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Sample records for long-term interest rates

  1. Interest in Long-Term Care among Health Services Administration Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, April; Thompson, Jon M.

    2011-01-01

    The aging of the population has created increased opportunities for health administrators in long-term care. This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey of 68 undergraduate health services administration students to explore factors related to interest in a career in long-term care administration. One third expressed interest working in the

  2. Interest in Long-Term Care among Health Services Administration Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, April; Thompson, Jon M.

    2011-01-01

    The aging of the population has created increased opportunities for health administrators in long-term care. This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey of 68 undergraduate health services administration students to explore factors related to interest in a career in long-term care administration. One third expressed interest working in the…

  3. The rising long-term trend in occupational injury rates.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J C

    1988-01-01

    Establishment survey data for the United States as a whole and workers' compensation data for the State of California were used to document long-term trends in occupational injury and acute illness rates. After declining throughout the first half of the century, national rates of disabling injuries in manufacturing, construction, and the trade sector have risen sharply in recent decades. Injury rates in mining show no strong trend either up or down since 1960. Increases over recent years have been especially pronounced for strains and sprains, cuts, lacerations and punctures, bone fractures, and acute illnesses. Injury rates in the manufacturing sector are strongly influenced by general economic conditions--rising sharply with business upsurges and declining during recessions. Increases in the rate of unemployment, which decrease worker and labor union bargaining power, are associated with increases in injury rates within manufacturing. PMID:3341497

  4. Determining long-term regional erosion rates using impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, Stefan; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    More than 300,000 impact craters have been found on Mars, while the surface of Moon's highlands is even saturated with craters. In contrast, only 184 impact craters have been confirmed on Earth so far with only 125 of them exposed at the surface. The spatial distribution of these impact craters is highly inhomogeneous. Beside the large variation in the age of the crust, consumption of craters by erosion and burial by sediments are the main actors being responsible for the quite small and inhomogeneous crater record. In this study we present a novel approach to infer long-term average erosion rates at regional scales from the terrestrial crater inventory. The basic idea behind this approach is a dynamic equilibrium between the production of new craters and their consumption by erosion. It is assumed that each crater remains detectable until the total erosion after the impact exceeds a characteristic depth depending on the crater's diameter. Combining this model with the terrestrial crater production rate, i.e., the number of craters per unit area and time as a function of their diameter, allows for a prediction of the expected number of craters in a given region as a function of the erosion rate. Using the real crater inventory, this relationship can be inverted to determine the regional long-term erosion rate and its statistical uncertainty. A limitation by the finite age of the crust can also be taken into account. Applying the method to the Colorado Plateau and the Deccan Traps, both being regions with a distinct geological history, yields erosion rates in excellent agreement with those obtained by other, more laborious methods. However, these rates are formally exposed to large statistical uncertainties due to the small number of impact craters. As higher crater densities are related to lower erosion rates, smaller statistical errors can be expected when large regions in old parts of the crust are considered. Very low long-term erosion rates of less than 4 meters per million years are obtained for large parts of the Baltic Shield and the Canadian Shield. A rather coarse world-wide map of erosion rates can be created using Voronoi diagrams.

  5. Rates of Long-Term Cochlear Implant Use in Children

    PubMed Central

    Contrera, Kevin J.; Choi, Janet S.; Blake, Caitlin R.; Betz, Joshua F.; Niparko, John K.; Lin, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the rate of long-term cochlear implant (CI) use in children Study Design: Consecutive case series Setting: Tertiary referral center Patients: 474 patients <18 years who received a first CI from 1999-2011 Interventions: Cochlear implantation Main Outcome Measure(s): Regular CI use, defined as using the CI for ? 8 hours per day Results: We successfully contacted and obtained follow-up data on 402 patients (85%) via email, telephone, and postal survey. The rate of regular CI use was 93.2% (95% CI, 90.0-95.4) at 5 years post-implantation and 87.7% (95% CI, 82.9-91.3) at 10 years post-implantation. The mean number of hours of use per day was 12.0 hours (SD, 4.1 hrs). Cox proportional hazard regression analysis demonstrated a linear association between the age at implantation and the risk of discontinuing regular CI use. Rates of CI discontinuation increased by 18.2% per year of age at implantation (95% CI, 7.2-30.4%). Reported reasons for CI use < 8 hours of per day include poor hearing benefit (53.2%), social pressure (21.3%), and recurrent displacement of the transmitter coil (17.0%). Conclusions: High rates of regular CI use are sustained after childhood implantation, and younger age at implantation is associated with a higher rate of continued device usage. PMID:24518403

  6. Long-Term Volumetric Eruption Rates and Magma Budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M. White Dept. Geological Sciences University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208; Joy A. Crisp Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91109; Frank J. Spera Dept. Earth Science University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93106

    2005-01-01

    A global compilation of 170 time-averaged volumetric volcanic output rates (Qe) is evaluated in terms of composition and petrotectonic setting to advance the understanding of long-term rates of magma generation and eruption on Earth. Repose periods between successive eruptions at a given site and intrusive:extrusive ratios were compiled for selected volcanic centers where long-term (>104 years) data were available. More silicic compositions, rhyolites and andesites, have a more limited range of eruption rates than basalts. Even when high Qe values contributed by flood basalts (9 ± 2 Å~ 10-1 km3/yr) are removed, there is a trend in decreasing average Qe with lava composition from basaltic eruptions (2.6 ± 1.0 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr) to andesites (2.3 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr) and rhyolites (4.0 ± 1.4 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr). This trend is also seen in the difference between oceanic and continental settings, as eruptions on oceanic crust tend to be predominately basaltic. All of the volcanoes occurring in oceanic settings fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 2.8 ± 0.4 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr, excluding flood basalts. Likewise, all of the volcanoes on continental crust also fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 4.4 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr. Flood basalts also form a distinctive class with an average Qe nearly two orders of magnitude higher than any other class. However, we have found no systematic evidence linking increased intrusive:extrusive ratios with lower volcanic rates. A simple heat balance analysis suggests that the preponderance of volcanic systems must be open magmatic systems with respect to heat and matter transport in order to maintain eruptible magma at shallow depth throughout the observed lifetime of the volcano. The empirical upper limit of Å`10-2 km3/yr for magma eruption rate in systems with relatively high intrusive:extrusive ratios may be a consequence of the fundamental parameters governing rates of melt generation (e.g., subsolidus isentropic decompression, hydration due to slab dehydration and heat transfer between underplated magma and the overlying crust) in the Earth

  7. Long-term alteration of basaltic glass: Mechanisms and rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parruzot, Benjamin; Jollivet, Patrick; Rébiscoul, Diane; Gin, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    The long-term behavior study of archaeological artifacts and natural minerals and glasses revealed discrepancies between laboratory and field data. For a better understanding of the cause of these discrepancies and to reinforce the use of basaltic glass as an analog for nuclear waste glasses, this study focuses on the determination of alteration rates and processes of synthetic basaltic glass in residual rate regime. Laboratory batch experiments were performed at high surface-to-volume ratios at 90 and 30 °C for more than 1000 days. In all the experiments, the residual rate regime was reached after about 6 months. The residual alteration rates at 30 and 90 °C were 4.0 ± 1.0 × 10-6 and 9.5 ± 3.2 × 10-6 g·m-2·d-1, respectively. At 90 °C, this residual alteration rate is five orders of magnitude lower than the forward alteration rate (0.8 g·m-2·d-1). Altered powders and monoliths were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. From glass core to solution, the altered materials are structured as follows: pristine glass, gel (corresponding to the palagonitic layer of natural glasses) and intergranular clays. To assess the passivating properties of this alteration film, we used solid characterization, an isotopically-tagged post-leaching experiment and the measurement of mobile species diffusion coefficients through the alteration film at different stages of reaction using various techniques (solution analysis and X-ray Reflectometry). These characterizations showed that the alteration film formed during residual rate alteration is passivating even without clogged porosity within the gel. Diffusion coefficients of water and alkali metals - respectively diffusing to and from the pristine glass - through the alteration film dropped from 10-20 to 10-19 m2·s-1 during the first alteration stages to 10-25 m2·s-1 in residual rate regime.

  8. Long term fault slip rates, distributed deformation rates and forecast of seismicity in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaverdian, A.; Zafarani, H.; Rahimian, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the long-term crustal flow of the Iranian Plateau is computed using a kinematic finite-element model (NeoKinema software). Based on the iterated weighted least squares method, the models are fitted to the newest data set of Iran including updated fault traces, geologic fault offset rates, geodetic benchmark velocities, principal stress directions, and velocity boundary conditions. We are successful to find the best kinematic model, in which geological slip rates, geodetic velocities, and interpolated stress directions are fitted at levels of 0.35, 1.0, and 1.0 datum standard deviation, respectively. The best fitted model, for the first time, provides long-term fault slip rates, velocity, and anelastic strain rate field in the Iranian Plateau from all available kinematic data. In order to verify the model, the estimates of fault slip rates are compared to slip rates from merely analyzing geodetic benchmark velocities or paleoseismological studies or published geological rates which have not been used in the model. Our estimated rates are all in the range of geodetic rates and are even more consistent with geological rates than previous GPS-based estimates. Using the selected model, long-term average seismicity maps and long-term moment rates are produced on the basis of the SHIFT hypothesis and previous global calibrations. Our kinematic model also provides a new constraint on ratio of seismic deformation to total deformation for different seismic zones of Iran. The resulting slip rates and the proposed seismic fraction of deformation provide the necessary input data for future time-dependent hazard studies in Iran. Moreover, spatial distribution and total number of strong (M > 6) and major (M > 7) earthquakes, which dominate the seismic hazard, are all compatible with the regional seismic catalog.

  9. Lunar gravity - A long-term Keplerian rate method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A. J.; Ananda, M. P.

    1977-01-01

    Nearside tracking data from Apollo subsatellites and Lunar Orbiter 5 are used to construct a model of the farside lunar gravity field. An indirect method of calculating the average effect of all the gravity anomalies which affect spacecraft orbits is reduced to a linear estimation problem by eliminating the integration of spacecraft dynamics. Doppler frequency shifts between the lunar satellite and earth-based tracking station are used to measure the line of sight velocity component between the orbiter and the tracker; gravity determination is then performed in a weighted least squares estimator which employs the orbital rates as data and formulates the normal equations using the associated Keplerian state. Simulations performed demonstrate that farside gravity features can be economically determined by use of gravity estimates obtained from long-period models of nearside orbiting tracks.

  10. Covered interest parity arbitrage and temporal long-term dependence between the US dollar and the Yen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, Jonathan A.; Szilagyi, Peter G.

    2007-03-01

    Using a daily time series from 1983 to 2005 of currency prices in spot and forward USD/Yen markets and matching equivalent maturity short-term US and Japanese interest rates, we investigate the sensitivity of the difference between actual prices in forward markets to those calculated from differentials in short-term interest rates. According to a fundamental theorem in financial economics termed covered interest parity (CIP), the actual and estimated prices should be identical once transaction and other costs are accommodated. The paper presents three important findings: first, we find evidence of considerable variation in CIP deviations from equilibrium; second, these deviations have diminished significantly and by 2000 have been almost eliminated; third, an analysis of the CIP deviations using the local Hurst exponent finds episodes of time-varying dependence over the various sample periods, which appear to be linked to episodes of dollar decline/Yen appreciation, or vice versa. The finding of temporal long-term dependence in CIP deviations is consistent with recent evidence of temporal long-term dependence in the returns of currency, stock and commodity markets.

  11. Investigating possible gravity change rates expected from long-term deep crustal processes in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouyen, M.; Simoes, M.; Mouthereau, F.; Masson, F.; Hwang, C.; Cheng, C.-C.

    2014-07-01

    We propose to test if gravimetry can prove useful in discriminating different models of long-term deep crustal processes in the case of the Taiwan mountain belt. We discuss two existing tectonic models that differ in the deep processes proposed to sustain the long-term growth of the orogen. One model assumes underplating of the uppermost Eurasian crust with subduction of the deeper part of the crust into the mantle. The other one suggests the accretion of the whole Eurasian crust above crustal-scale ramps, the lower crust being accreted into the collisional orogen. We compute the temporal gravity changes caused only by long-term rock mass transfers at depth for each of them. We show that the underplating model implies a rate of gravity change of -6 × 10-2 μGal yr-1, a value that increases to 2 × 10-2 μGal yr-1 if crustal subduction is neglected. If the accretion of the whole Eurasian crust occurs, a rate of 7 × 10-2 μGal yr-1 is obtained. The two models tested differ both in signal amplitude and spatial distribution. The yearly gravity changes expected by long-term deep crustal mass processes in Taiwan are two orders of magnitude below the present-day uncertainty of land-based gravity measurements. Assuming that these annually averaged long-term gravity changes will linearly accumulate with ongoing mountain building, multidecadal time-series are needed to identify comparable rates of gravity change. However, as gravity is sensitive to any mass redistribution, effects of short-term processes such as seismicity and surface mass transfers (erosion, sedimentation, ground-water) may prevent from detecting any long-term deep signal. This study indicates that temporal gravity is not appropriate for deciphering the long-term deep crustal processes involved in the Taiwan mountain belt.

  12. Long-term shoreline retreat rates on Whidbey Island, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Heather E.; Swanson, Terry W.; Stone, John O.

    2012-09-01

    Long-term retreat rates of Puget Sound's unconsolidated sediment shorelines have been difficult to quantify, and little systematic research has been completed to constrain retreat in this area. We put forward a new application of cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating to assess long-term shoreline retreat on Whidbey Island, WA by dating lag boulders exposed on the shore platform as the shoreline erodes. Production of 10Be in shoreline boulders is modulated by both tidal submergence and topographic shielding from the retreating bluff. By modeling the combined effect of these variables on 10Be production, the timing of exposure can be determined and used to calculate long-term (103-104 yr) bluff retreat rates. In rare cases, retreat rates are underestimated due to inherited 10Be. Within the study area, average retreat rates ranged between 0 and 8 cm yr- 1. Our results demonstrate the utility of cosmogenic nuclides for determining long-term shoreline retreat rates in areas with thick sediment cover, where large numbers of samples can be collected, and where the pre-depositional history of the boulders is uncomplicated.

  13. Estimating the long-term phosphorus accretion rate in the Everglades: A Bayesian approach with risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Song S.; Richardson, Curtis J.

    Using wetlands as a sink of nutrients, phosphorus in particular, is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to conventional wastewater treatment technology. In this paper, we briefly review the mechanism of phosphorus retention in wetlands, as well as previous modeling efforts. A Bayesian method is then proposed for estimating the long-term phosphorus accretion rate in wetlands through a piecewise linear model of outflow phosphorus concentration and phosphorus mass loading rate. The Bayesian approach was used for its simplicity in computation and its ability to accurately represent uncertainty. Applied to an Everglades wetland, the Bayesian method not only produced the probability distribution of the long-term phosphorus accretion rate but also generated a relationship of acceptable level of ``risk'' and optimal phosphorus mass loading rate for the proposed constructed wetlands in south Florida. The latter is a useful representation of uncertainty which is of interest to decision makers.

  14. Decoupling of long-term exhumation and short-term erosion rates in the Sikkim Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahami, Rachel; van der Beek, Peter; Huyghe, Pascale; Hardwick, Elisabeth; Carcaillet, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relative strengths of tectonic and climatic forcing on erosion at different spatial and temporal scales is important to understand the evolution of orogenic topography. To address this question, we quantified exhumation rates at geological timescales and erosion rates at millennial timescales in modern river sands from 10 sub-catchments of the Tista River drainage basin in the Sikkim Himalaya (northeast India) using detrital apatite fission-track thermochronology and cosmogenic 10Be analyses, respectively. We compare these rates to several potential geomorphic or climatic forcing parameters. Our results show that millennial erosion rates are generally higher and spatially more variable than long-term exhumation rates in Sikkim. They also show strongly contrasting spatial patterns, suggesting that the processes controlling these rates are decoupled. At geological timescales, exhumation rates decrease from south to north, with rates up to 1.2 ± 0.6 mm/yr recorded in southwest Sikkim and as low as 0.5 ± 0.2 mm/yr in the northernmost catchment. Long-term exhumation rates do not correlate with any geomorphic or climatic parameter. We suggest they are tectonically controlled: high rates in southwest Sikkim may be linked to the building of the Lesser Himalaya Rangit Duplex, whereas low rates in north Sikkim are consistent with cessation of extensional exhumation along the South Tibetan Detachment after 13 Ma. The highest apparent erosion rates recorded by cosmogenic nuclides (˜5 mm/yr) occur in catchments spanning the Main Central Thrust Zone, but these appear to be strongly influenced by recent landsliding. High millennial erosion rates (1-2 mm/yr) also occur in north Sikkim and may be climatically driven through strong glacial inheritance of the landscape, as attested by high channel-steepness values close to the maximum extent of glaciers during the Last Glacial Maximum. In contrast, variations in rainfall rate do not seem to strongly influence either millennial erosion or long-term exhumation rates in Sikkim.

  15. Short-term and Long-term Variations of Dose Rate measured by MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Rafkin, Scot; Boettcher, Stephan; Reitz, Guenther; Koehler, Jan; Ehresmann, Bent; Martin, Cesar; Burmeister, Soenke; Posner, Arik; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Hassler, Donald M.; Brinza, David; Boehm, Henning Eckart; Lohf, Henning; Appel, Jan

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), onboard Mars Science Laboratorys (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the spectra of both energetic charged and neutral particles along with radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars. Several effects have been observed for the first time to influence the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR)-driven particle radiation on the surface: [a] short-term diurnal variations of the Martian atmospheric pressure caused by daily thermal tides [Rafkin 2014]; [b] long-term seasonal pressure changes in the Martian atmosphere; and [c] the modulation of the primary GCR fluxes by the heliospheric magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activities and heliospheric rotation. These concurrent factors affect the dose rate variations measured by RAD on the Martian surface. RAD also recorded the dose rate during the 253-day cruise phase of MSL from the Earth to Mars. The variations of the GCR-induced dose rates during quiet time period without the direct detection of Solar Particle Events (SPE) were solely driven by the changes of heliospheric conditions (i.e. [c]). The RAD cruise and surface dose measurements, along with the surface pressure data and the solar modulation factor, are analysed in order to understand how the long-term influences ([b] and [c]) individually correlate with the measured dose rates.

  16. Constraints on the affinity term for modeling long-term glass dissolution rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W.L.; Carroll, S.A.; Phillips, B.L.

    1993-11-01

    Predictions of long-term glass dissolution rates are highly dependent on the form of the affinity term in the rate expression. Analysis of the quantitative effect of saturation state on glass dissolution rate for CSG glass (a simple analog of SRL-165 glass), shows that a simple (1-Q/K) affinity term does not match experimental results. Our data at 100{degree}C show that the data is better fit by an affinity term having the form (1 {minus} (Q/K){sup 1}/{sigma}) where {sigma} = 10.

  17. Long-term cosmogenic 10Be catchment-wide erosion rates in the Kruger National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzbach, Christoph; Paape, Alexander; Reinwarth, Bastian; Baade, Jussi; Miller, Jordan; Rowntree, Kate

    2015-04-01

    In this study we estimated long-term catchment-wide erosion rates in the central and southern Kruger National Park with cosmogenic 10Be analyses. Samples were collected in small catchments (2-100 km2) upstream of dams, which were used to determine short-term sediment yield rates. 10Be-derived erosion rates vary from 4-15 mm/kyr. Although there are significant site-specific differences in geomorphic parameters and precipitation we could not identify a single parameter controlling long-term erosion. Geomorphic fieldwork reveals that an unknown fraction of sampled sand-sized channel sediments derived from partly extensive and up to a few-meters deep gully erosion, which may lead to an overestimation of 10Be-derived erosion rates. Cosmogenic nuclide production is rapidly decreasing with depth and consequently the measured 10Be concentration of stream sediments is a mixture of (i) sand with high 10Be concentration from colluvial creep or sheet flow from hillslopes and (ii) sand with low 10Be concentration from gully erosion. To correct erosion rates, we quantify sediments derived from gullies using a combination of mapping gullies using remote sensing data and field work and geochemical characterisation of intact hillslopes and gully side walls.

  18. Long-Term Profile Stability of the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zytowski, Donald G.

    1976-01-01

    Profile stability of the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey was assessed for profiles obtained twelve and nineteen years apart for persons between thirteen and twenty years of age at the time of first administration. Reported reliabilities ranged from .40 to .80 for various sub-samples. (JKS)

  19. Effects of long-term grazing on sediment deposition and salt-marsh accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elschot, Kelly; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Temmerman, Stijn; Bakker, Jan P.

    2013-11-01

    Many studies have attempted to predict whether coastal marshes will be able to keep up with future acceleration of sea-level rise by estimating marsh accretion rates. However, there are few studies focussing on the long-term effects of herbivores on vegetation structure and subsequent effects on marsh accretion. Deposition of fine-grained, mineral sediment during tidal inundations, together with organic matter accumulation from the local vegetation, positively affects accretion rates of marsh surfaces. Tall vegetation can enhance sediment deposition by reducing current flow and wave action. Herbivores shorten vegetation height and this could potentially reduce sediment deposition. This study estimated the effects of herbivores on 1) vegetation height, 2) sediment deposition and 3) resulting marsh accretion after long-term (at least 16 years) herbivore exclusion of both small (i.e. hare and goose) and large grazers (i.e. cattle) for marshes of different ages. Our results firstly showed that both small and large herbivores can have a major impact on vegetation height. Secondly, grazing processes did not affect sediment deposition. Finally, trampling by large grazers affected marsh accretion rates by compacting the soil. In many European marshes, grazing is used as a tool in nature management as well as for agricultural purposes. Thus, we propose that soil compaction by large grazers should be taken in account when estimating the ability of coastal systems to cope with an accelerating sea-level rise.

  20. Hyperpolarization induces a long-term increase in the spontaneous firing rate of cerebellar Golgi cells.

    PubMed

    Hull, Court A; Chu, YunXiang; Thanawala, Monica; Regehr, Wade G

    2013-04-01

    Golgi cells (GoCs) are inhibitory interneurons that influence the cerebellar cortical response to sensory input by regulating the excitability of the granule cell layer. While GoC inhibition is essential for normal motor coordination, little is known about the circuit dynamics that govern the activity of these cells. In particular, although GoC spontaneous spiking influences the extent of inhibition and gain throughout the granule cell layer, it is not known whether this spontaneous activity can be modulated in a long-term manner. Here we describe a form of long-term plasticity that regulates the spontaneous firing rate of GoCs in the rat cerebellar cortex. We find that membrane hyperpolarization, either by mGluR2 activation of potassium channels, or by somatic current injection, induces a long-lasting increase in GoC spontaneous firing. This spike rate plasticity appears to result from a strong reduction in the spike after hyperpolarization. Pharmacological manipulations suggest the involvement of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II and calcium-activated potassium channels in mediating these firing rate increases. As a consequence of this plasticity, GoC spontaneous spiking is selectively enhanced, but the gain of evoked spiking is unaffected. Hence, this plasticity is well suited for selectively regulating the tonic output of GoCs rather than their sensory-evoked responses. PMID:23554471

  1. Preliminary investigations of Spirulina effect on cancer cells: interest for long-term manned space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatout, S.; Bekaert, S.; Hendrickx, L.; Derradji, H.; Mergeay, M.

    Background In view of long haul space exploration missions the development of regenerative life support systems is of crucial importance to increase the crew autonomy and decrease the cost associated to the mass embarked Therefore in the late 80 s the European Space Agency initiated the MELiSSA project Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative MELiSSA has been conceived as a micro-organisms and higher plant process enabling high recycling efficiency The cyanobacteria Arthrospira sp is occupying one of the MELiSSA compartments Its genome is now being sequenced and this will help to better understand or improve its food value as well as to have a look at its putative toxic potential Aim In this study we were interested in studying the threshold of intrinsic cytotoxic effects of Spirulina dry extract from Sigma containing washed and lyophilized mixed Arthrospira strains on human cancer cells and its cell type dependency Method For that purpose we used flow cytometry to estimate cell death apoptosis and necrosis in three human leukaemic cell lines HELA cervix carcinoma IM-9 multiple myeloma K562 chronic myelogenous leukaemia Cells were cultured in the presence of an aqueous extract of Spirulina concentrations ranging from 0 to 500 mu g ml for 15 to 40 hours Apoptosis and necrosis were evaluated by annexin-V-PI staining cell size and granularity Early apoptosis was monitored by analysing the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential DioC 6 3 and the

  2. Physical Inactivity and Long-Term Rates of Community-Acquired Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Baddley, John; Griffin, Russell; Judd, Suzanne; Howard, George; Donnelly, John; Safford, Monika M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors sought to determine the association between physical inactivity (characterized by exercise and television watching levels) and long-term rates of community-acquired sepsis. METHODS Population-based cohort study of 30,183 adult (?45 years) community-dwelling participants. Subjects reported weekly exercise (low=none, medium=1-3 times/week, high= ?4 times/week) and daily television watching (low= <1 hour/day, medium= 1-3 hours/day, high= ?4 hours/day) levels. The authors evaluated the association between exercise, television watching and rates of sepsis, defined as hospital treatment for a serious infection with ?2 Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria. RESULTS Among 30,183 participants, 1,500 experienced a sepsis event. Reported weekly exercise was: high 8,798 (29.2%), medium 10,695 (35.4%), and low 10,240 (33.9%). Where available, reported daily television watching was: low 4,615 (19.6%), medium 11,587 (49.3%) and high 7,317 (31.1%). Decreased weekly exercise was associated with increased adjusted sepsis rates (high referent; medium HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.96-1.20; low 1.33, 1.13-1.56). Daily television watching was not associated with sepsis rates. Sepsis rates were highest among those with both low exercise and high television watching levels (HR 1.49, 95% CI: 1.10-2.01). CONCLUSIONS Physical inactivity may be associated with increased long-term rates of community-acquired sepsis. PMID:24768917

  3. Metamemory ratings predict long-term changes in reactivated episodic memories

    PubMed Central

    Yacoby, Amnon; Dudai, Yadin; Mendelsohn, Avi

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of long-term memory can render the memory item temporarily labile, offering an opportunity to modify it via behavioral or pharmacological intervention. Declarative memory reactivation is accompanied by a metamemory ability to subjectively assess the knowledge available concerning the target item (Feeling of knowing, FOK). We set out to examine whether FOK can predict the extent of change of long-term episodic memories by post-retrieval manipulations. To this end, participants watched a short movie and were immediately thereafter tested on their memory for it. A day later, they were reminded of that movie, and either immediately or 1 day later, were presented with a second movie. The reminder phase consisted of memory cues to which participants were asked to judge their FOK regarding the original movie. The memory performance of participants to whom new information was presented immediately after reactivating the original episode corresponded to the degree of FOK ratings upon reactivation such that the lower their FOK, the less their memory declined. In contrast, no relation was found between FOK and memory strength for those who learned new information 1 day after the reminder phase. Our findings suggest that the subjective accessibility of reactivated memories may determine the extent to which new information might modify those memories. PMID:25709571

  4. Metamemory ratings predict long-term changes in reactivated episodic memories.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Amnon; Dudai, Yadin; Mendelsohn, Avi

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of long-term memory can render the memory item temporarily labile, offering an opportunity to modify it via behavioral or pharmacological intervention. Declarative memory reactivation is accompanied by a metamemory ability to subjectively assess the knowledge available concerning the target item (Feeling of knowing, FOK). We set out to examine whether FOK can predict the extent of change of long-term episodic memories by post-retrieval manipulations. To this end, participants watched a short movie and were immediately thereafter tested on their memory for it. A day later, they were reminded of that movie, and either immediately or 1 day later, were presented with a second movie. The reminder phase consisted of memory cues to which participants were asked to judge their FOK regarding the original movie. The memory performance of participants to whom new information was presented immediately after reactivating the original episode corresponded to the degree of FOK ratings upon reactivation such that the lower their FOK, the less their memory declined. In contrast, no relation was found between FOK and memory strength for those who learned new information 1 day after the reminder phase. Our findings suggest that the subjective accessibility of reactivated memories may determine the extent to which new information might modify those memories. PMID:25709571

  5. Effects of climate and mineral supply rates on long-term chemical weathering rates in granitic landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebe, C. S.; Kirchner, J. W.; Finkel, R. C.

    2003-12-01

    We used cosmogenic nuclide and geochemical mass balance methods to measure long-term rates of chemical weathering and physical erosion of granitic terrain. Our 43 study sites encompass widely varying climates and denudation rates; mean annual temperatures vary from 2 to 32\\deg C, average annual precipitation spans a 20-fold range (from 22 to 420 cm/yr), and denudation rates vary by 32-fold across our sites. Long-term chemical weathering rates for these 43 sites range from 0 to 173 t km-2 yr-1, in several cases exceeding the highest granitic weathering rates on record from previous work. Chemical weathering rates are highest at sites with rapid denudation rates, consistent with strong coupling between rates of chemical weathering and mineral supply from physical erosion of rock. To account for effects of mineral supply in analyzing how climate affects chemical weathering, we introduce the "Weathering Intensity Factor" (WIF), the ratio of chemical weathering rate to physical erosion rate. WIF's increase systematically with average annual precipitation and mean annual temperature, both for the soil as a whole, and for individual component elements including Si, Na, and Ca. Between 59 and 79 percent of the variance in WIF's can be explained by a simple Arrhenius-like relationship based on mean annual temperature and average annual precipitation. Moreover, when we couple this Arrhenius relationship with our measurements of long-term erosion rates, we obtain a simple prediction equation that explains between 79 and 93 percent of the variance in long-term chemical weathering rates. The temperature-dependence of WIF is roughly half what one would expect from laboratory measurements of activation energies for feldspar weathering. Our results imply that the strength of climate change feedbacks between temperature and silicate weathering rates may be weaker than previously thought, at least in actively eroding, unglaciated terrain similar to our study sites. Our results further indicate that chemical weathering rates may often be limited by the rates that fresh minerals are supplied to soils by erosion, implying that tectonic uplift may be an important regulator of long-term chemical weathering rates in mountainous, granitic landscapes.

  6. Do erosion rates control the long-term carbon isotope mass balance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields-Zhou, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    The long-term marine carbon isotope record responds to changes in the proportional burial rates of organic carbon relative to carbonate carbon on a global scale. For this reason, high δ13C values in marine carbonate rocks are normally interpreted to reflect faster rates of organic burial and increased atmospheric oxygenation. Geochemical redox tracers fail to support this paradigm for sustained deviations from the long-term δ13C mean, indicating perhaps that proportionally high organic burial may be associated with lower overall flux rates. Here I propose that ~107-108 year trends in average δ13C, as with seawater 87Sr/86Sr, are driven by changes in the balance between volcanism and denudation (~uplift). In other words, high proportional organic burial may be related to increases in the net CO2 flux (= organic carbon burial + Ca-Mg silicate weathering) relative to the carbonate weathering flux. According to this model, high baseline δ13C values will be associated with periods of heightened volcanic activity and/or diminished tectonic uplift. Conversely, lower baseline δ13C values can be related to times when the global carbon cycle was dominated by carbonate and oxidative weathering due to high rates of physical erosion. Shorter 105-106 year positive δ13C excursions have also been interpreted as the 'smoking gun' to extreme oxygenation events. However, large increases in organic burial are difficult to sustain under steady-state conditions without very high volcanic fluxes, indicating that some of these excursions might be better explained by transient changes to the isotopic composition of carbon sources and sinks.

  7. Long-term clinical failure rate of molar tubes bonded with a self-etching primer.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Christensen, Lars; Eliades, Theodore

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term in vivo failure rate of tubes bonded to first and second molars with a self-etching primer (SEF). A total of 810 molar tubes (414 first molar and 396 second molar) were bonded on 135 patients (56 male, 79 female; mean age 14 years) with the 3M Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer. The first-time failures of the tubes were recorded for a mean period of 26 months (range 23-29 months). Failure rates per jaw (maxilla-mandible), tooth (first and second molar), and quadrant (left, right) were analyzed with the chi(2) at alpha = 0.05 level of significance. Significant differences were found in the failure rate between first and second molars (9.66% vs 20%, respectively) as well as maxillary and mandibular molars (7.5% vs 21%, respectively). The combined, total failure rate for first and second molars was 14.80%. No difference was found between male and female failure rates for the molar tubes. First-molar tubes bonded with an SEF may show failure rates comparable with those reported in the literature for tubes bonded with conventional acid etching. PMID:16448245

  8. Cell Tropism Predicts Long-term Nucleotide Substitution Rates of Mammalian RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Allison L.; Duffy, Siobain

    2014-01-01

    The high rates of RNA virus evolution are generally attributed to replication with error-prone RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, these long-term nucleotide substitution rates span three orders of magnitude and do not correlate well with mutation rates or selection pressures. This substitution rate variation may be explained by differences in virus ecology or intrinsic genomic properties. We generated nucleotide substitution rate estimates for mammalian RNA viruses and compiled comparable published rates, yielding a dataset of 118 substitution rates of structural genes from 51 different species, as well as 40 rates of non-structural genes from 28 species. Through ANCOVA analyses, we evaluated the relationships between these rates and four ecological factors: target cell, transmission route, host range, infection duration; and three genomic properties: genome length, genome sense, genome segmentation. Of these seven factors, we found target cells to be the only significant predictors of viral substitution rates, with tropisms for epithelial cells or neurons (P<0.0001) as the most significant predictors. Further, one-tailed t-tests showed that viruses primarily infecting epithelial cells evolve significantly faster than neurotropic viruses (P<0.0001 and P<0.001 for the structural genes and non-structural genes, respectively). These results provide strong evidence that the fastest evolving mammalian RNA viruses infect cells with the highest turnover rates: the highly proliferative epithelial cells. Estimated viral generation times suggest that epithelial-infecting viruses replicate more quickly than viruses with different cell tropisms. Our results indicate that cell tropism is a key factor in viral evolvability. PMID:24415935

  9. Interest rates factor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwook; Kim, Min Jae; Kim, Soo Yong

    2011-07-01

    Interdependence of the interest rates of the US, the UK, and Japan is analyzed in this work by means of spectral analysis and network methods. A predominant effective factor in the interest rate market is which country floats a bond issue, and a minor effective factor is time to maturity of bonds. Power-law cross-correlation among different countries is analyzed by the detrended cross-correlation analysis method. Long-range cross-correlation is found between the first factors of interest rate, while there is no cross-correlation between some of the second factors. The tail dependency is indicated by tail indices from Archimedean copulas, including an empirical copula. In contrast to other pairs, the US-UK first factor pair has tail dependencies in both the upper-tail and lower-tail. Dynamic properties of interest rate are modeled by a stochastic volatility model. The properties of mean reverting and volatility clustering are observed and reflected in this model. The proposed simulation method combines the dependence structures and the factor dynamics model; it simultaneously describes the interest rates of different countries.

  10. Revised long-term creep rates on the Hayward Fault, Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.; Galehouse, Jon S.

    1997-01-01

    Although the Hayward fault is a source of major earthquakes, it also creeps or slips aseismically, and has done so steadily for several decades (certainly since 1921 and probably since 1869). Most of the fault creeps between 3 and 6 mm/yr, except for a 4- to 6-km-long segment near its south end that creeps at about 9 mm/yr. We present results of our recent surveys to recover angles and deflection lines established across the fault in the 1960s and 1970s, but unmonitored since. We have added data from more offset cultural features to the long-term creep rate data set and made substantial improvements to the analytical method used to compute offsets. The revised creep rate values improve our knowledge of spatial and temporal variation along the fault. The more accurate revised data has reduced the estimate of the average creep rate along most of the fault from 5.1 mm/yr to 4.6 mm/yr. Creep rates in the 9 mm/yr section near the south end have remained the same.

  11. Low slip rates and long-term preservation of geomorphic features in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, Ralf; Niedermann, Samuel; Tao, Mingxin; Kubik, Peter W; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Gao, Bo; Strecker, Manfred R

    2002-05-23

    In order to understand the dynamics of the India Asia collision zone, it is important to know the strain distribution in Central Asia, whose determination relies on the slip rates for active faults. Many previous slip-rate estimates of faults in Central Asia were based on the assumption that offset landforms are younger than the Last Glacial Maximum (approximately 20 kyr ago). In contrast, here we present surface exposure ages of 40 to 170 kyr, obtained using cosmogenic nuclide dating, for a series of terraces near a thrust at the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Combined with the tectonic offset, the ages imply a long-term slip rate of only about 0.35 mm x yr(-1) for the active thrust, an order of magnitude lower than rates obtained from the assumption that the terraces formed after the Last Glacial Maximum. Our data demonstrate that the preservation potential of geomorphic features in Central Asia is higher than commonly assumed. PMID:12024210

  12. Long-term flow rates and biomat zone hydrology in soil columns receiving septic tank effluent.

    PubMed

    Beal, C D; Gardner, E A; Kirchhof, G; Menzies, N W

    2006-07-01

    Soil absorption systems (SAS) are used commonly to treat and disperse septic tank effluent (STE). SAS can hydraulically fail as a result of the low permeable biomat zone that develops on the infiltrative surface. The objectives of this experiment were to compare the hydraulic properties of biomats grown in soils of different textures, to investigate the long-term acceptance rates (LTAR) from prolonged application of STE, and to assess if soils were of major importance in determining LTAR. The STE was applied to repacked sand, Oxisol and Vertisol soil columns over a period of 16 months, at equivalent hydraulic loading rates of 50, 35 and 8L/m(2)/d, respectively. Infiltration rates, soil matric potentials, and biomat hydraulic properties were measured either directly from the soil columns or calculated using established soil physics theory. Biomats 1 to 2 cm thick developed in all soils columns with hydraulic resistances of 27 to 39 d. These biomats reduced a 4 order of magnitude variation in saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(s)) between the soils to a one order of magnitude variation in LTAR. A relationship between biomat resistance and organic loading rate was observed in all soils. Saturated hydraulic conductivity influenced the rate and extent of biomat development. However, once the biomat was established, the LTAR was governed by the resistance of the biomat and the sub-biomat soil unsaturated flow regime induced by the biomat. Results show that whilst initial soil K(s) is likely to be important in the establishment of the biomat zone in a trench, LTAR is determined by the biomat resistance and the unsaturated soil hydraulic conductivity, not the K(s) of a soil. The results call into question the commonly used approach of basing the LTAR, and ultimately trench length in SAS, on the initial K(s) of soils. PMID:16764900

  13. Short- and long-term population response to changes in vital rates: implications for population viability analysis.

    PubMed

    Chirakkal, Haridas; Gerber, Leah R

    2010-04-01

    Conservation practitioners use demographic population viability analysis (PVA) to understand long-term effects of changing demographic rates on population growth rate. Sensitivities and elasticities of stage-specific survival and fertility rates provide managers with guidelines on the relative contributions of various life-history stages to long-term population growth. However, short-term patterns, especially single-year effects, of elasticity may be dramatically different from long-term effects, calling for caution in implementing management policies focusing entirely on only long- or short-term elasticities. Here we illustrate the temporal and spatial variation in elasticity patterns for four populations of California sea lions. Short-term stochastic elasticities were significantly different from long-term elasticities, and spatial patterns of short- and long-term elasticities varied across sites. These differences may be explained by transient effects in age structure and deviations from the stable age distribution, as well as environmental variation. Our results suggest that conservation practitioners should consider calculations of both short-and long-term elasticity in viability analyses that are used to guide management and should use caution in generalizing elasticity patterns across populations. PMID:20437963

  14. Long-term survival rate of teeth receiving multidisciplinary endodontic, periodontal and prosthodontic treatments.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, A S; Radafshar, G; Taramsari, M; Darabi, F

    2014-03-01

    Deciding whether to replace or preserve a compromised tooth, even with emerging trends in implant dentistry, is still a common dilemma for practitioners. This study sought to determine the 3- to more than 10-year survival rate of teeth that had undergone endodontic, periodontal and prosthodontic treatments. A total of 245 teeth in 87 patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated. All the teeth had received crown lengthening surgery by a single periodontist. Root canal therapy and prosthodontic procedures were rendered either by specialists or by experienced general dentists. Numbers of lost teeth were recorded and the criteria for hopeless teeth were defined. Survival rate was determined using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Clinical indices including pocket depth (PD), bleeding index (BI), C/R ratio, position of the restoration margin relative to the gingival margin (RM-GM) and the presence of intra-canal post were compared between different survival groups (<3, 3-5, 5-10 and >10years) using one-way analysis of variance (anova). Potential predictors of failure were determined using the Cox regression model. The means.d. of 3-, 5-, 10- and 13-year survival rates was 981%, 96 16%, 83145% and 519145%, respectively. The mean PD (P<0013), as well as C/R ratio in the mesial (P=0003) and distal (P=0007) surfaces, was significantly higher in the >10-year-survived teeth. Bleeding index and RM-GM showed no significant differences between the groups. C/R ratio and RM-GM position appeared to be the major determinants of tooth loss. The long-term survival rate of multidisciplinary-treated teeth was 83-98% in this specific sample. PMID:24483819

  15. Extremely low long-term erosion rates around the Gamburtsev Mountains in interior East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. E.; Thomson, S. N.; Reiners, P. W.; Hemming, S. R.; van de Flierdt, T.

    2010-11-01

    The high elevation and rugged relief (>3 km) of the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM) have long been considered enigmatic. Orogenesis normally occurs near plate boundaries, not cratonic interiors, and large-scale tectonic activity last occurred in East Antarctica during the Pan-African (480-600 Ma). We sampled detrital apatite from Eocene sands in Prydz Bay at the terminus of the Lambert Graben, which drained a large pre-glacial basin including the northern Gamburtsev Mountains. Apatite fission-track and (U-Th)/He cooling ages constrain bedrock erosion rates throughout the catchment. We double-dated apatites to resolve individual cooling histories. Erosion was very slow, averaging 0.01-0.02 km/Myr for >250 Myr, supporting the preservation of high elevation in interior East Antarctica since at least the cessation of Permian rifting. Long-term topographic preservation lends credence to postulated high-elevation mountain ice caps in East Antarctica since at least the Cretaceous and to the idea that cold-based glaciation can preserve tectonically inactive topography.

  16. Observer-rated depression in long-term care: frequency and risk factors.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G; Voyer, Philippe; Monette, Johanne; Champoux, Nathalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Vu, Minh; Dyachenko, Alina; Belzile, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe the prevalence and 6-month incidence of observer-rated depression in residents age 65 and over of long-term care (LTC) facilities; (2) to describe risk factors for depression, at baseline and over time. A multisite, prospective observational study was conducted in residents aged 65 and over of 7 LTC facilities. The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) was completed by nurses monthly for 6 months. We measured demographic, medical, and functional factors at baseline and monthly intervals, using data from research assessments, nurse interviews, and chart reviews. 274 residents were recruited and completed baseline depression assessments. The prevalence of depression (CSDD score of 6+) was 19.0%. The incidence of depression among those without prevalent depression was 73.3 per 100 person-years. A delirium diagnosis, pain, and diabetes were independently associated with prevalent depression. CSDD score at baseline and development of severe cognitive impairment at follow-up were independent risk factors for incident depression. A diagnosis of delirium and uncorrected visual impairment at follow-up occurred concurrently with incident depression. The results of this study have implications for the detection and prevention of depression in LTC. Delirium diagnosis, pain and diabetes at baseline were associated with prevalent depression; depression symptoms at baseline and development of severe cognitive impairment at follow-up were risk factors for incident depression. PMID:24345307

  17. Coupling of realistic rate estimates with genomic for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Phone

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F. S.; Crawford, R. L.; Sorenson, K.

    2003-06-01

    Dissolved dense nonaqueous-phase liquid plumes are persistent, widespread problems in the DOE complex. While perceived as being difficult to degrade, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) is disappearing from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) by natural attenuation, a finding that saves significant site restoration costs. Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation as a preferred treatment technology requires direct proof of the process and rate of the degradation. Our proposal aims to provide that proof for one such site by testing two hypotheses. First, we believe that realistic values for in situ rates of TCE cometabolism can be obtained by sustaining the putative microorganisms at the low catabolic activities consistent with aquifer conditions. Second, the patterns of functional gene expression evident in these communities under starvation conditions while carrying out TCE cometabolism can be used to diagnose the cometabolic activity in the aquifer itself. Using the cometabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained at this location and validate the long term stewardship of this plume. Realistic terms for cometabolism of TCE will provide marked improvements in DOE's ability to predict and monitor natural attenuation of chlorinated organics at other sites, increase the acceptability of this solution, and provide significant economic and health benefits through this noninvasive remediation strategy. Finally, this project will derive valuable genomic information about the functional attributes of subsurface microbial communities upon which DOE must depend to resolve some of its most difficult contamination issues.

  18. Long-term dynamics of death rates of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia and improving air quality

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Abernethy, Amy P; Holman, Sheila; Ross, William G; Lyerly, H Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background The respiratory tract is a major target of exposure to air pollutants, and respiratory diseases are associated with both short- and long-term exposures. We hypothesized that improved air quality in North Carolina was associated with reduced rates of death from respiratory diseases in local populations. Materials and methods We analyzed the trends of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia mortality and changes of the levels of ozone, sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matters (PM2.5 and PM10) using monthly data measurements from air-monitoring stations in North Carolina in 19932010. The log-linear model was used to evaluate associations between air-pollutant levels and age-adjusted death rates (per 100,000 of population) calculated for 5-year age-groups and for standard 2000 North Carolina population. The studied associations were adjusted by age group-specific smoking prevalence and seasonal fluctuations of disease-specific respiratory deaths. Results Decline in emphysema deaths was associated with decreasing levels of SO2 and CO in the air, decline in asthma deathswith lower SO2, CO, and PM10 levels, and decline in pneumonia deathswith lower levels of SO2. Sensitivity analyses were performed to study potential effects of the change from International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 to ICD-10 codes, the effects of air pollutants on mortality during summer and winter, the impact of approach when only the underlying causes of deaths were used, and when mortality and air-quality data were analyzed on the county level. In each case, the results of sensitivity analyses demonstrated stability. The importance of analysis of pneumonia as an underlying cause of death was also highlighted. Conclusion Significant associations were observed between decreasing death rates of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia and decreases in levels of ambient air pollutants in North Carolina. PMID:25018627

  19. Ductile strain rates measurements reveal continental crust long-term deformation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, E.; Leloup, P. H.; Sassier, C.; Gardien, V.; Ricard, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Any discussion on the long-term crustal rheology is hindered by our poor knowledge of deformation rates in the deep crust. These rates have only been estimated to be ?10-15 and ?10-13 s-1 in the "stable" and highly deforming zones respectively, and measured in a few peculiar cases. Because quartz ribbons are ubiquitous in continental shear zones, the quartz-strain-rate-metry (QRS) method, based on experimentally calibrated quartz piezometers and ductile flow laws, could provide deformation rates measurements in many geological contexts. However, the results are highly sensitive on the deformation temperature that is difficult to measure. Furthermore, results vary by three orders of magnitude depending on the chosen piezometer and rheological law. If recent technical progress allow measuring more precisely the deformation temperature, it is still not clear what is the most accurate piezometer - rheological law association. We solved that dilemma by comparing strain rates measured by the QRS method with a reference one measured with another method on the same outcrop of the Ailao Shan - Red River (ASRR) shear zone. At site C1, by combining dating of syntectonic dykes and measurements of their deformation, the strain rate is calculated between 3 and 4 x10-14 s-1 between 29 to 22 Ma, (Sassier et al., JGR, 2009). Quartz ribbons sampled in site C1 show large grains recrystallized by grain boundary migration (GBM), themselves recrystallized at lower temperature by sub-grain rotation (SGR). The mean recrystallized quartz grain size for the SGR event range between 74.0 and 79.3 ?m. The associated stresses, measured with Shimizu (JSG, 2008) piezometer, range between 35.2 and 38.1 MPa. Conditions of deformation of P? 1.5 kbar and T? 430C were inferred by combining several thermobarometers on quartz, such as TitaniQ, fluid inclusions microthermometry and crystallographic fabrics. The calculated strain rate with five flow laws and three piezometers range between 3.5 x10-18 and 4.3 x10-13 s-1. Strain rates of natural quartz ribbons deformation under mid-crustal conditions appear better approximated by the QRS method if using Hirth (J. Earth Sciences, 2001) power flow law and the Shimizu piezometer. Most other combinations underestimate the strain rate. Applying the QRS method to major continental shear zones, we can quantify across-strike local strain rate variations and document where deformation localizes. For example, nine quartz ribbons sampled across the ASRR shear zone provided strain rates progressively increasing from the south-western border to the north-eastern border, from 2.5 x10-15 to 1.34 x10-12 s-1. The north-eastern border of the ASRR shear zone has been interpreted as the paleo-center of the shear zone, exhumed in the footwall of the active normal Red River fault. We conclude that strain localized at the paleo-center of the shear zone, as inferred by most of numerical models of shear zones deformation. Summation of the local strain rates yield global strain rates compatible with the fault rate deduced from geological constraints. This opens the way to extensive strain rate measurements, quantification of deformation localization and direct comparison with numerical models for continental lithosphere rheology and strain localisation.

  20. Jensen’s Inequality and the Impact of Short-Term Environmental Variability on Long-Term Population Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, Evan J.; Thomson, David L.; Li, Teng A.; Xing, Shuang

    2015-01-01

    It is well established in theory that short-term environmental fluctuations could affect the long-term growth rates of wildlife populations, but this theory has rarely been tested and there remains little empirical evidence that the effect is actually important in practice. Here we develop models to quantify the effects of daily, seasonal, and yearly temperature fluctuations on the average population growth rates, and we apply them to long-term data on the endangered Black-faced Spoonbill (Platalea minor); an endothermic species whose population growth rates follow a concave relationship with temperature. We demonstrate for the first time that the current levels of temperature variability, particularly seasonal variability, are already large enough to substantially reduce long-term population growth rates. As the climate changes, our results highlight the importance of considering the ecological effects of climate variability and not just average conditions. PMID:26352857

  1. Erosional and climatic effects on long-term chemical weathering rates in granitic landscapes spanning diverse climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebe, Clifford S.; Kirchner, James W.; Finkel, Robert C.

    2004-08-01

    We used cosmogenic nuclide and geochemical mass balance methods to measure long-term rates of chemical weathering and total denudation in granitic landscapes in diverse climatic regimes. Our 42 study sites encompass widely varying climatic and erosional regimes, with mean annual temperatures ranging from 2 to 25 C, average precipitation ranging from 22 to 420 cmyear -1, and denudation rates ranging from 23 to 755 tkm -2year -1. Long-term chemical weathering rates range from 0 to 173 tkm -2 year -1, in several cases exceeding the highest granitic weathering rates on record from previous work. Chemical weathering rates are highest at the sites with rapid denudation rates, consistent with strong coupling between rates of chemical weathering and mineral supply from breakdown of rock. A simple empirical relationship based on temperature, precipitation and long-term denudation rates explains 89-95% of the variation in long-term weathering rates across our network of sites. Our analysis shows that, for a given precipitation and temperature, chemical weathering rates increase proportionally with fresh-material supply rates. We refer to this as "supply-limited" weathering, in which fresh material is chemically depleted to roughly the same degree, regardless of its rate of supply from breakdown of rock. The temperature sensitivity of chemical weathering rates is two to four times smaller than what one would expect from laboratory measurements of activation energies for feldspar weathering and previous inter-comparisons of catchment mass-balance data from the field. Our results suggest that climate change feedbacks between temperature and silicate weathering rates may be weaker than previously thought, at least in actively eroding, unglaciated terrain similar to our study sites. To the extent that chemical weathering rates are supply-limited in mountainous landscapes, factors that regulate rates of mineral supply from erosion, such as tectonic uplift, may lead to significant fluctuations in global climate over the long term.

  2. Long-term analysis of survival, fertility, and population growth rate of black bears in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brongo, L.L.; Mitchell, M.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    We estimated survival, fertility, and realized and asymptotic population growth rates from 1981 to 2002 for a protected population of black bears (Ursus americanus) in the southern Appalachian Mountains. We used Akaike's information criterion to assess the time interval for averaging observations that was best for estimating vital rates for our study, given our yearly sample sizes. The temporal symmetry approach allowed us to directly assess population growth and to address all losses and gains to the population by using only capture data, offering an alternative to the logistically intensive collection of reproductive data. Models that averaged survival and fertility across 5- and 7-year time intervals were best supported by our data. Studies of black bear populations with annual sample sizes similar to ours should be of at least 5 years in duration to estimate vital rates reliably, and at least 10 years in duration to evaluate changes in population growth rate (??). We also hypothesized that survival would not track changes in ?? because ?? is influenced by both survival and fertility. The 5-year model supported our hypothesis, but the 7-year model did not. Where long-term dynamics of large, relatively stable bear populations are of interest, monitoring survival is likely to be sufficient for evaluating trends in ??. For rapidly changing, small populations, however, failure to incorporate fertility into assessments of ?? could be misleading. ?? 2005 American Society of Mammalogists.

