has been live since Sep 2005, and in 5 months of operation over 6 million measurements have been collected. At a high level, our experiment was a success: we detected variations in soil condition corresponding to topography and external environmental parameters as expected. However, we encountered a number of challenging technical problems: need for low-level programming at multiple levels, calibration across space and time, and cross- reference of measurements with external sources. Based upon the experience with this system we are now deploying 200 mode nodes with close to a thousand sensors spread over multiple sites in the context of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study LTER. www

  2. Greenhouse Gases in the South Atlantic: Testing and Automation of Instrumentation for Long-Term Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, D.; Fisher, R.; Sriskantharajah, S.; Lanoisellé, M.; Etchells, A.; Manning, A.; Nisbet, E.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2 by the Southern Ocean is important for modelling of future global warming scenarios, particularly since it was recently proposed that this sink was reducing (Le Quéré, et al., 2007). To help our understanding of this problem a new project aims to flask sample air from 5 South Atlantic sites and set up continuous monitoring at the 2 most accessible of these: Ascension Island and the Falklands. Flask sample measurements will include CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios and the ^13C measurement of both of these gases using the rapid continuous flow trace gas analysis system at Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL). Routine precisions are ±0.03 per mil and ±0.05 per mil for CO2 and CH4, respectively (Fisher et al., 2006). A time series of ^13C in CH4 was maintained for Ascension Island from 2000-2005 and a time series for methane isotopes commenced for the Falkland Islands in autumn 2007. To meet the continuous monitoring requirements of the new project, three Picarro G1301 CO2 / CH4 / H2O Cavity Ring Down Spectrometers (CRDS) were installed at RHUL in October 2008 for testing, calibration and the development of an automated air inlet system suitable for analysis of calibration gases at the remote sites. Initial testing included calibration with NOAA calibrated and target gases, validation of the Picarro-defined H2O-correction of CO2, and derivation of an H2O-correction for CH4. Continuing checks on the H2O correction are made by having 2 instruments side-by-side taking air from the same inlet, but one having a combined Nafion / Mg-perchlorate drying system that utilizes the analysis system exhaust gas for the reverse flow through the Nafion and maintains water-levels at 0.05% for more than 2 weeks. These instruments are connected to the same air inlet as a GC measuring CH4 mixing ratio and a LiCor 6252 measuring CO2 mixing ratio at 30-minute and 1-minute intervals respectively. The third CRDS instrument is connected to a

  3. Results of a long-term monitoring of the multiple system SZ Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorda, S. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of the reduction of our photometric and spectroscopic observations for the eclipsing binary SZ Cam performed with the telescopes at the Astronomical Observatory of the Ural Federal University and the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 1996-2014. Based on an 11-year-long photometric monitoring of SZ Cam, we have obtained new elements of its photometric orbit and parameters of its components. We have detected low-amplitude periodic light variations in SZ Cam that are possibly related to the ellipsoidal shape of the components of the spectroscopic binary third body. Based on published data and our new spectroscopy, we have found new values for the mass ratio, q = 0.72 ± 0.01, and parameters of the radial velocity curves of the components, V 0 = -3.6 ± 1.7 km s-1, K 1 = 190.2 ± 1.9 km s-1, and K 2 = 263.0 ± 2.4 km s-1. The component masses have been estimated to be M 1 = 16.1 M ⊙ and M 2 = 11.6 M ⊙. We have obtained new light elements and parameters of the radial velocity curves for the third body, V {0/3 b } = 4.2 ± 0.6 km s-1 and K {1/3 b } = 26.6 ± 0.8 km s-1. We have improved the period of the relative orbit of SZ Cam and the third body, P orb = 55.6 ± 1.5 yr.

  4. Long-Term Benthic Macroinvertebrate Community Monitoring to Assess Pollution Abatement Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, John G; Brandt, Craig C; Christensen, Sigurd W

    2011-01-01

    The benthic macroinvertebrate community of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in East Tennessee was monitored for 18 years to evaluate the effectiveness of a water pollution control program implemented at a major United States (U.S.) Department of Energy facility. Several actions were implemented to reduce and control releases of pollutants into the headwaters of the stream. Four of the most significant actions were implemented during different time periods, which allowed assessment of each action. Macroinvertebrate samples were collected annually in April from three locations in EFPC (EFK24, EFK23, and EFK14) and two nearby reference streams from 1986 through 2003. Significant improvements occurred in the macroinvertebrate community at the headwater sites (EFK24 and EFK23) after implementation of each action, while changes detected 9 km further downstream (EFK14) could not be clearly attributed to any of the actions. Because the stream was impacted at its origin, invertebrate recolonization was primarily limited to aerial immigration, thus, recovery has been slow. As recovery progressed, abundances of small pollution-tolerant taxa (e.g., Orthocladiinae chironomids) decreased and longer lived taxa colonized (e.g., hydropsychid caddisflies, riffle beetles, Baetis). While assessments lasting three to four years may be long enough to detect a response to new pollution controls at highly impacted locations, more time may be needed to understand the full effects. Studies on the effectiveness of pollution controls can be improved if impacted and reference sites are selected to maximize spatial and temporal trending, and if a multidisciplinary approach is used to broadly assess environmental responses (e.g., water quality trends, invertebrate and fish community assessments, toxicity testing, etc.).

  5. Long-term monitoring of ULF electromagnetic fields at Parkfield, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Kappler, K.N.; Morrison, H.F.; Egbert, G.D.

    2009-08-01

    Electric and magnetic fields in the (10{sup -4}-1.0) Hz band were monitored at two sites adjacent to the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield and Hollister, California from 1995 to present. A data window [2002-2005], enclosing the September 28, 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake, was analyzed to determine if anomalous electric or magnetic fields, or changes in ground conductivity, occurred before the earthquake. The data were edited, removing intervals of instrument malfunction leaving 875 days in the four-year period. Frequent, spike-like disturbances were common, but were not more frequent around the time of the earthquake; these were removed before subsequent processing. Signal to noise amplitude spectra, estimated via magnetotelluric processing showed the behavior of the ULF fields to be remarkably constant over the period of analysis. These first-order plots make clear that most of the recorded energy is coherent over the spatial extent of the array. Three main statistical techniques were employed to separate local anomalous electrical or magnetic fields from the dominant coherent natural fields: transfer function estimates between components at each site were employed to subtract the dominant field, and look deeper at the 'residual' fields; the data were decomposed into principal components to identify the dominant coherent array modes; and the technique of canonical coherences was employed to distinguish anomalous fields which are spatially broad from anomalies which occur at a single site only, and furthermore to distinguish anomalies which are present in both the electric and magnetic fields from those which are present in only one field type. Standard remote reference apparent resistivity estimates were generated daily at Parkfield. A significant seasonal component of variability was observed suggesting local distortion due to variations in near surface resistance. In all cases, high levels of sensitivity to subtle electromagnetic effects were demonstrated, but no

  6. LONG-TERM MONITORING OF COMET 103P/HARTLEY 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.-Y.; Ip, W.-H.; Lara, L. M. E-mail: lara@iaa.csic.es

    2013-07-01

    We report the spectrophotometric, photometric, and imaging monitoring results of comet 103P/Hartley 2 obtained at the Lulin (1 m), Calar Alto (2.2 m), and Beijing Astronomical (2.16 m) observatories from 2010 April to December. We found that a dust feature in the sunward direction was detected starting from the end of September until the beginning of December (our last observation from the Lulin and Calar Alto observatories). Two distinct sunward jet features in the processed images were observed on October 11 and after October 29 until November 2. In parallel, the CN images reveal two asymmetrical jet features which are nearly perpendicular to the Sun-nucleus direction, these asymmetrical features imply that the comet was in a nearly side-on view in late October and early November. In addition to the jet features, the average result of the C{sub 2}-to-CN production rate ratio ranges from 0.7 to 1.5, consistent with 103P/Hartley 2 being of typical cometary chemistry. We found that the r{sub h} dependence for the dust production rate, Af{rho} (5000 km), is -3.75 {+-} 0.45 before perihelion and -3.44 {+-} 1.20 during the post-perihelion period. We detected higher dust reddening around the optocenter and decreased reddening along the sunward jet feature. We concluded that higher dust reddening could be associated with strong jet activity while lower dust reddening could be associated with the outburst or might imply changes in the optical properties. The average dust color did not appear to vary significantly as the comet passed through perihelion.

  7. Long-Term Benthic Macroinvertebrate Community Monitoring to Assess Pollution Abatement Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John G.; Brandt, Craig C.; Christensen, Sigurd W.

    2011-06-01

    The benthic macroinvertebrate community of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in East Tennessee was monitored for 18 years to evaluate the effectiveness of a water pollution control program implemented at a major United States (U.S.) Department of Energy facility. Several actions were implemented to reduce and control releases of pollutants into the headwaters of the stream. Four of the most significant actions were implemented during different time periods, which allowed assessment of each action. Macroinvertebrate samples were collected annually in April from three locations in EFPC (EFK24, EFK23, and EFK14) and two nearby reference streams from 1986 through 2003. Significant improvements occurred in the macroinvertebrate community at the headwater sites (EFK24 and EFK23) after implementation of each action, while changes detected 9 km further downstream (EFK14) could not be clearly attributed to any of the actions. Because the stream was impacted at its origin, invertebrate recolonization was primarily limited to aerial immigration, thus, recovery has been slow. As recovery progressed, abundances of small pollution-tolerant taxa (e.g., Orthocladiinae chironomids) decreased and longer lived taxa colonized (e.g., hydropsychid caddisflies, riffle beetles, Baetis). While assessments lasting three to four years may be long enough to detect a response to new pollution controls at highly impacted locations, more time may be needed to understand the full effects. Studies on the effectiveness of pollution controls can be improved if impacted and reference sites are selected to maximize spatial and temporal trending, and if a multidisciplinary approach is used to broadly assess environmental responses (e.g., water quality trends, invertebrate and fish community assessments, toxicity testing, etc.).

  8. Fine mode aerosol composition at three long-term atmospheric monitoring sites in the Amazon Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Artaxo, P.; Gerab, F.; Yamasoe, M.A.; Martins, J.V.

    1994-11-01

    The Amazon Basin tropical rain forest is a key region to study processes that are changing the composition of the global atmosphere, including the large amount of fine mode aerosol particles emitted during biomass burning that might influence the global atmosphere. Three background monitoring stations, Alta Floresta, Cuiaba, and Serra do Navio, are operating continuously measuring aerosol composition. Fine (particle diameter less than 2.0 microns) and coarse (particle diameter greater than 2.0 microns and less than 10 microns) mode aerosol particles were collected using stacked filter units. Particle-induced X-ray emission was used to measure concentrations of up to 20 elements in the fine mode: Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, and Pb. Soot carbon and gravimetric mass analysis were also performed. Absolute Principal Factor Analysis (APFA) has derived absolute elemental source profiles. APFA showed four aerosol particle components: soil dust (Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), biomass burning (soot, fine mode mass concentration, K, Cl), natural primary biogenic particles with gas-to-particle component (K, S, Ca, Mn, Zn), and marine aerosol (Cl). Biogenic and biomass burning aerosol particles dominate the fine mode mass concentration, with the presence of K, P, S, Cl, Zn, Br, and fine mode mass concentration (FPM). At the Alta Floresta and Cuiaba sites, during the dry season, a strong component of biomass burning is observed. Inhalable particulate matter (particle diameter less than 10 microns) mass concentration up to 700 micrograms/cu m was measured. Fine particle mass concentration alone can go as high as 400 micrograms/cu m for large regions.

  9. Stability of Caribbean coral communities quantified by long-term monitoring and autoregression models.

    PubMed

    Gross, Kevin; Edmunds, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Tropical coral reefs exemplify ecosystems imperiled by environmental change. Anticipating the future of reef ecosystems requires understanding how scleractinian corals respond to the multiple environmental disturbances that threaten their survival. We analyzed the stability of coral reefs at three habitats at different depths along the south shore of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, using multivariate autoregression (MAR) models and two decades of monitoring data. We quantified several measures of ecosystem stability, including the magnitude of typical stochastic fluctuations, the rate of recovery following disturbance, and the sensitivity of coral cover to hurricanes and elevated sea temperature. Our results show that, even within a -4 km shore, coral communities in different habitats display different stability properties, and that the stability of each habitat corresponds with the habitat's known synecology. Two Orbicella-dominated habitats are less prone to annual stochastic fluctuations than coral communities in shallower water, but they recover slowly from disturbance, and one habitat has suffered recent losses in scleractinian cover that will not be quickly reversed. In contrast, a shallower, low-coral-cover habitat is subject to greater stochastic fluctuations, but rebounds more quickly from disturbance and is more robust to hurricanes and seawater warming. In some sense, the shallower community is more stable, although the stability arguably arises from having little coral cover left. Our results sharpen understanding of recent changes in coral communities at these habitats, provide a more detailed understanding of how these habitats may change in future environments, and illustrate how MAR models can be used to assess stability of communities founded upon long-lived species. PMID:26378304

  10. Multi-step-ahead predictor design for effective long-term forecast of hydrological signals using a novel wavelet neural network hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.-S.; Yu, S.-P.; Liu, G.-M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of serial-propagated long-range multi-step-ahead (MSA) prediction, which has high practical value but also great implementary difficulty because of huge error accumulation, a novel wavelet neural network hybrid model - CDW-NN - combining continuous and discrete wavelet transforms (CWT and DWT) and neural networks (NNs), is designed as the MSA predictor for the effective long-term forecast of hydrological signals. By the application of 12 types of hybrid and pure models in estuarine 1096-day river stages forecasting, the different forecast performances and the superiorities of CDW-NN model with corresponding driving mechanisms are discussed. One type of CDW-NN model, CDW-NF, which uses neuro-fuzzy as the forecast submodel, has been proven to be the most effective MSA predictor for the prominent accuracy enhancement during the overall 1096-day long-term forecasts. The special superiority of CDW-NF model lies in the CWT-based methodology, which determines the 15-day and 28-day prior data series as model inputs by revealing the significant short-time periodicities involved in estuarine river stage signals. Comparing the conventional single-step-ahead-based long-term forecast models, the CWT-based hybrid models broaden the prediction range in each forecast step from 1 day to 15 days, and thus reduce the overall forecasting iteration steps from 1096 steps to 74 steps and finally create significant decrease of error accumulations. In addition, combination of the advantages of DWT method and neuro-fuzzy system also benefits filtering the noisy dynamics in model inputs and enhancing the simulation and forecast ability for the complex hydro-system.

  11. Multi-step-ahead predictor design for effective long-term forecast of hydrological signals using a novel wavelet-NN hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.-S.; Yu, S.-P.; Liu, G.-M.

    2013-07-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of serial-propagated long-range multi-step-ahead (MSA) prediction, which has high practical value but also great difficulty to conduct because of huge error accumulation, a novel wavelet-NN hybrid model CDW-NN, combining continuous and discrete wavelet transforms (CWT and DWT) and neural networks (NN), is designed as the MSA predictor for effective long-term forecast of hydrological signals. By the application of 12 types of hybrid and pure models in estuarine 1096 day river stage series forecasting, different forecast performances and the superiorities of CDW-NN model with corresponding driving mechanisms are discussed, and one type of CDW-NN model (CDW-NF), which uses Neuro-Fuzzy as the forecast submodel, has been proven to be the most effective MSA predictor for the accuracy enhancement in the overall 1096 days long-term forecast. The special superiority of CDW-NF model lies in the CWT based methodology, which determines the 15 and 28 day prior data series as model inputs by revealing the significant short-time periodicities involved in estuarine river stage signals. Comparing conventional single-step-ahead based long-term forecast models, the CWT based hybrid models broaden the prediction range in each forecast step from 1 day to 15 days, thus reduce the overall forecasting iteration steps from 1096 steps to 74 steps and finally creates significant decrease of error accumulations. In addition, combination of the advantages of DWT method and Neuro-Fuzzy system also very benefit filtering the noisy dynamics for model inputs and enhancing the simulation and forecast ability of the complex hydro-system.

  12. A New Framework for Adptive Sampling and Analysis During Long-Term Monitoring and Remedial Action Management

    SciTech Connect

    Minsker, Barbara

    2005-06-01

    Yonas Demissie, a research assistant supported by the project, has successfully created artificial data and assimilated it into coupled Modflow and artificial neural network models. His initial findings show that the neural networks help correct errors in the Modflow models. Abhishek Singh has used test cases from the literature to show that performing model calibration with an interactive genetic algorithm results in significantly improved parameter values. Meghna Babbar, the third research assistant supported by the project, has found similar results when applying an interactive genetic algorithms to long-term monitoring design. She has also developed new types of interactive genetic algorithms that significantly improve performance. Gayathri Gopalakrishnan, the last research assistant who is partially supported by the project, has shown that sampling branches of phytoremediation trees is an accurate approach to estimating soil and groundwater contaminations in areas surrounding the trees at the Argonne 317/319 site.

  13. Cost-effective long-term groundwater monitoring design using a genetic algorithm and global mass interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Patrick; Minsker, Barbara; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2000-12-01

    A new methodology for sampling plan design has been developed to reduce the costs associated with long-term monitoring of sites with groundwater contamination. The method combines a fate-and-transport model, plume interpolation, and a genetic algorithm to identify cost-effective sampling plans that accurately quantify the total mass of dissolved contaminant. The plume interpolation methods considered were inverse-distance weighting, ordinary kriging, and a hybrid method that combines the two approaches. Application of the methodology to Hill Air Force Base indicated that sampling costs could be reduced by as much as 60% without significant loss in accuracy of the global mass estimates. Inverse-distance weighting was shown to be most effective as a screening tool for evaluating whether more comprehensive geostatistical modeling is warranted. The hybrid method was effective for implementing such a tiered approach, reducing computational time by more than 60% relative to kriging alone.

  14. Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry Area (SWMU# 107) Annual Long-Term Monitoring Report (Year 1) Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jill W.; Towns, Crystal

    2015-01-01

    This document has been prepared by Geosyntec Consultants, Inc. (Geosyntec) to present and discuss the findings of the 2014 and 2015 Long-Term Monitoring (LTM) activities that were completed at the Launch Complex 39 (LC39) Observation Gantry Area (OGA) located at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida (Site). The remainder of this report includes: (i) a description of the Site location; (ii) summary of Site background and previous investigations; (iii) description of field activities completed as part of the annual LTM program at the Site; (iv) groundwater flow evaluation; (v) presentation and discussion of field and analytical results; and (vi) conclusions and recommendations. Applicable KSC Remediation Team (KSCRT) Meeting minutes are included in Attachment A. This Annual LTM Letter Report was prepared by Geosyntec Consultants (Geosyntec) for NASA under contract number NNK12CA13B, Delivery Order NNK13CA39T project number PCN ENV2188.

  15. Long-term monitoring of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) at the Norwegian Troll station in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenborn, R.; Breivik, K.; Eckhardt, S.; Lunder, C. R.; Manø, S.; Schlabach, M.; Stohl, A.

