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Sample records for long-term oral l-arginine

  1. Safety of long-term dietary supplementation with L-arginine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengdi; Li, Xilong; Rezaei, Reza; Meininger, Cynthia J; McNeal, Catherine J; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted with a swine model to determine the safety of long-term dietary supplementation with L-arginine-HCl or L-arginine free base. Beginning at 30 days of age, pigs were fed a corn- and soybean meal-based diet (31.5 g/kg body weight/day) supplemented with 0, 1.21, 1.81 or 2.42 % L-arginine-HCl (Experiment 1) or with 0, 1, 1.5 or 2 % L-arginine (Experiment 2). The supplemental doses of 0, 1, 1.5, and 2 % L-arginine provided pigs with 0, 315, 473, and 630 mg L-arginine/kg body weight/day, respectively, which were equivalent to 0, 286, 430, and 573 mg L-arginine/kg body weight/day, respectively, in humans. At 121 days of age (91 days after initiation of supplementation), blood samples were obtained from the jugular vein of pigs at 1 and 4 h after feeding for hematological and clinical chemistry tests. Dietary supplementation with L-arginine increased plasma concentrations of arginine, ornithine, proline, albumin and reticulocytes, while reducing plasma concentrations of ammonia, free fatty acids, triglyceride, cholesterol, and neutrophils. L-Arginine supplementation enhanced protein gain and reduced white-fat deposition in the body. Other variables in standard hematology and clinical chemistry tests, serum concentrations of insulin, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I did not differ among all the groups of pigs. These results indicate that dietary supplementation with L-arginine (up to 630 mg/kg body weight/day) is safe in pigs for at least 91 days. Our findings help guide clinical studies to determine the safety of long-term oral administration of L-arginine to humans. PMID:25655382

  2. Oral l-Arginine Stimulates GLP-1 Secretion to Improve Glucose Tolerance in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Smajilovic, Sanela; Smith, Eric P.; Woods, Stephen C.; Bruner-Osborne, Hans; Seeley, Randy J.; D'Alessio, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological and surgical interventions that increase glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) action are effective to improve glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In light of this, nutritional strategies to enhance postprandial GLP-1 secretion, particularly in the context of diet-induced obesity, may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. Importantly, recent evidence suggests the amino acid l-arginine, a well-known insulin secretagogue, can also stimulate release of GLP-1 from isolated rat intestine. Here we tested the hypothesis that oral l-arginine acts as a GLP-1 secretagogue in vivo, to augment postprandial insulin secretion and improve glucose tolerance. To test this, we administered l-arginine or vehicle by oral gavage, immediately prior to an oral glucose tolerance test in lean and diet-induced obese mice. In both lean and obese mice oral l-arginine increased plasma GLP-1 and insulin and substantially improved glucose clearance. To directly assess the contribution of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R)-signaling to these improvements, l-arginine was given to Glp1r knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. In this experiment oral l-arginine significantly augmented insulin secretion and improved glucose clearance in WT mice, but not in Glp1r knockout littermates. Taken together these findings identify l-arginine as a GLP-1 secretagogue in vivo and demonstrate that improvement of glucose tolerance by oral l-arginine depends on GLP-1R-signaling. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that l-arginine-based nutritional and/or pharmaceutical therapies may benefit glucose tolerance by improving the postprandial GLP-1 response in obese individuals. PMID:23959939

  3. Effects of chronic oral L-arginine administration on the L-arginine/NO pathway in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease or coronary artery disease: L-Arginine prevents renal loss of nitrite, the major NO reservoir.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jessica Y; Rothmann, Sabine; Schrder, Frank; Langen, Jennifer; Lcke, Thomas; Mariotti, Franois; Huneau, Jean Franois; Frlich, Jrgen C; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Despite saturation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) by its substrate L-arginine (Arg), oral and intravenous supplementation of Arg may enhance NO synthesis, a phenomenon known as "The L-arginine paradox". Yet, Arg is not only a source of NO, but is also a source for guanidine-methylated (N (G)) arginine derivatives which are all inhibitors of NOS activity. Therefore, Arg supplementation may not always result in enhanced NO synthesis. Concomitant synthesis of N (G)-monomethyl arginine (MMA), N (G),N (G)-dimethylarginine (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA) and N (G),N (G)-dimethylarginine (symmetric dimethylarginine, SDMA) from supplemented Arg may outweigh and even outbalance the positive effects of Arg on NO. Another possible, yet little investigated effect of Arg supplementation may be alteration of renal function, notably the influence on the excretion of nitrite in the urine. Nitrite is the autoxidation product of NO and the major reservoir of NO in the circulation. Nitrite and Arg are reabsorbed in the proximal tubule of the nephron and this reabsorption is coupled, at least in part, to the renal carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity. In the present placebo-controlled studies, we investigated the effect of chronic oral Arg supplementation of 10 g/day for 3 or 6 months in patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) or coronary artery disease (CAD) on the urinary excretion of nitrite relative to nitrate. We determined the urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio (UNOxR), which is a measure of nitrite-dependent renal CA activity before and after oral intake of Arg or placebo by the patients. The UNOxR was also determined in 6 children who underwent the Arg test, i.e., intravenous infusion of Arg (0.5 g Arg/kg bodyweight) for 30 min. Arg was well tolerated by the patients of the three studies. Oral Arg supplementation increased Arg (plasma and urine) and ADMA (urine) concentrations. No appreciable changes were seen in NO (in PAOD and CAD) and prostacyclin and thromboxane synthesis (in PAOD). In the PAOD study, UNOxR did not change in the Arginine group (480 51 vs 486 50), but fell in the Placebo group (422 67 vs 332 42, P = 0.025). In the CAD study, UNOxR did not change significantly in the Arginine group (518 77 at start vs 422 40 after 3 months vs 399 66 after 6 months), but fell in the Placebo group (524 69 vs 302 36 vs 285 31; P = 0.025 for 0 vs 3 months). Infusion of Arg tended to decrease the UNOxR in the children (317 41 vs 208 16, P = 0.06). We propose that oral long-term Arg supplementation prevents loss of NO bioactivity by saving nitrite. The optimum Arg dose needs to be elaborated and is likely to be less than 10 g per day in adults. Orally and intravenously administered arginine was well tolerated by the elderly patients and young children, respectively. PMID:26123989

  4. L-Arginine Destabilizes Oral Multi-Species Biofilm Communities Developed in Human Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Kolderman, Ethan; Bettampadi, Deepti; Samarian, Derek; Dowd, Scot E.; Foxman, Betsy; Jakubovics, Nicholas S.; Rickard, Alexander H.

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid L-arginine inhibits bacterial coaggregation, is involved in cell-cell signaling, and alters bacterial metabolism in a broad range of species present in the human oral cavity. Given the range of effects of L-arginine on bacteria, we hypothesized that L-arginine might alter multi-species oral biofilm development and cause developed multi-species biofilms to disassemble. Because of these potential biofilm-destabilizing effects, we also hypothesized that L-arginine might enhance the efficacy of antimicrobials that normally cannot rapidly penetrate biofilms. A static microplate biofilm system and a controlled-flow microfluidic system were used to develop multi-species oral biofilms derived from pooled unfiltered cell-containing saliva (CCS) in pooled filter-sterilized cell-free saliva (CFS) at 37oC. The addition of pH neutral L-arginine monohydrochloride (LAHCl) to CFS was found to exert negligible antimicrobial effects but significantly altered biofilm architecture in a concentration-dependent manner. Under controlled flow, the biovolume of biofilms (?m3/?m2) developed in saliva containing 100-500 mM LAHCl were up to two orders of magnitude less than when developed without LAHCI. Culture-independent community analysis demonstrated that 500 mM LAHCl substantially altered biofilm species composition: the proportion of Streptococcus and Veillonella species increased and the proportion of Gram-negative bacteria such as Neisseria and Aggregatibacter species was reduced. Adding LAHCl to pre-formed biofilms also reduced biovolume, presumably by altering cell-cell interactions and causing cell detachment. Furthermore, supplementing 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), an antimicrobial commonly used for the treatment of dental plaque, with 500 mM LAHCl resulted in greater penetration of CPC into the biofilms and significantly greater killing compared to a non-supplemented 0.01% CPC solution. Collectively, this work demonstrates that LAHCl moderates multi-species oral biofilm development and community composition and enhances the activity of CPC. The incorporation of LAHCl into oral healthcare products may be useful for enhanced biofilm control. PMID:25946040

  5. L-arginine destabilizes oral multi-species biofilm communities developed in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Kolderman, Ethan; Bettampadi, Deepti; Samarian, Derek; Dowd, Scot E; Foxman, Betsy; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Rickard, Alexander H

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid L-arginine inhibits bacterial coaggregation, is involved in cell-cell signaling, and alters bacterial metabolism in a broad range of species present in the human oral cavity. Given the range of effects of L-arginine on bacteria, we hypothesized that L-arginine might alter multi-species oral biofilm development and cause developed multi-species biofilms to disassemble. Because of these potential biofilm-destabilizing effects, we also hypothesized that L-arginine might enhance the efficacy of antimicrobials that normally cannot rapidly penetrate biofilms. A static microplate biofilm system and a controlled-flow microfluidic system were used to develop multi-species oral biofilms derived from pooled unfiltered cell-containing saliva (CCS) in pooled filter-sterilized cell-free saliva (CFS) at 37 C. The addition of pH neutral L-arginine monohydrochloride (LAHCl) to CFS was found to exert negligible antimicrobial effects but significantly altered biofilm architecture in a concentration-dependent manner. Under controlled flow, the biovolume of biofilms (?m(3)/?m(2)) developed in saliva containing 100-500 mM LAHCl were up to two orders of magnitude less than when developed without LAHCI. Culture-independent community analysis demonstrated that 500 mM LAHCl substantially altered biofilm species composition: the proportion of Streptococcus and Veillonella species increased and the proportion of Gram-negative bacteria such as Neisseria and Aggregatibacter species was reduced. Adding LAHCl to pre-formed biofilms also reduced biovolume, presumably by altering cell-cell interactions and causing cell detachment. Furthermore, supplementing 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), an antimicrobial commonly used for the treatment of dental plaque, with 500 mM LAHCl resulted in greater penetration of CPC into the biofilms and significantly greater killing compared to a non-supplemented 0.01% CPC solution. Collectively, this work demonstrates that LAHCl moderates multi-species oral biofilm development and community composition and enhances the activity of CPC. The incorporation of LAHCl into oral healthcare products may be useful for enhanced biofilm control. PMID:25946040

  6. Oral treatment with L-lysine and L-arginine reduces anxiety and basal cortisol levels in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Smriga, Miro; Ando, Toshihiko; Akutsu, Masahisa; Furukawa, Yasushi; Miwa, Kiyoshi; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2007-04-01

    Dietary supplementation with an essential amino acid L-lysine has been shown to reduce chronic anxiety in humans with low dietary intake of L-lysine. A combination of L-lysine and L-arginine has been documented to normalize hormonal stress responses in humans with high trait anxiety. The present study was carried out in one hundred eight healthy Japanese adults. The aim of study was to find out whether a week-long oral treatment with L-lysine (2.64 g per day) and L-arginine (2.64 g per day) reduces trait and stress-induced state anxiety and basal levels of stress hormones. We confirmed that, without regard to gender, the amino acid treatment significantly reduced both trait anxiety and state anxiety induced by cognitive stress battery. In addition, we found that the treatment with L-lysine and L-arginine decreased the basal levels of salivary cortisol and chromogranin-A (a salivary marker of the sympatho-adrenal system) in male subjects. These results of this double-blind, placebo controlled and randomized study confirm the previous findings in humans and animals and point to a combination of L-lysine and L-arginine as a potentially useful dietary intervention in otherwise healthy humans with high subjective levels of mental stress and anxiety. PMID:17510493

  7. Diabetic nephropathy is resistant to oral l-arginine or l-citrulline supplementation

    PubMed Central

    You, Hanning; Gao, Ting; Cooper, Timothy K.; Morris, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Our recent publication showed that pharmacological blockade of arginases confers kidney protection in diabetic nephropathy via a nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS)3-dependent mechanism. Arginase competes with endothelial NOS (eNOS) for the common substrate l-arginine. Lack of l-arginine results in reduced NO production and eNOS uncoupling, which lead to endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, we hypothesized that l-arginine or l-citrulline supplementation would ameliorate diabetic nephropathy. DBA mice injected with multiple low doses of vehicle or streptozotocin (50 mg/kg ip for 5 days) were provided drinking water with or without l-arginine (1.5%, 6.05 g·kg−1·day−1) or l-citrulline (1.66%, 5.73 g·kg−1·day−1) for 9 wk. Nonsupplemented diabetic mice showed significant increases in albuminuria, blood urea nitrogen, glomerular histopathological changes, kidney macrophage recruitment, kidney TNF-α and fibronectin mRNA expression, kidney arginase activity, kidney arginase-2 protein expression, and urinary oxidative stress along with a significant reduction of nephrin and eNOS protein expression and kidney nitrite + nitrate compared with normal mice after 9 wk of diabetes. Surprisingly, l-arginine or l-citrulline supplementation in diabetic mice did not affect any of these parameters despite greatly increasing kidney and plasma arginine levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic l-arginine or l-citrulline supplementation does not prevent or reduce renal injury in a model of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25320354

  8. L-arginine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of L-arginine by mouth daily, together with omega-3 faty acids and a balanced nutritional supplement, for ... L-arginine by mouth with glutamine, nucleotides, and omega-3 fatty acids reduces the recovery time, need for ...

  9. Chronic but not acute oral L-arginine supplementation delays the ventilatory threshold during exercise in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Doutreleau, Stphane; Mettauer, Bertrand; Piquard, Franois; Schaefer, Adrien; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Richard, Ruddy; Geny, Bernard

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, in heart failure patients (HF), whether acute or chronic L-arginine supplementation (LAS) might delay the ventilatory threshold (VT) and whether chronic LAS might reduce exercise-induced plasma lactate increase. HF patients undertook 4 cardiopulmonary bicycle exercises tests. The first 3 were maximal without (EX(1)), after acute (EX(2)), or chronic (EX(3)) oral LAS (6 gm twice a day for 6 weeks). The 4th test (EX(4)) performed after chronic LAS, was similar to the first in order to investigate the effect of chronic LAS on circulating lactate levels. Results showed that acute LAS failed to improve both submaximal and maximal exercise capacities. Similarly, maximal exercise capacity remained unmodified after chronic LAS. Nevertheless, chronic LAS delayed significantly the patients' ventilatory threshold. Thus exercise duration prior to VT increased (mean +/- SEM) from 6.04 +/- 0.9 to 7.7 +/- 1.03 min (p = 0.04), resulting in a significant increase in oxygen uptake (1.05 +/- 0.08 to 1.24 +/- 0.12 L.min(-1); p = 0.03), CO(2) release (0.94 +/- 0.10 to 1.2 +/- 0.12 L.min(-1); p = 0.018), minute ventilation (29.31 +/- 2.8 to 34.5 +/- 2.7 L; p = 0.009), and workload (60.7 +/- 9.8 to 78.5 +/- 10.2 watts; p = 0.034). Furthermore, chronic LAS significantly reduced the exercise-induced increase in postexercise plasma lactate concentration (-21 +/- 7%). In conclusion, unlike acute supplementation, chronic LAS significantly delays the ventilatory threshold, and chronic LAS reduces circulating plasma lactate in HF patients. These data suggest that chronic LAS might improve the ability of HF patients to perform their daily-life activities. PMID:16258181

  10. Oral L-Arginine Administration Improves Anthropometric and Biochemical Indices Associated With Cardiovascular Diseases in Obese Patients: A Randomized, Single Blind Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dashtabi, Arash; Mazloom, Zohreh; Fararouei, Mohammad; Hejazi, Najmeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, the potential of L-arginine supplementation as a novel and effective strategy for weight loss and improving biochemical parameters in obese patients has been under consideration. Objectives: To evaluate the influence of 8-week oral L-arginine supplementation on body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), triceps skinfold (TS), subscapular skinfold (SS), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), plasma fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in patients with BMI values > 29.9 or visceral obesity (WC > 102 cm in men or > 88 cm in women). Patients and Methods: Ninety obese patients were included in a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Patients were randomized to receive either L-arginine (3 or 6 g thrice daily) or placebo for 8 weeks. Anthropometric and biochemical indices, dietary intake, and blood pressure values were measured at the baseline and after the 8-week intervention. Results: Significant decreases in anthropometric parameters, blood pressure (SBP, DBP), FBS, HbA1c, LDL, MDA (P < 0.001), TG (P = 0.02), and TC (P = 0.002) and a significant increase in HDL (P < 0.001) were observed in the intervention group, compared to the control group. In the control group, no significant differences were found between the baseline and end-of-intervention measurements. Conclusions: In conclusion, oral L-Arginine supplementation appears to improve anthropometric parameters, blood pressure values, and some blood biochemical indices associated with cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:26889456

  11. Oral symptoms significantly higher among long-term khat (Catha edulis) users in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Astatkie, Ayalew; Demissie, Meaza; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Associations between khat (Catha edulis) chewing and different adverse oral-dental health conditions have been reported, yet evidence is still lacking. This study was designed to investigate the association between long-term regular khat chewing and self-reported oral symptoms. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 1,255 university students in southern Ethiopia. Data on khat chewing status, a range of oral symptoms and other pertinent variables were collected using self-administered questionnaires. The association between long-term regular khat chewing and oral symptom count was investigated using negative binomial regression. RESULTS: The mean oral symptom count among long-term regular khat chewers was 1.75 (standard deviation [SD], 2.18; standard error [SE], 0.31), whereas that among those who were not long-term regular khat chewers was 1.18 (SD, 1.68; SE, 0.10). After adjustment for other variables, long-term regular khat chewers had approximately 50% more oral symptoms than those who were not long-term chewers did (adjusted count ratio, 1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 2.10). CONCLUSIONS: Long-term khat chewing negatively affects the oral health of young university students. PMID:25773437

  12. Clinical and radiological assessment of effects of long-term corticosteroid therapy on oral health

    PubMed Central

    Beeraka, Swapna Sridevi; Natarajan, Kannan; Patil, Rajendra; Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Prathi, Venkata Sarath; Kolaparthi, Venkata Suneel Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Corticosteroids (Cs) are used widely for their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. They have the potential to cause dramatic improvement as well as produce equally dramatic adverse effects. The clinical misuse like over prescription of the drug should be avoided. Long-term administration may cause many adverse effects leading to impaired oral health. Oral health is usually not considered during management of patients on long-term corticosteroid therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the oral health status and radiological changes in the jaw bones of the patients under long-term corticosteroid therapy. Materials and Methods: Oral health of 100 patients under long-term corticosteroid therapy with a minimum of 3 months duration was compared with sex- and age-matched 100 healthy controls. The clinical examination included complete examination of the mouth and periodontal status. Radiographic evaluation of bone with the help of intra oral periapical radiograph and digital orthopantomograph and levels of serum calcium, alkaline phosphatase, and random blood sugar were assessed. ‘Chi-square test’, ‘Kolmogorov-Smirnov test’ and ‘Mann-Whitney U test’ were used for statistical analysis. P > 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Patients on steroids exhibited significantly higher levels of candidiasis and clinical attachment loss of the periodontal ligament, probing pocket depth. Bone density was significantly lower in the study group than that in the control group. Random blood glucose was significantly higher and significant lower levels of calcium were observed in patients on steroids. Conclusion: Long-term use of Cs may affect oral health adversely leading to candidiasis as well as impair bone metabolism leading to a considerable decrease in the mandibular bone mineral density. PMID:24348627

  13. Nursing home executive directors' perception of oral care in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Pyle, Marsha A; Jasinevicius, T Roma; Sawyer, Danny R; Madsen, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Oral health in long-term care (LTC) facilities has been repeatedly documented as less than ideal. The complex nature of this environment has made it difficult to understand and improve the oral health status of residents through education and training. The purpose of the study was to investigate how the executive directors (EDs) of LTC facilities value oral health and to determine facility variables, which may influence how oral care is delivered. A mail survey of the EDs of all LTC facilities in Ohio (n = 1018) was conducted with 338 responses received after secondary follow-up (33.2% response rate). The 30-item survey included information concerning the nursing facility, the EDs, the EDs' perception of the level of oral health care, and value statements rated on a Likert-like scale. The results of the survey showed that more than two-thirds of the EDs were female and that most facilities were proprietary (70.3%). ED gender was not statistically associated with any of the oral health variables. Fifty-three percent of the EDs rated their residents' oral health as fair or poor but were still satisfied with the oral care provided at their facilities. The apparent discontinuity between perceived levels of oral health and satisfaction with oral care suggests that EDs are distanced from the oral care of their residents or they do not acknowledge oral health care needs. While the survey results revealed important facility characteristics and administrators' perceptions about oral health, the most important aspect of this project was the low response rate despite secondary follow-up. That, coupled with the negativity expressed upon follow-up, suggests a larger issue that may affect oral health in nursing facilities: oral health continues to have a low priority in this setting. Continuing efforts to improve oral health and educate LTC professionals about oral health's influence on general health is critical for managing the oral health of future generations of aging adults. PMID:15856918

  14. Outpatient surgical treatment with CO2 laser in oral cancer: immediate and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Tradati, N; Zurrida, S; Bartoli, C; Boracchi, P; Sala, L; Contardi, N; Rossi, N; Chiesa, F

    1991-06-30

    The immediate and long-term results of excising squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity or lip by CO2 laser are analysed in 51 consecutive subjects treated as out-patients. From January 1982 to December 1989, 39 cases of T1 and 12 cases of small (less than 2.5 cm) non-infiltrating recurrences of squamous cell carcinoma were treated at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan. Complete removal was obtained in 44 instances, while in 7 cases cancerous margins were observed on the specimen; 5 of these underwent another wider treatment and 2 refused further therapy. Two of 39 T1 patients developed local relapses and 6/12 recurrent cancers relapsed again. Long term results are complicated by second primary cancers in 19 instances. Out-patient laser therapy is well accepted by patients and its use involves lowered direct and indirect health organisation and social costs. PMID:1862553

  15. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes.

    PubMed

    Abeles, Shira R; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances. PMID:26309137

  16. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Shira R.; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances. PMID:26309137

  17. Long-term effectiveness against cholera of oral killed whole-cell vaccine produced in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thiem, Vu Dinh; Deen, Jacqueline L; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Canh, Do Gia; Anh, Dang Duc; Park, Jin-Kyung; Ali, Mohammad; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Son, Nguyen Dinh; Hoa, Nguyen Thai; Holmgren, Jan; Clemens, John D

    2006-05-15

    We assessed the long-term protection afforded by a killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine produced in Vietnam. A mass immunization of children and adults with the killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine was undertaken in half of the communes of Hue, Vietnam, in 1998; the remaining communes were immunized in 2000. No cholera was observed in Hue until 2003, when an outbreak of El Tor cholera made it possible to conduct a case-control study. The overall vaccine effectiveness 3-5 years after vaccination was 50% (9-63%). This low-cost, easily administered vaccine should be considered as a tool for the control of cholera. PMID:16580760

  18. Bone mass and long-term monophasic oral contraceptive treatment in young women.

    PubMed

    Polatti, F; Perotti, F; Filippa, N; Gallina, D; Nappi, R E

    1995-04-01

    A prospective study has been designed to investigate bone metabolism in young women taking an oral monophasic contraceptive formulation (ethinylestradiol 20 micrograms + desogestrel 0.150 mg) over 5 years. Healthy women (n = 200) between 19 and 22 years of age were divided into two groups. Group A received oral contraception, Group B did not receive any treatment. All the subjects underwent a bone mass density (BMD) evaluation at spinal level L2-L4 with Dexa (Norland XR-26) and a measurement of the serum alkaline phosphatase levels and urinary excretion of OH-proline at baseline and every 12 months over 5 years. Our results demonstrated that Group A did not show any significant BMD change after 5 years of oral contraceptive treatment, while Group B demonstrated a significant increase (p < 0.01) in the bone mass content at the end of the time of observation (+7.8% after 5 years). No significant changes were found in serum alkaline phosphatase levels and in urinary excretion of OH-proline at the end of the study in comparison with basal levels in both groups. Our data suggested that long-term treatment with an oral monophasic contraceptive formulation (ethinylestradiol 20 micrograms + desogestrel 0.150 mg) did not modify the BMD but prevented the occurrence of the physiologic peak of bone mass in young women. PMID:7796586

  19. Long-term effects of oral clefts on health care utilization: a sibling comparison.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Morten Saaby; Wehby, George L; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Christensen, Kaare

    2015-07-01

    Oral clefts are among the most common birth defects affecting thousands of newborns each year, but little is known about their potential long-term consequences. In this paper, we explore the impact of oral clefts on health care utilization over most of the lifespan. To account for time-invariant unobservable parental characteristics, we compare affected individuals with their own unaffected siblings. The analysis is based on unique data comprising the entire cohort of individuals born with oral clefts in Denmark tracked until adulthood in administrative register data. We find that children with oral clefts use more health services than their unaffected siblings. Additional results show that the effects are driven primarily by congenital malformation-related hospitalizations and intake of anti-infectives. Although the absolute differences in most health care utilization diminish over time, affected individuals have slightly higher utilization of some health care services in adulthood (particularly for diseases of the nervous and respiratory system). These results have important implications for affected individuals, their families, and their health professionals. PMID:24908286

  20. Oral health status among long-term hospitalized adults: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Yavnai, Nirit; Zini, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Many Long-Term Care (LTC) institutionalized patients are the most frail and functionally dependent among the geriatric population and have significant oral health disparities.They often suffer from dental neglect due to limited access to appropriate professional dental care. These patients have chronic health situations and are treated with medications, which increase their risk of oral diseases. Despite the growth in elderly population in Israel, there is insufficient data regarding their oral health status and treatment needs. Objective. To describe the oral health status of the LTC hospitalized adults in a geriatric and psychiatric hospital in Israel. Methods. Data was recorded from LTC hospitalized adults with a physical and/or mental disabilities in a cross-sectional research design, which included general health anamnesis and clinical oral examination. Variables included gender, medicines, oral hygiene (OH), using dentures, number of caries lesions and residual teeth. Univariate analyses included Pearson ?2 and t-test analyses. Multivariate analyses included logistic and linear regressions while the outcome variables were categorical OH index and number of carious cavitations, number of residual teeth and carious teeth percentage. Results. 153 participants were included in the study with a mean age of 65.03 18.67 years. 31.3% of the patients were edentulous, and only 14% had partial or full dentures. Females had a significantly higher number of caries cavitation than males (P = 0.044). The number of caries cavitation was higher among patients with poor OH (P < 0.001) and when taking Clonazepam (P = 0.018). Number of residual teeth was higher in the fair OH group (P < 0.001). Carious teeth percentage was higher among the poor OH group (P < 0.001). PMID:24949240

  1. Oral health status among long-term hospitalized adults: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bilder, Leon; Yavnai, Nirit; Zini, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Many Long-Term Care (LTC) institutionalized patients are the most frail and functionally dependent among the geriatric population and have significant oral health disparities.They often suffer from dental neglect due to limited access to appropriate professional dental care. These patients have chronic health situations and are treated with medications, which increase their risk of oral diseases. Despite the growth in elderly population in Israel, there is insufficient data regarding their oral health status and treatment needs. Objective. To describe the oral health status of the LTC hospitalized adults in a geriatric and psychiatric hospital in Israel. Methods. Data was recorded from LTC hospitalized adults with a physical and/or mental disabilities in a cross-sectional research design, which included general health anamnesis and clinical oral examination. Variables included gender, medicines, oral hygiene (OH), using dentures, number of caries lesions and residual teeth. Univariate analyses included Pearson ? (2) and t-test analyses. Multivariate analyses included logistic and linear regressions while the outcome variables were categorical OH index and number of carious cavitations, number of residual teeth and carious teeth percentage. Results. 153 participants were included in the study with a mean age of 65.03 18.67 years. 31.3% of the patients were edentulous, and only 14% had partial or full dentures. Females had a significantly higher number of caries cavitation than males (P = 0.044). The number of caries cavitation was higher among patients with poor OH (P < 0.001) and when taking Clonazepam (P = 0.018). Number of residual teeth was higher in the fair OH group (P < 0.001). Carious teeth percentage was higher among the poor OH group (P < 0.001). PMID:24949240

  2. Production of rat homocytotropic antibodies using low dose, long term oral exposure to penicillin G.

    PubMed

    Perelmutter, L; Liakopoulou, A

    1975-11-01

    Sera from 15 patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to penicillin G gave positive responses in the rat mast cell test (RMCT) indicating the presence of IgE-type antibodies in the sera. Five sera were from patients who had had reactions to penicillin 15 to 22 years previously without known re-exposure to this antigen. To explore the possibility that non-therapeutic exposure to penicillin may have produced continued sensitization in these patients, an animal model system was developed to explore the efficacy of low dose, long term oral exposure to penicillin G in rats for producing homocytotropic antibodies in these animals. It was found that when rats were given penicillin G in their drinking water at concentrations of 0.1 to 1 U/ml over a period of 1 to 3 months they produced serum IgE and IgGa antibodies. In addition, IgE antibodies were actively bound to the peritoneal mast cells of these animals. The presence of circulating or cell bound antibodies was detected using the rat mast cell test. It was also shown that rats given penicillin G orally for 1 month were more prone to antibody production after a single intramuscular injection of penicillin G compared to a control group receiving only the intramuscular injection of this antigen. The results of this study are discussed in terms of possible non-therapeutic sensitization towards penicillin G in the human population. PMID:1243226

  3. Sailing between Scylla and Charybdis: oral long-term anticoagulation in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Krger, Thilo; Brandenburg, Vincent; Schlieper, Georg; Marx, Nikolaus; Floege, Jrgen

    2013-03-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased risk of bleeding compared with non-chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients due to uraemic platelet dysfunction, altered vessel architecture and other factors. This renders any long-term oral anticoagulation potentially difficult. While there is little doubt that ESRD patients with recurrent thromboembolism or a mechanical cardiac valve should receive vitamin K antagonists (coumarins), the use of coumarins in ESRD patients with atrial fibrillation is a matter of debate. In non-CKD patients, current guidelines strongly recommend the use of oral anticoagulants for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation if certain risk factors are present (CHA2DS2-VASc score). This recommendation is often extrapolated to patients with advanced CKD or ESRD but data supporting this practice are weak to absent. Besides an increased bleeding risk in ESRD patients, coumarins will also accelerate cardiovascular calcification and are potent risk factors for the development of calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis). Novel coumarin alternatives such as direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but none is currently approved for use in ESRD patients. Whether interventional treatment strategies such as atrial appendage occlusion are safe and effective options in advanced CKD is also as yet unresolved. This review attempts to balance the potential risks and benefits of coumarin usage in ESRD patients and to give the best possible recommendations for everyday patient care. PMID:23180880