  3. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often

  4. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  5. Simulating long-term effects of nitrogen fertilizer application rates on corn yield and nitrogen dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thoroughly tested agricultural systems models can be used to quantify the long-term effects of crop management practices under conditions where measurements are lacking. In a field near Story City, Iowa, ten years (1996-2005) of measured data were collected from plots receiving low, medium, and high...

  6. 41 CFR 301-11.14 - How is my daily lodging rate computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rate computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis? 301-11.14 Section 301-11.14 Public Contracts... computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis? When you obtain lodging on a long-term basis (e.g., weekly or monthly) your daily lodging rate is computed by dividing the total lodging cost by the...

  7. 41 CFR 301-11.14 - How is my daily lodging rate computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rate computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis? 301-11.14 Section 301-11.14 Public Contracts... computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis? When you obtain lodging on a long-term basis (e.g., weekly or monthly) your daily lodging rate is computed by dividing the total lodging cost by the...

  8. 41 CFR 301-11.14 - How is my daily lodging rate computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rate computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis? 301-11.14 Section 301-11.14 Public Contracts... computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis? When you obtain lodging on a long-term basis (e.g., weekly or monthly) your daily lodging rate is computed by dividing the total lodging cost by the...

  9. 41 CFR 301-11.14 - How is my daily lodging rate computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rate computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis? 301-11.14 Section 301-11.14 Public Contracts... computed when I rent lodging on a long-term basis? When you obtain lodging on a long-term basis (e.g., weekly or monthly) your daily lodging rate is computed by dividing the total lodging cost by the...

  10. Points of Interest: What Determines Interest Rates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Tim

    Interest rates can significantly influence people's behavior. When rates decline, homeowners rush to buy new homes and refinance old mortgages; automobile buyers scramble to buy new cars; the stock market soars, and people tend to feel more optimistic about the future. But even though individuals respond to changes in rates, they may not fully…

  11. Short-term vs. long-term heart rate variability in ischemic cardiomyopathy risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Andreas; Schroeder, Rico; Vallverd, Montserrat; Schulz, Steffen; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Vzquez, Rafael; Bays de Luna, Antoni; Caminal, Pere

    2013-01-01

    In industrialized countries with aging populations, heart failure affects 0.32% of the general population. The investigation of 24 h-ECG recordings revealed the potential of nonlinear indices of heart rate variability (HRV) for enhanced risk stratification in patients with ischemic heart failure (IHF). However, long-term analyses are time-consuming, expensive, and delay the initial diagnosis. The objective of this study was to investigate whether 30 min short-term HRV analysis is sufficient for comparable risk stratification in IHF in comparison to 24 h-HRV analysis. From 256 IHF patients [221 at low risk (IHFLR) and 35 at high risk (IHFHR)] (a) 24 h beat-to-beat time series (b) the first 30 min segment (c) the 30 min most stationary day segment and (d) the 30 min most stationary night segment were investigated. We calculated linear (time and frequency domain) and nonlinear HRV analysis indices. Optimal parameter sets for risk stratification in IHF were determined for 24 h and for each 30 min segment by applying discriminant analysis on significant clinical and non-clinical indices. Long- and short-term HRV indices from frequency domain and particularly from nonlinear dynamics revealed high univariate significances (p < 0.01) discriminating between IHFLR and IHFHR. For multivariate risk stratification, optimal mixed parameter sets consisting of 5 indices (clinical and nonlinear) achieved 80.4% AUC (area under the curve of receiver operating characteristics) from 24 h HRV analysis, 84.3% AUC from first 30 min, 82.2 % AUC from daytime 30 min and 81.7% AUC from nighttime 30 min. The optimal parameter set obtained from the first 30 min showed nearly the same classification power when compared to the optimal 24 h-parameter set. As results from stationary daytime and nighttime, 30 min segments indicate that short-term analyses of 30 min may provide at least a comparable risk stratification power in IHF in comparison to a 24 h analysis period. PMID:24379785

  12. THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF BIPOLAR DISORDER: WHAT DRIVES THE HIGH RATE OF MEDICAL BURDEN AND DETERMINES LONG-TERM PROGNOSIS?

    PubMed Central

    Soreca, Isabella; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) has been classically described as one of episodic mood disturbances. New evidence suggests that a chronic course and multisystem involvement is the rule, rather than the exception, and that together with disturbances of circadian rhythms, mood instability, cognitive impairment, a high rate of medical burden is often observed. The current diagnostic approach for BD neither describes the multisystem involvement that the recent literature has highlighted nor points toward potential predictors of long- term outcome. In light of the new evidence that the long-term course of BD is associated with a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity and an increased mortality from medical disease, we propose a multidimensional approach that includes several symptom domains, namely affective instability, circadian rhythm dysregulation, and cognitive and executive dysfunction, presenting in various combinations that give shape to each individual presentation, and offers potential indicators of overall long-term prognosis. PMID:18828143

  13. CHANGES IN LONG-TERM NO-TILL CORN GROWTH AND YIELD UNDER DIFFERENT RATES OF STOVER MULCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Removal of corn (Zea mays L.) stover for biofuel production may affect crop yields by altering soil properties. A partial stover removal may be feasible, but information on appropriate rates of removal is unavailable. This study assessed the short-term impacts of stover management on long-term no-...

  14. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF LAND APPLICATION OF DOMESTIC WASTEWATER: DICKINSON, NORTH DAKOTA, SLOW RATE IRRIGATION SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the findings of a study on the long-term effects of applying treated domestic wastewater to farmland at Dickinson, North Dakota. On the test site, slow rate irrigation, using the border-strip method, has been practiced since 1959. Water, soil, and crop sample...

  15. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF LAND APPLICATION OF DOMESTIC WASTEWATER, ROSWELL, NEW MEXICO, SLOW RATE IRRIGATION SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the findings of a study on the long-term effects of applying treated domestic wastewater to farmland at Roswell, New Mexico. On the test site, a slow rate irrigation method was used for 33 years. Water, soil, and crop samples from this test site were compared...

  16. 76 FR 38717 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to the average SBA direct loan. This rate may be used as a base rate...

  17. 77 FR 76586 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to the average SBA direct loan. This rate may be used as a base rate...

  18. 75 FR 37872 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to the average SBA direct loan. This rate may be used as a base rate...

  19. Long-term care and hospital utilisation by older people: an analysis of substitution rates.

    PubMed

    Forder, Julien

    2009-11-01

    Older people are intensive users of hospital and long-term care services. This paper explores the extent to which these services are substitutes. A small area analysis was used with both care home and (tariff cost-weighted) hospital utilisation for older people aggregated to electoral wards in England.Health and social-care structural equations were specified using a theoretical model. The estimation accounted for the skewed and censored nature of the data. For health utilisation, both a fixed effects instrumental variables GMM model and a generalised estimating equations (GEE) model were fitted, the later on a log dependent variable with predicted values of social care utilisation used to account for endogeneity (bootstrapping was used to derive standard errors). In addition to a GMM model, the social-care estimation used both two-part and tobit models (also with predicted health utilisation and bootstrapping).The results indicate that for each additional pound1 spent on care homes, hospital expenditure falls by pound0.35. Also, pound1 additional hospital spend corresponds to just over pound0.35 reduction on care home spend. With these cost substitution effects offsetting, a transfer of resources to care homes is efficient if the resultant outcome gain is greater than the outcome loss from reduced hospital use. PMID:19206085

  20. Accelerated forgetting? An evaluation on the use of long-term forgetting rates in patients with memory problems

    PubMed Central

    Geurts, Sofie; van der Werf, Sieberen P.; Kessels, Roy P. C.

    2015-01-01

    The main focus of this review was to evaluate whether long-term forgetting rates (delayed tests, days, to weeks, after initial learning) are more sensitive measures than standard delayed recall measures to detect memory problems in various patient groups. It has been suggested that accelerated forgetting might be characteristic for epilepsy patients, but little research has been performed in other populations. Here, we identified eleven studies in a wide range of brain injured patient groups, whose long-term forgetting patterns were compared to those of healthy controls. Signs of accelerated forgetting were found in three studies. The results of eight studies showed normal forgetting over time for the patient groups. However, most of the studies used only a recognition procedure, after optimizing initial learning. Based on these results, we recommend the use of a combined recall and recognition procedure to examine accelerated forgetting and we discuss the relevance of standard and optimized learning procedures in clinical practice. PMID:26106343

  1. Effects of long-term microgravity exposure in space on circadian rhythms of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naomune; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Kubo, Yutaka; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Mizuno, Koh; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Mukai, Chiaki

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated their circadian rhythms using data from electrocardiographic records and examined the change in circadian period related to normal RR intervals for astronauts who completed a long-term (?6-month) mission in space. The examinees were seven astronauts, five men and two women, from 2009 to 2010. Their mean??SD age was 52.0??4.2 years (47-59?yr). Each stayed in space for more than 160 days; their average length of stay was 172.6??14.6 days (163-199 days). We conducted a 24-h Holter electrocardiography before launch (Pre), at one month after launch (DF1), at two months after launch (DF2), at two weeks before return (DF3), and at three months after landing (Post), comparing each index of frequency-domain analysis and 24-h biological rhythms of the NN intervals (normal RR intervals). Results show that the mean period of Normal Sinus (NN) intervals was within 24??4?h at each examination. Inter-individual variability differed among the stages, being significantly smaller at DF3 (Pre versus DF1 versus DF3 versus Post?=?22.36??2.50 versus 25.46??4.37 versus 22.46??1.75 versus 26.16??7.18?h, p?

  2. 75 FR 60152 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to...

  3. 77 FR 59447 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to...

  4. 76 FR 18821 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to the government for maturities similar to...

  5. 75 FR 81326 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  6. 75 FR 17453 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  7. 76 FR 77581 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  8. 77 FR 20476 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  9. 77 FR 39560 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  10. 78 FR 39434 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  11. 78 FR 62932 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  12. 78 FR 18664 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  13. The long-term corrosion behavior of titanate ceramics for Pu disposition : rate-controlling processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Bakel, A. J.; Mertz, C. J.; Hash, M. C.; Chamberlain, D. C.

    1999-12-02

    The corrosion behavior of a titanate ceramic was investigated with the aim of describing the rate-controlling process or processes. These titanate ceramics are similar to SYNROC and are proposed as immobilization materials for surplus Pu. The corrosion behavior was described with results from MCC-I and PCT-B static dissolution tests. Three important observations were made: (a) Ca is released at a constant rate [6x10{sup -5}g/(m{sup 2} day)] in PCT-B tests for up to two years, (b) all of the test leachates are oversaturated with respect to rutile and anatase, and (c) the release rates for Pu and Gd increase with time (up to two years) in PCT-B tests. The first observation suggests that the ceramics continue to corrode at a low rate for at least 2 years in PCT-B tests. The second observation shows that the rate of the corrosion reaction is not affected by the concentration of Ti in solution, suggesting that the approach to saturation with respect to either rutile or anatase is not a rate-limiting process. The third observation shows that the rate of Pu and Gd release increases with time in these tests. While this observation cannot be fully explained at this point, two possible explanations, alteration phase formation and grain boundary corrosion, are forwarded.

  14. Long-term stability of global erosion rates and weathering during late-Cenozoic cooling.

    PubMed

    Willenbring, Jane K; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-05-13

    Over geologic timescales, CO(2) is emitted from the Earth's interior and is removed from the atmosphere by silicate rock weathering and organic carbon burial. This balance is thought to have stabilized greenhouse conditions within a range that ensured habitable conditions. Changes in this balance have been attributed to changes in topographic relief, where varying rates of continental rock weathering and erosion are superimposed on fluctuations in organic carbon burial. Geological strata provide an indirect yet imperfectly preserved record of this change through changing rates of sedimentation. Widespread observations of a recent (0-5-Myr) fourfold increase in global sedimentation rates require a global mechanism to explain them. Accelerated uplift and global cooling have been given as possible causes, but because of the links between rates of erosion and the correlated rate of weathering, an increase in the drawdown of CO(2) that is predicted to follow may be the cause of global climate change instead. However, globally, rates of uplift cannot increase everywhere in the way that apparent sedimentation rates do. Moreover, proxy records of past atmospheric CO(2) provide no evidence for this large reduction in recent CO(2) concentrations. Here we question whether this increase in global weathering and erosion actually occurred and whether the apparent increase in the sedimentation rate is due to observational biases in the sedimentary record. As evidence, we recast the ocean dissolved (10)Be/(9)Be isotope system as a weathering proxy spanning the past approximately 12 Myr (ref. 14). This proxy indicates stable weathering fluxes during the late-Cenozoic era. The sum of these observations shows neither clear evidence for increased erosion nor clear evidence for a pulse in weathered material to the ocean. We conclude that processes different from an increase in denudation caused Cenozoic global cooling, and that global cooling had no profound effect on spatially and temporally averaged weathering rates. PMID:20463736

  15. Refill Rates of Accessories for Positive Airway Pressure Therapy as a Surrogate Measure of Long-Term Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nimesh; Sam, Afshin; Valentin, Alexandra; Quan, Stuart F.; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify and validate a surrogate measure of long-term adherence to positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Academic center. Participants: 220 consecutive patients with OSA. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: In patients with OSA who were receiving PAP therapy (for > 1 year), PAP adherence measured by device-download and defined by Medicare criteria was compared to refill rates for mask and other PAP therapy accessories. First, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to identify a threshold value of refills per year that discriminated best between PAP adherent and non-adherent patients (derivation set; n = 100). Then the predictive accuracy of the threshold value of refills per year was tested in an additional 120 consecutive patients (validation set). Results: From the derivation set, ROC curve with good discriminant characteristics (ROC 0.83; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 0.75, 0.91, p < 0.0001) was used to identify a threshold value of refills (0.7 refills/year) for distinguishing PAP adherent and non-adherent patients. Subsequently, when the threshold was applied to the validation set, the likelihood ratio for a positive test (weighted for prevalence) predicting adherence to PAP therapy was 7.3 (95%CI, 3.8, 14), and likelihood ratio for a negative test was 0.6 (95%CI; 0.4, 0.8). Conclusion: Refill rate of PAP accessories exhibited good test characteristics for predicting long-term PAP adherence. Such a surrogate measure based upon insurance claims data can be a powerful epidemiological tool in bioinformatics-aided comparative-effectiveness research and to monitor clinical performance of health systems. Citation: Patel N; Sam A; Valentin A; Quan SF; Parthasarathy S. Refill rates of accessories for positive airway pressure therapy as a surrogate measure of long-term adherence. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(2):169-175. PMID:22505862

  16. The Effect of Dose Rate on Composite Durability When Exposed to a Simulated Long-Term Lunar Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; O'Rourke, Mary Jane; Hill, Charles; Nutt, Steven; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration of space beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) requires a safe living and working environment for crew. Composite materials are one type of material being investigated by NASA as a multi-functional structural approach to habitats for long-term use in space or on planetary surfaces with limited magnetic fields and atmosphere. These materials provide high strength with the potential for decreased weight and increased radiation protection of crew and electronics when compared with conventional aluminum structures. However, these materials have not been evaluated in a harsh radiation environment, as would be experienced outside of LEO or on a planetary surface. Thus, NASA has been investigating the durability of select composite materials in a long-term radiation environment. Previously, NASA exposed composite samples to a simulated, accelerated 30-year radiation treatment and tensile stresses similar to those of a habitat pressure vessel. The results showed evidence of potential surface oxidation and enhanced cross-linking of the matrix. As a follow-on study, we performed the same accelerated exposure alongside an exposure with a decreased dose rate. The slower dose ]rate is comparable to a realistic scenario, although still accelerated. Strain measurements were collected during exposure and showed that with a fastdose rate, the strain decreased with time, but with a slow ]dose rate, the strain increased with time. After the radiation exposures, samples were characterized via tensile tests, flexure tests, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The results of these tests will be discussed.

  17. Resting metabolic rate and cost of locomotion in long-term fasting emperor penguins.

    PubMed

    Dewasmes, G; Le Maho, Y; Cornet, A; Groscolas, R

    1980-11-01

    During the Antarctic winter emperor penguins fast for up to 120 days when breeding at rookeries, which may be as much as 120 km from open water. Emperors have lost almost half of their body mass by the time they walk back to the sea to feed. Resting metabolic rate and metabolic rate during treadmill walking at 1.4 km times h-1 were measured regularly along the course of 63-118 days of fasting in four emperors that lost between 33 and 55% of their body mass. Resting metabolic rate decreased linearly with body mass throughout the fast; it was 76 and 50 W at 39 and 18 kg body mass, respectively, which therefore corresponds to a limited increase in the resting metabolic rate per unit of body mass. There was a considerable decrease in the metabolic rate for walking at 1.4 km times h-1, from 340 to 140 W at body masses of 39 and 18 kg, respectively; this decrease was linear with body mass but at a steeper rate below 23 kg. From 39 to 23 kg, the cost of walking per unit of body mass remained constant. Below 23 kg (a point where about 2.5 kg of fat remain), the increased efficiency for walking may be due to a change in the mechanics of locomotion. PMID:7429912

  18. Bluff evolution and long-term recession rates, southwestern Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovey, C. W.; Borucki, M. K.

    1994-06-01

    Where eroding cohesive sediments are present, Lake Michigan bluffs range up to 40 m in height, exposing multiple glacial stratigraphic units. Following the model presented here, bluffs form as a wave-cut terrace erodes inland from a point near the original shoreline. The erosion plane is nearly horizontal, in contrast with the eastward dip of the glacial units inherited from underlying bedrock. Therefore, terraces eroding inland produce progressively higher bluffs and expose successively older units at the toe and beneath the lake. This process was repeated several times as lake levels sequentially dropped to their modern stage. The initial modern shoreline, and hence the width of the wave-cut terrace, was determined from four offshore seismic and bottom-sampling profiles. It was picked as an inflection point in the lake bed, occurring offshore of dipping reflectors intersecting the lake bottom. The calculated average recession rate over a 2500-year duration of the modern stage is 1.5 m/yr in contrast to average rates of approximately 0.6 m/yr measured over the last century. Thus rates decrease through time as the terrace widens and wave energy is dampened. By correlating bluff height to recession distance, a third rate of approximately 2.7 m/yr for the first 940 years of recession is calculated from relict Nipissing bluffs. The three rates define a steeply decaying exponential curve in early stages of bluff retreat, flattening into a nearly linear function after 1000 years.

  19. Analysis of long term heart rate variability: methods, 1/f scaling and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saul, J. P.; Albrecht, P.; Berger, R. D.; Cohen, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of spectral techniques to quantify short term heart rate fluctuations on the order of seconds to minutes has helped define the autonomic contributions to beat-to-beat control of heart rate. We used similar techniques to quantify the entire spectrum (0.00003-1.0 Hz) of heart rate variability during 24 hour ambulatory ECG monitoring. The ECG from standard Holter monitor recordings from normal subjects was sampled with the use of a phase locked loop, and a heart rate time series was constructed at 3 Hz. Frequency analysis of the heart rate signal was performed after a nonlinear filtering algorithm was used to eliminate artifacts. A power spectrum of the entire 24 hour record revealed power that was inversely proportional to frequency, 1/f, over 4 decades from 0.00003 to 0.1 Hz (period approximately 10 hours to 10 seconds). Displaying consecutive spectra calculated at 5 minute intervals revealed marked variability in the peaks at all frequencies throughout the 24 hours, probably accounting for the lack of distinct peaks in the spectra of the entire records.

  20. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, M. J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of 22Na, 36Cl, 54Mn, 60Co, 90Sr, 133Ba, 137Cs, 152Eu, and 154Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  1. Contrasting mutation rates from specific-locus and long-term mutation-accumulation procedures.

    PubMed

    Drake, John W

    2012-04-01

    Until recently, the two predominant ways to estimate mutation rates were the specific-locus method and the mutation-accumulation (Bateman-Mukai) method. Both involve seeding a number of parallel lines from a small, genetically uniform population, growing as long as is feasible but not so long as to allow selection to perturb mutant frequencies, and sometimes using extreme bottlenecks to facilitate the retention of deleterious mutations. In the specific-locus method, mutations are selected according to their specific phenotypes and are confirmed by sequencing. In older versions of the mutation-accumulation method, the increase in variance of a quantitative fitness trait is measured and converted into a mutation rate. More recently, a variation on the mutation-accumulation method has become possible based on phenotype-blind genomic sequencing, which might (or might not) provide improved sampling breadth, usually at the expense of sample size. In a recent study, genomic sequencing was applied to Escherichia coli lines propagated for 40,000 generations and passaged daily via 5,000,000 cells. To mitigate the impact of selection, the only targets employed for rate calculations were putatively neutral synonymous mutations. The mutation rate estimate was about 6-fold lower than obtained previously with a robust specific-locus method. Here I argue that purifying selection acting to shape the strong codon preferences of E. coli is the probable cause of the lower estimate, rather than, for instance, a lower mutation rate in nature than in the laboratory. PMID:22540039

  2. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Ware, M J; Bergeson, S D; Ellsworth, J E; Groesbeck, M; Hansen, J E; Pace, D; Peatross, J

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of (22)Na, (36)Cl, (54)Mn, (60)Co, (90)Sr, (133)Ba, (137)Cs, (152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate. PMID:26233381

  3. Bluff formation and long-term recession rates, southwestern Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, C.W. II )

    1992-01-01

    Where eroding cohesive sediments are present, Lake Michigan bluffs range up to 140 ft. in height and expose multiple stratigraphic units. According to the model presented here, bluffs form as a wave cut terrace erodes inland from a point near the original shoreline. The erosion plane is nearly horizontal, in contrast with the eastward dip of the glacial units inherited from underlying bedrock. Therefore, terraces eroding inland (west) produce progressively higher bluffs and expose successively older units at the toe and beneath the lake. This process repeated several times as lake levels sequentially dropped to their modern stage. The initial modern shoreline, and hence the width of the wave cut terrace, was determined from 4 offshore seismic profiles. It is picked as an inflection point in the slope of the lake bed, occurring offshore of dipping reflectors intersecting the lake bottom. The calculated average recession rate over the 2,500 year duration of the modern stage is 5 ft/yr in contrast to average rates of 2 ft/yr measured over the last century. Thus rates decrease through time as the terrace widens and wave energy is damped. By correlating bluff height to amount of recession of modern bluffs, a third rate of 12 ft/yr of the first 800 years of a recession is calculated for relict bluffs formed at the Nipissing II level. The 3 rates define a steeply decaying exponential curve in early stages of bluff retreat, flattening into a nearly linear function after 1,000 years.

  4. Complementary system for long term measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, J.; Kozak, K.

    2014-02-15

    A special set-up for continuous measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil is presented. It was constructed at Laboratory of Radiometric Expertise, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), Krakow, Poland. Radon exhalation rate was determined using the AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO (Genitron) radon monitor together with a special accumulation container which was put on the soil surface during the measurement. A special automatic device was built and used to raise and lower back onto the ground the accumulation container. The time of raising and putting down the container was controlled by an electronic timer. This set-up made it possible to perform 4–6 automatic measurements a day. Besides, some additional soil and meteorological parameters were continuously monitored. In this way, the diurnal and seasonal variability of radon exhalation rate from soil can be studied as well as its dependence on soil properties and meteorological conditions.

  5. Long-Term evolution of the erosion rates during Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quantin-Nataf, C.; Craddock, R. A.; Dubuffet, F.; Lozac'h, L.; Martinot, M.

    2015-10-01

    Many Geologic features attest to the fact that liquid water was once stable on the Martian surface. The erosional processes necessary to create these features must have been supported by a climate that is much different than today. However, the evolution of these primitives conditions toward the current dry and cold Martian climate where the erosion processes are 2-3 orders in magnitude lower represents a major gap in our understanding of the evolution of Mars history. Here we document the time-dependence of the erosion rates on Mars during early Mars, period during which the erosion rates have decreased of at least one order in magnitude.

  6. Design of long-term sludge-loading rates for forests under uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Crohn, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    A simple time series describing nitrate-nitrogen concentrations percolating form a sludge-amended forest is presented for the case where applications are made at several-year intervals. The time series converges to a quasi-steady-state solution that can be solved for an application rate limited by percolating nitrate-nitrogen concentrations. Excess nitrogen is commonly converted to nitrate, a form that leaches readily to pollute ground water. A chance constraint incorporates uncertainty associated with precipitation and evapotranspiration, the most important factors in determining the excess of water available for leaching. Design loading rates for eight New York state forest regions are discussed. If applications occur at 3-year intervals, rates range form 0.2 to 5.3 Mg/ha dry weight depending on the design confidence level, local excess water patterns, forest nitrogen uptake, sludge type, and atmospheric nitrogen deposition rates. Results are compared to predictions made with FORSENTO, a comprehensive model for simulating sludge applications to northern hardwood forests. FORSENTO simulations suggest that mature hardwoods need only 12 kg/ha to support annually perennial material growth and that atmospheric nitrogen deposition may eventually meet or exceed needs of trees so that landspreading may not be sustainable indefinitely in some areas.

  7. New emission deterioration rates for gasoline cars - Results from long-term measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borken-Kleefeld, Jens; Chen, Yuche

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle emission control systems have been found to degrade with use resulting in increasing emission rates with vehicle age. Standard European data for deterioration factors have only been based on a sample of vehicles with limited high mileage ranges, with only few Euro 3 and Euro 4 vehicles, and on laboratory tests only. Here we present deterioration rates derived from more than 110?000 records collected over the past thirteen years from on-road emission remote sensing in Zurich/Switzerland. Deterioration rates for hot NOx and CO emissions of older gasoline vehicles are much lower than assumed so far, but significantly higher for Euro 3 and Euro 4 cars. There is no evidence of high emitters but equipment gradually degrades across the fleet. Deterioration rates do not seem to depend on engine load. Routine idle emission tests have not resulted in measurable emission reductions of the inspected vehicles. National emission inventories should be updated in the light of this new data.

  8. The Greenville Fault: preliminary estimates of its long-term creep rate and seismic potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.; Barry, Robert G.; Smith, Forrest E.; Mello, Joseph D.; McFarland, Forrest S.

    2013-01-01

    Once assumed locked, we show that the northern third of the Greenville fault (GF) creeps at 2 mm/yr, based on 47 yr of trilateration net data. This northern GF creep rate equals its 11-ka slip rate, suggesting a low strain accumulation rate. In 1980, the GF, easternmost strand of the San Andreas fault system east of San Francisco Bay, produced a Mw5.8 earthquake with a 6-km surface rupture and dextral slip growing to ?2 cm on cracks over a few weeks. Trilateration shows a 10-cm post-1980 transient slip ending in 1984. Analysis of 2000-2012 crustal velocities on continuous global positioning system stations, allows creep rates of ~2 mm/yr on the northern GF, 0-1 mm/yr on the central GF, and ~0 mm/yr on its southern third. Modeled depth ranges of creep along the GF allow 5-25% aseismic release. Greater locking in the southern two thirds of the GF is consistent with paleoseismic evidence there for large late Holocene ruptures. Because the GF lacks large (>1 km) discontinuities likely to arrest higher (~1 m) slip ruptures, we expect full-length (54-km) ruptures to occur that include the northern creeping zone. We estimate sufficient strain accumulation on the entire GF to produce Mw6.9 earthquakes with a mean recurrence of ~575 yr. While the creeping 16-km northern part has the potential to produce a Mw6.2 event in 240 yr, it may rupture in both moderate (1980) and large events. These two-dimensional-model estimates of creep rate along the southern GF need verification with small aperture surveys.

  9. Long-term evolution of biodegradation and volatilization rates in a crude oil-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaplin, B.P.; Delin, G.N.; Baker, R.J.; Lahvis, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Rates of biodegradation and volatilization were documented twice 12 yr apart at a crude-oil spill site near Bemidji. Minnesota. Model results indicated that the coupled pathway has resulted in significant hydrocarbon mass loss at the site, and it was estimated that ??? 10.52 kg/day were lost in 1985 and 1.99 kg/day in 1997. In 1985, 3% of total volatile hydrocarbons diffusing from the floating oil were biodegraded in the lower 1 m of the unsaturated zone and increased to 52% by 1997. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation above the center of the floating oil were relatively stable from 1985 to 1997, as the primary metabolic pathway shifted from aerobic to methanogenic biodegradation. Model results indicate that in 1997 biodegradation under methanogenic conditions represented ??? 50% of total hydrocarbon biodegradation in the lower 1 m of the unsaturated zone. Further downgradient, where substrate concentrations have greatly increased, total biodegradation rates increased by greater than an order of magnitude from 0.04 to 0.43 g/sq m-day.

  10. Interest rate swaps under CIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallier, R.; Alobaidi, G.

    2004-03-01

    We consider fixed-for-floating interest rate swaps under the assumption that interest rates are given by the mean-reverting Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model. By using a Green's function approach, we derive analytical expressions for the values of both a vanilla swap and an in-arrears swap.

  11. Long-term results of breast cancer irradiation treatment with low-dose-rate external irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierquin, Bernard; Tubiana, Maurice . E-mail: maurice.tubiana@biomedicale.univ-paris5.fr; Pan, Camille; Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Calitchi, Elie; Otmezguine, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess beam therapy with low-dose-rate (LDR) external irradiation in a group of patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: This trial compared, from 1986 to 1989, patients with advanced breast cancer treated either by conventional fractionation or low-dose-rate (LDR) external radiotherapy (dose-rate 15 mGy/min, 5 sessions of 9 Gy delivered on 5 consecutive days). Results: A total of 21 patients were included in the fractionated therapy arm. At follow-up 15 years after treatment, 7 local recurrences had occurred, 3 patients had died of cancer, 18 patients were alive, 10 were without evidence of disease, and 6 had evidence of disease. A total of 22 patients had been included in the LDR arm of the study. Of these, 11 had received a dose of 45 Gy; thereafter, in view of severe local reactions, the dose was reduced to 35 Gy. There was no local recurrence in patients who had received 45 Gy, although there were 2 local recurrences among the 11 patients after 35 Gy. The sequelae were severe in patients who received 45 Gy but were comparable to those observed in patients treated by fractionated radiotherapy who received 35 Gy. The higher efficacy of tumor control in patients treated by LDR irradiation as well as the lower tolerance of normal tissue are probably related to the lack of repopulation. Conclusion: Although the patient numbers in this study are limited, based on our study results we conclude that the data for LDR irradiation are encouraging and that further investigation is warranted.

  12. Wearable wireless heart rate monitor for continuous long-term variability studies.

    PubMed

    Augustyniak, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Prototyping of a home care system for activity surveillance and sleep assessment targeted to elderly people involves the compromise of wearing comfort and measurement performance. We propose a wearable heart rate variability monitor connected via wireless digital link to a home-embedded infrastructure of multimodal health surveillance system. The coin-size wearable recorder acquires and processes the electrocardiogram and sends annotated tachogram data accordingly to the subject's status and programed schedule. Thanks to remote programmability, in case of predefined thresholds excess, the recorder response is immediate, whereas the regular reports are organized in packets and delivered in bulk in short transmission sessions. This approach significantly reduces the data rate and the energy required to supply the communication module. The prototype weighting 11.2 g is based on the ARM7 (Atmel Corporate Headquarters 2325 Orchard Parkway San Jose, CA, USA) processor running at 18 MHz and with a 300-mA h rechargeable battery allows for up to 10 days of seamless tachogram monitoring. PMID:21353066

  13. Long Term Corrosion Potential and Corrosion Rate of Creviced Alloy 22 in Chloride Plus Nitrate Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K J; Stuart, M L; Etien, R A; Hust, G A; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-05

    Alloy 22 is a nickel base alloy highly resistant to all forms of corrosion. In conditions where tight crevices exist in hot chloride containing solutions and at anodic potentials, Alloy 22 may suffer crevice corrosion, a form of localized attack. The occurrence (or not) of crevice corrosion in a given environment (e.g. salt concentration and temperature), is governed by the values of the critical potential (E{sub crit}) for crevice corrosion and the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) that the alloy may establish in the studied environment. If E{sub corr} is equal or higher than E{sub crit}, crevice corrosion may be expected. In addition, it is generally accepted that as Alloy 22 becomes passive in a certain environment, its E{sub corr} increases and its corrosion rate (CR) decreases. This paper discusses the evolution of E{sub corr} and corrosion rate (CR) of creviced Alloy 22 specimens in six different mixtures of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium nitrate (KNO{sub 3}) at 100 C. The effect of immersion time on the value of E{sub crit} was also determined. Two types of specimens were used, polished as-welded (ASW) and as-welded plus solution heat-treated (ASW+SHT). The latter contained the black annealing oxide film on the surface. Results show that, as the immersion time increases, E{sub corr} increased and the CR decreased. Even for highly concentrated brine solutions at 100 C the CR was < 30 nm/year after more than 250 days immersion. Some of the exposed specimens (mainly the SHT specimens) suffered crevice corrosion at the open circuit potential in the naturally aerated brines. Immersion times of over 250 days did not reduce the resistance of Alloy 22 to localized corrosion.

  14. Long-term variation of OH peak emission altitude and volume emission rate over Indian low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakandan, M.; Ramkumar, T. K.; Taori, A.; Rao, Venkateshwara; Niranjan, K.

    2016-02-01

    Using 13 (April 2002-December 2014) years of Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER/TIMED) 1.6 μm OH airglow emission data, we have studied the long-term variation of OH peak emission altitude and volume emission rate (VER) for 0-10°N latitude and 70-90°E longitude grid. We have noted that, during day time the OH peak emission altitude is varying from 80 to 87 km with mean value of 83.5 km and from 82 to 88 km with mean value of 85 km during night time. The signature of semi-annual oscillation (SAO), annual oscillation (AO) and quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the OH peak emission altitude as well as the VER is evident. Our analysis reveals that the SAO and QBO signatures but not the AO signature are very strong in the equatorial region during night time. Apart from the SAO, AO and QBO signatures, the presence of oscillation related to the El Niño oscillation (ENSO) is also noted. After the removal of these oscillations, we find the evidence of the influence of solar activity and a long term trend in the OH emission layer. It is also found good correlation between the mesospheric and stratospheric variations (ECMWF data).

  15. Recurrence rates in bipolar disorder: Systematic comparison of long-term prospective, naturalistic studies versus randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Vzquez, Gustavo H; Holtzman, Jessica N; Lolich, Mara; Ketter, Terence A; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2015-10-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a recurrent, lifelong illness with high risks of disability and excess mortality. Despite many treatment options with demonstrated short-term efficacy, evidence concerning long-term treatment effectiveness in BD remains limited and the relative value of naturalistic studies versus randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) in its assessment, uncertain. Systematic computer-searching yielded 10 naturalistic studies and 15 RCTs suitable for analysis of recurrence rates and their association with treatments and selected clinical factors. In naturalistic studies (3904 BD subjects, 53.3% women, 85.8% BD-I, mean onset age 29.1, followed up to 2.1 years), the pooled recurrence rate was 55.2% (26.3%/year). In RCTs (4828 subjects, 50.9% women, 96.0% BD-I, mean onset age 23.1, followed up to 1.9 years), the pooled recurrence rate was 39.3% (21.9%/year) with mood-stabilizing drug-treatment versus 60.6% (31.3%/year) with placebo; drug-versus-placebo outcomes favored antipsychotics over lithium, and disfavor an approved anticonvulsant. Depressive episode-polarity increased from 27.7% at intake to 52.0% at first-recurrence (p<0.0001). Recurrence rate (%/year) did not differ by study-type, was greater with younger onset and rapid-cycling, and paradoxically declined with longer observation. In short, recurrences of major affective episodes up to two years during putative mood-stabilizing treatment of BD patients in prospective, naturalistic studies and RCTs were substantial and similar (26.3 vs. 21.9%/year). Episode-polarity shifted strongly toward depressive first-recurrences. These findings support the value of naturalistic studies to complement long-term RCTs, and add to indications that control of depression in BD remains particularly unsatisfactory. PMID:26238969

  16. Styles and rates of long-term denudation in carbonate terrains under a Mediterranean to hyper-arid climatic gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryb, U.; Matmon, A.; Erel, Y.; Haviv, I.; Benedetti, L.; Hidy, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Carbonate minerals, unlike silicates, have the potential to dissolve almost completely and with high efficiency. Thus, in carbonate terrains denudation rate and style (the governing process of denudation, mechanical or chemical) should be more sensitive to climatic forcing. Using 36Cl measurements in 39 carbonate bedrock and sediment samples, we calculate long-term denudation rates across a sharp climatic gradient from Mediterranean to hyper-arid conditions. Our samples were collected along the Arugot watershed, which drains the eastern flank of the Judea Range (central Israel) to the Dead Sea and is characterized by a pronounced rain shadow. Denudation rates of flat-lying bedrock outcrops sampled along interfluves differ by an order of magnitude from ∼20 mm ka-1 in the Mediterranean zone to 1-3 mm ka-1 in the hyper-arid zone. These rates are strongly correlated with precipitation, and thus reflect the importance of carbonate mineral dissolution in the overall denudation process. In contrast, denudation rates of steep bedrock surfaces depend on the hillslope gradient, but only in the hyper-arid climate zone, indicating that mechanical processes dominate the overall hillslope denudation within this zone. The dominance of slope-dependent mechanical erosion in the hyper-arid zone is also reflected by an increase in spatially-average denudation rates from 17-19 mm ka-1 in the Mediterranean-semi-arid zones to 21-25 mm ka-1 in the hyper-arid zone. These higher rates are attributed to clast contribution from steep slopes under arid climate. This suggests an increased importance of mechanical processes to the overall denudation in the hyper-arid zone. We demonstrate that the transition between chemically-dominated denudation to mechanically-dominated denudation occurs between 100 and 200 mm of mean annual precipitation. Long-term denudation rates across the Judea Range indicate that between Mediterranean and hyper-arid climates, chemical weathering rates are limited by precipitation. Nevertheless, in more humid climates, chemical weathering rates are apparently limited by the rates of carbonate mineral dissolution. This study demonstrates that carbonate terrains have the capacity to shift between mechanically and chemically dominated denudation in response to changes in precipitation. Similar transitions in response to changes in temperature or the level of tectonic activity have been previously reported. We suggest that the abrupt nature of such transitions can be primarily attributed to the efficiency of carbonate dissolution processes and the competition between surface and subsurface drainage systems in carbonate terrains.

  17. Drivers and annual estimates of marine wildlife entanglement rates: A long-term case study with Australian fur seals.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Rebecca R; Kirkwood, Roger; Sutherland, Duncan R; Dann, Peter

    2015-12-30

    Methods of calculating wildlife entanglement rates are not standardised between studies and often ignore the influence of observer effort, confounding comparisons. From 1997-2013 we identified 359 entangled Australian fur seals at Seal Rocks, south-eastern Australia. Most entanglement materials originated from commercial fisheries; most frequently entangling pups and juveniles. Using Generalized Additive Mixed Models, which incorporated observer effort and survey frequency, we identified that entanglements were observed more frequently amongst pups from July to October as they approached weaning. Neither the decline in regional fishing intensity nor changing seal population size influenced the incidence of entanglements. Using the models, we estimated that 302 (95% CI=182-510) entangled seals were at Seal Rocks each year, equivalent to 1.0% (CI=0.6-1.7%) of the site population. This study highlights the influence of observer effort and the value of long-term datasets for determining the drivers of marine debris entanglements. PMID:26475026

  18. Long-term periodicity in LS I +61303 as beat frequency between orbital and precessional rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, M.; Jaron, F.

    2013-06-01

    Context. In the binary system LS I +61303 the peak flux density of the radio outburst, which is related to the orbital period of 26.4960 0.0028d, exibits a modulation of 1667 8 d. The radio emission at high spatial resolution appears structured in a precessing jet with a precessional period of 27-28 d. Aims: How close is the precessional period of the radio jet to the orbital period? Any periodicity in the radio emission should be revealed by timing analysis. The aim of this work is to establish the accurate value of the precessional period. Methods: We analyzed 6.7 years of the Green Bank Interferometer database at 2.2 GHz and 8.3 GHz with the Lomb-Scargle and phase dispersion minimization methods and performed simulations. Results: The periodograms show two periodicities, P1 = 26.49 0.07d (?1 = 0.03775 d-1) and P2 = 26.92 0.07d (?2 = 0.03715 d-1). Whereas radio outbursts have been known to have nearly orbital occurrence P1 with timing residuals exhibiting a puzzling sawtooth pattern, we probe in this paper that they are actually periodical outbursts and that their period is Paverage = 2/(?1 + ?2) = 26.70 0.05 d. The period Paverage as well as the long-term modulation Pbeat = 1/(?1 - ?2) = 1667 393 d result from the beat of the two close periods, the orbital P1 and the precessional P2 periods. Conclusions: The precessional period, indicated by the astrometry to be of 27-28 d, is P2 = 26.92 d. The system LS I +61303 seems to be one more case in astronomy of beat, i.e., a phenomenon occurring when two physical processes create stable variations of nearly equal frequencies. The very small difference in frequency creates a long-term variation of period 1/(?1 - ?2). The long-term modulation of 1667 d results from the beat of the two close orbital and precessional rates.

  19. Long-term Trends and Confidence in Global Natural Gas Fugitive Emissions Rates Based on ?13C-CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwietzke, S.; Sherwood, O.; Tans, P. P.; Michel, S. E.; Miller, J. B.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Griffin, W. M.; Bruhwiler, L.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous life cycle assessment (LCA) and field studies have estimated natural gas (NG) fugitive emissions rates (FER) - the fraction of produced NG, mostly CH4, emitted to the atmosphere, unintentionally or by design, during extraction, processing, transport, and distribution - at local, regional, and national scales. In a recent study, we estimated for the first time the global mean FER using long-term (three decades) atmospheric CH4, ?13C-CH4, and C2H6 measurements from global monitoring networks. As a further development, this work investigates the global mean FER uncertainty range (factor of 2) in more detail to increase confidence in the results. The objectives of this research are to (i) estimate probability distribution functions (PDF) of global mean FER, and (ii) identify long-term trends in global fossil fuel (FF) and other CH4 sources. In order to achieve these objectives, global atmospheric ?13C-CH4 measurements since the mid-1980s are analyzed using a box-model of the global CH4 sources and sinks. First, we derive PDFs of the key model parameters including literature isotopic source signatures, atmospheric lifetimes, natural and anthropogenic emissions, and FF hydrocarbon gas composition. Second, a Monte Carlo simulation of the box-model is performed to quantify FER confidence intervals. While our model attributes the majority of increased CH4 levels over the past three decades to microbial sources, FF sources have also increased slightly. However, FER - an indicator of NG life cycle efficiency - has decreased over the same period given the large NG production increase worldwide. Results are most sensitive to global average microbial isotopic signatures (weighted by source strength) and bottom-up estimates of biomass burning emissions, which will be discussed in more detail.

  20. Long-term trends in the incidence rates of upper digestive tract cancer in the Netherlands Antilles.

    PubMed

    Freni, S C

    1984-04-01

    Data from the Cancer Registry in the Netherlands Antilles made clear that the incidence rate of cancer of the upper digestive tract in this country was among the highest in the world. To study the long-term trends in the incidence rate a retrospective population-based case-finding survey was performed. The author presents the results of the period 1958 to 1981; data from earlier periods appeared to be incomplete. The highest incidence rates were found in the indigenous populations of Curaao and Bonaire. In the period studied, the rates of oral and esophageal cancer dropped approximately 3% per year, while a shift was seen towards a later onset of the disease. A breakdown of the rates by island of residency showed that the decline was highly significant only for the population of Curaao, the main island, with 89% of the total population studied. The presence of a downward trend on the other islands might be obscured by the small size of the populations. No significant change was found in the incidence rate of pharyngeal cancer, although a tendency toward lower rates was observed. Abuse of alcohol and tobacco, mineral deficiencies, malnutrition, the use of sorghum in the daily diet, and reverse smoking by females, are factors believed to be responsible for high rates in the past. With the exception of abuse of alcohol and tobacco, these factors have changed considerably in a favorable direction. It has been claimed that these changes have contributed to the sharp decrease in the incidence rates of oral and esophageal cancer. PMID:6697300

  1. Observations of historical sea cliff retreat rates exceed long-term estimates derived from cosmogenic 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Martin D.; Rood, Dylan H.; Ellis, Michael A.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2015-04-01

    Historical observation of coastal retreat are limited to relatively short timescales (< 150 years), during which time humans may have modified the coastal environment. There is growing concern that rates of coastal change may be accelerated in the face of anticipated stormier climates and rising sea level, yet there is little knowledge of rates of coastal change prior to the relatively brief historical records. In order to make predictions about potential future coastal change it is important to establish baseline conditions averaged over longer time periods. Here we present analysis of sea cliff retreat throughout the Holocene averaged for chalk cliffs in south-east England using cosmogenic isotopes. We determine long-term rates of sea cliff erosion from 10Be measured from in-situ flint samples collected from three transects across coastal platforms in East Sussex. A numerical model of 10Be accumulation on an evolving coastal profile allows estimation of cliff retreat rate during the Holocene. The model accounts for variation in 10Be accumulation with tides and sea-level rise, and takes into account platform downwear and topographic shielding by adjacent cliffs. We find that cliff retreat rates during the Holocene were significantly slower (2-6 cm yr-1) than those derived from recent historical observations (15-25 cm yr-1). Modelled accumulation of 10Be requires retreat rates that increase rapidly in recent times, potentially reflecting human modification of the coastal sediment budget through construction of sea defences, flood defenses and aggregate extraction. Therefore knowledge of past human activity at the coastline may be important in anticipating future rates of coastal retreat.

  2. Obtaining low bond interest rates.

    PubMed

    Bittel, S D; Grill, R R

    1995-11-01

    Healthcare executives whose organizations seek major capital financing through bond offerings typically focus their attention on obtaining the lowest possible bond placement fees for the services of underwriters, legal counsel, accounting firms, and other advisors. However, far greater savings can be achieved by employing a strategic approach to securing low bond interest rates. PMID:10151868

  3. Regression Method for Estimating Long-Term Mean Annual Ground-Water Recharge Rates from Base Flow in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risser, Dennis W.; Thompson, Ronald E.; Stuckey, Marla H.

    2008-01-01

    A method was developed for making estimates of long-term, mean annual ground-water recharge from streamflow data at 80 streamflow-gaging stations in Pennsylvania. The method relates mean annual base-flow yield derived from the streamflow data (as a proxy for recharge) to the climatic, geologic, hydrologic, and physiographic characteristics of the basins (basin characteristics) by use of a regression equation. Base-flow yield is the base flow of a stream divided by the drainage area of the basin, expressed in inches of water basinwide. Mean annual base-flow yield was computed for the period of available streamflow record at continuous streamflow-gaging stations by use of the computer program PART, which separates base flow from direct runoff on the streamflow hydrograph. Base flow provides a reasonable estimate of recharge for basins where streamflow is mostly unaffected by upstream regulation, diversion, or mining. Twenty-eight basin characteristics were included in the exploratory regression analysis as possible predictors of base-flow yield. Basin characteristics found to be statistically significant predictors of mean annual base-flow yield during 1971-2000 at the 95-percent confidence level were (1) mean annual precipitation, (2) average maximum daily temperature, (3) percentage of sand in the soil, (4) percentage of carbonate bedrock in the basin, and (5) stream channel slope. The equation for predicting recharge was developed using ordinary least-squares regression. The standard error of prediction for the equation on log-transformed data was 9.7 percent, and the coefficient of determination was 0.80. The equation can be used to predict long-term, mean annual recharge rates for ungaged basins, providing that the explanatory basin characteristics can be determined and that the underlying assumption is accepted that base-flow yield derived from PART is a reasonable estimate of ground-water recharge rates. For example, application of the equation for 370 hydrologic units in Pennsylvania predicted a range of ground-water recharge from about 6.0 to 22 inches per year. A map of the predicted recharge illustrates the general magnitude and variability of recharge throughout Pennsylvania.

  4. Accelerated Rates of Nitrogen Cycling and N2O Production in Salt Marsh Sediments due to Long-Term Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, X.; Ji, Q.; Angell, J.; Kearns, P.; Bowen, J. L.; Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Intensified sedimentary production of nitrous oxide (N2O), one of the most potent greenhouse gases, is one of the many possible environmental consequences of elevated nitrogen (N) loading into estuarine ecosystems. This study investigates the response to over 40 years of fertilization of nitrogen removal processes in the sediments of the Great Sippewissett Marsh in Falmouth, MA. Sediment slurries were incubated (1.5 hr) with trace amounts (< 10% of ambient concentration) of 15NH4+ + 14NO3- or 15NO3- + 14NH4+. An additional parallel incubation with 15NH4+ + 14NO3- and 1 mM of allylthiourea (ATU) was included to measure rates of anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox). Well-homogenized slurries filled about 10% of the volume in the gas-tight incubation vials, and the rest of the volume was replaced with an O2/He (20%/80%) mixture. The production of 29N2, 44N2O and 45N2O were determined using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The rate of total N2O production in fertilized sediments (0.89 nmol hr-1 g-1 wet weight) was 30-fold higher than in unfertilized sediments. The ratio of N2O to N2 production was also significantly higher in fertilized sediments (2.9%) than in unfertilized sediments (1.2%). This highlights the disproportionally large effect of long-term fertilization on N2O production in salt marsh sediments. The reduced oxygen level and higher ammonium concentrations in situ probably contributed to the significant rise in N2O production as a result of long-term fertilization. When detected, anammox and coupled nitrification-denitrification accounted for 10% and 14% of the total N2 production in fertilized sediments (30.5 nmol hr-1 g-1 wet weight), respectively, whereas neither was detected in unfertilized sediments. Thus these experiments indicate that N loading has important effects on multiple N cycle processes that result in N loss and N2O production.

  5. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F.S.; Crawford, R.L.; Sorenson, K.

    2005-09-01

    Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a preferred treatment technology saves significant site restoration costs for DOE. However, in order to be accepted MNA requires direct evidence of which processes are responsible for the contaminant loss and also the rates of the contaminant loss. Our proposal aims to: 1) provide evidence for one example of MNA, namely the disappearance of the dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Test Area North (TAN) site, 2) determine the rates at which aquifer microbes can co-metabolize TCE, and 3) determine whether there are other examples of natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents occurring at DOE sites. To this end, our research has several objectives. First, we have conducted studies to characterize the microbial processes that are likely responsible for the co-metabolic destruction of TCE in the aquifer at TAN (University of Idaho and INL). Second, we are investigating realistic rates of TCE co-metabolism at the low catabolic activities typical of microorganisms existing under aquifer conditions (INL). Using the co-metabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained in the aquifer at TAN and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Coupled with the research on low catabolic activities of co-metabolic microbes we are determining the patterns of functional gene expression by these cells, patterns that may be used to diagnose the co-metabolic activity in the SRPA or other aquifers.

  6. Generalized discriminant analysis for congestive heart failure risk assessment based on long-term heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Fatemeh; Asl, Babak Mohammadzadeh

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study are summarized in the following items: first, to investigate the class discrimination power of long-term heart rate variability (HRV) features for risk assessment in patients suffering from congestive heart failure (CHF); second, to introduce the most discriminative features of HRV to discriminate low risk patients (LRPs) and high risk patients (HRPs), and third, to examine the influence of feature dimension reduction in order to achieve desired accuracy of the classification. We analyzed two public Holter databases: 12 data of patients suffering from mild CHF (NYHA class I and II), labeled as LRPs and 32 data of patients suffering from severe CHF (NYHA class III and IV), labeled as HRPs. A K-nearest neighbor classifier was used to evaluate the performance of feature set in the classification. Moreover, to reduce the number of features as well as the overlap of the samples of two classes in feature space, we used generalized discriminant analysis (GDA) as a feature extraction method. By applying GDA to the discriminative nonlinear features, we achieved sensitivity and specificity of 100% having the least number of features. Finally, the results were compared with other similar conducted studies regarding the performance of feature selection procedure and classifier besides the number of features used in training. PMID:26344584

  7. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F. S.; Crawford, R. L.; Sorenson, K.