    2013-07-01

    A first long-term monitoring of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Antarctic air has been conducted at the Norwegian research station Troll (Dronning Maud Land). As target contaminants 32 PCB congeners, α- and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), trans- and cis-chlordane, trans- and cis-nonachlor, p,p'- and o,p-DDT, DDD, DDE as well as hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were selected. The monitoring program with weekly samples taken during the period 2007-2010 was coordinated with the parallel program at the Norwegian Arctic monitoring site (Zeppelin mountain, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard) in terms of priority compounds, sampling schedule as well as analytical methods. The POP concentration levels found in Antarctica were considerably lower than Arctic atmospheric background concentrations. Similar to observations for Arctic samples, HCB is the predominant POP compound, with levels of around 22 pg m-3 throughout the entire monitoring period. In general, the following concentration distribution was found for the Troll samples analyzed: HCB > Sum HCH > Sum PCB > Sum DDT > Sum chlordanes. Atmospheric long-range transport was identified as a major contamination source for POPs in Antarctic environments. Several long-range transport events with elevated levels of pesticides and/or compounds with industrial sources were identified based on retroplume calculations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART).

  16. Automated long-term monitoring of parallel microfluidic operations applying a machine vision-assisted positioning method.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon Ming; Li, John C S; Xie, Kai; Cui, Xin; Prasad, Agrim; Gao, Qiannan; Leung, Chi Chiu; Lam, Raymond H W

    2014-01-01

    As microfluidics has been applied extensively in many cell and biochemical applications, monitoring the related processes is an important requirement. In this work, we design and fabricate a high-throughput microfluidic device which contains 32 microchambers to perform automated parallel microfluidic operations and monitoring on an automated stage of a microscope. Images are captured at multiple spots on the device during the operations for monitoring samples in microchambers in parallel; yet the device positions may vary at different time points throughout operations as the device moves back and forth on a motorized microscopic stage. Here, we report an image-based positioning strategy to realign the chamber position before every recording of microscopic image. We fabricate alignment marks at defined locations next to the chambers in the microfluidic device as reference positions. We also develop image processing algorithms to recognize the chamber positions in real-time, followed by realigning the chambers to their preset positions in the captured images. We perform experiments to validate and characterize the device functionality and the automated realignment operation. Together, this microfluidic realignment strategy can be a platform technology to achieve precise positioning of multiple chambers for general microfluidic applications requiring long-term parallel monitoring of cell and biochemical activities. PMID:25133248

  17. Long-term hydrologic and biogeochemical responses of a soft water seepage lake in north central Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentz, Dennis A.; Rose, William J.; Webster, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrologic and chemical budgets were determined for the period October 1980 through September 1988 for Vandercook Lake, a 43-ha soft water seepage lake located in predominantly sandy outwash in northern Wisconsin. The 1951-1980 mean annual precipitation for the lake, based on nearby National Weather Service (NWS) stations, was 825 mm; volume-weighted p H of bulk atmospheric deposition during the 8-year study averaged 4.7. From October 1980 through September 1983, annual precipitation was 108% of the 30-year NWS average, annual recharge was 144% of the 8-year study period average, and annual groundwater inflow to the lake ranged from 5 to 9% of the total inflow. From October 1986 through September 1988, annual precipitation was 90% of the NWS average, annual recharge was 30% of the study period average, and the lake received no groundwater inflow. During the study, the lake changed from a system whose buffering mechanism was significantly influenced by mineral weathering in inflowing groundwater to one dominated by in-lake sulfate reduction. The functional differences exhibited by this lake during the 8 years of study demonstrate the tenuousness with which conclusions based on shorter-term studies of similar systems must be considered.

  18. Adaptive Wireless Ad-hoc Sensor Networks for Long-term and Event-oriented Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumberger, Jan; Mollenhauer, Hannes; Remmler, Paul; Schaedler, Martin; Schima, Robert; Mollenhauer, Olaf; Hutschenreuther, Tino; Toepfer, Hannes; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Ecosystems are often characterized by their high heterogeneity, complexity and dynamic. Hence, single point measurements are often not sufficient for their complete representation. The application of wireless sensor networks in terrestrial and aquatic environmental systems offer significant benefits as a better consideration to the local test conditions, due to the simple adjustment of the sensor distribution, the sensor types and the sample rate. Another advantage of wireless ad-hoc sensor networks is their self-organizing behavior, resulting in a major reduction in installation and operation costs and time. In addition, individual point measurements with a sensor are significantly improved by measuring at several points continuously. In this work a concept and realization for Long-term ecosystem research is given in the field monitoring of micrometeorology and soil parameters for the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes. This long term analyses are part of the Global Change Experimental Facility (GCEF), a large field-based experimental platform to assess the effects of climate change on ecosystem functions and processes under different land-use scenarios. Regarding to the adaptive behavior of the network, also a mobile version was developed to overcome the lack of information of temporally and spatially fixed measurements for the detection and recording of highly dynamic or time limited processes. First results of different field campaigns are given to present the potentials and limitations of this application in environmental science, especially for the monitoring of the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes, soil-atmosphere interaction and the validation of remote sensing data.

  19. Adaptive Wireless Ad-hoc Sensor Networks for Long-term and Event-oriented Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumberger, Jan; Mollenhauer, Hannes; Remmler, Paul; Chirila, Andrei Marian; Mollenhauer, Olaf; Hutschenreuther, Tino; Toepfer, Hannes; Dietrich, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystems are often characterized by their high heterogeneity, complexity and dynamic. Hence, single point measurements are often not sufficient for their complete representation. The application of wireless sensor networks in terrestrial and aquatic environmental systems offer significant benefits as a better consideration to the local test conditions, due to the simple adjustment of the sensor distribution, the sensor types and the sample rate. Another advantage of wireless ad-hoc sensor networks is their self-organizing behavior, resulting in a major reduction in installation and operation costs and time. In addition, individual point measurements with a sensor are significantly improved by measuring at several points continuously. In this work a concept and realization for Long-term ecosystem research is given in the field monitoring of micrometeorology and soil parameters for the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes. This long term analyses are part of the Global Change Experimental Facility (GCEF), a large field-based experimental platform to assess the effects of climate change on ecosystem functions and processes under different land-use scenarios. Regarding to the adaptive behavior of the network, also a mobile version was developed to overcome the lack of information of temporally and spatially fixed measurements for the detection and recording of highly dynamic or time limited processes. First results of different field campaigns are given to present the potentials and limitations of this application in environmental science, especially for the monitoring of the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes, soil-atmosphere interaction and the validation of remote sensing data.

  20. Integration of long-term fish kill data with ambient water quality monitoring data and application to water quality management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trim, Alan H.; Marcus, James M.

    1990-05-01

    Almost half (354) of all fish kills (805) in South Carolina, USA, between 1978 and 1988 occurred in the coastal zone. These kills were analyzed for causative, spatial, and temporal associations as a distinct data set and as one integrated with ambient water quality monitoring data. Estuarine kills as a result of natural causes accounted for 42.8% followed by man-induced (35.1%) and undetermined causes (22.1%). Although general pesticide usage was responsible for 53.9% of man-induced kills, weed control activities around resorts and municipal areas accounted for slightly more kills (20.9%) than did agricultural (19.8%) or vector control (13.2%) uses. A dramatic decline in agricultural-related kills has been observed since 1986 as the integrated pest management approach was adopted by many farmers. When taken with the few kills (12.0%) resulting from wastewaters, this suggests that these two land-use activities have been successfully managed via existing programs (IPM and NPDES, respectively) to minimize their contributions to estuarine fish kills. Ambient trend monitoring data demonstrated no coastal-wide dispersion of pesticide pollution. These data confirmed the nature of fish kills to be site-specific, near-field events most closely associated with the contiguous land-use practices and intensities. Typically, fish kill data are considered as event-specific data limited to the bounds of that event only. Our analysis has shown, however, that a long-term data set, when integrated with ambient water quality data, can assist in regulatory and resource management decisions for both short- and long-term planning and protection applications.

  1. Assessment of groundwater-surface water interaction using long-term hydrochemical data and isotope hydrology: Headwaters of the Condamine River, Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jorge L; Raiber, Matthias; Cox, Malcolm E

    2015-12-01

    A spatial analysis of hydrochemical data of groundwater and surface water was undertaken to identify groundwater-surface water connectivity in the headwaters of the Condamine River catchment, Southeast Queensland, Australia. An assessment of long-term hydrochemical and water level data supplemented by stable- and radioisotope measurements following a prolonged dry period dominated by baseflow, helped in determining patterns of interaction in different tributaries of the upper Condamine catchment. A conceptual hydrological model representing the major hydrochemical processes and their implications for stream-aquifer connectivity was developed and tested using multiple lines of evidence. The results of a multivariate statistical analysis highlight that there are two main regions with distinct hydrochemical facies (salinity, alkalinity, and predominant ions) in surface water. Geomorphology, geology, anthropogenic and climate influence were identified as the most relevant controlling factors of the spatial variability in water quality. Stable isotope data confirmed a clear evaporation trend in almost all surface water samples during baseflow conditions. Two water types can be identified and separated by the degree of evaporation and the proximity of one group to the local meteoric water line. The results confirm the discharge of groundwater from aquifers recharged by rainfall and located upstream of the surface water sampling sites. Overall, 222Rn data show a trend of increased activity in surface water towards the upstream portions of these tributaries, validating the use of this tracer to estimate groundwater input to the local creeks. The proportion of groundwater contribution to stream flow calculated by 222Rn and chloride mass balance is in agreement, and ranges between 20-70% in tributaries in the northern areas, and between 8-50% in the upper reaches of the main river channel. This study shows the efficacy of an integrated approach combining long-term

  2. Reconstructing the Migratory Behavior and Long-Term Survivorship of Juvenile Chinook Salmon under Contrasting Hydrologic Regimes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sturrock, Anna M.; Wikert, J. D.; Heyne, Timothy; Mesick, Carl; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hinkelman, Travis M.; Weber, Peter K.; Whitman, George E.; Glessner, Justin J.; Johnson, Rachel C.

    2015-05-20

    The loss of genetic and life history diversity has been documented across many taxonomic groups, and is considered a leading cause of increased extinction risk. Juvenile salmon leave their natal rivers at different sizes, ages and times of the year, and it is thought that this life history variation contributes to their population sustainability, and is thus central to many recovery efforts. However, in order to preserve and restore diversity in life history traits, it is necessary to first understand how environmental factors affect their expression and success. We used otolith 87Sr/86Sr in adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytcha) returning tomore » the Stanislaus River in the California Central Valley (USA) to reconstruct the sizes at which they outmigrated as juveniles in a wetter (2000) and drier (2003) year. We compared rotary screw trap-derived estimates of outmigrant timing, abundance and size with those reconstructed in the adults from the same cohort. This allowed us to estimate the relative survival and contribution of migratory phenotypes (fry, parr, smolts) to the adult spawning population under different flow regimes. Juvenile abundance and outmigration behavior varied with hydroclimatic regime, while downstream survival appeared to be driven by size- and time-selective mortality. Although fry survival is generally assumed to be negligible in this system, >20% of the adult spawners from outmigration year 2000 had outmigrated as fry. In both years, all three phenotypes contributed to the spawning population, however their relative proportions differed, reflecting greater fry contributions in the wetter year (23% vs. 10%) and greater smolt contributions in the drier year (13% vs. 44%). In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the expression and success of migratory phenotypes vary with hydrologic regime, emphasizing the importance of maintaining diversity in a changing climate.« less

  3. Reconstructing the Migratory Behavior and Long-Term Survivorship of Juvenile Chinook Salmon under Contrasting Hydrologic Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sturrock, Anna M.; Wikert, J. D.; Heyne, Timothy; Mesick, Carl; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hinkelman, Travis M.; Weber, Peter K.; Whitman, George E.; Glessner, Justin J.; Johnson, Rachel C.

    2015-05-20

    The loss of genetic and life history diversity has been documented across many taxonomic groups, and is considered a leading cause of increased extinction risk. Juvenile salmon leave their natal rivers at different sizes, ages and times of the year, and it is thought that this life history variation contributes to their population sustainability, and is thus central to many recovery efforts. However, in order to preserve and restore diversity in life history traits, it is necessary to first understand how environmental factors affect their expression and success. We used otolith 87Sr/86Sr in adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytcha) returning to the Stanislaus River in the California Central Valley (USA) to reconstruct the sizes at which they outmigrated as juveniles in a wetter (2000) and drier (2003) year. We compared rotary screw trap-derived estimates of outmigrant timing, abundance and size with those reconstructed in the adults from the same cohort. This allowed us to estimate the relative survival and contribution of migratory phenotypes (fry, parr, smolts) to the adult spawning population under different flow regimes. Juvenile abundance and outmigration behavior varied with hydroclimatic regime, while downstream survival appeared to be driven by size- and time-selective mortality. Although fry survival is generally assumed to be negligible in this system, >20% of the adult spawners from outmigration year 2000 had outmigrated as fry. In both years, all three phenotypes contributed to the spawning population, however their relative proportions differed, reflecting greater fry contributions in the wetter year (23% vs. 10%) and greater smolt contributions in the drier year (13% vs. 44%). In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the expression and success of migratory phenotypes vary with hydrologic regime, emphasizing the importance of maintaining diversity in a changing climate.

  4. Reconstructing the Migratory Behavior and Long-Term Survivorship of Juvenile Chinook Salmon under Contrasting Hydrologic Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Anna M.; Wikert, J. D.; Heyne, Timothy; Mesick, Carl; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hinkelman, Travis M.; Weber, Peter K.; Whitman, George E.; Glessner, Justin J.; Johnson, Rachel C.

    2015-01-01

    The loss of genetic and life history diversity has been documented across many taxonomic groups, and is considered a leading cause of increased extinction risk. Juvenile salmon leave their natal rivers at different sizes, ages and times of the year, and it is thought that this life history variation contributes to their population sustainability, and is thus central to many recovery efforts. However, in order to preserve and restore diversity in life history traits, it is necessary to first understand how environmental factors affect their expression and success. We used otolith 87Sr/86Sr in adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytcha) returning to the Stanislaus River in the California Central Valley (USA) to reconstruct the sizes at which they outmigrated as juveniles in a wetter (2000) and drier (2003) year. We compared rotary screw trap-derived estimates of outmigrant timing, abundance and size with those reconstructed in the adults from the same cohort. This allowed us to estimate the relative survival and contribution of migratory phenotypes (fry, parr, smolts) to the adult spawning population under different flow regimes. Juvenile abundance and outmigration behavior varied with hydroclimatic regime, while downstream survival appeared to be driven by size- and time-selective mortality. Although fry survival is generally assumed to be negligible in this system, >20% of the adult spawners from outmigration year 2000 had outmigrated as fry. In both years, all three phenotypes contributed to the spawning population, however their relative proportions differed, reflecting greater fry contributions in the wetter year (23% vs. 10%) and greater smolt contributions in the drier year (13% vs. 44%). These data demonstrate that the expression and success of migratory phenotypes vary with hydrologic regime, emphasizing the importance of maintaining diversity in a changing climate. PMID:25992556

  5. Assessing the long-term effects of the Sahel drought on ponds and semi-arid hydrology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, L.; Grippa, M.; Kergoat, L.; Hiernaux, P.; Peugeot, C.; Mougin, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Sahel underwent a severe rainfall deficit in the late 20th century, with extreme droughts in the early 70s and early 80s. This drought is the strongest multidecadal drought of the 20th century, globally. It has strongly impacted ecosystems, water availability, and populations. However, an increase of surface water has been observed during the same period: higher discharge of Sahelian rivers, and a general increase in pond's surface. This phenomenon, "less rain but more surface runoff", is referred to as the "Sahelian paradox". The causes of this paradox are still debated. The role of the significant increase in cropped areas, often cited for cultivated Sahel, does not hold for pastoral areas in central and northern Sahel. Degradation of vegetation as a result of the drought, soils erosion, may also play an important role. Most Sahelian watersheds are still poorly gauged or ungauged, which makes it difficult to quantify surface runoff and its determinants. A method is developed to estimate runoff over ungauged ponds watersheds. It is tested for the Agoufou pond in the Gourma region in Mali, where in situ data are available for 2007-2014. A 3D model is first developed to relate water volume to height surface. This model is combined with daily evaporation and precipitation, to estimate the water supply to the pond which is a proxy for runoff over the watershed. This model highlights a spectacular increase of the runoff coefficient over the last 60 years. The method is then applied to two ungauged Sahelian watersheds in Mauritania and Niger, where pond surfaces by remote sensing are the only information. The runoff coefficients also increased in the last 60 years over these watersheds. The runoff derived for the Agoufou pond is used to evaluate simulations with the KINEROS2 model. We discuss to what extent the changes in rain intensity, soil hydrological properties and land-use land cover are able to cause the observed change in runoff over the last 60 years.

  6. Reconstructing the Migratory Behavior and Long-Term Survivorship of Juvenile Chinook Salmon under Contrasting Hydrologic Regimes.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Anna M; Wikert, J D; Heyne, Timothy; Mesick, Carl; Hubbard, Alan E; Hinkelman, Travis M; Weber, Peter K; Whitman, George E; Glessner, Justin J; Johnson, Rachel C

    2015-01-01

    The loss of genetic and life history diversity has been documented across many taxonomic groups, and is considered a leading cause of increased extinction risk. Juvenile salmon leave their natal rivers at different sizes, ages and times of the year, and it is thought that this life history variation contributes to their population sustainability, and is thus central to many recovery efforts. However, in order to preserve and restore diversity in life history traits, it is necessary to first understand how environmental factors affect their expression and success. We used otolith (87)Sr/(86)Sr in adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytcha) returning to the Stanislaus River in the California Central Valley (USA) to reconstruct the sizes at which they outmigrated as juveniles in a wetter (2000) and drier (2003) year. We compared rotary screw trap-derived estimates of outmigrant timing, abundance and size with those reconstructed in the adults from the same cohort. This allowed us to estimate the relative survival and contribution of migratory phenotypes (fry, parr, smolts) to the adult spawning population under different flow regimes. Juvenile abundance and outmigration behavior varied with hydroclimatic regime, while downstream survival appeared to be driven by size- and time-selective mortality. Although fry survival is generally assumed to be negligible in this system, >20% of the adult spawners from outmigration year 2000 had outmigrated as fry. In both years, all three phenotypes contributed to the spawning population, however their relative proportions differed, reflecting greater fry contributions in the wetter year (23% vs. 10%) and greater smolt contributions in the drier year (13% vs. 44%). These data demonstrate that the expression and success of migratory phenotypes vary with hydrologic regime, emphasizing the importance of maintaining diversity in a changing climate. PMID:25992556

  7. Evaluation of a Hydrologic Model of the Rio Grande Using a Long-Term Dataset of Land Surface Fluxes and States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritchel, P. E.; Boyle, D. P.; McConnell, J. R.