  4. Diminished L-arginine bioavailability in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moss, Monique B; Brunini, Tatiana M C; Soares De Moura, Roberto; Novaes Malagris, Lúcia E; Roberts, Norman B; Ellory, J Clive; Mann, Giovanni E; Mendes Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2004-10-01

    L-Arginine is the precursor of NO (nitric oxide), a key endogenous mediator involved in endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and platelet function. Although the concentration of intracellular L-arginine is well above the Km for NO synthesis, in many cells and pathological conditions the transport of L-arginine is essential for NO production (L-arginine paradox). The present study was designed to investigate the modulation of L-arginine/NO pathway in systemic arterial hypertension. Transport of L-arginine into RBCs (red blood cells) and platelets, NOS (NO synthase) activity and amino acid profiles in plasma were analysed in hypertensive patients and in an animal model of hypertension. Influx of L-arginine into RBCs was mediated by the cationic amino acid transport systems y+ and y+L, whereas, in platelets, influx was mediated only via system y+L. Chromatographic analyses revealed higher plasma levels of L-arginine in hypertensive patients (175+/-19 micromol/l) compared with control subjects (137+/-8 micromol/l). L-Arginine transport via system y+L, but not y+, was significantly reduced in RBCs from hypertensive patients (60+/-7 micromol.l(-1).cells(-1).h(-1); n=16) compared with controls (90+/-17 micromol.l(-1).cells(-1).h(-1); n=18). In human platelets, the Vmax for L-arginine transport via system y+L was 86+/-17 pmol.10(9) cells(-1).min(-1) in controls compared with 36+/-9 pmol.10(9) cells(-1).min(-1) in hypertensive patients (n=10; P<0.05). Basal NOS activity was decreased in platelets from hypertensive patients (0.12+/-0.02 pmol/10(8) cells; n=8) compared with controls (0.22+/-0.01 pmol/10(8) cells; n=8; P<0.05). Studies with spontaneously hypertensive rats demonstrated that transport of L-arginine via system y+L was also inhibited in RBCs. Our findings provide the first evidence that hypertension is associated with an inhibition of L-arginine transport via system y+L in both humans and animals, with reduced availability of L-arginine limiting NO synthesis in blood cells. PMID:15182236

  5. Long-term survival in metastatic malignant struma ovarii treated with oral chemotherapy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ukita, Masayo; Nakai, Hidekatsu; Kotani, Yasushi; Tobiume, Takako; Koike, Eiji; Tsuji, Isao; Suzuki, Ayako; Mandai, Masaki

    2014-12-01

    Malignant struma ovarii is a rare type of ovarian tumor. Metastasis from malignant struma ovarii is rare and has only been documented in 5-6% of cases. The natural history and optimal treatment strategy for malignant struma ovarii remains controversial due to its rarity. The current report presents the case of a 45-year-old female who presented with a tumor of the rib bone. Following resection, the postoperative diagnosis was a metastasizing thyroid carcinoma. No abnormality was detected in the thyroid gland, however, computed tomography revealed a tumor in the left ovary. The patient underwent a left salpingo-oophorectomy and a wedge resection of the right ovary. The postoperative diagnosis was determined as a mature cystic teratoma with malignant struma ovarii (thyroid type, follicular carcinoma) of the left ovary and mature cystic teratoma of the right ovary. Four years subsequent to the initial diagnosis, multiple lung metastases were detected. The following chemotherapies were administered sequentially and intermittently: Tegafur-uracil, paclitaxel/carboplatin and oral etoposide. During this period, the metastatic lesions extended into the bone and progressed slowly. The patient continues to survive with the disease and 24 years have passed since the initial diagnosis, 20 years following the diagnosis of multiple lung metastates. The present report describes a rare case of malignant struma ovarii in which surgical resection and pathological examination of a metastatic rib tumor resulted in the identification of the primary ovarian lesion. The clinical behavior of malignant struma ovarii does not necessarily indicate a histological malignancy, therefore, prediction of future metastasis is difficult and the optimal treatment strategy for malignant struma ovarii is controversial. The present case indicates that the long-term use of oral anticancer agents may facilitate the maintenance of tumor dormancy. PMID:25364407

  6. Side effects of long-term oral antiviral therapy for hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Robert J

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the safety profile of the five approved oral nucleoside analogs used to treat chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, focusing on both the class adverse effects and those that have been reported with individual agents, as well as their safety in pregnancy. All nucleoside analogs have a "Black Box" warning because of their potential for inhibition of human DNA polymerase gamma involved in mitochondrial DNA replication. A reduction in intracellular mitochondrial DNA levels can lead to varying clinical manifestations of mitochondrial toxicity (i.e., neuropathy, myopathy, lactic acidosis), but these side effects are rarely reported with the oral antiviral agents active against HBV. Adefovir and tenofovir are associated with a dose-dependent but usually reversible proximal renal tubular toxicity. For these reasons, patients receiving these agents should be monitored for renal toxicity and the dose modified for renal insufficiency. Prolonged use of tenofovir has also been reported to lead to reduced bone mineral density in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, but prospective studies in patients with HBV infection are lacking. Telbivudine treatment is associated with moderate serum creatine phosphokinase elevations in up to 12% of patients. There have been few prospective studies on the safety of nucleoside analogs during pregnancy. According to the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry, the incidence of birth defects associated with lamivudine and tenofovir use during pregnancy is not increased. Studies on the safety of long-term therapy with the nucleoside analogs, alone and in combination, are needed as are further studies of children, the elderly, pregnant women, and patients with renal insufficiency. PMID:19399802

  7. Oral factor Xa inhibitors for the long-term management of ACS.

    PubMed

    Wisler, James W; Becker, Richard C

    2012-07-01

    Despite considerable reductions in cardiovascular events in patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) receiving dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), substantial residual risk persists. This unmet need has stimulated the development of anticoagulant drugs that target specific coagulation factors involved in the pathogenesis of thrombosis after atheromatous plaque disruption. Factor Xa is an attractive target for inhibition because of both its integral role in coagulation and its recognized participation in cellular proliferation and inflammation. Several oral, direct factor Xa inhibitors are undergoing investigation and large, phase III clinical trials of two agents, apixaban and rivaroxaban, in patients with an ACS have been completed. On the basis of the known pathobiology of ACS, one might anticipate that drugs in this class of anticoagulant would beneficially reduce ischemic and thrombotic events; however, a strategy of combined anticoagulant therapy and DAPT is likely to increase concomitant bleeding complications. The balance of benefit and risk will ultimately determine uptake in clinical practice. We review the available data on factor Xa inhibitors in the long-term management of patients with an ACS. PMID:22348973

  8. L-arginine attenuates oxidative stress condition during cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pratima; Pandey, Shivani

    2013-04-01

    Increased production of oxygen free radicals and decreased oxidant capacity occur in coronary artery diseases (CAD) This pro-oxidant shift in intracellular redox state may induce cell death by either direct cell membrane damage by lipic peroxidation or apoptosis through activation of transcription factors. These changes occur not only in cardiomyocytes, bu also in cardiac sympathetic nerves, which are very sensitive to oxidative damage. Patients with heart failure encountel reduced peripheralblood flow at rest, during exercise and in response to endothelium-dependentvasodilators. Current treatments of cardiomyopathy, a degenerative condition of the myocardium frequently associated with heart failure have done little to enhance patient survival. Decreased myocardial contractility and altered regulation of peripheral circulation along with oxidative conditions are important contributors to the symptoms and prognosis of the disease process. Nitric oxide formed from L-arginine (2-amino-5 guanidinovaleric acid) metabolism in endothelial cells contributes to regulation of blood flow under these conditions. L-Arginine is the precursor of nitric oxide, an endogenous messenger molecule involved in a variety of endothelium-mediated physiological effects in the vascular system. In the present study, we investigated the effect of oral administration of L-arginine (3 g/day) on the intracellular redox status of the patients of ischemic cardiomyopathy aged 45-60 yrs. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase, catalase, total thiols (TSH) and ascorbic acid along with pro-oxidant parameters, such as xanthine oxidase, as well as index of oxidative stress as protein carbonyl content and malondialdehyde (a marker of lipid peroxidation) were investigated in the plasma and RBC lysate. L-Arginine (3 g/day) administration was found to improve the levels of these parameters in the patients and regulate the blood flow, as evident by the improved blood pressure of the patients. Thus, it is inferred that L-arginine attenuates the oxidative stress conditions along with maintaining the blood pressure rate of patients suffering from cardiomyopathy. PMID:23720883

  9. ORAL TOXICITY OF 1,3-DICHLOROPROPANE: ACUTE, SHORT-TERM, AND LONG-TERM STUDIES IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this investigation was to characterize the acute and short- and long-term toxic potency of orally administered 1,2-dichloropropane (DCP). In the acute and short-term studies, male rats of 250-300 g were gavaged with 0, 100, 250, 500, or 1000 mg DCP/kg in corn oil...

  10. Effect of L- Arginine On Electrocardiographic Changes Induced By Hypercholesterolemia And Isoproterenol In Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Goyal, Manish; Agarwal, J L

    2009-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia, a well-known cardiovascular risk factor, is associated with prolonged action potential duration, longer QTc intervals (rate controlled QT interval), suggested that Hypercholesterolemia may have a direct effect on ventricular repolarization. Hypercholesterolemia was induced in rabbits and L-arginine was given orally to animals for sixteen weeks. The isoproterenol was injected in all the animals to produce electrocardiographic changes. ECG was recorded in lead II at start of study, after hypercholesterolemic diet and/ or L-arginine supplementation. It is observed that L-arginine significantly reduced the hypercholesterolemia induced QTc prolongation. Isoproterenol induced increase in QTc intervals were decreased only in normolipidemic animals. No significant changes were observed in QRS complex and heart rate. Our study suggests that L-arginine definitely have effect on repolarization processes of myocardium. PMID:19165358

  11. Considerations for long-term anticoagulant therapy in patients with venous thromboembolism in the novel oral anticoagulant era

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who have had a venous thromboembolic event are generally advised to receive anticoagulant treatment for 3 months or longer to prevent a recurrent episode. Current guidelines recommend initial heparin and an oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA) for long-term anticoagulation. However, because of the well-described disadvantages of VKAs, including extensive food and drug interactions and the need for regular anticoagulation monitoring, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have become an attractive option in recent years. These agents are given at fixed doses and do not require routine coagulation-time monitoring. The NOACs are discussed in this review with regard to the needs of patients on long-term anticoagulation. Methods Current guidelines from Europe and North America that refer to the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism are included, as well as published randomized Phase III clinical trials of NOACs. PubMed searches were used for sourcing case studies of long-term anticoagulant treatment, and results were filtered for human application and screened for relevance. Conclusion NOAC-based therapy showed a similar efficacy and safety profile to heparins/VKAs but without the need for regular anticoagulation monitoring or dietary adjustments, and can be taken as a fixed-dose regimen once or twice daily. This represents a significant step forward in facilitating the management of long-term anticoagulation therapy. Furthermore, in the EINSTEIN studies, improved patient satisfaction was documented with the NOAC rivaroxaban, which may result in better adherence to therapy and an overall reduction in the incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism. PMID:26929637

  12. Enteral L-Arginine and Glutamine Supplementation for Prevention of NEC in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    El-Shimi, M. S.; Awad, H. A.; Abdelwahed, M. A.; Mohamed, M. H.; Khafagy, S. M.; Saleh, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Evaluating the efficacy and safety of arginine and glutamine supplementation in decreasing the incidence of NEC among preterm neonates. Methods. Prospective case-control study done on 75 preterm neonates ?34 weeks, divided equally into L-arginine group receiving enteral L-arginine, glutamine group receiving enteral glutamine, and control group. Serum L-arginine and glutamine levels were measured at time of enrollment (sample 1), after 14 days of enrollment (sample 2), and at time of diagnosis of NEC (sample 3). Results. The incidence of NEC was 9.3%. There was no difference in the frequency of NEC between L-arginine and control groups (P > 0.05). NEC was not detected in glutamine group; L-arginine concentrations were significantly lower in arginine group than control group in both samples while glutamine concentrations were comparable in glutamine and control groups in both samples. No significant difference was found between groups as regards number of septic episodes, duration to reach full oral intake, or duration of hospital stay. Conclusion. Enteral L-arginine supplementation did not seem to reduce the incidence of NEC. Enteral glutamine may have a preventive role against NEC if supplied early to preterm neonates. However, larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. This work is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01263041). PMID:25861285

  13. Long-Term Repeated Daily Use of Intragastric Gavage Hinders Induction of Oral Tolerance to Ovalbumin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kinder, Jeremy M; Then, Jenny E; Hansel, Patrick M; Molinero, Luciana L; Bruns, Heather A

    2014-01-01

    Oral tolerance is dependent on the complex architecture of the mucosal system of the gastrointestinal tract, its associated lymphoid tissue, and specialized immune cells. Changes in this architecture or the failure of any of its components may hinder the generation of oral tolerance. The larynx and esophagus are the gateway to the gastrointestinal tract, serving as the site of oral antigen introduction to the immune system and may have an important role in establishing tolerance. Intragastric gavage is a common method for precise oral dosing of rodents, particularly in studies examining oral tolerance. However, complications such as esophageal trauma can occur and induce complicating factors that affect experimental outcomes. In this study, we examined the esophageal epithelium for alterations resulting from long-term repeated daily use of intragrastric gavage and its effect on the induction of tolerance. Tolerance to ovalbumin could not be achieved after using intragastric gavage for 14 d or more consecutively to introduce ovalbumin. However, tolerance was achieved when intragastric gavage was used for shorter durations. After 14 d of gavage, disruption of the esophageal mucosal epithelium indicative of an inflammatory pathology, cellular influx into the esophageal tissue, and proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were absent, and the CD3+ cell population in the esophageal epithelium decreased. These findings provide initial evidence for the important roles of esophageal integrity and cellular populations in the induction of oral tolerance and suggest possible immunologic sequelae in experiments involving the use of extended, repeated gavage. PMID:25402177

  14. [Bridging in patients with long-term oral anticoagulation - new recommendations].

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Bernd; Bauersachs, Rupert Martin

    2016-02-01

    Peri-interventional management of anticoagulation in patients receiving long-term anticoagulation can be challenging. The concept of "bridging" is known as an application of an anticoagulant with a short half-life (e. g. low-molecular-heparin) during interruption of therapy with vitamin-k-antagonists. Multiple studies have critically investigated the concept of bridging. Recently data from the ORBIT-AF-Register and the prospective randomized BRDIGE-Study have been released. The most common complication of bridging is bleeding. Overall the concept of bridging has lost some of its attractivity, especially concerning low or intermediate risk interventions or patients with a low risk of thromboembolism. An individual peri-interventional management based on individual patients' risk profile and interventional factors is recommended for VKA and NOACs. Main points of consideration are individual thromboembolic risk, specific bleeding risk of the planned intervention as well as patient factors (e. g. renal insufficiency). PMID:26780757

  15. Oral Finasteride Presents With Sexual-Unrelated Withdrawal in Long-Term Treated Androgenic Alopecia in Men.

    PubMed

    Perez-Mora, Nicolas; Velasco, Carlos; Bermüdez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Side effects associated with oral finasteride (FT) (1 mg/d) and topical 5% minoxidil (M5) have been previously described. The authors have evaluated long-term adverse effects and causes of long-term therapy withdrawal in patients with androgenic alopecia (AGA) treated with M5+FT vs M5 without FT. A total of 130 AGA patients with a minimum 2-year follow-up volunteered to complete a questionnaire on side effects. Patients' responses were classified as "never," "rarely," "sometimes," "often," and "all the time." An adverse effect was considered in the presence of an "often" or "all the time" response. A total of 100 patients received combined M5+FT and were compared with 30 patients receiving single-therapy M5 according to the physician's clinical criteria. Erectile dysfunction (3%), diminished libido (4%), and reduced ejaculation (7%) were present in patients taking M5+FT but were absent in patients taking M5. Only 1 of 100 patients taking M5+FT quit long-term therapy due to sexual adverse effects (diminished libido). The main causes for therapy withdrawal in the FT group were lack of positive results in 11% and in the M5 group side effects in 4% (P < .02). Increased body hair was different between groups: with 6.6% in the M5 group and 4% in the M5+FT group (P < .03). FT demonstrates sexual-unrelated reasons as the main cause of therapy withdrawal in long-term treated AGA patients. PMID:26380503

  16. The Impact of Long-Term Dental Health Education on Oral Hygiene Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Bonnie A.

    1982-01-01

    A study evaluated the impact of five years' exposure to a dental health curriculum on the oral hygiene of fifth-grade students. Findings of the study indicate that a well-designed dental health curriculum based on cognitive and behavioral objectives can result in a greater accumulation of dental health knowledge. (JN)

  17. Long-term follow-up of children whose mothers used oral contraceptives prior to conception.

    PubMed

    Magidor, S; Palti, H; Harlap, S; Baras, M

    1984-03-01

    Anthropometric, psychometric and hematologic measurements were made at intervals in the first 3 years of life in a cohort of 732 infants, including 177 (24.2%) whose mothers used oral contraceptives (OC) prior to conception. Analysis of the data focused on weight and height measurements at 3, 9, 12, 24 and 36 months of age; hemoglobin and hematocrit at 9 months; development quotient (DQ) at 2 years and its components, posture, coordination, language and social; and intelligence quotient (IQ) at 3 years and its verbal and nonverbal components. Analyses were made for both sexes combined and males and females separately, by examining crude means, and means adjusted through linear multiple regression for birthweight, age of child at the time of examination, height of mother, mother's weight-for-height centile, birth-order, maternal and paternal education, and maternal smoking. No significant differences were found between the children whose mothers did or did not use oral contraceptives. PMID:6734207

  18. A novel approach for long-term oral drug administration in animal research.

    PubMed

    Overk, Cassia R; Borgia, Jeffrey A; Mufson, Elliott J

    2011-02-15

    In the field of pharmacological research, the oral consumption of anastrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, when added to an animal's drinking water is hindered by poor drug palatability and environmental loss of drug solution. To overcome these caveats, we developed a novel approach for the oral delivery of anastrozole mixed in a solid hydration gel matrix that functions as a replacement for water. Heated hydration gel was mixed with anastrozole and distributed into a gel delivery device consisting of a 50 mL plastic conical tube containing four stacked 200 ?L pipette tips to allow for air pressure induced gel disbursement. Transgenic female 3xTgAD mice were randomized to receive either anastrozole-treated or untreated hydration gel at 3 months of age. Body weights were recorded weekly, and gel consumption was measured every 1-3 days. Six months post treatment mice were killed and serum anastrozole levels were determined using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Anastrozole-treated mice gained significantly more weight despite consuming significantly less hydration gel compared to vehicle treated mice. LC-MS analysis, using a low serum volume (10 ?L), revealed average anastrozole serum levels of 2.91 ng/mL. Anastrozole-treated ovarian tissue displayed ovarian cysts, massive edema-like stroma, and also lacked corp lutea compared to control mice. These findings demonstrate that hydration gel delivered using the newly developed oral delivery method is a viable approach for pharmacological research involving compounds with poor palatability, low water solubility, and cost prohibitive compounds where environmental loss needs to be minimized. PMID:21163304

  19. Long-Term High-dose Oral Morphine in Phantom Limb Pain with No Addiction Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Garg, Rakesh; Bharati, Sachidanand Jee; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Bhatanagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic phantom limb pain (PLP) is a type of neuropathic pain, which is located in the missing/amputated limb. Phantom pain is difficult to treat as the exact basis of pain mechanism is still unknown. Various methods of treatment for PLP have been described, including pharmacological (NSAIDs, opioids, antiepileptic, antidepressants) and non-pharmacological (TENS, sympathectomy, deep brain stimulation and motor cortex stimulation). Opioids are used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and dose of opioid is determined based on its effect and thus there is no defined ceiling dose for opioids. We report a case where a patient receiving high-dose oral morphine for chronic cancer pain did not demonstrate signs of addiction. PMID:25709194

  20. Long-Term Oral Administration of Hop Flower Extracts Mitigates Alzheimer Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sasaoka, Norio; Sakamoto, Megumi; Kanemori, Shoko; Kan, Michiru; Tsukano, Chihiro; Takemoto, Yoshiji; Kakizuka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Coincident with the expanding population of aged people, the incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is rapidly increasing in most advanced countries. At present, no effective prophylactics are available. Among several pathological mechanisms proposed for AD, the amyloid hypothesis has been most widely accepted, in which accumulation or deposition of A? is considered to be the initial event. Thus, prevention of A? production would be an ideal strategy for the treatment or prevention of AD. A? is produced via the proteolytic cleavage of its precursor protein, APP (amyloid precursor protein), by two different enzymes, ? and ?-secretases. Indeed, inhibitors against either or both enzymes have been developed and tested for clinical efficacy. Based on the amyloid hypothesis, we developed a luciferase-based screening method to monitor ?-secretase activity, screened more than 1,600 plant extracts, most of which have long been used in Chinese medicine, and observed that Hop extracts significantly inhibit A? production in cultured cells. A major component of the inhibitory activity was purified, and its chemical identity was determined by NMR to be Garcinielliptone HC. In vivo, oral administration of Hop extracts to AD model mice decreased A? depositions in the cerebral cortex of the parietal lobe, hippocampus, and artery walls (amyloid angiopathy) in the brains. In a Morris water maze test, AD model mice that had daily consumed Hop extracts in their drinking water showed significant mitigation of memory impairment at ages of 9 and 12 months. Moreover, in the open field test oral administration of Hop extracts also prevented an emotional disturbance that appeared in the AD mice at 18 months. Despite lifelong consumption of Hop extracts, no deleterious side effects were observed at any age. These results support the amyloid hypothesis, and indicate that Hop extract is a promising candidate for an effective prophylactic for AD. PMID:24489866

  1. Resveratrol Based Oral Nutritional Supplement Produces Long-Term Beneficial Effects on Structure and Visual Function in Human Patients

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Stuart; Patel, Shana; Sockanathan, Shivani; Ulanski, Lawrence J.; Miller, Luke; Podella, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Background: Longevinex® (L/RV) is a low dose hormetic over-the-counter (OTC) oral resveratrol (RV) based matrix of red wine solids, vitamin D3 and inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) with established bioavailability, safety, and short-term efficacy against the earliest signs of human atherosclerosis, murine cardiac reperfusion injury, clinical retinal neovascularization, and stem cell survival. We previously reported our short-term findings for dry and wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. Today we report long term (two to three year) clinical efficacy. Methods: We treated three patients including a patient with an AMD treatment resistant variant (polypoidal retinal vasculature disease). We evaluated two clinical measures of ocular structure (fundus autofluorescent imaging and spectral domain optical coherence extended depth choroidal imaging) and qualitatively appraised changes in macular pigment volume. We further evaluated three clinical measures of visual function (Snellen visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and glare recovery to a cone photo-stress stimulus). Results: We observed broad bilateral improvements in ocular structure and function over a long time period, opposite to what might be expected due to aging and the natural progression of the patient’s pathophysiology. No side effects were observed. Conclusions: These three cases demonstrate that application of epigenetics has long-term efficacy against AMD retinal disease, when the retinal specialist has exhausted other therapeutic modalities. PMID:25329968

  2. Differential long-term outcomes for voluntary and involuntary transition from injection to oral opioid maintenance treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The most widely used maintenance treatment for opioid dependency is substitution with long-acting oral opioids. Treatment with injectable diacetylmorphine provides an opportunity for patients to stabilize and possibly transition to oral treatment, if clinically indicated. The aim of this study was to explore outcomes of individuals that received injectable diacetylmorphine and voluntarily transitioned to oral methadone. Design and methods The North American Opiate Medication Initiative was a randomized controlled trial that compared the effectiveness of injectable diacetylmorphine (or hydromorphone) to oral methadone for long-term opioid-dependency. Treatment was provided for 12-months with an additional 3months for transition and weaning. Participants were followed until 24-months from randomization. Among the participants randomized to injectable treatments, a sub-group voluntarily chose to transition to oral methadone (n?=?16) during the treatment period. Illicit heroin use and treatment retention were assessed at 24-months for those voluntarily and involuntarily transitioning (n?=?95) to oral methadone. Results At 24-months, the group that voluntarily transitioned to oral methadone had higher odds of treatment retention (adjusted odds ratio?=?5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.11, 27.81; Chi-square?=?4.33, df?=?1, p-value?=?0.037) than the involuntary transition group. At 24-months, the adjusted mean difference in prior 30days of illicit heroin use for the voluntary, compared to the involuntary group was -5.58 (95% CI?=?-11.62, 0.47; t-value?=?-1.83, df?=?97.4, p-value?=?0.070). Conclusions Although the results of this study were based on small groups of self-selected (i.e., non-randomized) participants, our data underlines the critical importance of voluntary and patient-centered decision making. If we had continued offering treatment with diacetylmorphine, those retained to injectable medication may have sustained the achieved improvements in the first 12months. Diversified opioid treatment should be available so patients and physicians can flexibly choose the best treatment at the time. Trial registration Clinical Trial Registration: NCT00175357 PMID:24908387

  3. The long-term efficacy and tolerability of oral deferasirox for patients with transfusion-dependent ?-thalassemia in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Lu, Meng-Yao; Peng, Steven Shinn-Forng; Yang, Yung-Li; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Lin, Kai-Hsin

    2015-12-01

    Deferasirox is a novel once-daily, oral iron chelator. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and tolerability of deferasirox in Taiwanese patients with transfusion-dependent ?-thalassemia who have been treated with deferasirox for 7 years. Taiwanese patients aged ?2 years with transfusion-dependent ?-thalassemia whose serum ferritin levels were ?1000 ng/mL and had started deferasirox treatment since December 2005 at the National Taiwan University Hospital were enrolled. Sixty patients were recruited for analysis, and 11 (18.3 %) patients discontinued deferasirox during the study. In the 42 patients included in the efficacy analysis, the mean serum ferritin levels decreased significantly by 2566 ng/mL after 7 years of treatment (P?long-term treatment with deferasirox was effective in improving iron overload, including cardiac iron overload, in patients with transfusion-dependent ?-thalassemia. Deferasirox was well tolerated; however, the incidences of common adverse events related to deferasirox appeared higher in our Taiwanese patients than other studies. PMID:26404899

  4. Reference intervals for plasma L-arginine and the L-arginine:asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio in the Framingham Offspring Cohort.

    PubMed

    Lneburg, Nicole; Xanthakis, Vanessa; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Sullivan, Lisa M; Maas, Renke; Anderssohn, Maike; Riederer, Ulrich; Glazer, Nicole L; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Bger, Rainer H

    2011-12-01

    L-arginine, as a precursor of NO synthesis, has attracted much scientific attention in recent years. Experimental mouse models suggest that L-arginine supplementation can retard, halt, or even reverse atherogenesis. In human studies, supplementation with L-arginine improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation. However, L-arginine levels are best interpreted in the context of levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a competitive inhibitor of NO synthase. Thus, reference limits for circulating L-arginine and the L-arginine:ADMA ratio may help to determine the nutritional state of individuals at high cardiovascular risk in light of increased ADMA levels. We defined reference limits for plasma L-arginine in 1141 people and for the L-arginine:ADMA ratio in 1138 relatively healthy individuals from the Framingham Offspring Cohort. Plasma L-arginine and ADMA concentrations were determined by using a stable isotope-based LC-MS/MS method. The reference limits (2.5th and 97.5th percentiles) for plasma L-arginine were 41.0 ?mol/L (95% CI = 39.5-42.5 ?mol/L) and 114 ?mol/L (95% CI = 112-115 ?mol/L), whereas corresponding reference limits (2.5th and 97.5th percentiles) for the L-arginine:ADMA ratio were 74.3 ?mol/L (95% CI = 71.1-77.3 ?mol/L) and 225 ?mol/L (95% CI = 222-228 ?mol/L). Plasma L-arginine was positively associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and blood glucose levels, whereas the L-arginine:ADMA ratio was positively associated with eGFR and diastolic blood pressure but inversely associated with homocysteine and (log)C-reactive protein. We report reference levels for plasma L-arginine and for the L-arginine:ADMA ratio that may be helpful for evaluation of the effects of L-arginine supplementation in participants with an impaired L-arginine/NO pathway. PMID:22031661

  5. Point-of-Care International Normalized Ratio (INR) Monitoring Devices for Patients on Long-term Oral Anticoagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Subject of the Evidence-Based Analysis The purpose of this evidence based analysis report is to examine the safety and effectiveness of point-of-care (POC) international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring devices for patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT). Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Long-term OAT is typically required by patients with mechanical heart valves, chronic atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or peripheral arterial occlusion. It is estimated that approximately 1% of the population receives anticoagulation treatment and, by applying this value to Ontario, there are an estimated 132,000 patients on OAT in the province, a figure that is expected to increase with the aging population. Patients on OAT are regularly monitored and their medications adjusted to ensure that their INR scores remain in the therapeutic range. This can be challenging due to the narrow therapeutic window of warfarin and variation in individual responses. Optimal INR scores depend on the underlying indication for treatment and patient level characteristics, but for most patients the therapeutic range is an INR score of between 2.0 and 3.0. The current standard of care in Ontario for patients on long-term OAT is laboratory-based INR determination with management carried out by primary care physicians or anticoagulation clinics (ACCs). Patients also regularly visit a hospital or community-based facility to provide a venous blood samples (venipuncture) that are then sent to a laboratory for INR analysis. Experts, however, have commented that there may be under-utilization of OAT due to patient factors, physician factors, or regional practice variations and that sub-optimal patient management may also occur. There is currently no population-based Ontario data to permit the assessment of patient care, but recent systematic reviews have estimated that less that 50% of patients receive OAT on a routine basis and that patients are in the therapeutic range only 64% of the time. Overview of POC INR Devices POC INR devices offer an alternative to laboratory-based testing and venipuncture, enabling INR determination from a fingerstick sample of whole blood. Independent evaluations have shown POC devices to have an acceptable level of precision. They permit INR results to be determined immediately, allowing for more rapid medication adjustments. POC devices can be used in a variety of settings including physician offices, ACCs, long-term care facilities, pharmacies, or by the patients themselves through self-testing (PST) or self-management (PSM) techniques. With PST, patients measure their INR values and then contact their physician for instructions on dose adjustment, whereas with PSM, patients adjust the medication themselves based on pre-set algorithms. These models are not suitable for all patients and require the identification and education of suitable candidates. Potential advantages of POC devices include improved convenience to patients, better treatment compliance and satisfaction, more frequent monitoring and fewer thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications. Potential disadvantages of the device include the tendency to underestimate high INR values and overestimate low INR values, low thromboplastin sensitivity, inability to calculate a mean normal PT, and errors in INR determination in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies with certain instruments. Although treatment satisfaction and quality of life (QoL) may improve with POC INR monitoring, some patients may experience increased anxiety or preoccupation with their disease with these strategies. Evidence-Based Analysis Methods Research Questions 1. Effectiveness Does POC INR monitoring improve clinical outcomes in various settings compared to standard laboratory-based testing? Does POC INR monitoring impact patient satisfaction, QoL, compliance, acceptability, convenience compared to standard laboratory-based INR determination? Settings include primary care settings with use of POC INR dev

  6. Enhancement of cancer stem-like and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation property in oral epithelial cells with long-term nicotine exposure: Reversal by targeting SNAIL

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cheng-Chia; School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan ; Chang, Yu-Chao; Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan

    2013-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the major risk factors in the development and further progression of tumorigenesis, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Recent studies suggest that interplay cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) properties are responsible for the tumor maintenance and metastasis in OSCC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of long-term exposure with nicotine, a major component in cigarette, on CSCs and EMT characteristics. The possible reversal regulators were further explored in nicotine-induced CSCs and EMT properties in human oral epithelial (OE) cells. Long-term exposure with nicotine was demonstrated to up-regulate ALDH1 population in normal gingival and primary OSCC OE cells dose-dependently. Moreover, long-term nicotine treatment was found to enhance the self-renewal sphere-forming ability and stemness gene signatures expression and EMT regulators in OE cells. The migration/cell invasiveness/anchorage independent growth and in vivo tumor growth by nude mice xenotransplantation assay was enhanced in long-term nicotine-stimulated OE cells. Knockdown of Snail in long-term nicotine-treated OE cells was found to reduce their CSCs properties. Therapeutic delivery of Si-Snail significantly blocked the xenograft tumorigenesis of long-term nicotine-treated OSCC cells and largely significantly improved the recipient survival. The present study demonstrated that the enrichment of CSCs coupled EMT property in oral epithelial cells induced by nicotine is critical for the development of OSCC tumorigenesis. Targeting Snail might offer a new strategy for the treatment of OSCC patients with smoking habit. -- Highlights: ► Sustained nicotine treatment induced CSCs properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine treatment enhance EMT properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine exposure increased tumorigenicity of oral epithelial cells. ► Si-Snail blocked xenograft tumorigenesis of long-term nicotine-treated OSCC cells.