    2005-06-01

    Dissolved dense nonaqueous-phase liquid plumes are persistent, widespread problems in the DOE complex. At the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) is disappearing from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) by natural attenuation, a finding that saves significant site restoration costs. Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation as a preferred treatment technology requires direct evidence of the processes and rates of the degradation. Our proposal aims to provide that evidence for one such site by testing two hypotheses. First, we believe that realistic values for in situ rates of TCE cometabolism can be obtained by sustaining the putative microorganisms at the low catabolic activities consistent with aquifer conditions. Second, the patterns of functional gene expression evident in these communities under starvation conditions while carrying out TCE cometabolism can be used to diagnose the cometabolic activity in the aquifer itself. Using the cometabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained at this location and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Realistic terms for cometabolism of TCE will provide marked improvements in DOE's ability to predict and monitor natural attenuation of chlorinated organics at other sites, increase the acceptability of this solution, and provide significant economic and health benefits through this noninvasive remediation strategy. Finally, this project aims to derive valuable genomic information about the functional attributes of subsurface microbial communities upon which DOE must depend to resolve some of its most difficult contamination issues.

  8. Evaluation of Neural Response Telemetry (NRT™) with focus on long-term rate adaptation over a wide range of stimulation rates.

    PubMed

    Huarte, Alicia; Ramos, Angel; Morera, Constantino; Garcia-Ibáñez, Luis; Battmer, Rolf; Dillier, Norbert; Wesarg, Thomas; Müller-Deile, Joachim; Hey, Mattias; Offeciers, Erwin; von Wallenberg, Ernst; Coudert, Chrystelle; Killian, Matthijs

    2014-05-01

    Custom Sound EP™ (CSEP) is an advanced flexible software tool dedicated to recording of electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) in Nucleus® recipients using Neural Response Telemetry™ (NRT™). European multi-centre studies of the Freedom™ cochlear implant system confirmed that CSEP offers tools to effectively record ECAP thresholds, amplitude growth functions, recovery functions, spread of excitation functions, and rate adaptation functions and an automated algorithm (AutoNRT™) to measure threshold profiles. This paper reports on rate adaptation measurements. Rate adaptation of ECAP amplitudes can successfully be measured up to rates of 495 pulses per second (pps) by repeating conventional ECAP measurements and over a wide range of rates up to 8000 pps using the masked response extraction technique. Rate adaptation did not show a predictable relationship with speech perception and coding strategy channel rate preference. The masked response extraction method offers opportunities to study long-term rate adaptation with well-defined and controlled stimulation paradigms. PMID:24559068

  9. Determining the long-term slip rate of the Pernicana Fault System, Mt. Etna, to improve earthquake forecast modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amato, Davide; Pace, Bruno; Di Nicola, Luigia; Stuart, Finlay M.; Barfod, Dan; Branca, Stefano; Azzaro, Raffaele; Visini, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The Pernicana fault system (PFS) is a complex active tectonic systems located in the NE sector of Mt. Etna. It represents the northern boundary of the sliding side of the volcano and plays an important role in the dynamics of the eastern flank. Several historic and recent earthquakes have occurred close to this structure with coseismic surface faulting and damage (e.g. 02/04/2010 earthquake, Mw = 4.2). The PFS is transtensive, characterised by complex of en echelon segments with a N 110° overall direction. The dip-slip component decreases to the East accompanied with a decreasing of seismic activity. The eastern-most segment is characterised by left aseismic creeping strike-slip motion. The aim of this work is to constrain to constrain the long-term history of the PFS using 40Ar/39Ar and cosmogenic 3He ages of lava flows that are cut by the PFS in order to better understand the fault behaviour and improve the prediction of earthquake occurrence. We will present the first 3D shape of the PFS based on a network of detailed topographic profiles, to better constrain the variability of the fault scarp along strike and so the kinematics of the structure. In situ cosmogenic 3He exposure ages of two faulted lava flows from the central sector of PFS are used to determine the slip rate. Flow ages (1157 ± 230 yr and 1088 ± 96 yr) are combined with fault scarp heights to calculate an average vertical slip rate of about 11 mm/year over the last 1,000 years for the central section of the PFS. This rate is close to the rate determined from historical and geodetic data (displacement of antropic manufact and geodetic levelling), covering the last 20 years. It suggests that the slip-rates have not changed significantly in the last 1,000 years. The new fault geometry and slip rate data have been used to realise a kinematic and strain model of the PFS, in order to distinguish the vertical and the horizontal slip rate components and to model the tectonic and volcanic strain fields. The calculated tectonic component of the strain can be used to improve earthquake occurrence forecast modelling of this sector of the volcano.

  10. The Incidence Rate, High-Risk Factors, and Short- and Long-Term Adverse Outcomes of Fetal Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hua-Wei; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the incidence and high-risk factors of fetal growth restriction (FGR) in Mainland China and determine the adverse effects of this condition on fetal-neonatal health. This study was a retrospective chart review. We investigated the incidence rate of FGR using a retrospective analysis of clinical data obtained from mothers and newborns from 7 hospitals in Mainland China from January 1 to December 31, 2011. The short-term outcomes of FGR were analyzed based on data obtained from the neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) of Bayi Children's Hospital. The long-term outcomes of FGR were determined after a follow-up study of 125 cases of FGR in children at 18 months. The physical development index, mental development index (MDI), and psychomotor development index (PDI) were compared between FGR patients and controls. The incidence of FGR was 8.77%. The incidence of FGR was significantly higher in females than in males (9.80% vs 7.84%, P < 0.05). The incidence of FGR in preterm infants was higher than that in full-term infants (16.43% vs 7.87%, P < 0.01). Chronic hypertension, abnormal amniotic fluid, and umbilical cord abnormalities were independent factors of FGR. A significantly higher incidence of complications, including hypoglycemia, asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, gastrointestinal bleeding, congenital malformations, polycythemia, lung hemorrhage, apnea, congenital heart disease, and disseminated intravascular coagulation, was observed in FGR patients than in controls. The FGR prolonged the duration of the hospital stay and markedly increased hospitalization expenses (P < 0.05). Children with FGR showed catch-up growth, which reached the level of the control group after 1.5 years, but these individuals still had lower MDI and PDI scores. The incidence rate of FGR in Mainland China was 8.77%. It has a significantly adverse effect on fetal-neonatal health and cognitive development. PMID:25501078

  11. Future rates of sea-level rise from long-term coupled climate-ice sheet projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goelzer, Heiko; Huybrechts, Philippe; Loutre, Marie-France; Fichefet, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Global mean sea level rose at an average rate of ~3.1 mm yr-1 since the early 1990s and is projected to rise between 0.28 and 0.98 m until year 2100, strongly depending on the assumed anthropogenic forcing scenario (IPCC AR5). This global rise in sea level is a combination of contributions from ocean thermal expansion, glaciers and small ice caps, from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and changes in land water storage. Except for the latter, all components are expected to contribute to further sea-level rise well beyond the end of this century due to the long residence time of CO2 in the atmosphere. In the present study we present results from long-term future sea-level change experiments over 1000 years with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM version 1.3 forced by four extended RCP scenarios. The model includes fully coupled three-dimensional thermomechanical models of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, a global glacier melt algorithm to account for the response of mountain glaciers and small ice caps, and a diagnostic for oceanic thermal expansion. A range of the model's sensitivity to greenhouse warming was sampled by systematic parameter variations leading to an ensemble of model versions that simulate the present-day climate consistent with observations, while producing contrasted results for the future period. We analyse sea-level rates of change for all components over the course of the third millennium for the entire ensemble of model versions and forcing scenarios.

  12. Long-Term Effect of Population Screening for Diabetes on Cardiovascular Morbidity, Self-Rated Health, and Health Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B.; Simmons, Rebecca K.; Prevost, A. Toby; Williams, Kate M.; Kinmonth, Ann-Louise; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Griffin, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE There is limited trial evidence concerning the long-term effects of screening for type 2 diabetes on population morbidity. We examined the effect of a population-based diabetes screening program on cardiovascular morbidity, self-rated health, and health-related behaviors. METHODS We conducted a pragmatic, parallel-group, cluster-randomized controlled trial of diabetes screening (the ADDITION-Cambridge study) including 18,875 individuals aged 40 to 69 years at high risk of diabetes in 32 general practices in eastern England (27 practices randomly allocated to screening, 5 to no-screening for control). Of those eligible for screening, 466 (2.9%) were diagnosed with diabetes. Seven years after randomization, a random sample of patients was sent a postal questionnaire: 15% from the screening group (including diabetes screening visit attenders and non-attenders) and 40% from the no-screening control group. Self-reported cardiovascular morbidity, self-rated health (using the SF-8 Health Survey and EQ-5D instrument), and health behaviors were compared between trial groups using an intention-to-screen analysis. RESULTS Of the 3,286 questionnaires mailed out, 1,995 (61%) were returned, with 1,945 included in the analysis (screening: 1,373; control: 572). At 7 years, there were no significant differences between the screening and control groups in the proportion of participants reporting heart attack or stroke (OR = 0.90, 95% CI, 0.71–1.15); SF-8 physical health summary score as an indicator of self-rated health status (β −0.33, 95% CI, −1.80 to 1.14); EQ-5D visual analogue score (β: 0.80, 95% CI, −1.28 to 2.87); total physical activity (β 0.50, 95% CI, −4.08 to 5.07); current smoking (OR 0.97, 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.32); and alcohol consumption (β 0.14, 95% CI, −1.07 to 1.35). CONCLUSIONS Invitation to screening for type 2 diabetes appears to have limited impact on population levels of cardiovascular morbidity, self-rated health status, and health behavior after 7 years. PMID:25755036

  13. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, F. S.; Crawford, R. L.; Sorenson, K.

    2005-09-01

    Acceptance of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a preferred treatment technology saves significant site restoration costs for DOE. However, in order to be accepted MNA requires direct evidence of which processes are responsible for the contaminant loss and also the rates of the contaminant loss. Our proposal aims to: 1) provide evidence for one example of MNA, namely the disappearance of the dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) from the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Test Area North (TAN) site, 2) determine the rates at which aquifer microbes can co-metabolize TCE, and 3) determine whether there are other examples of natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents occurring at DOE sites. To this end, our research has several objectives. First, we have conducted studies to characterize the microbial processes that are likely responsible for the co-metabolic destruction of TCE in the aquifer at TAN (University of Idaho and INL). Second, we are investigating realistic rates of TCE co-metabolism at the low catabolic activities typical of microorganisms existing under aquifer conditions (INL). Using the co-metabolism rate parameters derived in low-growth bioreactors, we will complete the models that predict the time until background levels of TCE are attained in the aquifer at TAN and validate the long-term stewardship of this plume. Coupled with the research on low catabolic activities of co-metabolic microbes we are determining the patterns of functional gene expression by these cells, patterns that may be used to diagnose the co-metabolic activity in the SRPA or other aquifers. Third, we have systematically considered the aquifer contaminants at different locations in plumes at other DOE sites in order to determine whether MNA is a broadly applicable remediation strategy for chlorinated hydrocarbons (North Wind Inc.). Realistic terms for co-metabolism of TCE will provide marked improvements in DOE’s ability to predict and monitor natural attenuation of chlorinated organics, increase the acceptability of this solution, and provide significant economic and health benefits through this noninvasive remediation strategy. This project also aims to derive valuable genomic information about the functional attributes of subsurface microbial communities upon which DOE must depend to resolve some of its most difficult contamination issues.

  14. Are Changes in the Mean or Variability of Climate Signals More Important for Long-Term Stochastic Growth Rate?

    PubMed Central

    García-Carreras, Bernardo; Reuman, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Population dynamics are affected by changes in both the mean and standard deviation of climate, e.g., changes in average temperature are likely to affect populations, but so are changes in the strength of year-to-year temperature variability. The impacts of increases in average temperature are extensively researched, while the impacts of changes in climate variability are less studied. Is the greater attention given to changes in mean environment justified? To help answer this question we developed a simple population model, explicitly linked to an environmental process. We used the model to compare the sensitivities of a population's long-term stochastic growth rate, a measure of fitness, to changes in the mean and standard deviation of the environment. Results are interpreted in light of a comparative analysis of the relative magnitudes of change in means and standard deviations of biologically relevant climate variables in the United States. Results show that changes in the variability of the environment can be more important for many populations. Changes in mean conditions are likely to have a greater impact than changes in variability on populations far from their ideal environment, for example, populations near species range boundaries and potentially of conservation concern. Populations near range centres and close to their ideal environment are more likely to be affected by changes in variability. Among pest and insect disease vectors, as well as species of commercial value, populations likely to be of greatest economic and public health significance are those near species range centers, living in a near-ideal environment for the species. Observed changes in the variability of climate variables may benefit these populations. PMID:23691131

  15. The impairment of true glomerular filtration rate in long-term cyclosporine-treated pediatric allograft recipients

    SciTech Connect

    McDiarmid, S.V.; Ettenger, R.B.; Hawkins, R.A.; Senguttvan, P.; Busuttil, R.W.; Vargas, J.; Berquist, W.E.; Ament, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    We performed indium-111-DTPA plasma clearance studies in 61 pediatric kidney and liver recipients treated with cyclosporine to compare true glomerular filtration rate with calculated GFR (cGFR). The mean true GFR of 61.9 +/- 36.6 ml/min/1.73 m2 indicated renal impairment. The mean cGFR of 85.2 +/- 22.4 ml/min/1.73 m2 was significantly higher (P less than 0.001), and overestimated GFR by 38%. cGFR alone did not accurately reflect the degree of renal dysfunction. A group of 48 pediatric orthotopic liver transplant recipients was studied in more detail: 73% of these patients had a true GFR less than 70 ml/min/1.73 m2, while 85% had a true GFR below 90 ml/min/1.73 m2, the lower limit for normal GFR in children. The mean true GFR for patients treated more than 24 months with CsA was lower (P = 0.02) than patients treated with CsA for 12 to 24 months. OLT patients with normal true GFR (greater than 90 ml/min/1.73 m2) had significantly lower plasma CsA levels, and 50% of patients with a true GFR less than or equal to 50 ml/min/1.73 m2 had hypertension. There was no effect on true GFR of age, liver function, azathioprine use, or peritransplant treatment with other nephrotoxic drugs. We conclude that true GFR is significantly impaired in long-term CsA-treated allograft pediatric recipients. Calculations of GFR underestimate the degree of renal dysfunction. As patients treated greater than 24 months had the lowest true GFRs, the fall in GFR may be progressive.

  16. FEASIBILITY OF DOSE ADJUSTMENT BASED ON DIFFERENCE IN LONG-TERM CLEARANCE RATES OF INHALED PARTICULATE MATTER IN HUMANS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term pulmonary clearance rates were evaluated for several laboratory animal species, dogs, and humans to determine if differences among species exist, and if so, the adequacy of the data for dose adjustment. Within each species, large variations in clearance rates were seen,...

  17. The dual effect of Mg on the long-term alteration rate of AVM nuclear waste glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thien, Bruno M. J.; Godon, Nicole; Ballestero, Anthony; Gin, Stéphane; Ayral, André

    2012-08-01

    Inactive Mg-containing nuclear waste glasses simulating actual HLW glasses produced at the AVM facility since 1995 (Marcoule, France), were leached in aqueous solution in order to assess their long term behaviour. The focus was on the effect of Mg. Our findings show that the distribution of Mg between the gel and the secondary crystalline phases strongly influences the glass dissolution rate. The glasses were leached in initially pure water (T = 50 °C, surface/volume ratio (S/V) = 55 cm-1) with and without addition of Mg2+ in the solution. "Mg-free" AVM glasses were also leached in initially pure water (50 °C, 200 cm-1) with and without addition of Mg2+ in the solution. Accurate identification of Mg-smectite secondary phases and gel composition calculations enable us to explain the different observed behaviours. Glass AVM 10 was the less altered glass in pure water. Its gel is more protective than the other probably because it is mainly balanced by Mg2+. The addition of Mg2+ in the solution triggers the precipitation of smectite (not observed in pure water experiments), which consumes silicon from the gel, leading finally to a significant increase of the glass alteration. We also focused on the AVM 6 glass which was the most altered glass in pure water of available AVM glasses. Contrary to AVM 10, the gel of AVM 6 is mainly balanced by Na+. The addition of Mg2+ in the solution allows the replacement of Na by Mg within the gel. This reaction clearly improves the gel properties and allows the rate to decrease more rapidly, in spite of the precipitation of smectite (also observed in pure water experiments). Finally, the two glasses were altered in synthetic groundwater (SGW) with a high Mg-Ca content. As expected from the previous observations, AVM 10 was insensitive to the presence of alkaline earths in the leaching solution whereas AVM 6 glass exhibited a lower rate than in pure water thanks to the incorporation of Mg and Ca within the gel.

  18. Breast Cancer Liver Metastases: US-guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation—Intermediate and Long-term Survival Rates

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Maria Franca; Andreano, Anita; Laeseke, Paul F.; Livraghi, Tito; Sironi, Sandro; Lee, Fred T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively assess the local control and intermediate- and long-term survival of patients with liver metastases from breast cancer who have undergone percutaneous ultrasonography (US)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the hospital ethics committee, and all patients provided written informed consent. RF ablation was used to treat 87 breast cancer liver metastases (mean diameter, 2.5 cm) in 52 female patients (median age, 55 years). Inclusion criteria were as follows: fewer than five tumors, maximum tumor diameter of 5 cm or smaller, and disease either confined to the liver or stable with medical therapy. Forty-five (90%) of 50 patients had previously undergone chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, or both, and had no response or an incomplete response to the treatment. Contrast material–enhanced computed tomography and US were performed to evaluate complications and technical success and to assess for local tumor progression during follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess survival, and results were compared between groups with a log-rank test. Cox regression analysis was used to assess independent prognostic factors that affected survival. Results Complete tumor necrosis was achieved in 97% of tumors. Two (4%) minor complications occurred. Median time to follow-up from diagnosis of liver metastasis and from RF ablation was 37.2 and 19.1 months, respectively. Local tumor progression occurred in 25% of patients. New intrahepatic metastases developed in 53% of patients. From the time of first RF ablation, overall median survival time and 5-year survival rate were 29.9 months and 27%, respectively. From the time the first liver metastasis was diagnosed, overall median survival time was 42 months, and the 5-year survival rate was 32%. Patients with tumors 2.5 cm in diameter or larger had a worse prognosis (hazard ratio, 2.1) than did patients with tumors smaller than 2.5 cm in diameter. Conclusion Survival rates in selected patients with breast cancer liver metastases treated with RF ablation are comparable to those reported in the literature that were achieved with surgery or laser ablation. PMID:19709994

  19. Long-Term Slip Rate on the Southern San Andreas Fault Determined by Th-230/U Dating of Pedogenic Carbonate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, K. E.; Johnson, G.; Kendrick, K. J.; Hudnut, K. W.; Sharp, W. D.

    2006-12-01

    Determinations of long-term slip rates are limited, in part, by our ability to accurately estimate the age of offset landforms. U-series dating on pedogenic carbonate provides a relatively novel way of dating landforms, with strengths that complement more widely applied cosmogenic (CRN) techniques. We present new Th-230/U dates for pedogenic carbonate coatings on pebbles of the Biskra Palms fan, near Indio, California, which is offset by the southern San Andreas fault. Small, carefully chosen samples of dense pedogenic carbonate analyzed by mass spectrometry, have 3-10 ppm uranium and low common thorium (Th-232), making them highly favorable for U-series dating. Only minor corrections for initial Th-230 are necessary, and are made using Th-232 as an index isotope with propagation of uncertainties. Samples of early-formed carbonate collected from depths of about 2 m in fan soils typically consist of dense coatings 200-500 microns thick. Such coatings from 6 pebbles from 3 different locations within the fan yield apparent ages between 30 2 ka and 46 2 ka (all errors 2 sigma), with a median age of 38.4 ka (n= 11). Each age averages over the sampled interval of coating growth, hence the spread of ages reflects clast-to-clast variation in coating accumulation rates. All ages are therefore minimum ages for the stabilization of the fan because the time lag between stabilization and carbonate pedogenesis at Biskra Palms is, as yet, unknown. Sub-samples of individual clast-coatings yield ages in good agreement-- e.g., 45.0 0.8 ka, 46.0 1.8 ka, 44.8 1.0 ka, 45.7 0.9 ka (MSWD = 0.88), demonstrating closed U-Th systems. Van der Woerd et al (2006) reported an average CRN age of 35.5 2.5 ka for the fan surface and an offset of 565 80 m, for a slip rate of 15.9 3.4 mm/a. Using their offset, and our oldest mean age of 45.3 0.5 Ma (n=4, ages above) as the minimum landform age, we estimate a maximum slip rate of 12.5 1.8 mm/a. This maximum average slip rate for the past 45 ka is distinct from both modern rates for the southern San Andreas determined by geodesy (e.g. 23 2 mm/a; Bennett et al., 2006), and the rate at Cajon Pass (24.5 3.5 mm/a) determined for the past 15 ka (Weldon and Sieh, 1985). As noted by van der Woerd et al, such discrepancies suggest that: 1) large changes in slip-rate occurred prior to 15 ka, 2) the Biskra Palms site fails to record all of the slip on the southern San Andreas, or 3) that southward of Cajon Pass significant slip is transferred to other faults. More U-series dating is needed to understand the patterns of pedogenic carbonate accumulation on the scale of the fan, in selected soil profiles, and within individual coatings. In particular, sampling of the coatings at higher spatial resolution will better determine the age of onset of carbonate accumulation, thereby providing a closer estimate of the time of fan stabilization and abandonment.

  20. Changes in long-term no-till corn growth and yield under different rates of stover mulch

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Canqui, Dr. Humberto; Lal, Dr. Rattan; Post, Wilfred M; Owens, Lloyd

    2006-09-01

    Received for publication January 4, 2006. Removal of corn (Zea mays L.) stover for biofuel production may affect crop yields by altering soil properties. A partial stover removal may be feasible, but information on appropriate rates of removal is unavailable. We assessed the short-term impacts of stover management on long-term no-till (NT) continuous corn grown on a Rayne silt loam (fine loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston in Ohio, and predicted corn yield from soil properties using principal component analysis (PCA). The study was conducted in 2005 on the ongoing experiments started in May 2004 under 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200)% of stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal promoted early emergence and rapid seedling growth (P < 0.01). Early-emerging plants grew taller than late-emerging plants up to about 50 d, and then the heights reversed at Coshocton and were comparable at other two sites. Stover management affected corn yield only at the Coshocton site where average grain and stover yields in the T200, T100, T75, and T50 (10.8 and 10.3 Mg ha-1) were higher than those in the T0 and T25 treatments (8.5 and 6.5 Mg ha-1) (P < 0.01), showing that stover removal at rates as low as 50% (2.5 Mg ha-1) decreased crop yields. Soil properties explained 71% of the variability in grain yield and 33% of the variability in stover yield for the Coshocton site. Seventeen months after the start of the experiment, effects of stover management on corn yield and soil properties were site-specific.

  1. Long-term erosion rate measurements in gypsum caves of Sorbas (SE Spain) by the Micro-Erosion Meter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Laura; De Waele, Jo; Calaforra, Jos Maria; Forti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with the results of long-term micro-erosion measurements in the most important gypsum cave of Spain, the Cueva del Agua (Sorbas, Almeria, SE Spain). Nineteen MEM stations were positioned in 1992 in a wide range of morphological and environmental settings (gypsum floors and walls, carbonate speleothems, dry conduits and vadose passages) inside and outside the cave, on gypsum and carbonate bedrocks and exposed to variable degree of humidity, different air flow and hydrodynamic conditions. Four different sets of stations have been investigated: (1) the main cave entrance (Las Viicas spring); (2) the main river passage; (3) the abandoned Laboratory tunnel; and (4) the external gypsum surface. Data over a period of about 18 years are available. The average lowering rates vary from 0.014 to 0.016 mm yr- 1 near the main entrance and in the Laboratory tunnel, to 0.022 mm - 1 on gypsum floors and 0.028 mm yr- 1 on carbonate flowstones. The denudation data from the external gypsum stations are quite regular with a rate of 0.170 mm yr- 1. The observations allowed the collecting of important information concerning the feeding of the karst aquifer not only by infiltrating rainwater, but under present climate conditions also by water condensation of moist air flow. This contribution to the overall karst processes in the Cueva del Agua basin represents over 20% of the total chemical dissolution of the karst area and more than 50% of the speleogenetically removed gypsum in the cave system, thus representing all but a secondary role in speleogenesis. Condensation-corrosion is most active along the medium walls, being slower at the roof and almost absent close to the floor. This creates typical corrosion morphologies such as cupola, while gypsum flowers develop where evaporation dominates. This approach also shows quantitatively the morphological implications of condensation-corrosion processes in gypsum karst systems in arid zones, responsible for an average surface lowering of 0.047 mm yr- 1, while mechanical erosion produces a lowering of 0.123 mm yr- 1.

  2. Long-Term Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Long-Term Care What Is Long-Term Care? Long-term care involves a variety of services ... 8 sec Click to watch this video Most Care Provided at Home Click for more information Long- ...

  3. 31 CFR 351.12 - What do I need to know about the long-term savings bond rate, to understand redemption value...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What do I need to know about the long-term savings bond rate, to understand redemption value calculations in this subpart? 351.12 Section 351.12 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL...

  4. Rates, causes, and dynamic of long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic "passive continental margin", Brazil and Namibia, as revealed by thermo-kinematic numerical modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Stippich; Anton, Glasmacher Ulrich; Peter, Christian, Hackspacher

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the research is to quantify the long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin (SAPCM) in SE-Brazil and NW-Namibia. Excellent onshore outcrop conditions and complete rift to post-rift archives between Sao Paulo and Porto Alegre and in the transition from Namibia to Angola (onshore Walvis ridge) allow a high precision quantification of exhumation, and uplift rates, influencing physical parameters, long-term acting forces, and process-response systems. Research will integrate the published and partly published thermochronological data from Brazil and Namibia, and test lately published new concepts on causes of long-term landscape evolution at rifted margins. The climate-continental margin-mantle coupled process-response system is caused by the interaction between endogenous and exogenous forces, which are related to the mantle-process driven rift - drift - passive continental margin evolution of the South Atlantic, and the climate change since the Early/Late Cretaceous climate maximum. Special emphasis will be given to the influence of long-living transform faults such as the Florianopolis Fracture Zone (FFZ) on the long-term topography evolution of the SAPCM's. A long-term landscape evolution model with process rates will be achieved by thermo-kinematic 3-D modeling (software code PECUBE and FastCape). Testing model solutions obtained for a multidimensional parameter space against the real thermochronological and geomorphological data set, the most likely combinations of parameter rates, and values can be constrained. The data and models will allow separating the exogenous and endogenous forces and their process rates.

  5. A New Paradigm for Gamma Ray Bursts: Long Term Accretion Rate Modulation by an External Accretion Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzo, John; Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We present a new way of looking at the very long term evolution of GRBs in which the disk of material surrounding the putative black hole powering the GRB jet modulates the mass flow, and hence the efficacy of the process that extracts rotational energy from the black hole and inner accretion disk. The pre-Swift paradigm of achromatic, shallow-to-steep "breaks" in the long term GRB light curves has not been borne out by detailed Swift data amassed in the past several years. We argue that, given the initial existence of a fall-back disk near the progenitor, an unavoidable consequence will be the formation of an "external disk" whose outer edge continually moves to larger radii due to angular momentum transport and lack of a confining torque. The mass reservoir at large radii moves outward with time and gives a natural power law decay to the GRB light curves. In this model, the different canonical power law decay segments in the GRB identified by Zhang et al. and Nousek et al. represent different physical states of the accretion disk. We identify a physical disk state with each power law segment.

  6. A NEW PARADIGM FOR GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: LONG-TERM ACCRETION RATE MODULATION BY AN EXTERNAL ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Cannizzo, J. K. E-mail: gehrels@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov

    2009-08-01

    We present a new way of looking at the very long-term evolution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in which the disk of material surrounding the putative black hole powering the GRB jet modulates the mass flow, and hence the efficacy of the process that extracts rotational energy from the black hole and inner accretion disk. The pre-Swift paradigm of achromatic, shallow-to-steep 'breaks' in the long-term GRB light curves has not been borne out by detailed Swift data amassed in the past several years. We argue that, given the initial existence of a fall-back disk near the progenitor, an unavoidable consequence will be the formation of an 'external disk' whose outer edge continually moves to larger radii due to angular momentum transport and lack of a confining torque. The mass reservoir at large radii moves outward with time and gives a natural power-law decay to the GRB light curves. In this model, the different canonical power-law decay segments in the GRB identified by Zhang et al. and Nousek et al. represent different physical states of the accretion disk. We identify a physical disk state with each power-law segment.

  7. Possible use of EPDM in radioactive waste disposal: Long term low dose rate and short term high dose rate irradiation in aquatic and atmospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hac?o?lu, F?rat; zdemir, Tongu; avdar, Seda; Usanmaz, Ali

    2013-02-01

    In this study, changes in the properties of ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) irradiated with different dose rates in ambient atmosphere and aqueous environment were investigated. Irradiations were carried out both with low dose and high dose rate irradiation sources. EPDM samples which were differentiated from each other by peroxide type and 5-ethylidene 2-norbornene (ENB) contents were used. Long term low dose rate irradiations were carried out for the duration of up to 2.5 years (total dose of 1178 kGy) in two different irradiation environments. Dose rates (both high and low), irradiation environments (in aquatic and open to atmosphere), and peroxide types (aliphatic or aromatic) were the parameters studied. Characterization of irradiated EPDM samples were performed by hardness, compression, tensile, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), TGA-FTIR, ATR-FTIR, XRD and SEM tests. It was observed that the irradiation in water environment led to a lower degree of degradation when compared to that of irradiation open to atmosphere for the same irradiation dose. In addition, irradiation environment, peroxide type and dose rate had effects on the extent of change in the properties of EPDM. It was observed that EPDM is relatively radiation resistant and a candidate polymer for usage in radioactive waste management.

  8. Wildfire and monsoon induced short-term hillslope degradation rates compared with model long-term rates,San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Hackert, B.; Bursik, M.

    2003-04-01

    Event-scale erosion data were collected in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, from 1996 to 2000, to establish natural short-term hillslope degradation rates and compare these with existing computational models of long-term rates. This Neogene scoria cone field consists of late Miocene to Holocene volcanic cones, with a wide range of degradation stages. The semiarid climate makes the area exceptionally suitable for studies of extreme erosion events, because of the annual intense July and August monsoon season. Being the first study to collect an integrated set of natural hillslope degradation data, the results can be used to validate and improve existing computational models. Data on rainfall, rainsplash, overland flow and soil creep were collected with the help of splashboards, erosion pins, erosion plots, raingauges and channel cross-sections on slopes of 0^o to 30^o. Rainsplash data are consistent with a long-term diffusion model of slope degradation, but measured sediment fluxes are slightly higher than those predicted by such a model. Rainfall events cause formation of rilling and gullying by overland flow while dry periods cause diffusional infilling of the gullies and rills, as observed in successive channel cross-section and erosion pin measurements. Data on degradation by overland flow are not consistent with any type of diffusive-degradation model but have been compared to a channel-forming computational model, producing satisfactory results regarding flow speed, path and channel development, and erosion/deposition patterns. A severe forest fire burned one of two hillslope observation sites in 1996. This has given us the opportunity to observe the impact of fire on erosion due to drizzle (15 mm h-1) in areas having different severities of fire damage. This was compared to barren slopes on the unburned cone. The degradation has been accelerated in areas of high fire severity and high vegetation bareness by almost one order of magnitude. In particular, the rate of degradation by overland and pipe flow increased. A multiple regression of the field data including slope angle, vegetation, precipitation and fire severity fits data on degradation rate at alpha = 1 when fire severity is included in the regression.

  9. 12 CFR 614.4155 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pursuant to an interest rate plan within which management may establish rates. Any interest rate plan shall... management may adjust rates, and provide the upper and lower limits on management authority. Any interest... its review and approval of the institution's operational and strategic business plan....

  10. 12 CFR 614.4155 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pursuant to an interest rate plan within which management may establish rates. Any interest rate plan shall... management may adjust rates, and provide the upper and lower limits on management authority. Any interest... its review and approval of the institution's operational and strategic business plan....

  11. Three-Year long-term outcome of 458 naturalistically treated inpatients with major depressive episode: severe relapse rates and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Seemller, Florian; Meier, Sebastian; Obermeier, Michael; Musil, Richard; Bauer, Michael; Adli, Mazda; Kronmller, Klaus; Holsboer, Florian; Brieger, Peter; Laux, Gerd; Bender, Wolfram; Heuser, Isabella; Zeiler, Joachim; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Riedel, Michael; Falkai, Peter; Mller, Hans-Jrgen

    2014-10-01

    In randomized controlled trials, maintenance treatment for relapse prevention has been proven to be efficacious in patients responding in acute treatment, its efficacy in long-term outcome in "real-world patients" has yet to be proven. Three-year long-term data from a large naturalistic multisite follow-up were presented. Severe relapse was defined as suicide, severe suicide attempt, or rehospitalization. Next to relapse rates, possible risk factors including antidepressant medication were identified using univariate generalized log-rank tests and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model for time to severe relapse. Overall data of 458 patients were available for analysis. Of all patients, 155 (33.6%) experienced at least one severe relapse during the 3-year follow-up. The following variables were associated with a shorter time to a severe relapse in univariate and multivariate analyses: multiple hospitalizations, presence of avoidant personality disorder, continuing antipsychotic medication, and no further antidepressant treatment. In comparison with other studies, the observed rate of severe relapse during 3-year period is rather low. This is one of the first reports demonstrating a beneficial effect of long-term antidepressant medication on severe relapse rates in naturalistic patients. Concomitant antipsychotic medication may be a proxy marker for treatment resistant and psychotic depression. PMID:24590257

  12. 13 CFR 120.932 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Loan Program (504) 504 Loans and Debentures 120.932 Interest rate. The interest rate of the 504 Loan and the Debenture which funds it is set by the SBA and approved by the Secretary of the Treasury....

  13. Retention Rates - Renewed Interest but Whose Interest is Being Served?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longden, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Explores the increased level of interest in retention rates among full-time, undergraduate students, considering the interests served by the state, universities and colleges, and students, and suggesting that as British higher education moves from an elite to a mass system, the elite instincts continue to dominate, working against student

  14. Retention Rates - Renewed Interest but Whose Interest is Being Served?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longden, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Explores the increased level of interest in retention rates among full-time, undergraduate students, considering the interests served by the state, universities and colleges, and students, and suggesting that as British higher education moves from an elite to a mass system, the elite instincts continue to dominate, working against student…

  15. Sociosexual orientation and 2D:4D ratios in women: Relationship to men's desirability ratings as a long-term pair bond.

    PubMed

    DeLecce, Tara L; Polheber, John P; Matchock, Robert L

    2014-02-01

    The current study examined whether men's ratings of women's desirability as a long-term pairbond, based on static photographs, were related to the women's second-to-fourth digit (2D:4D) ratio and their sexual attitudes and behavior. The 2D:4D ratio was measured in 164 women and facial photographs were taken of 55 of these women. All women completed the Sociosexual Orientation Inventory (SOI). Male participants (n = 89), masked to this information, rated the 55 female participants on their desirability as a long-term sexual partner, specifically along dimensions of faithfulness, youthfulness, and attractiveness. Ten independent judges rated women's photographed faces on masculinity. Results indicated a significant negative relationship between women's SOI scores and men's faithfulness ratings (more unrestricted sociosexuality was associated with lower faithfulness ratings). There was also a significant positive relationship between right (but not left) 2D:4D ratio and faithfulness ratings (women with female-like ratios were rated as being more faithful). The SOI scores of the women were not related to 2D:4D ratios. These results suggest that the potential for sexual infidelity can be gleaned from static facial cues. PMID:24356948

  16. Long-term observations of SO2 gas emission rates from Nyiragongo volcano (RD Congo) during 2004-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalire, Matthiew; Galle, Bo; Arellano, Santiago; Norman, Patrik; Johansson, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Mount Nyiragongo (3470 m a.s.l.) is an active stratovolcano of mafic composition located in the Virunga Mountains in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is considered as one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world due to generation of voluminous and highly fluidized lava flows during historical eruptions and the proximity to densely inhabited areas. Nyiragongo volcano is also a source of prodigious gaseous emissions to the atmosphere during periods of both eruptive and non-eruptive activity. Documented records of the style, speciation, and magnitude of degassing from this volcano exist in the literature since three decades ago. These studies are mostly based on observations made during sporadic field campaigns or by satellite-borne sensors, owing to logistical constraints imposed by volcanic and political unrest. With the aim of strengthen the gas monitoring capabilities of Nyiragongo volcano, an automatic scanning spectroscopic (DOAS) system was installed in March 2004 in the Rusayo seismic station, 10 km from the volcano crater. This instrument is powered by solar panels and linked by radio telemetry to the Goma Volcanological Observatory. Combined with plume velocity data, this instrument provides near-to-real-time SO2 fluxes with a typical temporal resolution of 10 minutes during sunlight hours. In 2005 the instrument was upgraded and incorporated as part of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC). Since 2005 three additional instruments has been installed, at 10 - 14 km distance W - SW of the crater, as part of the NOVAC project. We present the results of the measurements performed at Nyiragongo during the period March 2004-October 2009. Wind data has been obtained from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model based on data from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to account for the effect of local topography. A statistical analysis of the results and its relation with other volcanological observations is presented. This study emphasizes the importance of long-term and continuous gas monitoring to better understand the human and environmental effects of the persistent activity of this volcano.

  17. Long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault from 10Be-26Al surface exposure dating of an offset alluvial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woerd, JRMe; Klinger, Yann; Sieh, Kerry; Tapponnier, Paul; Ryerson, Frederick J.; MRiaux, Anne-Sophie

    2006-04-01

    We determine the long-term slip rate of the southern San Andreas Fault in the southeastern Indio Hills using 10Be and 26Al isotopes to date an offset alluvial fan surface. Field mapping complemented with topographic data, air photos and satellite images allows precise determination of piercing points across the fault zone that are used to measure an offset of 565 80 m. A total of 26 quartz-rich cobbles from three different fan surfaces were collected and dated. The tight cluster of nuclide concentrations from 19 samples out of 20 from the offset fan surface implies a simple exposure history, negligible prior exposure and erosion, and yields an age of 35.5 2.5 ka. The long-term slip rate of the San Andreas Fault south of Biskra Palms is thus 15.9 3.4 mm/yr. This rate is about 10 mm/yr slower than geological (0-14 ka) and short-term geodetic estimates for this part of the San Andreas Fault, implying changes in slip rate or in faulting behavior. This result puts new constraints on the slip rate of the San Jacinto and on the Eastern California Shear Zone for the last 35 kyr. Our study shows that more sites along the major faults of southern California need to be targeted to better constrain the slip rates over different timescales.

  18. Long-term testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferber, M.; Graves, G. A., Jr.

    Land-based gas turbines are significantly different from automotive gas turbines in that they are designed to operate for 50,000 h or greater (compared to 5,000-10,000 h). The primary goal of this research is to determine the long-term survivability of ceramic materials for industrial gas turbine applications. Research activities in this program focus on the evaluation of the static tensile creep and stress rupture (SR) behavior of three commercially available structural ceramics which have been identified by the gas turbine manufacturers as leading candidates for use in industrial gas turbines. For each material investigated, a minimum of three temperatures and four stresses will be used to establish the stress and temperature sensitivities of the creep and SR behavior. Because existing data for many candidate structural ceramics are limited to testing times less than 2,000 h, this program will focus on extending these data to times on the order of 10,000 h, which represents the lower limit of operating time anticipated for ceramic blades and vanes in gas turbine engines. A secondary goal of the program will be to investigate the possibility of enhancing life prediction estimates by combining interrupted tensile SR tests and tensile dynamic fatigue tests in which tensile strength is measured as a function of stressing rate. The third goal of this program will be to investigate the effects of water vapor upon the SR behavior of the three structural ceramics chosen for the static tensile studies by measuring the flexural strength as a function of stressing rate at three temperatures.

  19. The use of a passive sampler for the simultaneous determination of long-term ventilation rates and VOC concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mailahn, W.; Seifert, B.; Ullrich, D. ); Moriske, H. )

    1989-01-01

    When interpreting seasonal variations of indoor concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC), the ventilation rate must be known. Therefore, a method has been developed which permits the simultaneous determination of the average ventilation rate and the concentration of VOC in a room over an integration period of two week with the same passive sampler. Hexafluorobenzene (HFB), a non-toxic substance, was chosen as the tracer so as not to interfere in the gas chromatographic analysis of VOC in indoor air. Emission rates of HFB sources were determined at various temperatures from 15 to 30{degree}C. After a test of the procedure for sampling periods of one and two weeks in an experimental chamber at ventilation rates between 0.5 and 2 h{sup {minus}1}, the procedure was successfully applied under field conditions. Good agreement was obtained when comparing the HFB method with a perfluorocarbon technique.

  20. Long-term monitoring of creep rate along the Hayward fault and evidence for a lasting creep response to 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, J.J.; Galehouse, J.S.; Simpson, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    We present results from over 30 yr of precise surveys of creep along the Hayward fault. Along most of the fault, spatial variability in long-term creep rates is well determined by these data and can help constrain 3D-models of the depth of the creeping zone. However, creep at the south end of the fault stopped completely for more than 6 years after the M7 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake (LPEQ), perhaps delayed by stress drop imposed by this event. With a decade of detailed data before LPEQ and a decade after it, we report that creep response to that event does indeed indicate the expected deficit in creep.

  1. 7 CFR 1950.105 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... handling Single Family Housing Loans are contained in 7 CFR part 3550. ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interest rate. 1950.105 Section 1950.105 Agriculture... rate. (a) The Soldiers and Sailors Relief Act requires that the effective interest rate charged...

  2. 7 CFR 1950.105 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... handling Single Family Housing Loans are contained in 7 CFR part 3550. ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Interest rate. 1950.105 Section 1950.105 Agriculture... rate. (a) The Soldiers and Sailors Relief Act requires that the effective interest rate charged...

  3. 7 CFR 1950.105 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... handling Single Family Housing Loans are contained in 7 CFR part 3550. ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interest rate. 1950.105 Section 1950.105 Agriculture... rate. (a) The Soldiers and Sailors Relief Act requires that the effective interest rate charged...

  4. 7 CFR 1950.105 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... handling Single Family Housing Loans are contained in 7 CFR part 3550. ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interest rate. 1950.105 Section 1950.105 Agriculture... rate. (a) The Soldiers and Sailors Relief Act requires that the effective interest rate charged...

  5. 76 FR 59767 - Interest Rates; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates; Notice AGENCY: Small Business Administration. The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This...

  6. Erosion Rates at the Mars Exploration Rover Landing Sites and Long-Term Climate Change on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Grant, J. A.; Crumpler, L. S.; Greeley, R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Weitz, C. M.; Sullivan, R.; Christensen, P. R.; Soderblom, L. A.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Erosion rates derived from the Gusev cratered plains and the erosion of weak sulfates by saltating sand at Meridiani Planum are so slow that they argue that the present dry and desiccating environment has persisted since the Early Hesperian. In contrast, sedimentary rocks at Meridiani formed in the presence of groundwater and occasional surface water, and many Columbia Hills rocks at Gusev underwent aqueous alteration during the Late Noachian, approximately coeval with a wide variety of geomorphic indicators that indicate a wetter and likely warmer environment. Two-toned rocks, elevated ventifacts, and perched and undercut rocks indicate localized deflation of the Gusev plains and deposition of an equivalent amount of sediment into craters to form hollows, suggesting average erosion rates of approx.0.03 nm/yr. Erosion of Hesperian craters, modification of Late Amazonian craters, and the concentration of hematite concretions in the soils of Meridiani yield slightly higher average erosion rates of 1-10 nm/yr in the Amazonian. These erosion rates are 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than the slowest continental denudation rates on Earth, indicating that liquid water was not an active erosional agent. Erosion rates for Meridiani just before deposition of the sulfate-rich sediments and other eroded Noachian areas are comparable with slow denudation rates on Earth that are dominated by liquid water. Available data suggest the climate change at the landing sites from wet and likely warm to dry and desiccating occurred sometime between the Late Noachian and the beginning of the Late Hesperian (3.7-3.5 Ga).

  7. Erosion rates at the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites and long-term climate change on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Grant, J. A.; Crumpler, L. S.; Greeley, R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F.; Weitz, C. M.; Sullivan, R.; Christensen, P. R.; Soderblom, L. A.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-12-01

    Erosion rates derived from the Gusev cratered plains and the erosion of weak sulfates by saltating sand at Meridiani Planum are so slow that they argue that the present dry and desiccating environment has persisted since the Early Hesperian. In contrast, sedimentary rocks at Meridiani formed in the presence of groundwater and occasional surface water, and many Columbia Hills rocks at Gusev underwent aqueous alteration during the Late Noachian, approximately coeval with a wide variety of geomorphic indicators that indicate a wetter and likely warmer environment. Two-toned rocks, elevated ventifacts, and perched and undercut rocks indicate localized deflation of the Gusev plains and deposition of an equivalent amount of sediment into craters to form hollows, suggesting average erosion rates of ~0.03 nm/yr. Erosion of Hesperian craters, modification of Late Amazonian craters, and the concentration of hematite concretions in the soils of Meridiani yield slightly higher average erosion rates of 1-10 nm/yr in the Amazonian. These erosion rates are 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than the slowest continental denudation rates on Earth, indicating that liquid water was not an active erosional agent. Erosion rates for Meridiani just before deposition of the sulfate-rich sediments and other eroded Noachian areas are comparable with slow denudation rates on Earth that are dominated by liquid water. Available data suggest the climate change at the landing sites from wet and likely warm to dry and desiccating occurred sometime between the Late Noachian and the beginning of the Late Hesperian (3.7-3.5 Ga).

  8. Erosion rates at the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites and long-term climate change on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.P.; Grant, J. A.; Crumpler, L.S.; Greeley, R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F., III; Weitz, C.M.; Sullivan, R.J.; Christensen, P.R.; Soderblom, L.A.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Erosion rates derived from the Gusev cratered plains and the erosion of weak sulfates by saltating sand at Meridiani Planum are so slow that they argue that the present dry and desiccating environment has persisted since the Early Hesperian. In contrast, sedimentary rocks at Meridiani formed in the presence of groundwater and occasional surface water, and many Columbia Hills rocks at Gusev underwent aqueous alteration during the Late Noachian, approximately coeval with a wide variety of geomorphic indicators that indicate a wetter and likely warmer environment. Two-toned rocks, elevated ventifacts, and perched and undercut rocks indicate localized deflation of the Gusev plains and deposition of an equivalent amount of sediment into craters to form hollows, suggesting average erosion rates of ???0.03 nm/yr. Erosion of Hesperian craters, modification of Late Amazonian craters, and the concentration of hematite concretions in the soils of Meridiani yield slightly higher average erosion rates of 1-10 nm/yr in the Amazonian. These erosion rates are 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than the slowest continental denudation rates on Earth, indicating that liquid water was not an active erosional agent. Erosion rates for Meridiani just before deposition of the sulfate-rich sediments and other eroded Noachian areas are comparable with slow denudation rates on Earth that are dominated by liquid water. Available data suggest the climate change at the landing sites from wet and likely warm to dry and desiccating occurred sometime between the Late Noachian and the beginning of the Late Hesperian (3.7-3.5 Ga). Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Carbon accumulation in a permafrost polygon peatland: steady long-term rates in spite of shifts between dry and wet conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Couwenberg, John

    2015-02-01

    Ice-wedge polygon peatlands contain a substantial part of the carbon stored in permafrost soils. However, little is known about their long-term carbon accumulation rates (CAR) in relation to shifts in vegetation and climate. We collected four peat profiles from one single polygon in NE Yakutia and cut them into contiguous 0.5 cm slices. Pollen density interpolation between AMS (14)C dated levels provided the time span contained in each of the sample slices, which--in combination with the volumetric carbon content--allowed for the reconstruction of CAR over decadal and centennial timescales. Vegetation representing dry palaeo-ridges and wet depressions was reconstructed with detailed micro- and macrofossil analysis. We found repeated shifts between wet and dry conditions during the past millennium. Dry ridges with associated permafrost growth originated during phases of (relatively) warm summer temperature and collapsed during relatively cold phases, illustrating the important role of vegetation and peat as intermediaries between ambient air temperature and the permafrost. The average long-term CAR across the four profiles was 10.6 5.5 g C m(-2) yr(-1). Time-weighted mean CAR did not differ significantly between wet depression and dry ridge/hummock phases (10.6 5.2 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 10.3 5.7 g C m(-2) yr(-1), respectively). Although we observed increased CAR in relation to warm shifts, we also found changes in the opposite direction and the highest CAR actually occurred during the Little Ice Age. In fact, CAR rather seems to be governed by strong internal feedback mechanisms and has roughly remained stable on centennial time scales. The absence of significant differences in CAR between dry ridge and wet depression phases suggests that recent warming and associated expansion of shrubs will not affect long-term rates of carbon burial in ice-wedge polygon peatlands. PMID:25230297

  10. The Participation Rates of Older Minority Persons in Community-Based Services in Long-Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Monica; And Others

    Existing data are summarized and original data provided on minority participation rates in alternative services among the elderly. Data from several federally-funded programs, including Medicare and Medicaid, are presented. A group of 32 counties in the US, representing a universe of counties in which minorities constitute a large proportion of

  11. In Vivo Tumor Growth Rate Measured by US in Preoperative Period and Long Term Disease Outcome in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyoon; Lee, Eunshin; Kim, Jongjin; Lee, Han-Byoel; Kang, Young Joon; Kim, Yun-Gyoung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth rate, calculated from tumor size measurements by US, on breast cancer patients outcome. Patients and Methods Breast cancer patients who received at least two serial breast ultrasonographies (US) in our institution during preoperative period and were surgically treated between 2002 and 2010 were reviewed. Tumor growth rate was determined by specific growth rate (SGR) using the two time point tumor sizes by US. Results A total of 957 patients were analyzed. The median duration between initial and second US was 28 days (range, 8140). The median initial tumor size was 1.7cm (range, 0.47.0) and median second size was 1.9cm (range, 0.37.2). 523(54.6%) cases had increase in size. The median SGR(x10-2) was 0.59 (range, -11.90~31.49) and mean tumor doubling time was 14.51 days. Tumor growth rate was higher when initial tumor size was smaller. Lymphovascular invasion, axillary lymph node metastasis, and higher histologic grade were significantly associated with higher SGR. SGR was significantly associated with disease-free survival (DFS) in a univariate analysis (p = 0.04), but not in a multivariate Cox analysis (p>0.05). High SGR was significantly associated with worse DFS in a subgroup of initial tumor size >2cm (p = 0.018), but not in those with tumor size <2cm (p>0.05). Conclusion Our results showed that tumor growth rate measured by US in a relatively short time interval was associated with other worse prognostic factors and DFS, but it was not an independent prognostic factor in breast cancer patients. PMID:26657267

  12. THE LONG-TERM DECAY IN PRODUCTION RATES FOLLOWING THE EXTREME OUTBURST OF COMET 17P/HOLMES

    SciTech Connect

    Schleicher, David G.

    2009-10-15

    Numerous sets of narrowband filter photometry were obtained of Comet 17P/Holmes from Lowell Observatory during the interval of 2007 November 1 to 2008 March 5. Observations began 8 days following its extreme outburst, at which time the derived water production rate, based on OH measurements, was 5 x 10{sup 29} molecule s{sup -1} and the derived proxy of dust production, A({theta})f{rho}, was about 5 x 10{sup 5} cm. Relative production rates for the other gas species, CN, C{sub 2}, C{sub 3}, and NH, are consistent with 'typical' composition (based on our update to the classifications by A'Hearn et al.). An exponential decay in the logarithm of measured production rates as a function of time was observed for all species, with each species dropping by factors of about 200-500 after 125 days. All gas species exhibited clear trends with aperture size, and these trends are consistent with larger apertures having a greater proportion of older material that was released when production rates were higher. Much larger aperture trends were measured for the dust, most likely because the dust grains have smaller outflow velocities and longer lifetimes than the gas species; therefore, a greater proportion of older, i.e., higher production dust is contained within a given aperture. By extrapolating to a sufficiently small aperture size, we derive near-instantaneous water and dust production rates throughout the interval of observation, and also estimate values immediately following the outburst. The finite lifetime of the gas species requires that much higher ice vaporization rates were taking place throughout the observation interval than occurred prior to the outburst, likely due to the continued release of icy grains from the nucleus. The relatively small aperture trends for the gas species also imply that the bulk of fresh, excess volatiles are confined to the nucleus and near-nucleus regime, rather than being associated with the outburst ejecta cloud. A minimum of about 0.1% of the total nucleus volume was vaporized water ice, while a dust volume corresponding to at least 1%-2% was likely to have been released from the nucleus.