    2003-12-01

    Researchers at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) are conducting SAHRA-related research aimed at (1) understanding the spatial and temporal distribution of snow and water balance above the mountain front and (2) developing and calibrating both operational and physically based numerical models that can be used to predict the quantity and timing of runoff in semi-arid regions where the majority of runoff originates in the seasonal snow pack. Unfortunately, observations of hydrologic variables (precipitation, streamflow, evapotranspiration, snow water equivalent, etc.) are sparse in the semi-arid regions of the western United States and, therefore, the evaluation of model accuracy (usually in terms of streamflow) is often very limited. However, comparisons of model output with newly developed high-resolution estimates of hydrologically based land surface fluxes and states may provide insight to model accuracy in areas with little or no observed information. In this study, we apply a hydrologic model to the Rio Grande (above El Paso, TX) and compare the model output to a dataset of estimated land surface fluxes and states. Specifically, the USGS Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), within the Modular Modeling System (MMS), is applied to the watershed at a daily time step with a spatial resolution of 1/8 degree. Many of the model parameters are derived directly from spatial information describing important hydrologic characteristics of the watershed (e.g., soils, vegetation, slope, aspect, etc.) using existing empirical relationships. Model estimates of land surface fluxes and states (e.g., streamflow, groundwater flow, evapotranspiration, snow water equivalent, soil moisture, etc.) are compared with a long-term dataset of land surface fluxes and states from a variety of different sources. From these comparisons, we hope to gain a better understanding of the role of basin scale, grid resolution and some of the uncertainties associated with current prediction

  8. Ultrafine particles in four European urban environments: Results from a new continuous long-term monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofman, J.; Staelens, J.; Cordell, R.; Stroobants, C.; Zikova, N.; Hama, S. M. L.; Wyche, K. P.; Kos, G. P. A.; Van Der Zee, S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Weijers, E. P.; Monks, P. S.; Roekens, E.

    2016-07-01

    To gain a better understanding on the spatiotemporal variation of ultrafine particles (UFPs) in urban environments, this study reports on the first results of a long-term UFP monitoring network, set up in Amsterdam (NL), Antwerp (BE), Leicester (UK) and London (UK). Total number concentrations and size distributions were assessed during 1-2 years at four fixed urban background sites, supplemented with mobile trailer measurements for co-location monitoring and additional short-term monitoring sites. Intra- and interurban spatiotemporal UFP variation, associations with commonly-monitored pollutants (PM, NOx and BC) and impacts of wind fields were evaluated. Although comparable size distributions were observed between the four cities, source-related differences were demonstrated within specific particle size classes. Total and size-resolved particle number concentrations showed clear traffic-related temporal variation, confirming road traffic as the major UFP contributor in urban environments. New particle formation events were observed in all cities. Correlations with typical traffic-related pollutants (BC and NOx) were obtained for all monitoring stations, except for Amsterdam, which might be attributable to UFP emissions from Schiphol airport. The temporal variation in particle number concentration correlated fairly weakly between the four cities (rs = 0.28-0.50, COD = 0.28-0.37), yet improved significantly inside individual cities (rs = 0.59-0.77). Nevertheless, considerable differences were still obtained in terms of particle numbers (20-38% for total particle numbers and up to 49% for size-resolved particle numbers), confirming the importance of local source contributions and the need for careful consideration when allocating UFP monitoring stations in heterogeneous urban environments.

  9. Relationship of psychological and physiological variables in long-term self-monitored data during work ability rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Pärkkä, Juha; Merilahti, Juho; Mattila, Elina M; Malm, Esko; Antila, Kari; Tuomisto, Martti T; Saarinen, Ari Viljam; van Gils, Mark; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2009-03-01

    Individual wellness comprises both psychological and physiological wellbeing, which are interrelated. In long-term monitoring of wellness, both components should be included. Work-related stress and burnout are persistent problems in industrial countries. Early identification of work-related stress symptoms and early intervention could reduce individual suffering and improve the working productivity and creativity. The goal of this study was to explore the relationship between physiological and psychological variables measured at home by the users themselves or automatically. In all, 17 (3 males and 14 females, age 40-62) people participating in a work ability rehabilitation program (due to work overload) were monitored for three months. Physiological and behavioral variables (activity, bed occupancy, heart rate (HR) and respiration during night, HR during day, blood pressure, steps, weight, room illumination, and temperature) were measured with different unobtrusive wireless sensors. Daily self-assessment of stress, mood, and behaviors (exercise, sleep) were collected using a mobile phone diary. The daily self-assessment of stress and the Derogatis stress profile questionnaire were used as reference for stress status. Results show modest, but significant pooled overall correlations between self-assessed stress level, and physiological and behavioral variables (e.g., sleep length measured with wrist-worn activity monitor: rho = -0.22, p < 0.001, and variance of nightly bedroom illumination: rho = 0.13, p < 0.001). Strong, but sometimes conflicting correlations can be found at individual level, suggesting individual reactions to stress in daily life. PMID:19272856

  10. Reliable long-term continuous blood glucose monitoring for patients in critical care using microdialysis and infrared spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. Michael; Damm, Uwe; Kondepati, Venkata R.

    2006-02-01

    For clinical research, in-vivo blood glucose monitoring is an ongoing important topic to improve glycemic control in patients with non-adequate blood glucose regulation. Critically ill patients received much interest, since the intensive insulin therapy treatment, as established for diabetics, reduces mortality significantly. Despite the existence of commercially available, mainly amperometric biosensors, continued interest is in infrared spectroscopic techniques for reagent-free glucose monitoring. For stable long-term operation, avoiding also sensor recalibration, a bed-side device coupled to a micro-dialysis probe was developed for quasi-continuous glucose monitoring. Multivariate calibration is required for glucose concentration prediction due to the complex composition of dialysates from interstitial body fluid. Measurements were carried out with different test persons, each experiment lasting for more than 8 hours. Owing to low dialysis recovery rates, glucose concentrations in the dialysates were between 0.83 and 4.44 mM. Standard errors of prediction (SEP) obtained with Partial Least Squares (PLS) calibration and different cross-validation strategies were mainly between 0.13 and 0.18 mM based on either full interval data or specially selected spectral variables.

  11. Monitoring of malolactic fermentation in wine using an electrochemical bienzymatic biosensor for L-lactate with long term stability.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Gómez, Pablo; Gutiérrez-Capitán, Manuel; Capdevila, Fina; Puig-Pujol, Anna; Fernández-Sánchez, César; Jiménez-Jorquera, Cecilia

    2016-01-28

    L-lactic acid is monitored during malolactic fermentation process of wine and its evolution is strongly related with the quality of the final product. The analysis of L-lactic acid is carried out off-line in a laboratory. Therefore, there is a clear demand for analytical tools that enabled real-time monitoring of this process in field and biosensors have positioned as a feasible alternative in this regard. The development of an amperometric biosensor for L-lactate determination showing long-term stability is reported in this work. The biosensor architecture includes a thin-film gold electrochemical transducer selectively modified with an enzymatic membrane, based on a three-dimensional matrix of polypyrrole (PPy) entrapping lactate oxidase (LOX) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzymes. The experimental conditions of the biosensor fabrication regarding the pyrrole polymerization and the enzymes entrapment are optimized. The biosensor response to L-lactate is linear in a concentration range of 1 × 10(-6)-1 × 10(-4) M, with a detection limit of 5.2 × 10(-7) M and a sensitivity of - (13500 ± 600) μA M(-1) cm(-2). The biosensor shows an excellent working stability, retaining more than 90% of its original sensitivity after 40 days. This is the determining factor that allowed for the application of this biosensor to monitor the malolactic fermentation of three red wines, showing a good agreement with the standard colorimetric method. PMID:26755146

  12. Parameterization and calibration of a hydrologic model for long-term simulations of a small un-gauged basin in the Malian Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warms, M.; Ramirez, J. A.; Kaptue, A.; Hanan, N. P.; Sigdel-Phuyal, M.; Giree, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Sahelian region of Africa is the geographic belt directly south of the Sahara, connecting the desert to the wetter Sudanian and Guinean savannas to the South. The region is semi-arid, receiving only 300-600 mm of precipitation on average annually, and experiencing severe dry seasons (7-9 months) with little to no rain. In parts of the Sahel, a remarkable expansion of ephemeral lakes extending longer in the dry season and a recent hydrologic regime shift such that some of the previously ephemeral lakes in the region have become perennial have been observed. To test hypotheses of how this regime shift occurred, or whether this trend will continue, a coupled hydrological, ecological, and social processes model is being developed. In this paper we focus on the parameterization and calibration of the physical hydrologic model--a task that is difficult given the lack of high-resolution datasets for this region. While soils and land cover datasets exist for the entire globe, for the Sahel they are typically too coarse to adequately characterize variability for hydrologic modeling of the small watersheds associated with these lakes. In addition, climate forcing data at a daily scale are scarce. Lastly, streamflow and other gauged data typically used for calibration and validation of hydrologic models are unavailable. To address these issues, anecdotal data and in-situ observations were combined with remotely sensed data to capture as much spatial and temporal variability as possible in the watershed at the highest resolution, including 30-meter land cover data derived from Landsat imagery to infer soil information in the watershed. In order to produce long-term daily climate forcings, the coarse Climate Research Unit (CRU) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) datasets were downscaled both spatially and temporally. Using Landsat imagery of lake sizes over time in conjunction with fractal descriptions of watershed topography and open water evaporation estimates

  13. Remediation and its effect represented on long term monitoring data at a chlorinated ethenes contaminated site, Wonju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Sun; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2016-04-01

    A research for the contamination of chlorinated ethenes such as trichloroethylene (TCE) at an industrial complex, Wonju, Korea, was carried out based on 17 rounds of groundwater quality data collection from 2009 to 2015. Remediation technologies such as soil vapor extraction, soil flushing, biostimulation, and pump-and-treat have been applied to eliminate the contaminant sources of trichloroethylene (TCE) and to prevent the migration of TCE plume from remediation target zones to groundwater discharge area like a stream. The remediation efficiency according to the remedial actions was evaluated by tracing a time-series of plume evaluation and temporal mass discharge at three transects (Source, Transect-1, Transect-2) which was assigned along the groundwater flow path. Also, based on long term monitoring data, dissolved TCE concentration and mass of residual TCE in the initial stage of disposal were estimated to evaluate the efficiency of in situ remediation. The results of temporal and spatial monitoring before remedial actions showed that a TCE plume originating from main and local source zones continues to be discharged to a stream. However, from the end of intensive remedial actions from 2012 to 2013, the aqueous concentrations of TCE plume present at and around the main source areas decreased significantly. Especially, during the intensive remediation period, the early average mass discharge (26.58 g/day) at source transect was decreased to average 4.99 g/day. Estimated initial dissolved concentration and residual mass of TCE in the initial stage of disposal decreased rapidly after an intensive remedial action in 2013 and it is expected to be continuously decreased from the end of remedial actions to 2020. This study demonstrates that long term monitoring data are useful in assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions at chlorinated ethenes contaminated site. Acknowledgements This project is supported by the Korea Ministry of Environment under "The GAIA

  14. MRI-Monitored Intra-Shunt Local Agent Delivery of Motexafin Gadolinium: Towards Improving Long-Term Patency of TIPS

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yanfeng; Zhang, Tong; Willis, Patrick; Le, Thomas; Soriano, Stephanie; Ray, Erik; Valji, Karim; Zhang, Guixiang; Yang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Background Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has become an important and effective interventional procedure in treatment of the complications related to portal hypertension. Although the primary patency of TIPS has been greatly improved due to the clinical application of cover stent-grafts, the long-term patency is still suboptimal. This study was to investigate the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-monitored intra-shunt local agent delivery of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) into shunt-vein walls of TIPS. This new technique aimed to ultimately inhibit shuntstenosis of TIPS. Methodology Human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were incubated with various concentrations of MGd, and then examed by confocal microscopy and T1-map MRI. In addition, the proliferation of MGd-treated cells was evaluated. For in vivo validation, seventeen pigs underwent TIPS. Before placement of the stent, an MGd/trypan-blue mixture was locally delivered, via a microporous balloon, into eleven shunt-hepatic vein walls under dynamic MRI monitoring, while trypan-blue only was locally delivered into six shunt-hepatic vein walls as serve as controls. T1-weighted MRI of the shunt-vein walls was achieved before- and at different time points after agent injections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the shunt-vein wall at each time-point was measured. Shunts were harvested for subsequent histology confirmation. Principal Findings In vitro studies confirmed the capability of SMCs in uptaking MGds in a concentration-dependent fashion, and demonstrated the suppression of cell proliferation by MGds as well. Dynamic MRI displayed MGd/blue penetration into the shunt-vein walls, showing significantly higher CNR of shunt-vein walls on post-delivery images than on pre-delivery images (49.5±9.4 vs 11.2±1.6, P<0.01), which was confirmed by histology. Conclusion Results of this study indicate that MRI-monitored intra-shunt local MGd delivery is feasible and MGd

  15. Parental Monitoring of Children’s Media Consumption: The Long-term Influences on Body Mass Index in Children

    PubMed Central

    Tiberio, Stacey S.; Kerr, David C. R.; Capaldi, Deborah M.; Pears, Katherine C.; Kim, Hyoun K.; Nowicka, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    monitoring effect on children's BMI z score slopes remained significant once adjusting for children's media time, and sports and recreational activity. Conclusions This study suggests that parental behaviors related to children's media consumption may have long-term impacts on children's BMI in middle childhood. The results underscore the importance of targeting parental media monitoring in efforts to prevent childhood obesity. PMID:24638968

  16. Long-term Monitoring of the TeV Emission from Mrk 421 with the ARGO-YBJ Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Bleve, C.; Bolognino, I.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Calabrese Melcarne, A. K.; Camarri, P.; Cao, Z.; Cappa, A.; Cardarelli, R.; Catalanotti, S.; Cattaneo, C.; Celio, P.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Chen, Y.; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Alí Staiti, G.; Danzengluobu; Dattoli, M.; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T.; Ding, X. H.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Galeazzi, F.; Galeotti, P.; Giroletti, E.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Huang, Q.; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; James, I.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Li, J. Y.; Li, X. X.; Liguori, G.; Liu, C.; Liu, C. Q.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Pagliaro, A.; Panareo, M.; Panico, B.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Qu, X. B.; Rossi, E.; Ruggieri, F.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Stanescu, C.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xu, B.; Xue, L.; Yan, Y. X.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, Jilong; Zhang, Jianli; Zhang, L.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; Zizzi, G.; ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    ARGO-YBJ is an air shower detector array with a fully covered layer of resistive plate chambers. It is operated with a high duty cycle and a large field of view. It continuously monitors the northern sky at energies above 0.3 TeV. In this paper, we report a long-term monitoring of Mrk 421 over the period from 2007 November to 2010 February. This source was observed by the satellite-borne experiments Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and Swift in the X-ray band. Mrk 421 was especially active in the first half of 2008. Many flares are observed in both X-ray and γ-ray bands simultaneously. The γ-ray flux observed by ARGO-YBJ has a clear correlation with the X-ray flux. No lag between the X-ray and γ-ray photons longer than 1 day is found. The evolution of the spectral energy distribution is investigated by measuring spectral indices at four different flux levels. Hardening of the spectra is observed in both X-ray and γ-ray bands. The γ-ray flux increases quadratically with the simultaneously measured X-ray flux. All these observational results strongly favor the synchrotron self-Compton process as the underlying radiative mechanism.

  17. Loch Vale Watershed Long-Term Ecological Research and Monitoring Program: Quality Assurance Report, 2003-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richer, Eric E.; Baron, Jill S.

    2011-01-01

    The Loch Vale watershed project is a long-term research and monitoring program located in Rocky Mountain National Park that addresses watershed-scale ecosystem processes, particularly as they respond to atmospheric deposition and climate variability. Measurements of precipitation depth, precipitation chemistry, discharge, and surface-water quality are made within the watershed and elsewhere in Rocky Mountain National Park. As data collected for the program are used by resource managers, scientists, policy makers, and students, it is important that all data collected in Loch Vale watershed meet high standards of quality. In this report, data quality was evaluated for precipitation, discharge, and surface-water chemistry measurements collected during 2003-09. Equipment upgrades were made at the Loch Vale National Atmospheric Deposition Program monitoring site to improve precipitation measurements and evaluate variability in precipitation depth and chemistry. Additional solar panels and batteries have been installed to improve the power supply, and data completeness, at the NADP site. As a result of equipment malfunction, discharge data for the Loch Outlet were estimated from October 18, 2005, to August 17, 2006. Quality-assurance results indicate that more than 98 percent of all surface-water chemistry measurements were accurate and precise. Records that did not meet quality criteria were removed from the database. Measurements of precipitation depth, precipitation chemistry, discharge, and surface-water quality were all sufficiently complete and consistent to support project data needs.

  18. Long-Term Monitoring of Rainfed Wheat Yield and Soil Water at the Loess Plateau Reveals Low Water Use Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei; Chi, Baoliang; Oenema, Oene

    2013-01-01

    Increasing crop yield and water use efficiency (WUE) in dryland farming requires a quantitative understanding of relationships between crop yield and the water balance over many years. Here, we report on a long-term dryland monitoring site at the Loess Plateau, Shanxi, China, where winter wheat was grown for 30 consecutive years and soil water content (0–200 cm) was measured every 10 days. The monitoring data were used to calibrate the AquaCrop model and then to analyse the components of the water balance. There was a strong positive relationship between total available water and mean cereal yield. However, only one-third of the available water was actually used by the winter wheat for crop transpiration. The remaining two-thirds were lost by soil evaporation, of which 40 and 60% was lost during the growing and fallow seasons, respectively. Wheat yields ranged from 0.6 to 3.9 ton/ha and WUE from 0.3 to 0.9 kg/m3. Results of model experiments suggest that minimizing soil evaporation via straw mulch or plastic film covers could potentially double wheat yields and WUE. We conclude that the relatively low wheat yields and low WUE were mainly related to (i) limited rainfall, (ii) low soil water storage during fallow season due to large soil evaporation, and (iii) poor synchronisation of the wheat growing season to the rain season. The model experiments suggest significant potential for increased yields and WUE. PMID:24302987

  19. Nitrous Oxide Production at a Fully Covered Wastewater Treatment Plant: Results of a Long-Term Online Monitoring Campaign.

    PubMed

    Kosonen, Heta; Heinonen, Mari; Mikola, Anna; Haimi, Henri; Mulas, Michela; Corona, Francesco; Vahala, Riku

    2016-06-01

    The nitrous oxide emissions of the Viikinmäki wastewater treatment plant were measured in a 12 month online monitoring campaign. The measurements, which were conducted with a continuous gas analyzer, covered all of the unit operations of the advanced wastewater-treatment process. The relation between the nitrous oxide emissions and certain process parameters, such as the wastewater temperature, influent biological oxygen demand, and ammonium nitrogen load, was investigated by applying online data obtained from the process-control system at 1 min intervals. Although seasonal variations in the measured nitrous oxide emissions were remarkable, the measurement data indicated no clear relationship between these emissions and seasonal changes in the wastewater temperature. The diurnal variations of the nitrous oxide emissions did, however, strongly correlate with the alternation of the influent biological oxygen demand and ammonium nitrogen load to the aerated zones of the activated sludge process. Overall, the annual nitrous oxide emissions of 168 g/PE/year and the emission factor of 1.9% of the influent nitrogen load are in the high range of values reported in the literature but in very good agreement with the results of other long-term online monitoring campaigns implemented at full-scale wastewater-treatment plants. PMID:27218458

  20. Long-term monitoring of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) at the Norwegian Troll station in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenborn, R.; Breivik, K.; Eckhardt, S.; Lunder, C. R.; Manø, S.; Schlabach, M.; Stohl, A.