  7. Effects of long-term oral administration of amiodarone on the electromechanical performance of rabbit ventricular muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, I.; Suzuki, R.; Kamiya, K.; Iwata, H.; Toyama, J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of long-term administration of oral amiodarone on transmembrane action potential and contraction of ventricular muscle were investigated in rabbits. 2. ECGs of rabbits that received oral amiodarone 50 mg or 100 mg kg-1 daily for 4 weeks, showed a significant prolongation of RR, QT and corrected QT (QTc) intervals, whereas PQ and QRS were unaffected. Serum and myocardial tissue amiodarone concentrations were 0.14-0.18 micrograms ml-1 and 1.47-3.63 micrograms g-1 wet wt. respectively. 3. Right ventricular papillary muscles isolated from treated rabbits were characterized by a moderate prolongation of action potential duration (APD) compared with controls. A slight decrease of the maximum upstroke velocity (Vmax) was also observed at the higher dose. The APD prolongation by chronic amiodarone, unlike acute effects of sotalol, E-4031, Cs+ and 4-aminopyridine, did not show marked reverse use-dependence. 4. APD and Vmax restitution following slow basic stimuli (0.03 Hz) were unaffected by chronic treatment with amiodarone. 5. Acute application of amiodarone (10 microM) caused a significant decrease in APD and developed tension, as well as a marked use-dependent Vmax inhibition with fast recovery kinetics. 6. These findings suggest that a major and consistent electro-physiological effect of chronic amiodarone is repolarization delay (Class-III action) showing minimal frequency-dependence. However, when amiodarone above a certain concentration is present in the extracellular space, a fast kinetic Class-I action would be added as an acute effect. PMID:1422596

  8. Molecular analysis of the microbiota in hard feces from healthy rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) medicated with long term oral meloxicam

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Analgesia is often indicated in rabbits undergoing surgical procedures or suffering from various painful conditions and the most common adverse effects associated with NSAIDs occur in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The objective of this study was to determine the potential effect of long-term (21 days) meloxicam administration on the fecal bacterial microbiota in healthy rabbits. Samples of hard feces were collected from six rabbits treated with meloxicam (1 mg/kg orally once every 24 h) on days 0,6,14 and 21. Next generation sequencing of V4 16S rRNA gene products was performed. Results A total of 2589912 V4 rRNA gene sequences passed all quality control filters. Firmicutes predominated (82.0 ± 6.2%). Sixteen other phyla were also identified but other than Verrucomicrobia (4.4 ± 4.9%), all accounted for less than 1% of the identified sequences. Within Firmicutes, Clostridia was the dominant class, accounting for 76% of operational taxon units (OTUs). In general, there were only few differences observed between time points and different rabbits at the phylum level. A significant change was observed in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria over the 4 time points (P = 0.02). Conclusions The gastrointestinal tract of rabbits harbors dense and diverse microbiota. Significant alteration of the hard fecal microbiota does not appear to be a considerable adverse effect expected in rabbits treated for 21 days with oral meloxicam at a dose of 1 mg/kg. PMID:24618207

  9. The short- and long-term effects of orally administered high-dose reduced graphene oxide nanosheets on mouse behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhang, Zheyu; Liu, Yayun; Chu, Maoquan; Yang, Chengyu; Li, Wenhao; Shao, Yuxiang; Yue, Yan; Xu, Rujiao

    2015-11-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO), a carbon-based nanomaterial, has enormous potential in biomedical research, including invivo cancer therapeutics. Concerns over the toxicity remain outstanding and must be investigated before clinical application. The effect of rGO exposure on animal behaviors, such as learning and memory abilities, has not been clarified. Herein, we explored the short- and long-term effects of orally administered rGO on mouse behaviors, including general locomotor activity level, balance and neuromuscular coordination, exploratory and anxiety behaviors, and learning and memory abilities using open-field, rotarod, and Morris water maze tests. Compared with mice administered buffer-dispersed mouse chow or buffer alone, mice receiving a high dose of small or large rGO nanosheets showed little change in exploratory, anxiety-like, or learning and memory behaviors, although general locomotor activity, balance, and neuromuscular coordination were initially affected, which the mechanisms (e.g. the influence of rGO exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase in mouse serum) were discussed. The results presented in this work look to provide a deep understanding of the invivo toxicity of rGO to animals, especially its effect on learning and memory and other behaviors. PMID:26276695

  10. Oral toxicity of 1,2-dichloropropane: Acute, short-term, and long-term studies in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, J.V.; MacKenzie, W.F.; Ramanathan, R.; Muralidhara, S.; Kim, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation characterized the acute and short- and long-term toxic potency of orally administered 1,2-dichloropropane (DCP). In the acute and short-term studies, male rats of 250-300 g were gavaged with 0, 100, 250, 500, or 1000 mg DCP/kg in corn oil once daily for up to 10 consecutive days. Although ingestion of DCP caused body weight loss and CNS depression, few other toxic effects were manifest 24 hr after a single dose of the chemical. Morphological changes were limited to liver centrilobular cells in 500 and 1000 mg/kg rats. Similarly, elevated activity of some serum enzymes occurred only at these two highest dose levels. Hepatic nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPS) levels were decreased and renal NPS levels increased at 24 hr. In the short-term study resistance developed to DCP hepatotoxicity over the 10 consecutive days of exposure, as reflected by progressively lower serum enzyme levels and by decreases in the severity and incidence of toxic hepatitis and periportal vacuolization. Nucleolar enlargement in hepatocytes, however, was observed at all dosage levels at 5 and 10 days. There were a number of manifestations of hemolytic anemia, including erythrophagocytosis in the liver, splenic hemosiderosis and hyperplasia of erythropoietic elements of the red pulp, renal tubular cell hemosiderosis, and hyperbilirubinemia.

  11. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-arginine production.

    PubMed

    Park, Seok Hyun; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Tae Yong; Park, Jun Seok; Kim, Suok-Su; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid for diverse industrial and health product applications. Here we report the development of metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 21831 for the production of L-arginine. Random mutagenesis is first performed to increase the tolerance of C. glutamicum to L-arginine analogues, followed by systems metabolic engineering for further strain improvement, involving removal of regulatory repressors of arginine operon, optimization of NADPH level, disruption of L-glutamate exporter to increase L-arginine precursor and flux optimization of rate-limiting L-arginine biosynthetic reactions. Fed-batch fermentation of the final strain in 5?l and large-scale 1,500?l bioreactors allows production of 92.5 and 81.2?g?l(-1) of L-arginine with the yields of 0.40 and 0.35?g L-arginine per gram carbon source (glucose plus sucrose), respectively. The systems metabolic engineering strategy described here will be useful for engineering Corynebacteria strains for the industrial production of L-arginine and related products. PMID:25091334

  12. Drug-Containing Gelatin Treats as an Alternative to Gavage for Long-Term Oral Administration in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Ye, Bin; Zeng, Li; Chen, Younan; He, Sirong; Wang, Chengshi; Li, Xinli; Zhao, Jiuming; Shi, Meimei; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Cheng, Jingqiu; Wang, Wei; Lu, Yanrong

    2012-01-01

    Long-term oral administration of immunosuppressive agents to transplanted rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) is one of the major challenges in such studies. To avoid the drawbacks of gavage, we tested an alternative method for oral dosing of sirolimus in rhesus monkeys by adding sirolimus, a commonly used immunosuppressant, to gelatin to create drug-containing gelatin ‘treats’ that our macaques would accept voluntarily. We evaluated the oral bioequivalence of the oral solution and drug-containing gelatin and assayed the whole-blood levels of sirolimus after long-term drug delivery. We found that time to peak concentration but not peak concentration itself or the area under the time–concentration curve differed between the 2 groups. Although the maximal concentration data did not fit the condition of bioequivalence, those for the time–concentration curves from 0 to 24 h and from 0 h to infinity did; therefore the extent of sirolimus absorption did not differ significantly between the 2 formulations. The sirolimus levels for long-term drug delivery were equivalent at 2.97 ± 1.91 ng/mL in the gelatin group and 3.13 ± 2.03 ng/mL in the solution group. The gelatin dosing technique we describe here is convenient and effective for oral administration of sirolimus in rhesus monkeys and likely can be adapted for other drugs. PMID:23294893

  13. Acute L-Arginine supplementation does not increase nitric oxide production in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Alvares, Thiago Silveira; Conte-Junior, Carlos Adam; Silva, Joab Trajano; Paschoalin, Vnia Margaret Flosi

    2012-01-01

    Dietary supplements containing L-arginine have been marketed with the purpose of increasing vasodilatation, and thus, blood and oxygen supply to the exercising muscle. The present study evaluated the acute effect of L-arginine supplementation on indicators of NO production, nitrite (NO2-)?+?nitrate (NO3-) (NOx), in healthy subjects. Plasma concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) have also been addressed. Seventeen healthy males participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Blood samples were drawn from a left antecubital vein at baseline (T0). Afterwards, subjects were randomly submittedto 6?g of oral L-arginine supplementation (as L-arginine hydrochloride) or placebo (as corn starch); afterwards, the subjects remained at rest in supine position and blood samples were drawn again at 30 (T1), 60 (T2), 90 (T3) and 120 minutes (T4) after supplementation. To analyze NO production, NO3- was converted to NO2- by nitrate reductase, followed by the derivatization of NO2- with 2,3-diaminonaphthalene. NOx, ADMA and SDMA were analyzed using a high-performance liquid chromatography system and monitored with a fluorescence detector. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures showed no significant changes in NOx concentrations on the L-arginine group as compared to placebo group at any of the fivetime points (T0: 17.6??3.9 vs 14.6??2.3??mol/L; T1: 15.8??2.4 vs 14.3??1.7??mol/L; T2: 16.8??4.9 vs 13.7??2.7??mol/L; T3: 16.7??3.9 vs 14.6??2.1??mol/L; T4: 15.1??2.8 vs 13.5??3.5??mol/L). Furthermore, plasma levels of ADMA and SDMA were not statistically significant between the L-arginine and placebo groups at T0 (0.43??0.19 vs 0.39??0.15??mol/L and 1.83??1.13 vs 1.70??0.62??mol/L), respectively. In conclusion, acute L-arginine supplementation does not increase plasma concentration of NOx in healthy individuals with normal plasma concentrations of ADMA. PMID:22691607

  14. Long-term therapy with oral treprostinil in pulmonary arterial hypertension failed to lead to improvement in important physiologic measures: results from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Rosechelle; Bartolome, Sonja; Velez-Martinez, Mariella; Darsaklis, Konstantina; Kingman, Martha; Harden, Scarlet; Torres, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sustained-release oral treprostinil, an oral prostacyclin, led to significant improvement in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) versus placebo in treatment-naive patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but failed to lead to significant improvement in two 16-week trials in patients receiving background PAH therapies (FREEDOM studies). Long-term studies are lacking. Our objective was to evaluate 6MWD, functional class, hemodynamics, and other long-term outcomes during oral treprostinil administration in PAH. Patients receiving oral treprostinil through the FREEDOM studies at our institution were included and were followed for up to 7 years. The primary end point was change in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at first follow-up catheterization. Other end points included 6MWD, functional class, and other hemodynamic results. Thirty-seven patients received oral treprostinil for a median of 948 days, with 81%, 61%, and 47% continuing therapy at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Mean treprostinil dose at 3, 12, and 24 months was 4.3 2.3, 8.6 3.2, and 11.7 5.8 mg/24 h, respectively. Compared with pretreatment values, there was no significant change in 6MWD at 3 or 12 months, no improvement in functional class at 12 months, and no significant change in hemodynamics at the first follow-up catheterization (N = 34). Oral treprostinil dose was inversely associated with change in PVR (r = ?0.42, P < 0.05), and change in PVR was numerically better among patients in the highest dosing quartile. No significant improvement in 6MWD, functional class, or hemodynamics versus pretreatment values was seen with long-term oral treprostinil therapy, potentially because of inability to achieve a clinically effective dose. PMID:26401252

  15. l-Arginine supplementation enhances antioxidant activity and erythrocyte integrity in sickle cell anaemia subjects.

    PubMed

    Kehinde, M O; Ogungbemi, S I; Anigbogu, C N; Jaja, S I

    2015-09-01

    The effect of oral, low-dose l-arginine supplementation (1g/day for 6 weeks) on antioxidant activity, haematological parameters and osmotic fragility of red blood cells was investigated in sickle cell disease sufferers. Twenty eight sickle cell anaemia subjects were recruited for the study. Five millilitres of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), total antioxidant enzymes (TAE) activity, malondialdehyde concentration ([MDA]), RBC count, [Hb], PCV, MCHC, MCV, MCH, percent irreversibly sickled cells (%ISC)) and osmotic fragility of red blood cells in the subjects. l-arginine supplementation increased [R] (p<0.001), TAE activity (p<0.05) and MCV (<0.05) but reduced plasma [MDA], MCHC, MCH and %ISC (p<0.001, respectively). ?[R] correlated positively with ?TAE (r=0.8) and negatively with ?[MDA] (r=-0.7) and ?%ISC (r=-0.5). Also ?TAE activity correlated negatively with ?[MDA] (r=-0.7) and ?%ISC (r=-0.6). Supplementation shifted the osmotic fragiligram to the right and reduced the concentrations of NaCl at which initial and complete lyses of erythrocytes occurred. Study showed that low-dose, oral l-arginine increased antioxidant activity, red blood cell resistance to osmotic lysis but reduced red cell density in SCD. PMID:26051155

  16. L-arginine and Vitamin D Adjunctive Therapies in Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Anna P.; Waramori, Govert; Pontororing, Gysje J.; Kenangalem, Enny; Wiguna, Andri; Tjitra, Emiliana; Sandjaja; Lolong, Dina B.; Yeo, Tsin W.; Chatfield, Mark D.; Soemanto, Retno K.; Bastian, Ivan; Lumb, Richard; Maguire, Graeme P.; Eisman, John; Price, Ric N.; Morris, Peter S.; Kelly, Paul M.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D (vitD) and L-arginine have important antimycobacterial effects in humans. Adjunctive therapy with these agents has the potential to improve outcomes in active tuberculosis (TB). Methods In a 4-arm randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled factorial trial in adults with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in Timika, Indonesia, we tested the effect of oral adjunctive vitD 50,000 IU 4-weekly or matching placebo, and L-arginine 6.0 g daily or matching placebo, for 8 weeks, on proportions of participants with negative 4-week sputum culture, and on an 8-week clinical score (weight, FEV1, cough, sputum, haemoptysis). All participants with available endpoints were included in analyses according to the study arm to which they were originally assigned. Adults with new smear-positive PTB were eligible. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00677339. Results 200 participants were enrolled, less than the intended sample size: 50 received L-arginine + active vitD, 49 received L-arginine + placebo vit D, 51 received placebo L-arginine + active vitD and 50 received placebo L-arginine + placebo vitD. According to the factorial model, 99 people received arginine, 101 placebo arginine, 101 vitamin D, 99 placebo vitamin D. Results for the primary endpoints were available in 155 (4-week culture) and 167 (clinical score) participants. Sputum culture conversion was achieved by week 4 in 48/76 (63%) participants in the active L-arginine versus 48/79 (61%) in placebo L-arginine arms (risk difference ?3%, 95% CI ?19 to 13%), and in 44/75 (59%) in the active vitD versus 52/80 (65%) in the placebo vitD arms (risk difference 7%, 95% CI ?9 to 22%). The mean clinical outcome score also did not differ between study arms. There were no effects of the interventions on adverse event rates including hypercalcaemia, or other secondary outcomes. Conclusion Neither vitD nor L-arginine supplementation, at the doses administered and with the power attained, affected TB outcomes. Registry ClinicalTrials.gov. Registry number: NCT00677339 PMID:23967066

  17. Long-Term Outcomes of a Dental Postbaccalaureate Program: Increasing Dental Student Diversity and Oral Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Wides, Cynthia D.; Brody, Harvey A.; Alexander, Charles J.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Mertz, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry established the Dental Postbaccalaureate Program in 1998 to provide reapplication assistance to students from economically and/or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds who were previously denied admission to dental school. The goals were to increase diversity in the dental school student population and improve access to dental services for underserved populations. This article assesses the program’s short-, mid-, and long-term outcomes and is the first to examine long-term practice patterns after a dental postbaccalaureate program. Data collected on all participant (n=94) demographics, pre/post-program DAT scores, and post-program dental school admission results were used to assess short- and mid-term outcomes. Long-term outcomes and practice patterns were assessed using results of a census survey administered between 2009 and 2011 to the participants who had completed dental school and been in practice for at least two years (n=57). The survey had a response rate of 93 percent (n=53). Descriptive statistical techniques were used to examine the responses and to compare them to U.S. Census Bureau data and nationally available practice data for new dental graduates. Program participants’ DAT scores improved by an average of two points, and 98 percent were accepted to dental school. All survey respondents were practicing dentistry, and 81 percent reported serving underserved populations. These participants treat more Medicaid recipients than do most dentists, and their patient population is more diverse than the general population. The outcomes demonstrate that the program’s graduates are increasing diversity in the dental student population and that their practices are providing access to care for underserved populations. PMID:23658398

  18. Beneficial effects of L-arginine supplementation in experimental hyperlipemia-hyperglycemia in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Popov, Doina; Costache, Gabriela; Georgescu, Adriana; Enache, Mirela

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether administration of L-arginine, the substrate for nitric oxide synthesis, was able to ameliorate the endothelial dysfunction and the morphological changes induced by the combined insult of hyperlipemia and hyperglycemia. To this purpose, golden Syrian hamsters were rendered simultaneously hyperlipemic and diabetic (HD group) for 24 weeks, and then orally treated with 622.14 mg/kg per day L-arginine, for 12 weeks (HD + L-arg group). The following assays were carried out: (1) spectrophotometric: concentrations of circulating glucose, cholesterol, and creatinine, the activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and the osmotic fragility of erythrocyte plasmalemma; (2) myographic: the endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation of the resistance arteries (i.d. 210-250 microm) to 10(-8) to 10(-4) M acetylcholine (ACh) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP); and (3) electron-microscopic: the ultrastructure of the resistance arteries, myocardium, and kidney glomeruli, which are main targets of hypertensive complications. The results showed that oral supplementation with L-arginine in simultaneous hyperlipemia-hyperglycemia induced in hamsters had favorable effects on: (1) homeostasis, i.e., diminished the concentration of circulating glucose (by ~63%) and cholesterol (by approximately 10%), reduced the ACE activity (by approximately 45%), and lowered the osmotic fragility of erythrocyte plasmalemma (as marker for the oxidative stress in plasma); (2) mesenteric resistance arteries, which showed (in 10(-4) M ACh) an improved endothelium-dependent relaxation (72.40+/-4.6% in the HD + L-arg group vs 61.90+/-1.45% in the HD group) and a reduced thickness (approximately 1.32-fold) of the smooth muscle cells' extracellular matrix; and (3) the heart, which displayed approximately 16% diminishing of the thickness of the left ventricular wall, and an apparently normal structure of the myocardium; the restoration of the thickness of the pericapillary extracellular matrix to almost normal dimensions was also observed. Administration of L-arginine did not modify the high level of plasma creatinine determined for the HD group (approximately 48% increased vs control group) and had no effect on the thickened, nodular basal lamina of the kidney capillaries. The results indicate that endothelial dysfunction established in combined hyperlipemia-diabetes is distinctive for each vascular bed (mesenteric arterioles, heart capillaries, kidney glomerular capillaries), and there is a reversible stage of the dysfunction in which L-arginine oral supplementation induced beneficial effects. PMID:12012211

  19. Long-term persistence of oral human papillomavirus type 16: the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study.

    PubMed

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Kreimer, Aime R; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; O'Keefe, Michael T; Ingles, Donna J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with oral HPV16 is believed to drive the development of most oropharyngeal cancers. However, patterns of oral HPV16 persistence remain understudied, particularly among HIV-negative individuals. Oral HPV16 persistence was evaluated among 1,626 participants of the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Twenty-three oral HPV16-positive men who provided an oral gargle sample on ?2 study visits were included in the analysis. Archived oral samples from all follow-up visits were tested for HPV16 using Linear Array and INNO-LiPA detection methods. Persistence was evaluated using consecutive HPV16-positive visits held approximately 6 months apart and using the Kaplan-Meier method. Oral HPV16-positive men were aged 18 to 64 years [median, 36 years; interquartile range (IQR), 25-42] and were followed for a median of 44.4 months (IQR, 29.9-49.5). Of 13 incident infections, 4 (30.8%) persisted ?12 months, 1 (10.0%) persisted ?24 months, and none persisted ?36 months [median infection duration, 7.3 months; 95% confidence interval (CI), 6.4-NA)]. Of 10 prevalent infections, 9 (90.0%) persisted ?12 months, 8 (80.0%) persisted ?24 months, 4 (57.1%) persisted ?36 months, and 2 (40.0%) persisted ?48 months (median infection duration, NA). Twelve-month persistence of incident infections increased significantly with age (Ptrend = 0.028). Prevalent oral HPV16 infections in men persisted longer than newly acquired infections, and persistence appeared to increase with age. These findings may explain the high prevalence of oral HPV observed at older ages. Understanding oral HPV16 persistence will aid in the identification of men at high-risk of developing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25575501

  20. Influence of L-arginine during bovine in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Velasco Guimarães; da Silva, Bruno Baraúna; de Sá, André Luiz Alves; da Costa, Nathalia Nogueira; Sampaio, Rafael Vilar; Cordeiro, Marcela da Silva; Santana, Priscila Di Paula Bessa; Adona, Paulo Roberto; Santos, Simone do Socorro Damasceno; Miranda, Moysés dos Santos; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of using L-arginine during in vitro fertilization (IVF) on in vitro embryonic development using Bos taurus and Bos indicus semen. Effect of different concentrations (0, 1, 10 and 50 mM) of L-arginine, added to the IVF medium, was evaluated on the fertilization rate at 18 h post-fertilization (hpf), NO3(-)/NO2(-) production during IVF by the Griess colorimetric method (30 hpf), cleavage and blastocyst rates (on Day 2 and Day 7 of culture, respectively) and total blastocyst cell number (Day 7 of culture). The results reveal that the addition of 50 mM L-arginine to IVF medium, with either Bos taurus or Bos indicus spermatozoa, decreased the cleavage rate and blastocyst rate compared to the control group. Other concentrations did not affect embryo production. However, 1 mM L-arginine with Bos indicus semen increased the proportion of hatched blastocysts. These results indicate that high L-arginine concentrations may exhibit toxic effects on bovine gametes during in vitro fertilization. PMID:25651608

  1. The effect of long-term oral dantrolene on the neuromuscular action of rocuronium: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jinwoo; Song, Sejin; Kim, Mun-Cheol; Kim, Kye-Min

    2014-01-01

    Oral dantrolene causes a dose-dependent depression of skeletal muscle contractility. A 52-year-old man treated with oral dantrolene for spasticity after spinal cord injury was scheduled to undergo irrigation and drainage of a thigh abscess under general anesthesia. He had taken 50 mg oral dantrolene per day for 3 years. Under standard neuromuscular monitoring, anesthesia was performed with propofol, rocuronium, and sevoflurane. A bolus dose of ED95 (0.3 mg/kg) of rocuronium could not depress T1 up to 95%. An additional dose of rocuronium depressed T1 completely and decreased the train-of-four (TOF) count to zero. There was no apparent prolongation of the neuromuscular blocking action of rocuronium. The TOF ratio was recovered to more than 0.9 within 40 minutes after the last dose of rocuronium. A small dose of oral dantrolene does not prolong the duration of action and recovery of rocuronium. PMID:24624274

  2. Changes in oral cytokeratin expression in HIV-infected subjects with long-term use of HAART

    PubMed Central

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Mitarnun, Winyou; Talungchit, Sineepat; Sriplung, Hutcha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine 1) the expression of oral cytokeratins (CKs) among HIV-infected subjects compared to non-HIV controls, 2) the oral CKs expression in the subjects with HAART compared to those without HAART, and 3) factors associated with the expression of oral CKs. Materials and methods Oral tissues from buccal mucosa were obtained by punched biopsy in HIV-infected subjects with and without HAART, and non-HIV individuals. The samples were processed for immunohistochemical studies of CK1, CK13, CK14, CK16 and involucrin. The staining intensity was scored and recorded. Logistic regression analysis and multi-way ANOVA test were performed. Results The expression of CK13, CK14, and CK16 was found to be significantly different between HIV-infected subjects and non-HIV individuals (p<.05). The expression of those CKs was also significantly different between those who were and were not on HAART (p<.05). No significant difference between the groups was observed regarding CK1 and involucrin. Conclusions Oral epithelial cell differentiation as marked by the CKs expression is affected by HIV infection and use of HAART. CKs may be the useful biomarkers to identify HIV-infected subjects who are at risk of malignant transformation of the oral mucosa due to HIV infection and HAART. PMID:22747944

  3. Osteonecrosis of the Torus Palatinus in the Setting of Long-Term Oral Bisphosphonate Use--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joshua L; Larson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are medications used orally and intravenously for a variety of conditions including cancer metastatic to bone, hypercalcemia of malignancy, Paget's disease and osteoporosis. Osteonecrosis of the jaw has been related to bisphosphonate use. Osteonecrosis of the jaw most commonly occurs in the setting of intravenous bisphosphonate use and concomitant dental work or trauma. Oral bisphosphonates have much less risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. We present an interesting case of a patient on an oral bisphosphonate for an extended period of time (nine years), with a torus palatinus, who burned her palate while eating a slice of pizza. Over six months later, she presented with an area of denuded bone and diagnosis consistent with osteonecrosis of the torus palatinus. PMID:26882578

  4. Long-Term Oral Administration of Capsicum baccatum Extracts Does Not Alter Behavioral, Hematological, and Metabolic Parameters in CF1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Aline Rigon; Leonardi, Bianca; Kalinine, Eduardo; de Souza, Diogo Onofre; Portela, Luis Valmor; Gosmann, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Our group showed that crude ethanol (CE) and butanol (BUT) extracts of Capsicum baccatum presented anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Furthermore, the flavonoid and total phenolic contents were positively correlated with both of these properties observed for C. baccatum extracts. The present study demonstrated that 60 days of oral administration of CE and BUT (200?mg/kg) in mice did not cause significant differences in the following parameters evaluated: hematological profile, body weight and relative weight of visceral organs, systemic lipid profile, glucose homeostasis (GTT), kidney and hepatic biochemical markers, and spontaneous locomotion and anxiety-like behavior. Altogether, these results indicate for the first time that the long-term oral administration of C. baccatum extracts does not affect specific aspects of CF1 mice physiology, suggesting their safety, building up the venue to test their efficacy in animal models underlying persistent activation of oxidative and inflammatory pathways. PMID:23320023

  5. Long-Term Oral Administration of Capsicum baccatum Extracts Does Not Alter Behavioral, Hematological, and Metabolic Parameters in CF1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Aline Rigon; Leonardi, Bianca; Zimmer, Eduardo Rigon; Kalinine, Eduardo; de Souza, Diogo Onofre; Portela, Luis Valmor; Gosmann, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Our group showed that crude ethanol (CE) and butanol (BUT) extracts of Capsicum baccatum presented anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Furthermore, the flavonoid and total phenolic contents were positively correlated with both of these properties observed for C. baccatum extracts. The present study demonstrated that 60 days of oral administration of CE and BUT (200?mg/kg) in mice did not cause significant differences in the following parameters evaluated: hematological profile, body weight and relative weight of visceral organs, systemic lipid profile, glucose homeostasis (GTT), kidney and hepatic biochemical markers, and spontaneous locomotion and anxiety-like behavior. Altogether, these results indicate for the first time that the long-term oral administration of C. baccatum extracts does not affect specific aspects of CF1 mice physiology, suggesting their safety, building up the venue to test their efficacy in animal models underlying persistent activation of oxidative and inflammatory pathways. PMID:23320023

  6. A new era in palaeomicrobiology: prospects for ancient dental calculus as a long-term record of the human oral microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, Christina; Speller, Camilla; Collins, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The field of palaeomicrobiology is dramatically expanding thanks to recent advances in high-throughput biomolecular sequencing, which allows unprecedented access to the evolutionary history and ecology of human-associated and environmental microbes. Recently, human dental calculus has been shown to be an abundant, nearly ubiquitous, and long-term reservoir of the ancient oral microbiome, preserving not only microbial and host biomolecules but also dietary and environmental debris. Modern investigations of native human microbiota have demonstrated that the human microbiome plays a central role in health and chronic disease, raising questions about changes in microbial ecology, diversity and function through time. This paper explores the current state of ancient oral microbiome research and discusses successful applications, methodological challenges and future possibilities in elucidating the intimate evolutionary relationship between humans and their microbes. PMID:25487328

  7. A new era in palaeomicrobiology: prospects for ancient dental calculus as a long-term record of the human oral microbiome.