  13. Visualization of Heart Rate Variability of Long-Term Heart Transplant Patient by Transition Networks: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wdowczyk, Joanna; Makowiec, Danuta; Dorniak, Karolina; Gruchała, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    We present a heart transplant patient at his 17th year of uncomplicated follow-up. Within a frame of routine check out several tests were performed. With such a long and uneventful follow-up some degree of graft reinnervation could be anticipated. However, the patient's electrocardiogram and exercise parameters seemed largely inconclusive in this regard. The exercise heart rate dynamics were suggestive of only mild, if any parasympathetic reinnervation of the graft with persisting sympathetic activation. On the other hand, traditional heart rate variability (HRV) indices were inadequately high, due to erratic rhythm resulting from interference of the persisting recipient sinus node or non-conducted atrial parasystole. New tools, originated from network representation of time series, by visualization short-term dynamical patterns, provided a method to discern HRV increase due to reinnervation from other reasons. PMID:27014081

  14. A long-term rock uplift rate for eastern Crete and geodynamic implications for the Hellenic subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Fassoulas, C.; Kubik, P. W.

    2014-08-01

    The island of Crete in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction zone has a rugged topography with local relief exceeding 2 km. Based on the elevation of marine shorelines, rates of rock uplift during the Late Holocene were previously estimated to range between 1 and 4 mm/a in different parts of the island. These rates may, however, not be representative for longer timescales, because subduction earthquakes with up to 9 m of vertical coseismic displacement have affected Crete in the Late Holocene. Here we use a well preserved sequence of marine terraces near Kato Zakros in eastern Crete to determine the rate of rock uplift over the last ?600 ka. Field investigations and topographic profiles document a flight of more than 13 marine bedrock terraces that were carved into limestones of the Tripolitza unit. Preliminary age constraints for the terraces were obtained by 10Be exposure dating of rare quartz-bearing sandstone clasts, which are present on some terraces. The 10Be ages of these samples, which have been corrected for an inherited nuclide component, yielded exposure ages between ?100 ka and zero. Combined with geomorphologic evidence the two oldest 10Be ages suggest that the terraces T4 and T5, with shoreline angles at an elevation of ?68 and ?76 m above sea level, respectively, formed during the marine isotope stage 5e about 120 ka ago. The correlation of the higher terraces (T6 to T13) with regional sea-level highstands indicates sustained rock uplift at a rate of ?0.5 m/ka since at least ?600 ka. As normal faulting has dominated the tectonics of Crete during the last several million years, upper crustal shortening can be ruled out as a cause for rock uplift. We argue that the sustained uplift of the island results from the continuous underplating of sediments, which are transferred from the subducting African plate to the base of the crust beneath Crete.

  15. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 10?9 (95% confidence interval = 4.6 10?96.5 10?9) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population. PMID:26129709

  16. Outcomes of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pinn-Bingham, Melva; Puthawala, Ajmel A.; Syed, A.M. Nisar; Sharma, Anil; DiSaia, Philip; Berman, Michael; Tewari, Krishnansu S.; Randall-Whitis, Leslie; Mahmood, Usama; Ramsinghani, Nilam; Kuo, Jeffrey; Chen, Wen-Pin; McLaren, Christine E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and toxicity of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and May 2009, 116 patients with cervical cancer were treated. Of these, 106 (91%) patients had advanced disease (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA). Ten patients had stage IB, 48 had stage II, 51 had stage III, and 7 had stage IVA disease. All patients were treated with a combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the pelvis (5040 cGy) and 2 applications of HDR-ISBT to a dose of 3600 cGy to the implanted volume. Sixty-one percent of patients also received interstitial hyperthermia, and 94 (81%) patients received chemotherapy. Results: Clinical LRC was achieved in 99 (85.3%) patients. Three-year DFS rates were 59%, 67%, 71%, and 57% for patients with stage IB, II, III, and IVA disease, respectively. The 5-year DFS and overall survival rates for the entire group were 60% and 44%, respectively. Acute and late toxicities were within acceptable limits. Conclusions: Locally advanced cervical cancer patients for whom intracavitary BT is unsuitable can achieve excellent LRC and OS with a combination of EBRT and HDR-ISBT.

  17. Outcomes of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results

    PubMed Central

    Pinn-Bingham, Melva; Puthawala, Ajmel A.; Syed, A.M. Nisar; Sharma, Anil; DiSaia, Philip; Berman, Michael; Tewari, Krishnansu S.; Randall-Whitis, Leslie; Mahmood, Usama; Ramsinghani, Nilam; Kuo, Jeffrey; Chen, Wen-Pin; McLaren, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and toxicity of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials Between March 1996 and May 2009, 116 patients with cervical cancer were treated. Of these, 106 (91%) patients had advanced disease (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA). Ten patients had stage IB, 48 had stage II, 51 had stage III, and 7 had stage IVA disease. All patients were treated with a combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the pelvis (5040 cGy) and 2 applications of HDR-ISBT to a dose of 3600 cGy to the implanted volume. Sixty-one percent of patients also received interstitial hyperthermia, and 94 (81%) patients received chemotherapy. Results Clinical LRC was achieved in 99 (85.3%) patients. Three-year DFS rates were 59%, 67%, 71%, and 57% for patients with stage IB, II, III, and IVA disease, respectively. The 5-year DFS and overall survival rates for the entire group were 60% and 44%, respectively. Acute and late toxicities were within acceptable limits. Conclusions Locally advanced cervical cancer patients for whom intracavitary BT is unsuitable can achieve excellent LRC and OS with a combination of EBRT and HDR-ISBT. PMID:22763030

  18. 7 CFR 1779.33 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS 1779.33 Interest rates. (a) General. Rates... eliminate the possibility of a balloon payment at the end of the loan. (c) Changes. Any change in...

  19. 7 CFR 1779.33 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED LOANS 1779.33 Interest rates. (a) General. Rates... eliminate the possibility of a balloon payment at the end of the loan. (c) Changes. Any change in...

  20. A long-term rock uplift rate for eastern Crete and geodynamic implications for the Hellenic subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Fassoulas, C.; Kubik, P.

    2014-12-01

    The island of Crete in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction zone has a rugged topography with a local relief exceeding 2 km. Based on the elevation of marine shorelines, rates of rock uplift during the Late Holocene were previously estimated to range between 1 and 4 mm/a in different parts of the island (e.g. Lambeck, 1995). These rates may, however, not be representative for longer timescales, because subduction earthquakes with up to 9 m of vertical coseismic displacement have recently affected Crete (Stiros, 2001). Here we use a well preserved sequence of marine terraces near Kato Zakros in eastern Crete to determine the rate of rock uplift over the last ˜600 ka. Field investigations and topographic profiles document a flight of more than 13 marine bedrock terraces that were carved into limestones of the Tripolitza unit. Preliminary age constraints for the terraces were obtained by 10Be exposure dating of rare quartz-bearing sandstone clasts, which are present on some terraces. The 10Be ages of these samples, which have been corrected for an inherited nuclide component, yielded exposure ages between ˜100 ka and zero. Combined with geomorphologic evidence the two oldest 10Be ages suggest that the terraces T4 and T5, with shoreline angles at an elevation of ca. 68 and ca. 76 m above sea level, respectively, formed during the marine isotope stage 5e about 120 ka ago. The correlation of the higher terraces (T6 to T13) with regional sea-level high-stands (Siddall et al., 2003) indicates sustained rock uplift at a rate of ˜0.5 m/ka since at least ˜600 ka. As normal faulting has dominated the tectonics of Crete during the last several million years, upper crustal shortening can be ruled out as a cause for rock uplift. We argue that the sustained uplift of the island results from the continuous underplating of sediments, which are transferred from the subducting African plate to the base of the crust beneath Crete. Lambeck, 1995, Geophys. J. Int. 122, 1022-1044.Siddall et al., 2003, Nature, 423, 853-858.Stiros, 2001, J. Struct. Geol., 23, 545-562.

  1. The impact of long-term water stress on relative growth rate and morphology of needles and shoots of Metasequoia glyptostroboides seedlings: research toward identifying mechanistic models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanxiang; Equiza, Maria Alejandra; Zheng, Quanshui; Tyree, Melvin T

    2011-09-01

    Leaf morphology in the upper canopy of trees tends to be different from that lower down. The effect of long-term water stress on leaf growth and morphology was studied in seedlings of Metasequoia glyptostroboides to understand how tree height might affect leaf morphology in larger trees. Tree height increases water stress on growing leaves through increased hydraulic resistance to water flow and increased gravitational potential, hence we assume that water stress imposed by soil dehydration will have an effect equivalent to stress induced by height. Seedlings were subjected to well-watered and two constant levels of long-term water stress treatments. Drought treatment significantly reduced final needle count, area and mass per area (leaf mass area, LMA) and increased needle density. Needles from water-stressed plants had lower maximum volumetric elastic modulus (?(max)), osmotic potential at full turgor (???(?)) (and at zero turgor (??(?)) (than those from well-watered plants. Palisade and spongy mesophyll cell size and upper epidermal cell size decreased significantly in drought treatments. Needle relative growth rate, needle length and cell sizes were linear functions of the daily average water potential at the time of leaf growth (r 0.88-0.999). We conclude that water stress alone does mimic the direction and magnitude of changes in leaf morphology observed in tall trees. The results are discussed in terms of various models for leaf growth rate. PMID:21534977

  2. Design of governmental policies for oil production rates and oil income spending; a long-term perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Moxnes, E.

    1983-01-01

    Norway is a small country with large oil reserves. In 1980, oil production amounted to 1 million barrels per day. Taxes and royalties to the government from this production provided 9% of the GNP. With current estimates of recoverable reserves, the 1980 production rate would last for 100 years. Because potential income is so large, decisions about oil production rates and oil income spending have tremendous impacts on society. The current debate provides a wide variety of policy suggestions. Attempts to design an appropriate oil policy are complicated by much uncertainty about total reserves, future oil prices, and complex economic responses to production and income. This report provides an integrating framework to aid government officials in their evaluation of policy options. A system dynamics model of the Norwegian national economy is developed for the analysis. The model determines endogenously the spending of oil income, GNP, consumption and investments, imports and exports, unemployment, and labor migration from exporting industries to service industries; all variables result from exogenous decisions about oil production.

  3. Seismic cycle, long-term faulting behavior and slip rate variations along the Dead Sea Fault (Jordan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Meghraoui, M.; Abou Karaki, N.

    2009-12-01

    The recurrence of large and destructive earthquakes along major fault systems is key to understanding the seismic cycle, the driving mechanism and forecast future behavior. We study the ~ 110-km-long Jordan Valley Fault segment (JVF) of the North-South trending Dead Sea Transform Fault and plate boundary by means of two independent approaches: i) the build-up of a paleoseismic catalogue of surface-rupturing events for the last 14 kyr, and ii) the construction of a history of slip rate over the last 48.5 kyr from different generations of left-lateral offset streams of the late Pleistocene and Holocene Lissan lacustrine deposits. Firstly, we combine published historical data, re-appraised archaeological data and paleoseismic trenching to produce and unprecedentedly complete catalogue of large (Mw > 7) earthquakes with at least 13 events in the last 14 kyr. The average ~1000 yrs recurrence interval presents large variations from 300 to more than 1500 yrs, with the various datasets intersecting and completing each other. Secondly, we present a detailed map of the active fault trace that intersects a set of 20 gullies. Stream incisions are classified as a function of their depth and relative age and characterized in terms of cumulative offsets. Absolute ages are obtained from paleoclimatic analysis of lacustrine deposits. Using the numerous isotopic dating of lacustrine deposits, lake-level fluctuations and extreme rainfall episodes, we obtain an average 4.9 mm/yr slip rate with extreme values of 3.5 and 11 mm/yr. Our results indicate slip rate variations and provide evidence for episodic faulting behavior. Both approaches indicate that the JVF encounters periods of increased seismic activity which suggests episodicity or mode-switching. Reduced recurrence intervals and/or larger co-seismic slip (and magnitudes) are required to account for observations as suggested by GPS observations (4.5 mm/yr) and seismic moment summation. The JVF has accumulated 3.5 m to 5 m of slip deficit after the AD 1033 earthquake and may be the site for a large earthquake in the near future.

  4. Analysis of T-wave Amplitude Adaptation to Heart Rate Using RR-binning of Long-Term ECG Recordings.

    PubMed

    Johannesen, L; Grove, Usl; Srensen, Js; Schmidt, M; Graff, C; Couderc, J-P

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with coronary artery disease at the early stage of the disease is a challenge of modern cardiology. There is an urgent need to risk stratify these patients. Holter technology is a cheap and cost effective tool to evaluate electrical abnormalities in the heart. We propose to investigate T-amplitude adaptation to heart rate (HR) using RR-binning. We used daytime recordings from healthy subjects and subjects with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) from the Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse. The AMI subjects were divided into two groups based on location of their infarction (group A: anterior or anterior lateral, group B: inferior or inferior lateral). Both AMI groups had acute and stable phase recordings. Population-based T-adaptation to HR was observed for healthy subjects (R2 = 0.92) but was less pronounced for AMI subjects: [Formula: see text]. PMID:22068719

  5. In a long-term experimental demography study, excluding ungulates reversed invader's explosive population growth rate and restored natives.

    PubMed

    Kalisz, Susan; Spigler, Rachel B; Horvitz, Carol C

    2014-03-25

    A major goal in ecology is to understand mechanisms that increase invasion success of exotic species. A recent hypothesis implicates altered species interactions resulting from ungulate herbivore overabundance as a key cause of exotic plant domination. To test this hypothesis, we maintained an experimental demography deer exclusion study for 6 y in a forest where the native ungulate Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) is overabundant and Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) is aggressively invading. Because population growth is multiplicative across time, we introduce metrics that correctly integrate experimental effects across treatment years, the cumulative population growth rate, ?c, and its geometric mean, ?per-year, the time-averaged annual population growth rate. We determined ?c and ?per-year of the invader and of a common native, Trillium erectum. Our results conclusively demonstrate that deer are required for the success of Alliaria; its projected population trajectory shifted from explosive growth in the presence of deer (?per-year = 1.33) to decline toward extinction where deer are excluded (?per-year = 0.88). In contrast, Trillium's ?per-year was suppressed in the presence of deer relative to deer exclusion (?per-year = 1.04 vs. 1.20, respectively). Retrospective sensitivity analyses revealed that the largest negative effect of deer exclusion on Alliaria came from rosette transitions, whereas the largest positive effect on Trillium came from reproductive transitions. Deer exclusion lowered Alliaria density while increasing Trillium density. Our results provide definitive experimental support that interactions with overabundant ungulates enhance demographic success of invaders and depress natives' success, with broad implications for biodiversity and ecosystem function worldwide. PMID:24616522

  6. Sources of variability in spotted owl population growth rate: testing predictions using long-term mark-recapture data.

    PubMed

    Seamans, Mark E; Gutiérrez, R J

    2007-05-01

    For long-lived iteroparous vertebrates that annually produce few young, life history theory predicts that reproductive output (R) and juvenile survival should influence temporal variation in population growth rate (lambda) more than adult survival does. We examined this general prediction using 15 years of mark-recapture data from a population of California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis). We found that survival of individuals > or =1 year old (phi) exhibited much less temporal variability (CV = 0.04), where CV is coefficient of variation, than R (CV = 0.83) and that R was strongly influenced by environmental stochasticity. Although lambda was most sensitive (ê; log-transformed sensitivity) to phi (ê = 0.77), and much less sensitive to either R (ê = 0.12) or juvenile survival (survival rate of owls from fledging to 1 year old; ê = 0.12), we estimated that R contributed as much as phi to the observed annual variability in lambda. The contribution of juvenile survival to variability in lambda was proportional to its ê. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that natural selection may have favored the evolution of longevity in spotted owls as a strategy to increase the probability of experiencing favorable years for reproduction. Our finding that annual weather patterns that most affected R (temperature and precipitation during incubation) and phi (conditions during winter related to the Southern Oscillation Index) were equally good at explaining temporal variability in lambda supports the conclusion that R and phi were equally responsible for variability in lambda. Although currently accepted conservation measures for spotted owl populations attempt to enhance survival, our results indicated that conservation measures that target R may be as successful, as long as actions do not reduce phi. PMID:17160689

  7. In a long-term experimental demography study, excluding ungulates reversed invader's explosive population growth rate and restored natives

    PubMed Central

    Kalisz, Susan; Spigler, Rachel B.; Horvitz, Carol C.

    2014-01-01

    A major goal in ecology is to understand mechanisms that increase invasion success of exotic species. A recent hypothesis implicates altered species interactions resulting from ungulate herbivore overabundance as a key cause of exotic plant domination. To test this hypothesis, we maintained an experimental demography deer exclusion study for 6 y in a forest where the native ungulate Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) is overabundant and Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) is aggressively invading. Because population growth is multiplicative across time, we introduce metrics that correctly integrate experimental effects across treatment years, the cumulative population growth rate, ?c, and its geometric mean, ?per-year, the time-averaged annual population growth rate. We determined ?c and ?per-year of the invader and of a common native, Trillium erectum. Our results conclusively demonstrate that deer are required for the success of Alliaria; its projected population trajectory shifted from explosive growth in the presence of deer (?per-year = 1.33) to decline toward extinction where deer are excluded (?per-year = 0.88). In contrast, Trilliums ?per-year was suppressed in the presence of deer relative to deer exclusion (?per-year = 1.04 vs. 1.20, respectively). Retrospective sensitivity analyses revealed that the largest negative effect of deer exclusion on Alliaria came from rosette transitions, whereas the largest positive effect on Trillium came from reproductive transitions. Deer exclusion lowered Alliaria density while increasing Trillium density. Our results provide definitive experimental support that interactions with overabundant ungulates enhance demographic success of invaders and depress natives success, with broad implications for biodiversity and ecosystem function worldwide. PMID:24616522

  8. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Kent S. Jr.

    2003-06-01

    Natural attenuation of TCE under aerobic conditions at the INEEL Test Area North site was demonstrated largely on the basis of preferential loss of TCE relative to conservative solutes (PCE and H-3) along groundwater flow paths. First order degradation half-lives were calculated from the rate of preferential TCE loss. We are utilizing the same approach at other DOE sites that have aerobic TCE plumes to determine if aerobic natural attenuation of TCE is rapid enough at these sites to be environmentally significant, i.e. if natural attenuation can reduce concentrations to acceptable levels before groundwater reaches potential receptors. The first step in this process was to identify TCE plumes at DOE sites that have the appropriate site conditions and data needed to perform this analysis. The site conditions include the presence of TCE in groundwater at appreciable concentrations in an aerobic aquifer, a co-mingled contaminant that can be used as a conservative tracer (e.g. PCE, H-3, Tc-99), a flow path that represents at least a decade of travel time, and several monitoring wells located along this flow path. Candidate sites were identified through interviews with knowledgeable individuals in the DOE system and by screening the U.S. Dept. of Energy Groundwater Database using the keywords ''TCE'' and ''groundwater''. The initial screening yielded 25 plumes for consideration. These sites had anywhere from one to 37 individual plumes containing TCE. Of the 25 sites, 13 sites were further evaluated because they met the screening criteria or were promising. After contacting DOE personnel from the respective sites, they were divided into three groups: (1) sites that meet all the project criteria, (2) sites that could potentially be used for the project, and (3) DOE sites that did not meet the criteria. The five sites with plumes that met the criteria were: Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and the Savannah River Site. Detailed characterization data from the promising plumes is being entered into our database as it is received. The next step is to calculate natural attenuation half-life values for all of these plumes. We will next identify the plumes in which natural attenuation via aerobic degradation of TCE is fast enough that it may be relevant as a component of a remedy. We will then select at least one of these sites and either modify an existing groundwater transport model or, if necessary, create a new model, for this plume. This model will initially include first order decay of TCE, and degradation will be parameterized using the half-live values determined from the field data. The models will be used to simulate the evolution of the TCE plume and to predict concentrations as a function of time at property lines or other artificial boundaries, and where potential receptors are located. Ultimately rate data from th e laboratory studies being performed at INEEL will be incorporated into this model, as well as the model of the TAN site to provide a realistic prediction of degradation rates and plume longevity. Although identifying suitable TCE plumes and obtaining characterization data has taken longer than expected, this process has successfully identified the plumes needed for the detailed modeling activity without adversely impacting the project budget.

  9. Long-term phenological trends, species accumulation rates, aphid traits and climate: five decades of change in migrating aphids

    PubMed Central

    Bell, James R; Alderson, Lynda; Izera, Daniela; Kruger, Tracey; Parker, Sue; Pickup, Jon; Shortall, Chris R; Taylor, Mark S; Verrier, Paul; Harrington, Richard

    2015-01-01

    1. Aphids represent a significant challenge to food production. The Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS) runs a network of 12·2-m suction-traps throughout the year to collect migrating aphids. In 2014, the RIS celebrated its 50th anniversary. This paper marks that achievement with an extensive spatiotemporal analysis and the provision of the first British annotated checklist of aphids since 1964. 2. Our main aim was to elucidate mechanisms that advance aphid phenology under climate change and explain these using life-history traits. We then highlight emerging pests using accumulation patterns. 3. Linear and nonlinear mixed-effect models estimated the average rate of change per annum and effects of climate on annual counts, first and last flights and length of flight season since 1965. Two climate drivers were used: the accumulated day degrees above 16 °C (ADD16) indicated the potential for migration during the aphid season; the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) signalled the severity of the winter before migration took place. 4. All 55 species studied had earlier first flight trends at rate of β = −0·611 ± SE 0·015 days year−1. Of these species, 49% had earlier last flights, but the average species effect appeared relatively stationary (β = −0·010 ± SE 0·022 days year−1). Most species (85%) showed increasing duration of their flight season (β = 0·336 ± SE 0·026 days year−1), even though only 54% increased their log annual count (β = 0·002 ± SE <0·001 year−1). 5. The ADD16 and NAO were shown to drive patterns in aphid phenology in a spatiotemporal context. Early in the year when the first aphids were migrating, the effect of the winter NAO was highly significant. Further into the year, ADD16 was a strong predictor. Latitude had a near linear effect on first flights, whereas longitude produced a generally less-clear effect on all responses. Aphids that are anholocyclic (permanently parthenogenetic) or are monoecious (non-host-alternating) were advancing their phenology faster than those that were not. 6. Climate drives phenology and traits help explain how this takes place biologically. Phenology and trait ecology are critical to understanding the threat posed by emerging pests such as Myzus persicae nicotianae and Aphis fabae cirsiiacanthoidis, as revealed by the species accumulation analysis. PMID:25123260

  10. Long-term phenological trends, species accumulation rates, aphid traits and climate: five decades of change in migrating aphids.

    PubMed

    Bell, James R; Alderson, Lynda; Izera, Daniela; Kruger, Tracey; Parker, Sue; Pickup, Jon; Shortall, Chris R; Taylor, Mark S; Verrier, Paul; Harrington, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aphids represent a significant challenge to food production. The Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS) runs a network of 122-m suction-traps throughout the year to collect migrating aphids. In 2014, the RIS celebrated its 50th anniversary. This paper marks that achievement with an extensive spatiotemporal analysis and the provision of the first British annotated checklist of aphids since 1964. Our main aim was to elucidate mechanisms that advance aphid phenology under climate change and explain these using life-history traits. We then highlight emerging pests using accumulation patterns. Linear and nonlinear mixed-effect models estimated the average rate of change per annum and effects of climate on annual counts, first and last flights and length of flight season since 1965. Two climate drivers were used: the accumulated day degrees above 16C (ADD16) indicated the potential for migration during the aphid season; the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) signalled the severity of the winter before migration took place. All 55 species studied had earlier first flight trends at rate of ?=-0611SE 0015daysyear(-1). Of these species, 49% had earlier last flights, but the average species effect appeared relatively stationary (?=-0010SE 0022daysyear(-1)). Most species (85%) showed increasing duration of their flight season (?=0336SE 0026daysyear(-1)), even though only 54% increased their log annual count (?=0002SE <0001year(-1)). The ADD16 and NAO were shown to drive patterns in aphid phenology in a spatiotemporal context. Early in the year when the first aphids were migrating, the effect of the winter NAO was highly significant. Further into the year, ADD16 was a strong predictor. Latitude had a near linear effect on first flights, whereas longitude produced a generally less-clear effect on all responses. Aphids that are anholocyclic (permanently parthenogenetic) or are monoecious (non-host-alternating) were advancing their phenology faster than those that were not. Climate drives phenology and traits help explain how this takes place biologically. Phenology and trait ecology are critical to understanding the threat posed by emerging pests such as Myzus persicae nicotianae and Aphis fabae cirsiiacanthoidis, as revealed by the species accumulation analysis. PMID:25123260

  11. Effects of short- and long-term exposure to ozone on heart rate and blood pressure of emphysematous rats

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, I.; Yokoyama, E.

    1989-02-01

    Electrocardiogram and arterial blood pressure of elastase-treated emphysematous rats (E rats) and saline-treated control rats (S rats) were recorded continuously during exposure to either 1 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/) for 3 hr or 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/ for 6 hr. The heart rates (HRs) of both groups decreased to about 50 and 65% of the initial levels at the end of 1 ppm and 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/ exposure, respectively. Mean arterial blood pressures (MAPs) also decreased to about 76 and 82%, respectively. There was no significant difference in these responses between E and S rats, although the levels of HRs and MAPs of the E rats were always a little lower than those of the S rats. Another group of E and S rats was continuously exposed to 0.2 ppm O/sub 3/ for 4 weeks. The HRs of both E and S groups decreased to about 81 and 88% of the initial levels on the first day, respectively, although they recovered completely by the third day. No significant difference in the variation of HRs during exposure was noted between E and S rats. However, the HR responses of these rats to a challenge exposure of 0.8 ppm O/sub 3/ for 1.5 hr appeared to be different. That is, S rats were more tolerant of the challenge exposure to O/sub 3/ for 1.5 hr than the E rats.

  12. How are pools influencing the long-term rate of peat accumulation at the ecosystem scale in northern peatlands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, J.; Pelletier, L.; Sonnentag, O.; Frolking, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Estimates of the global amount of carbon stored in peatlands are based on spatial extrapolations of peat carbon content values derived from peat core analysis. However, due to the labor-intensive nature and costs associated with peat core collection and analysis, most site-wide or region-wide peat carbon content or peat accumulation rate estimates are based on a very limited number of cores (often only one per site), ignoring the potential peat accumulation variations within a site. Variations in peat accumulation values between microforms, especially small open water features (pools) are therefore generally not quantified. Although poorly documented, the area occupied by pools in a given peatland can be quite significant, reaching up to 30% in peatlands of the Hudson's Bay Lowlands. As pools can be relatively deep (> 2 m), the carbon stored per unit area under pools is significantly lower than on the adjacent vegetated surfaces, where peat cores are typically collected. We present first order estimates of the potential impact of overlooking pools in regional peat carbon content inventories based on a review of the available data on pool coverage and depths, and on peat profiles generated by the Holocene Peat Model. We also present the implications of these results for future research.

  13. Wearable monitoring for mood recognition in bipolar disorder based on history-dependent long-term heart rate variability analysis.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Gaetano; Nardelli, Mimma; Lanat, Antonio; Gentili, Claudio; Bertschy, Gilles; Paradiso, Rita; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2014-09-01

    Current clinical practice in diagnosing patients affected by psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder is based only on verbal interviews and scores from specific questionnaires, and no reliable and objective psycho-physiological markers are taken into account. In this paper, we propose to use a wearable system based on a comfortable t-shirt with integrated fabric electrodes and sensors able to acquire electrocardiogram, respirogram, and body posture information in order to detect a pattern of objective physiological parameters to support diagnosis. Moreover, we implemented a novel ad hoc methodology of advanced biosignal processing able to effectively recognize four possible clinical mood states in bipolar patients (i.e., depression, mixed state, hypomania, and euthymia) continuously monitored up to 18 h, using heart rate variability information exclusively. Mood assessment is intended as an intrasubject evaluation in which the patient's states are modeled as a Markov chain, i.e., in the time domain, each mood state refers to the previous one. As validation, eight bipolar patients were monitored collecting and analyzing more than 400 h of autonomic and cardiovascular activity. Experimental results demonstrate that our novel concept of personalized and pervasive monitoring constitutes a viable and robust clinical decision support system for bipolar disorders recognizing mood states with a total classification accuracy up to 95.81%. PMID:24240031

  14. Evaluating release alternatives for a long-lived bird species under uncertainty about long-term demographic rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Clinton T.; Converse, Sarah J.; Folk, Martin J.; Runge, Michael C.; Nesbitt, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    The release of animals to reestablish an extirpated population is a decision problem that is often attended by considerable uncertainty about the probability of success. Annual releases of captive-reared juvenile Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) were begun in 1993 in central Florida, USA, to establish a breeding, non-migratory population. Over a 12-year period, 286 birds were released, but by 2004, the introduced flock had produced only four wild-fledged birds. Consequently, releases were halted over managers' concerns about the performance of the released flock and uncertainty about the efficacy of further releases. We used data on marked, released birds to develop predictive models for addressing whether releases should be resumed, and if so, under what schedule. To examine the outcome of different release scenarios, we simulated the survival and productivity of individual female birds under a baseline model that recognized age and breeding-class structure and which incorporated empirically estimated stochastic elements. As data on wild-fledged birds from captive-reared parents were sparse, a key uncertainty that confronts release decision-making is whether captive-reared birds and their offspring share the same vital rates. Therefore, we used data on the only population of wild Whooping Cranes in existence to construct two alternatives to the baseline model. The probability of population persistence was highly sensitive to the choice of these three models. Under the baseline model, extirpation of the population was nearly certain under any scenario of resumed releases. In contrast, the model based on estimates from wild birds projected a high probability of persistence under any release scenario, including cessation of releases. Therefore, belief in either of these models suggests that further releases are an ineffective use of resources. In the third model, which simulated a population Allee effect, population persistence was sensitive to the release decision: high persistence probability was achieved only through the release of more birds, whereas extirpation was highly probable with cessation of releases. Despite substantial investment of time and effort in the release program, evidence collected to date does not favor one model over another; therefore, any decision about further releases must be made under considerable biological uncertainty. However, given an assignment of credibility weight to each model, a best, informed decision about releases can be made under uncertainty. Furthermore, if managers can periodically revisit the release decision and collect monitoring data to further inform the models, then managers have a basis for confronting uncertainty and adaptively managing releases through time.

  15. Heart rate reduction for 36 months with ivabradine reduces left ventricular mass in cardiac allograft recipients: a long-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Doesch, Andreas O; Mueller, Susanne; Erbel, Christian; Gleissner, Christian A; Frankenstein, Lutz; Hardt, Stefan; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Ehlermann, Philipp; Dengler, Thomas; Katus, Hugo A

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to graft denervation, sinus tachycardia is a common problem after heart transplantation, underlining the importance of heart rate control without peripheral effects. However, long-term data regarding the effects of ivabradine, a novel If channel antagonist, are limited in patients after heart transplantation. Methods In this follow-up analysis, the resting heart rate, left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area (LVMI), tolerability, and safety of ivabradine therapy were evaluated at baseline and after 36 months in 30 heart transplant recipients with symptomatic sinus tachycardia versus a matched control group. Results During the study period, ivabradine medication was stopped in three patients (10% of total). Further analysis was based on 27 patients with 36 months of drug intake. The mean patient age was 53.311.3 years and mean time after heart transplantation was 5.04.8 years. After 36 months, the mean ivabradine dose was 12.03.4 mg/day. Resting heart rate was reduced from 91.010.7 beats per minute before initiation of ivabradine therapy (ie, baseline) to 81.29.8 beats per minute at follow-up (P=0.0006). After 36 months of ivabradine therapy, a statistically significant reduction of LVMI was observed (104.322.7 g at baseline versus 93.418.4 g at follow-up, P=0.002). Hematologic, renal, and liver function parameters remained stable during ivabradine therapy. Except for a lower mycophenolate mofetil dose at follow-up (P=0.02), no statistically significant changes in immunosuppressive drug dosage or blood levels were detected. No phosphenes were observed during 36 months of ivabradine intake despite active inquiry. Conclusion In line with previously published 12-month data, heart rate reduction with ivabradine remained effective and safe in chronic stable patients after heart transplantation, and also during 36-month long-term follow-up. Further, a significant reduction of LVMI was observed only during ivabradine therapy. Therefore, ivabradine may have a sustained long-term beneficial effect with regard to left ventricular remodeling in heart transplant patients. PMID:24235815

  16. Long-term follow up Helicobacter Pylori reinfection rate after second-line treatment: bismuth-containing quadruple therapy versus moxifloxacin-based triple therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing trend of antibiotic resistance requires effective second-line Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) treatment in high prevalence area of H. pylori. The aim of our study was to evaluate the reinfection rate of H. pylori after second-line treatment that would determine the long-term follow up effect of the rescue therapy. Methods A total of 648 patients who had failed previous H. pylori eradication on standard triple therapy were randomized into two regimens: 1, esomeprazole (20mg b.i.d), tripotassium dicitrate bismuthate (300mg q.i.d), metronidazole (500mgt.i.d), and tetracycline (500mg q.i.d) (EBMT) or 2, moxifloxacin (400mg q.d.), esomeprazole (20mg b.i.d), and amoxicillin (1000mg b.i.d.) (MEA). At four weeks after completion of eradication therapy, H. pylori tests were performed with 13C urea breath test or invasive tests. In patients who maintained continuous H. pylori negativity for the first year after eradication therapy, H. pylori status was assessed every year. For the evaluation of risk factors of reinfection, gender, age, clinical diagnosis, histological atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia were analyzed. Results The recrudescence rate of the EBMT was 1.7% and of the MEA group 3.3% (p?=?0.67). The annual reinfection rate of H. pylori of EBMT was found to be 4.45% and the MEA group 6.46%. Univariate analysis (Log-rank test) showed no association with any clinical risk factor for reinfection. Conclusions The long-term reinfection rate of H. pylori stayed low in both of bismuth-containing quadruple therapy and moxifloxacin-based triple therapy; thus reinfection cannot affect the choice of second-line treatment. Trial registration Clinical Trial Registration Number NCT01792700 PMID:24050512

  17. Payment Rates for Personal Care Assistants and the Use of Long-Term Services and Supports among Those Dually Eligible for Medicare and Medicaid

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Michelle; Newcomer, Robert; Kang, Taewoon; Hulett, Denis; Chu, Philip; Bindman, Andrew B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between payment rates for personal care assistants and use of long-term services and supports (LTSS) following hospital discharge among dual eligible Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries. Data Sources State hospital discharge, Medicaid and Medicare claims, and assessment data on California Medicaid LTSS users from 2006 to 2008. Study Design Cross-sectional study. We used multinomial logistic regression to analyze county personal care assistant payment rates and postdischarge LTSS use, and estimate marginal probabilities of each outcome across the range of rates paid in California. Data Extraction Methods We identified dual eligible Medicare and Medicaid adult beneficiaries discharged from an acute care hospital with no hospitalizations or LTSS use in the preceding 12months. Principal Findings Personal care assistant payment rates were modestly associated with home and community-based services (HCBS) use versus nursing facility entry following hospital discharge (RRR 1.2, 95 percent CI: 1.01.4). For a rate of $6.75 per hour, the probability of HCBS use was 5.6 percent (95 percent CI: 4.27.1); at $11.75 per hour, 18.0 percent (95 percent CI: 12.523.4). Payment rate was not associated with the probability of nursing facility entry. Conclusions Higher payment rates for personal care assistants may increase utilization of HCBS, but with limited substitution for nursing facility care. PMID:25327166

  18. 5 CFR 1655.7 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... processes the paper application or on the date the request is entered on the TSP Web site. (b) The interest... participant informs the TSP record keeper that he or she entered into active duty military service, and, as a result, requests that the interest rate on a loan issued before entry into active duty military...

  19. Differential ratings of pleasantness following right and left hemispheric application of low energy magnetic fields that stimulate long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Persinger, M A; Richards, P M; Koren, S A

    1994-12-01

    A total of 40 normal men and women were exposed under double blind conditions for 20 min to either sham-conditions or to 1 microT (10 mG) electromagnetic fields (known to produce long-term potentiation within hippocampal slices) that were applied primarily over the right temporal lobe, over the left temporal lobe or over both temporal lobes homogeneously. The men and women who received the stimulation over the right hemisphere rated their experiences as significantly more pleasant than those who received the same stimulation over the left hemisphere [eta = 0.51]. Covariance for the variation in ambient geomagnetic activity, which was negatively correlated with pleasantness, increased the significance of the experimental treatment. The potential clinical utility of applying computer-generated local and penetrative but weak intensity complex magnetic fields over portions of the human brain is discussed. PMID:7744561

  20. Cortical bone resorption rate in elderly persons: Estimates from long-term in vivo measurements of 90Sr in the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-06-01

    The rate of cortical bone resorption was assessed from long-term in vivo measurements of 90Sr content in the skeleton for men aged 50-80 years and for women 0-30 years after menopause. Measurements of 90Sr were conducted with a whole body counter for residents of the Techa Riverside communities (Southern Urals, Russia), who ingested large amounts of 90Sr as a result of releases of liquid radioactive wastes into the river from the Mayak plutonium facility in early 1950s. The results of this study showed an increase in the rate of cortical bone resorption in both men and women, as based on the use of accidentally ingested 90Sr as a tracer for bone metabolism. In men there was a continuous gradual increase in the rate of cortical bone resorption after 55 years from 2.8 to 4.5%/year by the age of 75 years. In women, there was a doubled increase in the rate of cortical bone resorption after menopause of up to 6%/year; then the rate remained unchanged for 10-12 years with a subsequent gradual decline down to 5-5.5%/year. Comparison of the rate of cortical bone resorption in men and women older than 55 years showed that women expressed significantly higher levels of cortical bone resorption.

  1. Who Becomes a Physics Major? A Long-term Longitudinal Study Examining the Roles of Pre-college Beliefs about Physics and Learning Physics, Interest, and Academic Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Katherine K.; Gratny, Mindy

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we examine the correlation between students' beliefs upon entering college and their likelihood of continuing on to become a physics major. Since 2004, we have collected CLASS survey and self-reported level-of-interest responses from students in the first-term, introductory calculus-based physics course (N>2500). Here, we conduct a retrospective analysis of students' incoming CLASS scores and level of interest, comparing those students who go on to become physics majors with those who do not. We find the incoming CLASS scores and reported interest of these future physics majors to be substantially higher than the class average, indicating that these students enter their first college course already having quite expert-like beliefs. The comparative differences are much smaller for grades, SAT score, and university predicted-GPA.

  2. Long-term stroke rates after catheter ablation or antiarrhythmic drug therapy for atrial fibrillation: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ya-Ru; Chen, Zhi-Yun; Ye, Li-Fang; Wang, Li-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke and is associated with increased risk of death. Randomized studies suggest improved quality of life for patients with AF after successful catheter ablation compared to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. The value of ablation in long-term risk of ischemic stroke, however, has not been assessed. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine whether AF ablation reduces the long-term risk of stroke compared to antiarrhythmic drug therapy in randomized controlled trials. Methods & Results PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register were searched for randomized trials from January 1990 to December 2014 comparing AF catheter ablation to drug therapy. The results are reported as risk differences (RDs) and 95% CI. Thirteen trials were analyzed with 1097 patients treated by catheter ablation and 855 patients received antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Overall, seven patients (0.64%) in the catheter ablation group had ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attacks vs. two patients (0.23%) in the drug therapy group. No difference was shown in the rate of stroke or transient ischemic attack between ablation and drug therapy (RD: 0.003, 95% CI: ?0.006 to 0.012, P = 0.470), and no evidence of heterogeneity was observed (I2 = 0, P = 0.981). No potential publication bias was found. There was also no difference in mortality between the two groups (RD: ?0.004, 95% CI: ?0.014 to 0.006, P = 0.472). Conclusions This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials showed similar rates of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and death in AF patients undergoing catheter ablation compared to drug therapy. A larger prospective randomized trial to confirm this finding is warranted. PMID:26512242

  3. Long-term data archiving

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2009-01-01

    Long term data archiving has much value for chemists, not only to retain access to research and product development records, but also to enable new developments and new discoveries. There are some recent regulatory requirements (e.g., FDA 21 CFR Part 11), but good science and good business both benefit regardless. A particular example of the benefits of and need for long term data archiving is the management of data from spectroscopic laboratory instruments. The sheer amount of spectroscopic data is increasing at a scary rate, and the pressures to archive come from the expense to create the data (or recreate it if it is lost) as well as its high information content. The goal of long-term data archiving is to save and organize instrument data files as well as any needed meta data (such as sample ID, LIMS information, operator, date, time, instrument conditions, sample type, excitation details, environmental parameters, etc.). This editorial explores the issues involved in long-term data archiving using the example of Raman spectral databases. There are at present several such databases, including common data format libraries and proprietary libraries. However, such databases and libraries should ultimately satisfy stringent criteria for long term data archiving, including readability for long times into the future, robustness to changes in computer hardware and operating systems, and use of public domain data formats. The latter criterion implies the data format should be platform independent and the tools to create the data format should be easily and publicly obtainable or developable. Several examples of attempts at spectral libraries exist, such as the ASTM ANDI format, and the JCAMP-DX format. On the other hand, proprietary library spectra can be exchanged and manipulated using proprietary tools. As the above examples have deficiencies according to the three long term data archiving criteria, Extensible Markup Language (XML; a product of the World Wide Web Consortium, an independent standards body) as a new data interchange tool is being investigated and implemented. In order to facilitate data archiving, Raman data needs calibration as well as some other kinds of data treatment. Figure 1 illustrates schematically the present situation for Raman data calibration in the world-wide Raman spectroscopy community, and presents some of the terminology used.

  4. 7 CFR 1980.320 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Interest rate. 1980.320 Section 1980.320 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... must not be more than the lender's published rate for VA first mortgage loans with no discount...

  5. 7 CFR 1980.320 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interest rate. 1980.320 Section 1980.320 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... must not be more than the lender's published rate for VA first mortgage loans with no discount...

  6. Long-term erosion rates of Neogene to Quaternary volcanoes of the Altiplano-Puna plateau, Central Andes: an SRTM DEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karátson, Dávid; Telbisz, Tamás.; Wörner, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Neogene to Quaternary volcanism of the Central Andes offers a unique opportunity to study long-term erosion of stratovolcanoes. On the basis of SRTM DEM data, we invesigated 35 stratovolcanoes of the 3,800-4,000 m high, arid-hyperarid Altiplano-Puna plateau (from 14oS, 64oW to 27oS, 74oW). The volcanoes have been selected on geomorphological criteria such as (1) a single, "mature" cone-shape with considerable size, (2) location on a relatively flat basement, (3) no overlap with other volcanic centres, and (4) lack of calderas or sector collapse scars. Volcanoes of various age (Mid-Miocene to Quaternary based on sporadic radiometric dates) and various degradation stage have been included in order to infer long-term erosion rates. The method we follow is to quantitatively compare the existing topography with the present-day active volcanoes, e.g. Parinacota (Northern Chile). By applying an advanced computational method, we fit the relief of the undissected, almost perfect reference cone over the degraded volcanic edifice. This way, we can precisely calculate (a) the degree of denudation by difference between the computed initial volume from the fit and the observed volume, and (b) for volcanoes with radiometric age constraint the erosion rate (m/Ma) as the areal mean of denudation divided by age. Our results show that (a) the studied volcanoes are degraded to various extent up to ~40% (denudation ratio) of the paleo-volume. In accordance, their relative height which is progressively lower shows a moderately good correlation with denudation (r2 = 0.70). Using the available age constraints, we obtained a stronger correlation between age and denudation (r2 = 0.82 for all volcanoes, and r2 = 0.95 without the southernmost hyperarid and northernmost semihumid volcanoes). (b) Therefore, calculating erosion rates gives highly reliable results. The youngest volcanoes (e.g. Ollagüe, Tacora) shows 50-100 m/Ma erosion rates which fits well to the initially rapid degradation of active volcanic edifices without vegetation cover. Long-term erosion rates of the Pliocene to Miocene volcanoes, in constrast, are much lower and more uniform (7-17 m/Ma), in agreement with other, similarly low erosion rates obtained by other methods (e.g. cosmogenic nuclides) for the Altiplano-Puna highland. Our rates show the smallest values for the hyperarid Puna and the southern Altiplano (e.g. Maricunga volcano), and the greatest values for the semihumid Southern Peru (e.g. Ccarhuaraso, Jatunpuco volcanoes). Moreover, using the very good age vs denudation correlation as a geomorphological dating tool, we are able to estimate ages for undated volcanoes of the Central Andes or for other regions under similar climate conditions.

  7. Assessment of individual adaptation to microgravity during long term space flight based on stepwise discriminant analysis of heart rate variability parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baevsky, Roman M.; Chernikova, Anna G.; Funtova, Irina I.; Tank, Jens

    2011-12-01

    Optimization of the cardiovascular system under conditions of long term space flight is provided by individual changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is an easy to use method under these extreme conditions. We tested the hypothesis that individual HRV analysis provides important information for crew health monitoring. HRV data from 14 Russian cosmonauts measured during long term space flights are presented (two times before and after flight, monthly in flight). HRV characteristics in the time and in the frequency domain were calculated. Predefined discriminant function equations obtained in reference groups (L1=-0.112*HR-1.006*SI-0.047*pNN50-0.086*HF; L2=0.140*HR-0.165*SI-1.293*pNN50+0.623*HF) were used to define four functional states. (1) Physiological normal, (2) prenosological, (3) premorbid and (4) pathological. Geometric mean values for the ISS cosmonauts based on L1 and L2 remained within normal ranges. A shift from the physiological normal state to the prenosological functional state during space flight was detected. The functional state assessed by HRV improved during space flight if compared to pre-flight and early post-flight functional states. Analysis of individual cosmonauts showed distinct patterns depending on the pre-flight functional state. Using the developed classification a transition process from the state of physiological normal into a prenosological state or premorbid state during different stages of space flight can be detected for individual Russian cosmonauts. Our approach to an estimation of HR regulatory pattern can be useful for prognostic purposes.

  8. Reconstructing shifts in vital rates driven by long-term environmental change: a new demographic method based on readily available data

    PubMed Central

    Gonzlez, Edgar J; Martorell, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Frequently, vital rates are driven by directional, long-term environmental changes. Many of these are of great importance, such as land degradation, climate change, and succession. Traditional demographic methods assume a constant or stationary environment, and thus are inappropriate to analyze populations subject to these changes. They also require repeat surveys of the individuals as change unfolds. Methods for reconstructing such lengthy processes are needed. We present a model that, based on a time series of population size structures and densities, reconstructs the impact of directional environmental changes on vital rates. The model uses integral projection models and maximum likelihood to identify the rates that best reconstructs the time series. The procedure was validated with artificial and real data. The former involved simulated species with widely different demographic behaviors. The latter used a chronosequence of populations of an endangered cactus subject to increasing anthropogenic disturbance. In our simulations, the vital rates and their change were always reconstructed accurately. Nevertheless, the model frequently produced alternative results. The use of coarse knowledge of the species' biology (whether vital rates increase or decrease with size or their plausible values) allowed the correct rates to be identified with a 90% success rate. With real data, the model correctly reconstructed the effects of disturbance on vital rates. These effects were previously known from two populations for which demographic data were available. Our procedure seems robust, as the data violated several of the model's assumptions. Thus, time series of size structures and densities contain the necessary information to reconstruct changing vital rates. However, additional biological knowledge may be required to provide reliable results. Because time series of size structures and densities are available for many species or can be rapidly generated, our model can contribute to understand populations that face highly pressing environmental problems. PMID:23919169

  9. Nitrogen transformations in a Vertisol under long-term tillage and no tillage management in dryland agricultual systems: key genes and potential rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melero, Sebastiana; Perez de Mora, Alfredo; Murillo, J. Manuel; Buegger, Franz; Kleinedam, Kristina; Kublik, Susanne; Vanderlinden, Karl; Moreno, Felix; Schloter, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The impact of tillage practices on microbial N transformations in semiarid regions is poorly understood and data from long-term field experiments are scarce. In this study, we evaluated the effects of traditional tillage (TT) vs no-tillage (NT) on key processes of the N cycle such as nitrification and denitrification in a long-term field experiment under a rainfed crop rotation system (cereal-sunflower-legumes) on a vertisol (SW Spain). Besides general soil chemical and biological parameters, we quantified the size of the ammonia oxidizing and denitrifying bacterial populations via real-time PCR (amoA, nirS and nosZ genes), and measured potential nitrification and denitrification rates. Soil was sampled at two depths (0-30, till layer; and 30-50 cm), once during the growing period of the crop (wheat) and another time after harvesting. Conservation tillage slightly increased total organic carbon and microbial biomass C content, whereas no effect on nutrient availability (C and N) was observed, likely due to the fertilization regime and the textural characteristics of the soil type (Vertisol). Gene abundance and potential rates were influenced by the interaction between tillage treatment and sampling period, mainly at 0-30 cm depth. In general, ammonia oxidizers and potential nitrification were enhanced under TT, particularly after harvesting. By contrast, higher abundance of denitrifiers, as reflected by both nirS and nosZ gene copy numbers and larger potential denitrification rates were found under NT during the growing period, but not after harvesting. Results also showed that the N2O/N2 ratio was constant throughout the experiment and thus was affected more significantly by environmental parameters such as the availability carbon than by changes in denitrifier abundance. Our results stress the importance of quantifying microbial populations to address the impact of agricultural practices on N transformations in soil. Furthermore, results suggest that the spatial and seasonal variability of tillage practices need to be taken into account as they can substantially influence the size and activity of microbial communities involved in nitrification and denitrification.

  10. The fate of 15N-nitrate in mesocosms from five European peatlands differing in long-term nitrogen deposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, K.; Blodau, C.

    2016-02-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition changes the retention, transformation, and fluxes of N in ombrotrophic peatlands. To evaluate such effects we applied a 15N tracer (NH4 15NO3) at a rate of 2.3 g N m-2 yr-1 to mesocosms of five European peatlands with differing long-term N deposition rates for a period of 76 days of dry and 90 days of wet conditions. We determined background N content and moss length growth, and recovered the 15N tracer from the mosses, graminoids, shrubs, the peat, and dissolved N. Background N contents in Sphagnum mosses increased from 5.5 (Degerö Stormyr, deposition < 0.2 g N m-2 yr-1) up to 12.2 mg g-1 (Frölichshaier Sattelmoor, 4.7-6.0 g N m-2 yr-1). In peat from Degerö, nitrate and ammonium concentrations were below 3 mg L-1, whereas up to 30 (nitrate) and 11 mg L-1 (ammonium) was found in peat from Frölichshaier Sattelmoor. Sphagnum mosses (down to 5 cm below surface) generally intercepted large amounts of 15N (0.2-0.35 mg g-1) and retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Similar quantities of the 15N were recovered from the peat, followed by shrubs, graminoids, and the dissolved pool. At the most polluted sites we recovered more 15N from shrubs (up to 12.4 %) and from nitrate and ammonium (up to 0.7 %). However, no impact of N deposition on 15N retention by Sphagnum could be identified and their length growth was highest under high N background deposition. Our experiment suggests that the decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, is likely more modest than previously thought. This conclusion is related to the finding that Sphagnum species can apparently thrive at elevated long-term N deposition rates in European peatlands.

  11. The fate of 5N-nitrate in mesocosms from five European peatlands differing in long-term nitrogen deposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, K.; Blodau, C.