    2013-03-01

    A first long-term monitoring of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Antarctic air has been conducted at the Norwegian Research station Troll (Dronning Maud Land). As target contaminants 32 PCB congeners, a- and g-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), trans- and cis-chlordane, trans- and cis-nonachlor, p,p'- and o,p-DDT, DDD, DDE as well as hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were selected. The monitoring program with weekly samples taken during the period 2007-2010 was coordinated with the parallel program at the Norwegian Arctic monitoring site (Zeppelin mountain, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard) in terms of priority compounds, sampling schedule as well as analytical methods. The POP concentration levels found in Antarctica were considerably lower than Arctic atmospheric background concentrations. Similar as observed for Arctic samples, HCB is the predominant POP compound with levels of around 22 pg m-3 throughout the entire monitoring period. In general, the following concentration distribution was found for the Troll samples analyzed: HCB > Sum HCH > Sum PCB > Sum DDT > Sum chlordanes. Atmospheric long-range transport was identified as a major contamination source for POPs in Antarctic environments. Several long-range transport events with elevated levels of pesticides and/or compounds with industrial sources were identified based on retroplume calculations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART). The POP levels determined in Troll air were compared with 1 concentrations found in earlier measurement campaigns at other Antarctic research stations from the past 18 yr. Except for HCB for which similar concentration distributions were observed in all sampling campaigns, concentrations in the recent Troll samples were lower than in samples collected during the early 1990s. These concentration reductions are obviously a direct consequence of international regulations restricting the usage of POP-like chemicals on a worldwide scale.

  1. Long term ocean bottom pressure monitoring in the Logatchev Hydrothermal Field - indications for tremor, earthquakes, uplift and subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, H.-H.; Villinger, H.

    2009-04-01

    The mid oceanic spreading axes are centers of recent ore generation, accommodate little known chemotropic biological communities, 90 per cent of the global volcanism and contribute 25 per cent of the heat released from the earth. But little is known about these systems because their location in the depth of the oceans and much less about their changes in time. Target of a joint multidisciplinary approach to learn more about the temporal variations of a hydrothermal field has been the Logatchev Hydrothermal Field (LHF) at the Mid Atlantic Ridge in the framework of the SPP1144 of the German Research Foundation. It was chosen because of its high representativity with its moderate spreading rate, the mixture of basaltic and mantle rocks in the subsurface and its pronounced bathymetric relief. In the Logatchev Hydrothermal Field (LHF) hydrothermal activity is observed at several distinct sites. Focussed high-temperature outlets at black smokers were found as well as diffuse warm water outflow. Four locations in the LHF were equipped with instruments, to monitor physical parameters for about one year. At "OBP-site" an ocean-bottom-pressure-meter (OBP) and an ocean-bottom-tilt-meter (OBT) were installed, monitoring water pressure, temperature as well as the sea floor inclination. At "Mooring-site" a sensor chain scanned the temperatures of the bottom water every 6 minutes in 1 m intervals, from the sea floor to 25 m vertically above. The adjoining mussel fields Quest and Irina2 were instrumented with 12 temperature loggers each, registering the temperatures. In this poster data of the long term ocean bottom pressure monitoring are presented and discussed in context with temperature data regarding their meaning for tectonic processes. Earthquakes and very low frequency tremor activity are recognized. Temperature monitoring and CTD measurements help to separate sea floor uplift and subsidence from oceanographic signals.

  2. Inertial sensing algorithms for long-term foot angle monitoring for assessment of idiopathic toe-walking.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Eric; Le, Jonathan; Sukhdeep, Dulai; Watt, Joe; Andersen, John; Lou, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    When children walk on their toes for no known reason, the condition is called Idiopathic Toe Walking (ITW). Assessing the true severity of ITW can be difficult because children can alter their gait while under observation in clinic. The ability to monitor the foot angle during daily life outside of clinic may improve the assessment of ITW. A foot-worn, battery-powered inertial sensing device has been designed to monitor patients' foot angle during daily activities. The monitor includes a 3-axis accelerometer, 2-axis gyroscope, and a low-power microcontroller. The device is necessarily small, with limited battery capacity and processing power. Therefore a high-accuracy but low-complexity inertial sensing algorithm is needed. This paper compares several low-complexity algorithms' aptitude for foot-angle measurement: accelerometer-only measurement, finite impulse response (FIR) and infinite impulse response (IIR) complementary filtering, and a new dynamic predict-correct style algorithm developed using fuzzy c-means clustering. A total of 11 subjects each walked 20 m with the inertial sensing device fixed to one foot; 10 m with normal gait and 10 m simulating toe walking. A cross-validation scheme was used to obtain a low-bias estimate of each algorithm's angle measurement accuracy. The new predict-correct algorithm achieved the lowest angle measurement error: <5° mean error during normal and toe walking. The IIR complementary filtering algorithm achieved almost-as good accuracy with less computational complexity. These two algorithms seem to have good aptitude for the foot-angle measurement problem, and would be good candidates for use in a long-term monitoring device for toe-walking assessment. PMID:24050952

  3. Long term global scale root zone soil moisture monitoring at ECMWF using a surface-only land data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albergel, Clement; de Rosnay, Patricia; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Dutra, Emanuel; Kral, Tomas; Munoz-Sabater, Joaquin; Isaksen, Lars; Boussetta, Souhail; Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the H-SAF (Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management) project of EUMETSAT, ECMWF is developing a re-analysis of soil moisture that will cover 1992-2014 and will make use of satellite derived surface soil moisture (SSM) from ERS-1&2, ASCAT. This study presents the first steps toward the conception of this long term global scale root zone soil moisture; a surface-only Land Data Assimilation System (so-LDAS) able to ingest satellite-derived SSM observations is tested at global scale to increase prediction accuracy for surface and root zone soil moisture. The so-LDAS is defined as an offline sequential data assimilation system (simplified Extended Kalman Filter) based on a Land Surface Model (HTESSEL) uncoupled with the atmosphere, it is driven by ERA-Interim observations based atmospheric forcing. Its impact is assessed over 2010-2013 (1) using local in situ measurements of surface and root zone soil moisture and (2) at a basin scale initialising an event based Rainfall-Runoff hydrological model. Additionally to an open loop experiment (OL no analysis) three data assimilation experiments are used with different specification of the error matrices. The first one (Asc1) has been set up to test the so-LDAS with a soil moisture standard deviation of σb=0.01 m3m-3 for the first three layers of soil analysed and σo=0.02 m3m-3 for ASCAT SSM. σb was then doubled (Asc2) and σo set to 0.05 m3m-3 to be more consistent with satellite derived SSM errors deduced from previous independent studies. In a third experiment (Asc3), σo is set to 0.05 m3m-3, σb, is set to 0.1 × (wfc - wwilt), where wfc and wwilt are the volumetric water content at field capacity and at permanent wilting point, which depend on soil texture.

  4. Long-term effects of climate change on the hydrological system of a lowland area at the German North Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeff, Thomas; Baroni, Gabriele; Krause, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Coastal areas are highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. In particular for the winter season, global sea level rise is expected to be combined with increased precipitation and higher storm surge frequency. During summer, due to the increase of temperature, enhanced evapotranspiration with an increase of groundwater intrusion has been observed. It is expected that the salinization of the surface will rise under drier conditions by upward seeping groundwater. Coastal water resource management requires a better understanding and predictions of these dynamic systems. Therefore, a long-term monitoring programme has been established at the German North Sea coast, located at the estuary of the River Ems. The research area is dominated by a dense canal system that is regulated by pumping stations and tidal gates. Landuse of the area is mainly dairy farming with 30 % of the area below sea level. The underlying aquifer is confined and brackish, and it is connected to the surface water by geological faults of old paleo-channels. Observations in those areas indicate a high salinity with concentrations peaking during the summer period. This study investigates the effects of climate change on water balance and salt transport by applying regional climate models (RCMs) based on the IPCC emission scenarios for the period until 2100 as drivers for a hydrological and solute transport model. To investigate the impact of different meteorological scenarios, the RCM results for the climate scenarios A1B, A2 and B1 are used to cover an increase of future temperature between 1 and 3.5 K. As changes in water level and salinity are expected to influence vegetation patterns (and water management aims to guaranty agricultural use) two alternative landuse scenarios are considered. The first scenario assumes that the technological level of the management will be adapted to rainfall and sea level but without additional drainage from the hinterland to reduce salt water concentration

  5. Long-term monitoring at multiple trophic levels suggests heterogeneity in responses to climate change in the Canadian Arctic tundra

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Gilles; Bêty, Joël; Cadieux, Marie-Christine; Legagneux, Pierre; Doiron, Madeleine; Chevallier, Clément; Lai, Sandra; Tarroux, Arnaud; Berteaux, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Arctic wildlife is often presented as being highly at risk in the face of current climate warming. We use the long-term (up to 24 years) monitoring records available on Bylot Island in the Canadian Arctic to examine temporal trends in population attributes of several terrestrial vertebrates and in primary production. Despite a warming trend (e.g. cumulative annual thawing degree-days increased by 37% and snow-melt date advanced by 4–7 days over a 23-year period), we found little evidence for changes in the phenology, abundance or productivity of several vertebrate species (snow goose, foxes, lemmings, avian predators and one passerine). Only primary production showed a response to warming (annual above-ground biomass of wetland graminoids increased by 123% during this period). We nonetheless found evidence for potential mismatches between herbivores and their food plants in response to warming as snow geese adjusted their laying date by only 3.8 days on average for a change in snow-melt of 10 days, half of the corresponding adjustment shown by the timing of plant growth (7.1 days). We discuss several reasons (duration of time series, large annual variability, amplitude of observed climate change, nonlinear dynamic or constraints imposed by various rate of warming with latitude in migrants) to explain the lack of response by herbivores and predators to climate warming at our study site. We also show how length and intensity of monitoring could affect our ability to detect temporal trends and provide recommendations for future monitoring. PMID:23836788

  6. Sensitivity of Decomposition Rates and Long-term Carbon Sequestration to Modeled Disturbance Scenarios: Implications for National Monitoring Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, K. P.; Harden, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    Soil systems are central to carbon, water, and nutrient cycles and play a key role in regulating CO{2} exchange in terrestrial systems. While recent advances have been made for measuring plant production, the mechanisms that control the loss of carbon from land are masked by difficulties in detecting and scaling belowground processes. National and international reporting requirements have placed increased emphasis on the development of spatially explicit soil carbon inventories based on monitoring changes in major soil reservoirs. Although this inventory approach provides critical baseline information, the ecological significance of this soil carbon ultimately depends upon the level of chemical and physical protection, the response of the soil system to disturbance, and the temporal and spatial scales of interest. In this paper, we model the sensitivity of carbon storage estimates to differing assumptions of decomposition and disturbance response using data from the USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program. The FIA soil indicator program represents the only nationally consistent source of forest soil monitoring data in the United States and forms the basis for national reporting on the Montreal Process Criteria and Indicators of Sustainable Management. A mass-balance model of long term soil carbon dynamics is used to address the following questions: (1) how sensitive are soil carbon inventories to current assumptions of inputs, turnover, and disturbance response; (2) which soil processes have the greatest influence on C storage over the time scales relevant to land use policies and how can we best monitor these processes; (3) what are the critical data gaps limiting the use of inventory data in regional and global carbon models.

  7. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rio Blanco site for the LTHMP on May 16 and 17, 2011. The samples were shipped to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed, with the exception of the determination of tritium concentration by the enrichment method, because the laboratory no longer provides that service. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and tritium using the conventional method. Starting in 2012, DOE will retain a different laboratory that provides the enriched tritium analysis service.

  8. A Multi-Institutional Big Data Collaboration to Estimate Long Term Terrestrial Net Carbon Uptake from Remote Sensing and Hydrological Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halem, M.; Dorband, J.; Rao, R.; Lomonaco, S.; Chapman, D. R.; LeMoigne, J.; Nearing, G. S.; Pelissier, C. S.; Simpson, D. G.; Clune, T.

    2014-12-01

    Recent aircraft measurements from scattered records have shown long-term, global, seasonal photosynthetic CO2 uptake over land accelerating over the past 50 years. The successful launch of the sun-synchronous Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) on July 2, 2014 is expected to provide global, high spatial and spectral resolution datasets of vertical CO2 concentrations with surface spectral resolutions capable of yielding accurate CO2 flux profiles. It is unclear whether the biosphere will continue to act as a sink for anthropogenic CO2 loading of the atmosphere. Since current climate models with detailed terrestrial ecosystems are unable to simulate the observed increase in net ecosystem production (NEP), we will conduct assimilation studies with the derived CO2 fluxes in the GSFC Land Information System hydrological model to validate the generated NEP uptake. Further, we plan to use the OCO-2 CO2 concentrations to train a neural network to enable the calculation of long term trends from a decade of AIRS CO2 concentration data to produce regional NEP. To address this important Big Data science issue, a multi-institutional collaboration was formed to leverage their combined resources and the expertise of the researchers at the NASA GSFC, the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory and UMBC. We will employ a high speed 10Gb network to connect the collaborating researchers and provide them with remote access to dedicated computational hybrid multicore resources at UMBC, as well as access to an archive containing more than a decade of readily accessible continuous daily gridded AIRS data and ten years of daily MODIS data for each September. The status of the following research efforts is planned to be presented; (i) acquisition and processing of the expected CO2 profile data from OCO-2 for two test sites, a low latitude region over the Amazon and a Boral forest at high latitude, (ii) initial impact of 3-D data assimilation of CO2 fluxes with the advanced Goddard LIS

  9. Monitoring of Bright Giant Variables requested in support of ground-based spectroscopy and for long-term study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, Travis; Price, Aaron; Templeton, Matthew R.

    2011-05-01

    Dr. Steve Howell (NASA) and Dr. Travis Rector (University of Alaska, Anchorage) have requested AAVSO observations of several bright giant variable stars of diverse classes in support of spectroscopic observations to be made at Kitt Peak National Observatory between 2011 May 30 and 2011 June 01. Long-term monitoring of these objects is also encouraged. The goal of the project is to determine if the surface temperatures and radii of these stars change in a recognizable pattern over long timescales. Priority targets are Z UMa, R CrB, SX Her, TT Oph, TX Oph, AC Her, and R Sct. Additional targets are R Vir, Y CVn, g Her, UU Her, UZ Oph, V453 Oph, XX Oph, TZ Oph, V564 Oph, T Lyr, AD Aql, AR Sgr, V5569 Sgr, EP Lyr, and EU Del. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  10. Digital holographic microscopy long-term and real-time monitoring of cell division and changes under simulated zero gravity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Liu, Shuo; Wang, Zhe; Shang, Peng; Xiao, Wen

    2012-05-01

    The long-term and real-time monitoring the cell division and changes of osteoblasts under simulated zero gravity condition were succeed by combing a digital holographic microscopy (DHM) with a superconducting magnet (SM). The SM could generate different magnetic force fields in a cylindrical cavity, where the gravitational force of biological samples could be canceled at a special gravity position by a high magnetic force. Therefore the specimens were levitated and in a simulated zero gravity environment. The DHM was modified to fit with SM by using single mode optical fibers and a vertically-configured jig designed to hold specimens and integrate optical device in the magnet's bore. The results presented the first-phase images of living cells undergoing dynamic divisions and changes under simulated zero gravity environment for a period of 10 hours. The experiments demonstrated that the SM-compatible DHM setup could provide a highly efficient and versatile method for research on the effects of microgravity on biological samples. PMID:22565769

  11. Long-term monitoring of sleep apnea at home in heart failure patients: preliminary results from the HHH study.

    PubMed

    Pinna, G D; Maestri, R; Gobbi, E; Capomolla, S; Campana, C; Emdin, M; Di Lenarda, A; La Rovere, M T; Andrews, D; Johnson, P; Mortara, A; Sleight, P

    2004-01-01

    Sleep apnea is very common in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and has important implications in terms of morbidity, mortality and clinical management. Home respiratory telemonitoring might constitute a potential low-cost, widely-applicable alternative to traditional polysomnography in the evaluation and long-term monitoring of breathing disorders in these patients. In this paper we briefly describe the technological infrastructure and present preliminary results of the European Community multicountry trial HHH (Home or Hospital in Heart Failure), which is currently testing a novel system for home telemonitoring of cardiorespiratory signals in CHF patients. The recording and transmitting devices are suitable to be self-managed by the patient. We give a detailed report on the prevalence of nocturnal respiratory disorders at the beginning of the one-year follow-up and on their persistency over the following recordings (one per month). These preliminary findings clearly indicate that intermittent home telemonitoring of respiratory signals based on patient's self-management is feasible in CHF patients and the compliance is high. Reported statistics unambiguously confirm the high prevalence of nocturnal breathing disorders in these patients and clearly show that this phenomenon tends to persist over time. PMID:17271142

  12. Survey of the terrestrial habitats and vegetation of Shetland, 1974 - a framework for long-term ecological monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Claire M.; Bunce, Robert G. H.

    2016-02-01

    A survey of the natural environment was undertaken in Shetland in 1974, after concern was expressed that large-scale development from the new oil industry could threaten the natural features of the islands. A framework was constructed by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology on which to select samples for the survey. The vegetation and habitat data that were collected, along with the sampling framework, have recently been made public via the following doi:10.5285/06fc0b8c-cc4a-4ea8-b4be-f8bd7ee25342 (Terrestrial habitat, vegetation and soil data from Shetland, 1974) and doi:10.5285/f1b3179e-b446-473d-a5fb-4166668da146 (Land Classification of Shetland 1974). In addition to providing valuable information about the state of the natural environment of Shetland, the repeatable and statistically robust methods developed in the survey were used to underpin the Countryside Survey, Great Britain's national long-term integrated environmental monitoring programme. The demonstration of the effectiveness of the methodology indicates that a repeat of the Shetland survey would yield statistics about ecological changes in the islands, such as those arising from the impacts of the oil industry, a range of socio-economic impacts, and perhaps climate change. Currently no such figures are available, although there is much information on the sociological impacts, as well as changes in agriculture.

  13. A Long-Term and Reproducible Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Data Record for Climate Studies and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 km × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere polar regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The data set, along with detailed data processing steps and error source information, can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  14. Long term monitoring of the optical background in the Capo Passero deep-sea site with the NEMO tower prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Aiello, S.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ardid, M.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F. C. T.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Biagioni, A.; Bouhadef, B.; Bozza, C.; Cacopardo, G.; Calamai, M.; Calì, C.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caruso, F.; Ceres, A.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Luca, V.; Deniskina, N.; De Rosa, G.; di Capua, F.; Distefano, C.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fermani, P.; Ferrara, G.; Flaminio, V.; Fusco, L. A.; Garufi, F.; Giordano, V.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Hugon, C.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leismüller, K. P.; Leonora, E.; Litrico, P.; Llorens Alvarez, C. D.; Lonardo, A.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, E.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C. M.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Orzelli, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pugliatti, C.; Pulvirenti, S.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Real, D.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Saldaña, M.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Sciacca, V.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Sipala, V.; Speziale, F.; Spitaleri, A.; Spurio, M.; Stellacci, S. M.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Ventura, C.; Vicini, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.

    2016-02-01

    The NEMO Phase-2 tower is the first detector which was operated underwater for more than 1 year at the "record" depth of 3500 m. It was designed and built within the framework of the NEMO (NEutrino Mediterranean Observatory) project. The 380 m high tower was successfully installed in March 2013 80 km offshore Capo Passero (Italy). This is the first prototype operated on the site where the Italian node of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope will be built. The installation and operation of the NEMO Phase-2 tower has proven the functionality of the infrastructure and the operability at 3500 m depth. A more than 1 year long monitoring of the deep water characteristics of the site has been also provided. In this paper the infrastructure and the tower structure and instrumentation are described. The results of long term optical background measurements are presented. The rates show stable and low baseline values, compatible with the contribution of ^{40}K light emission, with a small percentage of light bursts due to bioluminescence. All these features confirm the stability and good optical properties of the site.