    PubMed

    Warinner, Christina; Speller, Camilla; Collins, Matthew J

    2015-01-19

    The field of palaeomicrobiology is dramatically expanding thanks to recent advances in high-throughput biomolecular sequencing, which allows unprecedented access to the evolutionary history and ecology of human-associated and environmental microbes. Recently, human dental calculus has been shown to be an abundant, nearly ubiquitous, and long-term reservoir of the ancient oral microbiome, preserving not only microbial and host biomolecules but also dietary and environmental debris. Modern investigations of native human microbiota have demonstrated that the human microbiome plays a central role in health and chronic disease, raising questions about changes in microbial ecology, diversity and function through time. This paper explores the current state of ancient oral microbiome research and discusses successful applications, methodological challenges and future possibilities in elucidating the intimate evolutionary relationship between humans and their microbes. PMID:25487328

  8. Combined oral pulse and topical corticosteroid therapy for severe alopecia areata in children: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Lalosevic, Jovan; Gajic-Veljic, Mirjana; Bonaci-Nikolic, Branka; Nikolic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    There are no widely accepted therapy protocols for severe alopecia areata (AA). We treated 65 children/adolescents with AA affecting >30% of scalp. Fourty-three percent of patients had AA plurifocalis (AAP). Fifty-seven percent had AA subtotalis (AAS), AAP+ophiasis (AAP+OPH), and alopecia totalis/universalis (AT/AU). Long-term follow-up (median 96 months) data were available for 69% of patients. Oral dexamethasone (prednisolone 5 mg/kg equivalent) was given once in 4 weeks. Patients received 6, 9, or 12 pulses. Clobetasol propionate 0.05% ointment under plastic wrap occlusion was applied 6 days a week. Hair growth was assessed on a scale ranging 0-100% of regrowth in individual AA lesions. Regrowth >50% was considered good response. Six to twelve months months after the therapy, 56.9% of patients had >75% of hair regrowth. In AAP, 65.5% had complete regrowth. 61.5% of all patients were considered good responders. Significantly, higher percentage of good responders was found in AA lasting ?12 months. No patients had serious side effects. There was no change in stability of the hair status at the long-term follow-up. Most AA patients had beneficial effects with this protocol. Best results were in AAP and AAP+OPH. Combined topical and oral pulse corticosteroid therapy of AA in children shows long-lasting results, without serious side effects. PMID:26179196

  9. [Change in the incidence of diabetes mellitus in oral cancer patients based on a long-term comparative study].

    PubMed

    Végh, Dániel; Bányai, Dorottya; Ujpál, Márta

    2015-03-01

    Our research is focused on the incidence of diabetes mellitus and glucose metabolic disorders among oral cancer patients and the frequency of different oral localizations of cancer. Diabetes mellitus affects 7% of the Hungarian population. This study uses data spanning 14 years, with 2 datasets of 1998-1999 and 2012-2013, collected first hand by the authors. These datasets have led us to examine the blood glucose level in 267 patients with histologically confirmed malignant tumours in the oral cavity. Diabetes mellitus was found in 59 of them (22.1%), The blood glucose was elevated in 32 cases (12%). The most frequent tumor locations among the diabetic patients: labial, lingual and gingival tumors gingivae. Comparative epidemiological study demonstrates that in 2012-2013 dataset there was an increased observed percentage of people with diabetes mellitus [17.6% to 22.1%]. The percentage of patients with IFG (impaired fasting glucose) also increased from 9.8% to 12%. Overall the number of patients with glucose metabolic disorders climbed from 27.4% to 34.1%, (p > 0.05). Our intention of this introductory analysis is to emphasize the close connection of these two very important disease groups, and the wider spread of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26117953

  10. Long-term oral administration of aluminum in mice. Aluminum distribution in tissues and effects on calcium metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anghileri, L J; Maincent, P; Thouvenot, P

    1994-01-01

    Six months of oral administration of aluminum lactate provokes an important accumulation of aluminum in various tissues of mice. The accumulation magnitude order is spleen > kidney > brain > liver > blood. No systemic toxic effects (weight loss or neurolytic effects) were observed. Values of calcium content and 45Ca-uptake by the different tissues showed no modifications of calcium metabolism. The lack of calcium homeostasis modification caused by a probable aluminum insolubilization, and the incidence of other individual factors on individual deviations from group behavior is discussed. PMID:8147566

  11. Hypertensive Crisis and Left Ventricular Thrombi after an Upper Respiratory Infection during the Long-term Use of Oral Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Natsuko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Mizuno, Tomofumi; Kato, Yukari; Suga, Norihiro; Yoshino, Masabumi; Miura, Naoto; Banno, Shogo; Imai, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman who had been using oral contraceptives for 10 years developed hypertensive crisis with papilloedema after an upper respiratory infection. Laboratory data showed hyperreninemic hyperaldosteronism and elevated levels of fibrinogen, fibrin, and fibrinogen degradation products. Echocardiography demonstrated two masses (18 mm) in the left ventricle. On the fourth hospital day, cerebral infarction, renal infarction, and upper mesenteric artery occlusion suddenly occurred despite the blood pressure being well-controlled using anti-hypertensive drugs. Echocardiography revealed the disappearance of the left ventricular masses, which suggested left ventricular thrombi. Cessation of the contraceptives and administration of heparin, warfarin, and anti-platelets drugs improved her general condition. PMID:26726092

  12. Long-Term Changes in Human Colonic Bifidobacterium Populations Induced by a 5-Day Oral Amoxicillin-Clavulanic Acid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, Irène; Lévêque, Christophe; Magne, Fabien; Suau, Antonia; Pochart, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible modifications due to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) treatment on total bacteria and on Bifidobacterium species balance in human colonic microbiota. Eighteen healthy volunteers (19 to 36 years old) were given a 875/125 mg dose of AMC twice a day for 5 days. Fecal samples were obtained before and after antibiotic exposure. After total DNA extraction, total bacteria and bifidobacteria were specifically quantified using real-time PCR. Dominant species were monitored over time using bacterial and bifidobacterial Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE). At the end of AMC exposure, total bacterial concentrations as well as bifidobacteria concentrations were significantly reduced compared to before AMC exposure:10.7±0.1 log10 16S rRNA gene copies/g vs 11.1±0.1 log10 (p = 0.003) and 8.1±0.5 log10 16S rRNA gene copies/g vs 9.4±0.3 log10 (p = 0.003), respectively. At the same time, the mean similarity percentages of TTGE bacteria and TTGE bifidobacteria profiles were significantly reduced compared to before AMC exposure: 51.6%±3.5% vs 81.4%±2.1% and 55.8%±7.6% vs 84.5%±4.1%, respectively. Occurrence of B. adolescentis, B. bifidum and B. pseudocatenulatum/B. catenulatum species significantly decreased. Occurrence of B. longum remained stable. Moreover, the number of distinct Bifidobacterium species per sample significantly decreased (1.5±0.3 vs 2.3±0.3; p = 0.01). Two months after AMC exposure, the mean similarity percentage of TTGE profiles was 55.6% for bacteria and 62.3% for bifidobacteria. These results clearly demonstrated that a common antibiotic treatment may qualitatively alter the colonic microbiota. Such modifications may have potential long-term physiological consequences. PMID:23209691

  13. Intracellular L-arginine concentration does not determine NO production in endothelial cells: Implications on the 'L-arginine paradox'

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Soyoung; Mohan, Srinidi; Fung, Ho-Leung

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our findings provide a possible solution to the 'L-arginine paradox'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular L-arginine concentration is the major determinant of NO production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular L-arginine action is limited by cellular ARG transport, not the K{sub m} of NOS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explain how L-arginine supplementation can work to increase endothelial function. -- Abstract: We examined the relative contributory roles of extracellular vs. intracellular L-arginine (ARG) toward cellular activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human endothelial cells. EA.hy926 human endothelial cells were incubated with different concentrations of {sup 15}N{sub 4}-ARG, ARG, or L-arginine ethyl ester (ARG-EE) for 2 h. To modulate ARG transport, siRNA for ARG transporter (CAT-1) vs. sham siRNA were transfected into cells. ARG transport activity was assessed by cellular fluxes of ARG, {sup 15}N{sub 4}-ARG, dimethylarginines, and L-citrulline by an LC-MS/MS assay. eNOS activity was determined by nitrite/nitrate accumulation, either via a fluorometric assay or by{sup 15}N-nitrite or estimated {sup 15}N{sub 3}-citrulline concentrations when {sup 15}N{sub 4}-ARG was used to challenge the cells. We found that ARG-EE incubation increased cellular ARG concentration but no increase in nitrite/nitrate was observed, while ARG incubation increased both cellular ARG concentration and nitrite accumulation. Cellular nitrite/nitrate production did not correlate with cellular total ARG concentration. Reduced {sup 15}N{sub 4}-ARG cellular uptake in CAT-1 siRNA transfected cells vs. control was accompanied by reduced eNOS activity, as determined by {sup 15}N-nitrite, total nitrite and {sup 15}N{sub 3}-citrulline formation. Our data suggest that extracellular ARG, not intracellular ARG, is the major determinant of NO production in endothelial cells. It is likely that once transported inside the cell, ARG can no longer gain access to the membrane-bound eNOS. These observations indicate that the 'L-arginine paradox' should not consider intracellular ARG concentration as a reference point.

  14. Responses of dairy cattle to long-term and short-term supplementation with oral selenium and vitamin E

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, H.D.; Thomas, J.W.; Johnson, T.; Marteniuk, J.V.; Morrow, D.A.; Ullrey, D.E. )

    1988-07-01

    In a two-lactation-gestation cycle experiment, 152 Holstein cows with low serum Se and vitamin E were fed total mixed rations and assigned at parturition to four groups (1, control; 2, 500 IU vitamin E/d; 3, 2 mg Se/d; 4, 500 IU vitamin E plus 2 mg Se/d). Supplements were not fed during dry periods. Serium Se and vitamin E were increased within 1 mo by oral supplements. Maximal mean serum Se in cycles 1 and 2 occurred in groups 3 and 4, respectively. Maximal mean serum vitamin E in cycle 1 and 2 occurred in groups 4 and 2, respectively. Selenium treatment of the dams increased Se in colostrum and in serum of presuckle calves. Vitamin E supplementation of dams did not affect vitamin E in serum of presuckled calves. Reproductive performance was not affected by supplement. In an 8-wk study, 24 lactating cows with low serum Se were assigned (6/group) to 0, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg supplemental Se/d. Maximal mean serum Se concentrations of 23, 56, 71, and 79 ng/ml were attained by wk 4 in the above respective groups. These data indicate that 2 to 2.5 mg supplemental Se/cow per d were inadequate for desirable serum Se concentrations and support recent changes in allowed Se supplementation for dairy cattle.

  15. The long term oral regulation of blood glucose in diabetic patients by using of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 expressing CTB-IGF-1 hybrid protein.

    PubMed

    Bazi, Zahra; Jalili, Mahsa; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2013-11-01

    Regarding to the high prevalence and comorbidities of chronic high blood glucose in diabetic patients and the limited efficacy and current painful treatments. It is necessary to improve new treatments that are non-invasive and long-term for controlling blood glucose. Recent studies have shown that the healthy microflora in different body organs can perform as the gene vectors for expressing different types of gene therapies in situ. We have proposed that by constructing a recombinant Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 that expresses CTB-IGF-1 hybrid gene under control of ompC glucose sensitive promoter, the intestinal glucose level can be regulated. This method in comparison with other methods is a non-invasive way to control the blood glucose orally and it can be used for all types of diabetes. PMID:24074833

  16. The Effects of Long-Term Oral Benfotiamine Supplementation on Peripheral Nerve Function and Inflammatory Markers in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, David A.; Diep, Lien M.; Hovden, Inger Anette; Nilsen, Kristian B.; Sveen, Kari Anne; Seljeflot, Ingebjrg; Hanssen, Kristian F.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the effects of long-term oral benfotiamine supplementation on peripheral nerve function and soluble inflammatory markers in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study randomly assigned 67 patients with type 1 diabetes to receive 24-month benfotiamine (300 mg/day) or placebo supplementation. Peripheral nerve function and levels of soluble inflammatory variables were assessed at baseline and at 24 months. RESULTS Fifty-nine patients completed the study. Marked increases in whole-blood concentrations of thiamine and thiamine diphosphate were found in the benfotiamine group (both P < 0.001 vs. placebo). However, no significant differences in changes in peripheral nerve function or soluble inflammatory biomarkers were observed between the groups. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that high-dose benfotiamine (300 mg/day) supplementation over 24 months has no significant effects upon peripheral nerve function or soluble markers of inflammation in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:22446172

  17. Successive Oral Immunizations Against Piscirickettsia Salmonis and Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus are Required to Maintain a Long-Term Protection in Farmed Salmonids

    PubMed Central

    Tobar, Ivn; Arancibia, Sergio; Torres, Constanza; Vera, Vernica; Soto, Paola; Carrasco, Claudia; Alvarado, Marcelo; Neira, Eduardo; Arcos, Sandra; Tobar, Jaime A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is a growing demand to determine the protective status of vaccinated fish in order to prevent diseases outbreaks. A set of different parameters that include the infectious and immunological status of vaccinated salmonids from 622 Chilean farms were analyzed during 20112014. The aim of this study was to optimize the vaccination program of these centers through the determination of the protective state of vaccinated fish using oral immunizations. This state was determined from the association of the concentration of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) in the serum and the mortality rate of vaccinated fish. Salmonids were vaccinated with different commercial mono- or polyvalent vaccines against salmonid rickettsial septicemia (SRS) and infectious salmon anemia (ISA), first by the intraperitoneal injection of oil-adjuvanted antigens and then by the stimulation of mucosal immunity using oral vaccines as a booster vaccination. The results showed that high levels of specific IgM antibodies were observed after injectable vaccination, reaching a maximum concentration at 600800?degree-days. Similar levels of antibodies were observed when oral immunizations were administrated. The high concentration of antibodies [above 2750?ng/mL for ISA virus (ISAv) and 3500?ng/mL for SRS] was maintained for a period of 800?degree-days after each vaccination procedure. In this regard, oral immunizations maintained a long-term high concentration of anti-SRS and anti-ISAv specific IgM antibodies. When the concentration of antibodies decreased below 2000?pg/mL, a window of susceptibility to SRS infection was observed in the farm, suggesting a close association between antibody levels and fish protective status. These results demonstrated that, in the field, several oral immunizations are essential to uphold a high level of specific anti-pathogens antibodies and, therefore, the protective status during the whole productive cycle. PMID:26074916

  18. Long-term oral methylphenidate treatment in adolescent and adult rats: differential effects on brain morphology and function.

    PubMed

    van der Marel, Kajo; Klomp, Anne; Meerhoff, Gideon F; Schipper, Pieter; Lucassen, Paul J; Homberg, Judith R; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Methylphenidate is a widely prescribed psychostimulant for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents, which raises questions regarding its potential interference with the developing brain. In the present study, we investigated effects of 3 weeks oral methylphenidate (5?mg/kg) vs vehicle treatment on brain structure and function in adolescent (post-natal day [P]25) and adult (P65) rats. Following a 1-week washout period, we used multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess effects of age and treatment on independent component analysis-based functional connectivity (resting-state functional MRI), D-amphetamine-induced neural activation responses (pharmacological MRI), gray and white matter tissue volumes and cortical thickness (postmortem structural MRI), and white matter structural integrity (postmortem diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)). Many age-related differences were found, including cortical thinning, white matter development, larger dopamine-mediated activation responses and increased striatal functional connectivity. Methylphenidate reduced anterior cingulate cortical network strength in both adolescents and adults. In contrast to clinical observations from ADHD patient studies, methylphenidate did not increase white matter tissue volume or cortical thickness in rat. Nevertheless, DTI-based fractional anisotropy was higher in the anterior part of the corpus callosum following adolescent treatment. Furthermore, methylphenidate differentially affected adolescents and adults as evidenced by reduced striatal volume and myelination upon adolescent treatment, although we did not observe adverse treatment effects on striatal functional activity. Our findings of small but significant age-dependent effects of psychostimulant treatment in the striatum of healthy rats highlights the importance of further research in children and adolescents that are exposed to methylphenidate. PMID:23851400

  19. Long-Term Oral Methylphenidate Treatment in Adolescent and Adult Rats: Differential Effects on Brain Morphology and Function

    PubMed Central

    van der Marel, Kajo; Klomp, Anne; Meerhoff, Gideon F; Schipper, Pieter; Lucassen, Paul J; Homberg, Judith R; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Methylphenidate is a widely prescribed psychostimulant for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents, which raises questions regarding its potential interference with the developing brain. In the present study, we investigated effects of 3 weeks oral methylphenidate (5 mg/kg) vs vehicle treatment on brain structure and function in adolescent (post-natal day [P]25) and adult (P65) rats. Following a 1-week washout period, we used multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess effects of age and treatment on independent component analysis-based functional connectivity (resting-state functional MRI), D-amphetamine-induced neural activation responses (pharmacological MRI), gray and white matter tissue volumes and cortical thickness (postmortem structural MRI), and white matter structural integrity (postmortem diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)). Many age-related differences were found, including cortical thinning, white matter development, larger dopamine-mediated activation responses and increased striatal functional connectivity. Methylphenidate reduced anterior cingulate cortical network strength in both adolescents and adults. In contrast to clinical observations from ADHD patient studies, methylphenidate did not increase white matter tissue volume or cortical thickness in rat. Nevertheless, DTI-based fractional anisotropy was higher in the anterior part of the corpus callosum following adolescent treatment. Furthermore, methylphenidate differentially affected adolescents and adults as evidenced by reduced striatal volume and myelination upon adolescent treatment, although we did not observe adverse treatment effects on striatal functional activity. Our findings of small but significant age-dependent effects of psychostimulant treatment in the striatum of healthy rats highlights the importance of further research in children and adolescents that are exposed to methylphenidate. PMID:23851400

  20. [Oral flecainide in the treatment of refractory arrhythmias. Long-term follow-up of 98 patients].

    PubMed

    Haissaguerre, M; Warin, J F; Benchimol, D; Le Mtayer, P; Regaudie, J J; Blanchot, P

    1987-03-01

    Oral flecainide was administered to 98 patients with arrhythmias regarded as resistant to other antiarrhythmic agents: quinidines (82), propafenone (40), beta-blockers (30), amiodarone alone (38) or combined with a class I compound (19). Therapeutic effectiveness was assessed on clinical date, repeated Holter recordings (64 patients), exercise tests (8) and electrophysiological exploration (15). Mean follow-up was 11.7 +/- 11 months; the patients treated have now been followed up for 18.2 +/- 12 months (range: 7-58 months). Fifty-three patients had atrial arrhythmia (fibrillation or flutter in 45, atrial tachycardia in 8). Flecainide was effective in 26 patients (49%) and ineffective in 27 (51%). There was no significant difference in dosage between these 2 groups: 231 +/- 62 mg/day and 265 +/- 61 mg/day respectively. Paroxysms of re-entrant junctional tachycardia were controlled in 6 of the 8 cases observed. Eleven patients presented with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: treatment was successful in the 3 patients with atrial fibrillation and in 8 of the 10 patients with orthodromic reciprocating rhythms. Among 30 patients with episodes of ventricular tachycardia, 9 (30%) responded to flecainide and 21 (70%) failed to respond. Flecainide reduced the repetitive forms by more than 90% in 7/15 patients and suppressed exercise-induced ventricular tachycardia in 2/8 patients. Fifteen out of 18 patients had ventricular tachycardia reproducible by programmed stimulation; under flecainide, the ventricular tachycardia spontaneously recurred in 4 cases, was provoked by stimulation in 5 other cases, was more easily inducible in 3 cases and was not inducible in a sustained manner in the last 3 cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3113358

  1. Chronic l-arginine treatment improves metabolic, cardiovascular and liver complications in diet-induced obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Ashraful; Kauter, Kathleen; Withers, Kerry; Sernia, Conrad; Brown, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    l-Arginine is an important dietary amino acid in both health and disease, especially of the cardiovascular system. This study has determined whether dietary supplementation with l-arginine attenuates cardiovascular, metabolic, pancreatic and liver changes in a rat model of the human metabolic syndrome. Male Wistar rats (8-9 weeks old) were divided into four groups. Two groups of rats were fed a corn starch-rich diet (C) whereas the other two groups were given a high carbohydrate, high fat diet (H) with 25% fructose in the drinking water, for 16 weeks. One group fed each diet was supplemented with 5% l-arginine in the food for the final 8 weeks of this protocol. The corn starch diet (C) contained ?68% carbohydrates mainly as polysaccharides, while the high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet contained ?68% carbohydrates mainly as fructose and sucrose together with 24% fat mainly as saturated and monounsaturated fats from beef tallow. The high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats showed the symptoms of metabolic syndrome including obesity and hypertension with heart and liver damage. Supplementation with l-arginine attenuated impairment in left ventricular and liver structure and function, glucose tolerance, and decreased blood pressure, abdominal fat pads, inflammatory cell infiltration, pancreatic cell hypertrophy and oxidative stress. This study indicates that oral supplementation with l-arginine attenuated or normalised obesity-related changes in the heart, liver and pancreas by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress associated with high carbohydrate, high fat feeding in rats. PMID:23010865

  2. Long-Term Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Long-Term Care What Is Long-Term Care? Long-term care involves a variety of services ... 8 sec Click to watch this video Most Care Provided at Home Click for more information Long- ...

  3. Long-term effects of oral tea polyphenols and Lactobacillus brevis M8 on biochemical parameters, digestive enzymes, and cytokines expression in broilers.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Li; Li, Zong-Jun; Wei, Zhong-Shan; Liu, Ting; Zou, Xiao-Zuo; Liao, Yong; Luo, Yu

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the long-term effects of oral tea polyphenols (TPs) and Lactobacillus brevis M8 (LB) on biochemical parameters, digestive enzymes, and cytokines expression in broilers. In experiment 1, 240 broiler chickens were selected to investigate the effects of 0.06 g/kg body weight (BW) TP and 1.0 ml/kg BW LB on broilers; in experiment 2, 180 broiler chickens were assigned randomly to three groups to investigate the effects of different dosages of TP (0.03, 0.06, and 0.09 g/kg BW) combined with 1.0 ml/kg BW LB on broilers; in experiment 3, 180 broiler chickens were assigned randomly to three groups to investigate the effects of different dosages of LB (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ml/kg BW) combined with 0.06 g/kg BW TP on broilers. The results showed that TP and LB affected serum biochemical parameters, and TP reduced serum cholesterol (CHO) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) abundances in a dosage-dependent manner (P<0.05) on Day 84. Meanwhile, broilers fed a diet supplemented with TP or LB had a lower intestinal lipase activity on Day 84 compared with the control group (P<0.05). Middle and high dosages of TP increased pancreatic lipase and proventriculus pepsin activities (P<0.05). Also middle and high dosages of LB significantly enhanced pancreatic lipase activity (P<0.05), while high LB supplementation inhibited intestinal trypsase (P<0.05) on Day 84. Furthermore, both TP and LB reduced intestinal cytokine expression and nuclear factor-? B (NF-?B) mRNA level on Days 56 and 84. In conclusion, long-term treatment of TP and LB improved lipid metabolism and digestive enzymes activities, and affected intestinal inflammatory status, which may be associated with the NF-?B signal. PMID:26642185

  4. Long-term quality of life after intensified multi-modality treatment of oral cancer including intra-arterial induction chemotherapy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Adorján F.; Stefenelli, Ulrich; Thorn, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) studies are well established when accompanying trials in head and neck cancer, but studies on long-term survivors are rare. Aims: The aim was to evaluate long-term follow-up patients treated with an intensified multi-modality therapy. Setting and Design: Cross-sectional study, tertiary care center. Patients and Methods: A total of 135 oral/oropharyngeal cancer survivors having been treated with an effective four modality treatment (intra-arterial induction chemotherapy, radical surgery, adjuvant radiation, concurrent systemic chemotherapy) filled European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and HN35 questionnaires. Mean distance to treatment was 6.1 (1.3–16.6) years. Results were compared with a reference patient population (EORTC reference manual). In-study group comparison was also carried out. Statistical Analysis: One-sample t-test, Mann–Whitney-test, Kruskal–Wallis analysis. Results: QoL scores of both populations were well comparable. Global health status, cognitive and social functioning, fatigue, social eating, status of teeth, mouth opening and dryness, and sticky saliva were significantly worse in the study population; pain and need for pain killers, cough, need for nutritional support, problems with weight loss and gain were judged to be significantly less. Patients 1-year posttreatment had generally worse scores as compared to patients with two or more years distance to treatment. Complex reconstructive measures and adjuvant (chemo) radiation were main reasons for significant impairment of QoL. Conclusion Subjective disease status of patients following a maximized multi-modality treatment showed an expectable high degree of limitations, but was generally comparable to a reference group treated less intensively, suggesting that the administration of an intensified multi-modality treatment is feasible in terms of QoL/effectivity ratio. PMID:26389030

  5. A novel L-arginine salt nonlinear optical crystal: L-arginine p-nitrobenzoate monohydrate (LANB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Zhang, G. H.; Liu, X. T.; Wang, L. N.; Wang, X. Q.; Zhu, L. Y.; Xu, D.

    2014-01-01

    A novel L-arginine salt nonlinear optical single crystal, L-arginine p-nitrobenzoate monohydrate (LANB) has been grown by slow cooling method from aqueous solution. Its solubility at different temperatures in water was measured. The grown crystal was characterized by the elemental analyses, X-ray single crystal and powder diffractions, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectra. The structure analysis revealed that LANB belongs to the monoclinic crystallographic system, space group P21, with unit cell parameters: a = 8.566(3), b = 5.817(2), c = 17.131(7) , ? = 101.223(5), Z = 2 and V = 837.2(6) 3. The proton and carbon configurations of L-arginine were confirmed through 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra analyses. The linear and nonlinear optical properties of LANB crystal were studied by the use of transmission spectrum and second harmonic generation (SHG). The thermal properties were investigated by using thermo gravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA).

  6. A Prospective Study Comparing the Long-term Effectiveness of Injectable Risperidone Long-acting Therapy and Oral Aripiprazole in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Macfadden, Wayne; Ma, Yi-Wen; Thomas Haskins, J.; Bossie, Cynthia A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that long-term maintenance with injectable risperidone long-acting therapy is superior to oral daily aripiprazole in stable patients with schizophrenia. Design: This two-year, rater-blinded, open-label, multicenter study (NCT00299702) randomized subjects to injectable risperidone long-acting therapy (2550mg, injected every 2 weeks) or oral aripiprazole (530mg/day), with study visits every two weeks. Subjects who met relapse criteria or discontinued study drug could remain in the study. Setting: Clinical trial. Participants: Stable subjects with schizophrenia not adequately benefiting from current treatment who experienced two or more relapses in the past two years. If recently relapsed, subjects were stabilized (per clinician judgment) for two or more months before entry. Measurements: Primary endpoints: time to relapse and time in remission. Safety assessments included adverse event reporting. Results: Of 355 subjects randomized, 349 were in the intent-to-treat analysis set. Data inspection revealed that 53 (14.9%) randomized subjects deviated from inclusion/exclusion criteria, most commonly not meeting stability requirements. At baseline, mean (standard deviation [SD]) Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score was 68.9 (14.6); 115 (33.0%) intent-to-treat subjects met remission criteria. Approximately 29 percent in each group discontinued the study before completing two years. No significant between-group differences were noted in time to relapse or time in remission. No new tolerability issues were identified. Conclusion: Results failed to demonstrate superiority with injectable risperidone long-acting therapy versus oral aripiprazole. The study design did not allow for valid conclusions of equivalence or noninferiority. Although this study attempted to mimic a real-world treatment setting for stable patients, the broad study population, the lack of patient selection for nonadherence, biweekly visits, regular assessments, and other design issues limited generalizability and interpretation relative to the study hypothesis. PMID:21191530

  7. ?,?-amyrin, a natural triterpenoid ameliorates L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Caroline Mouro; Carvalho, Karine Maria Martins Bezerra; Neves, Julliana Catharina de Sousa; Morais, Talita Cavalcante; Rao, Vietla Satyanarayana; Santos, Flvia Almeida; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Chaves, Mariana Helena

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the beneficial effects of triterpene ?,?-amyrin and the underlying mechanisms in an experimental pancreatitis model. METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced in five groups of rats (n = 8) by L-arginine (2 2.5 g/kg, intraperitoneal, 1 h apart) and 1 h later, they received a single oral dose of ?,?-amyrin (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg), methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg) and vehicle (3% Tween 80). A saline (0.9% NaCl) treated group served as a normal control. Efficacy was assessed at 24 h by determination of serum levels of amylase, lipase and pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and interleukin (IL)-6], pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lipid peroxidation [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)], nitrate/nitrite levels, and the wet weight/body weight ratio. Tissue histology and the immunoreactivity for TNF-? and inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) were performed. RESULTS: ?,?-amyrin and methylprednisolone treatments significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the L-arginine-induced increases in pancreatic wet weight/body weight ratio, and decreased the serum levels of amylase and lipase, and TNF-? and IL-6, as compared to the vehicle control. Also, pancreatic levels of MPO activity, TBARS, and nitrate/nitrite were significantly lower. Histological findings and TNF-? and iNOS immunostaining further confirmed the amelioration of pancreatic injury by ?,?-amyrin. CONCLUSION: ?,?-amyrin has the potential to combat acute pancreatitis by acting as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agent. PMID:20818810

  8. A randomized controlled trial comparing treatment with oral agents and basal insulin in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes in long-term care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Pasquel, Francisco J; Powell, Winter; Peng, Limin; Johnson, Theodore M; Sadeghi-Yarandi, Shadi; Newton, Christopher; Smiley, Dawn; Toyoshima, Marcos T; Aram, Pedram; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2015-01-01

    Background Managing hyperglycemia and diabetes is challenging in geriatric patients admitted to long-term care (LTC) facilities. Methods This randomized control trial enrolled patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) with blood glucose (BG) >180?mg/dL or glycated hemoglobin >7.5% to receive low-dose basal insulin (glargine, starting dose 0.1?U/kg/day) or oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) therapy as per primary care provider discretion for 26?weeks. Both groups received supplemental rapid-acting insulin before meals for BG >200?mg/dL. Primary end point was difference in glycemic control as measured by fasting and mean daily glucose concentration between groups. Results A total of 150 patients (age: 798?years, body mass index: 30.16.5?kg/m2, duration of diabetes mellitus: 8.25.1?years, randomization BG: 19497?mg/dL) were randomized to basal insulin (n=75) and OAD therapy (n=75). There were no differences in the mean fasting BG (13127?mg/dL vs 12323?mg/dL, p=0.06) between insulin and OAD groups, but patients treated with insulin had greater mean daily BG (16339?mg/dL vs 13827?mg/dL, p<0.001) compared to those treated with OADs. There were no differences in the rate of hypoglycemia (<70?mg/dL) between insulin (27%) and OAD (31%) groups, p=0.58. In addition, there were no differences in the number of hospital complications, emergency room visits, and mortality between treatment groups. Conclusions The results of this randomized study indicate that elderly patients with T2D in LTC facilities exhibited similar glycemic control, hypoglycemic events and complications when treated with either basal insulin or with oral antidiabetic drugs. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01131052. PMID:26336609