    2015-10-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition changes the retention, transformation, and fluxes of N in ombrotrophic peatlands. To evaluate such effects we applied a 15N tracer (NH415NO3) at a rate of 2.3 g N m-2 yr-1 to mesocosms of five European peatlands with differing long-term N deposition rates for a period of 76 days of dry and 90 days of wet conditions. We determined background N content and moss length growth, and recovered the 15N tracer from the mosses, graminoids, shrubs, the peat, and dissolved N. Background N contents in Sphagnum mosses increased from 5.5 (Degerö Stormyr, deposition < 0.2 g N m-2 yr-1) up to 12.2 mg g-1 (Frölichshaier Sattelmoor, 4.7-6.0 g N m-2 yr-1). In peat from Degerö nitrate and ammonium concentrations were below 3 mg L-1, whereas up to 30 mg L-1 (nitrate) and 11 mg L-1 (ammonium) was found in peat from Frölichshaier Sattelmoor. Sphagnum mosses (down to 5 cm below surface) generally intercepted large amounts of 15N (0.2-0.35 mg g-1) and retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Similar quantities of the 15N were recovered from the peat, followed by shrubs, graminoids and the dissolved pool. At the most polluted sites we recovered more 15N from shrubs (up to 12.4 %) and from nitrate and ammonium (up to 0.7 %). However, no impact of N deposition on 15N retention by Sphagnum could be identified and their length growth was highest under high N background deposition. Our experiment suggests that the decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, is likely more modest than previously thought. This conclusion is related to the finding that Sphagnum species can apparently thrive at elevated long-term N deposition rates in European peatlands.

  12. Contrasts Between Short- and Long-Term Erosion Rates in the NW Himalaya: Disequilibrium at 103 to 106-yr Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Burbank, D. W.; Strecker, M. R.; Thiede, R. C.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2006-12-01

    Along the Sutlej Valley in the NW Indian Himalaya, large tectonic and climatic gradients influence landscape evolution in different spatial and temporal domains. Here, we present (1) results from 8 new cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) river-sand samples that help quantify Holocene basin-wide erosion rates, (2) a surface- processes model based on specific stream power to explain the measured erosion rates in light of present-day climatic conditions, and (3) a comparison of short-term (103 - 104 yr) erosion and long-term (105 - 106 yr) exhumation rates based on published apatite fission-track (AFT) ages that reveal large spatiotemporal discrepancies. CRN-derived erosion rates from the upper Sutlej River draining ~30,000 km2 within the Tibetan Plateau average ~0.2 mm/yr (all rates represent an averaged value from Al and Be cosmogenic isotopes). Erosion rates, as measured from tributary catchments, increase downstream to a peak of ~3 mm/yr in the midst of the High Himalaya (~2000 m asl on the main stem). Near the toe of the Himalayan mountains, erosion rates based on detrital CRNs are ~1.1 mm/yr along the Sutlej main stem at river elevations of ~1000 m asl and thus represent an integrated rate over the entire catchment. Next, we compare the measurements to an erosion model that utilizes river discharge, width, and slope to calculate specific stream power, a proxy for the energy per unit stream length. In this numerical model, (1) river discharge is explicitly derived from calibrated, high resolution satellite-rainfall measurements (TRMM), (2) river width is taken from a discharge width scaling law adjusted to the Himalaya, and (3) river slope is taken from a hydrologically corrected, 90m Digital Elevation Model (SRTM) where data gaps have been carefully patched with DEMs derived from stereo-pair satellite imagery and other high-resolution datasets. Using the present-day monsoonal rainfall as input for discharge, a linear relation emerges between measured erosion rates and modeled specific stream power. This simple relationship predicts an erosion threshold such that no significant erosion occurs where specific stream power is low. In contrast, long-term erosion rates derived from AFT data appear to be moderate to high in some parts of the landscape with low, present-day specific stream power amounts. We suggest that this apparent discrepancy results from the variable efficiency of erosive processes throughout the last few Ma. During phases of intensified monsoonal circulation associated with increased precipitation, fluvial and glacial erosion is likely to have been accelerated, particularly in the presently drier regions. This may dominate the temporally-averaged erosion signal, especially in areas where present-day erosion rates are lower.

  13. Impact of organic loading rate on the performance of psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion of dairy manure and wheat straw: long-term operation.

    PubMed

    Saady, Noori M Cata; Mass, Daniel I

    2015-04-01

    Development of efficient processes for valorising animal wastes would be a major advancement in cold-climate regions. This paper reports the results of long term (315 days experiment) of novel psychrophilic (20C) dry anaerobic digestion (PDAD) of cow feces and wheat straw in laboratory scale sequence batch reactor operated at increasing organic loading rate. The PDAD process fed with a mixture of feces and straw (TS of 27%) over a treatment cycle length of 21 days at organic loading rate (OLR) 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 g TCOD kg(-1) inoculum d(-1) (of 2.9 0.1, 3.7 0.1, and 4.4 0.1g VS kg(-1) inoculum d(-1), respectively) resulted in average specific methane yield (SMY) of 187.3 18.1, 163.6 39.5, 150.8 32.9 N L CH4 kg(-1)VS fed, respectively. PDAD of cow feces and wheat straw is possible with VS-based inoculum-to-substrate ratio of 1.4 at OLR of 6.0 g TCOD kg(-1) inoculum d(-1). Hydrolysis was the limiting step reaction. PMID:25681795

  14. Why history matters for quantitative target setting: long-term trends in socioeconomic and racial/ethnic inequities in US infant death rates (19602010)

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Nancy; Singh, Nakul; Chen, Jarvis T.; Coull, Brent A.; Beckfield, Jason; Kiang, Mathew V.; Waterman, Pamela D.; Gruskin, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Policy-oriented population health targets, such as the Millennium Development Goals and national targets to address health inequities, typically are based on trends of a decade or less. To test whether expanded timeframes might be more apt, we analyzed 50-year trends in US infant death rates (19602010) jointly by income and race/ethnicity. The largest annual percent changes in the infant death rate (between ?4% and ?10%) occurred, for all racial/ethnic groups, in the lowest income quintile between the mid-1960s and early 1980s, and in the second lowest income quintile between the mid-1960s and 1973; since the 1990s, they have hovered, in all groups, between ?1% and ?3%. Hence, to look back only 15 years, in 2014, to 1999, would ignore gains achieved prior to the post-1980 onset of neoliberal policies. Target setting should be informed by a deeper and more long-term appraisal of what is possible to achieve. PMID:25971237

  15. 24 CFR 232.560 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interest rate. 232.560 Section 232.560 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN...

  16. 7 CFR 1980.423 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Adjustments.” The State Director will make corrections to the Rural Community Facility Tracking System (FCFTS) reflecting the interest rate change. The FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 loan file, as well as the attachments to the copy of the promissory note in the file, will be documented by the...

  17. 7 CFR 1980.423 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Adjustments.” The State Director will make corrections to the Rural Community Facility Tracking System (FCFTS) reflecting the interest rate change. The FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 loan file, as well as the attachments to the copy of the promissory note in the file, will be documented by the...

  18. 7 CFR 1980.423 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Adjustments.” The State Director will make corrections to the Rural Community Facility Tracking System (FCFTS) reflecting the interest rate change. The FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 loan file, as well as the attachments to the copy of the promissory note in the file, will be documented by the...

  19. 7 CFR 1980.423 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Adjustments.” The State Director will make corrections to the Rural Community Facility Tracking System (FCFTS) reflecting the interest rate change. The FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 loan file, as well as the attachments to the copy of the promissory note in the file, will be documented by the...

  20. 24 CFR 232.560 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interest rate. 232.560 Section 232.560 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN...

  1. 7 CFR 4279.231 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interest rates. 4279.231 Section 4279.231 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Biorefinery Assistance Loans ...

  2. 7 CFR 4279.231 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interest rates. 4279.231 Section 4279.231 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Biorefinery Assistance Loans ...

  3. 7 CFR 4279.231 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interest rates. 4279.231 Section 4279.231 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Biorefinery Assistance Loans ...

  4. 7 CFR 1980.423 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... loan. (2) Under a Memorandum of Understanding between FmHA or its successor agency under Public Law 103... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan Program § 1980.423 Interest rates. (a)...

  5. Paying for long-term care.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, C L; Bodenheimer, T

    1994-01-01

    Everyone agrees that insurance for long-term care is inadequate in the United States. Disagreement exists, however, on whether such insurance should be provided through the private or public sector. Private insurance generally uses the experience-rating principle that persons with higher risk of illness are charged higher premiums. For private insurance for long-term care, this principle creates a dilemma. Most policies will be purchased by the elderly; yet, because the elderly have a high risk of needing long-term care, only about 20% of them can afford the cost of premiums. A public-private partnership by which the government partially subsidizes private long-term-care insurance is unlikely to resolve this dilemma. Only a social insurance program for long-term care can provide universal, affordable, and equitable coverage. PMID:8128712

  6. Long-term follow-up and suboptimal treatment rates of treatment-eligible chronic hepatitis B patients in diverse practice settings: a gap in linkage to care

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Vinh D; Do, Ailinh; Nguyen, Nghia H; Kim, Lily H; Trinh, Huy N; Nguyen, Huy A; Nguyen, Khanh K; Nguyen, My; Huynh, Andrew; Nguyen, Mindie H

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Despite available effective therapies, only a minority of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) receive treatment. Our goal is to study treatment rates and time to treatment initiation in patients who meet treatment criteria on long-term follow-up. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 608 consecutive treatment-eligible patients with CHB (by 2008 US Panel or 2009 American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) criteria) at a US community gastroenterology clinic and a university liver clinic between 2007 and 2011. Patients were observed until they started treatment or last follow-up if untreated. Results Mean age was 44 and most were Asian (96%) with community patients being younger and having lower alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. A total of 62% started treatment, and 38% remained untreated after median follow-up of 17?months (IQR=140?months). Overall, treatment rate was significantly higher at university liver clinic than in the community (66.7% vs 59.9%, p=0.01). In multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.02, p=0.002), male gender (HR 1.37, p=0.02), and baseline ALT >45?U/L for males and >29?U/L for females (HR 2.24, p<0.0001) were significant predictors of treatment initiation, but not practice setting. Conclusions Approximately 40% of treatment-eligible patients still have not started treatment on longer follow-up. Treatment rates were higher at university clinics, but practice setting was not a predictor for treatment, but older age, male gender, and higher ALT levels were. Further studies are needed to determine the barriers for treatment initiation and to improve treatment rates in treatment-eligible patients. PMID:26543565

  7. Recurrence rate of superficial basal cell carcinoma following treatment with imiquimod 5% cream: conclusion of a 5-year long-term follow-up study in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, Harald; Barona, Carlos Guilln; Frank, Ronald Gj; Ruzicka, Thomas; Megahed, Mosaad; Maus, Joachim; Munzel, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    Imiquimod 5% cream is an immune response modifier approved for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) once daily, 5 x per week for 6 weeks. This report reveals the final results of a 5-year follow-up study to evaluate the recurrence rate of sBCCs treated with imiquimod. As previously reported, 182 patients were enrolled in the study and 163 (89.6%) had no clinical evidence of their target sBCC at the 12-week post-treatment assessment; these 163 were followed for up to 5 years. During the follow-up period, 18 clinical recurrences occurred at the target tumour site, 8 and 10 of which occurred during the first 6 and 12 months of follow-up, respectively. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier and life-table estimates for sustained clinical clearance of those patients initially cleared were 84.5% and 86.9%, respectively, and 90.3% considering histology. The estimate of overall treatment success for all treated patients at the end of follow-up was 77.9% (80.9% considering histology). The data support clinical assessment of initial response as predictive of long-term outcome. Most of the recurrences occurred early, indicating that careful follow-up is important during the first year after treatment. PMID:18955210

  8. An appraisal of the use of an infrared digital monitoring system for long-term measurement of heart rate in reptilian embryos.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Marina R; Taylor, Edwin W; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of heart rate (fH) in embryonic reptiles has previously imposed some degree of invasive treatment on the developing embryo. Recently a non-invasive technique of fH detection from intact eggs was developed for commercial avian breeders and has since been used in biological research. This device uses infrared light, enabling it to detect heartbeats in very early embryos. However, infrared light is a source of heat and extended enclosure of an egg in the device is likely to affect temperature with consequent effects on physiological processes, including fH. We studied the effect of use of the monitor on the temperature of eggs and on fH in two species of reptiles, the snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) and the green iguana (Iguana iguana). Egg temperature increased from a room temperature of 27-28 °C, by 26% in turtles and 14% in iguanas over 1h of enclosure, resulting in an increase in fH of 76-81% in turtles and 35-50% iguanas. These effects on fH can either be avoided by brief enclosure of each egg in the monitor or measured and accounted for during the design of long-term experiments. PMID:26086361

  9. Chemical weathering of a marine terrace chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. Part II: Solute profiles, gradients and the comparisons of contemporary and long-term weathering rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Vivit, D.V.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Bullen, T.D.; Maher, K.; Blum, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The spatial and temporal changes in hydrology and pore water elemental and 87Sr/86Sr compositions are used to determine contemporary weathering rates in a 65- to 226-kyr-old soil chronosequence formed from granitic sediments deposited on marine terraces along coastal California. Soil moisture, tension and saturation exhibit large seasonal variations in shallow soils in response to a Mediterranean climate. These climate effects are dampened in underlying argillic horizons that progressively developed in older soils, and reached steady-state conditions in unsaturated horizons extending to depths in excess of 15 m. Hydraulic fluxes (qh), based on Cl mass balances, vary from 0.06 to 0.22 m yr-1, resulting in fluid residence times in the terraces of 10-24 yrs. As expected for a coastal environment, the order of cation abundances in soil pore waters is comparable to sea water, i.e., Na > Mg > Ca > K > Sr, while the anion sequence Cl > NO3 > HCO3 > SO4 reflects modifying effects of nutrient cycling in the grassland vegetation. Net Cl-corrected solute Na, K and Si increase with depth, denoting inputs from feldspar weathering. Solute 87Sr/86Sr ratios exhibit progressive mixing of sea water-dominated precipitation with inputs from less radiogenic plagioclase. While net Sr and Ca concentrations are anomalously high in shallow soils due to biological cycling, they decline with depth to low and/or negative net concentrations. Ca/Mg, Sr/Mg and 87Sr/86Sr solute and exchange ratios are similar in all the terraces, denoting active exchange equilibration with selectivities close to unity for both detrital smectite and secondary kaolinite. Large differences in the magnitudes of the pore waters and exchange reservoirs result in short-term buffering of the solute Ca, Sr, and Mg. Such buffering over geologic time scales can not be sustained due to declining inputs from residual plagioclase and smectite, implying periodic resetting of the exchange reservoir such as by past vegetational changes and/or climate. Pore waters approach thermodynamic saturation with respect to albite at depth in the younger terraces, indicating that weathering rates ultimately become transport-limited and dependent on hydrologic flux. Contemporary rates Rsolute are estimated from linear Na and Si pore weathering gradients bsolute such that Rsolute = frac(qh, bsolute ?? Sv) where Sv is the volumetric surface area and ?? is the stoichiometric coefficient. Plagioclase weathering rates (0.38-2.8 ?? 10-15 mol m-2 s-1) are comparable to those based on 87Sr/86Sr mass balances and solid-state Na and Ca gradients using analogous gradient approximations. In addition, contemporary solute gradients, under transport-limited conditions, approximate long-term solid-state gradients when normalized against the mass of protolith plagioclase and its corresponding aqueous solubility. The multi-faceted weathering analysis presented in this paper is perhaps the most comprehensive yet applied to a single field study. Within uncertainties of the methods used, present day weathering rates, based on solute characterizations, are comparable to average long-term past rates as evidenced by soil profiles.

  10. Effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate particles on growth and gas exchange rates of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Otani, Yoko; Li, Peiran; Nagao, Hiroshi; Lenggoro, I. Wuled; Ishida, Atsushi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Noguchi, Kyotaro; Nakaba, Satoshi; Yamane, Kenichi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Sano, Yuzou; Funada, Ryo; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    To clarify the effects of long-term exposure to ammonium sulfate (AS) particles on growth and physiological functions of forest tree species, seedlings of Fagus crenata, Castanopsis sieboldii, Larix kaempferi and Cryptomeria japonica were exposed to submicron-size AS particles during two growing seasons from 3 June 2011 to 8 October 2012. The mean sulfate concentration in PM2.5 increased during the exposure inside the chamber in 2011 and 2012 by 2.73 and 4.32 ?g SO42- m-3, respectively. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were detected on the whole-plant dry mass of the seedlings. These results indicate that the exposure to submicrometer AS particles at the ambient level for two growing seasons did not significantly affect the growth of the seedlings. No significant effects of exposure to AS particles were found on the net photosynthetic rate in the leaves or needles of F. crenata, C. sieboldii and L. kaempferi seedlings. Also, in the previous-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, exposure to AS particles significantly reduced the net photosynthetic rate, which may be caused by the reduction in the concentration of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). On the contrary, in current-year needles of C. japonica seedlings, net photosynthetic rate significantly increased with exposure to AS particles, which may be the result of increases in stomatal conductance and concentrations of Rubisco and chlorophyll. Furthermore, exposure to AS particles correlated with an increase in concentrations of NH4+, free amino acid and total soluble protein, suggesting that AS particles may be deliquesced, absorbed into the leaves and metabolized into amino acid and protein. These results suggest that net photosynthesis in the needles of C. japonica is relatively sensitive to submicron-size AS particles as compared with the other three tree species.

  11. Outcomes of a ventilator-associated pneumonia bundle on rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia and other health care-associated infections in a long-term acute care hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Sulis, Carol A; Walkey, Allan J; Abadi, Yafet; Campbell Reardon, Christine; Joyce-Brady, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Long-term trends in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates, and other health care-associated infections, were examined prior to, during, and after introduction of a VAP bundle in a long-term acute care hospital setting. VAP incidence rate declined in a step-wise fashion and reached a null value. Incidence rates of bacteremia from any cause declined in a similar fashion. The incidence rates of vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection rates also decreased, but that of Clostridium difficile infection did not. VAP in the long-term acute care hospital setting can be controlled over time with implementation of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-based VAP bundle. This outcome also may decrease certain other health care-associated infections. PMID:24773791

  12. Alarming rates of virological failure and drug resistance in patients on long-term antiretroviral treatment in routine HIV clinics in Togo.

    PubMed

    Konou, Abla A; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Vidal, Nicole; Salou, Mounerou; Adam, Zakillatou; Singo-Tokofai, Assétina; Delaporte, Eric; Prince-David, Mireille; Peeters, Martine

    2015-11-28

    Information on efficacy of long-term antiretroviral treatment (ART) exposure in resource-limited countries is still scarce. In 767 patients attending routine HIV centers in Togo and receiving first-line ART for more than four years, 42% had viral load greater than 1000 copies/ml and either were on a completely ineffective ART regime or were with only a single drug active. The actual conditions to ensure lifelong ART in resource-limited countries can have dramatic long-term outcomes. PMID:26558549

  13. Long-term slip rates of the Elsinore-Laguna Salada fault, southern California, by U-series Dating of Pedogenic Carbonate in Progressively Offset Alluvial fan Remnants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, K. E.; Rockwell, T. K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2007-12-01

    The Elsinore-Laguna Salada (ELS) fault is one of the principal strands of the San Andreas fault system in southern California, however its seismic potential is often de-emphasized due to previous estimates of a low slip rate. Nevertheless, the fault zone has produced two historic earthquakes over M6, with the 1892 event estimated at >M7; thus further investigation of the long-term slip rate on the ELS fault is warranted. On the western slopes of the Coyote Mountains (CM), southwest Imperial Valley, a series of alluvial fans are progressively offset by the Elsinore fault. These fans can be correlated to their source drainages via distinctive clast assemblages, thereby defining measurable offsets on the fault. Dating of the CM fans (to compute slip rates), however, is challenging. Organic materials appropriate for C-14 dating are rare or absent in the arid, oxidizing environment. Cosmogenic surface exposure techniques are limited by the absence of suitable sample materials and are inapplicable to numerous buried fan remnants that are otherwise excellent strain markers. Pedogenic carbonate datable by U-series, however, occurs in CM soil profiles, ubiquitously developed in fan gravels, and is apparent in deposits as young as ~1 ka. In CM gravels 10's ka and older, carbonate forms continuous, dense, yellow coatings up to 3 mm thick on the undersides of clasts. Powdery white carbonate may completely engulf clasts, but is not dateable. Carefully selected samples of dense, innermost carbonate lamina weighing 10's of milligrams and analyzed by TIMS, are geochemically favorable for precise U-series dating (e.g., U = 1-1.5 ppm, median 238U/232Th ~ 7), and yield reproducible ages for coatings from the same microstratigraphic horizon (e.g., 48.2 ± 2.7 and 49.9 ± 2.2 ka), indicating that U-Th systems have remained closed and that inherited coatings, though present, have been avoided. Accordingly, U-series on pedogenic carbonate provides reliable minimum ages for deposition of host landforms, thereby facilitating determination of maximum bounds on corresponding slip rates. Results to date show that pedogenic carbonate dating in the CM has a useful range of at least 140 ka, thus progressively offset geomorphic surfaces in the CM study area afford the opportunity to examine the pattern of slip on the Elsinore fault over time scales from circa 10 to >100 ka.

  14. Short Communication: Low False Recent Rate of Limiting-Antigen Avidity Assay Among Long-Term Infected Subjects from Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Wendel, Sarah K; Liang, Fuxiong; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xueyan; Wang, Lu; Pang, Xianwu; Fang, Zhongliao

    2015-12-01

    Assays used for HIV cross-sectional incidence testing can misclassify some individuals with nonrecent HIV infection as recently infected, overestimating HIV incidence. We analyzed the frequency and factors associated with false-recent misclassification on subjects from Quangxi, China known to have long-term infection using the limited antigen-avidity assay (LAg-Avidity). Stored samples from treatment-naive individuals from Guangxi, China were tested using the LAg-Avidity. A total of 362 samples from individuals known to be infected 2 to 13.5 years were tested and the false-recent rate (FRR), the frequency of samples with a positive result, was determined at different cutoff values of the assay. Additionally, factors associated with misclassification were determined. The FRR of the LAg-Avidity was 1.1% (4/362) using a cutoff of 1.5 normalized optical density units (OD-n). All four samples had viral loads >1,000 copies/ml. Using a cutoff of 3.0 OD-n the FRR was 5.5% (20/362), with four samples having viral loads <1,000 copies/ml. Factors associated with a higher odds of misclassification were female gender (OR 7.7, 95% CI 1.0-56.4) and being a female sex worker (OR 31.3, 95% CI 4.0-242). At the higher cutoff, being of Zhuang decent, relative to Han, had higher odds of misclassification (OR 6.2, 95% CI 1.99-19.0). The LAg-Avidity assay had a low FRR in this Chinese population. Further investigations of the higher frequency of low LAg-Avidity results seen in female sex workers and individuals of Zhuang descent should be explored in a larger study. PMID:26331573

  15. Promising Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlgren, Thomas Nilsson, Sten; Lennernaes, Bo; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To explore the long-term general and disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) >5 years after combined radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, including a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost and hormonal deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: Of 196 eligible patients with localized prostate cancer (Stage T1-T3a) consecutively treated with curative radiotherapy at our institution between June 1998 and August 2000, 182 (93%) completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25, including specific questions on fecal incontinence >5 years after treatment in September 2005. A comparison with age-matched normative data was done, as well as a longitudinal analysis using HRQOL data from a previous study. Results: The analysis included 158 nonrecurrent patients. Comparisons made with normative data showed that physical and role functioning were significantly better statistically and social functioning was significantly worse. Diarrhea and sleep disturbances were more pronounced and pain less pronounced than in a normal male population. The longitudinal analysis of disease-specific HRQOL showed that urinary urgency and erectile problems persisted 5 years after treatment, and nocturia and hormonally dependent symptoms had declined significantly, with a statistically significant difference. Fecal incontinence was recognized by 25% of patients, of whom 80% considered it a minor problem. Conclusion: More than 5 years after combined radiotherapy, irritative urinary problems and erectile dysfunction remain concerns, although severe bowel disturbance and fecal incontinence seem to be minor problems. Longitudinally, a decline mainly in hormonally dependent symptoms was seen. Minor differences in general HRQOL compared with normative data were observed, possibly including 'response shift' effects.

  16. Chronic heart rate reduction with ivabradine improves systolic function of the reperfused heart through a dual mechanism involving a direct mechanical effect and a long-term increase in FKBP12/12.6 expression

    PubMed Central

    Couvreur, Nicolas; Tissier, Renaud; Pons, Sandrine; Chetboul, Valrie; Gouni, Vassiliky; Bruneval, Patrick; Mandet, Chantal; Pouchelon, Jean-Louis; Berdeaux, Alain; Ghaleh, Bijan

    2010-01-01

    Aims To investigate the adaptations of left ventricular function and calcium handling to chronic heart rate reduction with ivabradine in the reperfused heart. Methods and Results Rabbits underwent 20-min coronary artery occlusion followed by 3 weeks of reperfusion. Throughout reperfusion, rabbits received ivabradine (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (Control). Ivabradine reduced heart rate by about 20% and improved both ejection fraction (+35%) and systolic displacement (+26%) after 3 weeks of treatment. Interestingly, this was associated with a 2-fold increase expression of FKBP12/12.6. There was no difference in the expressions of phospholamban, SERCA2a, calsequestrin, ryanodine, phospho-ryanodine and Na2+/Ca2+ exchanger in the two groups. Infarct scar and vascular density were similar in both groups. Administration of a single intravenous bolus of ivabradine (1 mg/kg) in control rabbits at 3 weeks of reperfusion also significantly improved acutely ejection fraction and systolic displacement. Conclusion Chronic heart rate reduction protects the myocardium against ventricular dysfunction induced by myocardial ischaemia followed by 3 weeks of reperfusion. Beyond pure heart rate reduction, ivabradine improves global and regional systolic function of the reperfused heart through a dual mechanism involving a direct mechanical effect and a long-term adaptation in calcium handling, as supported by the increase in FKBP12/12.6 expression. PMID:20028694

  17. Luminescence dating of offset terraces at the Elmali segment of the North Anatolian Fault (NE Turkey); Implications for long term geologic slip-rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabci, Cengiz; Sanar, Taylan; Akyuz, H. Serdar; Gunec Kiyak, Nafiye

    2010-05-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is 1500 km-long dextral strike-slip fault, starts from Karliova triple junction in the east and terminates at the Aegean Sea in the west with northward convex arc shaped geometry. In the 20th century, series of earthquakes which started by 1939 Erzincan (M=7.9) in the east and ended by August 17, 1999 Izmit (M=7.4) and November 12, 1999 Duzce (M=7.1) events in the west, caused many causalities and economic loss at settlements all along this zone. Geodetic short term slip rate is measured to be between 28.00.3 mm/yr and 24.20.3 mm/yr by GPS as snapshots of strain accumulation for a relatively short period of time. The geologic long term slip rates are determined, mostly from west and middle sections of the NAF, to be between 10 mm to 20.55.5 mm/yr, which are slower than the short term of elastic strain accumulation measured geodetically. This mismatch is also seen on many fault systems after the dating of many offset geological and morphotectonic structures at different parts of the Earth. These observations raise several fundamentally important questions about how strain accumulates and is released along major plate boundary fault systems. Are geologic slip rates averaged over thousands to millions of years compatible with short term geodetic rates, or do strain transients commonly occur? In addition, determination of geologic slip rates at many locations on the same fault zone helps to understand the uniformity of the slip rate or an existence of a gradient for the whole system. In this study, we undertook field and aerial photography research on one of the least known sections of the NAF, Elmali segment, at the NE Turkey. The NAF is extremely placed on a relatively narrow zone around Erzincan and 150 to 200 km west of it. However, more to the east, deformation extends to a wider zone of a width of around 10 km between the Yedisu basin and Karliova. Here, three different segments form a restraining double bend and are clearly defined physiographically along the Elmali valley. The compressional nature of this restraining double bend structure creates an uplift, which is expressed by formation of fill terraces in alluvial fans as insets on the geomorphology of the region. We determined two locations, 5 km-apart each other, consist of dextrally deflected; Dinarbey and Kaynarpinar spots. An alluvial fan is incised by an active stream, which created two terrace surfaces, at the Dinarbey spot. Terrace risers, forming boundaries between two terraces and the recent floodplain, have recorded dextral offset of 675 m and 215 m with respect to each other. We used cylindrical metal pipes with 25 cm length and 5 cm diameter to sample the upper terrace both from the northern and southern blocks of the fault for Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating. These samples yielded ages of 3273567 yr BP and 3279258 yr BP giving a slip-rate of 20.42.2 mm/yr for this section of the fault. Although, we see the same terrace formation at Kaynarpinar spot, it is not easy to reconstruct the net offset of terrace risers. The lateral erosion of the stream system modified the geometry of terrace risers not to have any piercing point for the measurement of the net offset. However, it is morphologically clear that 555m net offset of incised stream should have formed after the formation of the alluvial fan and before the formation of the upper terrace. At this spot, terraces and lower fan surface are sampled for luminescence dating, which is still in process.

  18. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: An analysis of variables associated with late toxicity and long-term cosmetic outcome after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wazer, David E. . E-mail: dwazer@tufts-nemc.org; Kaufman, Seth; Cuttino, Laurie; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To perform a detailed analysis of variables associated with late tissue effects of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a large cohort of patients with prolonged follow-up. Methods and Materials: Beginning in 1995, 75 women with Stage I/II breast cancer were enrolled in identical institutional trials evaluating APBI as monotherapy after lumpectomy. Patients eligible included those with T1-2, N0-1 ({<=}3 nodes positive), M0 tumors of nonlobular histology with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular nodal extension, and negative results on postexcision mammogram. All patients underwent surgical excision and postoperative irradiation with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. Treatment was delivered with a high-activity Ir-192 source at 3.4 Gy per fraction twice daily for 5 days to a total dose of 34 Gy. Dosimetric analyses were performed with three-dimensional postimplant dose and volume reconstructions. All patients were evaluated at 3-6-month intervals and assessed with a standardized cosmetic rating scale and according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late normal tissue toxicity scoring criteria. Clinical and therapy-related features were analyzed for their relationship to cosmetic outcome and toxicity rating. Clinical features analyzed included age, volume of resection, history of diabetes or hypertension, extent of axillary surgery, and systemic therapies. Therapy-related features analyzed included volume of tissue encompassed by the 100%, 150%, and 200% isodose lines (V100, V150, and V200, respectively), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), number of source dwell positions, and planar separation. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 73 months (range, 43-118 months). The cosmetic outcome at last follow-up was rated as excellent, good, and fair/poor in 67%, 24%, and 9% of patients, respectively. Suboptimal cosmetic outcome was significantly associated with the number of source dwell positions, V150, and V200 and inversely associated with DHI (0.77 vs. 0.73; p = 0.05). Late skin toxicity was rated as Grade 0, 1, or 2 in 77%, 19%, and 4% of patients, respectively. The risk of Grade 1/2 skin toxicity was significantly associated with V150 and V200 and inversely associated with DHI (0.77 vs. 0.71; p = 0.009). Late subcutaneous toxicity was rated as Grade 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 in 55%, 15%, 12%, 5%, and 13% of patients, respectively. The risk of Grade 0/1 vs. Grade 2-4 subcutaneous toxicity was significantly associated only with a lower value of DHI (0.77 vs. 0.73; p = 0.02). To further explore factors that might contribute to the risk of fat necrosis (symptomatic or asymptomatic), a separate analysis showed that only dose hotspots as reflected in V150 and V200 were significantly associated with elevated risk. The use of adriamycin-based chemotherapy after APBI was found to be associated with a significant increase in the incidence of higher-grade skin toxicity and a higher risk of fat necrosis and suboptimal cosmetic outcome. Patient age, volume of resection, extent of axillary surgery, a history of diabetes or hypertension, and the use of tamoxifen were not found to be significantly associated with cosmetic outcome or late normal tissue complications. Conclusions: Long-term cosmetic results and the risk of late skin and subcutaneous toxicity after APBI with interstitial HDR brachytherapy can be correlated with specific treatment-related variables. These data provide dosimetric parameters that might be used to minimize the risk of normal tissue injury after APBI interstitial brachytherapy.

  19. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors.

  20. Long-term environmental stewardship.

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Michael David

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this Supplemental Information Source Document is to effectively describe Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). More specifically, this document describes the LTES and Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Programs, distinguishes between the LTES and LTS Programs, and summarizes the current status of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project.

  1. Interest Rates and Coupon Bonds in Quantum Finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2009-09-01

    1. Synopsis; 2. Interest rates and coupon bonds; 3. Options and option theory; 4. Interest rate and coupon bond options; 5. Quantum field theory of bond forward interest rates; 6. Libor Market Model of interest rates; 7. Empirical analysis of forward interest rates; 8. Libor Market Model of interest rate options; 9. Numeraires for bond forward interest rates; 10. Empirical analysis of interest rate caps; 11. Coupon bond European and Asian options; 12. Empirical analysis of interest rate swaptions; 13. Correlation of coupon bond options; 14. Hedging interest rate options; 15. Interest rate Hamiltonian and option theory; 16. American options for coupon bonds and interest rates; 17. Hamiltonian derivation of coupon bond options; Appendixes; Glossaries; List of symbols; Reference; Index.

  2. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  3. Nitrogen Isotopes as an Indicator of Long-Term N Cycling in a Grazed Temperate Pasture Receiving Different Rates of Superphosphate Fertilizer and Irrigation for ~50 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudge, P. L.; Schipper, L. A.; Ghani, A.; Baisden, W. T.; Dodd, M.

    2010-12-01

    Pastoral agriculture is the dominant land use in New Zealand and intensification (as a result of fertilizer inputs and in some areas irrigation) has led to increased nitrogen (N) losses to the wider environment. An indicator that could identify soils which are vulnerable to N loss would be useful for the development of management practices and regulations aimed at reducing unwanted N losses. The natural abundance of 15N relative to 14N (?15N) in soils is one potential indicator. Most N cycle processes associated with N losses (e.g. nitrification, denitrification, and volatilisation) discriminate against 15N and therefore soil ?15N could provide an indication of cumulative N losses. In this study we measured ?15N in archived soils from two long-term field trials receiving different rates of superphosphate fertilizer and irrigation. Both trials were in mid-Canterbury, New Zealand and were grazed by sheep. The fertilizer trial began in 1952, and treatments used were the control (nilP), 376 kg superphosphate ha-1 y-1 (376PA) and a treatment where 376 kg superphosphate ha-1 y-1 was applied between 1952 and 1957, no fertilizer from 1958 to 1979 and then 250 kg superphosphate ha-1 y-1 from 1980 to 2009 (376-0-250PA). The irrigation trial was initiated in 1949 and ceased in 2002. The dryland treatment and treatments irrigated when soil moisture was 10% and 20% were used in this study. From 1958, soil samples (0-75 mm depth) were taken annually from each trial, air dried and archived. Soil samples at four year intervals were analysed for this study. Pasture production varied considerably between treatments, with higher rates of fertilizer and irrigation promoting greater pasture growth and therefore higher grazing intensities. Initially ?15N was about the same (3.3) in all treatments of both trials. ?15N in the 376PA treatment of the fertilizer trial increased gradually with time and by 2009 was 4.5. In the 376-0-250PA treatment, ?15N stayed constant until about 1980 and then increased rapidly, which coincided with re-commencement of P fertilizer application. ?15N in the nilP treatment initially declined slightly and then remained relatively constant. In the irrigation trial, ?15N stayed constant (~3.3) in all three treatments up until around 1985 and then increased. After 1985 there was a separation between treatments with ?15N in the 20% treatment increasing marginally more than the 10% treatment and considerably more than the dryland treatment. We had anticipated an increase and divergence in ?15N values from the start of the irrigation trial. In general soil ?15N scaled with intensity of grazing, which suggests that N losses were greater under more intensive systems. ?15N therefore shows potential as an indicator of the vulnerability of soils to N loss. Further work will investigate the relationship between changes in ?15N and total C and N at these two trials, and future work will seek to directly relate soil ?15N to cumulative N losses via leaching and gaseous emissions.

  4. Long-Term Stability of Tutor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the extent to which tutor ratings remained stable in the long term by evaluating 291 ratings of 140 tutors at Maastricht University in the Netherlands between 1992 and 1995. The results indicated that, if the aggregated score and overall judgement are used to interpret the precision of individual scores, four and two occasions,…

  5. Scenarios for long-term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Data Preservation and Long-Term Analysis of High Energy Physics (HEP) Experiments data is described and summarized in this talk. The summary covers information presented at the First Workshop on Data Preservation and Long-Term Analysis. Experiments representing e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions (LEP, B Factories and CLEO), ep collisions (H1 and ZEUS), p{bar p} collisions (CDF and D0) and others presented interesting information related to utilizing the large datasets collected over many years at these HEP facilities. Many questions and issues remain to be explored.

  6. Rate of long term bleaching in FK 51 optical glass darkened by Co60 ionizing radiation at dose rates of 10 krad/hr and 7 rad/hr

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

    1997-07-01

    A previous paper presented long term bleaching data on various glasses exposed to 10.6 krad of ionizing radiation. All the glasses reported except FK 51 have readily available `G` glass equivalents that are stabilized to the natural space environment. Yet, FK 51, because of its location on the Abbe diagram is extremely useful in certain lens design applications. To more fully explore the bleaching of FK 51, after the initial dose of 10.6 krad at 11.8 krad/hour, we irradiated three more samples at a similar dose rate but to different total doses. Since the dose rate for this study was significantly higher than the dose rate anticipated for glasses in as shielded space-based lens system (tilde 3 rad/day), additional data were obtained at a lower rate of 7 rad/hour. While this dose rate is still higher than the anticipated operational rate, it is more than 1000 times lower than the dose 011 011 011 rate used for our initial studies. The bleaching rate for the samples exposed at the lower dose rate is considerably less than for the samples exposed at the higher rate.

  7. 26 CFR 301.6621-1 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interest rate. 301.6621-1 Section 301.6621-1... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Interest Interest on Underpayments 301.6621-1 Interest rate. (a) In general. The interest rate established under section 6621 shall be (1) On amounts outstanding before...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6621-1 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Interest rate. 301.6621-1 Section 301.6621-1... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Interest Interest on Underpayments 301.6621-1 Interest rate. (a) In general. The interest rate established under section 6621 shall be (1) On amounts outstanding before...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6621-1 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interest rate. 301.6621-1 Section 301.6621-1... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Interest Interest on Underpayments 301.6621-1 Interest rate. (a) In general. The interest rate established under section 6621 shall be (1) On amounts outstanding before...

  10. 26 CFR 301.6621-1 - Interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interest rate. 301.6621-1 Section 301.6621-1... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Interest Interest on Underpayments 301.6621-1 Interest rate. (a) In general. The interest rate established under section 6621 shall be (1) On amounts outstanding before...

  11. Long-term Observations of Electric Field, Temperature, Pressure, Humidity, Wind Speed, Wind Direction, Rainfall Rate and Solar Insolation at a Remote Meteorological Observing Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, F. W.; Beasley, W. H.; Bansemer, A. R.; Grimsley, D. L.; Byerley, L. G.

    2001-12-01

    For nearly two years we observed the electric field at the surface continually and simultaneously with observations of temperature, pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction, rainfall rate and solar insolation at a remote automated meteorological observing station in Norman, OK. The electric-field observations were made with electric-field mills that were cycled on every few minutes for a period of about 20 seconds, 24 hours a day, seven days a week for the entire period of time. We observed a number of interesting patterns in the observations, some familiar and some not. For example, monthly averages of the observations often yield Carnegie curves, but not always. We noted what appears to be a sunrise effect on some days. We present a representative sample of the observations.

  12. The effect of long-term nitrate treatment on SRB activity, corrosion rate and bacterial community composition in offshore water injection systems.

    PubMed

    Bdtker, Gunhild; Thorstenson, Tore; Lilleb, Bente-Lise P; Thorbjrnsen, Bente E; Ulven, Rikke Helen; Sunde, Egil; Torsvik, Terje

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic production of hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is a problem for the oil industry as it leads to corrosion and reservoir souring. Continuous injection of a low nitrate concentration (0.25-0.33 mM) replaced glutaraldehyde as corrosion and souring control at the Veslefrikk and Gullfaks oil field (North Sea) in 1999. The response to nitrate treatment was a rapid reduction in number and activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the water injection system biofilm at both fields. The present long-term study shows that SRB activity has remained low at < or =0.3 and < or =0.9 microg H(2)S/cm(2)/day at Veslefrikk and Gullfaks respectively, during the 7-8 years with continuous nitrate injection. At Veslefrikk, 16S rRNA gene based community analysis by PCR-DGGE showed that bacteria affiliated to nitrate-reducing sulphide-oxidizing Sulfurimonas (NR-SOB) formed major populations at the injection well head throughout the treatment period. Downstream of deaerator the presence of Sulfurimonas like bacteria was less pronounced, and were no longer observed 40 months into the treatment period. The biofilm community during nitrate treatment was highly diverse and relative stable for long periods of time. At the Gullfaks field, a reduction in corrosion of up to 40% was observed after switch to nitrate treatment. The present study show that nitrate injection may provide a stable long-term inhibition of SRB in sea water injection systems, and that corrosion may be significantly reduced when compared to traditional biocide treatment. PMID:18752014

  13. Long Term Storage of Lyophilized Liposomal Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Payton, N.M.; Wempe, M.F.; Xu, Y.; Anchordoquy, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Because aqueous liposomal formulations containing multiply unsaturated lipids are susceptible to chemical degradation, these formulations are often lyophilized. Despite their limited chemical stability, interest in the use of multiply unsaturated lipids to promote intracellular delivery has increased considerably in recent years. The goal of the current study was to examine the long term storage stability of lyophilized formulations containing lipids with increasing levels of unsaturation, and various strategies which can be employed to improve stability. Aqueous lipid-trehalose formulations containing 1,2-dilinolenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC), 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLinPC) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) were lyophilized and stored at temperatures ranging from 4°C to 60°C. We observed that the lipid degradation rate increased as the storage temperature and unsaturation level were increased. Even the cleanest sugars which are available commercially contain iron contaminants, and it was observed that the chelation of these iron contaminants significantly improved the stability of DLPC during storage. However, the glass transition temperature of the sugar which was included in the formulation, the reduction of the oxygen in the aqueous sample prior to lyophilization, the inclusion of helper lipids (i.e., cholesterol), and the rate of freezing did not significantly improve stability. PMID:25308534

  14. A long-term frequency stabilized deep ultraviolet laser for Mg+ ions trapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yuan, W. H.; Deng, K.; Deng, A.; Xu, Z. T.; Qin, C. B.; Lu, Z. H.; Luo, J.

    2013-12-01

    As many precision laser spectroscopy experiments require frequency stabilized lasers, development of long-term stabilized lasers is of great interest. In this work, we report long-term frequency stabilization of a 280 nm deep ultraviolet laser to a high precision wavemeter with digital servo control such that the long-term drift of the laser frequency was greatly reduced. Long-term laser frequency drift was measured with a fiber frequency comb system over 8 h. After locking, the maximum drift rate of the 280 nm laser was lowered from 576 MHz/h to 6.4 MHz/h. With proper environment control of the wavemeter, the maximum drift rate of the 280 nm laser was further lowered to less than 480 kHz/h. The locked laser system was successfully used in a Mg+ ions trapping experiment, which was also discussed in this work.

  15. 7 CFR 1714.7 - Interest rate cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... section, or both the rate disparity test for the interest rate cap and the consumer income test set forth... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interest rate cap. 1714.7 Section 1714.7 Agriculture... PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR INSURED ELECTRIC LOANS General 1714.7 Interest rate cap....

  16. 7 CFR 1714.7 - Interest rate cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... section, or both the rate disparity test for the interest rate cap and the consumer income test set forth... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interest rate cap. 1714.7 Section 1714.7 Agriculture... PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR INSURED ELECTRIC LOANS General 1714.7 Interest rate cap....

  17. 7 CFR 1714.7 - Interest rate cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... section, or both the rate disparity test for the interest rate cap and the consumer income test set forth... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interest rate cap. 1714.7 Section 1714.7 Agriculture... PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR INSURED ELECTRIC LOANS General 1714.7 Interest rate cap....

  18. 12 CFR 906.5 - Monthly interest rate survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monthly interest rate survey. 906.5 Section 906... OPERATIONS OPERATIONS Monthly Interest Rate Survey (MIRS) § 906.5 Monthly interest rate survey. The Finance Board conducts its Monthly Survey of Rates and Terms on Conventional One-Family Non-farm Mortgage...

  19. 38 CFR 36.4312 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... adjustable rate mortgage must correspond to changes in the weekly average yield on one year (52 weeks) Treasury bills adjusted to a constant maturity. Yields on one year Treasury bills at constant maturity... actively traded one year Treasury bills in the over-the-counter market. The weekly average one...

  20. 7 CFR 4274.325 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT AND INSURED LOANMAKING Intermediary Relending Program... intermediary and ultimate recipient. The rate must be within limits established by the intermediary's work...

  1. 7 CFR 4274.325 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT AND INSURED LOANMAKING Intermediary Relending Program... intermediary and ultimate recipient. The rate must be within limits established by the intermediary's work...

  2. 7 CFR 4274.325 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT AND INSURED LOANMAKING Intermediary Relending Program... intermediary and ultimate recipient. The rate must be within limits established by the intermediary's work...

  3. 7 CFR 4274.325 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT AND INSURED LOANMAKING Intermediary Relending Program... intermediary and ultimate recipient. The rate must be within limits established by the intermediary's work...

  4. 7 CFR 4274.325 - Interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT AND INSURED LOANMAKING Intermediary Relending Program... intermediary and ultimate recipient. The rate must be within limits established by the intermediary's work...

  5. Long-term orbital lifetime predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, P. E.; Lyons, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term orbital lifetime predictions are analyzed. Predictions were made for three satellites: the Solar Max Mission (SMM), the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), and the Pegasus Boiler Plate (BP). A technique is discussed for determining an appropriate ballistic coefficient to use in the lifetime prediction. The orbital decay rate should be monitored regularly. Ballistic coefficient updates should be done whenever there is a significant change in the actual decay rate or in the solar activity prediction.

  6. Long Term Illness and Wages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandy, Robert; Elliott, Robert R.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term illness (LTI) is a more prevalent workplace risk than fatal accidents but there is virtually no evidence for compensating differentials for a broad measure of LTI. In 1990 almost 3.4 percent of the U.K. adult population suffered from a LTI caused solely by their working conditions. This paper provides the first estimates of compensating

  7. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Patient-Provider Communication, Quality-of-Care Ratings, and Patient Activation Among Long-Term Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Nynikka R.A.; Kent, Erin E.; Forsythe, Laura P.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Rowland, Julia H.; Aziz, Noreen M.; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hamilton, Ann S.; Weaver, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We examined racial and ethnic disparities in patient-provider communication (PPC), perceived care quality, and patient activation among long-term cancer survivors. Methods In 2005 to 2006, survivors of breast, prostate, colorectal, ovarian, and endometrial cancers completed a mailed survey on cancer follow-up care. African American, Asian/Pacific Islander (Asian), Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white (white) survivors who had seen a physician for follow-up care in the past 2 years (n = 1,196) composed the analytic sample. We conducted linear and logistic regression analyses to identify racial and ethnic differences in PPC (overall communication and medical test communication), perceived care quality, and patient activation in clinical care (self-efficacy in medical decisions and perceived control). We further examined the potential contribution of PPC to racial and ethnic differences in perceived care quality and patient activation. Results Compared with white survivors (mean score, 85.16), Hispanic (mean score, 79.95) and Asian (mean score, 76.55) survivors reported poorer overall communication (P = .04 and P < .001, respectively), and Asian survivors (mean score, 79.97) reported poorer medical test communication (P = .001). Asian survivors were less likely to report high care quality (odds ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.72) and reported lower self-efficacy in medical decisions (mean score, 74.71; P < .001) compared with white survivors (mean score, 84.22). No disparity was found in perceived control. PPC was positively associated with care quality (P < .001) and self-efficacy (P < .001). After adjusting for PPC and other covariates, when compared with whites, Asian disparities remained significant. Conclusion Asian survivors report poorer follow-up care communication and care quality. More research is needed to identify contributing factors beyond PPC, such as cultural influences and medical system factors. PMID:25403220

  8. Credit Cards, Economization of Money, and Interest Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steindl, Frank G.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the effect of interest rates on the increased use of credit cards, a popular method of financing households. Uses three models to demonstrate that interest rates must rise, resulting in increased consumption expenditures. (CMK)

  9. 24 CFR 203.405 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 203.405... Debenture interest rate. (a) Debentures shall bear interest from the date of issue, payable semiannually on... program, debentures shall bear interest from the date of issue, payable semiannually on the first day...

  10. 5 CFR 842.605 - Election of insurable interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Election of insurable interest rate. 842... Election of insurable interest rate. (a) At the time of retirement, an employee or Member in good health and who is applying for a non-disability annuity may elect an insurable interest rate. An...

  11. 5 CFR 842.605 - Election of insurable interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Election of insurable interest rate. 842... Election of insurable interest rate. (a) At the time of retirement, an employee or Member in good health and who is applying for a non-disability annuity may elect an insurable interest rate. An...

  12. 38 CFR 36.4223 - Interest rate reduction refinancing loan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interest rate reduction..., Including Site Preparation General Provisions 36.4223 Interest rate reduction refinancing loan. (a) A... being refinanced. (b) Notwithstanding any other regulatory provision, the interest rate...

  13. 38 CFR 36.4307 - Interest rate reduction refinancing loan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interest rate reduction... 36.4307 Interest rate reduction refinancing loan. (a) Pursuant to 38 U.S.C. 3710(a)(8), (a)(9)(B)(i... provision, the interest rate reduction refinancing loan may be guaranteed without regard to the amount...

  14. 38 CFR 36.4307 - Interest rate reduction refinancing loan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interest rate reduction... 36.4307 Interest rate reduction refinancing loan. (a) Pursuant to 38 U.S.C. 3710(a)(8), (a)(9)(B)(i... provision, the interest rate reduction refinancing loan may be guaranteed without regard to the amount...

  15. 38 CFR 36.4223 - Interest rate reduction refinancing loan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interest rate reduction..., Including Site Preparation General Provisions 36.4223 Interest rate reduction refinancing loan. (a) A... being refinanced. (b) Notwithstanding any other regulatory provision, the interest rate...

  16. 12 CFR 652.30 - Interest rate risk management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... management and must be knowledgeable of the nature and level of interest rate risk taken by Farmer Mac. (b... values by conducting interest rate stress tests and simulations of multiple economic scenarios at least quarterly. Your stress tests must gauge how interest rate fluctuations affect the Corporation's...

  17. 12 CFR 615.5135 - Management of interest rate risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of interest rate risk. The board of directors of each Farm Credit Bank, bank for cooperatives, and agricultural credit bank shall develop and implement an interest rate risk management program as set forth in... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Management of interest rate risk....

  18. The use of interest rate swaps in hospital capital finance.

    PubMed

    Smith, S D

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the structure of an interest rate swap as it is commonly employed in hospital capital finance. It explores the role of the swap dealer as a facilitator of interest rate swap transactions and explains the motivation for doing so. Through the use of examples, the article details the incentives for hospitals to engage in interest rate swap transactions, including the desire to lower borrowing costs and/or to reduce exposure to interest rate risk. Finally, the article outlines the types of risks inherent in interest rate swap transactions. PMID:7614222

  19. Long term consistency of handwriting grip kinetics in adults.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Bassma; Mamun, Khondaker A; Chau, Tom

    2014-04-01

    While there is growing interest in clinical applications of handwriting grip kinetics, the consistency of these forces over time is not well-understood at present. In this study, we investigated the short- and long-term intra-participant consistency and inter-participant differences in grip kinetics associated with adult signature writing. Grip data were collected from 20 adult participants using a digitizing tablet and an instrumented pen. The first phase of data collection occurred over 10 separate days within a three week period. To ascertain long-term consistency, a second phase of data collection followed, one day per month over several months. In both phases, data were collected three times a day. After pre-processing and feature extraction, nonparametric statistical tests were used to compare the within-participant grip force variation between the two phases. Participant classification based on grip force features was used to determine the relative magnitude of inter-participant versus intra-participant differences. The misclassification rate for the longitudinal data were used as an indication of long term kinetic consistency. Intra-participant analysis revealed significant changes in grip kinetic features between the two phases for many participants. However, the misclassification rate, on average, remained stable, despite different demarcations of training, and testing data. This finding suggests that while signature writing grip forces may evolve over time, inter-participant kinetic differences consistently exceeds within-participant force changes in the long-term. These results bear implications on the collection, modeling and interpretation of grip kinetics in clinical applications. PMID:24510237

  20. 12 CFR 7.4001 - Charging interest at rates permitted competing institutions; charging interest to corporate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... institutions; charging interest to corporate borrowers. 7.4001 Section 7.4001 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF... interest at rates permitted competing institutions; charging interest to corporate borrowers. (a... the law of that state. If state law permits different interest charges on specified classes of...