  15. Cloud2IR: Infrared thermography and environmental sensors integrated in an autonomoussystem for long term monitoring of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crinière, Antoine; Dumoulin, Jean; Mevel, Laurent; Andrade-Barroso, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    Since late 2014, the project Cloud2SM aims to develop a robust information system able to assess the long term monitoring of civil engineering structures as well as interfacing various sensors and data. Cloud2SM address three main goals, the management of distributed data and sensors network, the asynchronous processing of the data through network and the local management of the sensors themselves [1]. Integrated to this project Cloud2IR is an autonomous sensor system dedicated to the long term monitoring of infrastructures. Past experimentations have shown the need as well as usefulness of such system [2]. Before Cloud2IR an initially laboratory oriented system was used, which implied heavy operating system to be used [3]. Based on such system Cloud2IR has benefited of the experimental knowledge acquired to redefine a lighter architecture based on generics standards, more appropriated to autonomous operations on field and which can be later included in a wide distributed architecture such as Cloud2SM. The sensor system can be divided in two parts. The sensor side, this part is mainly composed by the various sensors drivers themselves as the infrared camera, the weather station or the pyranometers and their different fixed configurations. In our case, as infrared camera are slightly different than other kind of sensors, the system implement in addition an RTSP server which can be used to set up the FOV as well as other measurement parameter considerations. The second part can be seen as the data side, which is common to all sensors. It instantiate through a generic interface all the sensors and control the data access loop (not the requesting). This side of the system is weakly coupled (see data coupling) with the sensor side. It can be seen as a general framework able to aggregate any sensor data, type or size and automatically encapsulate them in various generic data format as HDF5 or cloud data as OGC SWE standard. This whole part is also responsible of the

  16. Short and Long-Term Effect of Carotid Artery Stenting on Arterial Blood Pressure Measured through Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Köklü, Erkan; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Arslan, Şakir; Bayar, Nermin; Köklü, Fatma; Çay, Serkan; Çağırcı, Göksel; Küçükseymen, Selçuk; Kuş, Görkem

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the short and long-term effects of carotid artery stenting (CAS) procedure on blood pressure (BP) through ambulatory BP monitoring. Methods One hundred fifty three patients who underwent CAS for primary or secondary protection from December 2010 to September 2013 were enrolled to our study. The BP levels of total of 123 patients were monitored for 1 year. Thereafter, the pre-procedure levels of BP were compared with BP levels at the 24-hour and the first year intervals after the procedure. Results Systolic and diastolic BP levels at the 24-hour and the first year intervals after CAS were significantly lower than the pre-procedure BP levels. The mean 24-hour systolic BP was 113 ± 13 mmHg and diastolic BP was 63 ± 8 mmHg, both of which were significantly lower (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively), while the pre-procedure mean systolic BP was 133 ± 10 mmHg and the mean diastolic BP was 75 ± 9 mmHg. Moreover, the mean first-year systolic BP was 125 ± 10 mmHg with a decline of 8 ± 8 mmHg and mean diastolic BP was 71 ± 8 mmHg with a decline of 4 ± 7 mmHg, both of which were again significantly lower compared to the pre-procedure levels (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions The results of our study suggested that systolic and diastolic BP levels diminished after CAS. Additionally, BP reduction continued even 1 year after the CAS. PMID:27274176

  17. Multi-objective optimization of long-term groundwater monitoring network design using a probabilistic Pareto genetic algorithm under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qiankun; Wu, Jianfeng; Yang, Yun; Qian, Jiazhong; Wu, Jichun

    2016-03-01

    Optimal design of long term groundwater monitoring (LTGM) network often involves conflicting objectives and substantial uncertainty arising from insufficient hydraulic conductivity (K) data. This study develops a new multi-objective simulation-optimization model involving four objectives: minimizations of (i) the total sampling costs for monitoring contaminant plume, (ii) mass estimation error, (iii) the first moment estimation error, and (iv) the second moment estimation error of the contaminant plume, for LTGM network design problems. Then a new probabilistic Pareto genetic algorithm (PPGA) coupled with the commonly used flow and transport codes, MODFLOW and MT3DMS, is developed to search for the Pareto-optimal solutions to the multi-objective LTGM problems under uncertainty of the K-fields. The PPGA integrates the niched Pareto genetic algorithm with probabilistic Pareto sorting scheme to deal with the uncertainty of objectives caused by the uncertain K-field. Also, the elitist selection strategy, the operation library and the Pareto solution set filter are conducted to improve the diversity and reliability of Pareto-optimal solutions by the PPGA. Furthermore, the sampling strategy of noisy genetic algorithm is adopted to cope with the uncertainty of the K-fields and improve the computational efficiency of the PPGA. In particular, Monte Carlo (MC) analysis is employed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology in finding Pareto-optimal sampling network designs of LTGM systems through a two-dimensional hypothetical example and a three-dimensional field application in Indiana (USA). Comprehensive analysis demonstrates that the proposed PPGA can find Pareto optimal solutions with low variability and high reliability and is a promising tool for optimizing multi-objective LTGM network designs under uncertainty.

  18. Loading of red blood cells with an analyte-sensitive dye for development of a long-term monitoring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Sarah C.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2012-03-01

    Measurement of blood analytes, such as pH and glucose, provide crucial information about a patient's health. Some such analytes, such as glucose in the case of diabetes, require long-term or near-continuous monitoring for proper disease management. However, current monitoring techniques are far from ideal: multiple-per-day finger stick tests are inconvenient and painful for the patient; implantable sensors have short functional life spans (i.e., 3-7 days). Red blood cells serve as an attractive alternative for carriers of analyte sensors. Once reintroduced to the blood stream, these carriers may continue to live for the remainder of their life span (120 days for humans). They are also biodegradable and biocompatible, thereby eliminating the immune system response common for many implanted devices. The proposed carrier system takes advantage of the ability of the red blood cells to swell in response to a decrease in the osmolarity of the extracellular solution. Just before the membranes lyse, they develop small pores on the scale of tens of nanometers. Analyte-sensitive dyes in the extracellular solution may then diffuse into the perforated red blood cells and become entrapped upon restoration of physiological temperature and osmolarity. Because the membranes contain various analyte transporters, intracellular analyte levels rapidly equilibrate to those of the extracellular solution. A fluorescent dye has been loaded inside of red blood cells using a preswelling technique. Alterations in preparation parameters have been shown to affect characteristics of the resulting dye-loaded red blood cells (e.g., intensity of fluorescence).

  19. Passive Acoustic Monitoring of the Temporal Variability of Odontocete Tonal Sounds from a Long-Term Marine Observatory

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Hao; Yu, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Chi-Fang; Chou, Lien-Siang

    2015-01-01

    The developments of marine observatories and automatic sound detection algorithms have facilitated the long-term monitoring of multiple species of odontocetes. Although classification remains difficult, information on tonal sound in odontocetes (i.e., toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises) can provide insights into the species composition and group behavior of these species. However, the approach to measure whistle contour parameters for detecting the variability of odontocete vocal behavior may be biased when the signal-to-noise ratio is low. Thus, methods for analyzing the whistle usage of an entire group are necessary. In this study, a local-max detector was used to detect burst pulses and representative frequencies of whistles within 4.5–48 kHz. Whistle contours were extracted and classified using an unsupervised method. Whistle characteristics and usage pattern were quantified based on the distribution of representative frequencies and the composition of whistle repertoires. Based on the one year recordings collected from the Marine Cable Hosted Observatory off northeastern Taiwan, odontocete burst pulses and whistles were primarily detected during the nighttime, especially after sunset. Whistle usage during the nighttime was more complex, and whistles with higher frequency were mainly detected during summer and fall. According to the multivariate analysis, the diurnal variation of whistle usage was primarily related to the change of mode frequency, diversity of representative frequency, and sequence complexity. The seasonal variation of whistle usage involved the previous three parameters, in addition to the diversity of whistle clusters. Our results indicated that the species and behavioral composition of the local odontocete community may vary among seasonal and diurnal cycles. The current monitoring platform facilitates the evaluation of whistle usage based on group behavior and provides feature vectors for species and behavioral

  20. Long-term sequential monitoring of controlled graves representing common burial scenarios with ground penetrating radar: Years 2 and 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, John J.; Walter, Brittany S.; Healy, Carrie

    2016-09-01

    Geophysical techniques such as ground-penetrating radar (GPR) have been successfully used for forensic searches to locate clandestine graves and physical evidence. However, additional controlled research is needed to fully understand the applicability of this technology when searching for clandestine graves in various environments, soil types, and for longer periods of time post-burial. The purpose of this study was to determine the applicability of GPR for detecting controlled graves in a Spodosol representing multiple burial scenarios for Years 2 and 3 of a three-year monitoring period. Objectives included determining how different burial scenarios are factors in producing a distinctive anomalous response; determining how different GPR imagery options (2D reflection profiles and horizontal time slices) can provide increased visibility of the burials; and comparing GPR imagery between 500 MHz and 250 MHz dominant frequency antennae. The research site contained a grid with eight graves representing common forensic burial scenarios in a Spodosol, a common soil type of Florida, with six graves containing a pig carcass (Sus scrofa). Burial scenarios with grave items (a deep grave with a layer of rocks over the carcass and a carcass wrapped in a tarpaulin) produced a more distinctive response with clearer target reflections over the duration of the monitoring period compared to naked carcasses. Months with increased precipitation were also found to produce clearer target reflections than drier months, particularly during Year 3 when many grave scenarios that were not previously visible became visible after increased seasonal rainfall. Overall, the 250 MHz dominant frequency antenna imagery was more favorable than the 500 MHz. While detection of a simulated grave may be difficult to detect over time, long term detection of a grave in a Spodosol may be possible if the disturbed spodic horizon is detected. Furthermore, while grave visibility increased with the 2D

  1. Size Distribution of Sperm Whales Acoustically Identified during Long Term Deep-Sea Monitoring in the Ionian Sea.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Francesco; Sciacca, Virginia; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Larosa, Giuseppina; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Pavan, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) emits a typical short acoustic signal, defined as a "click", almost continuously while diving. It is produced in different time patterns to acoustically explore the environment and communicate with conspecifics. Each emitted click has a multi-pulse structure, resulting from the production of the sound within the sperm whale's head. A Stable Inter Pulse Interval (Stable IPI) can be identified among the pulses that compose a single click. Applying specific algorithms, the measurement of this interval provides useful information to assess the total length of the animal recorded. In January 2005, a cabled hydrophone array was deployed at a depth of 2,100 m in the Central Mediterranean Sea, 25 km offshore Catania (Ionian Sea). The acoustic antenna, named OνDE (Ocean noise Detection Experiment), was in operation until November 2006. OνDE provided real time acoustic data used to perform Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) of cetacean sound emissions. In this work, an innovative approach was applied to automatically measure the Stable IPI of the clicks, performing a cepstrum analysis to the energy (square amplitude) of the signals. About 2,100 five-minute recordings were processed to study the size distribution of the sperm whales detected during the OνDE long term deep-sea acoustic monitoring. Stable IPIs were measured in the range between 2.1 ms and 6.4 ms. The equations of Gordon (1991) and of Growcott (2011) were used to convert the IPIs into measures of size. The results revealed that the sperm whales recorded were distributed in length from about 7.5 m to 14 m. The size category most represented was from 9 m to 12 m (adult females or juvenile males) and specimens longer than 14 m (old males) seemed to be absent. PMID:26675588

  2. Size Distribution of Sperm Whales Acoustically Identified during Long Term Deep-Sea Monitoring in the Ionian Sea

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Francesco; Sciacca, Virginia; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Larosa, Giuseppina; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Pavan, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) emits a typical short acoustic signal, defined as a “click”, almost continuously while diving. It is produced in different time patterns to acoustically explore the environment and communicate with conspecifics. Each emitted click has a multi-pulse structure, resulting from the production of the sound within the sperm whale’s head. A Stable Inter Pulse Interval (Stable IPI) can be identified among the pulses that compose a single click. Applying specific algorithms, the measurement of this interval provides useful information to assess the total length of the animal recorded. In January 2005, a cabled hydrophone array was deployed at a depth of 2,100 m in the Central Mediterranean Sea, 25 km offshore Catania (Ionian Sea). The acoustic antenna, named OνDE (Ocean noise Detection Experiment), was in operation until November 2006. OνDE provided real time acoustic data used to perform Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) of cetacean sound emissions. In this work, an innovative approach was applied to automatically measure the Stable IPI of the clicks, performing a cepstrum analysis to the energy (square amplitude) of the signals. About 2,100 five-minute recordings were processed to study the size distribution of the sperm whales detected during the OνDE long term deep-sea acoustic monitoring. Stable IPIs were measured in the range between 2.1 ms and 6.4 ms. The equations of Gordon (1991) and of Growcott (2011) were used to convert the IPIs into measures of size. The results revealed that the sperm whales recorded were distributed in length from about 7.5 m to 14 m. The size category most represented was from 9 m to 12 m (adult females or juvenile males) and specimens longer than 14 m (old males) seemed to be absent. PMID:26675588

  3. CUMAS: a seafloor multi-sensor module for volcanic hazard monitoring - First long-term experiment and performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannaccone, G.; Guardato, S.; Vassallo, M.; Stabile, T. A.; Elia, L.; Beranzoli, L.

    2009-12-01

    providing continuous geophysical data to the Monitoring Center of the Campi Flegrei volcanic areas, managed by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. The long-term operational performance of CUMAS is presented here, together with the first results from the analysis of the geophysical long time-series acquired. Examples of the acquired signals, especially geophysical data, will be presented to point out the high quality in term of signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, earthquake recordings obtained from the hydrophone resulted of comparable quality to the seismic data acquired on land by the permanent network, thus demonstrating the suitability of hydrophones to monitor the seismic activity of the caldera.

  4. Pilot evaluation of an integrated monitor-adhesive patch for long-term cardiac arrhythmia detection in India.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Maneesh; Padte, Sanjay; Arora, Vanita; Biffi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Electrocardiographic monitoring represents one of the most reliable and time-tested methods for reducing ambiguity in cardiac arrhythmia diagnosis. In India, the resting ECG is generally the first tool of choice for in-clinic diagnosis. The external loop recorder (ELR) is another useful tool that compounds the advantages of traditional tools by coupling ambulatory monitoring with a long-term window. Thus, the objective was to test the use of a 7-day ELR for arrhythmia diagnosis in India for a broad range of presenting symptoms. In this study set in the Indian healthcare environment, an auto-triggered, wireless patch-type ELR was used with 125 patients (62.5 ± 16.7 years, 76 males) presenting a broad range of symptoms. Eighty percent of the symptoms were related to syncope, presyncope or palpitations. Patients were administered an ELR for 7-28 days depending on the physician's prescription. Prespecified significant arrhythmias included sinus pause >2 s, symptomatic bradycardia <40 b.p.m., second-degree (and higher) AV block, complete heart block, ventricular fibrillation, sustained/nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (>3 beats), atrial fibrillation (chronic or paroxysmal), atrial flutter and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) >130 b.p.m. Diagnostic yield was 38% when a stringent tabulation methodology considering only clinically significant arrhythmia was used. When first-degree AV block, premature atrial and ventricular beats, couplets (both atrial and ventricular in origin), bigeminy or trigeminy, or sudden changes in rate (noted as sinus arrhythmia) were included in the calculation, diagnostic yield was 80%. Patient compliance was 98%; patients wore the patch for the entire prescribed monitoring period without disruption. Seventy percent of the reported symptoms corresponded with an arrhythmia. Use of the ELR led to therapy change in 24% of patients: 15 patients went on to receive an implantable cardioverter defibrillator or pacemaker, 4 received ablation

  5. NanTroSEIZE observatories: Installation of a long-term borehole monitoring systems offshore the Kii Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Davis, E. E.; Araki, E.; Kinoshita, M.; Lauer, R. M.; Wheat, C. G.; Kitada, K.; Kimura, T.; Toczko, S.; Eguchi, N. O.; Science Parties, E.

    2010-12-01

    The IODP Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) is a multi-expedition drilling program designed to investigate fault mechanics, fault slip behavior, and strain accumulation along subduction megathrusts, through coring, logging, and long-term monitoring experiments. One key objective is the development and installation of a borehole observatory network extending from locations above the outer, presumably aseismic accretionary wedge to the seismogenic and interseismically locked plate interface, to record seismicity and slip transients, monitor strain accumulation, document hydraulic transients associated with deformation events, and quantify in situ pore fluid pressure and temperature. As part of recent NanTroSEIZE operations, borehole instruments have been developed for deployment at two sites: (1) Site C0010, which penetrates a major out-of-sequence thrust fault termed the “megasplay” at ca. 400 mbsf, and (2) Site C0002 in the Kumano forearc basin at a location that overlies both the updip edge of the inferred interseismically locked portion of the plate interface, and clusters of very low frequency thrust and reverse earthquakes located within the accretionary prism and potentially on the megasplay fault. In 2009, Site C0010 was drilled and cased with screens to access the megasplay fault, and a simple pore pressure and temperature monitoring system (a ”smartplug”) was installed. The simple observatory unit includes pressure and temperature sensors and a data logging package mounted beneath a mechanically set retrievable casing packer, and includes two pressure sensors, one in hydraulic communication with the formation through the casing screens below the packer, and the other to the open borehole above the packer to record hydrostatic reference pressure and ocean loading signals. Temperatures are recorded within the instrument package using a platinum thermometer and by a self-contained miniature temperature logger (MTL). In fall 2010

  6. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Perspectives on the geological and hydrological aspects of long-term release scenario analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Stottlemyre, J.A.; Wallace, R.W.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

    1980-06-01

    Information that may be relevant to individuals involved with analyzing long-term release scenarios of specific repositories for nuclear waste is presented. The bulk of the information is derived from recent studies in West Germany and the United States. Emphasis is on the specific geological and hydrological phenomena that, alone or in concert, could potentially perturb the area around specific repository sites. Research is continuing on most of the topics discussed within this report. Because research is ongoing, statements and conclusions described in this document are subject to change. The main topics of this report are: (1) fracturing, (2) geohydrology, (3) magmatic activity, and (4) geomorphology. Therefore, the site-specific nature of the problem cannot be overemphasized. As an example of how one might combine the many synergistic and time-dependent parameters into a concise format the reader is referred to A Conceputal Simulation Model for Release Scenario Analysis of a Hypothetical Site in Columbia Plateau Basalts, PNL-2892. For additional details on the topics in this report, the reader is referred to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) consultant report listed in the bibliography.

  7. Long-Term Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Long-Term Care What Is Long-Term Care? Long-term care involves a variety of services ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) Most Care Provided at Home Long-term care is provided ...