  9. Long-term effects of oral tea polyphenols and Lactobacillus brevis M8 on biochemical parameters, digestive enzymes, and cytokines expression in broilers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua-li; Li, Zong-jun; Wei, Zhong-shan; Liu, Ting; Zou, Xiao-zuo; Liao, Yong; Luo, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the long-term effects of oral tea polyphenols (TPs) and Lactobacillus brevis M8 (LB) on biochemical parameters, digestive enzymes, and cytokines expression in broilers. In experiment 1, 240 broiler chickens were selected to investigate the effects of 0.06 g/kg body weight (BW) TP and 1.0 ml/kg BW LB on broilers; in experiment 2, 180 broiler chickens were assigned randomly to three groups to investigate the effects of different dosages of TP (0.03, 0.06, and 0.09 g/kg BW) combined with 1.0 ml/kg BW LB on broilers; in experiment 3, 180 broiler chickens were assigned randomly to three groups to investigate the effects of different dosages of LB (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 ml/kg BW) combined with 0.06 g/kg BW TP on broilers. The results showed that TP and LB affected serum biochemical parameters, and TP reduced serum cholesterol (CHO) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) abundances in a dosage-dependent manner (P<0.05) on Day 84. Meanwhile, broilers fed a diet supplemented with TP or LB had a lower intestinal lipase activity on Day 84 compared with the control group (P<0.05). Middle and high dosages of TP increased pancreatic lipase and proventriculus pepsin activities (P<0.05). Also middle and high dosages of LB significantly enhanced pancreatic lipase activity (P<0.05), while high LB supplementation inhibited intestinal trypsase (P<0.05) on Day 84. Furthermore, both TP and LB reduced intestinal cytokine expression and nuclear factor-κ B (NF-κB) mRNA level on Days 56 and 84. In conclusion, long-term treatment of TP and LB improved lipid metabolism and digestive enzymes activities, and affected intestinal inflammatory status, which may be associated with the NF-κB signal. PMID:26642185

  10. l-Arginine oxidase from Pseudomonas sp. TPU 7192: Characterization, gene cloning, heterologous expression, and application to l-arginine determination.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Daisuke; Terai, Anna; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    l-Arginine oxidase (AROD, EC 1.4.3.-) was discovered in newly discovered Pseudomonas sp. TPU 7192 and its characteristics were described. The molecular mass (MS) of the enzyme was estimated to be 528kDa, which was accounted for by eight identical subunits with MS of 66kDa each. AROD was identified as a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent enzyme with 1mol of FAD being contained in each subunit. It catalyzed the oxidative deamination of l-arginine and converted l-arginine to 2-ketoarginine, which was non-enzymatically converted into 4-guanidinobutyric acid when the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formed by l-arginine oxidation was not removed. In contrast, 2-ketoarginine was present when H2O2was decomposed. AROD was specific to l-arginine with a Km value of 149?M. It exhibited maximal activity at 55C and pH 5.5. AROD was stable in the pH range 5.5-7.5 and >95% of its original activity was below 60C at pH 7.0. Since these enzymatic properties are considered suitable for the determination of l-arginine, the gene was cloned and expressed in a heterologous expression system. We herein successfully developed a new simple enzymatic method for the determination of l-arginine using Pseudomonas AROD. PMID:26672462

  11. The influence of a novel pentadecapeptide, BPC 157, on N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester and L-arginine effects on stomach mucosa integrity and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Sikiri?, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevi?, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagi?, V; Turkovi?, B; Rotkvi?, I; Mise, S; Zorici?, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovi?, D; Jurina, L; Separovi?, J; Hanzevacki, M; Artukovi?, B; Bratuli?, M; Tisljar, M; Gjurasin, M; Mikli?, P; Stanci?-Rokotov, D; Slobodnjak, Z; Jelovac, N; Marovi?, A

    1997-07-30

    The known effects of a novel stomach pentadecapeptide BPC157 (10 microg or 10 ng/kg), namely its salutary activity against ethanol (96%, i.g.)-induced gastric lesions (simultaneously applied i.p.) and in blood pressure maintenance (given i.v.), were investigated in rats challenged with a combination of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME) (5 mg/kg i.v.), a competitive inhibitor of endothelium nitric oxide (NO)-generation and NO precursor, L-arginine (200 mg/kg i.v.) (D-arginine was ineffective). In the gastric lesions assay, NO agents were given 5 min before ethanol injury and BPC 157 medication. Given alone, BPC157 had an antiulcer effect, as did L-arginine, but L-NAME had no effect. L-NAME completely abolished the effect of L-arginine, whereas it only attenuated the effect of BPC 157. After application of the combination of L-NAME + L-arginine, the BPC157 effect was additionally impaired. In blood pressure studies, compared with L-arginine, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (without effect on basal normal values) had both a mimicking effect (impaired L-NAME-blood pressure increase, when applied prophylactically and decreased already raised L-NAME values, given at the time of the maximal L-NAME-blood pressure increase (i.e., 10 min after L-NAME)) and preventive activity (L-arginine-induced moderate blood pressure decrease was prevented by BPC 157 pretreatment). When BPC 157 was given 10 min after L-NAME + L-arginine combination, which still led to a blood pressure increase, its previously clear effect (noted in L-NAME treated rats) disappeared. In vitro, in gastric mucosa from rat stomach tissue homogenates, BPC 157, given in the same dose (100 microM) as L-arginine, induced a comparable generation of NO. But, BPC 157 effect could not be inhibited by L-NAME, even when L-NAME was given in a tenfold (100 versus 1000 microM) higher dose than that needed for inhibition of the L-arginine effect. NO synthesis was blunted when the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 and L-arginine were combined. In summary, BPC 157 could interfere with the effects of NO on both gastric mucosal integrity and blood pressure maintenance in a specific way, especially with L-arginine, having a more prominent and/or particularly different effect from that of NO. PMID:9298922

  12. Whole-body synthesis of L-homoarginine in pigs and rats supplemented with L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Jia, Sichao; Nawaratna, Gayan; Che, Dongsheng; Wang, Fenglai; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies suggest an important role for L-homoarginine in cardiovascular, hepatic and neurological functions, as well as the regulation of glucose metabolism. However, little is known about whole-body L-homoarginine synthesis or its response to dietary L-arginine intake in animals. Four series of experiments were conducted to determine L-homoarginine synthesis and catabolism in pigs and rats. In Experiment 1, male and female pigs were fed a corn- and soybean meal-based diet supplemented with 0.0-2.42 % L-arginine-HCl. In Experiment 2, male and female rats were fed a casein-based diet, while receiving drinking water containing supplemental L-arginine-HCl to provide 0.0-3.6 g L-arginine/kg body-weight/day. In both experiments, urine collected from the animals for 24 h was analyzed for L-homoarginine and related metabolites. In Experiment 3, pigs and rats received a single oral dose of 1 or 10 mg L-homoarginine/kg body-weight, respectively, and their urine was collected for 24 h for analyses of L-homoarginine and related substances. In Experiment 4, slices of pig and rat tissues (including liver, brain, kidney, heart, and skeletal-muscle) were incubated for 1 h in Krebs-bicarbonate buffer containing 5 or 50 µM L-homoarginine. Our results indicated that: (a) animal tissues did not degrade L-homoarginine in the presence of physiological concentrations of other amino-acids; (b) 95-96 % of orally administered L-homoarginine was recovered in urine; (c) L-homoarginine was quantitatively a minor product of L-arginineg catabolism in the body; and (d) dietary L-arginine supplementation dose-dependently increased whole-body L-homoarginine synthesis. These novel findings provide a new framework for future studies of L-homoarginine metabolism and physiology in animals and humans. PMID:26676627

  13. Characterization of casein and poly-L-arginine multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Szyk-Warszy?ska, Lilianna; Kilan, Katarzyna; Socha, Robert P

    2014-06-01

    Thin films containing casein appear to be a promising material for coatings used in the medical area to promote biomineralization. ?- and ?-casein and poly-L-arginine multilayer films were formed by the layer-by layer technique and their thickness and mass were analyzed by ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). (PLArg/casein) films deposited in 0.15M NaCl exhibit fast (exponential-like) growth of the film thickness with the number of layers. The resulting films were c.a. 10 times thicker than obtained for poly-L-arginine and natural polyanions. We investigated the effect of the type of casein used for the film formation, finding that films with ?-casein were slightly thicker than ones with ?-casein. The effect of polyethylene imine anchoring layer on the thickness and mass of adsorbed films was similar as for linear polyelectrolyte pairs. Thickness of "wet" films was c.a. two times larger than measured after drying that suggests their large hydration. The analysis of the mass of films during their post-treatment with the solutions of various ionic strength and pH provided the information concerning films stability. Films remain stable in the neutral and weakly basic conditions that includes HEPES buffer, which is widely used in cell culture and biomedical experiments. At the conditions of high ionic strength films swell but their swelling is reversible. Films containing caseins as polyanion appear to be more elastic and the same time more viscous than one formed with polyelectrolyte pairs. XPS elemental analysis confirmed binding of calcium ions by the casein embedded in the multilayers. PMID:24703671

  14. Protective effect of L-arginine on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ba?han, ?brahim; Ba?han, Perihan; Seilmi?, Mehmet Ata; ?ingirik, Ergin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: L-arginine has a protective effect on gentamicin-induced renal failure and it may decrease the tubular reabsorption of another cationic substance, gentamicin due to its cationic structure. The aim of this study is to compare the possible protective effects of L-arginine and its inactive isomer D-arginine on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: Wistar albino rats were housed in metabolic cages and assigned to six groups as: control group, gentamicin (100 mg/kg), gentamicin + L-arginine (2 g/l), gentamicin + D-arginine (2 g/l), gentamicin + L-arginine + Nv-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (100 mg/l) and gentamicin + D-arginine + L-NAME. Gentamicin was administered by subcutaneous injections and the other drugs were added in drinking water for seven consecutive days. The animals were killed by decapitation and intracardiac blood and urine samples were obtained on the seventh day. Blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, sodium, potassium, urine gamma glutamyl transferase, creatinine, sodium, potassium and gentamicin levels were measured using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) technique. Results: Gentamicin treated group had significant increase in blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, fractional Na excretion and urine gamma glutamyl transferase levels, and significant decrease in creatinine clearance compared to the control group. L-arginine and D-arginine reversed these findings. L-NAME abolished the nephroprotective effect of L-arginine. The urinary levels of gentamicin were significantly increased in rats treated with L-arginine or D-arginine compared to those treated with gentamicin. L-arginine and D-arginine reversed the advanced degenerative changes due to gentamicin administration in histopathological examination. Conclusion: Our study revealed the protective effect of L-arginine on gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity, the contribution of the cationic feature of L-arginine, and the major role of NO in this protective effect. PMID:25538331

  15. Long-term efficacy of psoriasis vulgaris treatments: analysis of treatment with topical corticosteroid and/or vitamin D3 analog, oral cyclosporin, etretinate and phototherapy over a 35-year period, 1975-2010.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Emiko; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Manabe, Yasuaki; Yahagi, Eiichiro; Yamada-Hiruma, Azusa; Yamaoka, Hanako; Kojima, Tomoko; Kato, Masayuki; Ikoma, Norihiro; Ozawa, Akira; Haruki, Yasuo

    2013-04-01

    Various therapies have been tried for psoriasis. In Japan, biologics began to be used for psoriasis treatment in January 2010. Their clinical efficacy is well known, but biologics cannot be used in all psoriasis patients for reasons such as side-effects and cost. It is necessary to evaluate the effect of long-term psoriasis treatment, but there have been no reports evaluating long-term treatment. Therefore, the outcomes of patients who had been treated at the Tokai University Hospital for more than 5 years, before biological agents were released, were examined. Three categories, classified by initial severity, changes in severity by method of treatment and background characteristics, were investigated. In conclusion, cases of long-term treatment with a combination of topical corticosteroid and topical vitamin D3 analog or oral cyclosporin were found to be effective therapies. Patients with a history of diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular disease of psoriasis were likely to be treatment resistant. PMID:23330814

  16. Freeze drying of L-arginine/sucrose-based protein formulations, part I: influence of formulation and arginine counter ion on the critical formulation temperature, product performance and protein stability.

    PubMed

    Strtzel, Peter; Gieseler, Henning; Gieseler, Margit; Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Goldbach, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate product performance of freeze dried l-arginine/sucrose-based formulations under variation of excipient weight ratios, l-arginine counter ions and formulation pH as a matrix to stabilize a therapeutic monoclonal antibody (MAb) during freeze drying and shelf life. Protein and placebo formulations were lyophilized at aggressive primary drying conditions and key attributes of the freeze dried solids were correlated to their thermal properties and critical formulation temperature. Stability (physical) during processing and long-term storage of the MAb in different formulations was assessed by SE-HPLC. Thermal properties of the mixtures were greatly affected by the type of l-arginine counter ion. High glass transition temperatures were achieved by adding multivalent acids, whereas the temperature values significantly decreased in the presence of chloride ions. All mixtures were stable during freeze drying, but storage stability varied for the different preparations and counter ions. For l-arginine-based formulations, the protein was most stable in the presence of chloride ion, showing no obvious correlation to estimated global mobility of the glass. Besides drying behavior and thermal properties of the freeze dried solids, the counter ion of l-arginine must be considered relevant for protein shelf life stability. PMID:25994980

  17. l-arginine ameliorates experimental autoimmune myocarditis by maintaining extracellular matrix and reducing cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Taka-aki; Hattori, Miki; Yuan, Zuyi; Kishimoto, Chiharu

    2008-01-01

    It was previously shown that administration of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) aggravated murine viral myocarditis by increasing myocardial virus titres. Experimental autoimmune myocarditis in mice and rats mimics human fulminant myocarditis. The effects of l-arginine, a precursor of nitric oxide, upon heart failure in experimental autoimmune myocarditis were evaluated. Dietary l-arginine (l-arginine group) and l-arginine plus NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-arginine + l-NAME group) were administered to C57BL/6 mice immunized with porcine cardiac myosin over 3 weeks. An untreated myocarditis group was prepared. Cardiac damage was less in the l-arginine group compared with the other two groups, as was incidence of heart failure. In addition, extracellular matrix change was less prominent in the l-arginine group. Plasma concentrations of nitric oxide were elevated in the l-arginine group. Cytotoxic activities of lymphocytes were lower in l-arginine group than in other two groups. l-arginine treatment may be effective in preventing the development of heart failure in experimental myocarditis by maintaining extracellular matrix and reducing the cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes. PMID:18808530

  18. Dimethyl Fumarate Protects Pancreatic Islet Cells and Non-Endocrine Tissue in L-Arginine-Induced Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Lourdes; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Li, Shiri; Masuda, Yuichi; Takasu, Chie; Takasu, Mizuki; Vo, Kelly; Farzaneh, Seyed H.; Stamos, Michael J.; Ichii, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disorder resulting in the destruction and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma which ultimately leads to impairment of the endocrine and exocrine functions. Dimethyl Fumarate (DMF) was recently approved by FDA for treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. DMF's unique anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties make it an interesting drug to test on other inflammatory conditions. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of DMF on islet cells and non-endocrine tissue in a rodent model of L-Arginine-induced CP. Methods Male Wistar rats fed daily DMF (25 mg/kg) or vehicle by oral gavage were given 5 IP injections of L-Arginine (250 mg/100 g2, 1 hr apart). Rats were assessed with weights and intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT, 2 g/kg). Islets were isolated and assessed for islet mass and viability with flow cytometry. Non-endocrine tissue was assessed for histology, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and lipid peroxidation level (MDA). In vitro assessments included determination of heme oxygenase (HO-1) protein expression by Western blot. Results Weight gain was significantly reduced in untreated CP group at 6 weeks. IPGTT revealed significant impairment in untreated CP group and its restoration with DMF therapy (P <0.05). Untreated CP rats had pancreatic atrophy, severe acinar architectural damage, edema, and fatty infiltration as well as elevated MDA and MPO levels, which were significantly improved by DMF treatment. After islet isolation, the volume of non-endocrine tissue was significantly smaller in untreated CP group. Although islet counts were similar in the two groups, islet viability was significantly reduced in untreated CP group and improved with DMF treatment. In vitro incubation of human pancreatic tissue with DMF significantly increased HO-1 expression. Conclusion Administration of DMF attenuated L-Arginine-induced CP and islet function in rats. DMF treatment could be a possible strategy to improve clinical outcome in patients with CP. PMID:25198679

  19. Temporal metabonomic modeling of l-arginine-induced exocrine pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bohus, Eszter; Coen, Muireann; Keun, Hector C; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Beckonert, Olaf; Lindon, John C; Holmes, Elaine; Noszál, Béla; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2008-10-01

    The time-related metabolic responses to l-arginine (ARG)-induced exocrine pancreatic toxicity were investigated using single ip doses of 1,000 and 4,000 mg/kg body weight over a 7 day experimental period in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Sequential timed urine and plasma samples were analyzed using high resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy together with complementary clinical chemistry and histopathology analyses. Principal components analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection on latent structures discriminant analysis (O-PLS-DA) were utilized to analyze the (1)H NMR data and to extract and identify candidate biomarkers and to construct metabolic trajectories post ARG administration. Low doses of ARG resulted in virtually no histopathological damage and distinct reversible metabolic response trajectories. High doses of ARG caused pancreatic acinar degeneration and necrosis and characteristic metabolic trajectory profiles with several distinct phases. The initial trajectory phase (0-8 h) involved changes in the urea cycle and transamination indicating a homeostatic response to detoxify excess ammonia generated from ARG catabolism. By 48 h, there was a notable enhancement of the excretion of the gut microbial metabolites, phenylacetylglycine (PAG), 4-cresol-glucuronide and 4-cresol-sulfate, suggesting that compromised pancreatic function impacts on the activity of the gut microbiota giving potential rise to a novel class of surrogate extragenomic biomarkers of pancreatic injury. The implied compromise of microbiotal function may also contribute to secondary hepatic and pancreatic toxic responses. We show here for the first time the value of metabonomic studies in investigating metabolic disruption due to experimental pancreatitis. The variety of observed systemic responses suggests that this approach may be of general value in the assessment of other animal models or human pancreatitis. PMID:18710274

  20. High Oral Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Load Predicts Long-term Persistence in Individuals With or at Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; Guo, Yingshi; Xiao, Wiehong; Burk, Robert D; Minkoff, Howard; Strickler, Howard D; Cranston, Ross D; Wiley, Dorothy J; Jacobson, Lisa P; Weber, Kathleen M; Margolick, Joseph B; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Reddy, Susheel; Gillison, Maura L; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-11-15

    The association between oral human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) DNA load and infection clearance was evaluated among 88 individuals with oral HPV16 infection who were identified within a prospective cohort of 1470 HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. Oral rinse specimens were collected semiannually for up to 5 years. The oral HPV16 load at the time of the first positive test result was significantly associated with the time to clearance of infection (continuous P trends <.01). Notably, clearance rates by 24 months were 41% and 94% in the highest and lowest HPV16 load tertiles (P = .03), respectively. High oral HPV16 load warrants consideration as a biomarker for infection persistence, the presumed precursor of HPV16-associated oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25954049

  1. The effects of L-arginine on spatial memory and synaptic plasticity impairments induced by lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Reisi, Parham; Nosratabadi, Reza; Behradnia, Sepehr; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: An important role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuroinflammation has been suggested. It is also suggested that NO has a critical role in learning and memory. Neuro-inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been reported that deteriorates learning and memory. The effect of L-arginine (LA) as a precursor of NO on LPS-induced spatial learning and memory and neuronal plasticity impairment was evaluated. Materials and Methods: The animals were grouped into: (1) Control, (2) LPS, (3) LA-LPS, and (4) LA. The rats received intraperitoneally LPS (1 mg/kg) 2 h before experiments and LA (200 mg/kg) 30 min before LPS. The animals were examined in Morris water maze (MWM). Long-term potentiation (LTP) from CA1 area of the hippocampus was also assessed by 100 Hz stimulation in the ipsilateral Schaffer collateral pathway. Results: In MWM, time latency and traveled path were higher in LPS group than the control group (P < 0.001) whereas in LA-LPS group they were shorter than LPS group (P < 0.001). The amplitude and slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) decreased in LPS group compared to control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) whereas, there was not any significant difference in these parameters between LPS and LA-LPS groups. Conclusion: Administration of LPS impaired spatial memory and synaptic plasticity. Although LA ameliorated deleterious effects of LPS on learning of spatial tasks, it could not restore LPS-induced LTP impairment. PMID:26601090

  2. Beneficial effects of L-argininenitric oxide-producing pathway in rats treated with alloxan

    PubMed Central

    Vasilijevi?, Ana; Buzadi?, Biljana; Kora?, Aleksandra; Petrovi?, Vesna; Jankovi?, Aleksandra; Kora?, Bato

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to elucidate molecular mechanisms and factors involved in ? cell regeneration, we evaluated a possible role of the l-argininenitric oxide (NO)-producing pathway in alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. Diabetes was induced in male Mill Hill rats with a single alloxan dose (120 mg kg?1). Both non-diabetic and diabetic groups were additionally separated into three subgroups: (i) receiving l-arginine HCl (2.25%), (ii) receiving l-NAME HCl (0.01%) for 12 days as drinking liquids, and (iii) control. Treatment of diabetic animals started after diabetes induction (glucose level ? 12 mmol l?1). We found that disturbed glucose homeostasis, i.e. blood insulin and glucose levels in diabetic rats was restored after l-arginine treatment. Immunohistochemical findings revealed that l-arginine had a favourable effect on ? cell neogenesis, i.e. it increased the area of insulin-immunopositive cells. Moreover, confocal microscopy showed colocalization of insulin and pancreas duodenum homeobox-1 (PDX-1) in both endocrine and exocrine pancreas. This increase in insulin-expressing cells was accompanied by increased cell proliferation (observed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen-PCNA immunopositivity) which occurred in a regulated manner since it was associated with increased apoptosis (detected by the TUNEL method). Furthermore, l-arginine enhanced both nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunopositivities. The effect of l-arginine on antioxidative defence was observed especially in restoring to control level the diabetes-induced increase in glutathione peroxidase activity. In contrast to l-arginine, diabetic pancreas was not affected by l-NAME supplementation. In conclusion, the results suggest beneficial l-arginine effects on alloxan-induced diabetes resulting from the stimulation of ? cell neogenesis, including complex mechanisms of transcriptional and redox regulation. PMID:17717015

  3. Vascular endothelial dysfunction resulting from l-arginine deficiency in a patient with lysinuric protein intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kamada, Yoshihiro; Nagaretani, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Shinji; Ohama, Tohru; Maruyama, Takao; Hiraoka, Hisatoyo; Yamashita, Shizuya; Yamada, Akira; Kiso, Shinichi; Inui, Yoshiaki; Ito, Nobuyuki; Kayanoki, Yoshiro; Kawata, Sumio; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2001-01-01

    Although L-arginine is the only substrate for nitric oxide (NO) production, no studies have yet been reported on the effect of an L-arginine deficiency on vascular function in humans. Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is a rare autosomal recessive defect of dibasic amino acid transport caused by mutations in the SLC7A7 gene, resulting in an L-arginine deficiency. Vascular endothelial function was examined in an LPI patient who was shown to be a compound heterozygote for two mutations in the gene (5.3-kbp Alu-mediated deletion, IVS3+1G??). The lumen diameter of the brachial artery was measured in this patient and in healthy controls at rest, during reactive hyperemia (endothelium-dependent vasodilation [EDV]), and after sublingual nitroglycerin administration (endothelium-independent vasodilation [EIV]) using ultrasonography. Both EDV and NOx concentrations were markedly reduced in the patient compared with those for the controls. They became normal after an L-arginine infusion. EIV was not significantly different between the patient and controls. Positron emission tomography of the heart and a treadmill test revealed ischemic changes in the patient, which were improved by the L-arginine infusion. Thus, in the LPI patient, L-arginine deficiency caused vascular endothelial dysfunction via a decrease in NO production. PMID:11544277

  4. Long-term follow-up trial of oral rifampin-cotrimoxazole combination versus intravenous cloxacillin in treatment of chronic staphylococcal osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Euba, G; Murillo, O; Fernndez-Sab, N; Mascar, J; Cabo, J; Prez, A; Tubau, F; Verdaguer, R; Gudiol, F; Ariza, J

    2009-06-01

    Oral therapies alternative to fluoroquinolones against staphylococcal chronic osteomyelitis have not been evaluated in comparative studies. Consecutive nonaxial Staphylococcus aureus chronic osteomyelitis cases were included in a comparative trial after debridement. Fifty patients were randomized: group A (n = 22) was treated with cloxacillin for 6 weeks intravenously plus 2 weeks orally (p.o.), and group B (n = 28) was treated with rifampin-cotrimoxazole for 8 weeks p.o. During follow-up (10 years), five relapses occurred: two (10%) in group A and three (11%) in group B. Foreign-body maintenance was associated with relapse (P = 0.016). Oral rifampin-cotrimoxazole treatment showed outcomes comparable to those for intravenous cloxacillin treatment. PMID:19307354

  5. Caution should be used in long-term treatment with oral compounds of hyaluronic acid in patients with a history of cancer.

    PubMed

    Simone, Procopio; Alberto, Migliore

    2015-11-01

    Intra-articular administration of hyaluronic acid is a valuable therapeutic tool for the management of patients with osteoarthritis. However, in recent years numerous formulations containing hyaluronic acid administrable by oral route have entered the market. Even if there are some data in the literature that have shown their effectiveness, systemic administration may expose a greater risk in certain situations. In fact, although hyaluronic acid is not considered a drug it is certain that it can interact with specific receptors and promote cell proliferation. This interaction may be potentially hazardous in cancer patients for which these oral formulations should be contraindicated. PMID:26410544

  6. Long-term testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferber, M.; Graves, G. A., Jr.

    Land-based gas turbines are significantly different from automotive gas turbines in that they are designed to operate for 50,000 h or greater (compared to 5,000-10,000 h). The primary goal of this research is to determine the long-term survivability of ceramic materials for industrial gas turbine applications. Research activities in this program focus on the evaluation of the static tensile creep and stress rupture (SR) behavior of three commercially available structural ceramics which have been identified by the gas turbine manufacturers as leading candidates for use in industrial gas turbines. For each material investigated, a minimum of three temperatures and four stresses will be used to establish the stress and temperature sensitivities of the creep and SR behavior. Because existing data for many candidate structural ceramics are limited to testing times less than 2,000 h, this program will focus on extending these data to times on the order of 10,000 h, which represents the lower limit of operating time anticipated for ceramic blades and vanes in gas turbine engines. A secondary goal of the program will be to investigate the possibility of enhancing life prediction estimates by combining interrupted tensile SR tests and tensile dynamic fatigue tests in which tensile strength is measured as a function of stressing rate. The third goal of this program will be to investigate the effects of water vapor upon the SR behavior of the three structural ceramics chosen for the static tensile studies by measuring the flexural strength as a function of stressing rate at three temperatures.

  7. Oral prostacycline analog and clopidogrel combination provides early maturation and long-term survival after arteriovenous fistula creation: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Abacilar, A. F.; Atalay, H.; Dogan, O. F.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular access is used as a lifeline for hemodialysis in patients with end stage renal disease failure (ESRD). Failure of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) maturation is still high. The purpose of this study was to research the effects of clopidogrel in combination with oral iloprost, a synthetic analog of prostacyclin PGI2. Ninety-six diabetic ESRD patients were divided into two groups. In the first group (Group 1, N = 50), clopidogrel (75 mg daily dose) and an oral prostacycline analog (200 mg daily dose) were administered. In the second group (Group 2, N = 46), placebo was given. All patients took study medication 710 days prior to surgery. A Doppler ultrasound (USG) was performed for measurement of arterial and venous diameters, and peak systolic velocity of arterial flow based on subsequent fistula adequacy. Autogenous AVFs were constructed in forearm as distally as possible in all patients. Both groups were followed-up for a year. In the placebo group, early AVF thrombosis was detected in two patients (4.3%). AVF maturation failure was noted in 14 patients (30.4%) in placebo group and in four patients (8%) in clopidogrel plus oral prostacycline analog group in the early postoperative period (P = 0.001). The mean maturation time was 38 6.5 and 53 12.8 days in study and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.023). The mean blood flow was 352 94 mL/min in placebo group and 604 125 mL/min in study group (P = 0.001). The arterial end diastolic velocity was 116 14 cm/s in study group and 72 21 cm/s in placebo group (P = 0.036) 1 year after the surgery. Our data indicated that clopidogrel and oral prostacycline analog combination is effective and safe for the prevention of primary AVF failure in hemodialysis patients and decreased acute and chronic thrombotic events. PMID:26060361

  8. Long-term oral intake of aluminium or zinc does not accelerate Alzheimer pathology in A?PP and A?PP/tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hosokawa, Masato; Kametani, Fuyuki; Kondo, Hiromi; Chiba, Momoko; Fukushima, Masako; Tabira, Takeshi

    2012-08-01

    Whether or not the oral intake of metals such as aluminium (Al) and zinc (Zn) is a risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been a matter of controversy. Lack of AD pathology in patients with Al encephalopathy indicates Al does not cause AD. On the other hand, some epidemiological studies have suggested high Al increases the occurrence of AD. Our purpose is to test if high Al in drinking water is a risk factor for AD. We administered Al and Zn in drinking water to Tg2576, a transgenic mouse model for amyloid ?-protein (A?) deposition with the A? precursor protein (A?PP) mutations (K670N/M671L), and Tg2576/tau(P301L), a model for A? and tau deposition. Deionized water was given to the control Tg2576 and Tg2576/tau. After administration for 4-10 months of approximately 100?mg/kg body weight Al or Zn per day, we were not able to find by quantitative immunohistochemical analyses differences in the deposition of A? and tau between the treated and untreated groups. Nor did the Al or Zn treatment affect the amount of soluble A? and A?*56, an A? oligomer, measured by ELISA or immunoblot. The oral intake of excess Al or Zn does not accelerate AD pathology in the transgenic mouse models for A? and tau accumulation. Such results do not seem to support the notion that excessive oral intake of Al or Zn is a risk factor for AD. PMID:22118300

  9. Dietary L-Arginine Supplementation Affects the Skeletal Longissimus Muscle Proteome in Finishing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xianyong; Zheng, Chuntian; Hu, Youjun; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2015-01-01

    Forty-eight Duroc x Landrace x Large White gilts were used to determine the relationship between proteome changes of longissimus muscle and intramuscular fat (IMF) content in arginine-supplemented pigs. Beginning at 60 kg BW, pigs were fed a corn- and soybean meal-based diet supplemented or not with 1% L-arginine until they reached a BW of 100 kg. Supplementation with 1% L-arginine did not affect the growth performance or carcass traits, while it increased IMF content by 32% (P < 0.01), it also decreased the drip loss at 48 h post-mortem and the b* meat color value at 24 h post-mortem; supplementation with 1% dietary L-arginine did not change the proportion of SFA and MUFA in muscle lipids. The proteome changes in longissimus muscle between the control and supplemented pigs showed that L-arginine significantly influenced the abundance of proteins related to energy metabolism, fiber type and structure. The increase in IMF content was positively correlated with the increased abundance of slow twitch troponin I (TNNI1) protein and negatively correlated with myosin heavy chain IIb (MyHC IIb) protein content. It is suggested that the proteome changes in longissimus muscle contributed to the greater IMF content in L-arginine supplemented pigs. PMID:25635834

  10. Dietary L-arginine supplementation affects the skeletal longissimus muscle proteome in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xianyong; Zheng, Chuntian; Hu, Youjun; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuefen; Jiang, Zongyong

    2015-01-01

    Forty-eight Duroc x Landrace x Large White gilts were used to determine the relationship between proteome changes of longissimus muscle and intramuscular fat (IMF) content in arginine-supplemented pigs. Beginning at 60 kg BW, pigs were fed a corn- and soybean meal-based diet supplemented or not with 1% L-arginine until they reached a BW of 100 kg. Supplementation with 1% L-arginine did not affect the growth performance or carcass traits, while it increased IMF content by 32% (P < 0.01), it also decreased the drip loss at 48 h post-mortem and the b* meat color value at 24 h post-mortem; supplementation with 1% dietary L-arginine did not change the proportion of SFA and MUFA in muscle lipids. The proteome changes in longissimus muscle between the control and supplemented pigs showed that L-arginine significantly influenced the abundance of proteins related to energy metabolism, fiber type and structure. The increase in IMF content was positively correlated with the increased abundance of slow twitch troponin I (TNNI1) protein and negatively correlated with myosin heavy chain IIb (MyHC IIb) protein content. It is suggested that the proteome changes in longissimus muscle contributed to the greater IMF content in L-arginine supplemented pigs. PMID:25635834

  11. Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase by L-Arginine

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2010-01-07

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in L-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by L-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with L-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and L-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked trimers. Each monomer has two domains: an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain with an AAK-like fold but lacking kinase activity and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain homologous to other GCN5-related transferases. Binding of L-arginine to the AAK domain induces a global conformational change that increases the diameter of the hexamer by {approx}10 {angstrom} and decreases its height by {approx}20{angstrom}. AAK dimers move 5{angstrom} outward along their 2-fold axes, and their tilt relative to the plane of the hexamer decreases by {approx}4{sup o}. The NAT domains rotate {approx}109{sup o} relative to AAK domains enabling new interdomain interactions. Interactions between AAK and NAT domains on different subunits also change. Local motions of several loops at the L-arginine-binding site enable the protein to close around the bound ligand, whereas several loops at the NAT active site become disordered, markedly reducing enzymatic specific activity.