  1. Using the Autism Detection in Early Childhood (ADEC) and Childhood Autism Rating Scales (CARS) to Predict Long Term Outcomes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nah, Yong-Hwee; Young, Robyn L.; Brewer, Neil

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the predictive validity of the Autism Detection in Early Childhood (ADEC; Young, Autism detection in early childhood: ADEC. Australian Council of Educational Research, Camberwell, VIC 2007) and a well-established screening tool, the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS; Schopler et al. The childhood autism rating scale (CARS).

  2. Using the Autism Detection in Early Childhood (ADEC) and Childhood Autism Rating Scales (CARS) to Predict Long Term Outcomes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nah, Yong-Hwee; Young, Robyn L.; Brewer, Neil

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the predictive validity of the Autism Detection in Early Childhood (ADEC; Young, Autism detection in early childhood: ADEC. Australian Council of Educational Research, Camberwell, VIC 2007) and a well-established screening tool, the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS; Schopler et al. The childhood autism rating scale (CARS).…

  3. Estimating Long-Term Mating Systems Using DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, B. G.

    1996-01-01

    Plant mating systems often involve a mixture of self fertilizations and outcross fertilizations. The degree of selfing has a large impact on the genetic composition of natural populations and on the evolution of the mating system itself in response to such factors as inbreeding depression. This paper describes a means of estimating the long-term rate of self-fertilization from samples of alleles taken from individuals in a population. Use is made of the genealogy of pairs of alleles at a locus within individuals and pairs between individuals. The degree of selfing is closely related to the extent to which the number of nucleotide sites differing within an individual is reduced relative to the number differing between individuals. Importantly, the estimate of long-term selfing is largely independent of population size and is not affected by historical fluctuations in population size; instead it responds directly to the mating system itself. The approach outlined here is most appropriate to evolutionary problems in which the long-term nature of the mating system is of interest, such as to determine the relationship between prior inbreeding and inbreeding depression. PMID:8852858

  4. 24 CFR 203.479 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 203.479... SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Rehabilitation Loans 203.479 Debenture interest rate. (a) Debentures shall bear interest from the date of issue, payable semiannually on the...

  5. Long-term recovery of PCB-contaminated sediments at the Lake Hartwell superfund site: PCB dechlorination. 2. Rates and extent.

    PubMed

    Magar, Victor S; Brenner, Richard C; Johnson, Glenn W; Quensen, John F

    2005-05-15

    This paper reports on extensive polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) dechlorination measured in Lake Hartwell (Pickens County, SC) sediments. Vertical sediment cores were collected from 18 locations in Lake Hartwell (Pickens County, SC) and analyzed in 5-cm increments for PCB congeners. The preferential loss of meta and para chlorines with sediment depth demonstrated that PCBs in the sediments underwent reductive dechlorination after burial. Notably, ortho chlorines were highly conserved for more than 5 decades; since the first appearance of PCBs, ca. 1950-1955. These dechlorination characteristics resulted in the accumulation of lower chlorinated congeners dominated by ortho chlorine substituents. Dechlorination rates were determined by plotting the numbers of meta plus para chlorines per biphenyl molecule (mol of chlorine/mol of PCB) with sediment age. Regression analyses showed linear correlations between meta plus para chlorine concentrations with time. The average dechlorination rate was 0.094 +/- 0.063 mol of Cl/mol of PCB/yr. The rates measured using the 2001 cores were approximately twice those measured using the 2000 cores, most likely because the 2001 cores were collected only at transects O, L, and I, which had the highest rates measured in 2000. An inverse of the dechlorination rates indicated that 16.4 +/- 11.6 yr was required per meta plus para chlorine removal (ranging from 4.3 to 43.5 yr per chlorine removal). The rates determined from this study were 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than rates reported from laboratory microcosm studies using Hudson River and St. Lawrence River sediments, suggesting that dechlorination rates reported for laboratory experiments are much higher than those occurring in situ. PMID:15952357

  6. Consider long-term care as service alternative.

    PubMed

    Loria, L S

    1987-04-01

    The increasing demand for elderly care services, pressures on inpatient average length of stay and payment levels, and potential financial rewards from providing additional services, makes long-term care look attractive to hospitals. Long-term care, however, is not for every hospital. Before deciding to establish long-term care services, management should examine how the service fits within the hospital's strategic plan. The action plan below provides guidance in evaluating a decision to use hospital facilities for long-term care. Examine how long-term care services fit within the hospital's strategic plan. Study area demographics and competitors to assess the need and supply of long-term care services. Survey the medical staff, consumers and payers to determine attitudes, perceptions and interests regarding long-term care services. Develop a facility plan that identifies areas of excess capacity that can be most easily converted into long-term care with minimal effects on hospital operations. Prepare a financial feasibility analysis of the contribution margin and return on investment attributable to long-term care services. Include an impact analysis on hospital operations. Establish a management task force to develop a detailed implementation plan including assigned individual responsibilities and related timetable. Develop an effective marketing plan designed to generate increased patient market share. PMID:10312056

  7. 5 CFR 842.605 - Election of insurable interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... beneficiary's date of birth. (f) OPM will notify the employee or Member of initial monthly annuity rates with... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Election of insurable interest rate. 842... Election of insurable interest rate. (a) At the time of retirement, an employee or Member in good...

  8. Effects of Wyoming big sagebrush seeding rate and grass competition on the long-term density and canopy volume of the big sagebrush and wildlife habitat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was initiated in 1997 to evaluate the effects of seeding rates of grass and Wyoming big sagebrush on the establishment of big sagebrush. The research was accomplished at the Belle Ayr West mine, south of Gillette, WY using a randomized complete block experimental design with three big ...

  9. Development of long-term performance models for radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2011-03-22

    The long-term performance of solid radioactive waste is measured by the release rate of radionuclides into the environment, which depends on corrosion or weathering rates of the solid waste form. The reactions involved depend on the characteristics of the solid matrix containing the radioactive waste, the radionuclides of interest, and their interaction with surrounding geologic materials. This chapter describes thermo-hydro-mechanical and reactive transport models related to the long-term performance of solid radioactive waste forms, including metal, ceramic, glass, steam reformer and cement. Future trends involving Monte-Carlo simulations and coupled/multi-scale process modeling are also discussed.

  10. Tolerance of the vaginal vault to high-dose rate brachytherapy and concomitant chemo-pelvic irradiation: Long-term perspective?

    PubMed Central

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Abdah-Bortnyak, Roxolyana; Amit, Amnon; Nevelsky, Alexander; Berniger, Alison; Bar-Deroma, Raquel; Ben-Yosef, Rahamim; Kuten, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Aim/background We sought to determine the tolerance level and complication rates of the vaginal vault to combined high-dose-rate intra-cavitary brachytherapy with concomitant chemo-radiotherapy. Patients and methods A retrospective review of medical records of all the patients who received definitive chemo-radiotherapy for cervical cancer between 1998 and 2002 was undertaken. The records were reviewed for doses and for radiation-associated early and late sequelae of the vagina, rectum and bladder. Cumulative biological effective dose was calculated for two reference vaginal surface points. Results Fifty patients were included. Average age at diagnosis was 54 years. Median follow-up was 59 months. There were no recorded instances of acute grade IV toxicity. Maximal high-dose-rate vaginal surface dose (upper central point) was 103Gy, and maximal brachytherapy lateral surface dose was 70Gy. Maximal cumulative biological effective dose for the lateral surface reference point was 465.5Gy3, and the maximal cumulative biological effective dose for the superior reference point was 878.6Gy3. There were no cases of vaginal necrosis or fistulas, and no cases of grade IV late vaginal, rectal or bladder toxicity. No correlation was found between the maximal vaginal surface dose and vaginal, rectal or bladder toxicity. Conclusions The maximal surface HDR brachytherapy dose of 103Gy and the maximal cBED of 878.6Gy3 were not associated with fistula or necrosis or other grade 34 vaginal complications. Concomitant chemo-radiotherapy, including pelvic radiotherapy and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy, is relatively safe for cervical cancer patients. PMID:24936320

  11. A comparison of methods for deriving solute flux rates using long-term data from streams in the mirror lake watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bukaveckas, P.A.; Likens, G.E.; Winter, T.C.; Buso, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Calculation of chemical flux rates for streams requires integration of continuous measurements of discharge with discrete measurements of solute concentrations. We compared two commonly used methods for interpolating chemistry data (time-averaging and flow-weighting) to determine whether discrepancies between the two methods were large relative to other sources of error in estimating flux rates. Flux rates of dissolved Si and SO42- were calculated from 10 years of data (1981-1990) for the NW inlet and Outlet of Mirror Lake and for a 40-day period (March 22 to April 30, 1993) during which we augmented our routine (weekly) chemical monitoring with collection of daily samples. The time-averaging method yielded higher estimates of solute flux during high-flow periods if no chemistry samples were collected corresponding to peak discharge. Concentration-discharge relationships should be used to interpolate stream chemistry during changing flow conditions if chemical changes are large. Caution should be used in choosing the appropriate time-scale over which data are pooled to derive the concentration-discharge regressions because the model parameters (slope and intercept) were found to be sensitive to seasonal and inter-annual variation. Both methods approximated solute flux to within 2-10% for a range of solutes that were monitored during the intensive sampling period. Our results suggest that errors arising from interpolation of stream chemistry data are small compared with other sources of error in developing watershed mass balances.

  12. LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES: A CORNUCOPIA OF VIRAL PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our study sought to determine the frequency and types of respiratory viruses circulating in 33 Boston long term care facilities during a three year period and correlate rates of infection with serum zinc levels. Participants were residents of long term care that had previously participated in a tria...

  13. Seismically induced changes in bedrock erosional efficiency along the Peikang River, central Taiwan: the role of sediment cover variability in controlling long-term incision rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanites, B. J.; Tucker, G. E.; Hsu, H. L.; Chen, C. C.; Chen, Y. G.; Mueller, K. J.; Wilcox, T.

    2009-04-01

    Sediment cover in a fluvial system can modulate bedrock incision rates by mantling underlying bedrock from erosion processes. The degree of sediment buffering can be variable in both time and space, and therefore documenting and understanding changes in sediment cover along a river is important for landscape evolution studies. The supply of sediment to the fluvial system is highly variable in dynamic landscapes as earthquakes and weather events can induce regionally correlated landslide events of diverse magnitudes. Landslides caused by the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake in central Taiwan are an example of this variable sediment supply. We examine the sediment cover response from this event along a segment of the Peikang River, central Taiwan. This river is undergoing differential incision as it passes over the active Shuilikeng Fault, thus providing a unique natural experiment that highlights the spatially variable responses to this sudden increase in sediment supply. Data derived from topographic cross-section records at a gauging station show that the maximum riverbed aggradation occurred sometime between 2001 and 2003, and field observations indicate that it has not significantly degraded as of January, 2008. Further, we present high-resolution electrical resistivity surveys taken in March, 2008, along the actively incising Peikang River in central Taiwan. The surveys allow the quantification of the spatial variability of the thickness of sediment stored in the river valley following the sudden increase in sediment supply. Comparison of the thickness of sediment cover with incision rate and transport capacity reveals a strong inverse relationship (i.e. high capacity and high incision rate reaches have low sediment cover and vice versa). The high volume of sediment (6-12 m depth) currently stored in the low incision zone suggests that vertical incision has been effectively shut off since the arrival of this sediment pulse. In contrast, the shallower (zero to 4m) stored in the high-incision zone suggest that erosion processes are ongoing, although potentially at a reduced rate. The data presented here support the hypothesis that the frequency of bed exposure to erosive wear is related to channel hydraulics (e.g. transport capacity) and is an important mechanism for the dynamic adjustment of channels to differential incision. The close correspondence between the spatial variability in sediment cover, transport capacity, and incision rate suggests that the degree of sediment buffering in a particular reach is a strong, mechanistic control on the rate of incision along the Peikang River. Further, the data suggests that sediment cover is temporally variable, and the magnitude of this variation may depend on local transport capacity. This suggests that sediment-flux dependent fluvial incision models must account for the temporal variability of sediment supply from hillslopes in order to fully capture the channel response to tectonic and/or climatic forcings. Finally, this study reveals that events that lead to rapid hillslope denudation can reduce the efficiency of fluvial processes.

  14. Rate of recovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from frozen acid-fast-bacillus smear-positive sputum samples subjected to long-term storage in Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tessema, Belay; Beer, Joerg; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in Ethiopia. The diagnosis and treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis remain a challenge in the country. This study aimed to assess whether single morning sputum samples could be stored at -20 C for extended periods of time at remote settings and then transported and successfully cultured for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Single morning sputum samples were collected from all smear-positive tuberculosis patients diagnosed at Gondar Hospital, Gondar Health Center, Metemma Hospital, Bahir Dar Hospital, and Debre Markos Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia between March and July 2009. Specimens were stored at the study sites and sent to the mycobacteriology laboratory at the University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany, where specimens were processed and inoculated into the BacT/Alert 3D system and Lowenstein-Jensen and Gottsacker media. Ice packs were added in the package of the specimens during transport. A total of 319 patients were enrolled in this study. The median specimen storage time was 132 days (range, 16 to 180 days). Of all specimens, 283 (88.7%) were culture positive by any of the three culturing systems. M. tuberculosis isolates from four contaminated specimens in all culturing systems were successfully isolated on Middlebrook 7H10 agar; thereby, the recovery rate increased to 287 (90.0%). The length of time of sputum storage had no significant effect on the rate of recovery of M. tuberculosis in all culturing systems. In conclusion, single morning sputum specimens collected at remote settings stored at -20 C for long periods of time without the addition of preservatives can yield a high recovery rate. These findings suggest a simple and cost-effective alternative method of sputum storage for epidemiological and drug resistance studies in low-resource countries. PMID:21562105

  15. The influence of environmental factors on heart rate chronostructure depending on the individual characteristics of autonomic regulation. Results of long-term medical-ecological studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaeva, Olga; Zenchenko, Tatiana; Breus, Tamara; Chernikova, Anna; Baevsky, Roman

    It was previously shown [Baevsky, Petrov, 1998] that during space flight under influence of geomagnetic disturbances there are both specific response of the autonomic regulation system in the form of vasomotor cardiovascular center activation (LF spectral components) and non-specific stress response, which depends on the actual autonomic balance [Breus, Baevsky, 2002]. Within the project "Mars-500" the parallel medical-ecological studies were conducted in 10 groups (10-16 people), that lived in different regions of the world under the influence of various environmental factors - climatic, geographic, industrial, social and other. It allowed us to obtain a sufficiently large number of variants of adaptive reactions caused by differences in external impacts. The main research method was the heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in short ECG samples (5 minutes) for assessing heart rate chronostructure and functional status of autonomic regulation. Results of studies have demonstrated that environmental loads on the regulatory mechanisms is higher in the northern and north-eastern regions of Russia - Magadan and Syktyvkar. Stress-index of regulatory systems and adaptive risk indicator is significantly higher in these groups [Baevsky, Berseneva, 2013]. The preliminary search of weather factors (atmospheric pressure, air temperature, humidity and magnetic index Kp) influence on the autonomic regulation of heart rate showed that there are no any significant changes and relationships in the entire group of participants. We have assumed that the character of adaptive responses, including responses to changing weather and geomagnetic conditions, is associated with the individual characteristics and the initial functional state of autonomic regulation. To test this hypothesis, we have identified two groups of subjects with different autonomic balance. The first group included individuals with a pronounced predominance of sympathetic regulation (n = 127), the second - with a strong predominance of parasympathetic activity (n = 64). The analysis of correlations between weather and heart rate chronostructure and functional condition of autonomic regulation revealed that attitude of low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) of heart rhythm spectrum higher in both groups at declining geomagnetic activity and lower at its growth. The comparison of other HRV indicators at decreasing and increasing geomagnetic activity displayed the opposite trends in these groups. Stress-index of regulatory systems (SI), which reflects the sympathetic activity, rises in group with sympathetic dominance at reducing geomagnetic activity, and at its growth - in group with parasympathetic dominance. So, we can see that specific adaptive reaction as response to changing geomagnetic situation, which manifested in activation of vasomotor cardiovascular center, is the similar in subjects with different autonomic balance. Non-specific component depends on initial dominance of one or another regulatory mechanism.

  16. A long-term comparison of carbon sequestration rates in impounded and naturally tidal freshwater marshes along the lower Waccamaw River, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Krauss, Ken W.; Sasser, M. Craig; Fuller, Christopher C.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Powell, Amber; Swanson, Kathleen M.; Orlando, James

    2013-01-01

    Carbon storage was compared between impounded and naturally tidal freshwater marshes along the Lower Waccamaw River in South Carolina, USA. Soil cores were collected in (1) naturally tidal, (2) moist soil (impounded, seasonally drained since ~1970), and (3) deeply flooded “treatments” (impounded, flooded to ~90 cm since ~2002). Cores were analyzed for % organic carbon, % total carbon, bulk density, and 210Pb and 137Cs for dating purposes. Carbon sequestration rates ranged from 25 to 200 g C m−2 yr−1 (moist soil), 80–435 g C m−2 yr−1 (naturally tidal), and 100–250 g C m−2 yr−1 (deeply flooded). The moist soil and naturally tidal treatments were compared over a period of 40 years. The naturally tidal treatment had significantly higher carbon storage (mean = 219 g C m−2 yr−1 vs. mean = 91 g C m−2 yr−1) and four times the vertical accretion rate (mean = 0.84 cm yr−1 vs. mean = 0.21 cm yr−1) of the moist soil treatment. The results strongly suggest that the long drainage period in moist soil management limits carbon storage over time. Managers across the National Wildlife Refuge system have an opportunity to increase carbon storage by minimizing drainage in impoundments as much as practicable.

  17. Long-term results of high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the primary treatment of medically inoperable stage I-II endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Souhami, Luis . E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Portelance, Lorraine; Bahoric, Boris; Gilbert, Lucy; Stanimir, Gerald

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Total-abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAHBSO) is the gold-standard therapy for patients with endometrial carcinoma. However, patients with high operative risks are usually treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone. The goal of this study was to update our experience of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB), with or without external-beam irradiation (EBRT), for such patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1984 and 2003, 38 patients with Stage I and Stage II adenocarcinoma of the endometrium considered high operative risk received RT as the primary treatment. The median age was 74.1 years. Before 1996, the local extent of the disease was assessed by an examination under anesthesia (EUA) and by EUA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thereafter. Eight patients (21%) were treated with combined HDRB and EBRT, and 30 patients (79%) were treated with with HDRB alone. The median HDRB dose was 23.9 Gy, typically delivered in 3 fractions in a weekly schedule. The median EBRT dose was 42 Gy. Results: At a median follow-up of 57.5 months for patients at risk, 11 patients (29%) have failed: 6 patients (16%) locally, 4 patients (10.5%) distantly, and 1 patient (3%) locally and distantly. Local failure was established by biopsy, and 4 patients were salvaged by TAHBSO. Higher stage and higher grade were both associated with increased failure rate. The 15-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 78% for all stages, 90% for Stage I, and 42% for Stage II (p < 0.0001). The 15-year DSS was 91% for Grade I and 67% for Grade II and III combined (p = 0.0254). Patients with Stage I disease established by MRI (11 patients) and who received a total HDRB dose of 30 Gy had a DSS rate of 100% at 10 years. Four patients experienced late toxicities: 1 Grade II and 3 Grade III or IV. Conclusion: Medically inoperable Stage I endometrial carcinoma may be safely and effectively treated with HDRB as the primary therapy. In selected Stage I patients, our results are equivalent to that of surgery. We believe that the alternative option of HDRB as the primary therapy for selected Stage I endometrial carcinoma, even in patients with low operative risks, needs further evaluation.

  18. Links between short and long term tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Traor, Nafissatou; Lecomte, Emmanuel; Saleeby, Jason

    2013-04-01

    In the quest for understanding the rheology of the lithosphere a central question that can be addressed is the existence of a parameterisation of the rheology, which could reflect both the response of the lithosphere over the large time scale (10's Myr) and the time scale of earthquakes and faulting. The gap existing between these observational time scales is mainly due to modelling approximations which in each separate fields permit to fit the data but which rely on simplification of the physics, the rheology and set of boundary conditions which are not always compatible one with each other. The long-term community, i.e. the geodynamics community, tend to use Mohr-Coulomb non-associated plasticity to model self-consistent shear zone localisation. This type of rheology corresponds, in the limit of a discrete fault plan, to a slip weakening/hardening formulation in which weakening rate depends on fault plan orientation. The short term community, i.e. the earthquake community, has stopped using this kind of formulation and rather uses the rate and state formulation to model the activity of faults. Rate and State is limited because it cannot self-consistently generate an earthquake, the triggering, i.e. the initial slip acceleration must be imposed. This contribution is a synthesis of several geological case studies at different length-scale, in which we suspects a strong link between long term geodynamic processes and current seismological and geodetic observations. We make use of these case studies together with quantitative numerical models to understand how the seismic and inter-seismic behaviour reflects the rather long-term geodynamic setting than the internal rheological properties of faults. After briefly revisiting the different modelling approaches from geodynamic seismologic and geodetic communities, we show how modelling results obtained with the long term modelling approach brings new insights and alternative models for both the seismological and geodetic behaviour of active faults. The first example will concern the seismic activity on low angle normal faults focussing on the case of the Gulf of Corinth. Then focusing on strike slip tectonic, I will compare data from active and exhumed strike slip faults and discuss how a single model can explain their behaviour. The last example will focus on the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault to discuss how heterogeneities in the long-term tectonic loading (in that instance flexure of the lithosphere) may influence the seismic behaviour of strike slip fault.

  19. Long-Term Results of Fixed High-Dose I-131 Treatment for Toxic Nodular Goiter: Higher Euthyroidism Rates in Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aktaş, Gül Ege; Turoğlu, Halil Turgut; Erdil, Tanju Yusuf; İnanır, Sabahat; Dede, Fuat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Geriatric patient population has special importance due to particular challenges. In addition to the increase in incidence of toxic nodular goiter (TNG) with age, it has a high incidence in the regions of low-medium iodine intake such as in our country. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall outcome of high fixed dose radioiodine (RAI) therapy, and investigate the particular differences in the geriatric patient population. Methods: One hundred and three TNG patients treated with high dose I-131 (370-740 MBq) were retrospectively reviewed. The baseline characteristics; age, gender, scintigraphic patterns and thyroid function tests before and after treatment, as well as follow-up, duration of antithyroid drug (ATD) medication and achievement of euthyroid or hypothyroid state were evaluated. The patient population was divided into two groups as those=>65 years and those who were younger, in order to assess the effect of age. Results: Treatment success was 90% with single dose RAI therapy. Hyperthyroidism was treated in 7±7, 2 months after RAI administration. At the end of the first year, overall hypothyroidism rate was 30% and euthyroid state was achieved in 70% of patients. Age was found to be the only statistically significant variable effecting outcome. A higher ratio of euthyroidism was achieved in the geriatric patient population. Conclusion: High fixed dose I-131 treatment should be preferred in geriatric TNG patients in order to treat persistent hyperthyroidism rapidly. The result of this study suggests that high fixed dose RAI therapy is a successful modality in treating TNG, and high rates of euthyroidism can be achieved in geriatric patients.

  20. No improvement in long-term wear and revision rates with the second-generation Biomet cup (RingLoc) in young patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of excellent results with the cementless titanium femoral component of the Mallory Head Total Hip Replacement have been published. Unfortunately, these excellent results have been counteracted by the poor performance of the cementless titanium acetabular components. In 1994, the HexLoc acetabular component was replaced with a second-generation design, the RingLoc. We hypothesized that the new generation would have improved the results. Methods We retrospectively studied 111 consecutive patients (150 hips) younger than 55 years. Median follow-up time was 14 (6–18) years for the HexLoc and 10 (1–14) years for the RingLoc. 7 patients were lost to follow-up and 7 patients died. The 10-year survival rate, radiographic liner wear, and radiographic signs of prosthesis failure were compared between the 2 acetabular components. Results The Kaplan-Meier survival estimate with revision for any reason as the endpoint showed a 10-year survival of 89% (95% CI: 81–97) for the HexLoc and 92% (CI: 85–98) for the RingLoc. The mean annual wear rate for the HexLoc was 0.16 (SD 0.16) mm and it was 0.15 (0.1) mm for the RingLoc (p = 0.3). The radiographic signs of failure were equally distributed between the 2 groups. Interpretation Compared to the HexLoc type, the RingLoc system did not improve the mean percentage survival at 10 years; nor did it reduce the liner wear. Despite correction of the known design flaws in the HexLoc design, the RingLoc system did not show a clinically relevant improvement compared to its predecessor. PMID:22066563

  1. Long-Term Follow-Up of Proteinuria and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in HIV-Infected Patients with Tubular Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Peyriere, Hlne; Cournil, Amandine; Casanova, Marie-Laure; Badiou, Stphanie; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Reynes, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this prospective observational study was to describe the evolution of tubular proteinuria detected in HIV-infected patients, and to evaluate the impact of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) discontinuation. Methods Proteinuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were followed during a median duration of 32 months, in 81 HIV-infected patients with tubular proteinuria and eGFR ? 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 (determined using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology (CKD-EPI) Collaboration equation). Tubular proteinuria was defined by urine protein to creatinine ratio (uPCR) ?200 mg/g and albumin to protein ratio (uAPR) <0.4. Results Twenty per cent of patients had persistence of tubular proteinuria: TDF continuation was the main factor associated with this persistence [OR 9.0; 95%CI: 1.941.4; p = 0.01]. Among the 23 patients who discontinued TDF, uPCR returned below the threshold of 200 mg/g in 11 patients. Overall, eGFR decreased with a mean rate of decline of 3.8 ml/min/1.73m2/year. The decline in eGFR was lesser after discontinuation of TDF (5.8 ml/min/1.73m2/year during TDF exposure versus 3 ml/min/1.73m2/year after TDF discontinuation; p = 0.01). Conclusions The continuation of TDF was the main factor associated with the persistence of proteinuria. Moreover, proteinuria was normalized in only half of the patients who discontinued TDF. The clinical significance of TDF-related low level of proteinuria as a factor associated with renal disease progression and bone loss remains poorly understood. PMID:26571117

  2. 20 CFR 606.30 - Interest rates on advances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... UNDER THE FEDERAL UNEMPLOYMENT TAX ACT; ADVANCES UNDER TITLE XII OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT Interest on... rate for each calendar year will be 10 percent or, if less, the rate determined by the Secretary of...

  3. Long-term course of opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Evans, Elizabeth; Grella, Christine; Ling, Walter; Anglin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Opioid addiction is associated with excess mortality, morbidities, and other adverse conditions. Guided by a life-course framework, we review the literature on the long-term course of opioid addiction in terms of use trajectories, transitions, and turning points, as well as other factors that facilitate recovery from addiction. Most long-term follow-up studies are based on heroin addicts recruited from treatment settings (mostly methadone maintenance treatment), many of whom are referred by the criminal justice system. Cumulative evidence indicates that opioid addiction is a chronic disorder with frequent relapses. Longer treatment retention is associated with a greater likelihood of abstinence, whereas incarceration is negatively related to subsequent abstinence. Over the long term, the mortality rate of opioid addicts (overdose being the most common cause) is about 6 to 20 times greater than that of the general population; among those who remain alive, the prevalence of stable abstinence from opioid use is low (less than 30% after 10-30 years of observation), and many continue to use alcohol and other drugs after ceasing to use opioids. Histories of sexual or physical abuse and comorbid mental disorders are associated with the persistence of opioid use, whereas family and social support, as well as employment, facilitates recovery. Maintaining opioid abstinence for at least five years substantially increases the likelihood of future stable abstinence. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment options (buprenorphine and naltrexone) include depot formulations offering longer duration of medication; their impact on the long-term course of opioid addiction remains to be assessed. PMID:25747921

  4. Long-term variation of energetic electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asikainen, Timo

    2015-04-01

    The long-term evolution of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) is of considerable interest, e.g., because of its atmospheric and climatic effects. However, the long-term evolution of EEP over several solar cycles has been problematic due to the lack of reliable long-term data. The NOAA/POES satellites have measured energetic particles for more than 35 years. This dataset has been used widely but it has been plagued by several instrumental problems, which have restricted its use for long-term studies. However, we have recently corrected and recalibrated the entire NOAA/POES energetic particle dataset. Using this unique dataset we present here an overview of the long-term evolution of EEP paying particular attention to the role of different types of solar wind disturbances in driving the EEP.

  5. Rutile TiO2 Mesocrystals/Reduced Graphene Oxide with High-Rate and Long-Term Performance for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tongbin; Qiu, Heyuan; Xie, Fengyan; Yang, Jie; Wei, Mingdeng

    2015-01-01

    An in situ hydrothermal route is developed for fabricating rutile TiO2 mesocrystals/reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (TGR) hybrids in the presence of dodecylbenzenesulphonic acid (ADBS). These rutile TiO2 mesocrystals with a Wulff shape are composed of ultra-tiny rod-like subunits with the same oriented direction and closely wrapped by the nanosheets of reduced graphene oxide (RGO). It is found that ADBS played a key role for the formation of mesocrystals during the self-assembly process, which pillared the graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and involved the aggregation of the mesocrystal subunits. Furthermore, the TGR hybrids are used as an anode material and exhibited a large capacity over 150 mA h g−1 at 20 C after 1000 cycles, and high rate capability up to 40 C. These high performance characteristics may be due to the intrinsic characteristics of rutile TiO2 mesocrystals constructed from ultra-tiny subunits and hybridized with super conductive RGO nanosheets. PMID:25688035

  6. Association between resting heart rate, chronotropic index, and long-term outcomes in patients with heart failure receiving ?-blocker therapy: data from the HF-ACTION trial

    PubMed Central

    Dobre, Daniela; Zannad, Faiez; Keteyian, Steven J.; Stevens, Susanna R.; Rossignol, Patrick; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Landzberg, Joel; Howlett, Jonathan; Kraus, William E.; Ellis, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to assess the association between resting heart rate (HR), chronotropic index (CI), and clinical outcomes in optimally treated chronic heart failure (HF) patients on ?-blocker therapy. Methods and results We performed a sub-study in 1118 patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction (EF < 35%) included in the HF-ACTION trial. Patients in sinus rhythm who received a ?-blocker and who performed with maximal effort on the exercise test were included. Chronotropic index was calculated as an index of HR reserve achieved, by using the equation (220-age) for estimating maximum HR. A sensitivity analysis using an equation developed for HF patients on ?-blockers was also performed. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to assess the association between CI and clinical outcomes. Median (25th, 75th percentiles) follow-up was 32 (21, 44) months. In a multivariable model including resting HR and CI as continuous variables, neither was associated with the primary outcome of all-cause mortality or hospitalization. However, each 0.1 unit decrease in CI <0.6 was associated with 17% increased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.011.36; P = 0.036), and 13% increased risk of cardiovascular mortality or HF hospitalization (hazard ratio 1.13, 1.021.26; P = 0.025). Overall, 666 of 1118 (60%) patients had a CI <0.6. Chronotropic index did not retain statistical significance when dichotomized at a value of ?0.62. Conclusion In HF patients receiving optimal medical therapy, a decrease in CI <0.6 was associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Obtaining an optimal HR response to exercise, even in patients receiving optimal ?-blocker therapy, may be a therapeutic target in the HF population. PMID:23315907

  7. 12 CFR 615.5135 - Management of interest rate risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Management of interest rate risk. 615.5135 Section 615.5135 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL... asset/liability management policy which establishes interest rate risk exposure limits as well as...

  8. Thailand's Student Loans Fund: Interest Rate Subsidies and Repayment Burdens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Bruce; Lounkaew, Kiatanantha; Polsiri, Piruna; Sarachitti, Rangsit; Sitthipongpanich, Thitima

    2010-01-01

    Government student loan schemes typically have implicit interest rate subsidies which, while these are a cost to taxpayers, they have the benefit of diminishing repayment burdens for graduates. Our goal is to illustrate the extent of both interest rate subsidies and repayment burdens with respect to Thailand's Student Loans Fund (SLF), using

  9. 13 CFR 120.315 - Interest rate and loan limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interest rate and loan limit. 120.315 Section 120.315 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Disabled Assistance Loan Program (dal) 120.315 Interest rate and loan limit....

  10. 13 CFR 120.315 - Interest rate and loan limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interest rate and loan limit. 120.315 Section 120.315 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Disabled Assistance Loan Program (dal) 120.315 Interest rate and loan limit....

  11. 13 CFR 120.315 - Interest rate and loan limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interest rate and loan limit. 120.315 Section 120.315 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Disabled Assistance Loan Program (dal) 120.315 Interest rate and loan limit....

  12. 13 CFR 120.315 - Interest rate and loan limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interest rate and loan limit. 120.315 Section 120.315 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Disabled Assistance Loan Program (dal) 120.315 Interest rate and loan limit....

  13. 13 CFR 120.315 - Interest rate and loan limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interest rate and loan limit. 120.315 Section 120.315 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans Disabled Assistance Loan Program (dal) 120.315 Interest rate and loan limit....

  14. 76 FR 9870 - Financial Management Policies-Interest Rate Risk

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Financial Management Policies--Interest Rate Risk AGENCY: Office of Thrift... of Proposal: Financial Management Policies--Interest Rate Risk OMB Number: 1550-0094 Form Number: N/A... below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, as required by the Paperwork...

  15. 76 FR 23646 - Financial Management Policies-Interest Rate Risk

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Financial Management Policies--Interest Rate Risk AGENCY: Office of Thrift... following information collection. Title of Proposal: Financial Management Policies--Interest Rate Risk. OMB... collection request (ICR) described below has been submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)...

  16. 78 FR 67364 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the... Service Award Program (42 U.S.C. 288(c)(4)(B)).'' This interest rate will be applied to overdue debt...

  17. 78 FR 44124 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the... Award Program (42 U.S.C. 288(c)(4)(B)).'' This interest rate will be applied to overdue debt until...

  18. 12 CFR 615.5135 - Management of interest rate risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Management of interest rate risk. 615.5135 Section 615.5135 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Investment Management 615.5135 Management of interest rate risk. The board of directors...

  19. Glomerular filtration rate after alpha-radioimmunotherapy with 211At-MX35-F(ab')2: a long-term study of renal function in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Bck, Tom; Haraldsson, Brje; Hultborn, Ragnar; Jensen, Holger; Johansson, Martin E; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2009-12-01

    Besides bone marrow, the kidneys are often dose-limiting organs in internal radiotherapy. The effects of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the kidneys after alpha-radioimmunotherapy (alpha-RIT) with the alpha-particle emitter, (211)At, were studied in nude mice by serial measurements of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The renal toxicity was evaluated at levels close to the dose limit for the bone marrow and well within the range for therapeutic efficacy on tumors. Astatinated MX35-F(ab')(2) monoclonal antibodies were administered intravenously to nude mice. Both non-tumor-bearing animals and animals bearing subcutaneous xenografts of the human ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, were used. The animals received approximately 0.4, 0.8, or 1.2 MBq in one, two, or three fractions. The mean absorbed doses to the kidneys ranged from 1.5 to 15 Gy. The renal function was studied by serial GFR measurements, using plasma clearance of (51)Cr-EDTA, up to 67 weeks after the first astatine injection. A dose-dependent effect on GFR was found and at the time interval 8-30 weeks after the first administration of astatine, the absorbed doses causing a 50% decrease in GFR were 16.4 +/- 3.3 and 14.0 +/- 4.1 Gy (mean +/- SEM), tumor- and non-tumor-bearing animals, respectively. The reduction in GFR progressed with time, and at the later time interval, (31-67 weeks) the corresponding absorbed doses were 7.5 +/- 2.4 and 11.3 +/- 2.3 Gy, respectively, suggesting that the effects of radiation on the kidneys were manifested late. Examination of the kidney sections showed histologic changes that were overall subdued. Following alpha-RIT with (211)At-MX35-F(ab')(2) at levels close to the dose limit of severe myelotoxicity, the effects found on renal function were relatively small, with only minor to moderate reductions in GFR. These results suggest that a mean absorbed dose to the kidneys of approximately 10 Gy is acceptable, and that the kidneys would not be the primary dose-limiting organ in systemic alpha-RIT when using (211)At-MX35-F(ab')(2). PMID:20025544

  20. Coupling of Realistic Rate Estimates with Genomics for Assessing Contaminant Attenuation and Long-Term Plume Containment - Task 4: Modeling - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Starr

    2005-10-31

    Trichloroethene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, can be degraded under certain conditions by microorganisms that occur naturally in the subsurface. TCE can be degraded under anaerobic conditions to less chlorinated compounds and ultimately into the non-chlorinated, non-hazardous end product, ethene, via anaerobic reductive dechlorination (ARD). ARD is widely recognized as a TCE degradation mechanism, and occurs in active groundwater remediation and can occur during monitored natural attenuation (MNA). MNA relies on natural processes, such as dispersion and degradation, to reduce contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels without active human intervention other than monitoring. TCE can also be biodegraded under aerobic conditions via cometabolism, in which microbial enzymes produced for other purposes fortuitously also react with TCE. In cometabolism, TCE is oxidized directly to non-hazardous products. Cometabolism as a TCE-degrading process under aerobic conditions is less well known than ARD. Natural attenuation is often discounted as a TCE remedial alternative in aerobic conditions based on the paradigm that TCE is biodegradable only under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to this paradigm, TCE was shown to degrade relative to conservative co-contaminants at an environmentally significant rate in a large (approximately 3 km long) TCE plume in aerobic groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the degradation mechanism was shown to be cometabolism. MNA was selected as the remedy for most of this plume, resulting in a considerable cost savings relative to conventional remedial methods. To determine if cometabolism might be a viable remedy at other sites with TCE-contaminated aerobic groundwater, TCE plumes at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were screened to evaluate whether TCE commonly degrades in aerobic groundwater, and if degradation rates are fast enough that natural attenuation could be a viable remedy. One hundred and twenty seven plumes at 24 DOE facilities were screened, and 14 plumes were selected for detailed examination. In the plumes selected for further study, spatial changes in the concentration of a conservative co-contaminant were used to compensate for the effects of mixing and temporal changes in TCE release from the contaminant source. Decline in TCE concentration along a flow path in excess of the co contaminant concentration decline was attributed to cometabolic degradation. This study indicated that TCE was degraded in 9 of the 14 plumes examined, with first order degradation half-lives ranging from about 1 to 12 years. TCE degradation in about two-thirds of the plumes examined suggests that cometabolism of TCE in aerobic groundwater is a common occurrence, in contrast to the conventional wisdom that TCE is recalcitrant in aerobic groundwater. The degradation half-life values calculated in this study are short enough that natural attenuation may be a viable remedy in many aerobic plumes. Computer modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport and degradation is frequently used to predict the evolution of groundwater plumes, and for evaluating natural attenuation and other remedial alternatives. An important aspect of a computer model is the mathematical approach for describing degradation kinetics. A common approach is to assume that degradation occurs as a first-order process. First order kinetics are easily incorporated into transport models and require only a single value (a degradation half-life) to describe reaction kinetics. The use of first order kinetics is justified in many cases because more elaborate kinetic equations often closely approximate first order kinetics under typical field conditions. A previous modeling study successfully simulated the INL TCE plume using first order degradation kinetics. TCE cometabolism is the result of TCE reacting with microbial enzymes that were produced for other purposes, such as oxidizing a growth substrate to obtain energy. Both TCE and the growth substrate compete for enzyme reactive sites, and the presence of one interferes with reactions with the enzyme by the other. It was assumed that a competitive inhibition kinetic expression would be more technically rigorous than a first order decay kinetic model. Two activities were undertaken to evaluate this assumption. First, a collaborator measured the parameters of this kinetic model under conditions similar to those of the INL TCE plume. The results will be used in a transport model to compare transport simulated using these measured values with transport simulated using kinetic parameter values from the literature, which are typically for actively growing microorganisms, in contrast to the steady-state, near starvation conditions in the INL TCE plume. Second, modification of flow and reactive transport simulation software to include a competitive inhibition kinetic model was begun.

  1. Interest rates in quantum finance: The Wilson expansion and Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2009-10-01

    Interest rate instruments form a major component of the capital markets. The Libor market model (LMM) is the finance industry standard interest rate model for both Libor and Euribor, which are the most important interest rates. The quantum finance formulation of the Libor market model is given in this paper and leads to a key generalization: all the Libors, for different future times, are imperfectly correlated. A key difference between a forward interest rate model and the LMM lies in the fact that the LMM is calibrated directly from the observed market interest rates. The short distance Wilson expansion [Phys. Rev. 179, 1499 (1969)] of a Gaussian quantum field is shown to provide the generalization of Ito calculus; in particular, the Wilson expansion of the Gaussian quantum field A(t,x) driving the Libors yields a derivation of the Libor drift term that incorporates imperfect correlations of the different Libors. The logarithm of Libor ?(t,x) is defined and provides an efficient and compact representation of the quantum field theory of the Libor market model. The Lagrangian and Feynman path integrals of the Libor market model of interest rates are obtained, as well as a derivation given by its Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian formulation of the martingale condition provides an exact solution for the nonlinear drift of the Libor market model. The quantum finance formulation of the LMM is shown to reduce to the industry standard Bruce-Gatarek-Musiela-Jamshidian model when the forward interest rates are taken to be exactly correlated.

  2. Long-range dependence in interest rates and monetary policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajueiro, Daniel O.; Tabak, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    This Letter studies the dynamics of Brazilian interest rates for short-term maturities. The Letter employs developed techniques in the econophysics literature and tests for long-range dependence in the term structure of these interest rates for the last decade. Empirical results suggest that the degree of long-range dependence has changed over time due to changes in monetary policy, specially in the short-end of the term structure of interest rates. Therefore, we show that it is possible to identify monetary arrangements using these techniques from econophysics.

  3. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us Administration on Aging (AoA) Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program (OAA, Title VII, Chapter 2, Sections ... Services Provided to Persons Living in Long-Term Care Facilities Program data for FY 2013 indicate that ...

  4. Consumer Direction in Long-Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Generations, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Issue includes 17 theme articles on long-term care, covering legal issues, federal role, state programs, demonstration programs, family caregivers, home health care, home care workers, culturally appropriate long-term care, financial support, and cognitive impairments. (SK)

  5. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  6. Long-term equilibrium tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, John A.; Cerveny, Randall S.

    1998-08-01

    Extreme equilibrium tides, or ``hypertides,'' are computed in a new equilibrium tidal model combining algorithms of a version of the Chapront ELP-2000/82 Lunar Theory with the BER78 Milankovitch astronomical expansions. For the recent past, a high correspondence exists between computed semidiurnal tide levels and a record of coastal flooding demonstrating that astronomical alignment is a potential influence on such flooding. For the Holocene and near future, maximum tides demonstrate cyclic variations with peaks at near 5000 B.P. and 4000 A.P. On the late Quaternary timescale, variations in maximum equilibrium tide level display oscillations with periods of approximately 10,000, 100,000 and 400,000 years, because of precessional shifts in tidal maxima between vernal and autumnal equinoxes. While flooding occurs under the combined effects of tides and storms via ``storm surges,'' the most extensive flooding will occur with the coincidence of storms and the rarer hypertides and is thus primarily influenced by hypertides. Therefore we suggest that astronomical alignment's relationship to coastal flooding is probabilistic rather than deterministic. Data derived from this model are applicable to (1) archaeological and paleoclimatic coastal reconstructions, (2) long-term planning, for example, radioactive waste site selection, (3) sealevel change and paleoestuarine studies or (4) ocean-meteorological interactions.

  7. 'Preemie' Babies May Face Long-Term Anesthesia Risks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 157464.html 'Preemie' Babies May Face Long-Term Anesthesia Risks Study tracked higher rate of complications up ... prematurely may be at risk for complications from anesthesia and sedation at least into young adulthood, a ...

  8. High-dose-rate brachytherapy and hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy combined with long-term hormonal therapy for high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer: outcomes after 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kitano, Masashi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Komori, Shouko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Soda, Itaru; Kurosaka, Shinji; Sekiguchi, Akane; Kimura, Masaki; Kawakami, Shogo; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria-defined high-risk (HR) and very high-risk (VHR) prostate cancer. Data from 178 HR (n = 96, 54%) and VHR (n = 82, 46%) prostate cancer patients who underwent 192Ir-HDR brachytherapy and hypofractionated EBRT with long-term ADT between 2003 and 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 Gy/fraction of HDR brachytherapy. After five fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administered. All patients initially underwent ≥6 months of neoadjuvant ADT, and adjuvant ADT was continued for 36 months after EBRT. The median follow-up was 61 months (range, 25–94 months) from the start of radiotherapy. The 5-year biochemical non-evidence of disease, freedom from clinical failure and overall survival rates were 90.6% (HR, 97.8%; VHR, 81.9%), 95.2% (HR, 97.7%; VHR, 92.1%), and 96.9% (HR, 100%; VHR, 93.3%), respectively. The highest Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-defined late genitourinary toxicities were Grade 2 in 7.3% of patients and Grade 3 in 9.6%. The highest late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 2 in 2.8% of patients and Grade 3 in 0%. Although the 5-year outcome of this tri-modality approach seems favorable, further follow-up is necessary to validate clinical and survival advantages of this intensive approach compared with the standard EBRT approach. PMID:24222312

  9. High-dose-rate brachytherapy and hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy combined with long-term hormonal therapy for high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer: outcomes after 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Kitano, Masashi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Komori, Shouko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Soda, Itaru; Kurosaka, Shinji; Sekiguchi, Akane; Kimura, Masaki; Kawakami, Shogo; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria-defined high-risk (HR) and very high-risk (VHR) prostate cancer. Data from 178 HR (n = 96, 54%) and VHR (n = 82, 46%) prostate cancer patients who underwent (192)Ir-HDR brachytherapy and hypofractionated EBRT with long-term ADT between 2003 and 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. The mean dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 Gy/fraction of HDR brachytherapy. After five fractions of HDR treatment, EBRT with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administered. All patients initially underwent ? 6 months of neoadjuvant ADT, and adjuvant ADT was continued for 36 months after EBRT. The median follow-up was 61 months (range, 25-94 months) from the start of radiotherapy. The 5-year biochemical non-evidence of disease, freedom from clinical failure and overall survival rates were 90.6% (HR, 97.8%; VHR, 81.9%), 95.2% (HR, 97.7%; VHR, 92.1%), and 96.9% (HR, 100%; VHR, 93.3%), respectively. The highest Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-defined late genitourinary toxicities were Grade 2 in 7.3% of patients and Grade 3 in 9.6%. The highest late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 2 in 2.8% of patients and Grade 3 in 0%. Although the 5-year outcome of this tri-modality approach seems favorable, further follow-up is necessary to validate clinical and survival advantages of this intensive approach compared with the standard EBRT approach. PMID:24222312

  10. 20 CFR 606.30 - Interest rates on advances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interest rates on advances. 606.30 Section 606.30 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TAX CREDITS UNDER THE FEDERAL UNEMPLOYMENT TAX ACT; ADVANCES UNDER TITLE XII OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT Interest...

  11. 77 FR 5155 - Interest Rate Risk Policy and Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... on generally recognized best practices for safely and soundly managing interest rate risk. DATES... using such assumptions or generic standards so long as these are consistent with the best practices... IRR program. The guidance describes widely-accepted best practices in the management of interest...

  12. 75 FR 82146 - Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Fiscal Service Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt... Manager, Federal Borrowings Branch, Office of Public Debt Accounting, Bureau of the Public Debt... interest penalty. 31 U.S.C. 3902(a). The Contract Disputes Act of 1978, Sec. 12, Public Law 95-563, 92...

  13. 76 FR 38742 - Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Fiscal Service Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt... Manager, Federal Borrowings Branch, Office of Public Debt Accounting, Bureau of the Public Debt... interest penalty. 31 U.S.C. 3902(a). The Contract Disputes Act of 1978, Sec. 12, Public Law 95-563, 92...

  14. Long term changes in the polar vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2015-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented.

  15. Brain size and neuropsychological functioning in long-term survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy Levy, Jean M

    2013-01-01

    With the increased survival of pediatric cancer patients the interest in the late effects of treatments is rapidly increasing. Long-term survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) now approach 90%. Treatment for ALL includes intensified central nervous system (CNS)-directed therapy, which is associated with risks for long-term neurocognitive effects. It is becoming clear that current therapies can have not only a detrimental effect on IQ, processing speed, and memory, but also on structural changes that lead to permanent alterations of the organization of the CNS. Understanding how the CNS is affected by the treatments is a critical step in evaluating current therapies and developing interventions to decrease the incidence and severity of long-term changes in brain anatomy and function.

  16. Individuals and Environments: Linking Ability and Skill Ratings with Interests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthoney, Sarah Fetter; Armstrong, Patrick Ian

    2010-01-01

    Holland's (1997) theory of corresponding person and work environment structures was evaluated by comparing the integration of individual and occupational ratings of interests, abilities, and skills. Occupational ratings were obtained from the U.S. Department of Labor's O*NET database (U.S. Department of Labor, 2007). College students (494 women,

  17. Individuals and Environments: Linking Ability and Skill Ratings with Interests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthoney, Sarah Fetter; Armstrong, Patrick Ian

    2010-01-01

    Holland's (1997) theory of corresponding person and work environment structures was evaluated by comparing the integration of individual and occupational ratings of interests, abilities, and skills. Occupational ratings were obtained from the U.S. Department of Labor's O*NET database (U.S. Department of Labor, 2007). College students (494 women,…

  18. 49 CFR 1141.1 - Procedures to calculate interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Prime Rate as published by The Wall Street Journal. The rate levels will be determined as follows: (1... Street Journal in effect on the date the statement is filed accounting for all amounts received under the... by The Wall Street Journal in effect on the day when the unlawful charge is paid. The interest...

  19. Prediction of interest rate using CKLS model with stochastic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Khor Chia; Hin, Pooi Ah

    2014-06-19

    The Chan, Karolyi, Longstaff and Sanders (CKLS) model is a popular one-factor model for describing the spot interest rates. In this paper, the four parameters in the CKLS model are regarded as stochastic. The parameter vector ?{sup (j)} of four parameters at the (J+n)-th time point is estimated by the j-th window which is defined as the set consisting of the observed interest rates at the j?-th time point where j?j??j+n. To model the variation of ?{sup (j)}, we assume that ?{sup (j)} depends on ?{sup (j?m)}, ?{sup (j?m+1)},, ?{sup (j?1)} and the interest rate r{sub j+n} at the (j+n)-th time point via a four-dimensional conditional distribution which is derived from a [4(m+1)+1]-dimensional power-normal distribution. Treating the (j+n)-th time point as the present time point, we find a prediction interval for the future value r{sub j+n+1} of the interest rate at the next time point when the value r{sub j+n} of the interest rate is given. From the above four-dimensional conditional distribution, we also find a prediction interval for the future interest rate r{sub j+n+d} at the next d-th (d?2) time point. The prediction intervals based on the CKLS model with stochastic parameters are found to have better ability of covering the observed future interest rates when compared with those based on the model with fixed parameters.