  8. Long-term continuous monitoring of mercury in the Russian arctic: winter increase of atmospheric mercury depletion events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Fidel; Mahura, Alexander; Popov, Valentin; Katz, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    Among pollutants mercury is a major environmental concern due to its ecological hazard. The mercury can reside in the atmosphere for a long time high, and it is a reason of its global propagation in the Northern Hemisphere and elevated mercury concentrations are reported in the Arctic environment. First time, in 1995, the effect of atmospheric mercury depletion in the troposphere was found at the Canadian station Alert. This phenomenon (called the Atmospheric Mercury Depletion Event - AMDE) is observed during April-June, when the Polar sunrise starts till the end of the snowmelt. The same effect was reported for other polar stations situated to the north of 60° N. Long-term continuous monitoring of gaseous elemental mercury in the surface air at the polar station Amderma (69,720N; 61,620E) using the analyzer Tekran 2537A has been conducted from Jun 2001 to date. Individual measurements were collected every thirty minutes. It has been shown, that during eleven years of observations the AMDEs were observed every year, from the end of March till early June. For the winter period (Dec-Feb) these events of the atmospheric mercury depletion were registered from 2010 to 2013, which had not been observed before. A large number of hours during the day, when the concentration of mercury was recorded at level of below 1 ng/m3, was registered during Dec-Feb. The sun declination above the horizon is negative, and solar activity is still not enough to trigger the photochemical reactions. The these last 3 years confirmed a tendency to displacement of AMDEs to the winter season, which leads to an additional factor entry of mercury in various biological objects, due to the additional deposition of various forms of mercury on the snowpack. At the same time, especially during the winter seasons, there is a substantial increase (up to 8 times) of AMDEs, compared with the previous years. In particular, in winter 2013 the maximum number of AMDs reached 31 cases. The explanation can be

  9. Field Evaluations of Sampling Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Upland Ecosystems on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark E.; Witwicki, Dana L.; Mann, Rebecca K.; Tancreto, Nicole J.

    2007-01-01

    To inform planning for long-term ecological monitoring, we sampled vegetation and soil-surface attributes across a range of terrestrial ecosystems (physiognomic types) in seven National Park Service units on the Colorado Plateau. Primary objectives were (1) to evaluate a suite of sampling methods according to measures of repeatability, efficiency, and impacts on plot conditions; and (2) to characterize within- and among-plot variability in monitoring measures. This work was designed to support NPS staff in selecting the combination of methods that best meets their monitoring objectives and resource constraints. We found no differences among cover-estimation techniques in terms of repeatability between observers (measurement precision). Estimates for total live understory canopy cover, cover of individual species, and cover of soil-surface features were highly repeatable between observers for 10-m2 quadrats, 1-m2 quadrats, and line-point intercept sampling methods. Estimates of shrub and tree density in 10-m2 quadrats also were repeatable between observers, although sample sizes for were small for many species. At 10 of 11 ecological sites, we found that sampling with 10-m2 quadrats was the most efficient cover-estimation technique with respect to within-plot variability in cover estimates and numbers of subsamples required to estimate plot-level cover with 20 percent precision. According to these same measures, sampling with 1-m2 quadrats was the least efficient cover-estimation technique at eight of 11 ecological sites. The line-point technique was most efficient at eight of 11 ecological sites in terms of the amount of time required to estimate total plot-level cover with 20 percent precision - largely because 10-m2 quadrats were more time consuming and 1-m2 quadrats had greater within-plot variability relative to line-point sampling. However, there was no statistical difference among methods with respect to median subsampling times for 20 percent precision

  10. Automated outlier detection framework for identifying damage states in multi-girder steel bridges using long-term wireless monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Sean M.; Zhang, Yilan; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2015-04-01

    Advances in wireless sensor technology have enabled low cost and extremely scalable sensing platforms prompting high density sensor installations. High density long-term monitoring generates a wealth of sensor data demanding an efficient means of data storage and data processing for information extraction that is pertinent to the decision making of bridge owners. This paper reports on decision making inferences drawn from automated data processing of long-term highway bridge data. The Telegraph Road Bridge (TRB) demonstration testbed for sensor technology innovation and data processing tool development has been instrumented with a long-term wireless structural monitoring system that has been in operation since September 2011. The monitoring system has been designed to specifically address stated concerns by the Michigan Department of Transportation regarding pin and hanger steel girder bridges. The sensing strategy consists of strain, acceleration and temperature sensors deployed in a manner to track specific damage modalities common to multigirder steel concrete composite bridges using link plate assemblies. To efficiently store and process long-term sensor data, the TRB monitoring system operates around the SenStore database system. SenStore combines sensor data with bridge information (e.g., material properties, geometry, boundary conditions) and exposes an application programming interface to enable automated data extraction by processing tools. Large long-term data sets are modeled for environmental and operational influence by regression methods. Response processes are defined by statistical parameters extracted from long-term data and used to automate decision support in an outlier detection, or statistical process control, framework.

  11. Monitoring Tree Population Dynamics in Arid Zone Through Multiple Temporal Scales: Integration of Spatial Analysis, Change Detection and Field Long Term Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, S.; Rachmilevitch, S.; Ephrath, J. E.; Maman, S.; Blumberg, D. G.

    2016-06-01

    High mortality rates and lack of recruitment in the acacia populations throughout the Negev Desert and the Arava rift valley of Israel have been reported in previous studies. However, it is difficult to determine whether these reports can be evidence to a significant decline trend of the trees populations. This is because of the slow dynamic processes of acaia tree populations and the lack of long term continuous monitoring data. We suggest a new data analysis technique that expands the time scope of the field long term monitoring of trees in arid environments. This will enables us to improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal changes of these populations. We implemented two different approaches in order to expand the time scope of the acacia population field survey: (1) individual based tree change detection using Corona satellite images and (2) spatial analysis of trees population, converting spatial data into temporal data. The next step was to integrate the results of the two analysis techniques (change detection and spatial analysis) with field monitoring. This technique can be implemented to other tree populations in arid environments to help assess the vegetation conditions and dynamics of those ecosystems.

  12. The Swift-BAT monitoring reveals a long term decay of the cyclotron line energy in Vela X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; D'Aì, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the behaviour of the cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) of the high mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 using the long-term hard X-ray monitoring performed by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift. High statistics, intensity selected spectra were built along 11 years of BAT survey. While the fundamental line is not revealed, the second harmonic of the CRSF can be clearly detected in all the spectra, at an energy varying between ˜53 keV and ˜58 keV, directly correlated with the luminosity. We have further investigated the evolution of the CRSF in time, by studying the intensity selected spectra built along four 33-month time intervals along the survey. For the first time we find in this source a secular variation in the CRSF energy: independent of the source luminosity, the CRSF second harmonic energy decreases by ˜0.36 keV/year between the first and the third time interval, corresponding to an apparent decay of the magnetic field of ˜3 × 1010 G/year. The intensity-cyclotron energy pattern is consistent between the third and the last time intervals. A possible interpretation for this decay could be the settling of an accreted mound that produces either a distortion of the poloidal magnetic field on the polar cap or a geometrical displacement of the line forming region. This hypothesis seems supported by the correspondance between the rate of the line shift per unit accreted mass and the mass accreted on the polar cap per unit area in Vela X-1 and Her X-1, respectively.

  13. Long-Term GPS Tracking of Ocean Sunfish Mola mola Offers a New Direction in Fish Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Sims, David W.; Queiroz, Nuno; Humphries, Nicolas E.; Lima, Fernando P.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite tracking of large pelagic fish provides insights on free-ranging behaviour, distributions and population structuring. Up to now, such fish have been tracked remotely using two principal methods: direct positioning of transmitters by Argos polar-orbiting satellites, and satellite relay of tag-derived light-level data for post hoc track reconstruction. Error fields associated with positions determined by these methods range from hundreds of metres to hundreds of kilometres. However, low spatial accuracy of tracks masks important details, such as foraging patterns. Here we use a fast-acquisition global positioning system (Fastloc GPS) tag with remote data retrieval to track long-term movements, in near real time and position accuracy of <70 m, of the world's largest bony fish, the ocean sunfish Mola mola. Search-like movements occurred over at least three distinct spatial scales. At fine scales, sunfish spent longer in highly localised areas with faster, straighter excursions between them. These ‘stopovers’ during long-distance movement appear consistent with finding and exploiting food patches. This demonstrates the feasibility of GPS tagging to provide tracks of unparalleled accuracy for monitoring movements of large pelagic fish, and with nearly four times as many locations obtained by the GPS tag than by a conventional Argos transmitter. The results signal the potential of GPS-tagged pelagic fish that surface regularly to be detectors of resource ‘hotspots’ in the blue ocean and provides a new capability for understanding large pelagic fish behaviour and habitat use that is relevant to ocean management and species conservation. PMID:19816576

  14. A long-term and reproducible passive microwave sea ice concentration data record for climate studies and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-05-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere Polar Regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007 with an update through 2011 underway. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)'s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The dataset along with detailed data processing steps and error source information can be found at: doi:10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  15. A long-term and reproducible passive microwave sea ice concentration data record for climate studies and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-10-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 km × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere polar regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The data set, along with detailed data processing steps and error source information, can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  16. Survey of the terrestrial habitats and vegetation of Shetland, 1974 - a framework for long term ecological monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. M.; Bunce, R. G. H.

    2015-10-01

    A survey of the natural environment was undertaken in Shetland in 1974, after concern was expressed that large scale development from the new oil industry could threaten the natural features of the islands. A framework was constructed by the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology on which to select samples for the survey. The vegetation and habitat data that were collected, along with the sampling framework, have recently been made public via the following DOIs: doi:10.5285/06fc0b8c-cc4a-4ea8-b4be-f8bd7ee25342 (Terrestrial habitat, vegetation and soil data from Shetland, 1974) and doi:10.5285/f1b3179e-b446-473d-a5fb-4166668da146 (Land Classification of Shetland 1974). In addition to providing valuable information about the state of the natural environment of Shetland, the repeatable and statistically robust methods developed in the survey were used to underpin the Countryside Survey, Great Britain's national long-term integrated environmental monitoring programme. The demonstration of the effectiveness of the methodology indicates that a repeat of the survey would yield statistics about ecological changes in the islands, such as those arising from the impacts of the oil industry. Currently no such figures are available although there is much information on the sociological impacts, as well as changes in agriculture.

  17. Appearance and characteristics of major phytoplankton species based on long-term monitoring datasets in southern sea of Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sik; Kim, Jin Young

    2012-07-01

    To understand the mechanism of phytoplankton bloom forming, we investigated the relationship between several species and water quality factors using long-term monitoring datasets from 1996 to 2003. The seven sites at this study were classified into four groups by phytoplankton species or water quality datasets and the species for phytoplankton bloom forming seems to be mainly influenced by the water quality or surrounding water conditions. E. gymnastica and P. minimum were observed for the longest time period from April to September, and C. polykrikoides shortest time period from summer to autumn. E. gymnastica was observed across the widest temperature range (14-27 degrees C), and C. polykrikoides narrowest temperature range (20-28 degrees C). Chaetoceros spp. was observed over the narrowest salinity range (22-33 ppt), and E. gymnastica, P. minimum, H. akashiwo wide salinity range (14-34 ppt). The main reasons for the formation of Chaetoceros spp. and S. costatum blooms seems to be fresh water input through forest and fields by heavy rainfall events. Thalassiosira spp. seems to grow well in conditions of fresh water input and/or in eutrophicated areas with salinities >20 ppt and water temperatures > 17 degrees C. C. furca seems to grow well in sea areas that are affected by inflows of domestic and industrial wastewater and by inflows of freshwater with domestic and industrial wastewater, rather than only freshwater input, after May when water temperatures are higher than 18 degrees C. E. gymnastica, H. akashiwo, P. minimum, and P. triestinum seem to grow well in eutrophicated sea areas where nutrient levels are high and where domestic and industrial wastewater flow are abundant. C. polykrikoides blooms seem to be due to suitable seawater input from off sea areas, and freshwater after heavy rainfall that has high nitrogen concentration. PMID:23360014

  18. Long-term GPS tracking of ocean sunfish Mola mola offers a new direction in fish monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sims, David W; Queiroz, Nuno; Humphries, Nicolas E; Lima, Fernando P; Hays, Graeme C

    2009-01-01

    Satellite tracking of large pelagic fish provides insights on free-ranging behaviour, distributions and population structuring. Up to now, such fish have been tracked remotely using two principal methods: direct positioning of transmitters by Argos polar-orbiting satellites, and satellite relay of tag-derived light-level data for post hoc track reconstruction. Error fields associated with positions determined by these methods range from hundreds of metres to hundreds of kilometres. However, low spatial accuracy of tracks masks important details, such as foraging patterns. Here we use a fast-acquisition global positioning system (Fastloc GPS) tag with remote data retrieval to track long-term movements, in near real time and position accuracy of <70 m, of the world's largest bony fish, the ocean sunfish Mola mola. Search-like movements occurred over at least three distinct spatial scales. At fine scales, sunfish spent longer in highly localised areas with faster, straighter excursions between them. These 'stopovers' during long-distance movement appear consistent with finding and exploiting food patches. This demonstrates the feasibility of GPS tagging to provide tracks of unparalleled accuracy for monitoring movements of large pelagic fish, and with nearly four times as many locations obtained by the GPS tag than by a conventional Argos transmitter. The results signal the potential of GPS-tagged pelagic fish that surface regularly to be detectors of resource 'hotspots' in the blue ocean and provides a new capability for understanding large pelagic fish behaviour and habitat use that is relevant to ocean management and species conservation. PMID:19816576

  19. Long-term monitoring of a marine geologic hydrocarbon source by a coastal air pollution station in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Eliza; Leifer, Ira; Roberts, Dar

    2010-12-01

    Hourly total hydrocarbon (THC) data, spanning 1990-2008 from a California air pollution station located near the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field, were analyzed and clearly showed geologic CH 4 emissions as the dominant local source. Annual COP emissions are conservatively estimated as 0.015 Tg CH 4 year -1 and represent a natural and concentrated geologic methane source (24 m 3 m -2 day -1 gas flux at some active seeps, Clark et al., 2010). For a sense of the scale and potential importance to the regional Southern California methane budget, COP emits an amount equivalent to 8% of the estimated Los Angeles County anthropogenic emissions. Station THC measurements near COP showed a strong wind dependency with elevated levels closely correlated with a sonar-derived spatial distribution of seep field emissions. THC varied seasonally, with a maximum in January and minimum in July and a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.24 ppm. The seasonal signal was more readily apparent midday ( R2 = 0.69 harmonic fit), compared to nighttime and morning ( R2 < 0.45). The bimodal diel THC pattern consisted of seasonally-modulated peaks in the morning and evening. THC temporal and spatial trends were consistent with both transport and source emission variations. Long-term, annual seep field emissions consistently decreased on a field-wide basis until the late 1990s, before increasing consistently, most likely as a function of underlying geologic processes. This study demonstrates the value of municipal air quality monitoring stations for insight into local greenhouse gas sources and highlights the non-negligible and variable contribution from marine geologic seepage.

  20. Hydrology, sediment circulation and long-term morphological changes in highly urbanized Shenzhen River estuary, China: A combined field experimental and modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiyan; Mao, Xian-zhong

    2015-10-01

    The Shenzhen River estuary is a small estuary in highly urbanized regions between Shenzhen and Hong Kong, China. An increasing amount of sediment has been observed to accumulate in the estuary, imposing a severe impact on the ecological environment. In this study we utilized a series of hydrographic and bathymetry surveys to study the hydrology, sediment transport and morphological processes in the estuary. Flow and sediment circulation patterns in different seasons were inferred using current velocity, salinity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) time series collected in the hydrographic surveys in conjunction with fathometer profiles in bathymetry surveys. Historical time series at two stations were also analyzed by Mann-Kendall test for possible trends of the driving forces for estuarine morphological processes. The two-dimensional depth-averaged DELFT numerical model was employed to simulate the flow, salinity and SSC fields during the synchronous surveys and to predict the long-term morphological processes in the estuary. A bimodal SSC distribution was observed with two high-SSC zones separated by a low-SSC zone near the central bay, which cannot be explained by the conventional nongravitational transport theory of Postma (1967). It is hypothesized that sediment circulation in the estuary can be separated into two different systems: the "tidal zone" is under the influence of marine sediment from the Pearl River estuary, whereas the "fluvial zone" is mainly affected by terrestrial sediment from the river. Sediment mass exchange between the two systems is limited due to the presence of the low-SSC zone, the location of which could vary with the relative strengths of river flow and tides. The trend analysis of historical time series shows that the river discharge and the mean sea level are increasing and the flood tide range and the ebb tide range are decreasing. These trends are closely related to the intense human activities in the urbanization of

  1. Long-term monitoring of nitrate-N transport to drainage from three agricultural clayey till fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstsen, V.; Olsen, P.; Rosenbom, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    The application of nitrogen (N) fertilisers to crops grown on tile-drained fields is necessary to sustain most modern crop production, but poses a risk to the aquatic environment since tile drains facilitate rapid transport pathways with no significant reduction in nitrate. To maintain the water quality of the aquatic environment and the provision of food from highly efficient agriculture in line with the EU's Water Framework Directive and Nitrates Directive, field-scale knowledge is imperative if there is to be differentiated N-regulation in future. This study describes nitrate-N leaching to drainage based on coherent monitoring of nitrate-N concentrations, the climate, the groundwater table and crop-specific parameters obtained over eleven years (2001-2011) at three subsurface-drained clayey till fields (1.3-2.3 ha). The monitoring results showed significant field differences in nitrate-N transport to drainage. Not only were these caused by periods of bare soil after short-season crops and N-fixing crops (pea), which have been shown to generate high nitrate-N concentrations in drainage, but by the hydrogeological field conditions that were shown to be the controlling factor of nitrate-N transport to drainage. The fields had the following characteristics: (A) the lowest mass transport (13 kg N ha-1) and fertiliser input had short-term and low-intensity drainage with the highest nitrate-N concentrations detected, representing 40% of net precipitation (226 mm) combined with low air temperatures, (B) the medium mass transport (14 kg N ha-1) had medium-term and medium-intensity drainage, representing 42% of net precipitation (471 mm) combined with periods of both low and higher air temperatures, (C) the highest mass transport (19 kg N ha-1) had long-term drainage, representing 68% of net precipitation (617 mm), but had the highest potential for in-situ soil denitrification and post-treatment (e.g. constructed wetlands) due to long periods with both high water

  2. Puna Geothermal Venture Hydrologic Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    1990-04-01

    This document provides the basis for the Hydrologic Monitoring Program (HMP) for the Puna Geothermal Venture. The HMP is complementary to two additional environmental compliance monitoring programs also being submitted by Puma Geothermal Venture (PGV) for their proposed activities at the site. The other two programs are the Meteorology and Air Quality Monitoring Program (MAQMP) and the Noise Monitoring Program (NMP), being submitted concurrently.

  3. Comparing State-of-the-Art Evolutionary Multi-Objective Algorithms for Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, P. M.; Kollat, J. B.