  12. L-arginine pretreatment reduces intestinal mucositis as induced by 5-FU in mice.

    PubMed

    Leocdio, Paola C L; Antunes, Masa M; Teixeira, Llian G; Leonel, Alda J; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I; Machado, Denise C C; Generoso, Simone V; Cardoso, Valbert N; Correia, Maria Isabel T D

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of L-arginine on immune responses and bowel function have been reported. Mucositis is a side effect of chemotherapy treatment that affects approximately 40% of patients. This complication is characterized by inflammation that affects the gastrointestinal tract, increasing permeability and causing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, which worsen the patient's nutritional status and increases morbimortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pretreating with 2% L-arginine supplementation in water on mucositis as induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a single dose of 200 mg/kg body weight) in Swiss male mice. The effect of L-arginine on weight, intestinal permeability, morphology, and the histopathological score of the small intestine (from 0 to 12), oxidative stress, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) activities were evaluated. Intestinal length improvement was observed, in addition to the partial recovery of the mucosal architecture. L-arginine attenuated the histopathological score and MPO activity. There was also an improvement in intestinal permeability, despite weight loss after 5-FU administration. In conclusion, L-arginine can positively impact intestinal mucositis by promoting partial mucosal recovery, reducing inflammation and improving intestinal permeability. PMID:25803482

  13. Growth and dielectric, mechanical, thermal and etching studies of an organic nonlinear optical L-arginine trifluoroacetate (LATF) single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Arjunan, S.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Mohan, R.; Jayavel, R.

    2008-08-04

    L-arginine trifluoroacetate, an organic nonlinear optical material, has been synthesized from aqueous solution. Bulk single crystal of dimension 57 mm x 5 mm x 3 mm has been grown by temperature lowering technique. Powder X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the monoclinic structure of the grown L-arginine trifluoroacetate crystal. Linear optical property of the grown crystal has been studied by UV-vis spectrum. Dielectric response of the L-arginine trifluoroacetate crystal was analysed for different frequencies and temperatures in detail. Microhardness study on the sample reveals that the crystal possesses relatively higher hardness compared to many organic crystals. Thermal analyses confirmed that the L-arginine trifluoroacetate material is thermally stable upto 212 deg. C. The etching studies have been performed to assess the perfection of the L-arginine trifluoroacetate crystal. Kurtz powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical properties of the as-grown L-arginine trifluoroacetate crystal.

  14. Long-term outcomes in patients with schizophrenia treated with risperidone long-acting injection or oral antipsychotics in Spain: results from the electronic Schizophrenia Treatment Adherence Registry (e-STAR).

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Olivares JM; Rodriguez-Morales A; Diels J; Povey M; Jacobs A; Zhao Z; Lam A; Villalobos Vega JC; Cullar JA; de Castro FJ; Quintero CM; Martin JF; Domnguez P; Ojeda JL; Corts SS; Cala FI; Marn CG; Castro LM; Duaso MA; Albarracn JR; Vergara GN; Bentez AF; Cleries FM; Prez-Brian JM; Aragn AB; Navarro JC; Biedma JA; de Pedro RB; Gonzlez JF; Lpez ME; Moreno HD; Lpez JA; Rodrguez EO; de Hoyos CM; Sacristn MP; Martn MD; Ballesteros EM; Rodrguez PA; Menndez LF; Rivas RS; del Pino Cuadrado P; Lauffer JC; Solano JJ; Martnez JM; Solano FG; Rodrguez PG; Rodrguez JA; Cano TR; Fortacin MD; Lobeiras JM; Sampedro JM; Bravo AP; Pellicer AF; Lpez MD; Liste JF; Fernndez MR; Losada AC; Mendez RV; Romero SA; Blanco JJ; Bonaselt IT; Mahia MC; del Valle EF; Yaez PQ; Camarasa MG; Alonso JA; Mendez GF; Feliz FD; Lamela MA; Piero MV; Alvarado PF; Gmez IL; Martn PF; Gmez JL; Lpez AG; Jimnez AR; Nafs AE; Barquero NC; Ortiz RF; Noguera JL; Carrasco PR; Muoz JM; Palma MM; Hortelano CM; Bonome LS; Sevilla JS; Juan JM; Ramos JM; Muoz JL; Guisasola JE; Vazquez LS; Guerras FC; Nebot FJ; Fernndez FJ; Nicolau AL; Subirats RC; Kidias MM; Navarro VF; Garca BF; del Rosal FM; de Vicente Muoz T; Ballester JA; Lieb PM; Martel AD; Bea ER; Joaquim IG; Enjuanes FB; Piol MB; Carbonell EF; Muoz RM; Giribets CA; Sans LA; Blanco AS; Felipe MA; Muoz PG; Villanueva AP; Arroyo MB; Borri RC; Fallada SM; Merola MC; Rodon EP; Palmes JR; Martnez EP; Catala JM; Coca AS; Ferrandiz FP; Paya EF; Caballero GI; Bonet AF; Figueras JF; Pagador PM; Garibo MM; Camo VP; Carrillo CS; Valero CP; Rebollo FJ; Garca Campayo J; Sala Ayma JM; Roig MM; de Ua Mateos MA; Bertolin RG; Garca AM; Mazo FJ; Velasco JL; Prez LS; Casado CJ; Barba JJ; Diaz MC; Rubio JP; Mandoli AS; Herrero AU; Martnez AR; Serrano PS; Rodrguez EN; Montesinos JS; Macia JF; Mateos Marcos AM; Soto JV; Dumont MV; Pagan JP; Martnez VB; Santiuste de Pablos M; Delgado CE; Quiles MD; Lpez FJ; Navarro PP; Torres AM; Ingles FJ; Arias-Camison JM; Manzano JC; Pea RV; Guitarte GP; Fontecilla HB; Romero JB; Gil RS; Lozano JM; Adanez LD; Zarranz Herrera-Oria I; Jimnez JP; Vaz FC; Garca OS; Anton CC; Casula RR; Hernandez MC; Escabias FT; Torresano JR; Prez-Villamil AH; Estevez L; Figuero MA; Muoz de Morales A; Calvin JL; Criado MD; Rodrguez VM; Ambrosolio EB; Madera PM; Alfaro GP; Vidal MM; Valtuille AG; Ruiz O; Cabornero GL; Echevarria Martnez de Bujo M; Mallen MJ; Puigros JS; Martorell AL; Forteza AC; Arrebola ER; Rodrguez de la Torre M; Saiz CG; Bardolet I Casas C; Linde ER; De Arce Cordon R; Molina EM; Carazo FJ; Romero JJ; Cano DV; Dorado MS; Velazquez SC; Snchez AJ; Leon SO; Snchez KP; Benitez MH; Zugarramurai AI; Contreras MA; De la Varga Gonzlez M; Marn PB; Robina FG; Garca MS; Prez FJ; Bros PC; Gmez AC; de Dios Molina Martn J; Perera JL; Averbach MC; Perera JL; Palancares EG; Gallego de Dios MT; Rojo CF; Iglesias SS; Merino MI; Mestre NP; Urdaniz AP; Snchez JM; Seco RG; Muoz JF; Agut MM; Lozano ML; Herguedas FM; Pena AT; Garca JV; Martnez AV; Sanz Granado OS; Fernndez MA; Canseco JM; Lpez PA; Martn MA; Barrio JA; Ubago JG; Bennassar MR; Dez JM; Fleta JL; Fortes FP; Lpez CA; Medina O; Alvarez DF; Roca JM; Valladolid GR; Tavera JA; Garca-Castrillon Sales JA; Llordes IB; Melgarejo CA; Caas de la Paz F; Callol VV; Garca MB; Garca JB; Leal FJ; Corrales EC; Iglesias ES; Gmez MA; Serrano GG; Chillarn EG; Aguado FJ; Castillo JJ; Gonzlez AG; Vzquez JG; Peralvarez MB; Diaz MR; Mesa MY; Artiles FJ; Chao MA; Mesa MY; del Rosario Santana P; Escudero MA; Berenguer MM; Llacer JM; Berna JA; Ortiz JB; Pardell LT; Hernndez-Alvarez de Sotomayor C; Mndez MR; Garate RC; Mgica BD; Gonzlez MC; Domingo JP; Navarro CS; Vera GS; Cuquerella MA; Monzo JL; Boada PC; Prez MF; Parrado EC; Snchez JJ; Fernndez JC; e-STAR Spanish Study Group

    2009-06-01

    BACKGROUND: The electronic Schizophrenia Treatment Adherence Registry (e-STAR) is a prospective, observational study of patients with schizophrenia designed to evaluate long-term treatment outcomes in routine clinical practice.METHODS: Parameters were assessed at baseline and at 3 month intervals for 2 years in patients initiated on risperidone long-acting injection (RLAI) (n=1345) or a new oral antipsychotic (AP) (n=277; 35.7% and 36.5% on risperidone and olanzapine, respectively) in Spain. Hospitalization prior to therapy was assessed by a retrospective chart review.RESULTS: At 24 months, treatment retention (81.8% for RLAI versus 63.4% for oral APs, p<0.0001) and reduction in Clinical Global Impression Severity scores (-1.14 for RLAI versus -0.94 for APs, p=0.0165) were significantly higher with RLAI. Compared to the pre-switch period, RLAI patients had greater reductions in the number (reduction of 0.37 stays per patient versus 0.2, p<0.05) and days (18.74 versus 13.02, p<0.01) of hospitalizations at 24 months than oral AP patients.CONCLUSIONS: This 2 year, prospective, observational study showed that, compared to oral antipsychotics, RLAI was associated with better treatment retention, greater improvement in clinical symptoms and functioning, and greater reduction in hospital stays and days in hospital in patients with schizophrenia. Improved treatment adherence, increased efficacy and reduced hospitalization with RLAI offer the opportunity of substantial therapeutic improvement in schizophrenia.

  15. Deprivation of L-Arginine Induces Oxidative Stress Mediated Apoptosis in Leishmania donovani Promastigotes: Contribution of the Polyamine Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Roy, Saptarshi; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Sardar, Abul Hasan; Verma, Sudha; Saini, Savita; Singh, Ruby; Abhishek, Kumar; Kumar, Ajay; Mandal, Chitra; Das, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    The growth and survival of intracellular parasites depends on the availability of extracellular nutrients. Deprivation of nutrients viz glucose or amino acid alters redox balance in mammalian cells as well as some lower organisms. To further understand the relationship, the mechanistic role of L-arginine in regulation of redox mediated survival of Leishmania donovani promastigotes was investigated. L-arginine deprivation from the culture medium was found to inhibit cell growth, reduce proliferation and increase L-arginine uptake. Relative expression of enzymes, involved in L-arginine metabolism, which leads to polyamine and trypanothione biosynthesis, were downregulated causing decreased production of polyamines in L-arginine deprived parasites and cell death. The resultant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), due to L-arginine deprivation, correlated with increased NADP+/NADPH ratio, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) level, increased lipid peroxidation and reduced thiol content. A deficiency of L-arginine triggered phosphatidyl serine externalization, a change in mitochondrial membrane potential, release of intracellular calcium and cytochrome-c. This finally led to DNA damage in Leishmania promastigotes. In summary, the growth and survival of Leishmania depends on the availability of extracellular L-arginine. In its absence the parasite undergoes ROS mediated, caspase-independent apoptosis-like cell death. Therefore, L-arginine metabolism pathway could be a probable target for controlling the growth of Leishmania parasites and disease pathogenesis. PMID:26808657

  16. Deprivation of L-Arginine Induces Oxidative Stress Mediated Apoptosis in Leishmania donovani Promastigotes: Contribution of the Polyamine Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Roy, Saptarshi; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Sardar, Abul Hasan; Verma, Sudha; Saini, Savita; Singh, Ruby; Abhishek, Kumar; Kumar, Ajay; Mandal, Chitra; Das, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    The growth and survival of intracellular parasites depends on the availability of extracellular nutrients. Deprivation of nutrients viz glucose or amino acid alters redox balance in mammalian cells as well as some lower organisms. To further understand the relationship, the mechanistic role of L-arginine in regulation of redox mediated survival of Leishmania donovani promastigotes was investigated. L-arginine deprivation from the culture medium was found to inhibit cell growth, reduce proliferation and increase L-arginine uptake. Relative expression of enzymes, involved in L-arginine metabolism, which leads to polyamine and trypanothione biosynthesis, were downregulated causing decreased production of polyamines in L-arginine deprived parasites and cell death. The resultant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), due to L-arginine deprivation, correlated with increased NADP+/NADPH ratio, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) level, increased lipid peroxidation and reduced thiol content. A deficiency of L-arginine triggered phosphatidyl serine externalization, a change in mitochondrial membrane potential, release of intracellular calcium and cytochrome-c. This finally led to DNA damage in Leishmania promastigotes. In summary, the growth and survival of Leishmania depends on the availability of extracellular L-arginine. In its absence the parasite undergoes ROS mediated, caspase-independent apoptosis-like cell death. Therefore, L-arginine metabolism pathway could be a probable target for controlling the growth of Leishmania parasites and disease pathogenesis. PMID:26808657

  17. Competitive metabolism of L-arginine: arginase as a therapeutic target in asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Zeki, Amir A.; Last, Jerold A.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Exhaled breath nitric oxide (NO) is an accepted asthma biomarker. Lung concentrations of NO and its amino acid precursor, L-arginine, are regulated by the relative expressions of the NO synthase (NOS) and arginase isoforms. Increased expression of arginase I and NOS2 occurs in murine models of allergic asthma and in biopsies of asthmatic airways. Although clinical trials involving the inhibition of NO-producing enzymes have shown mixed results, small molecule arginase inhibitors have shown potential as a therapeutic intervention in animal and cell culture models. Their transition to clinical trials is hampered by concerns regarding their safety and potential toxicity. In this review, we discuss the paradigm of arginase and NOS competition for their substrate L-arginine in the asthmatic airway. We address the functional role of L-arginine in inflammation and the potential role of arginase inhibitors as therapeutics. PMID:23554705

  18. [New approach for treatment of chronic pancreatitis, caused by L-arginine, in rats].

    PubMed

    Petrushenko, V V; Sukhodolia, S A; Falalieieva, T M; Berehova, T V

    2013-12-01

    Impact of rofecoxib on progressing of pancreatic fibrous changes in the rats in experimental chronic pancreatitis, caused by L-arginine, was studied up. In 60 male rats chronic pancreatitis was simulated, using intraabdominal L-arginine introduction (100 mg/100 g) through 21 days. Rofecoxib (5 mg/kg) was injected during 14 days to rats of the main group after L-arginine injections were completed. In 35 days of experiment the animals state, the pancreatic amylase and lipase activity in the blood serum, as well as morphological changes in pancreatic gland, were analyzed. Application of rofecoxib have had promoted the postponed pancreatic fibrosis formation, the morphofunctional state of pancreatic gland improvement. The data obtained constitute the experimental substantiation of possibility to apply nonsteroid antiinflammatory medicines in complex of clinical treatment of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24502017

  19. L-Arginine as a Nutritional Prophylaxis Against Vascular Endothelial Dysfunction With Aging

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S.; Fahs, Christopher A.; Ranadive, Sushant M.; Patvardhan, Eshan A.

    2010-01-01

    With advancing age, peripheral conduit and resistance arteries lose the ability to effectively dilate owing to endothelial dysfunction. This vascular senescence contributes to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) with aging. L-arginine plays a role in numerous physiological processes including nitrogen detoxification, immunocompetence, growth hormone (GH) secretion, and insulin secretion. Recently, a considerable amount of attention has been placed on the ability of this amino acid to affect vascular endothelial function. The purpose of this review will be to examine the use of L-arginine as a novel nutritional strategy to potentially stave progression of vascular dysfunction with aging and CVD. Emphasis will be placed on the ability of L-arginine to modulate the vascular inflammatory and systemic hormonal milieu, which in turn may have a positive effect on vascular endothelial function. PMID:20053922

  20. The long-term oral administration of a product derived from a probiotic, Clostridium butyricum induced no pathological effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshio; Andoh, Akira; Takizawa, Jyou; Takizawa, Wataru; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2003-10-01

    Recent studies have suggested that short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) exert a therapeutic effect on some human and experimental animal diseases. In our previous study, we showed that Clostridium butyricum produces high levels of SCFAs in the culture system used. In addition, an additive based on yogurt was effective in eliminating and masking the odor derived from these SCFAs in the product. Recently, we reported that the oral administration of a high concentration (50% w/w) of this product derived from Clostridium butyricum for 17 days caused no pathological abnormalities in rats. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the prolonged oral administration of this product in rats. Male and female Wistar Hannover GALAS rats, 5 weeks old, were given a mixture of a standard diet plus the product derived from Clostridium butyricum (5% w/w) with 0.1% additive for 16 months (n=6). The control rats were allowed the same standard diet plus tap water (5% w/w) with 0.1% additive (n=6). After 16 months, a laparotomy was performed. A hemocyte count, and biochemical and electrolyte analyses were subsequently carried out. The esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine and pancreas were investigated macroscopically and microscopically. The results showed that the rats grew normally for the duration of the experimental period. The body weights of the product-fed rats were comparable with those of the control-fed rats. There were no significant differences in the organ weight between the product- and control-fed rats, except for a significantly increased weight of the large intestine in the product-fed male rats. No pathological abnormalities were found in the hemocyte count, the biochemical and electrolyte analyses, or the macroscopic and microscopic findings. PMID:12964036

  1. Supplementation with rumen-protected L-arginine-HCl increased fertility in sheep with synchronized estrus.

    PubMed

    de Chávez, Julio Agustín Ruiz; Guzmán, Adrian; Zamora-Gutiérrez, Diana; Mendoza, Germán David; Melgoza, Luz María; Montes, Sergio; Rosales-Torres, Ana María

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of L-arginine-HCl supplementation on ovulation rate, fertility, prolificacy, and serum VEGF concentrations in ewes with synchronized oestrus. Thirty Suffolk ewes with a mean body weight of 45 ± 3 kg and a mean body condition score (BCS) of 2.4 ± 0.28 were synchronized for estrus presentation with a progestin-containing sponge (20 mg Chronogest® CR) for 9 days plus PGF2-α (Lutalyse; Pfizer, USA) on day 7 after the insertion of the sponge. The ewes were divided into two groups; i.e., a control group (n = 15) that was fed on the native pasture (basal diet) and an L-arginine-HCl group (n = 15) that received 7.8 g of rumen-protected L-arginine-HCl from day 5 of the sponge insertion until day 25 after mating plus the basal diet. The L-arginine-HCl was administered daily via an esophageal probe between days 5 and 9 of the synchronization protocol and every third day subsequently. Blood samples were drawn from the jugular vein every 6 days throughout the entire experimental period. The results revealed that the L-arginine-HCl supplementation increased fertility during the synchronized estrus (P = 0.05). However, no effects were observed on the final BCS (P = 0.78), estrus presentation (P = 0.33), multiple ovulations (P = 0.24), prolificacy (P = 0.63), or serum VEGF concentration. In conclusion, L-arginine-HCl supplementation during the period used in this study increased fertility in sheep with synchronized estrus possibly due to improved embryo-fetal survival during early pregnancy. PMID:25991464

  2. Dependence of endotoxin-induced vascular hyporeactivity on extracellular L-arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, C. A.; Gray, G. A.; Stoclet, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    1. The dependence on extracellular L-arginine of vascular hyporeactivity induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was studied in vivo in rats infused with LPS and in vitro in endothelium-denuded rat thoracic aortic rings exposed to LPS. 2. Infusion of LPS during 50 min at a dose of 10 mg kg-1 h-1 produced a significant impairment of the pressor effect of noradrenaline, while in tissues collected 60 min after the start of LPS infusion, no significant alteration in either plasma arginine concentration or aortic arginine content was found compared to saline-infused controls (where plasma arginine was 78.5 +/- 7 microM and aortic arginine 394 +/- 124 nmol g-1 tissue). 3. Incubation of isolated, endothelium-denuded aortic rings with LPS (10 micrograms ml-1) in the absence of L-arginine for 4 h at 37 degrees C produced a 6 fold (P < 0.01) rightward shift in the noradrenaline concentration-effect curve compared to polymyxin B (1 micrograms ml-1, a LPS neutralizing agent) and reduced by 15% the maximum observed tension. 4. The presence of L-arginine (100 microM) during the incubation with LPS and throughout the following contraction experiments caused a 15 fold (P < 0.01) increase in the EC50 of noradrenaline and greater depression (45%) of the maximum observed tension compared to polymyxin B-treated controls. Responses in control, non LPS-treated rings were unaffected by the presence of L-arginine. 5. The addition of L-arginine to rings incubated with LPS in the absence of L-arginine and maximally precontracted with noradrenaline (10 microM) induced a dose-dependent relaxation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8428212

  3. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates L-arginine mediated cellular responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our prior study revealed the loss in short-term L-Arginine (ARG) therapeutic efficacy after continuous exposure; resulting in tolerance development, mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) down-regulation, secondary to oxidative stress and induced glucose accumulation. However, the potential factor regulating ARG cellular response is presently unknown. Method Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 100 ?M ARG for 2 h in buffer (short-term or acute), or for 7 days in culture medium and challenged for 2 h in buffer (continuous or chronic), in the presence or absence of other agents. eNOS activity was determined by analyzing cellular nitrite/nitrate (NO2/NO3), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity was assayed using SAMS peptide. 13C6 glucose was added to medium to measure glucose uptake during cellular treatments, which were determined by LC-MS/MS. Cellular glucose was identified by o-toluidine method. Superoxide (O2) was identified by EPR-spin-trap, and peroxynitrite (ONOO) was measured by flow-cytometer using aminophenyl fluorescein dye. Results Short-term incubation of cells with 100 ?M ARG in the presence or absence of 30 ?M L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 30 ?M AMPK inhibitor (compound C, CMP-C) increased cellular oxidative stress and overall glucose accumulation with no variation in glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), or AMPK activity from control. The increase in total NO2/NO3 after 2 h 100 ?M ARG exposure, was suppressed in cells co-incubated with 30??M CMP-C or L-NAME. Long-term exposure of ARG with or without CMP-C or L-NAME suppressed NO2/NO3, glucose uptake, GLUT-1, AMPK expression and activity below control, and increased overall cellular glucose, O2 and ONOO. Gluconeogenesis inhibition with 30 ?M 5-Chloro-2-N-2,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonamido-benzoxazole (CDB) during ARG exposure for 2 h maintained overall cellular glucose to control, but increased cellular glucose uptake. Continuous co-incubation with CDB and ARG increased NO2/NO3, glucose uptake, GLUT-1, AMPK expression and activity, and maintained overall cellular glucose, O2 and ONOO to control conditions. Conclusion The present study provides the fundamental evidence for AMPK as the primary modulator of ARG cellular responses and for regulating the mode of glucose accumulation during short-term and continuous ARG treatments. PMID:23718875

  4. Endogenous Inactivators of Arginase, l-Arginine Decarboxylase, and Agmatine Amidinohydrolase in Evernia prunastri Thallus.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M E; Vicente, C

    1983-02-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), l-arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and agmatine amidinohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.11) activities spontaneously decay in Evernia prunastri thalli incubated on 40 millimolar l-arginine used as inducer of the three enzymes if dithiothreitol is not added to the media. Lichen thalli accumulate both chloroatranorin and evernic acid in parallel to the loss of activity. These substances behave as inactivators of the enzymes at a range of concentrations between 2 and 20 micromolar, whereas several concentrations of dithiothreitol reverse, to some extent, the in vitro inactivation. PMID:16662821

  5. Endogenous Inactivators of Arginase, l-Arginine Decarboxylase, and Agmatine Amidinohydrolase in Evernia prunastri Thallus 1

    PubMed Central

    Legaz, María Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    1983-01-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), l-arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and agmatine amidinohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.11) activities spontaneously decay in Evernia prunastri thalli incubated on 40 millimolar l-arginine used as inducer of the three enzymes if dithiothreitol is not added to the media. Lichen thalli accumulate both chloroatranorin and evernic acid in parallel to the loss of activity. These substances behave as inactivators of the enzymes at a range of concentrations between 2 and 20 micromolar, whereas several concentrations of dithiothreitol reverse, to some extent, the in vitro inactivation. PMID:16662821

  6. Growth and characterization of amino acid (glycine and valine) substituted L-arginine diphosphate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph Arul Pragasam, A.; Madhavan, J.; Gulam Mohamed, M.; Selvakumar, S.; Ambujam, K.; Sagayaraj, P.

    2006-11-01

    The family of L-arginine phosphate single crystals is one of the most promising semiorganic non-linear optical materials. Single crystals of amino acid (glycine and valine) substituted L-arginine diphosphate (GLADP and VLADP) are grown by slow evaporation technique. The growth conditions and surface morphology of the crystals are studied and the grown crystals are confirmed by XRD. The SHG in the sample is confirmed by the Kurtz powder technique. The crystals are characterized by FTIR, optical absorption, thermal, microhardness and photoconductivity studies.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of chemical analogs of L-arginine phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, S.B.; Davis, L.D.; Velsko, S.P.; Wang, F.T.; Eimerl, D.; Zalkin, A.

    1987-07-01

    L-arginine phosphate is a promising new material for harmonic generation of the Nd:YAG fundamental wavelength, 1064 nm. The synthesis of 24 other salts of L-arginine was attempted and millimeter size crystals of 9 of these were obtained. These were analyzed for crystal structure and chemical composition and the linear and nonlinear optical properties measured. The compounds were all optically biaxial and several gave second harmonic signals greater than quartz. Phasematching has been observed in four of the crystals to date. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of chemical analogs of L-arginine phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, S. B.; Davis, L. E.; Velsko, S. P.; Wang, F. T.; Eimerl, D.; Zalkin, A.

    1987-11-01

    L-arginine phosphate is a promising new material for generating harmonics of the Nd: YAG fundamental wavelength, 1064 nm. The synthesis of 20 other salts of L-arginine was attempted and millimeter size crystals of 10 of these were obtained. These were analyzed for crystal structure and chemical composition and the linear and nonlinear optical properties were measured. The compounds were all oprically biaxial and several gave second harmonic signals greater than quartz. Phasematching has been observed in four of the crystals to date.