  20. The Long-Term Influence of Body Mass Index on the Success Rate of Mid-Urethral Sling Surgery among Women with Stress Urinary Incontinence or Stress-Predominant Mixed Incontinence: Comparisons between Retropubic and Transobturator Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seong Jin; Lee, Han Sol; Lee, Jeong Keun; Jeong, Jin Woo; Lee, Sang Cheol; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Hong, Sung Kyu; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Sang Eun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mid-urethral sling (MUS) surgery for the treatment of urinary incontinence has been widespread since the introduction of tension-free vaginal tape in the mid-1990s. The majority of studies with short-term follow-up <2 years found no differences in the surgical outcomes according to body mass index (BMI). However, considering the chronic influence of obesity on pelvic floor musculature, it is cautiously speculated that higher BMI could increase stress on pelvic floor and sub-urethral tape, possibly decreasing the long-term success rate in the obese population. We aimed to compare the long-term effects of BMI on the outcomes of MUS between women with retropubic and transobturator approaches. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis on 243 consecutive women who received MUS and were followed up for ?36 months. The influence of BMI on the success rates was separately estimated and the factors for treatment failure were examined using logistic regression in either approach. Results The mean follow-up was 58.4 months, and 30.5% were normal weight, 51.0% overweight, and 18.5% obese. Patients received either the retropubic (30.5%) or transobturator (69.5%) approach. The success rates (%) under the transobturator approach differed according to the BMI groups (94.3, 88.6, and 78.6, respectively; P?=?0.037) while those under the retropubic approach were not different according to the BMI groups. However, in multivariate models, only the presence of preoperative mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) was proven to be the risk factor for treatment failure in the transobturator approach (OR 6.39, P?=?0.003). The percent of subjects with MUI was higher in obese women than in non-obese women with the transobturator approach. Conclusions BMI was not independently associated with failures in either approach. Higher success rates in women with lower BMI in the transobturator approach were attributed to the lower percent of preoperative MUI in those with lower BMI. PMID:25415490

  1. Long-term reductions in tinnitus severity

    PubMed Central

    Folmer, Robert L

    2002-01-01

    Background This study was undertaken to assess long-term changes in tinnitus severity exhibited by patients who completed a comprehensive tinnitus management program; to identify factors that contributed to changes in tinnitus severity within this population; to contribute to the development and refinement of effective assessment and management procedures for tinnitus. Methods Detailed questionnaires were mailed to 300 consecutive patients prior to their initial appointment at the Oregon Health & Science University Tinnitus Clinic. All patients were then evaluated and treated within a comprehensive tinnitus management program. Follow-up questionnaires were mailed to the same 300 patients 6 to 36 months after their initial tinnitus clinic appointment. Results One hundred ninety patients (133 males, 57 females; mean age 57 years) returned follow-up questionnaires 6 to 36 months (mean = 22 months) after their initial tinnitus clinic appointment. This group of patients exhibited significant long-term reductions in self-rated tinnitus loudness, Tinnitus Severity Index scores, tinnitus-related anxiety and prevalence of current depression. Patients who improved their sleep patterns or Beck Depression Inventory scores exhibited greater reductions of tinnitus severity scores than patients who continued to experience insomnia and depression at follow-up. Conclusions Individualized tinnitus management programs that were designed for each patient contributed to overall reductions in tinnitus severity exhibited on follow-up questionnaires. Identification and treatment of patients experiencing anxiety, insomnia or depression are vital components of an effective tinnitus management program. Utilization of acoustic therapy also contributed to improvements exhibited by these patients. PMID:12234379

  2. Craniopharyngioma in Children: Long-term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    STEINBOK, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The survival rate for childhood craniopharyngioma has been improving, with more long-term survivors. Unfortunately it is rare for the patient to be normal, either from the disease itself or from the effects of treatment. Long-term survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma suffer a number of impairments, which include visual loss, endocrinopathy, hypothalamic dysfunction, cerebrovascular problems, neurologic and neurocognitive dysfunction. Pituitary insufficiency is present in almost 100%. Visual and hypothalamic dysfunction is common. There is a high risk of metabolic syndrome and increased risk of cerebrovascular disease, including stroke and Moyamoya syndrome. Cognitive, psychosocial, and emotional problems are prevalent. Finally, there is a higher risk of premature death among survivors of craniopharyngioma, and often this is not from tumor recurrence. It is important to consider craniopharyngioma as a chronic disease. There is no perfect treatment. The treatment has to be tailored to the individual patient to minimize dysfunction caused by tumor and treatments. So cure of the tumor does not mean a normal patient. The management of the patient and family needs multidisciplinary evaluation and should involve ophthalmology, endocrinology, neurosurgery, oncology, and psychology. Furthermore, it is also important to address emotional issues and social integration. PMID:26345668

  3. Managing soils for long-term productivity

    PubMed Central

    Syers, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Meeting the goal of long-term agricultural productivity requires that soil degradation be halted and reversed. Soil fertility decline is a key factor in soil degradation and is probably the major cause of declining crop yields. There is evidence that the contribution of declining soil fertility to soil degradation has been underestimated.
    Sensitivity to soil degradation is implicit in the assessment of the sustainability of land management practices, with wide recognition of the fact that soils vary in their ability to resist change and recover subsequent to stress. The concept of resilience in relation to sustainability requires further elaboration and evaluation.
    In the context of soil degradation, a decline in soil fertility is primarily interpreted as the depletion of organic matter and plant nutrients. Despite a higher turnover rate of organic matter in the tropics there is no intrinsic difference between the organic matter content of soils from tropical and temperate regions. The level of organic matter in a soil is closely related to the above and below ground inputs. In the absence of adequate organic material inputs and where cultivation is continuous, soil organic matter declines progressively. Maintaining the quantity and quality of soil organic matter should be a guiding principle in developing management practices.
    Soil microbial biomass serves as an important reservoir of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S), and regulates the cycling of organic matter and nutrients. Because of its high turnover rate, microbial biomass reacts quickly to changes in management and is a sensitive indicator for monitoring and predicting changes in soil organic matter. Modelling techniques have been reasonably successful in predicting changes in soil organic matter with different organic material inputs, but there is little information from the tropics.
    Nutrient depletion through harvested crop components and residue removal, and by leaching and soil erosion accentuates the often very low inherent fertility of many soils in the tropics. An integrated approach involving inorganic and organic inputs is required where animal and plant residues are returned, as far as practicable. Chemical fertilizers alone cannot achieve long-term productivity on many soils and organic material inputs are required to maintain soil organic matter levels and crop productivity. A major research effort is required to develop improved strategies for halting and reversing soil degradation if long-term productivity is to be secured.

  4. Long-term solar-terrestrial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The results of an 18-month study of the requirements for long-term monitoring and archiving of solar-terrestrial data is presented. The value of long-term solar-terrestrial observations is discussed together with parameters, associated measurements, and observational problem areas in each of the solar-terrestrial links (the sun, the interplanetary medium, the magnetosphere, and the thermosphere-ionosphere). Some recommendations are offered for coordinated planning for long-term solar-terrestrial observations.

  5. Long-term cryogenic space storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. A.; Chronic, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the design, fabrication and testing of a 225-cu ft spherical cryogenic storage system for long-term subcritical applications under zero-g conditions in storing subcritical cryogens for space vehicle propulsion systems. The insulation system design, the analytical methods used, and the correlation between the performance test results and analytical predictions are described. The best available multilayer insulation materials and state-of-the-art thermal protection concepts were applied in the design, providing a boiloff rate of 0.152 lb/hr, or 0.032% per day, and an overall heat flux of 0.066 Btu/sq ft hr based on a 200 sq ft surface area. A six to eighteen month cryogenic storage is provided by this system for space applications.

  6. Planning long-term vegetation studies at landscape scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Long-term ecological research is receiving more attention now than ever before. Two recent books, Long-term Studies in Ecology: Approaches and Alternatives, edited by Gene Likens (1989), and Long-term Ecological Research: An International Perspective, edited by Paul Risser (1991), prompt the question, “Why are these books so thin?” Except for data from paleoecological, retrospective studies (see below), there are exceptionally few long-term data sets in terrestrial ecology (Strayer et al. 1986; Tilman 1989; this volume). In a sample of 749 papers published in Ecology, Tilman (1989) found that only 1.7% of the studies lasted at least five field seasons. Only one chapter in each of the review books dealt specifically with expanding both the temporal and the spatial scales of ecological research (Berkowitz et al. 1989; Magnuson et al. 1991). Judging by the growing number of landscape-scale long-term studies, however, such as the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program (Callahan 1991), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP; Palmer et al. 1991), the U.S. Army’s Land Condition-Trend Analysis (LCTA) Program (Diersing et al. 1992), and various agencies’ global change research programs (CEES 1993), there is a growing interest to expand ecological research both temporally and spatially.

  7. Exploring Fiscal Policy at Zero Interest Rates in Intermediate Macroeconomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramamurthy, Srikanth; Sedgley, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Since the financial meltdown of 2007, advanced macroeconomic theory has delved more deeply into the question of the appropriate fiscal policy when the nominal interest rate is close to or at zero percent. Such analysis is typically conducted with the aid of New Keynesian Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium models. The policy implications are,

  8. Actuarial models of life insurance with stochastic interest rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiang; Hu, Ping

    2009-07-01

    On the basis of general actuarial model of life insurance, this article has carried on research to continuous life insurance actuarial models under the stochastic interest rate separately. And it provide net single premium for life insurance and life annuity due over a period based on that de Moivre law of mortality and Makeham's law of mortality separately.

  9. Macroeconomic Stabilization When the Natural Real Interest Rate Is Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttet, Sebastien; Roy, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    The authors modify the Dynamic Aggregate Demand-Dynamic Aggregate Supply model in Mankiw's widely used intermediate macroeconomics textbook to discuss monetary policy when the natural real interest rate is falling over time. Their results highlight a new role for the central bank's inflation target as a tool of macroeconomic stabilization. They…

  10. 77 FR 57990 - Interest Rate Risk Policy and Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Part 741 RIN 3133-AD66 Interest Rate Risk Policy and Program Correction In rule document 2012-02091, appearing on pages 55155-5167 in the issue of Thursday, February 2, 2012, make...

  11. 24 CFR 241.560 - Agreed interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agreed interest rate. 241.560 Section 241.560 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN...

  12. 24 CFR 241.560 - Agreed interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Agreed interest rate. 241.560 Section 241.560 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN...

  13. 24 CFR 221.790 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 221.790 Section 221.790 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND...

  14. 24 CFR 241.560 - Agreed interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Agreed interest rate. 241.560 Section 241.560 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN...

  15. 24 CFR 220.830 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... MORTGAGE INSURANCE AND INSURED IMPROVEMENT LOANS FOR URBAN RENEWAL AND CONCENTRATED DEVELOPMENT AREAS... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 220.830 Section 220.830 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  16. 24 CFR 220.830 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 220.830 Section 220.830 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND...

  17. 24 CFR 220.830 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... MORTGAGE INSURANCE AND INSURED IMPROVEMENT LOANS FOR URBAN RENEWAL AND CONCENTRATED DEVELOPMENT AREAS... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 220.830 Section 220.830 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  18. 24 CFR 220.830 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... MORTGAGE INSURANCE AND INSURED IMPROVEMENT LOANS FOR URBAN RENEWAL AND CONCENTRATED DEVELOPMENT AREAS... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 220.830 Section 220.830 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  19. 24 CFR 220.830 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... MORTGAGE INSURANCE AND INSURED IMPROVEMENT LOANS FOR URBAN RENEWAL AND CONCENTRATED DEVELOPMENT AREAS... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 220.830 Section 220.830 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  20. 12 CFR 615.5135 - Management of interest rate risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Management of interest rate risk. 615.5135 Section 615.5135 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Investment Management 615.5135...

  1. 24 CFR 241.560 - Agreed interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Agreed interest rate. 241.560 Section 241.560 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN...

  2. Exploring Fiscal Policy at Zero Interest Rates in Intermediate Macroeconomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramamurthy, Srikanth; Sedgley, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Since the financial meltdown of 2007, advanced macroeconomic theory has delved more deeply into the question of the appropriate fiscal policy when the nominal interest rate is close to or at zero percent. Such analysis is typically conducted with the aid of New Keynesian Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium models. The policy implications are,…

  3. 24 CFR 221.790 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 221.790 Section 221.790 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  4. 24 CFR 221.790 - Debenture interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Debenture interest rate. 221.790 Section 221.790 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  5. 75 FR 37881 - Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... Fiscal Service Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt... July 1, 2010, to December 31, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Hanna, Manager, Federal...). The Contract Disputes Act of 1978, Sec. 12, Public Law 95-563, 92 Stat. 2389, and the Prompt...

  6. 77 FR 38888 - Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... Fiscal Service Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt... July 1, 2012, to December 31, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brant McDaniel, Manager, Federal...). The Contract Disputes Act of 1978, Sec. 12, Public Law 95-563, 92 Stat. 2389, and the Prompt...

  7. 78 FR 39063 - Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... Fiscal Service Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act AGENCY: Bureau of the Fiscal Service..., 2013, to December 31, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Adam Charlton, Manager, Federal Borrowings...). The Contract Disputes Act of 1978, Sec. 12, Public Law 95-563, 92 Stat. 2389, and the Prompt...

  8. 76 FR 82350 - Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... Fiscal Service Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt... January 1, 2012, to June 30, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brant McDaniel, Manager, Federal...). The Contract Disputes Act of 1978, Sec. 12, Public Law 95-563, 92 Stat. 2389, and the Prompt...

  9. 77 FR 76624 - Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Fiscal Service Prompt Payment Interest Rate; Contract Disputes Act AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt... January 1, 2013, to June 30, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Adam Charlton, Manager, Federal...). The Contract Disputes Act of 1978, Sec. 12, Public Law 95-563, 92 Stat. 2389, and the Prompt...

  10. Macroeconomic Stabilization When the Natural Real Interest Rate Is Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttet, Sebastien; Roy, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    The authors modify the Dynamic Aggregate Demand-Dynamic Aggregate Supply model in Mankiw's widely used intermediate macroeconomics textbook to discuss monetary policy when the natural real interest rate is falling over time. Their results highlight a new role for the central bank's inflation target as a tool of macroeconomic stabilization. They

  11. 75 FR 22136 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR part 30) provides that...

  12. 77 FR 20399 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR part 30) provides that...

  13. 76 FR 30721 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR part 30) provides that...

  14. 76 FR 8370 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR part 30) provides that...

  15. 78 FR 23936 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the... debt until the Department of Health and Human Services publishes a revision. Dated: April 17,...

  16. 75 FR 22136 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR Part 30) provides that...

  17. 77 FR 76492 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office Of The Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR part 30) provides that...

  18. 77 FR 35681 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR part 30) provides that...

  19. 77 FR 60438 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR part 30) provides that...

  20. 75 FR 48690 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR Part 30) provides that...

  1. 75 FR 80055 - Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Notice of Interest Rate on Overdue Debts Section 30.18 of the Department of Health and Human Services' claims collection regulations (45 CFR part 30) provides that...

  2. 24 CFR 241.560 - Agreed interest rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agreed interest rate. 241.560 Section 241.560 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN...

  3. Phase II Trial of Radiation Dose Escalation With Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Long-Term Androgen Suppression in Unfavorable Prostate Cancer: Feasibility Report

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, Jeanette; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Galan, Carlos; Teijeira, Mercedes; Romero, Pilar; Zudaire, Javier; Moreno, Marta; Ciervide, Raquel; Aristu, Jose Javier; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combined long-term luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist-based androgen suppressive therapy (AST) and dose escalation with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for high-risk (HRPC) or very-high-risk prostate cancer (VHRPC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and October 2006, 134 patients (median age, 70 years) with either National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria-defined HRPC (n = 47, 35.1%) or VHRPC (n = 87, 64.9%) were prospectively enrolled in this Phase II trial. Tumor characteristics included a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 14.6 ng/mL, a median clinical stage of T2c, and a median Gleason score of 7. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (54 Gy in 30 fractions) was followed by HDR brachytherapy (19 Gy in 4 b.i.d. treatments). Androgen suppressive therapy started 0-3 months before three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and continued for 2 years. Results: One implant was repositioned with a new procedure (0.7%). Five patients (3.7%) discontinued AST at a median of 13 months (range, 6-18 months) because of disease progression (n = 1), hot flashes (n = 2), fatigue (n = 1), and impotence (n = 1). After a median follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 24-90 months), the highest Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-defined late urinary toxicities were Grade 0 in 47.8%, Grade 1 in 38.1%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 6.7% of patients. Maximal late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 0 in 73.1%, Grade 1 in 16.4%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 2.9% of patients. There were no Grade 4 or 5 events. Conclusions: Intermediate-term results show that dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy combined with long-term AST is feasible and has a toxicity profile similar to that reported by previous HDR brachytherapy studies.

  4. The coevolution of bed roughness, grain clustering, surface armoring, hydraulic roughness, and sediment transport rate in experimental coarse alluvial channels: implications for long-term effects of gravel augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. P.; Aronovitz, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted laboratory flume experiments to quantify changes in multiple factors leading to mountain river bed stability (i.e., minimal bed changes in space and time), and to understand how stable beds respond to perturbations in sediment supply. Experiments were run in a small flume 4 m long by 0.1 m wide. We imposed an initial well-graded size distribution of sediment (from coarse sand to up to 4 cm clasts), a steady water discharge (0.9 L/s), and initial bed surface slopes (8% and 12%). We measured outlet sediment flux and size distribution, bed topography and surface size distributions, and water depths; from these we calculated total shear stress, form drag and skin friction stress partitioning, and hydraulic roughness. The bed was initially allowed to stabilize with no imposed upstream sediment flux. This stabilization occurred due to significant changes in all of the factors listed in the title, and resulted in incipient step-pool like bed morphologies. In addition, this study was designed to explore possible long-term effects of gravel augmentation on mountain channel morphology and surface grain size. While the short-term goal of gravel augmentation is usually to cause fining of surface sediment patches, we find that the long-term effects may be opposite. We perturbed the stabilized channels by temporarily imposing an upstream sediment flux of the finest sediment size fraction (sand to granules). Median surface sizes initially decreased due to fine sediment deposition, although transport rates of intermediate-sized grains increased. When the fine sediment supply was stopped, beds evolved to be both rougher and coarser than they had been previously, because the largest grains remained on the bed but intermediate-sized grains were preferentially transported out, leaving higher fractions of larger grains on the surface. Existing models for mixed grain size transport actually predict changes in mobilization reasonably well, but do not explicity account for surface roughness evolution. Our results indicate a nonlinear relationship between surface median grain size and bed roughness.

  5. Interest rates in quantum finance: Caps, swaptions and bond options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2010-01-01

    The prices of the main interest rate options in the financial markets, derived from the Libor (London Interbank Overnight Rate), are studied in the quantum finance model of interest rates. The option prices show new features for the Libor Market Model arising from the fact that, in the quantum finance formulation, all the different Libor payments are coupled and (imperfectly) correlated. Blacks caplet formula for quantum finance is given an exact path integral derivation. The coupon and zero coupon bond options as well as the Libor European and Asian swaptions are derived in the framework of quantum finance. The approximate Libor option prices are derived using the volatility expansion. The BGM-Jamshidian (Gatarek et al. (1996) [1], Jamshidian (1997) [2]) result for the Libor swaption prices is obtained as the limiting case when all the Libors are exactly correlated. A path integral derivation is given of the approximate BGM-Jamshidian approximate price.

  6. 7 CFR 1714.5 - Determination of interest rates on municipal rate loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administration (FmHA) at 7 CFR 1942.17(f) (1) and (4). Pursuant to the FmHA rule, the interest rates are set... website, Electric Program HomePage, a schedule of interest rates for municipal rate loans at the...

  7. [Primary hyperparathyroidism: postoperative long-term evolution].

    PubMed

    Spivacow, Francisco R; Martnez, Carolina; Polonsky, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The long-term postoperative outcome of 87 patients with primary hyperparathyrodism is here presented. Of the total 78 were females and 9 males, ratio: 8.7:1. Mean age 55.3 10.2 years. Before surgery, 44% had kidney stones, 70% had osteopenia or osteoporosis and 71.2% had hypercalciuria. Decrease renal glomerular filtration was found in 12.6%. Of the total, 72 patients had a single adenoma, two double adenoma, two hyperplasia, four had normal histology and seven could not dispose of the result. Serum calcium, ionized calcium, phosphorus and intact parathyroid hormone were normalized in all post surgery patients. Bone mineral density increased by 6.9% in lumbar spine and 3% in femoral neck. Markers of bone remodeling were normalized and persisted normal 23 months of follow-up, coinciding with the normal intact parathyroid hormone. Same thing happened with the values of 25 OH D. When patients whith initial hypercalciuria were compared with those with normocalciuria, no differences were found in the basal values and postsurgery in both groups. In 11 patients with previous renal glomerular filtration < 60 ml min, we found a higher intact parathyroid hormone and lower bone mineral density than the rest. The glomerular filtration rate did not change significantly after surgery. In conclusion, the surgical primary hyperparathyroidism, operated by specialized surgeons has an excellent long-term outcome, with normalization of all parameters of phosphocalcic metabolism and bone remodeling and significant improvement in bone mineral density. Adverse effects were scarce and had spontaneous resolution. PMID:20920956

  8. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web

  9. Long-term preservation of Anammox bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deposit of useful microorganisms in culture collections requires long-term preservation and successful reactivation techniques. The goal of this study was to develop a simple preservation protocol for the long-term storage and reactivation of the anammox biomass. To achieve this, anammox biomass w...

  10. Long Term TOA - M Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-30

    ... A Long-Term TOA and Constrained Surface Radiation Budget Project A Long-Term TOA and Constrained Surface Readiation ... that span nearly 30 years to date.   The proposed project utilizes knowledge gained in the last 10 years through CERES data ...

  11. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web…

  12. Long Term Preservation of Digital Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorie, Raymond A.

    The preservation of digital data for the long term presents a variety of challenges from technical to social and organizational. The technical challenge is to ensure that the information, generated today, can survive long term changes in storage media, devices, and data formats. This paper presents a novel approach to the problem. It distinguishes

  13. Long-term fluvial incision rates and postglacial river relaxation time in the French Western Alps from 10Be dating of alluvial terraces with assessment of inheritance, soil development and wind ablation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, G. Y.; van der Beek, P. A.; Bourls, D. L.; Siame, L. L.; Mugnier, J.-L.

    2003-04-01

    Studying river long-profile development as a response to tectonic and climatic controls requires reliable age-dating of palaeo-profile remnants preserved as river terraces. Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating often represents the only method available to date river terraces, but the interpretation of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations is complicated by pre-depositional inheritance and post-depositional disturbance of the terrace deposits through pedogenesis and surface inflation or deflation. Here, we use cosmogenic 10Be measurements to date alluvial terraces in the French Western Alps, in order to estimate river incision rates and to infer river response to climatic fluctuations and tectonic forcing. We assess inheritance by constructing 10Be concentration vs. pebble depth profiles and use a Monte Carlo technique to estimate terrace ages. We find that inheritance is negligible on all terraces, enabling us to date terraces as young as 5 kyr. Terraces that predate the last glaciation experienced intense pedogenesis and wind ablation, which led to significant scatter in the 10Be concentrations of surface samples. We assess these effects using a model of 10Be ingrowth and show that the oldest CRE ages of surface clasts are close to the probable terrace age. We study two catchments which have undergone varying degrees of glacial disruption. The Buch River experienced variations in runoff and sediment flux during the last glaciation, as well as occasional ice-dammings of its outlet. Its upper terraces record incision rates averaged over 190 kyr of 0.8 mm yr -1, consistent with denudation rates estimated in the surrounding areas and suggesting long-term stability of river incision rates. Climatic forcing is well documented for the Drac River, which was repeatedly dammed by glaciers during cold periods. Its postglacial incision history was triggered by an 800 m drop in base level following ice-dam disappearance. Long-profile development by knickpoint propagation explains the time-lag of 2-5 kyr between this base-level drop and terrace abandonment upstream, as well as subsequent peak incision rates of >6 cm yr -1 followed by a gradual decrease in incision rates. The present knickpoint location, 55 km upstream from the glacial damming site, enables us to calculate a fluvial response time of 15-20 kyr, controlled by knickpoint propagation rates of several metres per year, within the Drac River.

  14. Transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy: Long term results

    PubMed Central

    Kaynak, Pelin; Ozturker, Can; Karabulut, Gamze; Çelik, Burcu; Yilmaz, Omer Faruk; Demirok, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes of transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy (TRC-DCR) surgery in patients with epiphora due to primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) at second year follow-up. Methods In this retrospective, interventional study, 33 eyes of 29 patients, with epiphora due to PANDO, are included. Lower eyelid conjunctiva is incised at vestibulum inferomedially to access the lacrimal sac and nasal mucosa. Bone is perforated with burr and rongeurs and saccal and nasal flaps are anastomosed. Conjunctival wound edges are apposed and left unsutured. Intraoperative difficulties, surgical time and complications are noted. Average follow-up time was 2 years. Anatomical success was defined as patent lacrimal passages upon irrigation and functional success was defined as relief of epiphora. Results In nineteen (57.6%) eyes the surgeries were completed with the anterior and the posterior flaps sutured. In eight eyes (24.2%) only anterior flaps could be sutured. In 6 eyes (18.2%), the surgical procedure was converted to external dacryocystorhinostomy since the nasal mucosa could not be exposed adequately via transconjunctival route. The mean surgical time was 65.1 min. One patient had a millimeter long lower eyelid margin laceration in one eye (3.7%) intraoperatively due to traction for visualization of the operative site. Epiphora resolved in 25 of 27 eyes (92.5%) in whom TRC-DCR could be completed. Epiphora and failure to irrigation were noted in two eyes (7.4%) at the postoperative 4th and 8th months, respectively and required reoperation. No complications occurred, except granuloma formation at the conjunctival incision site in three eyes (11.1%). Epiphora resolved in all the six eyes of patients who underwent an external DCR (100%). Conclusion Transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy is a scarless dacryocystorhinostomy technique which is performed without endoscope and/or laser assistance, with 92.5% success rate comparable to external DCR at the second year follow-up without major complications. PMID:24526861

  15. Long-term efficacy of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ault, Kevin A

    2007-11-01

    Achieving long-term protection following vaccination is crucial to ensuring that high levels of immunity are maintained within a population while eliminating the need to introduce booster vaccinations. Based on an analysis of the hepatitis B virus vaccine, several factors have been shown to contribute to long-term protection, namely: specific lymphoproliferation, the in vivo humoral response, and immune memory. To ensure protection against persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the subsequent development of cervical lesions, an effective HPV vaccine must be able to induce strong humoral immune responses. Mathematical modeling analyses based on a three-dose regimen of HPV type 16 prophylactic vaccine indicated that 99% of 16- to 23-year-old women would have almost life-long detectable anti-HPV-16 levels. Available data on the quadrivalent HPV vaccine demonstrated that long-term immune memory was induced, with anti-HPV geometric mean titers after 5 years remaining at or above those observed with natural infection. Vaccination also resulted in a substantial reduction in the combined incidence of HPV-6/11/16/18 related persistent infection or disease, and there were no cases of precancerous cervical dysplasia compared with six cases in women receiving placebo. Similarly the bivalent HPV vaccine has been shown to induce long-term immunity with >98% seropositivity maintained after 4.5 years of follow-up and geometric mean titres at this time point remaining substantially higher than those noted with naturally acquired infection. Countrywide registration regarding population and health events in a stable population of approximately 25 million makes the Nordic countries an ideal setting for the evaluation of long-term cervical cancer control. Population-based long-term efficacy trials conducted in these countries aim to investigate the long-term efficacy of HPV vaccination with regard to invasive cervical cancer, and the results of these trials are awaited with interest. PMID:17938016

  16. Equivalence of interest rate models and lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjol, Dan

    2012-04-01

    We consider the class of short rate interest rate models for which the short rate is proportional to the exponential of a Gaussian Markov process x(t) in the terminal measure r(t)=a(t)exp[x(t)]. These models include the Black-Derman-Toy and Black-Karasinski models in the terminal measure. We show that such interest rate models are equivalent to lattice gases with attractive two-body interaction, V(t1,t2)=-Cov[x(t1),x(t2)]. We consider in some detail the Black-Karasinski model with x(t) as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, and show that it is similar to a lattice gas model considered by Kac and Helfand, with attractive long-range two-body interactions, V(x,y)=-?(e-?|x-y|-e-?(x+y)). An explicit solution for the model is given as a sum over the states of the lattice gas, which is used to show that the model has a phase transition similar to that found previously in the Black-Derman-Toy model in the terminal measure.

  17. Intermediate- and long-term earthquake prediction.

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, L R

    1996-01-01

    Progress in long- and intermediate-term earthquake prediction is reviewed emphasizing results from California. Earthquake prediction as a scientific discipline is still in its infancy. Probabilistic estimates that segments of several faults in California will be the sites of large shocks in the next 30 years are now generally accepted and widely used. Several examples are presented of changes in rates of moderate-size earthquakes and seismic moment release on time scales of a few to 30 years that occurred prior to large shocks. A distinction is made between large earthquakes that rupture the entire downdip width of the outer brittle part of the earth's crust and small shocks that do not. Large events occur quasi-periodically in time along a fault segment and happen much more often than predicted from the rates of small shocks along that segment. I am moderately optimistic about improving predictions of large events for time scales of a few to 30 years although little work of that type is currently underway in the United States. Precursory effects, like the changes in stress they reflect, should be examined from a tensorial rather than a scalar perspective. A broad pattern of increased numbers of moderate-size shocks in southern California since 1986 resembles the pattern in the 25 years before the great 1906 earthquake. Since it may be a long-term precursor to a great event on the southern San Andreas fault, that area deserves detailed intensified study. Images Fig. 1 PMID:11607658

  18. External-Beam Radiation Therapy and High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Long-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy in High and Very High Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Data on Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Moreno, Marta; Ciervide, Raquel; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Perez-Gracia, Jose Luis; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Arbea, Leire; Pascual, Ignacio; Aristu, Javier

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combined long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and dose escalation with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2007, 200 patients with high-risk prostate cancer (32.5%) or very high-risk prostate cancer (67.5%) were prospectively enrolled in this Phase II trial. Tumor characteristics included a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen of 15.2 ng/mL, a clinical stage of T2c, and a Gleason score of 7. Treatment consisted of 54 Gy of external irradiation (three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [3DCRT]) followed by 19 Gy of HDR brachytherapy in four twice-daily treatments. ADT started 0-3 months before 3DCRT and continued for 2 years. Results: One hundred and ninety patients (95%) received 2 years of ADT. After a median follow-up of 3.7 years (range, 2-9), late Grade {>=}2 urinary toxicity was observed in 18% of the patients and Grade {>=}3 was observed in 5%. Prior transurethral resection of the prostate (p = 0.013) and bladder D{sub 50} {>=}1.19 Gy (p = 0.014) were associated with increased Grade {>=}2 urinary complications; age {>=}70 (p = 0.05) was associated with Grade {>=}3 urinary complications. Late Grade {>=}2 gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in 9% of the patients and Grade {>=}3 in 1.5%. CTV size {>=}35.8 cc (p = 0.007) and D{sub 100} {>=}3.05 Gy (p = 0.01) were significant for increased Grade {>=}2 complications. The 5-year and 9-year biochemical relapse-free survival (nadir + 2) rates were 85.1% and 75.7%, respectively. Patients with Gleason score of 7-10 had a decreased biochemical relapse-free survival (p = 0.007). Conclusions: Intermediate-term results at the 5-year time point indicate a favorable outcome without an increase in the rate of late complications.

  19. Global Horizontal Irradiance Anomalies in Long Term Series Over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cony, Marco; Liria, Juan; Weisenberg, Ralf; Serrano, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    India has a high potential for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource potential. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation (GHI) and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of GHI measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of GHI using anomalies techniques over ten different sites over India. Besides, techniques of linear trends have been applied for to show the evolution over this period. The analysis of anomalies has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the anomalies observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative anomalies. The results exhibit a decreasing trend and negative anomalies confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar energy deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater anomalies and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative anomalies and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.

  20. Analysis of Solar Irradiation Anomalies in Long Term Over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cony, M.; Polo, J.; Martin, L.; Navarro, A.; Serra, I.

    2012-04-01

    India has a high potential for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource potential. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of global hemispheric irradiation measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of solar irradiation in India using anomalies techniques and trends in ten places over India. Most of the places have exhibit a decreasing trend and negative anomalies confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. The analysis of anomalies has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the anomalies observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative anomalies. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar energy deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater anomalies and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative anomalies and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.

  1. Long Term Effects of Food Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... develop chronic arthritis. Brain and nerve damage A Listeria infection can lead to meningitis, an inflammation of ... brain. If a newborn infant is infected with Listeria , long-term consequences may include mental retardation, seizures, ...

  2. First Long-term Slip-rate Along The San Andreas Fault Based On 10be-26al Surface Exposure Dating : The Biskra Palms Site, 23 Mm/yr For The Last 30000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Y.; van der Woerd, J.; Sieh, K.; Tapponnier, P.; Ryerson, F. J.

    Slip-rate along the San Andreas fault is known precisely at only two locations : at Wallace Creek, 34 +- 3 mm/yr for the past 13,500 yrs and at Cajon Creek, 24.5 +- 3 mm/yr for the past 14,500 yrs. When compared to the long-term and far-field plate motion, these rates provide important constraint on how and where strain is accommo- dated across the plate boundary. Here we present a new determination of the slip-rate along the San Andreas Fault at Biskra Palms, based on 10Be-26Al surface exposure dating. The studied area is located southeast of the San Gorgonio restraining bend, a complex section of the fault which has not produced a large earthquake in historical time. At Biskra Palms, the San Andreas Fault offsets an alluvial fan (T2) about 700 m. Keller et al. (1982) recognized the importance of this site and estimated the age of the offset fan surfaces based on degree of soil development between 20 and 70 kyrs, providing a very loosely constraint slip-rate between 10 and 35 mm/yr. We have an- alyzed 21 quartz rich cobbles from the surface of the fan, upstream, downstream and within the fault zone. 10Be and 26Al measurements yield consistent results implying simple exposure at the surface. 7 samples collected on the T2 fan surface downstream yield an average exposure age of 30.7 +- 2.1 kyrs. The tight cluster of these ages in- dicate no or minor pre-exposition during transport in the small catchment upstream. 7 samples from T2 upstream from the fault yield an average exposure age of 29.5 +- 2.8 kyrs. One additional sample of this surface (38.4s3.6 kyrs) is older than the others ´ and may have been pre-exposed before deposition on the fan. 2 samples from a T2 remnant within the fault zone yield an average age of 29.6 +- 2.6 kyrs. 4 additional samples were collected from two smaller alluvial surfaces (T3 and T4) remnant found only upstream from the fault zone and yield average ages of 33.3 and 27.3 kyrs that are similar to the age of T2. This suggest that these surfaces were emplaced rapidly in a few thousands years or so ~30,000 years ago. Taking the 700 m offset and dividing it by the average age of T2 (30.1 +- 2.4 kyrs) yields a slip-rate of 23.3 +- 3.5 mm/yrs. The different fault strands of the San Gorgonio step-over converge southeastward to- ward the Biskra Palms site, so that this rate applies to the the entire San Andreas fault zone. The 23 mm/yr rate is undistinguishable from the rate derived at Cajon Creek, 1 120 km to the northwest, and places an important new constraint on the behavior of the San Andreas Fault across the San Gorgonio Pass restraining bend. Keller et al. (1982), Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 93, 46-56. 2

  3. First Long-Term slip-Rate Along the San Andreas Fault Based on 10Be-26Al Surface Exposure Dating : The Biskra Palms Site, 23 mm/yr for the last 30,000 years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woerd, J.; Klinger, Y.; Sieh, K.; Tapponnier, P.; Ryerson, F.

    2001-12-01

    Slip-rate along the San Andreas fault is known precisely at only two locations : at Wallace Creek, 34 +/- 3 mm/yr for the past 13,500 yrs and at Cajon Creek, 24.5+/- 3 mm/yr for the past 14,500 yrs. When compared to the long-term and far-field plate motion, these rates provide important constraint on how and where strain is accommodated across the plate boundary. Here we present a new determination of the slip-rate along the San Andreas Fault at Biskra Palms, based on 10Be-26Al surface exposure dating. The studied area is located southeast of the San Gorgonio restraining bend, a complex section of the fault which has not produced a large earthquake in historical time. At Biskra Palms, the San Andreas Fault offsets an alluvial fan (T2) about 700 m. Keller et al. (1982) recognized the importance of this site and estimated the age of the offset fan surfaces based on degree of soil development between 20 and 70 kyrs, providing a very loosely constraint slip-rate between 10 and 35 mm/yr. We have analyzed 21 quartz rich cobbles from the surface of the fan, upstream, downstream and within the fault zone. 10Be and 26Al measurements yield consistent results implying simple exposure at the surface. 7 samples collected on the T2 fan surface downstream yield an average exposure age of 30.7 +/- 2.1 kyrs. The tight cluster of these ages indicate no or minor pre-exposition during transport in the small catchment upstream. 7 samples from T2 upstream from the fault yield an average exposure age of 29.5 +/- 2.8 kyrs. One additional sample of this surface (38.4+/-3.6 kyrs) is older than the others and may have been pre-exposed before deposition on the fan. 2 samples from a T2 remnant within the fault zone yield an average age of 29.6 +/- 2.6 kyrs. 4 additional samples were collected from two smaller alluvial surfaces (T3 and T4) remnant found only upstream from the fault zone and yield average ages of 33.3 and 27.3 kyrs that are similar to the age of T2. This suggest that these surfaces were emplaced rapidly in a few thousands years or so ~30,000 years ago. Taking the 700 m offset and dividing it by the average age of T2 (30.1 +/-2.4 kyrs) yields a slip-rate of 23.3+/-3.5 mm/yrs. The different fault strands of the San Gorgonio step-over converge southeastward toward the Biskra Palms site, so that this rate applies to the the entire San Andreas fault zone. The 23 mm/yr rate is undistinguishable from the rate derived at Cajon Creek, 120 km to the northwest, and places an important new constraint on the behavior of the San Andreas Fault across the San Gorgonio Pass restraining bend. Keller et al. (1982), Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 93, 46-56.

  4. Cross-correlation between interest rates and commodity prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Hu, Yiming

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate cross-correlations between interest rate and agricultural commodity markets. Based on a statistic of Podobnik et al. (2009), we find that the cross-correlations are all significant. Using the MF-DFA and MF-DXA methods, we find strong multifractality in both auto-correlations and cross-correlations. Moreover, the cross-correlations are persistent. Finally, based on the technique of rolling window, the time-variation property of cross-correlations is also revealed.

  5. [Long term adherence to HAART in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Bastard, M; Fall, M Basty Koita

    2014-10-01

    Adherence is one of the main predictors of antiretroviral treatment success. A governmental initiative was launched in 1998 for HIV-infected patients in Senegal to provide access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Adherence measurements, defined as pills taken/pills prescribed, were assessed between November 1999 and June 2010 using a pill count along with a questionnaire for 330 patients. Predictors of adherence and identification of adherence trajectories were explored through latent class mixed model. We also performed a survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard model. Three adherence behaviours were revealed as well as a better adherence for women. A third of patients had a high adherence trajectory over time and a third had an intermediate one. Male gender and low adherence behaviour over time were independently associated with a higher mortality rate. This study shows that an overall good adherence can be obtained in the long term in Senegal, suggests a better adherence for women and points out a large subsample of patients with intermediate level of adherence behaviour who are at risk for developing resistance to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:24615434

  6. Long-term intraperitoneal insulin delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, H A; Saudek, C D; Zacur, H A

    1992-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, 21 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus have been managed at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions with variable rate, remotely controlled implanted insulin pumps. To date, nearly 70 patient-years of experience has been gained with intraperitoneal delivery of a new U-400 insulin with a surfactant. All 21 patients are alive after a mean of 39.3 months (range, 10 to 65 months) after insulin pump implantation. Nineteen of the 21 patients remain on intraperitoneal insulin, for a 5-year actuarial system survival of 90%. Glucose control was improved, especially during the first 16 months after pump implantation, without an increased incidence of severe hypoglycemia. Catheter blockage has been a significant problem, occurring in nine of the 21 patients (43%). Catheter occlusion has been successfully managed, however, with laparoscopic repair in seven of 10 attempts or with catheter change in four of five patients. Nevertheless, quality of life and patient acceptance remain excellent. Moreover, pre-existing nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy have been surprisingly stable. With an aggressive policy of catheter change or laparoscopic clearance of catheter blockage, long-term intraperitoneal insulin delivery is now a safe and effective treatment for type I diabetics. PMID:1417197

  7. Long-term complications requiring reoperations after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaojun; Zhang, Xin; Bi, Jianwei; Yin, Kai

    2015-01-01

    At present, bariatric surgery is the most effective option for morbidly obese patients. Among all of the surgical procedures, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is characterized by superior safety, a stable weight loss effect, and unique reversibility. However, the worldwide popularity of LAGB is challenged and overshadowed by a number of adverse events. This systematic review examined the incidence and outcomes of the long-term complications that require reoperations after LAGB. A PubMed search was conducted through October 31, 2014, for relevant studies that included minimal 10-year follow-up data for LAGB patients. The defined outcomes of interest were weight loss outcomes, long-term complications, and reoperations. Seventeen studies, including 2 randomized controlled trials and 15 observational studies, were identified involving a total of 9706 LAGB patients, of which 8215 patients (84.6%) were followed up and 1974 patients (20.3%) were available 10 years after LAGB. The follow-up data indicated that the mean percentage of excess weight loss at 10 years after LAGB was 49.1% 13.1% and the median long-term complication rate and reoperation rate for the LAGB patients were 42.7% (5.9%-52.9%) and 36.5% (7.2%-66.1%), respectively. At the end of long-term follow-up, approximately 22.9% (5.4%-54.0%) of the LAGB patients had their bands removed and the commonest reason was complications. In conclusion, long-term adverse events are important and remarkable for LAGB patients. The role of LAGB in bariatric surgery is worthy of further appraisal, by comparing with other types of bariatric procedures, because of the limited high-quality evidence. PMID:25638595

  8. Long-Term Impact of Service Learning in Environmental Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFall, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Long-term impacts from a senior course in Environmental Studies were evaluated by a survey of program graduates (36 respondents, 50% response rate) who had participated in the course over an 8-year permiod. Each year, the Senior Seminar used a service-learning pedagogy with a different environmentally focused project ranging from web resource…

  9. Long-Term Impact of Service Learning in Environmental Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFall, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Long-term impacts from a senior course in Environmental Studies were evaluated by a survey of program graduates (36 respondents, 50% response rate) who had participated in the course over an 8-year permiod. Each year, the Senior Seminar used a service-learning pedagogy with a different environmentally focused project ranging from web resource

  10. Long-term symptom relief after septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sundh, Carolina; Sunnergren, Ola

    2015-10-01

    The results for long-term symptom relief after septoplasty are contradictory in reviewed publications but the findings suggest that results are unsatisfactory. In this study, we analyzed and compared short- and long-term symptom relief after septoplasty and factors possibly associated with symptom relief. 111 patients that underwent septoplasty between 2008 and 2010 were included in the study. Medical charts were reviewed for preoperative characteristics and assessments. Data on short-term symptom relief (6 months) were retrieved from the Swedish National Quality Registry for Septoplasty; data on long-term symptom relief (34-70 months) were collected through a questionnaire. Upon the 34-70 month follow-up, 53% of the patients reported that symptoms either remained or had worsened and 83% reported nasal obstruction. Degree of symptom relief was significantly higher among patients not reporting nasal obstruction than among patients reporting nasal obstruction at long-term follow-up. The proportion of patients that reported "my symptoms are gone" declined from 53% after 6 months to 18% after 34-70 months. None of the factors taken into consideration, age at surgery, gender, follow-up time, primary operation/reoperation, history of nasal trauma, self-reported allergy, rhinometric obstruction, or same sided rhinometric, clinical and subjective nasal obstruction were associated with symptom relief. The long-term results after septoplasty are unsatisfactory. A majority of patients report that their symptoms remain after septoplasty. PMID:25432640

  11. Private Long-Term Care Insurance: Value to Claimants and Implications for Long-Term Care Financing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Pamela; Cohen, Marc A.; Miller, Jessica; Shi, Xiaomei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to obtain a profile of individuals with private long-term care (LTC) insurance as they begin using paid LTC services and track their patterns of service use, satisfaction with services and insurance, claims denial rates, and transitions over a 28-month period. Design and Methods: Ten LTC insurance companies

  12. Private Long-Term Care Insurance: Value to Claimants and Implications for Long-Term Care Financing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Pamela; Cohen, Marc A.; Miller, Jessica; Shi, Xiaomei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to obtain a profile of individuals with private long-term care (LTC) insurance as they begin using paid LTC services and track their patterns of service use, satisfaction with services and insurance, claims denial rates, and transitions over a 28-month period. Design and Methods: Ten LTC insurance companies…

  13. Environmental and Genetic Preconditioning for Long-Term Anoxia Responses Requires AMPK in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    LaRue, Bobby L.; Padilla, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Preconditioning environments or therapeutics, to suppress the cellular damage associated with severe oxygen deprivation, is of interest to our understanding of diseases associated with oxygen deprivation. Wildtype C. elegans exposed to anoxia enter into a state of suspended animation in which energy-requiring processes reversibly arrest. C. elegans at all developmental stages survive 24-hours of anoxia exposure however, the ability of adult hermaphrodites to survive three days of anoxia significantly decreases. Mutations in the insulin-like signaling receptor (daf-2) and LIN-12/Notch (glp-1) lead to an enhanced long-term anoxia survival phenotype. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we show that the combined growth environment of 25C and a diet of HT115 E. coli will precondition adult hermaphrodites to survive long-term anoxia; many of these survivors have normal movement after anoxia treatment. Animals fed the drug metformin, which induces a dietary-restriction like state in animals and activates AMPK in mammalian cell culture, have a higher survival rate when exposed to long-term anoxia. Mutations in genes encoding components of AMPK (aak-2, aakb-1, aakb-2, aakg-2) suppress the environmentally and genetically induced long-term anoxia survival phenotype. We further determine that there is a correlation between the animals that survive long-term anoxia and increased levels of carminic acid staining, which is a fluorescent dye that incorporates in with carbohydrates such as glycogen. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that small changes in growth conditions such as increased temperature and food source can influence the physiology of the animal thus affecting the responses to stress such as anoxia. Furthermore, this supports the idea that metformin should be further investigated as a therapeutic tool for treatment of oxygen-deprived tissues. Finally, the capacity for an animal to survive long bouts of severe oxygen deprivation is likely dependent on specific subunits of the heterotrimeric protein AMPK and energy stores such as carbohydrates. PMID:21304820

  14. 78 FR 63238 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... Decision 85-93, published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on... rates for overpayments will be 2 percent for corporations and 3 percent for non-corporations, and the interest rate for underpayments will be 3 percent for both corporations and non-corporations. This...

  15. Long-term consequences of foodborne infections.

    PubMed

    Batz, Michael B; Henke, Evan; Kowalcyk, Barbara

    2013-09-01

    Foodborne infections with Campylobacter, E. coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Shigella, Toxoplasma gondii, and other pathogens can result in long-term sequelae to numerous organ systems. These include irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, reactive arthritis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, Guillain-Barré Syndrome, neurological disorders from acquired and congenital listeriosis and toxoplasmosis, and cognitive and developmental deficits due to diarrheal malnutrition or severe acute illness. A full understanding of the long-term sequelae of foodborne infection is important both for individual patient management by clinicians, as well as to inform food safety and public health decision making. PMID:24011832

  16. Long term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöger, Julia; Eder, Wolfgang; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Antonino, Briguglio; Carles, Ferrandes-Cañadell; Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-04-01

    Benthic Foraminifera are used in a variety of applications employing numerous different methods, i.e. ecological monitoring, studying the effects of ocean acidification, reconstructing palaeo-bathymetry or investigating palaeo-salinity and palaeo-temperature to name only a few. To refine our understanding of ecological influences on larger benthic foraminiferal biology and to review inferences from field observations, culture experiments have become an indispensable tool. While culture experiments on smaller benthic foraminifera have become increasingly frequent in the past century, reports of the cultivation of symbiont bearing larger Foraminifera are rare. Generally, cultivation experiments can be divided into two groups: Culturing of populations and cultivation of single specimens allowing individual investigation. The latter differ form the former by several restrictions resulting from the need to limit individual motility without abridging microenvironmental conditions in the Foraminiferans artificial habitat, necessary to enable the individual to development as unfettered as possible. In this study we present first experiences and preliminary results of the long-term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera conducted at the 'Tropical Biosphere Research Station Sesoko Island, University of the Ryukyus', Japan, trying to reproduce natural conditions as closely as possible. Individuals of three species of larger benthic Foraminifera (Heterostegina depressa, Palaeonummulites venosus and Operculina complanata) have been cultured since April 2014. At the time of the general assembly the cultivation experiments will have been going on for more than one year, with the aim to investigate growth rates, longevities and reproduction strategies for comparison with results statistically inferred from application of the of the 'natural laboratory' method. The most important factor influencing foraminiferal health and development was found to be light intensity and light spectrum. The light intensities reaching the Foraminifera in cultivation however largely depend on the substrate provided (e.g. sand and silt where individuals dig close to the surface or coral rubble used as shelter by the Foraminiferans and as an easy way of retaining the organisms within a designated container by the investigator).

  17. Neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love

    PubMed Central

    Aron, Arthur; Fisher, Helen E.; Brown, Lucy L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ten women and 7 men married an average of 21.4 years underwent fMRI while viewing facial images of their partner. Control images included a highly familiar acquaintance; a close, long-term friend; and a low-familiar person. Effects specific to the intensely loved, long-term partner were found in: (i) areas of the dopamine-rich reward and basal ganglia system, such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dorsal striatum, consistent with results from early-stage romantic love studies; and (ii) several regions implicated in maternal attachment, such as the globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra, Raphe nucleus, thalamus, insular cortex, anterior cingulate and posterior cingulate. Correlations of neural activity in regions of interest with widely used questionnaires showed: (i) VTA and caudate responses correlated with romantic love scores and inclusion of other in the self; (ii) GP responses correlated with friendship-based love scores; (iii) hypothalamus and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with sexual frequency; and (iv) caudate, septum/fornix, posterior cingulate and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with obsession. Overall, results suggest that for some individuals the reward-value associated with a long-term partner may be sustained, similar to new love, but also involves brain systems implicated in attachment and pair-bonding. PMID:21208991

  18. Oil Prices and Interest Rates: Do They Determine the Exchange Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, I. A.; Old, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the relationship between the British pound sterling, interest rates, and oil prices has been overemphasized by economic commentators because they ignored a basic economic theory about the determination of the exchange rate. Provides an example and suggestions for follow up instruction. (Author/JDH)

  19. Long term failure mechanisms of NPN switching transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper will describe a number of long term failure mechanisms that occurred in a group of switching transistors. The transistors examined are in excess of 20 years old. Of particular interest is the transformation and failure of several of the gold ball bonds. These devices appear to be reaching their ``natural`` wear-out limits--the end of the classic reliability wear-out bathtub curve.

  20. 75 FR 37823 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable overpayments or underpayments of customs... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue Division, Collection and Refunds Branch, 6650...

  1. 75 FR 419 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable overpayments or underpayments of customs... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue Division, Collection and Refunds Branch, 6650...

  2. 75 FR 59279 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used In Calculating Interest On Overdue Accounts and Refunds On...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable overpayments or underpayments of customs... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue Division, Collection and Refunds Branch, 6650...

  3. Long-Term Stability of Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyyppa, Markku T.; Maki, Juhani; Alanen, Erkki; Impivaara, Olli; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability of social participation was investigated in a representative urban population of 415 men and 579 women who had taken part in the nationwide Mini-Finland Health Survey in the years 1978-1980 and were re-examined 20 years later. Stability was assessed by means of the following tracking coefficients: kappa, proportion of

  4. Long-Term Memory and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, John

    2011-01-01

    The English National Curriculum Programmes of Study emphasise the importance of knowledge, understanding and skills, and teachers are well versed in structuring learning in those terms. Research outcomes into how long-term memory is stored and retrieved provide support for structuring learning in this way. Four further messages are added to the…

  5. Who Recommends Long-Term Care Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Bershadsky, Boris; Bershadsky, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Making good consumer decisions requires having good information. This study compared long-term-care recommendations among various types of health professionals. Design and Methods: We gave randomly varied scenarios to a convenience national sample of 211 professionals from varying disciplines and work locations. For each scenario, we

  6. TOXIC MODELING SYSTEM LONG-TERM (TOXLT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxic Modeling System Long-Term (TOXLT) is a personal-computer- based model that has been developed in conjunction with the release of the new version of the EPAs Industrial Source Complex (ISC2) Dispersion Models (EPA, 1992) and the promulgation of the EPAs A Tiered Modeling...