    2005-12-01

    This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a modified version of Deb's Non-Dominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm II (NSGAII), which the authors have named the Epsilon-Dominance Non-Dominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm II (Epsilon-NSGAII), at solving a four objective long-term groundwater monitoring (LTM) design test case. The Epsilon-NSGAII incorporates prior theoretical competent evolutionary algorithm (EA) design concepts and epsilon-dominance archiving to improve the original NSGAII's efficiency, reliability, and ease-of-use. This algorithm eliminates much of the traditional trial-and-error parameterization associated with evolutionary multi-objective optimization (EMO) through epsilon-dominance archiving, dynamic population sizing, and automatic termination. The effectiveness and reliability of the new algorithm is compared to the original NSGAII as well as two other benchmark multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs), the Epsilon-Dominance Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm (Epsilon-MOEA) and the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm 2 (SPEA2). These MOEAs have been selected because they have been demonstrated to be highly effective at solving numerous multi-objective problems. The results presented in this study indicate superior performance of the Epsilon-NSGAII in terms of the hypervolume indicator, unary Epsilon-indicator, and first-order empirical attainment function metrics. In addition, the runtime metric results indicate that the diversity and convergence dynamics of the Epsilon-NSGAII are competitive to superior relative to the SPEA2, with both algorithms greatly outperforming the NSGAII and Epsilon-MOEA in terms of these metrics. The improvements in performance of the Epsilon-NSGAII over its parent algorithm the NSGAII demonstrate that the application of Epsilon-dominance archiving, dynamic population sizing with archive injection, and automatic termination greatly improve algorithm efficiency and reliability. In addition, the usability of

  4. A new concept for an ocean bottom pressure meter capable of precision long-term monitoring in marine geodesy and oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, Hans-Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Long-term vertical seafloor displacements and geostrophic changes in the water column height could be easily monitored if pressure meters were less susceptible to drift. Currently, these signals, which have typical amplitudes from decimeters to less than 1 mm/yr, cannot be differentiated from instrumental drift. In this paper, we introduce and outline a new constructional concept for an ocean bottom pressure meter that aims for unequivocal detection and monitoring of long-term trends. The concept is based on a differential pressure sensor that measures the pressure difference between the environment and a reference pressure within a sealed volume. This sealed volume conserves the instantaneous pressure at the moment of its closure at the monitoring location in a temperature-compensated manner. Furthermore, the approach enables easy in situ calibration of the differential pressure gauge by simply opening the reference pressure chamber to the environment and checking the zero point offset.

  5. Monitoring the Long-Term Effectiveness of Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Implementation Through Use of a Performance Dashboard Process

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Kinney and William D. Barrick

    2008-09-01

    This session will examine a method developed by Federal and Contractor personnel at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) to examine long-term maintenance of DOE Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) criteria, including safety culture attributes, as well as identification of process improvement opportunities. This process was initially developed in the summer of 2000 and has since been expanded to recognize the importance of safety culture attributes, and associated safety culture elements, as defined in DOE M 450.4-1, “Integrated Safety Management System Manual.” This process has proven to significantly enhance collective awareness of the importance of long-term ISMS implementation as well as support commitments by NNSA/NSO personnel to examine the continued effectiveness of ISMS processes.

  6. Accesible hydrological monitoring for better decision making and modelling: a regional initiative in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bievre, B.; Célleri, R.; Crespo, P.; Ochoa, B.; Buytaert, W.; Tobón, C.; Villacís, M.; Villazon, M. F.; Llerena, C.; Rodriguez, M.; Viñas, P.

    2013-05-01

    The goal of the Hydrological Monitoring of Andean Ecosystems Initiative is to improve the conservation and management of High-Andean ecosystems by providing information on the hydrological response of these ecosystems and how different land-uses affect their water yield and regulation capacity. The initiative fills a gap left by widespread hydrological modeling exercises that suffer from lack of data, and by glacier monitoring under climate change. The initiative proposes a hydrological monitoring system involving precipitation, discharge and land cover monitoring in paired catchments. The methodology is accessible for non-specialist organizations, and allows for generation of evidence of land use impact on hydrology on the short term (i.e. a few years). Nevertheless, long term monitoring is pursued with the aim of identifying trends in hydrological response (as opposed to trends in climate) under global change. In this way it supports decision making on the preservation of the hydrological services of the catchment. The initiative aims at a high number of paired catchment sites along the Andes, in order to draw regional conclusions and capture variability, and is connected to more detailed hydrological research sites of several Andean universities. We present preliminary results of a dozen of sites from Venezuela to Bolivia, summarized in hydrological performance indicators that were agreed upon among hydrologists, local stakeholders, and water authorities. The success factors, as well as limitations, of the network are discussed.

  7. Monitoring long-term evolutionary changes following Wolbachia introduction into a novel host: the Wolbachia popcorn infection in Drosophila simulans

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Lauren B.; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Weeks, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Wolbachia may act as a biological control agent for pest management; in particular, the Wolbachia variant wMelPop (popcorn) shortens host longevity and may be useful for dengue suppression. However, long-term changes in the host and Wolbachia genomes can alter Wolbachia spread and/or host effects that suppress disease. Here, we investigate the phenotypic effects of wMelPop in a non-native host, Drosophila simulans, following artificial transinfection approximately 200 generations ago. Long-term rearing and maintenance of the bacteria were at 19°C in the original I-102 genetic background that was transinfected with the popcorn strain. The bacteria were then introgressed into three massbred backgrounds, and tetracycline was used to create uninfected sublines. The effect of wMelPop on longevity in this species appears to have changed; longevity was no longer reduced at 25°C in some nuclear backgrounds, reflecting different geographical origin, selection or drift, although the reduction was still evident for flies held at 30°C. Wolbachia influenced productivity and viability, and development time in some host backgrounds. These findings suggest that long-term attenuation of Wolbachia effects may compromise the effectiveness of this bacterium in pest control. They also emphasize the importance of host nuclear background on Wolbachia phenotypic effects. PMID:20219740

  8. Long-Term Continuous Monitoring of Fluid Chemistry and Flux at the Bush Hill Gas Hydrate Field, Gulf of Mexico Using a New Flow Meter, The MOSQUITO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, E.; Kastner, M.; Jannasch, H.; Weinstein, Y.; Robertson, G.; Aubrey, A.

    2004-12-01

    Long-term monitoring of fluid, solute, and methane fluxes that influence marine gas hydrate formation and dissociation has important implications for the seafloor biochemical environment, ocean chemistry, and potentially the atmosphere. Four newly designed flux meters called the MOSQUITO (Multiple Orifice Sampler and Quantitative Injection Tracer Observer) and two temperature loggers were deployed adjacent to the Bush Hill hydrate mound in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GC185) in order to understand how chemistry, physics, biology, and subsurface hydrology dynamically influence the growth and dissociation of the hydrate mound. The MOSQUITO contains a network of osmotic samplers and a tracer injection device, each connected to a titanium capillary tube that penetrates the sediment. The tracer is injected as a point source, and fluid chemistry and tracer concentrations are continuously sampled simultaneously at multiple depths below the seafloor in a three dimensional array with respect to the tracer injection point. Bottom water chemistry is also sampled continuously. Vertical and horizontal flow rates as low as 1 cm/yr are determined by modeling the variability in tracer concentration at each depth over time. MOSQUITOs can be deployed at passive margins, ridge crests, ridge flanks, subduction zones, and lakes. MOSQUITOs were deployed over a period of 430 days from June 2002 to August 2003 and were sampled at weekly resolution. The temperature loggers were attached to the MOSQUITOs and recorded seafloor temperature every 40 minutes. Three MOSQUITOs were deployed within 3 m of the hydrate mound and ˜ 5 m apart, adjacent to transient methane seeps; in a mussel field, in a bacterial mat, and in a tubeworm field. The fourth MOSQUITO was placed ˜150 m southwest of the hydrate mound to monitor background fluid flow, geochemistry, and temperature. The average bottom water temperature over the 430-day deployment period was 7.94° C, with minimum temperatures occurring every

  9. Seperating Long-term Hydrological Loading and Tectonic Deformation Observed with Multi-temporal SAR Interferometry and GPS in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, G.; Lin, H.

    2014-12-01

    From 2000 till present, most endorheic lakes in Tibetan plateau experienced quick increasing. Several largest lakes, gathered several meters depth water during one decade. Such massive mass increasing will lead to elastic and visco-elastic deformation of the ground. Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is one the most active tectonic places in the world; monitoring its ground deformation is essential, when loading effect is a nuisance item. Due to the sparse distribution of GPS sites and most are roving sites, it is hard to distinguish tectonic component from mass loading effect. In this research we took Selin Co Lake located at Nujiang-Bangoin suture zone and evaluated long time ground deformation at hundred kilometers scale by multi-temporal SAR interferometry and simulate the ground deformation by loading history evaluated by multi mission satellite altimetry and optical images observation. At Nujiang-Bangoin suture zone, where GPS presented the maximum ground subsidence in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of 3.6mm/a which was found at the shore of Selin Co Lake from 1999 to 2011, when it experienced water level increasing of 0.7m/a. A model of elastic plate lying over Newtonian viscous half-space matches well with the results of multi-temporal SAR interferometry and GPS observations. We concluded that near Selin Co Lake area, ground deformation is composed by both tectonic and hydrological loading part. As SAR image coverage is much smaller than tectonic scale, we contribute the deformation detected by InSAR to loading effect. After evaluating and removing the hydrological loading effect, we founds that Nujiang-Bangoin suture zone did not experience quick subsidence, but only limited to 0.5mm/a. Selin Co Lake's quick volume increasing caused 3mm/a subsidence rate to the nearest GPS site. The Second nearest site showed the 1.4mm/a subsidence totally, which were composed by 1.05mm/a hydrological loading effect and the rest was tectonic. We also found that Young's Modulus is the most

  10. Using the Sonoran Desert test site to monitor the long-term radiometric stability of the Landsat TM/ETM+ and Terra MODIS sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angal, A.; Xiong, X.; Choi, T.; Chander, G.; Wu, A.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudo-invariant ground targets have been extensively used to monitor the long-term radiometric calibration stability of remote sensing instruments. The NASA MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST), in collaboration with members from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, has previously demonstrated the use of pseudo-invariant ground sites for the long-term stability monitoring of Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 ETM+ sensors. This paper focuses on the results derived from observations made over the Sonoran Desert. Additionally, Landsat 5 TM data over the Sonoran Desert site were used to evaluate the temporal stability of this site. Top-ofatmosphere (TOA) reflectances were computed for the closely matched TM, ETM+, and MODIS spectral bands over selected regions of interest. The impacts due to different viewing geometries, or the effect of test site Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF), are also presented. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  11. A new index to monitor temporal and long-term variations of the equatorial electrojet by MAGDAS/CPMN real-time data: EE-Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uozumi, T.; Yumoto, K.; Kitamura, K.; Abe, S.; Kakinami, Y.; Shinohara, M.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kawano, H.; Ueno, T.; Tokunaga, T.; McNamara, D.; Ishituka, J. K.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Damtie, B.; Doumbia, V.; Obrou, O.; Rabiu, A. B.; Adimula, I. A.; Othman, M.; Fairos, M.; Otadoy, R. E. S.; Magdas Group

    2008-07-01

    A new index, EE-index (EDst, EU, and EL), is proposed to monitor temporal and long-term variations of the equatorial electrojet by using the MAGDAS/CPMN real-time data. The mean value of the H component magnetic variations observed at the nightside (LT = 18-06) MAGDAS/CPMN stations along the magnetic equatorial region is found to show variations similar to those of Dst; we defined this quantity as EDst. The EDst can be used as a proxy of Dst for the real-time and long-term geospace monitoring. By subtracting EDst from the H component data of each equatorial station, it is possible to extract the Equatorial Electrojet and Counter Electrojet components, which are defined as EU and EL, respectively.

  12. Intended long-term permafrost monitoring in Austria: Observations from eight years (2006-2014) of ground temperature monitoring in the Tauern Range, Central Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Lintschnig, Michèle

    2015-04-01

    At present permafrost monitoring in Austria is carried out by several institutions at some 20 sites in the Austrian Alps. However, so far this monitoring is not coordinated and institutionalised in terms of monitoring strategy, organization, data management and funding. Within the currently running permAT project such an institutionalization is in progress. Permafrost in the Austrian mountains is rather warm and hence sensitive to present climate change. Consequently permafrost conditions and changes are of increasing importance also for the public. Therefore, it is evident that a coordinated and institutionalised long-term monitoring of ground temperature in Austria is essential for permafrost understanding and people's safety. In this contribution we present up to eight years of field data from nine different study sites in Austria. All sites are located in the highest mountain range in Austria, the Tauern Range (maximum elevation 3798 m asl) covering some 9000 km² of the national territory. The nine different study sites are located between latitude 46°55' to 47°22' and longitude 12°44' to 14°41'. Altogether 57 ground temperature monitoring sites have been installed in 2006 and 2007 at the nine study sites using one- (at 23 sites) and three-channel (at 34 sites) miniature temperature dataloggers produced by GeoPrecision, Germany. Therefore, more than 120 ground temperature data series are available from between the ground surface to maximum depths of 2.75 m. The 57 monitoring sites range from 1922 to 3002 m asl in elevation and consider flat terrain as well as step rock walls. All slope aspects are adequately considered. Relevant research questions we intend to address in this contribution include (a) general ground thermal conditions in 2006-2014, (b) the influence of different substrates and aspects on ground temperatures, (c) potential permafrost occurrence, (d) changes or stable conditions during the observation period, (e) regional pattern, and (f

  13. Large-sized Fetal Striatal Grafts in Huntington's Disease Do Stop Growing: Long-term Monitoring in the Florence Experience.

    PubMed

    Mascalchi, Mario; Diciotti, Stefano; Paganini, Marco; Bianchi, Andrea; Ginestroni, Andrea; Lombardini, Letizia; Porfirio, Berardino; Conti, Renato; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Gallina, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Development of six large nodules of solid tissue after bilateral human fetal striatal transplantation in four Huntington's disease patients has raised concern about the safety of this experimental therapy in our setting. We investigated by serial MRI-based volumetric analysis the growth behaviour of such grafts. After 33-73 months from transplantation the size of five grafts was stable and one graft showed a mild decrease in size. Signs neither of intracranial hypertension nor of adjuctive focal neurological deficit have ever been observed. This supports long-term safety of the grafting procedure at our Institution. PMID:25642368

  14. Determination of epileptic focus side in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using long-term noninvasive fNIRS/EEG monitoring for presurgical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rizki, Edmi Edison; Uga, Minako; Dan, Ippeita; Dan, Haruka; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Yokota, Hidenori; Oguro, Keiji; Watanabe, Eiju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Noninvasive localization of an epileptogenic zone is a fundamental step for presurgical evaluation of epileptic patients. Here, we applied long-term simultaneous functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)/electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring for focus diagnosis in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Six MTLE patients underwent long-term (8–16 h per day for 4 days) fNIRS/EEG monitoring for the occurrence of spontaneous seizures. Four spontaneous seizures were successfully recorded out of the six patients. To determine oxy-Hb amplitude, the period-average values of oxy-Hb across 20 s from the EEG- or clinically defined epileptic onset were calculated for both hemispheres from the simultaneously recorded fNIRS data. The average oxy-Hb values for the temporal lobe at the earlier EEG- or clinically defined epileptic onsets were greater for the epileptic side than for the contralateral side after EEG activity suppression, spike train, and clinical seizure in all four cases. The true laterality was determined based on the relief of seizures by selective amygdalo-hippocampectomy. Thus, oxy-Hb amplitude could be a reliable measure for determining the epileptic focus side. Long-term simultaneous fNIRS/EEG measurement serves as an effective tool for recording spontaneous seizures. Cerebral hemodynamic measurement by fNIRS would serve as a valuable supplementary noninvasive measurement method for presurgical evaluation of MTLE. PMID:26158007

  15. Non-Invasive in vivo Mapping and Long-Term Monitoring of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Different Organs of Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Maxim; Yuriev, Mikhail; Brusentsov, Nikolai; Vetoshko, Petr; Nikitin, Petr

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative detection of magnetic nanoparticles (MP) in vivo is very important for various biomedical applications. Our original detection method based on non-linear MP magnetization has been modified for non-invasive in vivo mapping of the MP distribution among different organs of rats. A novel highly sensitive room-temperature device equipped with an external probe has been designed and tested for quantification of MP within 20-mm depth from the animal skin. Results obtained by external in vivo scanning of rats by the probe and ex vivo MP quantification in different organs of rats well correlated. The method allows long-term in vivo study of MP evolution, clearance and redistribution among different organs of the animal. Experiments showed that dynamics in vivo strongly depend on MP characteristics (size, material, coatings, etc.), site of injection and dose. The developed detection method combined with the magnetic nanolabels can substitute the radioactive labeling in many applications.

  16. Improved Analysis of Long-Term Monitoring Data Demonstrates Marked Regional Declines of Bat Populations in the Eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Thomas E; Sewall, Brent J; Amelon, Sybill K

    2013-01-01

    Bats are diverse and ecologically important, but are also subject to a suite of severe threats. Evidence for localized bat mortality from these threats is well-documented in some cases, but long-term changes in regional populations of bats remain poorly understood. Bat hibernation surveys provide an opportunity to improve understanding, but analysis is complicated by bats' cryptic nature, non-conformity of count data to assumptions of traditional statistical methods, and observation heterogeneities such as variation in survey timing. We used generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs) to account for these complicating factors and to evaluate long-term, regional population trajectories of bats. We focused on four hibernating bat species - little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus), tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus), Indiana myotis (M. sodalis), and northern myotis (M. septentrionalis) - in a four-state region of the eastern United States during 1999-2011. Our results, from counts of nearly 1.2 million bats, suggest that cumulative declines in regional relative abundance by 2011 from peak levels were 71% (with 95% confidence interval of ±11%) in M. lucifugus, 34% (±38%) in P. subflavus, 30% (±26%) in M. sodalis, and 31% (±18%) in M. septentrionalis. The M. lucifugus population fluctuated until 2004 before persistently declining, and the populations of the other three species declined persistently throughout the study period. Population trajectories suggest declines likely resulted from the combined effect of multiple threats, and indicate a need for enhanced conservation efforts. They provide strong support for a change in the IUCN Red List conservation status in M. lucifugus from Least Concern to Endangered within the study area, and are suggestive of a need to change the conservation status of the other species. Our modeling approach provided estimates of uncertainty, accommodated non-linearities, and controlled for observation heterogeneities, and thus has wide

  17. Improved Analysis of Long-Term Monitoring Data Demonstrates Marked Regional Declines of Bat Populations in the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Amelon, Sybill K.

    2013-01-01

    Bats are diverse and ecologically important, but are also subject to a suite of severe threats. Evidence for localized bat mortality from these threats is well-documented in some cases, but long-term changes in regional populations of bats remain poorly understood. Bat hibernation surveys provide an opportunity to improve understanding, but analysis is complicated by bats' cryptic nature, non-conformity of count data to assumptions of traditional statistical methods, and observation heterogeneities such as variation in survey timing. We used generalized additive mixed models (GAMMs) to account for these complicating factors and to evaluate long-term, regional population trajectories of bats. We focused on four hibernating bat species – little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus), tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus), Indiana myotis (M. sodalis), and northern myotis (M. septentrionalis) – in a four-state region of the eastern United States during 1999–2011. Our results, from counts of nearly 1.2 million bats, suggest that cumulative declines in regional relative abundance by 2011 from peak levels were 71% (with 95% confidence interval of ±11%) in M. lucifugus, 34% (±38%) in P. subflavus, 30% (±26%) in M. sodalis, and 31% (±18%) in M. septentrionalis. The M. lucifugus population fluctuated until 2004 before persistently declining, and the populations of the other three species declined persistently throughout the study period. Population trajectories suggest declines likely resulted from the combined effect of multiple threats, and indicate a need for enhanced conservation efforts. They provide strong support for a change in the IUCN Red List conservation status in M. lucifugus from Least Concern to Endangered within the study area, and are suggestive of a need to change the conservation status of the other species. Our modeling approach provided estimates of uncertainty, accommodated non-linearities, and controlled for observation heterogeneities, and thus

  18. Long-term treatment follow-up of children with sickle cell disease monitored with abnormal transcranial Doppler velocities.