  9. Long-term oral administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine extends life span in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Akira; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2015-04-10

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by extension of a CAG repeat in the Sca1gene. Although the mechanisms underlying the symptoms of SCA1 have not been determined, aberrant neuronal activation potentially contributes to the neuronal cell death characteristic of the disease. Here we examined the potential involvement of extrasynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation in the pathogenesis of SCA1 by administering memantine, a low-affinity noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist, in SCA1 knock-in (KI) mice. In KI mice, the exon in the ataxin 1 gene is replaced with abnormally expanded 154CAG repeats. Memantine was administered orally to the SCA1 KI mice from 4 weeks of age until death. The treatment significantly attenuated body-weight loss and prolonged the life span of SCA1 KI mice. Furthermore, memantine significantly suppressed the loss of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum and motor neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, which are critical for motor function and parasympathetic function, respectively. These findings support the contribution of aberrant activation of extrasynaptic NMDARs to neuronal cell death in SCA1 KI mice and suggest that memantine may also have therapeutic benefits in human SCA1 patients. PMID:25725171

  10. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness results from the randomised controlled Trial of Oral Mandibular Advancement Devices for Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (TOMADO) and long-term economic analysis of oral devices and continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, Linda; Glover, Matthew; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail; Bennett, Maxine; Jordan, Jake; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus; East, Clare; Cameron, Malcolm; Davies, Mike; Oscroft, Nick; Smith, Ian; Morrell, Mary; Fox-Rushby, Julia; Quinnell, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), impairs quality of life (QoL) and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment is clinically effective but undermined by intolerance, and its cost-effectiveness is borderline in milder cases. Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) are another option, but evidence is lacking regarding their clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in milder disease. OBJECTIVES (1) Conduct a randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MADs against no treatment in mild to moderate OSAH. (2) Update systematic reviews and an existing health economic decision model with data from the Trial of Oral Mandibular Advancement Devices for Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (TOMADO) and newly published results to better inform long-term clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MADs and CPAP in mild to moderate OSAH. TOMADO A crossover RCT comparing clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three MADs: self-moulded [SleepPro 1™ (SP1); Meditas Ltd, Winchester, UK]; semibespoke [SleepPro 2™ (SP2); Meditas Ltd, Winchester, UK]; and fully bespoke [bespoke MAD (bMAD); NHS Oral-Maxillofacial Laboratory, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK] against no treatment, in 90 adults with mild to moderate OSAH. All devices improved primary outcome [apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI)] compared with no treatment: relative risk 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62 to 0.89] for SP1; relative risk 0.67 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.76) for SP2; and relative risk 0.64 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.76) for bMAD (p < 0.001). Differences between MADs were not significant. Sleepiness [as measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)] was scored 1.51 [95% CI 0.73 to 2.29 (SP1)] to 2.37 [95% CI 1.53 to 3.22 (bMAD)] lower than no treatment (p < 0.001), with SP2 and bMAD significantly better than SP1. All MADs improved disease-specific QoL. Compliance was lower for SP1, which was unpopular at trial exit. At 4 weeks, all devices were cost-effective at £20,000/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), with SP2 the best value below £39,800/QALY. META-ANALYSIS A MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index search updating two existing systematic reviews (one from November 2006 and the other from June 2008) to August 2013 identified 77 RCTs in adult OSAH patients comparing MAD with conservative management (CM), MADs with CPAP or CPAP with CM. MADs and CPAP significantly improved AHI [MAD -9.3/hour (p < 0.001); CPAP -25.4/hour (p < 0.001)]. Effect difference between CPAP and MADs was 7.0/hour (p < 0.001), favouring CPAP. No trials compared CPAP with MADs in mild OSAH. MAD and CPAP reduced the ESS score similarly [MAD 1.6 (p < 0.001); CPAP 1.6 (p < 0.001)]. LONG-TERM COST-EFFECTIVENESS An existing model assessed lifetime cost-utility of MAD and CPAP in mild to moderate OSAH, using the revised meta-analysis to update input values. The TOMADO provided utility estimates, mapping ESS score to European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions three-level version for device cost-utility. Using SP2 as the standard device, MADs produced higher mean costs and mean QALYs than CM [incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) £6687/QALY]. From a willingness to pay (WTP) of £15,367/QALY, CPAP is cost-effective, although the likelihood of MADs (p = 0.48) and CPAP (p = 0.49) being cost-effective is very similar. Both were better than CM, but there was much uncertainty in the choice between CPAP and MAD (at a WTP £20,000/QALY, the probability of being the most cost-effective was 47% for MAD and 52% for CPAP). When SP2 lifespan increased to 18 months, the ICER for CPAP compared with MAD became £44,066. The ICER for SP1 compared with CM was £1552, and for bMAD compared with CM the ICER was £13,836. The ICER for CPAP compared with SP1 was £89,182, but CPAP produced lower mean costs and higher mean QALYs than bMAD. Differential compliance rates for CPAP reduces cost-effectiveness so MADs become less costly and more clinically effective with CPAP compliance 90% of SP2. CONCLUSIONS Mandibular advancement devices are clinically effective and cost-effective in mild to moderate OSAH. A semi-bespoke MAD is the appropriate first choice in most patients in the short term. Future work should explore whether or not adjustable MADs give additional clinical and cost benefits. Further data on longer-term cardiovascular risk and its risk factors would reduce uncertainty in the health economic model and improve precision of effectiveness estimates. TRIAL REGISTRATION This trial is registered as ISRCTN02309506. FUNDING This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 18, No. 67. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID:25359435

  11. Long-term follow-up of a phase 2 study of oral teriflunomide in relapsing multiple sclerosis: safety and efficacy results up to 8.5 years

    PubMed Central

    Li, David K; Freedman, Mark S; Truffinet, Philippe; Benzerdjeb, Hadj; Wang, Dazhe; Bar-Or, Amit; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Reiman, Lucy E; O’Connor, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    Background: Teriflunomide, an oral disease-modifying therapy in development for patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS), was well tolerated and effective in reducing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in 179 RMS patients in a phase 2 36-week, placebo-controlled study. Methods: A total of 147 patients who completed the core study entered an open-label extension. Teriflunomide patients continued their assigned dose, and placebo patients were re-allocated to teriflunomide, 7 mg/day or 14 mg/day. An interim analysis was performed at a cut-off on January 8 2010. Results: The mean and median duration of study treatment, including both the core and extension phase, from baseline to the interim cut-off, was 5.6 years (standard deviation: 2.7 years) and 7.1 years (range: 0.05–8.5 years), respectively. Of 147 patients, 62 (42.2%) discontinued (19% due to treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs)). The most common TEAEs were mild infections, fatigue, sensory disturbances and diarrhoea. No serious opportunistic infections occurred, with no discontinuations due to infection. Asymptomatic alanine aminotransferase increases (≤3× upper limit of normal (ULN)) were common (7 mg, 64.2%; 14 mg, 62.1%); increases >3×ULN were similar across groups (7 mg, 12.3%; 14 mg, 12.1%). Mild decreases in neutrophil counts occurred; none led to discontinuation. The incidence of malignancies was comparable to that of the general population, and cases were not reminiscent of those observed in immunocompromised patients. Annualised relapse rates remained low, minimal disability progression was observed, with a dose-dependent benefit with teriflunomide 14 mg for several MRI parameters. Conclusion: Teriflunomide had a favourable safety profile for up to 8.5 years. PMID:22307384

  12. Long-term environmental stewardship.

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Michael David

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this Supplemental Information Source Document is to effectively describe Long-Term Environmental Stewardship (LTES) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). More specifically, this document describes the LTES and Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Programs, distinguishes between the LTES and LTS Programs, and summarizes the current status of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project.

  13. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  14. L-arginine improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in hypercholesterolemic humans.

    PubMed Central

    Creager, M A; Gallagher, S J; Girerd, X J; Coleman, S M; Dzau, V J; Cooke, J P

    1992-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired in hypercholesterolemia, even before the development of atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether infusion of L-arginine, the precursor of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor, nitric oxide, improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in hypercholesterolemic humans. Vascular reactivity was measured in the forearm resistance vessels of 11 normal subjects (serum LDL cholesterol = 2.76 +/- 0.10 mmol/liter) and 14 age-matched patients with hypercholesterolemia (serum LDL cholesterol = 4.65 +/- 0.36 mmol/liter, P < 0.05). The vasodilative response to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator, methacholine chloride, was depressed in the hypercholesterolemic group, whereas endothelium-independent vasodilation, induced by nitroprusside, was similar in each group. Intravenous administration of L-arginine augmented the forearm blood flow response to methacholine in the hypercholesterolemic individuals, but not in the normal subjects. L-arginine did not alter the effect of nitroprusside in either group. D-arginine had no effect on forearm vascular reactivity in either group. It is concluded that endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired in hypercholesterolemic humans. This abnormality can be improved acutely by administration of L-arginine, possibly by increasing the synthesis of endothelium-derived relaxing factor. PMID:1401062

  15. L-arginine normalizes endothelial function in cerebral vessels from hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Rossitch, E; Alexander, E; Black, P M; Cooke, J P

    1991-01-01

    We hypothesized that normal vascular reactivity could be restored in vessels from hypercholesterolemic animals by exposing them to L-arginine, the precursor of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). Basilar arteries were harvested from New Zealand white rabbits fed normal chow or that supplemented with 2% cholesterol for 10 wk. Vessels were cannulated for perfusion at physiologic pressure. Changes in vessel diameter were monitored by videomicroscopy. In comparison to normal vessels, those from hypercholesterolemic animals vasoconstricted more to KCl, endothelin (E), and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Conversely, vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh) (but not that to verapamil) was significantly impaired in the hypercholesterolemic animals. In vitro administration of L-arginine (3 mM) for 45 min normalized vasodilation to ACh and vasoconstriction to E, 5-HT, and KCl in the isolated vessels from hypercholesterolemic animals. This effect was stereospecific, since D-arginine had no effect. To conclude, these data confirm that hypercholesterolemia attenuates endothelium-derived relaxation, and enhances the sensitivity of these vessels to vasoconstrictors. In vitro administration of L-arginine normalized vascular reactivity of isolated vessels from hypercholesterolemic animals. Thus, hypercholesterolemia induces a reversible endothelial dysfunction that may be corrected by supplying the precursor of EDRF, L-arginine. PMID:2010542

  16. Using L-arginine-functionalized gold nanorods for visible detection of mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jiehao; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2015-04-01

    A rapid and simple approach for visible determination of mercury ions (Hg(2+) ) in aqueous solutions was developed based on surface plasmon resonance phenomenon using L-arginine-functionalized gold nanorods (AuNRs). At pH greater than 9, the deprotonated amine group of L-arginine on the AuNRs bound with Hg(2+) leading to the side-by-side assembly of AuNRs, which was verified by transmission electron microscopy images. Thus, when Hg(2+) was present in the test solution, a blue shift of the typical longitudinal plasmon band of the AuNRs was observed in the ultra violet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) spectra, along with a change in the color of the solution, which occurred within 5 min. After carefully optimizing the potential factors affecting the performance, the L-arginine/AuNRs sensing system was found to be highly sensitive to Hg(2+) , with the limit of detection of 5 nM (S/N = 3); it is also very selective and free of interference from 10 other metal ions (Ba(2+) , Ca(2+) , Cd(2+) , Co(2+) , Cs(+) , Cu(2+) , K(+) , Li(+) , Ni(2+) , Pb(2+) ). The result suggests that the L-arginine-functionalized AuNRs can potentially serve as a rapid, sensitive, and easy-to-use colorimetric biosensor useful for determining Hg(2+) in food and environmental samples. PMID:25754066

  17. L-arginine may mediate the therapeutic effects of low protein diets.

    PubMed Central

    Narita, I; Border, W A; Ketteler, M; Ruoslahti, E; Noble, N A

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown beneficial effects of dietary protein restriction on transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) expression and glomerular matrix accumulation in experimental glomerulonephritis. We hypothesized that these effects result from restriction of dietary L-arginine intake. Arginine is a precursor for three pathways, the products of which are involved in tissue injury and repair: nitric oxide, an effector molecule in inflammatory and immunological tissue injury; polyamines, which are required for DNA synthesis and cell growth; and proline, which is required for collagen production. Rats were fed six isocaloric diets differing in L-arginine and/or total protein content, starting immediately after induction of glomerulonephritis by injection of an antibody reactive to glomerular mesangial cells. Mesangial cell lysis and monocyte/macrophage infiltration did not differ with diet. However, restriction of dietary L-arginine intake, even when total protein intake was normal, resulted in decreased proteinuria, decreased expression of TGF-beta 1 mRNA and TGF-beta 1 protein, and decreased production and deposition of matrix components. L-Arginine, but not D-arginine, supplementation to low protein diets reversed these effects. These results implicate arginine as a key component in the beneficial effects of low protein diet. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7753841

  18. Ammonia Intoxication in Rats: Protection by N-Carbamoyl-L-Glutamate Plus L-Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangduk; Paik, Woon Ki; Cohen, Philip P.

    1972-01-01

    Rats given a lethal dose (LD99.9) of ammonium acetate (10.8 mmol/kg of body weight) were protected to the extent of 85 and 76% when previously injected with N-carbamoyl glutamate or L-arginine, respectively, at a level of 4 mmol/kg of body weight. At a dose of 1 mmol/kg of body weight, L-arginine protected 24%, while N-carbamoyl-L-glutamate protected 61% of the animals. When a combination of N-carbamoyl-L-glutamate plus L-arginine (1 mmol each per kg of body weight) was injected, 100% of the rats were protected. The efficacy of N-carbamoyl-L-glutamate is related to its role as an activator of mitochondrial carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (EC 2.7.2.5) and its resistance to hydrolysis by tissue acylaminoacid acylase. N-Acetyl-L-glutamate, the naturally occurring and most effective activator of mitochondrial carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, was relatively ineffective in protection against lethal dose of ammonium acetate, because of its ready hydrolysis by acylaminoacid acylase. The findings reported provide a rational basis for the use of N-carbamoyl-L-glutamate plus L-arginine in the prevention and treatment of hyperammonemia in clinical conditions of liver disease and parental infusion of amino acids, and in feeding of urea supplements to ruminants. PMID:4509311

  19. Requirements for neutrophil products and L-arginine in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed Central

    Seekamp, A.; Mulligan, M. S.; Till, G. O.; Ward, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion in rat limb results in evidence of vascular injury in the limb as well as in the lung as measured by leakage of [125I]albumin and extravasation of [51Cr] red blood cells. Vascular injury in lung and limb was proportional to the time of limb reperfusion and was associated with accumulation of myeloperoxidase, as well as evidence of complement consumption. In this model, the rank order of protective interventions was: neutrophil depletion > catalase + superoxide dismutase = allopurinol > dimethylthiourea = dimethylsulfoxide > deferoxamine = complement depletion. These data suggest that toxic oxygen products of neutrophils are related to the development of vascular injury. There was a reasonable correlation between protective effects of interventions and reduced tissue content of myeloperoxidase. Systemic treatment with the L-arginine antagonists, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine or nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, was also protective against vascular injury, suggesting that metabolic products of L-arginine participate in events leading to injury. Images Figure 3 PMID:8386444

  20. Dietary L-arginine supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplementation on inflammatory response and innate immunity of broilers. Experiment 1 was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatment; 6 birds/cage) with 3 dietary Arg concentrations (1.05, 1.4...

  1. L-arginine enhances cell proliferation and reduces apoptosis in human endometrial RL95-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    L-arginine is considered to be one of the most versatile amino acids due to the fact that it serves as a precursor for many important molecules in cellular physiology. When supplemented in the diet, L-arginine can increase the number of implantation sites in mice and rats, suggesting an effect at th...

  2. l-Arginine metabolism in cardiovascular and renal tissue from hyper- and hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Moliz, Juan N; Quesada, Andrés; Montoro-Molina, Sebastian; Vargas-Tendero, Pablo; Osuna, Antonio; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Vargas, Félix

    2016-03-01

    This study assessed the effects of thyroid hormones on the enzymes involved in l-arginine metabolism and the metabolites generated by the different metabolic pathways. Compounds of l-arginine metabolism were measured in the kidney, heart, aorta, and liver of euthyroid, hyperthyroid, and hypothyroid rats after 6 weeks of treatment. Enzymes studied were NOS isoforms (neuronal [nNOS], inducible [iNOS], and endothelial [eNOS]), arginases I and II, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), and l-arginine decarboxylase (ADC). Metabolites studied were l-arginine, l-citrulline, spermidine, spermine, and l-proline. Kidney heart and aorta levels of eNOS and iNOS were augmented and reduced (P < 0.05, for each tissue and enzyme) in hyper- and hypothyroid rats, respectively. Arginase I abundance in aorta, heart, and kidney was increased (P < 0.05, for each tissue) in hyperthyroid rats and was decreased in kidney and aorta of hypothyroid rats (P < 0.05, for each tissue). Arginase II was augmented in aorta and kidney (P < 0.05, for each tissue) of hyperthyroid rats and remained unchanged in all organs of hypothyroid rats. The substrate for these enzymes, l-arginine, was reduced (P < 0.05, for all tissues) in hyperthyroid rats. Levels of ODC and spermidine, its product, were increased and decreased (P < 0.05) in hyper- and hypothyroid rats, respectively, in all organs studied. OAT and proline levels were positively modulated by thyroid hormones in liver but not in the other tissues. ADC protein levels were positively modulated by thyroid hormones in all tissues. According to these findings, thyroid hormone treatment positively modulates different l-arginine metabolic pathways. The changes recorded in the abundance of eNOS, arginases I and II, and ADC protein in renal and cardiovascular tissues may play a role in the hemodynamic and renal manifestations observed in thyroid disorders. Furthermore, the changes in ODC and spermidine might contribute to the changes in cardiac and renal mass observed in thyroid disorders. PMID:26674221

  3. Nanoscale characterization of effect of L-arginine on Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shivani; Lavender, Stacey; Woo, JungReem; Guo, Lihong; Shi, Wenyuan; Kilpatrick-Liverman, LaTonya; Gimzewski, James K

    2014-07-01

    A major aetiological factor of dental caries is the pathology of the dental plaque biofilms. The amino acid L-arginine (Arg) is found naturally in saliva as a free molecule or as a part of salivary peptides and proteins. Plaque bacteria metabolize Arg to produce alkali and neutralize glycolytic acids, promoting a less cariogenous oral microbiome. Here, we explored an alternative and complementary mechanism of action of Arg using atomic force microscopy. The nanomechanical properties of Streptococcus mutans biofilm extracellular matrix were characterized under physiological buffer conditions. We report the effect of Arg on the adhesive behaviour and structural properties of extracellular polysaccharides in S. mutans biofilms. High-resolution imaging of biofilm surfaces can reveal additional structural information on bacterial cells embedded within the surrounding extracellular matrix. A dense extracellular matrix was observed in biofilms without Arg compared to those grown in the presence of Arg. S. mutans biofilms grown in the presence of Arg could influence the production and/or composition of extracellular membrane glucans and thereby affect their adhesion properties. Our results suggest that the presence of Arg in the oral cavity could influence the adhesion properties of S. mutans to the tooth surface. PMID:24763427

  4. Theoretical studies on vibrational spectra and nonlinear optical property of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kechen; Liu, Caiping; Mang, Chaoyong

    2007-05-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical properties of the organic-inorganic hybrid crystal, L-arginine phosphate monohydrate crystal have been investigated by the first-principles calculation as well as the electronic and vibrational properties. The calculated nonlinear optical coefficients agreed well to the experimental data. The results showed both organic and inorganic structural building blocks contribute to the large nonlinear optical activities of this crystal and the significant contribution of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The absorption-edges on both IR and UV sides of LAP crystal have been estimated and the structure-property relationship has been discussed. The study is helpful to the further development of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate crystal analogs with improved nonlinear optical properties.

  5. Long-term treatment of aged Long Evans rats with a dietary supplement containing neuroprotective peptides (N-PEP-12) to prevent brain aging: effects of three months daily treatment by oral gavage.

    PubMed

    Hutter-Paier, B; Reininger-Gutmann, B; Wronski, R; Doppler, E; Moessler, H

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with morphological and functional changes in the brain, resulting in the deterioration of cognitive performance. Growth factors like BDNF are suggested to be involved in the regulation of age-related processes in the brain. A novel dietary supplement produced from purified nerve cell proteins, N-PEP-12, has shown to share properties with naturally occurring peptide growth factors by stimulating neurite outgrowth and beneficial effects on neuronal survival and protection against metabolic stress in cell cultures. The current study investigates the effects of long-term intake on age-dependent memory decline by assessing cognitive performance and synaptic density. All the experiments were performed in aged Long Evans rats randomly assigned to saline or N-PEP-12 once daily by gavage over a period of three months. Behavioral tests were performed in the Morris Water Maze after one, two and three months of treatment. Histological examinations were performed in the hippocampal formation and in the entorhinal cortex by measuring the synaptic density. This study shows that the oral intake of N-PEP-12 has beneficial effects on the cognitive performance of aged animals and that these effects go along with an increase in the synaptic density. Thus, N-PEP-12 may help maintain memory and learning performance during the aging process. PMID:25866580

  6. Studies on growth defects and mechanical properties of nonlinear optical crystal: L-arginine hydrofluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Tanusri; Kar, Tanusree

    2005-03-01

    Chemical etching technique has been used for the first time to reveal dislocation structure of the cleavage plane of L-arginine hydrofluoride monohydrate (LAHF). Selective behaviour of the etchants for revealing macrosteps and cooperating spirals has been demonstrated. Presence of growth spirals on (1 0 0) face indicates that growth of this face is governed by screw dislocation mechanism. Microhardness measurement reveals that LAHF is harder than LAP.

  7. Excess L-arginine restores endothelium-dependent relaxation impaired by monocrotaline pyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Wei; Oike, Masahiro . E-mail: moike@pharmaco.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ohnaka, Keizo; Koyama, Tetsuya; Ito, Yushi

    2005-09-15

    The pyrrolizidine alkaloid plant toxin monocrotaline pyrrole (MCTP) causes pulmonary hypertension in experimental animals. The present study aimed to examine the effects of MCTP on the endothelium-dependent relaxation. We constructed an in vitro disease model of pulmonary hypertension by overlaying MCTP-treated bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAEs) onto pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell-embedded collagen gel lattice. Acetylcholine (Ach) induced a relaxation of the control CPAEs-overlaid gels that were pre-contracted with noradrenaline, and the relaxation was inhibited by L-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). In contrast, when MCTP-treated CPAEs were overlaid, the pre-contracted gels did not show a relaxation in response to Ach in the presence of 0.5 mM L-arginine. Expression of endothelial NOS protein, Ach-induced Ca{sup 2+} transients and cellular uptake of L-[{sup 3}H]arginine were significantly smaller in MCTP-treated CPAEs than in control cells, indicating that these changes were responsible for the impaired NO production in MCTP-treated CPAEs. Since cellular uptake of L-[{sup 3}H]arginine linearly increased according to its extracellular concentration, we hypothesized that the excess concentration of extracellular L-arginine might restore NO production in MCTP-treated CPAEs. As expected, in the presence of 10 mM L-arginine, Ach showed a relaxation of the MCTP-treated CPAEs-overlaid gels. These results indicate that the impaired NO production in damaged endothelial cells can be reversed by supplying excess L-arginine.

  8. Long Term Illness and Wages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandy, Robert; Elliott, Robert R.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term illness (LTI) is a more prevalent workplace risk than fatal accidents but there is virtually no evidence for compensating differentials for a broad measure of LTI. In 1990 almost 3.4 percent of the U.K. adult population suffered from a LTI caused solely by their working conditions. This paper provides the first estimates of compensating

  9. Comparison of the Novel Oral Anticoagulants Apixaban, Dabigatran, Edoxaban, and Rivaroxaban in the Initial and Long-Term Treatment and Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism: Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A. T.; Hamilton, M.; Mitchell, S. A.; Phatak, H.; Liu, X.; Bird, A.; Tushabe, D.; Batson, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists is the current standard of care (SOC) for venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment and prevention. Although novel oral anti-coagulants (NOACs) have been compared with SOC in this indication, no head-to-head randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have directly compared NOACs. A systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) were conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of NOACs for the initial and long-term treatment of VTE. Methods Electronic databases (accessed July 2014) were systematically searched to identify RCTs evaluating apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban versus SOC. Eligible patients included adults with an objectively confirmed deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) or both. A fixed-effect Bayesian NMA was conducted for outcomes of interest, and results were presented as relative risks (RR) and 95% credible intervals (Crl). Results Six Phase III RCTs met criteria for inclusion: apixaban (one RCT; n = 5,395); rivaroxaban (two RCTs; n = 3,423/4,832); dabigatran (two RCTs; n = 2,539/2,568); edoxaban (one RCT; n = 8,240). There were no statistically significant differences between the NOACs with regard to the risk of ‘VTE and VTE-related death. Apixaban treatment was associated with the most favourable safety profile of the NOACs, showing a statistically significantly reduced risk of ‘major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleed’ compared with rivaroxaban (0.47 [0.36, 0.61]), dabigatran (0.69 [0.51, 0.94]), and edoxaban (0.54 [0.41, 0.69]). Dabigatran was also associated with a significantly lower risk of ‘major or CRNM bleed’ compared with rivaroxaban (0.68 [0.53, 0.87]) and edoxaban (0.77 [0.60, 0.99]). Conclusions Indirect comparisons showed statistically similar reductions in the risk of ‘VTE or VTE-related death for all NOACs. In contrast, reductions in ‘major or CRNM bleed’ for initial/long-term treatment were significantly better with apixaban compared with all other NOACs, and with dabigatran compared with rivaroxaban and edoxaban. Results from the current analysis indicate that the NOACs offer clinical benefit over conventional therapy while highlighting relative differences in their bleeding profile. PMID:26716830

  10. Prevention of muscle fibers atrophy during gravitational unloading: The effect of L-arginine administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashkina, N.; Lomonosova, Y.; Shevchenko, T. F.; Bugrova, A. E.; Turtikova, O. V.; Kalamkarov, G. R.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational unloading results in pronounced atrophy of m.soleus. Probably, the output of NO is controlled by the muscle activity. We hypothesized that NO may be involved in the protein metabolism and increase of its concentration in muscle can prevent atrophic changes induced by gravitational unloading. In order to test the hypothesis we applied NO donor L-arginine during gravitational unloading. 2.5-month-old male Wistar rats weighing 220-230g were divided into sedentary control group (CTR, n=7), 14-day hindlimb suspension (HS, n=7), 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-arginine (HSL, n=7) (with a daily supplementation of 500 mg/kg wt L-arginine) and 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-NAME (HSN, n=7) (90 mg/kg wt during 14 days). Cross sectional area (CSA) of slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) soleus muscle fibers decreased by 45% and 28% in the HS group ( p<0.05) and 40% and 25% in the HSN group, as compared to the CTR group ( p<0.05), respectively. CSA of ST and FT muscle fibers were 25% and 16% larger in the HSL group in comparison with the HS group ( p<0.05), respectively. The atrophy of FT muscle fibers in the HSL group was completely prevented since FT fiber CSA had no significant differences from the CTR group. In HS group, the percentage of fibers revealing either gaps/disruption of the dystrophin layer of the myofiber surface membrane increased by 27% and 17%, respectively, as compared to the controls (CTR group, p<0.05). The destructions in dystrophin layer integrity and reductions of desmin content were significantly prevented in HSL group. NO concentration decreased by 60% in the HS group (as well as HSN group) and at the same time no changes were detectable in the HSL group. This fact indicates the compensation of NO content in the unloaded muscle under L-arginine administration. The levels of atrogin-1 mRNA were considerably altered in suspended animals (HS group: plus 27%, HSL group: minus 13%) as compared to the control level. Conclusion: L-arginine administration allows maintaining NO concentration in m.soleus at the level of cage control group, prevents from dystrophin layer destruction, decreases the atrogin mRNA concentration in the muscle and atrophy level under gravitational unloading.

  11. L-Arginine Affects Aerobic Capacity and Muscle Metabolism in MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodan, Lance H.; Wells, Greg D.; Banks, Laura; Thompson, Sara; Schneiderman, Jane E.; Tein, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of L-arginine (L-Arg) on total body aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism as assessed by 31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in patients with MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy with Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes) syndrome. Methods We performed a case control study in 3 MELAS siblings (m.3243A>G tRNAleu(UUR) in MTTL1 gene) with different % blood mutant mtDNA to evaluate total body maximal aerobic capacity (VO2peak) using graded cycle ergometry and muscle metabolism using 31P-MRS. We then ran a clinical trial pilot study in MELAS sibs to assess response of these parameters to single dose and a 6-week steady-state trial of oral L-Arginine. Results At baseline (no L-Arg), MELAS had lower serum Arg (p = 0.001). On 31P-MRS muscle at rest, MELAS subjects had increased phosphocreatine (PCr) (p = 0.05), decreased ATP (p = 0.018), and decreased intracellular Mg2+ (p = 0.0002) when compared to matched controls. With L-arginine therapy, the following trends were noted in MELAS siblings on cycle ergometry: (1) increase in mean % maximum work at anaerobic threshold (AT) (2) increase in % maximum heart rate at AT (3) small increase in VO2peak. On 31P-MRS the following mean trends were noted: (1) A blunted decrease in pH after exercise (less acidosis) (2) increase in Pi/PCr ratio (ADP) suggesting increased work capacity (3) a faster half time of PCr recovery (marker of mitochondrial activity) following 5 minutes of moderate intensity exercise (4) increase in torque. Significance These results suggest an improvement in aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects in response to supplementation with L-Arg. Intramyocellular hypomagnesemia is a novel finding that warrants further study. Classification of Evidence Class III evidence that L-arginine improves aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01603446. PMID:25993630

  12. Interaction of the islet nitric oxide system with L-arginine-induced secretion of insulin and glucagon in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Akesson, B.; Mosn, H.; Panagiotidis, G.; Lundquist, I.

    1996-01-01

    1. Several recent in vitro studies have suggested that production of nitric oxide (NO) from the islet NO system may have an important regulatory influence on the secretion of insulin and glucagon. In the present paper we have investigated, mainly with an in vivo approach, the influence and specificity of the NO synthase (NOS) blocker NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) on L-arginine-induced secretion of insulin and glucagon. 2. In freely fed mice, L-NAME pretreatment (1.2 mmol kg-1) influenced the dynamics of insulin and glucagon release following an equimolar dose of L-arginine, the specific substrate for NOS activity, in that the NOS inhibitor enhanced the insulin response but suppressed the glucagon responses. This was reflected in a large decrease in the plasma glucose levels of the L-NAME pretreated animals. 3. L-NAME pretreatment did not influence the insulin and glucagon secretory responses to the L-arginine-enantiomer D-arginine, which cannot serve as a substrate for NOS activity. 4. Replacing L-NAME pretreatment by pretreatment with D-arginine or L-arginine itself, which both carry the same cationic change and are devoid of NOS inhibitory properties, did not mimic the effects of L-NAME on L-arginine-induced hormone release. 5. Fasting the animals for 24 h totally abolished the L-NAME-induced potentiation of L-arginine stimulated insulin release suggesting that the sensitivity of the beta-cell secretory machinery to NO-production is greatly changed in the fasting state. However, the L-NAME-induced suppression of L-arginine stimulated glucagon release was unaffected by starvation. 6. In isolated islets from freely fed mice, L-arginine (5 mM) stimulated insulin release was greatly enhanced and glucagon release markedly suppressed by the presence of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME in the incubation medium. These effects were abolished in isolated islets taken from 24 h fasted mice. 7. Our present results, which showed that the NOS inhibitor L-NAME markedly enhances insulin release but suppresses glucagon release induced by L-arginine in the intact animal, give strong support to our previous hypothesis that the islet NO system is a negative modulator of insulin secretion and a positive modulator of glucagon secretion. Additionally, we observed that the importance of the beta-cell NO-production for secretory mechanisms, as evaluated by the effect of L-NAME on L-arginine-induced insulin release, was greatly changed after starvation, an effect less prominent with regard to glucagon release. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8904652

  13. [The effect of agmatine on L-arginine metabolism in erythrocytes under streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats].