  7. LONG TERM HYDROLOGICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (LTHIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    LTHIA is a universal Urban Sprawl analysis tool that is available to all at no charge through the Internet. It estimates impacts on runoff, recharge and nonpoint source pollution resulting from past or proposed land use changes. It gives long-term average annual runoff for a lan...

  8. Long-Term Impacts of Educational Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deming, David James

    2010-01-01

    The school accountability movement has led to a marked increase in the use of standardized test scores to measure school and teacher productivity, yet little is known about the correlation between test score gains and improvements in long-term outcomes. In the first chapter of my dissertation, I study the impact of a school choice policy in

  9. Professionalism in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubinski, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists who serve elders in a variety of long-term care settings have a variety of professional skills and responsibilities. Fundamental to quality service is knowledge of aging and communication changes and disorders associated with this process, institutional alternatives, and the changing nature of today's elders in

  10. Truancy: Short and Long-Term Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    This book offers guidance on dealing with the problem of truancy and non-attendance. It provides examples of the latest ways that schools, teachers, education welfare officers, and local education authorities in the United Kingdom have worked to overcome their attendance problems, identifying 120 short-term solutions and several long-term

  11. Long-term lysimeter data on evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term crop evapotranspiration (ET) data measured using large weighing lysimeters have only been gathered in a few places in the world, yet are of great importance for ground truthing of many models of plant water use, mesoscale climate, remote sensing estimation of ET, climate change and climate...

  12. Long-term risks of bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Watts, Nelson B

    2014-07-01

    The objective this study was to summarize long-term risks associated with bisphosphonate therapy. Search of relevant medical publications for data from clinical trials, trial extensions, observational studies and post-marketing reports. Trial extensions and modifications did not reveal significant long-term safety issues. Observational data suggest at least as many benefits as risks. Post-marketing reports of musculoskeletal pain, osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been widely circulated in the lay press. Most focus on long-terms risks has been on osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures which occur in patients who have not received bisphosphonate therapy but may be more frequent (though still uncommon) in patients who have been on treatment for 5 years or longer. Lower-risk patients may be able to stop treatment after 3-5 years for a "drug holiday," which mitigates these long-term risks; for higher risk patients, therapy through 6-10 years appears to be advisable and offers more benefits than risks. PMID:25166043

  13. Who Recommends Long-Term Care Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Bershadsky, Boris; Bershadsky, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Making good consumer decisions requires having good information. This study compared long-term-care recommendations among various types of health professionals. Design and Methods: We gave randomly varied scenarios to a convenience national sample of 211 professionals from varying disciplines and work locations. For each scenario, we…

  14. Long-Term Care Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Peter

    2003-01-01

    This article provides a framework for understanding how long-term care (LTC) research contributes to policy, develops a typology of research contributions to policy with examples of each type, and suggests ways to ensure that contributions continue in the future. The article draws on in-depth interviews with LTC experts working at the interface…

  15. NATIONAL LONG TERM CARE SURVEY (NLTCS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Long Term Care Surveys (NLTCS) are surveys of the entire aged population with a particular emphasis on the functionally impaired. Longitudinal study of the health and well-being of elderly Americans. Information about the population of chronically disabled elderly person...

  16. Professionalism in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubinski, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists who serve elders in a variety of long-term care settings have a variety of professional skills and responsibilities. Fundamental to quality service is knowledge of aging and communication changes and disorders associated with this process, institutional alternatives, and the changing nature of today's elders in…

  17. Bounded rational expectations and the stability of interest rate policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Orlando; Mendes, Diana A.; Mendes, Vivaldo M.

    2008-06-01

    The New Keynesian model has recently been subject to two serious criticisms: the model cannot produce plausible inflation and output dynamics following a monetary shock, and the stability of its dynamics suffers from indeterminacy. The procedures that have been proposed to eliminate these two shortcomings fall into two categories: the introduction of some sort of backward price indexation into the standard model and/or other forms of stickiness (like sticky information); and the adoption of some form of policy rule that completely offsets the effects of forward looking dynamics in the optimization process. In this paper we do not eradicate forward looking behavior from the dynamics of the New Keynesian model, neither do we impose some form of backward price indexation. We assume that private economic agents have forward looking behavior and that they do try to optimize with all available information; the only novelty is that they are allowed to make small mistakes near the rational expectations equilibrium, in a fully deterministic setup. These “near rational” or “bounded rational” expectations show that the dynamics of the model with active interest rate rules is much richer than the simple problem of local indeterminacy as is usually found in the literature.

  18. 26 CFR 19.3-1 - Interest on certain deferred payments; interest rate for use in determining whether there is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Interest on certain deferred payments; interest rate for use in determining whether there is total unstated interest under a contract. 19.3-1 Section 19.3-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY REGULATIONS UNDER...

  19. 26 CFR 19.3-1 - Interest on certain deferred payments; interest rate for use in determining whether there is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Interest on certain deferred payments; interest rate for use in determining whether there is total unstated interest under a contract. 19.3-1 Section 19.3-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY REGULATIONS UNDER...

  20. Long term exposure of metals to hydrazine nitrate blend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Clifford M.; Blue, Gary D.

    1986-01-01

    A long term testing program is being conducted to determine the effects of materials in contact with a hydrazine nitrate blend for the purpose of designing chemical propulsion systems which can be used for current as well as future planetary spacecraft. Analysis of this data indicates that some aluminum alloys are acceptable for use with the particular blend of fuel used. Titanium alloy was identified as being acceptable for 10-year applications. Corrosion resistant steels, however, were found to have excessive corrosion rates and are therefore considered unacceptable for long-term use. There is also some evidence that the propellant decomposed at a rate far in excess of the acceptable rate of 0.1 percent per year when in contact with stainless steel.

  1. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSPC documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

  2. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in the performance assessment for the SDA. The corrosion on the carbon steel, beryllium, and aluminum were more evident with a clear difference in corrosion performance between the 4-ft and 10-ft levels. Notable surface corrosion products were evident as well as numerous pit initiation sites. Since the corrosion of the beryllium and aluminum is characterized by pitting, the geometrical character of the corrosion becomes more significant than the general corrosion rate. Both pitting factor and weight loss data should be used together. For six-year exposure, the maximum carbon steel corrosion rate was 0.3643 MPY while the maximum beryllium corrosion rate was 0.3282 MPY and the maximum aluminum corrosion rate was 0.0030 MPY.

  3. Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Long-Term Radiation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Smith, Leon E.; Carlson, Deborah K.; Anderson, Dale N.; Metz.er, S.

    2004-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is currently developing a prototype instrumented container system for the detection of illicit nuclear and radiological materials in maritime scenarios. Data collection during this long-term monitoring of radiation sensor signals will be inherently sequential in that wireless data transmission will occur at set intervals. Among the possible decision-making algorithms for sequentially-acquired radiation sensor data is the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT). The suitability of the SPRT for this long-term monitoring application is discussed, and the decision-making performance of the SPRT is compared to that of the commonly used single-interval test (SIT). The analysis spans a wide range of signal and background count rates so that results are applicable to sensors of all sizes operating in different ambient conditions, and a spectrum of alarm thresholds. It is demonstrated that for these simulated long-term monitoring scenarios, decisions to issue an alarm when the measured count rate equals the threshold count rate, are made 3-5 times faster using the SPRT than with the SIT. The ability of the SPRT to provide an ''all-clear'' indication when the measured count rate is consistent with the expected background count rate is contrasted to the inconclusive results of the SIT test under the same conditions. The need for SPRT truncation strategies for measured count rate regions where the SPRT decision times become excessive is discussed. Finally, it is shown that the truncated SPRT provides a greater probability of detection than the SIT in a case of ''early termination'' of both tests, a situation likely to occur in long-term monitoring applications.

  4. Development of a Self-Assessment Tool to Facilitate Decision-Making in Choosing a Long Term Care Administration Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johs-Artisensi, Jennifer L.; Olson, Douglas M.; Nahm, Abraham Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long term care administrators need a broad base of knowledge, skills, and interests to provide leadership and be successful in managing a fiscally responsible, quality long term care organization. Researchers developed a tool to help students assess whether a long term care administration major is a compatible fit. With input from professionals in

  5. Development of a Self-Assessment Tool to Facilitate Decision-Making in Choosing a Long Term Care Administration Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johs-Artisensi, Jennifer L.; Olson, Douglas M.; Nahm, Abraham Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long term care administrators need a broad base of knowledge, skills, and interests to provide leadership and be successful in managing a fiscally responsible, quality long term care organization. Researchers developed a tool to help students assess whether a long term care administration major is a compatible fit. With input from professionals in…

  6. Is Current Hydrogeologic Research Addressing Long-TermPredictions?

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-09-10

    Hydrogeology is a field closely related to the needs of society. Many problems of current national and local interest require predictions of hydrogeological system behavior, and, in a number of important cases, the period of prediction is tens to hundreds of thousands of years. It is argued that the demand for such long-term hydrogeological predictions casts a new light on the future needs of hydrogeological research. Key scientific issues are no longer concerned only with simple processes or narrowly focused modeling or testing methods, but also with assessment of prediction uncertainties and confidence, couplings among multiple physico-chemical processes occurring simultaneously at a site, and the interplay between site characterization and predictive modeling. These considerations also have significant implications for hydrogeological education. With this view, it is asserted that hydrogeological directions and education need to be reexamined and possibly refocused to address specific needs for long-term predictions.

  7. TANK S-109 LONG TERM HUMAN HEALTH RISK CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    CARLSON, S.E.

    2003-12-16

    This document provides Tank S-109 long-term human risks calculations, in support of Functions and Requirements document (RPP-18812) as required by milestone M-45-00 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. This calculation was performed to provide a screening-level assessment of long-term human health risk associated with potential leakage that could occur during waste retrieval operations for tank S-109 This calculation supports the development of tank S-109 waste retrieval functions and requirements as documented in RPP-18812. Risks associated with current waste and potential residual waste in tank S-109, as well as risk associated with other S farm tanks, were not of interest and were not evaluated.

  8. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart A of... - Notice of Change in Interest Rate

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Notice of Change in Interest Rate B Exhibit B to... Interest Rate (insert date) Notice of Change in Interest Rate (insert borrower's address) Re: ? ? Fund code... ___, for the original amount of ___ dollars ($___) provides for a change in interest rate for a...

  9. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart A of... - Notice of Change in Interest Rate

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Notice of Change in Interest Rate B Exhibit B to... Interest Rate (insert date) Notice of Change in Interest Rate (insert borrower's address) Re: ? ? Fund code... ___, for the original amount of ___ dollars ($___) provides for a change in interest rate for a...

  10. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart A of... - Notice of Change in Interest Rate

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notice of Change in Interest Rate B Exhibit B to... Interest Rate (insert date) Notice of Change in Interest Rate (insert borrower's address) Re: ? ? Fund code... ___, for the original amount of ___ dollars ($___) provides for a change in interest rate for a...

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart A of... - Notice of Change in Interest Rate

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Notice of Change in Interest Rate B Exhibit B to... Interest Rate (insert date) Notice of Change in Interest Rate (insert borrower's address) Re: ? ? Fund code... ___, for the original amount of ___ dollars ($___) provides for a change in interest rate for a...

  12. Prokaryotic community structure and respiration during long-term incubations

    PubMed Central

    Baltar, Federico; Lindh, Markus V; Parparov, Arkadi; Berman, Tom; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of incubation assays for studies in microbial ecology that frequently require long confinement times, few reports are available in which changes in the assemblage structure of aquatic prokaryotes were monitored during long-term incubations. We measured rates of dissolved organic carbon degradation and microbial respiration by consumption of dissolved oxygen (DO) in four experiments with Lake Kinneret near-surface water and, concomitantly, we analyzed the variability in prokaryotic community structure during long-term dark bottle incubations. During the first 24 h, there were only minor changes in bacterial community composition. Thereafter there were marked changes in the prokaryotic community structure during the incubations. In contrast, oxygen consumption rates (a proxy for both respiration and dissolved organic carbon degradation rates) remained stable for up to 1023 days. This study is one of the first to examine closely the phylo-genetic changes that occur in the microbial community of untreated freshwater during long-term (days) incubations in dark, sealed containers. Novel information on the diversity of the main bacterial phylotypes that may be involved in dissolved organic matter degradation in lake Kinneret is also provided. Our results suggest that, under certain ecological settings, constant community metabolic rates can be maintained as a result of shifts in community composition. PMID:22950026

  13. [Bariatric surgery - significance, risks, long term consequences].

    PubMed

    Schubert, T; Jahn, U; Eben, E; Deuber, H J

    2013-03-21

    In recent years the number of bariatric surgery has markedly increased in industrial nations. Surgery provides a more rapid decrease of body weight than conservative approach. However a long term conservative follow up therapy is mandatory to stabilize reduced weight. Due to increasing knowledge from long term follow up of surgically treated obese patients there is a growing body of evidence that frequently there is necessity of reoperations and of substitution both of trace elementsand of minerals or vitamins due to their hampered enteral resorption. Additionally therapy of surgery induced endocrine alterations not seldom is necessary.These insights are of outstanding importance because meanwhile an enlargement of the indications for bariatric surgery as a therapeutic option for metabolic disorders is being discussed. This review refers to the recent internationally published papers concerning consequences of bariatric surgery. PMID:23678666

  14. Long term mortality in burned children

    PubMed Central

    Stamboulian, Daniel; Lede, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Studies about risk factors for mortality in burn children are scarce and are even less in the follow up of this population across time. Usually, after complete event attendance, children are not follow-up as risk patients, burn injury affects all facets of life. Integration of professionals from different disciplines has enabled burn centers to develop collaborative methods of assessing the quality of care delivered to patients with burns. In this editorial we comment the paper of Duke et al. The authors highlight the importance of maintaining a long-term monitoring of children who suffered burns. The importance of this original study is to promote the reconsideration of clinical guides of long-term follow-up of burn patients. PMID:26835375

  15. Case presentation: long-term treatment.

    PubMed

    Glucksman, Myron L

    2013-01-01

    The long-term (14 years) psychodynamic psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy of a depressed, suicidal, self-mutilating female patient is described. Her diagnoses included Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, and Recurrent Major Depression. Treatment was punctuated with repeated hospitalizations for self-mutilation (cutting) and suicidal ideation. A major determinant for her psychopathology was sexual abuse by her father from ages 6 to 14. This resulted in feelings of guilt and rage that she repressed and acted out through self-mutilating and suicidal behavior. A prolonged negative transference gradually became ambivalent, then positive. This was associated with her internalization of the healing qualities of the therapeutic relationship. She also gained insight into the reasons for her need to punish herself. Her initial self-representation as unworthy and bad was transformed into perceiving herself as a worthwhile, loving person. This case illustrates the role of long-term treatment for a complex, life-threatening, psychiatric disorder. PMID:24001161

  16. Titanium for long-term tritium storage

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1994-12-01

    Due to the reduction of nuclear weapon stockpile, there will be an excess of tritium returned from the field. The excess tritium needs to be stored for future use, which might be several years away. A safe and cost effective means for long term storage of tritium is needed. Storing tritium in a solid metal tritide is preferred to storing tritium as a gas, because a metal tritide can store tritium in a compact form and the stored tritium will not be released until heat is applied to increase its temperature to several hundred degrees centigrade. Storing tritium as a tritide is safer and more cost effective than as a gas. Several candidate metal hydride materials have been evaluated for long term tritium storage. They include uranium, La-Ni-Al alloys, zirconium and titanium. The criteria used include material cost, radioactivity, stability to air, storage capacity, storage pressure, loading and unloading conditions, and helium retention. Titanium has the best combination of properties and is recommended for long term tritium storage.

  17. Long-term predictive capability of erosion models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veerabhadra, P.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    A brief overview of long-term cavitation and liquid impingement erosion and modeling methods proposed by different investigators, including the curve-fit approach is presented. A table was prepared to highlight the number of variables necessary for each model in order to compute the erosion-versus-time curves. A power law relation based on the average erosion rate is suggested which may solve several modeling problems.

  18. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Long-Term Cryopreserved Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kar Wey; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan; Choi, Jane Ru; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Chua, Kien Hui; Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman Wan

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation represents an effective technique to maintain the functional properties of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and allows pooling of cells via long-term storage for clinical applications, e.g., cell-based therapies. It is crucial to reduce freezing injury during the cryopreservation process by loading the ASCs with the optimum concentration of suitable cryoprotective agents (CPAs). In this study, human ASCs were preserved for 3 months in different combinations of CPAs, including 1) 0.25 M trehalose; 2) 5% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO); 3) 10% DMSO; 4) 5% DMSO + 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS); 5) 10% DMSO + 20% FBS; 6) 10% DMSO + 90% FBS. Interestingly, even with a reduction of DMSO to 5% and without FBS, cryopreserved ASCs maintained high cell viability comparable with standard cryomedium (10% DMSO + 90% FBS), with normal cell phenotype and proliferation rate. Cryopreserved ASCs also maintained their differentiation capability (e.g., to adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes) and showed an enhanced expression level of stemness markers (e.g., NANOG, OCT-4, SOX-2 and REX-1). Our findings suggest that 5% DMSO without FBS may be an ideal CPA for an efficient long-term cryopreservation of human ASCs. These results aid in establishing standardized xeno-free long-term cryopreservation of human ASCs for clinical applications. PMID:25872464

  19. Transcription Factors in Long-Term Memory and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Alberini, Cristina M.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription is a molecular requisite for long-term synaptic plasticity and long-term memory formation. Thus, in the last several years, one main interest of molecular neuroscience has been the identification of families of transcription factors that are involved in both of these processes. Transcription is a highly regulated process that involves the combined interaction and function of chromatin and many other proteins, some of which are essential for the basal process of transcription, while others control the selective activation or repression of specific genes. These regulated interactions ultimately allow a sophisticated response to multiple environmental conditions, as well as control of spatial and temporal differences in gene expression. Evidence based on correlative changes in expression, genetic mutations, and targeted molecular inhibition of gene expression have shed light on the function of transcription in both synaptic plasticity and memory formation. This review provides a brief overview of experimental work showing that several families of transcription factors, including CREB, C/EBP, Egr, AP-1, and Rel have essential functions in both processes. The results of this work suggest that patterns of transcription regulation represent the molecular signatures of long-term synaptic changes and memory formation. PMID:19126756

  20. 78 FR 20349 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Decision 85-93, published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on... personnel. DATES: Effective Date: April 1, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman,...

  1. 76 FR 64964 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable overpayments or...: October 1, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue Division, Collection and...

  2. 76 FR 20697 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ..., published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable.... DATES: Effective Date: April 1, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue...

  3. 77 FR 18256 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ..., published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable.... DATES: Effective Date: April 1, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue...

  4. 78 FR 37839 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ..., published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable... personnel. DATES: Effective Date: July 1, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue...

  5. 76 FR 41283 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ..., published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable.... DATES: Effective Date: July 1, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue...

  6. 77 FR 59411 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ..., published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable.... DATES: Effective Date: October 1, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue...

  7. 78 FR 1222 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Decision 85-93, published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on... personnel. DATES: Effective Date: January 1, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman,...

  8. 77 FR 2308 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... Decision 85-93, published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on... personnel. DATES: Effective Date: January 1, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman,...

  9. 77 FR 38076 - Quarterly IRS Interest Rates Used in Calculating Interest on Overdue Accounts and Refunds on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ..., published in the Federal Register on May 29, 1985 (50 FR 21832), the interest rate paid on applicable.... DATES: Effective Date: July 1, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ron Wyman, Revenue...

  10. The Long-Term Public Health Benefits of Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Binns, Colin; Lee, MiKyung; Low, Wah Yun

    2016-01-01

    Breastfeeding has many health benefits, both in the short term and the longer term, to infants and their mothers. There is an increasing number of studies that report on associations between breastfeeding and long-term protection against chronic disease. Recent research evidence is reviewed in this study, building on previous authoritative reviews. The recent World Health Organization reviews of the short- and long-term benefits of breastfeeding concluded that there was strong evidence for many public health benefits of breastfeeding. Cognitive development is improved by breastfeeding, and infants who are breastfed and mothers who breastfeed have lower rates of obesity. Other chronic diseases that are reduced by breastfeeding include diabetes (both type 1 and type 2), obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, and some types of cancer. PMID:26792873

  11. 26 CFR 19.3-1 - Interest on certain deferred payments; interest rate for use in determining whether there is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... rate for use in determining whether there is total unstated interest under a contract. 19.3-1 Section 19.3-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY REGULATIONS UNDER THE REVENUE ACT OF 1964 19.3-1 Interest on certain...

  12. 26 CFR 19.3-1 - Interest on certain deferred payments; interest rate for use in determining whether there is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... rate for use in determining whether there is total unstated interest under a contract. 19.3-1 Section 19.3-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY REGULATIONS UNDER THE REVENUE ACT OF 1964 19.3-1 Interest on certain...

  13. 26 CFR 19.3-1 - Interest on certain deferred payments; interest rate for use in determining whether there is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... rate for use in determining whether there is total unstated interest under a contract. 19.3-1 Section 19.3-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY REGULATIONS UNDER THE REVENUE ACT OF 1964 19.3-1 Interest on certain...

  14. 31 CFR 535.440 - Commercially reasonable interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... bank and Iran. However, where a deposit has in fact operated as a demand account under Treasury license... bearing account. Furthermore, in the event that the Iran-U.S Claims Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) determines that interest additional to that agreed upon between the bank and Iran, or compensation or damages...

  15. 31 CFR 535.440 - Commercially reasonable interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bank and Iran. However, where a deposit has in fact operated as a demand account under Treasury license... bearing account. Furthermore, in the event that the Iran-U.S Claims Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) determines that interest additional to that agreed upon between the bank and Iran, or compensation or damages...

  16. 31 CFR 535.440 - Commercially reasonable interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bank and Iran. However, where a deposit has in fact operated as a demand account under Treasury license... bearing account. Furthermore, in the event that the Iran-U.S Claims Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) determines that interest additional to that agreed upon between the bank and Iran, or compensation or damages...

  17. 31 CFR 535.440 - Commercially reasonable interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... bank and Iran. However, where a deposit has in fact operated as a demand account under Treasury license... bearing account. Furthermore, in the event that the Iran-U.S Claims Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) determines that interest additional to that agreed upon between the bank and Iran, or compensation or damages...

  18. 31 CFR 535.440 - Commercially reasonable interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... bank and Iran. However, where a deposit has in fact operated as a demand account under Treasury license... bearing account. Furthermore, in the event that the Iran-U.S Claims Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) determines that interest additional to that agreed upon between the bank and Iran, or compensation or damages...

  19. Long-term EARLINET dust observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Amiridis, Vassilis; Amodeo, Aldo; Binietoglou, Ioannis; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Schwarz, Anja; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Papayannis, Alexandros; Sicard, Michael; Comeron, Adolfo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Systematic observations of Saharan dust events over Europe are performed from May 2000 by EARLINET, the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork. EARLINET is a coordinated network of stations that make use of advanced lidar methods for the vertical profiling of aerosols. The backbone of EARLINET network is a common schedule for performing the measurements and the quality assurance of instruments/data. Particular attention is paid to monitoring the Saharan dust intrusions over the European continent. The geographical distribution of the EARLINET stations is particularly appealing for the dust observation, with stations located all around the Mediterranean and in the center of the Mediterranean (Italian stations) where dust intrusions are frequent, and with several stations in the central Europe where dust penetrates occasionally. All aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles related to observations collected during these alerts are grouped in the devoted "Saharan dust" category of the EARLINET database. This category consists of about 4700 files (as of December 2013). Case studies involving several stations around Europe selected from this long-term database have been provided the opportunity to investigate dust modification processes during transport over the continent. More important, the long term EARLINET dust monitoring allows the investigation of the horizontal and vertical extent of dust outbreaks over Europe and the climatological analysis of dust optical intensive and extensive properties at continental scale. This long-term database is also a unique tool for a systematic comparison with dust model outputs and satellite-derived dust products. Because of the relevance for both dust modeling and satellite retrievals improvement, results about desert dust layers extensive properties as a function of season and source regions are investigated and will be presented at the conference. First comparisons with models outputs and CALIPSO dust products will be presented. ACKNOWLEDGMENTs The financial support by the European Community through the ACTRIS Research Infrastructure Action under the 7th Framework Programme under ACTRIS Grant Agreement n° 262254 is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Long-term mortality after pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Eric M; Metersky, Mark L

    2012-06-01

    Although pneumonia is currently considered the eighth leading cause of death in the United States this estimate includes only short-term mortality. Evidence suggests that pneumonia may have significant longer-term effects and that hospitalization for pneumonia is associated with higher long-term mortality than for many other major medical conditions. Reasons for this increased mortality appear to be due to several factors, including cardiovascular disease, neoplasms, and alterations in immune function. Clinicians need to be aware that even for those patients who survive the initial episode of pneumonia there will still be an impact upon their potential survival for the coming years. PMID:22718218

  1. Quantifying long-term scientific impact.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dashun; Song, Chaoming; Barabsi, Albert-Lszl

    2013-10-01

    The lack of predictability of citation-based measures frequently used to gauge impact, from impact factors to short-term citations, raises a fundamental question: Is there long-term predictability in citation patterns? Here, we derive a mechanistic model for the citation dynamics of individual papers, allowing us to collapse the citation histories of papers from different journals and disciplines into a single curve, indicating that all papers tend to follow the same universal temporal pattern. The observed patterns not only help us uncover basic mechanisms that govern scientific impact but also offer reliable measures of influence that may have potential policy implications. PMID:24092745

  2. Long term cryogenic storage system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonemetz, R. E.; Pratt, J. H.; Winstead, T. W.

    1971-01-01

    Investigations have revealed significant increases in performance when a reliquefier and solar shield in conjunction with a zero-gravity vapor vent system are utilized. Application of a reliquefier and solar shield in long term deep space missions may effect a 60% reduction in propellant loss, compared to that associated with the vapor vent system only. Significant improvements in storage system performance are possible for low earth orbit applicatons; for the typical system that was evaluated, system performance gains were realized for mission durations exceeding 7 days. Spherical solar shields are generally not competitive for low earth orbit applications.

  3. Long-Term Wind Power Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

  4. [Malaria prevention for long-term travelers].

    PubMed

    Rossi, I; Genton, B

    2009-05-01

    The risk of malaria increases with the duration of stay. Long-term travelers need to know the risk of malaria and the effective measures to reduce this risk: personal protective measures against mosquito bites and chemoprophylaxis. The use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and window screens should be emphasized. When chemoprophylaxis is indicated it should be prescribed at least for the first 3 to 6 months. Then, alternative strategies can be discussed with the traveler: continuous chemoprophylaxis, seasonal chemoprophylaxis and/or standby emergency treatment. PMID:19530531

  5. Performance considerations in long-term spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    Maintenance of skilled performance during extended space flight is of critical importance to both the health and safety of crew members and to the overall success of mission goals. An examination of long term effects and performance requirements is therefore a factor of immense importance to the planning of future missions. Factors that were investigated include: definition of performance categories to be investigated; methods for assessing and predicting performance levels; in-flight factors which can affect performance; and factors pertinent to the maintenance of skilled performance.

  6. Human Behaviour in Long-Term Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session WP1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Psychological Support for International Space Station Mission; Psycho-social Training for Man in Space; Study of the Physiological Adaptation of the Crew During A 135-Day Space Simulation; Interpersonal Relationships in Space Simulation, The Long-Term Bed Rest in Head-Down Tilt Position; Psychological Adaptation in Groups of Varying Sizes and Environments; Deviance Among Expeditioners, Defining the Off-Nominal Act in Space and Polar Field Analogs; Getting Effective Sleep in the Space-Station Environment; Human Sleep and Circadian Rhythms are Altered During Spaceflight; and Methodological Approach to Study of Cosmonauts Errors and Its Instrumental Support.

  7. Shift work and long-term injury among police officers

    PubMed Central

    Violanti, John M; Fekedulegn, Desta; Andrew, Michael E; Charles, Luenda E; Hartley, Tara A; Vila, Bryan; Burchfiel, Cecil M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our previous work has suggested that the incidence of any occurrence of injury leave among police officers is higher on night shifts. In this study, we extended our inquiry to determine whether the incidence of long-term injury leave varies across shifts. Methods Police officers (N=419) from an urban department were included in the analysis. Daily payroll work history data from 19942010 was collected. Injury leave duration was examined ranging from ?1?90 days. Poisson regression models were used to compute incidence rates (IR) and incidence rate ratios (IRR) of long-term injury. Results Cumulative incidence of injury for different durations of leave defined as ?1, ?5, ?10, ?15, ?30, and ?90 days were 61.3%, 45.4%, 39.9%, 33.9%, 26.5%, and 9.6% respectively. Age-and gender adjusted IRR of long-term injury (?90 days) for night versus day shifts was IRR 3.12, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.357.21 and IRR 2.21, 95% CI 1.044.68, for night versus afternoon shifts. Among all durations examined, the largest IRR was for injury ?90 days, night versus day shifts (IRR 3.12, 95% CI 1.357.21). Conclusions Night shift work was significantly associated with long-term injury among police officers after adjustment for age and gender. Although type of injury was not available, it is possible that variation in injury type across shifts might account for some of this association. PMID:23503596

  8. 17 CFR 256.224 - Other long-term debt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other long-term debt. 256.224... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 6. Long-Term Debt § 256.224 Other long-term debt. This account shall include all long-term debt to nonassociates and not subject to current settlement. Note: Subaccounts shall be...

  9. Clinically meaningful parameters of progression and long-term outcome of Parkinson disease: An international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Andreas; Brighina, Laura; Markopoulou, Katerina; Aasly, Jan; Chung, Sun Ju; Frigerio, Roberta; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios; Kõks, Sulev; Krüger, Rejko; Siuda, Joanna; Wider, Christian; Zesiewicz, Theresa A; Maraganore, Demetrius M

    2015-07-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is associated with a clinical course of variable duration, severity, and a combination of motor and non-motor features. Recent PD research has focused primarily on etiology rather than clinical progression and long-term outcomes. For the PD patient, caregivers, and clinicians, information on expected clinical progression and long-term outcomes is of great importance. Today, it remains largely unknown what factors influence long-term clinical progression and outcomes in PD; recent data indicate that the factors that increase the risk to develop PD differ, at least partly, from those that accelerate clinical progression and lead to worse outcomes. Prospective studies will be required to identify factors that influence progression and outcome. We suggest that data for such studies is collected during routine office visits in order to guarantee high external validity of such research. We report here the results of a consensus meeting of international movement disorder experts from the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease (GEO-PD) consortium, who convened to define which long-term outcomes are of interest to patients, caregivers and clinicians, and what is presently known about environmental or genetic factors influencing clinical progression or long-term outcomes in PD. We propose a panel of rating scales that collects a significant amount of phenotypic information, can be performed in the routine office visit and allows international standardization. Research into the progression and long-term outcomes of PD aims at providing individual prognostic information early, adapting treatment choices, and taking specific measures to provide care optimized to the individual patient's needs. PMID:25952959

  10. 7 CFR 771.9 - Interest rates, terms, security requirements, and repayment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Interest rates, terms, security requirements, and repayment. (a) Interest rate. The interest rate will be fixed for the term of the loan. The rate will be established by FSA, based upon the cost of Government...) Assignments of assessments, taxes, levies, or other sources of revenue as authorized by State law;...

  11. 7 CFR 771.9 - Interest rates, terms, security requirements, and repayment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Interest rates, terms, security requirements, and repayment. (a) Interest rate. The interest rate will be fixed for the term of the loan. The rate will be established by FSA, based upon the cost of Government...) Assignments of assessments, taxes, levies, or other sources of revenue as authorized by State law;...

  12. 7 CFR 771.9 - Interest rates, terms, security requirements, and repayment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Interest rates, terms, security requirements, and repayment. (a) Interest rate. The interest rate will be fixed for the term of the loan. The rate will be established by FSA, based upon the cost of Government...) Assignments of assessments, taxes, levies, or other sources of revenue as authorized by State law;...

  13. 7 CFR 771.9 - Interest rates, terms, security requirements, and repayment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Interest rates, terms, security requirements, and repayment. (a) Interest rate. The interest rate will be fixed for the term of the loan. The rate will be established by FSA, based upon the cost of Government...) Assignments of assessments, taxes, levies, or other sources of revenue as authorized by State law;...

  14. Integration of Research with Long-Term Monitoring: Breeding Wood Ducks on the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kennamer, R.A.; Hepp, G.R.

    2000-10-01

    In 1981, long-term monitoring of breeding wood ducks was initiated. Females were marked and recaptured for 15 years and annual population parameters were developed. Precise parameter estimates were possible due to high capture rates. The results contribute to the long-term understanding of wood duck populations.

  15. Long-Term Refugee Health: Health Behaviors and Outcomes of Cambodian Refugee and Immigrant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson-Peterman, Jerusha L.; Toof, Robin; Liang, Sidney L.; Grigg-Saito, Dorcas C.

    2015-01-01

    Refugees in the United States have high rates of chronic disease. Both long-term effects of the refugee experience and adjustment to the U.S. health environment may contribute. While there is significant research on health outcomes of newly resettled refugees and long-term mental health experiences of established refugees, there is currently…

  16. Long-Term Refugee Health: Health Behaviors and Outcomes of Cambodian Refugee and Immigrant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson-Peterman, Jerusha L.; Toof, Robin; Liang, Sidney L.; Grigg-Saito, Dorcas C.

    2015-01-01

    Refugees in the United States have high rates of chronic disease. Both long-term effects of the refugee experience and adjustment to the U.S. health environment may contribute. While there is significant research on health outcomes of newly resettled refugees and long-term mental health experiences of established refugees, there is currently

  17. Soil respiration is not limited by reductions in microbial biomass during long-term soil incubations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declining rates of soil respiration are reliably observed during long-term laboratory incubations, but the cause is uncertain. We explored different controls on soil respiration during long-term soil incubations. Following a 707 day incubation (30 C) of soils from cultivated and forested plots at Ke...

  18. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts 1. The minimum capital components for interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts are computed on the basis of the credit...

  19. Toward a comprehensive long term nicotine policy.

    PubMed

    Gray, N; Henningfield, J E; Benowitz, N L; Connolly, G N; Dresler, C; Fagerstrom, K; Jarvis, M J; Boyle, P

    2005-06-01

    Global tobacco deaths are high and rising. Tobacco use is primarily driven by nicotine addiction. Overall tobacco control policy is relatively well agreed upon but a long term nicotine policy has been less well considered and requires further debate. Reaching consensus is important because a nicotine policy is integral to the target of reducing tobacco caused disease, and the contentious issues need to be resolved before the necessary political changes can be sought. A long term and comprehensive nicotine policy is proposed here. It envisages both reducing the attractiveness and addictiveness of existing tobacco based nicotine delivery systems as well as providing alternative sources of acceptable clean nicotine as competition for tobacco. Clean nicotine is defined as nicotine free enough of tobacco toxicants to pass regulatory approval. A three phase policy is proposed. The initial phase requires regulatory capture of cigarette and smoke constituents liberalising the market for clean nicotine; regulating all nicotine sources from the same agency; and research into nicotine absorption and the role of tobacco additives in this process. The second phase anticipates clean nicotine overtaking tobacco as the primary source of the drug (facilitated by use of regulatory and taxation measures); simplification of tobacco products by limitation of additives which make tobacco attractive and easier to smoke (but tobacco would still be able to provide a satisfying dose of nicotine). The third phase includes a progressive reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes, with clean nicotine freely available to take the place of tobacco as society's main nicotine source. PMID:15923465

  20. Clinical review: Long-term noninvasive ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Dominique; Argaud, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Noninvasive positive ventilation has undergone a remarkable evolution over the past decades and is assuming an important role in the management of both acute and chronic respiratory failure. Long-term ventilatory support should be considered a standard of care to treat selected patients following an intensive care unit (ICU) stay. In this setting, appropriate use of noninvasive ventilation can be expected to improve patient outcomes, reduce ICU admission, enhance patient comfort, and increase the efficiency of health care resource utilization. Current literature indicates that noninvasive ventilation improves and stabilizes the clinical course of many patients with chronic ventilatory failure. Noninvasive ventilation also permits long-term mechanical ventilation to be an acceptable option for patients who otherwise would not have been treated if tracheostomy were the only alternative. Nevertheless, these results appear to be better in patients with neuromuscular/-parietal disorders than in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This clinical review will address the use of noninvasive ventilation (not including continuous positive airway pressure) mainly in diseases responsible for chronic hypoventilation (that is, restrictive disorders, including neuromuscular disease and lung disease) and incidentally in others such as obstructive sleep apnea or problems of central drive. PMID:17419882

  1. Postpartum evaluation and long term implications.

    PubMed

    Firoz, Tabassum; Melnik, Tanya

    2011-08-01

    Hypertension, proteinuria and biochemical changes caused by pre-eclampsia may persist for several weeks and even months postpartum. Hypertension and pre-eclampsia may even develop for the first time postpartum. Care in the six weeks postpartum should include management of hypertension and screening for secondary causes of hypertension including renal disease if abnormalities persist beyond six weeks. Optimal postpartum monitoring for patients with preeclampsia has not been determined, and care needs to be individualized. The postpartum period also provides a window of opportunity for planning for the next pregnancy in addition to discussing long term implications of pre-eclampsia. Increased risk for the development of premature cardiovascular disease is the most significant long term implication of pre-eclampsia. Pre-eclampsia and cardiovascular disease share a common disease pathophysiology. Women who develop pre-eclampsia have pre-existing metabolic abnormalities or may develop them later in life. Women with early onset pre-eclampsia are at the highest risk of ischemic heart disease. Women with a history of pre-eclampsia should adopt a heart healthy lifestyle and should be screened and treated for traditional cardiovascular risk factors according to locally accepted guidelines. PMID:21536498

  2. Long-Term Care Policy: Singapore's Experience.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chee Wei Winston; Phua, Kai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Singapore, like many developed countries, is facing the challenge of a rapidly aging population and the increasing need to provide long-term care (LTC) services for elderly in the community. The Singapore government's philosophy on care for the elderly is that the family should be the first line of support, and it has relied on voluntary welfare organizations (VWOs) or charities for the bulk of LTC service provision. For LTC financing, it has emphasized the principles of co-payment and targeting of state support to the low-income population through means-tested government subsidies. It has also instituted ElderShield, a national severe disability insurance scheme. This paper discusses some of the challenges facing LTC policy in Singapore, particularly the presence of perverse financial incentives for hospitalization, the pitfalls of over-reliance on VWOs, and the challenges facing informal family caregivers. It discusses the role of private LTC insurance in LTC financing, bearing in mind demand- and supply-side failures that have plagued the private LTC insurance market. It suggests the need for more standardized needs assessment and portable LTC benefits, with reference to the Japanese Long-Term Care Insurance program, and also discusses the need to provide more support to informal family caregivers. PMID:26808468

  3. Sleep facilitates long-term face adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ditye, Thomas; Javadi, Amir Homayoun; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Walsh, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is an automatic neural mechanism supporting the optimization of visual processing on the basis of previous experiences. While the short-term effects of adaptation on behaviour and physiology have been studied extensively, perceptual long-term changes associated with adaptation are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the integration of adaptation-dependent long-term shifts in neural function is facilitated by sleep. Perceptual shifts induced by adaptation to a distorted image of a famous person were larger in a group of participants who had slept (experiment 1) or merely napped for 90 min (experiment 2) during the interval between adaptation and test compared with controls who stayed awake. Participants' individual rapid eye movement sleep duration predicted the size of post-sleep behavioural adaptation effects. Our data suggest that sleep prevented decay of adaptation in a way that is qualitatively different from the effects of reduced visual interference known as ‘storage’. In the light of the well-established link between sleep and memory consolidation, our findings link the perceptual mechanisms of sensory adaptation—which are usually not considered to play a relevant role in mnemonic processes—with learning and memory, and at the same time reveal a new function of sleep in cognition. PMID:23986109

  4. Increased Risk of Long-Term Sickness Absence, Lower Rate of Return to Work, and Higher Risk of Unemployment and Disability Pensioning for Thyroid Patients: A Danish Register-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Watt, T.; Pedersen, J.; Bonnema, S. J.; Hegedüs, L.; Rasmussen, A. K.; Feldt-Rasmussen, U.; Bjorner, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Little is known about how thyroid diseases affect work ability. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk of work disability for patients with thyroid disease compared with the general population. Design, Setting, and Participants: In a longitudinal register study, outpatients (n = 862) with nontoxic goiter, hyperthyroidism, Graves' orbitopathy (GO), autoimmune hypothyroidism, or other thyroid diseases and their matched controls (n = 7043) were observed in the years 1994–2011 in Danish national registers of social benefits, health, and work characteristics. Cox regression analyses estimated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for the first year after diagnosis and subsequent years. Main Outcome Measures: Transitions between work, long-term sickness absence, unemployment, and disability pension were measured. Results: Patients differed significantly from the general population with regard to sickness absence, disability pension, return from sickness absence, and unemployment. In the first year after diagnosis, higher risks of sickness absence was seen for GO (HR 6.94) and other hyperthyroid patients (HR 2.08), who also had lower probability of returning from sickness absence (HR 0.62) and higher risk of disability pension (HR 4.15). Patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism showed a lower probability of returning from sickness absence (HR 0.62). In subsequent years, GO patients had significantly higher risk of sickness absence (HR 2.08), lower probability of return from sickness absence (HR 0.51), and unemployment (HR 0.52) and a higher risk of disability pension (HR 4.40). Hyperthyroid patients also had difficulties returning from sickness absence (HR 0.71). Conclusions: Thyroid patients' risk of work disability is most pronounced in the first year after diagnosis and attenuates in subsequent years. GO patients have the highest risk of work disability. PMID:24937367

  5. Durability of devices: long-term results and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Mani; Mack, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Over the last decade, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged to become the treatment of choice for inoperable patients and the preferred alternative for high-risk patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Questions about the long-term durability of TAVI valves were raised early in the history of the procedure. Although there has not yet been a significant signal of early structural valve deterioration (SVD), these concerns remain important today, especially if TAVI is to be considered for use in lower-risk and younger patients with longer life expectancy. Durability expectations for TAVI to some degree parallel those of surgical bioprostheses, but the different tissue, mounting design and crimping of TAVI devices might adversely influence long-term results. The experience with surgical bioprostheses has shown that deterioration of these valves is a slow and gradual process. Thus, despite promising midterm results of many surgical bioprostheses at five to seven years, design faults with higher failure rates have become manifest eight to 10 years after implantation. Similarly, although the initial five-year outcomes of TAVI are promising, these results cannot yet be extrapolated to predict long-term durability with any firm degree of assuredness, especially in younger patient populations. Thus, a high degree of caution is necessary when considering TAVI in intermediate-risk and younger patients until more evidence of durability equivalent to that of surgical bioprostheses is forthcoming. PMID:26384176

  6. Spent filter packaging for long term storage and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Duberville, T.M.; Miller, C.

    2007-07-01

    This paper will discuss filter packaging experience using spent filter transfer casks, a filter shear and the NUKEM macro-encapsulation process. Marco-encapsulation of spent filters in cement has provided sufficient shielding to enable filter containers to be shipped in less expensive IP-2 casks. The lower dose rate and higher density also off-sets disposal rates at Barnwell based on mass. No re-dewatering of encapsulated filter containers is required after a period of long term storage and encapsulation eliminates the possibility of gas generation from filters during storage. Encapsulation can be performed on filters loaded into poly HICs or carbon steel liners. (authors)

  7. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat Disposal Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSP (based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program), documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

  8. Long-term care reimbursement issues.

    PubMed

    Stone, D; Reublinger, V

    1995-08-01

    There have been dramatic changes in long-term care funding recently. Considered only an insignificant part of the continuum of care system just a few years ago, this level of care is now looked to as a wellspring for desperately needed health care cost reductions. Government, insurance companies, intermediaries, large providers, and consumer and physician groups are actively focused on the development and expansion of alternative care provision sites; sub-acute care; hospice; home health care; social, medical, and rehabilitative day care; assisted living and adult congregate care facilities; risk or capitation contracting; expanded health maintenance organizations; alternative care providers; and alternative care approaches. In addition, the improvement in reimbursement is reviewed and is one aspect in ensuring that the economics are right for those needed services to continue to be provided. PMID:7585394

  9. [Femoral angioplasty. Long-term results].

    PubMed

    Foucart, H; Carlier, C; Baudrillard, J C; Joffre, F; Ccile, J P

    1990-01-01

    A study on the long-term efficacy of femoral-popliteal angioplasty was carried out on 185 angioplasty cases over a 5 year follow-up period. A classification of data according to the type of lesion treated, revealed that results were favorable in case of stenosis (87%), short obstruction (70%) and long obstruction (35%). A special study of the outcome of treatments for stage IV arteritis was carried out. After comparing results with those obtained by other teams, the authors list the complications encountered, hematomas, and thromboses, and show their current tendency for regression. Lastly, the authors stress the advantages of angioscopy, which permits to identify the nature of the treated lesions and to predict possible complications, which are usually underrated by angiography. PMID:2145379

  10. Advanced long term cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Norman S.

    1987-01-01

    Long term, cryogenic fluid storage facilities will be required to support future space programs such as the space-based Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), Telescopes, and Laser Systems. An orbital liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen storage system with an initial capacity of approximately 200,000 lb will be required. The storage facility tank design must have the capability of fluid acquisition in microgravity and limit cryogen boiloff due to environmental heating. Cryogenic boiloff management features, minimizing Earth-to-orbit transportation costs, will include advanced thick multilayer insulation/integrated vapor cooled shield concepts, low conductance support structures, and refrigeration/reliquefaction systems. Contracted study efforts are under way to develop storage system designs, technology plans, test article hardware designs, and develop plans for ground/flight testing.

  11. Long term performance of radon mitigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-03-01

    Researchers installed radon mitigation systems in 12 houses in Spokane, Washington and Coeur d'Alene, Idaho during the heating season 1985--1986 and continued to monitor indoor radon quarterly and annually for ten years. The mitigation systems included active sub-slab ventilation, basement over-pressurization, and crawlspace isolation and ventilation. The occupants reported various operational problems with these early mitigation systems. The long-term radon measurements were essential to track the effectiveness of the mitigation systems over time. All 12 homes were visited during the second year of the study, while a second set 5 homes was visited during the fifth year to determine the cause(s) of increased radon in the homes. During these visits, the mitigation systems were inspected and measurements of system performance were made. Maintenance and modifications were performed to improve system performance in these homes.

  12. Long-term monitoring for closed sites

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Sedlet, J.; Veluri, V.R.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is presented for planning and implementing a long-term environmental monitoring program for closed low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. The initial task in this procedure is to collect the available information on the legal/regulatory requirements, site and area characteristics, source term, pathway analysis, and prior monitoring results. This information is coupled with parameters such as half-life and retardation factors to develop a monitoring program. As examples, programs are presented for a site that has had little or no waste migration, and for sites where waste has been moved by suface water, by ground water, and by air. Sampling techniques and practices are discussed relative to how a current program would be structured and projections are made on techniques and practices expected to be available in the future. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Networking: a long-term management strategy.

    PubMed

    Gumbus, Andra

    2003-01-01

    As we face a changing health-care landscape of mergers and acquisitions during these tough economic times, it is more important than ever to cultivate a network of individuals who can assist you in your career development efforts. How do you manage your career in a shrinking economy? What is networking and how can you use it to enhance your career and professional competencies? Many myths surround the networking process; this article clarifies those misperceptions and tells you the truth about networking and the positive results you can achieve. Networking can be used to get a new job, but it has much wider application as a long-term career management strategy. Learn how you can manage your own career while building professional relationships and coaching your employees. PMID:12813955

  14. [Childhood liver transplantation. Long-term results].

    PubMed

    Jara, Paloma; Hierro, Loreto

    2010-05-01

    Liver transplantation allows long-term survival (10 years or more) in 75% of children receiving transplants before 2000. The risk of mortality after the first year is 4-10% in the next 10-20 years. Chronic rejection affects 6%. The need for late retransplantation is 3-5%. However, the follow-up of these patients involves the management of diverse problems in the graft (immunological, biliary, vascular) and others related to the use of immunosuppressants (renal dysfunction, lymphoproliferative syndrome). The transition from pediatric to adult care generates special needs. Adolescence and young adulthood are associated with a lack of compliance. Adult specialists should be aware of the special features of the original diagnosis and the surgical techniques used in childhood transplantation. Final quality of life is good overall but is lower than that in healthy young persons. PMID:20122757

  15. Long term cryogenic storage facility systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, John R.

    1987-01-01

    The Long Term Cryogenic Storage Facility Systems Study (LTCSFSS) is a Phase A study of a large capacity propellant depot for the space based, cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle. The study is being performed for Marshall Space Flight Center by General Dynamics Space Systems Division and has five principal objectives: (1) Definition of preliminary concept designs for four storage facility concepts; (2) Selection of preferred concepts through the application of trade studies to candidate propellant management system components; (3) Preparation of a conceptual design for an orbital storage facility; (4) Development of supporting research and technology requirements; and (5) Development of a test program to demonstrate facility performance. The initial study has been completed, and continuation activities are just getting under way to provide greater detail in key areas and accommodate changes in study guidelines and assumptions.

  16. [Strongyloidiasis following long-term corticosteroid therapy].

    PubMed

    Yamori, S; Yamamoto, M; Kawabata, A; Nakashima, K; Iinuma, Y; Satake, T; Shimokata, K

    1989-10-01

    A 64-year-old man who was born and raised in Fukuoka Prefecture was admitted because of dyspnea. The chest X-ray film showed multiple pulmonary cysts. Corticosteroid therapy was given because of repeated episodes of dyspnea and wheezing. He complained of epigastric pain 20 months after administration of corticosteroid therapy. Gastro-endoscopic examination showed inflammatory changes of the gastric mucosa and the biopsy specimens revealed the filariform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. Furthermore, the larvae were frequently detected in both sputum specimens and stools. Pyrvinium pamoate was initially administered and was switched to thiabendazole because of the presence of hyperinfection. Although two cycles of thiabendazole treatment were given, the larvae were not eradicated. This case report suggests that long term corticosteroid therapy caused the hyperinfection syndrome of Strongyloides stercoralis in a patient who was auto-infected with this nematode. PMID:2615077

  17. Long-term control of root growth

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin. 7 figs.

  18. Long-term control of root growth

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G. (West Richland, WA); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Cline, John F. (Prosser, WA); Skiens, W. Eugene (Richland, WA)

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  19. Reducing long-term reservoir performance uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.

    1988-04-01

    Reservoir performance is one of the key issues that have to be addressed before going ahead with the development of a geothermal field. In order to select the type and size of the power plant and design other surface installations, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the production wells and of the produced fluids, and to predict the changes over a 10--30 year period. This is not a straightforward task, as in most cases the calculations have to be made on the basis of data collected before significant fluid volumes have been extracted from the reservoir. The paper describes the methodology used in predicting the long-term performance of hydrothermal systems, as well as DOE/GTD-sponsored research aimed at reducing the uncertainties associated with these predictions. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Managing Records for the Long Term - 12363

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, John V.; Gueretta, Jeanie

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing vast amounts of information documenting historical and current operations. This information is critical to the operations of the DOE Office of Legacy Management. Managing legacy records and information is challenging in terms of accessibility and changing technology. The Office of Legacy Management is meeting these challenges by making records and information management an organizational priority. The Office of Legacy Management mission is to manage DOE post-closure responsibilities at former Cold War weapons sites to ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. These responsibilities include environmental stewardship and long-term preservation and management of operational and environmental cleanup records associated with each site. A primary organizational goal for the Office of Legacy Management is to 'Preserve, Protect, and Share Records and Information'. Managing records for long-term preservation is an important responsibility. Adequate and dedicated resources and management support are required to perform this responsibility successfully. Records tell the story of an organization and may be required to defend an organization in court, provide historical information, identify lessons learned, or provide valuable information for researchers. Loss of records or the inability to retrieve records because of poor records management processes can have serious consequences and even lead to an organisation's downfall. Organizations must invest time and resources to establish a good records management program because of its significance to the organization as a whole. The Office of Legacy Management will continue to research and apply innovative ways of doing business to ensure that the organization stays at the forefront of effective records and information management. DOE is committed to preserving records that document our nation's Cold War legacy, and the Office of Legacy Management will keep records management as a high priority. (authors)