    PubMed

    Bernaudin, Françoise; Verlhac, Suzanne; Arnaud, Cécile; Kamdem, Annie; Hau, Isabelle; Leveillé, Emmanuella; Vasile, Manuela; Kasbi, Florence; Madhi, Fouad; Fourmaux, Christine; Biscardi, Sandra; Gluckman, Eliane; Socié, Gérard; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Epaud, Ralph; Pondarré, Corinne

    2016-04-01

    Stroke risk in sickle cell anemia (SCA), predicted by high transcranial Doppler (TCD) velocities, is prevented by transfusions. We present the long-term follow-up of SCA children from the Créteil newborn cohort (1992-2012) detected at risk by TCD and placed on chronic transfusions. Patients with normalized velocities and no stenosis were treated with hydroxyurea, known to decrease anemia and hemolytic rate. Trimestrial Doppler was performed and transfusions restarted immediately in the case of reversion to abnormal velocities. Patients with a genoidentical donor underwent transplant. Abnormal time-averaged maximum mean velocities (TAMMV) ≥200 cm/s were detected in 92 SCA children at a mean age of 3.7 years (range, 1.3-8.3 years). No stroke occurred posttransfusion after a mean follow-up of 6.1 years. Normalization of velocities (TAMMV < 170 cm/s) was observed in 83.5% of patients. Stenosis, present in 27.5% of patients, was associated with the risk of non-normalization (P< .001). Switch from transfusions to hydroxyurea was prescribed for 45 patients, with a mean follow-up of 3.4 years. Reversion, predicted by baseline reticulocyte count ≥400 × 10(9)/L (P< .001), occurred in 28.9% (13/45) patients at the mean age of 7.1 years (range, 4.3-9.5 years). Transplant, performed in 24 patients, allowed transfusions to be safely stopped in all patients and velocities to be normalized in 4 patients who still had abnormal velocities on transfusions. This long-term cohort study shows that transfusions can be stopped not only in transplanted patients but also in a subset of patients switched to hydroxyurea, provided trimestrial Doppler follow-up and immediate restart of transfusions in the case of reversion. PMID:26851292

  19. Statistical analysis of modal properties of a cable-stayed bridge through long-term structural health monitoring with wireless smart sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadollahi, Parisa; Li, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the dynamic behavior of complex structures such as long-span bridges requires dense deployment of sensors. Traditional wired sensor systems are generally expensive and time-consuming to install due to cabling. With wireless communication and on-board computation capabilities, wireless smart sensor networks have the advantages of being low cost, easy to deploy and maintain and therefore facilitate dense instrumentation for structural health monitoring. A long-term monitoring project was recently carried out for a cable-stayed bridge in South Korea with a dense array of 113 smart sensors, which feature the world's largest wireless smart sensor network for civil structural monitoring. This paper presents a comprehensive statistical analysis of the modal properties including natural frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes of the monitored cable-stayed bridge. Data analyzed in this paper is composed of structural vibration signals monitored during a 12-month period under ambient excitations. The correlation between environmental temperature and the modal frequencies is also investigated. The results showed the long-term statistical structural behavior of the bridge, which serves as the basis for Bayesian statistical updating for the numerical model.

  20. Simulating long-term impacts of winter rye cover crop on hydrologic cycling and nitrogen dynamics for a corn-soybean crop system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Planting winter cover crops into corn-soybean rotation is a promising approach for reducing subsurface drainage and nitrate loss. However, the long-term impact of this practice needs investigation. We evaluated the performance of the RZWQM-DSSAT model against five years of comprehensive field data n...

  1. Hydrologic monitoring and selected hydrologic and environmental studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Georgia, 2011–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Dalton, Melinda J., (compiler)

    2013-01-01

    This compendium of papers describes results of hydrologic monitoring and hydrologic and environmental studies completed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Georgia during 2011–2013. The USGS addresses a wide variety of water issues in the State of Georgia working with local, State, and Federal partners. As the primary Federal science agency for water resource information, the USGS monitors the quantity and quality of water in the Nation’s rivers and aquifers, assesses the sources and fate of contaminants in aquatic systems, collects and analyzes data on aquatic ecosystems, develops tools to improve the application of hydrologic information, and ensures that its information and tools are available to all potential users. During 2011–2013, the USGS continued a long-term program of monitoring stream and groundwater resources, including flow, water quality, and water use. In addition, a variety of hydrologic and environmental studies were completed to assess water availability, hydrologic hazards, and the impact of development on water resources. Information on USGS activities in Georgia is available online at http://ga.water.usgs.gov/.

  2. SRP Transport in the Salto River, Costa Rica: Long-term Monitoring and Short-term Experimental Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triska, F. J.; Pringle, C. M.; Duff, J. H.; Avanzino, R. J.; Ardon, M.

    2005-05-01

    Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) transport retention was determined since 1988 at 4 sites in three rain forest streams draining La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. SRP levels can be naturally high there due to regional geothermal groundwater discharge at ambient temperature. Mean SRP was 89±53ug/L for the Salto (1988-1996) compared to 21±39ug/L for a tributary Pantano (1988-1998) and 26±35ug/L in the nearby Sabalo. After 1997 Salto SRP was determined separately in upland (Upper Salto) and lowland forest (Lower Salto) reaches. Upper Salto SRP is low until enriched at the slope transition. There high SRP springs contribute approximately 36% of long term discharge and 85% of SRP load leaving the watershed. TP is negatively correlated to discharge in all streams. SRP is not correlated to discharge at low SRP sites, but negatively correlated to discharge in Lower Salto when data from 2 ENSO events (EL Nino Southern Oscillation) are removed. Short-term SPR conservative tracer addition experiments indicate high retention at all sites. Retention is dominated by sediment, as indicated by subsequent adsorption-desorption studies. Enhanced input to high SRP streams can affect biotic metabolism, litter decomposition and secondary production in these tropical environments.

  3. Long-term monitoring of the human intestinal microbiota from the 2nd week to 13 years of age.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Pӓrtty, Anna; Kalliomӓki, Marko; Isolauri, Erika; Salminen, Seppo

    2014-08-01

    Microbial contact begins prior to birth and continues rapidly thereafter. Few long term follow-up studies have been reported and we therefore characterized the development of intestinal microbiota of ten subjects from the 2nd week of life to 13 years of age. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis combined with several bacterial group-specific primer sets demonstrated the colonization steps of defined bacterial groups in the microbiota. Bifidobacterium species were seen throughout the test period in all subjects. Bacteroides fragilis group and Blautia coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group species were not detected in several subjects during the first 6 months of life but were commonly seen after 12 months of life. Streptococcus group appeared during early life but was not seen in several subjects at the age of 13 years. Although a few species were linked with the increasing age, major bacterial species in the groups did not change dramatically. Rather considerable changes were found in the relative abundances of each bacterial species. Clustering analysis of total bacterial flora indicated that the microbiota changed considerably between 6 months and 12 months of life, and, at the age of 12 months, the intestinal microbiota was already converted toward a profile characteristic of an adult microbiota. Probiotic supplementation in the beginning of life did not have major impacts on later microbiota development. PMID:24933584

  4. Long-term monitoring of airborne nickel (Ni) pollution in association with some potential source processes in the urban environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Shon, Zang-Ho; Mauulida, Puteri T; Song, Sang-Keun

    2014-09-01

    The environmental behavior and pollution status of nickel (Ni) were investigated in seven major cities in Korea over a 13-year time span (1998-2010). The mean concentrations of Ni measured during the whole study period fell within the range of 3.71 (Gwangju: GJ) to 12.6ngm(-3) (Incheon: IC). Although Ni values showed a good comparability in a relatively large spatial scale, its values in most cities (6 out of 7) were subject to moderate reductions over the study period. To assess the effect of major sources on the long-term distribution of Ni, the relationship between their concentrations and the potent source processes like non-road transportation sources (e.g., ship and aircraft emissions) were examined from some cities with port and airport facilities. The potential impact of long-range transport of Asian dust particles in controlling Ni levels was also evaluated. The overall results suggest that the Ni levels were subject to gradual reductions over the study period irrespective of changes in such localized non-road source activities. The pollution of Ni at all the study sites was maintained well below the international threshold (Directive 2004/107/EC) value of 20ngm(-3). PMID:24997934

  5. Smart ECG Monitoring Patch with Built-in R-Peak Detection for Long-Term HRV Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, W K; Yoon, H; Park, K S

    2016-07-01

    Since heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is widely used to evaluate the physiological status of the human body, devices specifically designed for such applications are needed. To this end, we developed a smart electrocardiography (ECG) patch. The smart patch measures ECG using three electrodes integrated into the patch, filters the measured signals to minimize noise, performs analog-to-digital conversion, and detects R-peaks. The measured raw ECG data and the interval between the detected R-peaks can be recorded to enable long-term HRV analysis. Experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of the built-in R-wave detection, robustness of the device under motion, and applicability to the evaluation of mental stress. The R-peak detection results obtained with the device exhibited a sensitivity of 99.29%, a positive predictive value of 100.00%, and an error of 0.71%. The device also exhibited less motional noise than conventional ECG recording, being stable up to a walking speed of 5 km/h. When applied to mental stress analysis, the device evaluated the variation in HRV parameters in the same way as a normal ECG, with very little difference. This device can help users better understand their state of health and provide physicians with more reliable data for objective diagnosis. PMID:26558395

  6. Long-term monitoring of the onboard aircraft exposure level with a Si-diode based spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurný, F.; Dachev, Ts.

    The radiation fields onboard aircraft are complex (EURADOS, 1996), and several methods are used to characterise them for radiation protection. We have tested a spectrometer based on Si-diode at different sources and accelerator facilities. The energy deposited in the diode is analysed to estimate the contribution of different radiations to dosimetry quantities. The spectrum of energy deposition events onboard aircraft is similar to that registered in the CERN high-energy reference field. We used this similarity to determine the correction factors to appreciate radiation protection quantities from the results of onboard measurements. During 2001-2002, the spectrometer was used to acquire measurements onboard commercial aircraft during five long-term exposures. All necessary flight parameters were acquired; thus permitting calculations of the onboard effective dose and/or ambient dose equivalent by means of both the CARI6 and the EPCARD codes and comparison with the results of the measurements. It was found that the apparent ambient dose equivalent values from measured data are in reasonable agreement with the results of calculations. Quantitative analysis of this agreement as a function of flight parameters (geomagnetic position, solar activity variations, etc.) is presented. During one flight, an important solar event GLE 60 on 15 April 2001 was recorded by the spectrometer. In some other cases the measurements during a Forbush decreases were acquired. These extremes were well registered by the equipment and the data obtained are analyzed.

  7. Long-term monitoring of captive red drum Sciaenops ocellatus reveals that calling incidence and structure correlate with egg deposition.

    PubMed

    Montie, E W; Kehrer, C; Yost, J; Brenkert, K; O'Donnell, T; Denson, M R

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, quantitative data were collected to clarify the relationship between calling, call structure and eggs produced in a captive population of red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. Sciaenops ocellatus were held in four tanks equipped with long-term acoustic loggers to record underwater sound throughout a simulated reproductive season. Maximal sound production of captive S. ocellatus occurred when the photoperiod shifted from 13·0 to 12·5 h of light, and the water temperature decreased to c. 25° C. These captive settings are similar to the amount of daylight and water temperatures observed during the autumn, which is the primary spawning period for S. ocellatus. Sciaenops ocellatus exhibited daily patterns of calling with peak sound production occurring in the evenings between 0·50 h before dark and 1·08 h after dark. Spawning occurred only on evenings in which S. ocellatus were calling, and spawning was more productive when S. ocellatus produced more calls with longer durations and more pulses. This study provides ample evidence that sound production equates to spawning in captive S. ocellatus when calls are longer than 0·8 s and contain more than seven pulses. The fact that more calling, longer calls and higher sound pressure levels are associated with spawns that are more productive indicates that acoustic metrics can provide quantitative information on spawning in the wild. PMID:27170109

  8. Effects of Relocation and Individual and Environmental Factors on the Long-Term Stress Levels in Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Monitoring Hair Cortisol and Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Yamanashi, Yumi; Teramoto, Migaku; Morimura, Naruki; Hirata, Satoshi; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Idani, Gen'ichi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors associated with the long-term stress levels of captive animals is important from the view of animal welfare. In this study, we investigated the effects of relocation in addition to individual and environmental factors related to social management on long-term stress level in group-living captive chimpanzees by examining behaviors and hair cortisol (HC). Specifically, we conducted two studies. The first compared changes in HC levels before and after the relocation of 8 chimpanzees (Study 1) and the second examined the relationship between individual and environmental factors and individual HC levels in 58 chimpanzees living in Kumamoto Sanctuary (KS), Kyoto University (Study 2). We hypothesized that relocation, social situation, sex, and early rearing conditions, would affect the HC levels of captive chimpanzees. We cut arm hair from chimpanzees and extracted and assayed cortisol with an enzyme immunoassay. Aggressive behaviors were recorded ad libitum by keepers using a daily behavior monitoring sheet developed for this study. The results of Study 1 indicate that HC levels increased during the first year after relocation to the new environment and then decreased during the second year. We observed individual differences in reactions to relocation and hypothesized that social factors may mediate these changes. In Study 2, we found that the standardized rate of receiving aggression, rearing history, sex, and group formation had a significant influence on mean HC levels. Relocation status was not a significant factor, but mean HC level was positively correlated with the rate of receiving aggression. Mean HC levels were higher in males than in females, and the association between aggressive interactions and HC levels differed by sex. These results suggest that, although relocation can affect long-term stress level, individuals' experiences of aggression and sex may be more important contributors to long-term stress than relocation alone. PMID

  9. Effects of Relocation and Individual and Environmental Factors on the Long-Term Stress Levels in Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Monitoring Hair Cortisol and Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Yamanashi, Yumi; Teramoto, Migaku; Morimura, Naruki; Hirata, Satoshi; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Idani, Gen'ichi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors associated with the long-term stress levels of captive animals is important from the view of animal welfare. In this study, we investigated the effects of relocation in addition to individual and environmental factors related to social management on long-term stress level in group-living captive chimpanzees by examining behaviors and hair cortisol (HC). Specifically, we conducted two studies. The first compared changes in HC levels before and after the relocation of 8 chimpanzees (Study 1) and the second examined the relationship between individual and environmental factors and individual HC levels in 58 chimpanzees living in Kumamoto Sanctuary (KS), Kyoto University (Study 2). We hypothesized that relocation, social situation, sex, and early rearing conditions, would affect the HC levels of captive chimpanzees. We cut arm hair from chimpanzees and extracted and assayed cortisol with an enzyme immunoassay. Aggressive behaviors were recorded ad libitum by keepers using a daily behavior monitoring sheet developed for this study. The results of Study 1 indicate that HC levels increased during the first year after relocation to the new environment and then decreased during the second year. We observed individual differences in reactions to relocation and hypothesized that social factors may mediate these changes. In Study 2, we found that the standardized rate of receiving aggression, rearing history, sex, and group formation had a significant influence on mean HC levels. Relocation status was not a significant factor, but mean HC level was positively correlated with the rate of receiving aggression. Mean HC levels were higher in males than in females, and the association between aggressive interactions and HC levels differed by sex. These results suggest that, although relocation can affect long-term stress level, individuals’ experiences of aggression and sex may be more important contributors to long-term stress than relocation alone

  10. Nitrogen fluxes in response to changing NOx emissions and deposition at EPA's Mid-Atlantic Long Term Monitoring (LTM) stream sites, 1990-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, C.; Lynch, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Surface water chemistry provides direct indicators of the potential effects of anthropogenic impacts, such as acid deposition and climate change, on the overall health of aquatic ecosystems. Long-term surface water monitoring networks provide a host of environmental data that can be used, in conjunction with other networks, to assess how water bodies respond to stressors and if they are potentially at risk (e.g., receiving pollutant deposition beyond its critical load). Two EPA-administered monitoring programs provide information on the effects of acidic deposition on headwater aquatic systems: the Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) program and Long Term Monitoring (LTM) program, designed to track the effectiveness of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) in reducing the acidity of surface waters in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Here we compare trends in inorganic nitrogen emissions and deposition to streamwater nitrate (NO3-) concentration trends and NO3- export in headwater Mid-Atlantic streams. Annual NOx emissions from the fossil fuel based power sector, regulated under Title IV of the 1990 CAAA, decreased 67% from 6.7 million tones in 1990 to 2.0 million tones in 2009. Commensurate with decreased NOx emissions, there was a 31% reduction in total inorganic nitrogen deposition in the Mid-Atlantic region, from 8.7 kg N/ha to 6.0 kg N/yr. Over the same time period, surface water nitrate concentrations in headwater streams in the Northern Appalachian Plateau (n=9) and Central Appalachian mountains (n=66) improve (show a decreasing NO3- trend) at 30% and 50% of monitored sites, respectively. Despite these improvements, only 10% of monitored Appalachian streams show improvement in critical load status to no longer exceed the acid sensitivity threshold and experience adverse ecological effects. Information from long-term monitoring has shown that emission reductions have in improved environmental conditions and increased ecosystem protection

  11. Comparative test of ecological assessment methods of lowland streams based on long-term monitoring data of macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Wiegleb, Gerhard; Gebler, Daniel; van de Weyer, Klaus; Birk, Sebastian

    2016-01-15

    Ecological assessment of water courses is required by the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). Assessment by means of macrophytes is impeded by insufficient knowledge on the relations between assessment scores and the dynamics of environmental parameters. Data from a long-term observation of macrophyte dynamics over 21 years in two lowland rivers were used for testing the performance of six widely used assessment methods. Six sample sites situated in two lowland streams were selected. Four sites were classified as of moderate habitat quality and two sites as of poor habitat quality in the context of WFD. Assessment methods generally showed a poor performance in recognizing the ecological status of the annual observations. Status was more often over- than underestimated. Performance of methods differed among individual rivers and among river zones. Assessment scores mostly showed a steady decline, even though all sites obviously remained in the same habitat quality class throughout the observation period. Variation of most environmental factors was largely unrelated to assessment scores. Fluctuations of assessment scores were partly related to single natural disturbance events such as high discharge. Increased shading by marginal trees was reflected negatively by most assessment scores. Assessment scores were highly correlated with species richness and total abundance. The best overall performance was shown by the North-Rhine Westphalian (NRW) method. In contrast to single metric methods it can be adapted to individual properties of a reach in a flexible way. Macrophyte assessment based on the pressure-impact framework did not lead to a satisfying result in our case study. Improvement of species assessment scores and inclusion of functional properties such as growth form may help to overcome the present difficulties. PMID:26476066

  12. RESULTS FROM LONG-TERM OPTICAL MONITORING OF THE SOFT X-RAY TRANSIENT SAX J1810.8-2609

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Ling; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz

    2012-12-20

    In this paper, we report the long-term optical observation of the faint soft X-ray transient SAX J1810.8-2609 from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) and Microlensing Observation