    PubMed

    Ferents, I V; Brodiak, I V; Liuta, M Ia; Burda, V A; Fedorovych, A M; Sybirna, N O

    2012-01-01

    The effects of agmatine on oxidative and nonoxidative metabolic pathways of L-arginine were investigated both in plasma and erythrocytes under experimental diabetes mellitus. It was indicated, that agmatine prevents the development of oxidative-nitrosative stress in diabetic rats. After treatment of animals by agmatine NO-synthase methabolic pathway of L-arginine is depressed whereas arginase one increases in erythrocytes of rats with experimental diabetes mellitus. PMID:22860402

  14. Long-term data archiving

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2009-01-01

    Long term data archiving has much value for chemists, not only to retain access to research and product development records, but also to enable new developments and new discoveries. There are some recent regulatory requirements (e.g., FDA 21 CFR Part 11), but good science and good business both benefit regardless. A particular example of the benefits of and need for long term data archiving is the management of data from spectroscopic laboratory instruments. The sheer amount of spectroscopic data is increasing at a scary rate, and the pressures to archive come from the expense to create the data (or recreate it if it is lost) as well as its high information content. The goal of long-term data archiving is to save and organize instrument data files as well as any needed meta data (such as sample ID, LIMS information, operator, date, time, instrument conditions, sample type, excitation details, environmental parameters, etc.). This editorial explores the issues involved in long-term data archiving using the example of Raman spectral databases. There are at present several such databases, including common data format libraries and proprietary libraries. However, such databases and libraries should ultimately satisfy stringent criteria for long term data archiving, including readability for long times into the future, robustness to changes in computer hardware and operating systems, and use of public domain data formats. The latter criterion implies the data format should be platform independent and the tools to create the data format should be easily and publicly obtainable or developable. Several examples of attempts at spectral libraries exist, such as the ASTM ANDI format, and the JCAMP-DX format. On the other hand, proprietary library spectra can be exchanged and manipulated using proprietary tools. As the above examples have deficiencies according to the three long term data archiving criteria, Extensible Markup Language (XML; a product of the World Wide Web Consortium, an independent standards body) as a new data interchange tool is being investigated and implemented. In order to facilitate data archiving, Raman data needs calibration as well as some other kinds of data treatment. Figure 1 illustrates schematically the present situation for Raman data calibration in the world-wide Raman spectroscopy community, and presents some of the terminology used.

  15. The protective effects of long-term oral administration of marine collagen hydrolysate from chum salmon on collagen matrix homeostasis in the chronological aged skin of Sprague-Dawley male rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiang; Pei, Xinrong; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Nan; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yong

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the long-term effects of marine collagen hydrolysate (MCH) from Chum Salmon skin on the aberrant collagen matrix homeostasis in chronological aged skin, Sprague-Dawley male rats of 4-wk-old were orally administrated with MCH at the diet concentrations of 2.25% and 4.5% for 24 mo. Histological and biochemical analysis revealed that MCH had the potential to inhibit the collagen loss and collagen fragmentation in chronological aged skin. Based on immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, collagen type I and III protein expression levels in MCH-treated groups significantly increased as compared with the aged control group. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis showed MCH was able to increase the expressions of procollagen type I and III mRNA (COL1A2 and COL3A1) through activating Smad signaling pathway with up-regulated TGF-?RII (T?RII) expression level. Meanwhile, MCH was shown to inhibit the age-related increased collagen degradation through attenuating MMP-1 expression and increasing tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, MCH could alleviate the oxidative stress in chronological aged skin, which was revealed from the data of superoxide dismutase activity and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances level in skin homogenates. Therefore, MCH was demonstrated to have the protective effects on chronological skin aging due to the influence on collagen matrix homeostasis. And the antioxidative property of MCH might play an important role in the process. PMID:21535500

  16. Role of nitric oxide in kidney and liver (as distance organ) function in bilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion: Effect of L-Arginine and NG-nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mahmood; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Daneshmand, Fatemeh; Moeini, Maryam; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Renal ischemia-reperfusion (RIR) is a major cause of renal dysfunction that acts through different mechanisms. We investigated the role of L-Arginine as an endogenous nitric oxide (NO) precursor and NG-nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) as an NO inhibitor on kidney and liver function in RIR model. Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Groups 1 (sham-operated, n = 13) received a single dose of saline (4 ml/kg, i.p.) and 2 (Ischemia [Isch], n = 14) received a single dose of saline (4 ml/kg, i.p.). Groups 3 (Isch + L-NAME, n = 15) received a single dose of L-NAME (20 mg/kg, i.p.) and 4 (Isch + L-Arginine n = 16) received a single dose of L-Arginine (300 mg/kg, i.p.), After 2 h, renal failure was induced by clamping both renal pedicles for 45 min, followed by 24-h reperfusion in Groups 2–4. Finally, blood samples were obtained, and kidney tissue samples were subjected for pathology investigations. Results: The body weight decreased, and the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr), and kidney tissue damage score (KTDS) increased significantly in the Isch and Isch + L-NAME groups compared with the sham group while L-Arginine improved weight reduction (P < 0.05), and it reduced the serum levels of BUN and Cr, and KTDS when compared with the Isch and Isch + L-NAME groups. Kidney weight increased significantly in all groups compared with the sham group. L-Arginine reduced the liver tissue level of malondialdehyde and increased alkaline phosphatase. Conclusion: L-Arginine as an NO precursor can improve kidney function against RIR. It also improves oxidative stress in liver tissue. PMID:26645018

  17. Poly-L-arginine-hydroxyapatite nanoparticle complexes translocate through lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Satoru; Shimabayashi, Saburo

    2009-01-01

    Certain molecules, which are able to directly translocate across phospholipid bilayer membranes (cell or endosormal membrane), can be useful as carriers (vectors) for drags (especially polymeric drags). We have studied the translocationability of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticle-poly-L-arginine complex through the negatively charged phospholipid bilayer membranes by using several instruments. It was confirmed by means of a confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) not only the fact that the complex can translocate through the membranes but also the fact that the complexes were still retained in the inner water layer of the liposome even after the translocation. PMID:19581704

  18. X-ray radiation of poly-L-arginine hydrochloride and multilayered DNA-coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stypczy?ska, Agnieszka; Nixon, Tony; Mason, Nigel

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the chemical changes induced in thin films of the dry polypeptide poly-L-arginine hydrochloride and its mixture with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) during 5 h of soft X-ray exposure. The physical and chemical effects of the soft X-ray irradiation were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Analysis of O1 s, N1 s and C1 s features in XPS spectra reveals the existence of several routes of radiation-induced decomposition and shows quantitative and qualitative changes.

  19. Monomeric Corynebacterium glutamicum N-acetyl glutamate kinase maintains sensitivity to L-arginine but has a lower intrinsic catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Li, Cheng; Zhang, Hao; Liang, Shuli; Han, Shuangyan; Lin, Ying; Yang, Xiaorong; Zheng, Suiping

    2016-02-01

    N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of L-arginine, and L-arginine-sensitive NAGK typically has hexameric architecture. Defining the relationship between this architecture and L-arginine inhibition can provide a foundation to identify the key amino acids involved in the allosteric regulation network of L-arginine. In the present study, the key amino acids in the N-terminal helix (N-helix) of Corynebacterium glutamicum (Cg) NAGK required for hexamer formation were determined using structural homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis. It was also verified that hexameric architecture is required for the positive cooperativity of inhibition by L-arginine and for efficient catalysis, but that it is not the determinant of inhibition by L-arginine. Monomeric mutants retained a similar sensitivity to L-arginine as the hexameric form, indicating that monomers contain an independent, sensitive signal transduction network of L-arginine to mediate allosteric regulation. Mutation studies of CgNAGKs also revealed that amino acid residues 18-23 of the N-helix are required for inhibition by L-arginine, and that E19 may be an essential amino acid influencing the apparent affinity of L-arginine. Collectively, these studies may illuminate the basic mechanism of metabolic homeostasis of C. glutamicum. PMID:26512006

  20. l-Arginine Decreases Inflammation and Modulates the Nuclear Factor-κB/Matrix Metalloproteinase Cascade in Mdx Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hnia, Karim; Gayraud, Jérôme; Hugon, Gérald; Ramonatxo, Michèle; De La Porte, Sabine; Matecki, Stefan; Mornet, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked disorder associated with dystrophin deficiency that results in chronic inflammation, sarcolemma damage, and severe skeletal muscle degeneration. Recently, the use of l-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), has been proposed as a pharmacological treatment to attenuate the dystrophic pattern of DMD. However, little is known about signaling events that occur in dystrophic muscle with l-arginine treatment. Considering the implication of inflammation in dystrophic processes, we asked whether l-arginine inhibits inflammatory signaling cascades. We demonstrate that l-arginine decreases inflammation and enhances muscle regeneration in the mdx mouse model. Classic stimulatory signals, such as proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, are significantly decreased in mdx mouse muscle, resulting in lower nuclear factor (NF)-κB levels and activity. NF-κB serves as a pivotal transcription factor with multiple levels of regulation; previous studies have shown perturbation of NF-κB signaling in both mdx and DMD muscle. Moreover, l-arginine decreases the activity of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, which are transcriptionally activated by NF-κB. We show that the inhibitory effect of l-arginine on the NF-κB/MMP cascade reduces β-dystroglycan cleavage and translocates utrophin and nNOS throughout the sarcolemma. Collectively, our results clarify the molecular events by which l-arginine promotes muscle membrane integrity in dystrophic muscle and suggest that NF-κB-related signaling cascades could be potential therapeutic targets for DMD management. PMID:18458097

  1. Role of L-arginine in the biological effects of blue light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, Anu M.

    2005-11-01

    Arginine, a semi-essential amino acid, and metabolites of arginine exert multiple biological effects. It has been known that arginine causes the release of various hormones such as insulin, glucagon, growth hormone, prolactin, and adrenal catecholamines. Arginine infusion also produces vasodilation, and in the kidney increased plasma flow accompanied by increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Recent studies have showed that blue and red light irradiation in vitro and in vivo can increase production of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anion, and related reactive oxygen species (ROS). These then can modulate the production and secretion of several cytokines and other mediators and play an important role as regulatory mediators in signaling processes which can then modulate the production, mobilization and homing of stem cells. It is proposed that some of the therapeutic effects of light can be considered to be due to the changes in the metabolism of L-arginine. The regulation of L-arginine turnover by the use of light at blue wavelengths between 400nm and 510nm can be the explanation for some of the observed effects of blue light: lowering of blood pressure, pain killing effect, regulating insulin production, anti-inflammatory action, and possible effects on the release and homing of stem cells.

  2. Dietary l-Arginine Supplementation Protects Weanling Pigs from Deoxynivalenol-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Liao, Peng; He, Liuqin; Feng, Zemeng; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the positive effects of dietary supplementation with l-arginine (Arg) on piglets fed a deoxynivalenol (DON)-contaminated diet. A total of eighteen, 28-day-old healthy weanling pigs were randomly assigned into one of three groups: uncontaminated basal diet (control group), 6 mg/kg DON-contaminated diet (DON group) and 6 mg/kg DON + 1% l-arginine (DON + ARG group). After 21 days of Arg supplementation, piglets in the DON and DON + ARG groups were challenged by feeding 6 mg/kg DON-contaminated diet for seven days. The results showed that DON resulted in damage to piglets. However, clinical parameters, including jejunal morphology, amino acid concentrations in the serum, jejunum and ileum, were improved by Arg (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the mRNA levels for sodium-glucose transporter-1 (SGLT-1), glucose transporter type-2 (GLUT-2) and y+l-type amino acid transporter-1 (y+LAT-1) were downregulated in the DON group, but the values were increased in the DON + ARG group (p < 0.05). Collectively, these results indicate that dietary supplementation with Arg exerts a protective role in pigs fed DON-contaminated diets. PMID:25884909

  3. Cerebral Endothelial Function Determined by Cerebrovascular Reactivity to L-Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Pretnar-Oblak, Janja

    2014-01-01

    Endothelium forms the inner cellular lining of blood vessels and plays an important role in many physiological functions including the control of vasomotor tone. Cerebral endothelium is probably one of the most specific types but until recently it was impossible to determine its function. In this review, the role of cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine (CVR-L-Arg) for assessment of cerebral endothelial function is discussed. L-Arginine induces vasodilatation through enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) in the cerebral endothelium. Transcranial Doppler sonography is used for evaluation of cerebral blood flow changes. The method is noninvasive, inexpensive, and enables reproducible measurements. CVR-L-Arg has been compared to flow-mediated dilatation as a gold standard for systemic endothelial function and intima-media thickness as a marker for morphological changes. However, it seems to show specific cerebral endothelial function. So far CVR-L-Arg has been used to study cerebral endothelial function in many pathological conditions such as stroke, migraine, etc. In addition CVR-L-Arg has also proven its usefulness in order to show potential improvement after pharmacological interventions. In conclusion CVR-L-Arg is a promising noninvasive research method that could provide means for evaluation of cerebral endothelial function in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24860826

  4. Electrochemical behavior of tectoridin and its sensitive determination based on L-arginine modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wenhua; Wang, Lu; Li, Huichao; Li, Gaiping; Li, Jianjun; Ye, Baoxian

    2015-11-01

    A simple, inexpensive and highly sensitive voltammetric method for the determination of tectoridin was developed using a poly(L-Arginine) modified electrode. The redox character of tectoridin at proposed electrode was studied systematically and some dynamic parameters were calculated for the first time. A reasonable reaction mechanism of tectoridin on the poly(L-Arginine)/GCE was also dicussed and proposed, which could be a reference for the pharmacological action of tectoridin in clinical study. And the electroanalytical method for determination of tectoridin was established by differential pulse voltammograms (DPV). Under optimum conditions, the response peak currents were linear relationship with tectoridin concentrations in the range of 5.010(-8)-2.010(-6) mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 4.010(-8) mol L(-1). Therefore, the high sensitivity for tectoridin sensing at the proposed electrode was achieved, and the proposed method could also be used to detect tectoridin in the Chinese medicinal herb Blackberrylily with satisfactory results. PMID:26452883

  5. Dietary L-arginine supplementation protects weanling pigs from deoxynivalenol-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Liao, Peng; He, Liuqin; Feng, Zemeng; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the positive effects of dietary supplementation with L-arginine (Arg) on piglets fed a deoxynivalenol (DON)-contaminated diet. A total of eighteen, 28-day-old healthy weanling pigs were randomly assigned into one of three groups: uncontaminated basal diet (control group), 6 mg/kg DON-contaminated diet (DON group) and 6 mg/kg DON + 1% L-arginine (DON + ARG group). After 21 days of Arg supplementation, piglets in the DON and DON + ARG groups were challenged by feeding 6 mg/kg DON-contaminated diet for seven days. The results showed that DON resulted in damage to piglets. However, clinical parameters, including jejunal morphology, amino acid concentrations in the serum, jejunum and ileum, were improved by Arg (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the mRNA levels for sodium-glucose transporter-1 (SGLT-1), glucose transporter type-2 (GLUT-2) and y(+)L-type amino acid transporter-1 (y(+)LAT-1) were downregulated in the DON group, but the values were increased in the DON + ARG group (p < 0.05). Collectively, these results indicate that dietary supplementation with Arg exerts a protective role in pigs fed DON-contaminated diets. PMID:25884909

  6. Effect of L-arginine supplementation on insulin resistance and serum adiponectin concentration in rats with fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Miczke, Anna; Suliburska, Joanna; Pupek-Musialik, Danuta; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Jabłecka, Anna; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Skrypnik, Damian; Bogdański, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Object: The purpose of this study was to determine whether supplementation with L-arginine, a substrate used in the production of nitric oxide, had an effect on adiponectin concentration in rats fed a high-fat diet. The influence of L-arginine on insulin resistance was also evaluated. Materials and methods: The experiment was performed using 36 Wistar rats divided into three groups: group 1 was fed a standard diet, group 2 a high-fat (HF) diet, group 3 a HF diet supplemented with L-arginine. After 42 days, serum levels of lipids, glucose, insulin, NO, and adiponectin were measured. Insulin resistance (IR) was estimated by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA). Results: Body mass was equal in all 3 groups, at the beginning as well as at the end of the study, however, in group 2 the amount of visceral fat was greater after 42 days. In group 3, there was a tendency for visceral fat to decrease. An increase in cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR, as well as a decrease in NO and adiponectin were seen in group 2, while in group 3, L-arginine supplementation ameliorated these disturbances. Conclusions: Our study shows that L-arginine supplementation in rats fed a HF diet is associated with an increase in insulin sensitivity. Our findings suggest that the underlying mechanism could be at least partially related to an increase in adiponectin concentration. PMID:26379826

  7. Phase III Multi-Institutional Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy With Paclitaxel, Estramustine, and Oral Etoposide Combined With Long-Term Androgen Suppression Therapy and Radiotherapy Versus Long-Term Androgen Suppression Plus Radiotherapy Alone for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of RTOG 99-02

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Seth A. Bae, Kyoungwha; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Sobczak, Mark L.; Asbell, Sucha O.; Rajan, Raghu; Kerlin, Kevin J.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Long-term androgen suppression plus radiotherapy (AS+RT) is standard treatment of high-risk prostate cancer. A randomized trial, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 9902, was undertaken to determine whether adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel, estramustine, and etoposide (TEE) plus AS+RT would improve disease outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Methods and Materials: High-risk (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score {>=}7; or Stage T2 or greater, Gleason score 8, prostate-specific antigen level <100 ng/mL) nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients were randomized to AS+RT (Arm 1) vs. AS+RT plus four cycles of TEE (Arm 2). TEE was delivered 4 weeks after RT. AS continued for 2 years for both treatment arms. RT began after 8 weeks of AS began. Results: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 trial opened January 11, 2000. Excess thromboembolic toxicity was noted, leading to study closure October 4, 2004. A total of 397 patients were accrued, and the data for 381 were analyzable. An acute and long-term toxicity analysis was performed. The worst overall toxicities during treatment were increased for Arm 2. Of the 192 patients, 136 (71%) on Arm 2 had RTOG Grade 3 or greater toxicity compared with 70 (37%) of 189 patients on Arm 1. Statistically significant increases in hematologic toxicity (p < 0.0001) and gastrointestinal toxicity (p = 0.017) but not genitourinary toxicity (p = 0.07) were noted during treatment. Two Grade 5 complications related to neutropenic infection occurred in Arm 2. Three cases of myelodysplasia/acute myelogenous leukemia were noted in Arm 2. At 2 and 3 years after therapy completion, excess long-term toxicity was not observed in Arm 2. Conclusion: TEE was associated with significantly increased toxicity during treatment. The toxicity profiles did not differ at 2 and 3 years after therapy. Toxicity is an important consideration in the design of trials using adjuvant chemotherapy for prostate cancer.

  8. l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency: clinical presentation and response to treatment in two patients with a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Edvardson, Simon; Korman, Stanley H; Livne, Amir; Shaag, Avraham; Saada, Ann; Nalbandian, Ruppen; Allouche-Arnon, Hyla; Gomori, J Moshe; Katz-Brull, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Creatine and creatine phosphate provide storage and transmission of phosphate-bound energy in muscle and brain. Of the three inborn errors of creatine metabolism causing brain creatine depletion, l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency has been described in only two families. We describe clinical and biochemical features, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings and response to creatine supplementation in two siblings with a novel mutation in the AGAT-encoding GATM gene. The sister and brother were evaluated at age 12 and 18years, respectively, because of mild mental retardation, muscle weakness and low weight. Extensive work-up had previously yielded negative results. Electron microscopy of the muscle revealed tubular aggregates and the activity of respiratory chain complexes was decreased in the muscle. Urine organic acid concentrations normalized to urine creatinine concentration were all increased, suggesting a creatine metabolism disorder. Brain MRS was remarkable for absence of creatine. Urine guanidinoacetate levels by tandem mass spectrometry were low, suggesting AGAT deficiency. GATM sequencing revealed a homozygous single nucleotide insertion 1111_1112insA, producing a frame-shift at Met-371 and premature termination at codon 376. Eleven months after commencing treatment with oral creatine monohydrate 100mg/kg/day, repeat MRI/MRS showed significantly increased brain creatine in the sister and a slight increase in the older brother. The parents' impression of improved strength and stamina was substantiated by increased post-treatment versus pre-treatment scores in the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, straight-arm raising and timed up-and-go tests. Similarly, there was an apparent improvement in cognitive function, with significantly increased IQ-scores in the sister and marginal improvement in the brother. PMID:20682460

  9. Isotopic study of L-Arginine kinetics in the lung during pseudomonas sepsis in an ovine model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongzhi; Watson, Davin; Yu, Yong-Ming; Traber, Daniel L; Fischer, Stefani; Nichols, Joan; Deyo, Donald; Traber, Lillian L; Cortiella, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate how L-Arginine pulmonary metabolism is altered in response Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) induced septic conditions using an ovine model. Methods: Seven female sheep were infused with a primed-constant infusion of L-[15N2-guanidino, 5, 5, 2H2] L-Arginine for 28 hs. After the initial 4 hs of the L-Arginine infusion, a continuous infusion of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria started for 24 hs. A NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, NG-Methyl-L-arginine (L-NMA), infusion was added during the last 4 hs of the bacterial infusion. Blood samples were taken at specific time points for isotopic enrichment during control, septic and NOS blocking phases of the study. Results: We observed that the level of total delivery of L-Arginine to the lungs was significantly decreased in septic phase after 24 hours of pseudomonas infusion. In contrast, the fractional uptake and metabolism of L-Arginine by the lungs was doubled during septic phase relative to the control phase (MARG-basal = 100% vs. MARG-septic = 220 56%, P < 0.05). NO production in the lungs was also significantly increased. Infusion of L-NMA markedly blunted this elevated NO production and attenuated the total arginine metabolized in the septic lungs (Mnitrate-septic = 43.6 5.7 vs. Mnitrate-septic + L-NMA = 13.4 5.1 umol/kg/min; p < 0.05). We demonstrated sepsis induced by P. aeruginosa infusion caused an increase in the fractional uptake and metabolic rate of arginine in the lungs. Furthermore, our data suggests that arginine was mainly consumed via arginine NO pathway, which might be responsible for this enhanced arginine metabolic activity in the septic lungs. PMID:24273695

  10. Isotopic study of L-Arginine kinetics in the lung during pseudomonas sepsis in an ovine model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongzhi; Watson, Davin; Yu, Yong-Ming; Traber, Daniel L; Fischer, Stefani; Nichols, Joan; Deyo, Donald; Traber, Lillian L; Cortiella, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate how L-Arginine pulmonary metabolism is altered in response Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) induced septic conditions using an ovine model. Methods: Seven female sheep were infused with a primed-constant infusion of L-[15N2-guanidino, 5, 5, 2H2] L-Arginine for 28 hs. After the initial 4 hs of the L-Arginine infusion, a continuous infusion of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria started for 24 hs. A NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, NG-Methyl-L-arginine (L-NMA), infusion was added during the last 4 hs of the bacterial infusion. Blood samples were taken at specific time points for isotopic enrichment during control, septic and NOS blocking phases of the study. Results: We observed that the level of total delivery of L-Arginine to the lungs was significantly decreased in septic phase after 24 hours of pseudomonas infusion. In contrast, the fractional uptake and metabolism of L-Arginine by the lungs was doubled during septic phase relative to the control phase (MARG-basal = 100% vs. MARG-septic = 220 56%, P < 0.05). NO production in the lungs was also significantly increased. Infusion of L-NMA markedly blunted this elevated NO production and attenuated the total arginine metabolized in the septic lungs (MARG-septic = 220 56% vs. MARG-NO blocking = -25 20%; P < 0.05). We demonstrated sepsis induced by P. aeruginosa infusion caused an increase in the fractional uptake and metabolic rate of arginine in the lungs. Furthermore, our data suggests that arginine was mainly consumed via arginine NO pathway, which might be responsible for this enhanced arginine metabolic activity in the septic lungs. PMID:24624312

  11. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us Administration on Aging (AoA) Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program (OAA, Title VII, Chapter 2, Sections ... Services Provided to Persons Living in Long-Term Care Facilities Program data for FY 2013 indicate that ...

  12. Consumer Direction in Long-Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Generations, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Issue includes 17 theme articles on long-term care, covering legal issues, federal role, state programs, demonstration programs, family caregivers, home health care, home care workers, culturally appropriate long-term care, financial support, and cognitive impairments. (SK)

  13. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  14. Long-term equilibrium tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, John A.; Cerveny, Randall S.

    1998-08-01

    Extreme equilibrium tides, or ``hypertides,'' are computed in a new equilibrium tidal model combining algorithms of a version of the Chapront ELP-2000/82 Lunar Theory with the BER78 Milankovitch astronomical expansions. For the recent past, a high correspondence exists between computed semidiurnal tide levels and a record of coastal flooding demonstrating that astronomical alignment is a potential influence on such flooding. For the Holocene and near future, maximum tides demonstrate cyclic variations with peaks at near 5000 B.P. and 4000 A.P. On the late Quaternary timescale, variations in maximum equilibrium tide level display oscillations with periods of approximately 10,000, 100,000 and 400,000 years, because of precessional shifts in tidal maxima between vernal and autumnal equinoxes. While flooding occurs under the combined effects of tides and storms via ``storm surges,'' the most extensive flooding will occur with the coincidence of storms and the rarer hypertides and is thus primarily influenced by hypertides. Therefore we suggest that astronomical alignment's relationship to coastal flooding is probabilistic rather than deterministic. Data derived from this model are applicable to (1) archaeological and paleoclimatic coastal reconstructions, (2) long-term planning, for example, radioactive waste site selection, (3) sealevel change and paleoestuarine studies or (4) ocean-meteorological interactions.

  15. Bioanalytical profile of the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway and its evaluation by capillary electrophoresis◇

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.

    2007-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes recent progress in fundamental understanding and analytical profiling of the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway. It focuses on key analytical references of NO actions and on the experimental acquisition of these references in vivo, with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) comprising one of the most flexible and technologically promising analytical platform for comprehensive high-resolution profiling of NO-related metabolites. Second aim of this review is to express demands and bridge efforts of experimental biologists, medical professionals and chemical analysis-oriented scientists who strive to understand evolution and physiological roles of NO and to develop analytical methods for use in biology and medicine. PMID:17329176

  16. Ground based experiments on the growth and characterization of L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP) crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, S. M.; Cao, C.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.; Mookherji, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP) is a new nonlinear optical material with higher efficiency for harmonic generation compared to KDP. Crystals of LAP were grown in the laboratory from supersaturated solutions by temperature lowering technique. Investigations revealed the presence of large dislocation densities inside the crystals which are observed to produce refractive index changes causing damage at high laser powers. This is a result of the convection during crystal growth from supersaturated solutions. It is proposed to grow these crystals in a diffusion controlled growth condition under microgravity environment and compare the crystals grown in space with those grown on ground. Physical properties of the solutions needed for modelling of crystal growth are also presented.

  17. Diamond turning of L-arginine phosphate, a new organic nonlinear crystal.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, B A; Syn, C K; Velsko, S P

    1989-10-15

    We have demonstrated that single point diamond turning can be used to generate high optical quality finished surfaces on a new organic nonlinear crystal, L-arginine phosphate (LAP). The proper choice of cutting conditions can produce surfaces with <5-A rms local roughness. Local softening or melting near the cutting tool tip may play a key role in the machining process by ensuring that material is removed by ductile cutting rather than brittle fracture. At the same time, the low melting temperature of LAP makes lubrication and cooling especially important to prevent extensive melting and tool fouling. In spite of the presence of a weak cleavage plane in LAP, the surface quality is relatively insensitive to crystallographic orientation. Tool wear is apparently negligible, so that surface flatness is governed by the stability of the diamond turning machine. These results suggest that it may be possible to fabricate large aperture LAP harmonic converters for use in inertial confinement fusion lasers. PMID:20555896

  18. Diamond turning of L-arginine phosphate, a new organic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, B.A.; Syn, K.; Velsko, S.P. )

    1989-10-15

    We have demonstrated that single point diamond turning can be used to generate high optical quality finished surfaces on a new organic nonlinear crystal, L-arginine phosphate (LAP). The proper choice of cutting conditions can produce surfaces with {lt}5-A rms local roughness. Local softening or melting near the cutting tool tip may play a key role in the machining process by ensuring that material is removed by ductile cutting rather than brittle fracture. At the same time, the low melting temperature of LAP makes lubrication and cooling especially important to prevent extensive melting and tool fouling. In spite of the presence of a weak cleavage plane in LAP, the surface quality is relatively insensitive to crystallographic orientation. Tool wear is apparently negligible, so that surface flatness is governed by the stability of the diamond turning machine. These results suggest that it may be possible to fabricate large aperture LAP harmonic converters for use in inertial confinement fusion lasers.

  19. L-arginine decreases infarct size in rats exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B; Sun, Y; Sievers, R E; Shuman, J L; Glantz, S A; Chatterjee, K; Parmley, W W; Wolfe, C L

    1996-07-01

    This study examined the effects of L-arginine on myocardial infarct size, hemodynamics, and vascular reactivity in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS)-exposed and non-ETS-exposed rats. We previously demonstrated that exposure to ETS increased myocardial infarct size in a rat model of ischemia and reperfusion. If reduced reperfusion was caused by endothelial cell damage and increased vascular tone, L-arginine (ARG) would increase nitric oxide and better protect the heart. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: ETS or non-ETS (control) with and without ARG (2.25% ARG in drinking water). The ETS groups were exposed to passive smoking (4 Marlboro cigarettes per 15 minutes, 6 hours a day) for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, all rats were subjected to 35 minutes of left coronary artery occlusion and 120 minutes of reperfusion, with hemodynamic monitoring. Aortic rings were harvested to evaluate vascular reactivity. Average air nicotine, carbon monoxide, and total particulate concentrations were 1304 +/- 215 microgram/m3, 78 +/- 2.0 ppm, and 31 +/- .7 mg/m3 (mean +/- SEM) for the ETS-exposed rats. Infarct size (infarct mass/risk area x 100%) increased with ETS exposure but decreased significantly in the ETS-with-ARG group compared with the ETS-without-ARG group (42% +/- 6% vs 64% +/- 6%, mean +/- SEM; p = 0.043). The benefit of ARG was dependent on ETS exposure (ETS x ARG interaction, p = 0.043). There were no significant differences between groups in heart rate, systolic pressure, and rate-pressure product. ARG significantly decreased myocardial infarct size after ischemia and reperfusion in ETS-exposed rats. Neither the adverse effects of ETS on infarct size nor the blockage of this effect by ARG appears to be the result of ETS-induced alterations in hemodynamics. PMID:8701882

  20. L-arginine reduces exercise-induced increase in plasma lactate and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, A; Piquard, F; Geny, B; Doutreleau, S; Lampert, E; Mettauer, B; Lonsdorfer, J

    2002-08-01

    To investigate the effect of L-arginine supplementation (L-ARG) on physiological and metabolic changes during exercise, we determined in a double-blind study the cardiorespiratory (heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and carbon dioxide production (VCO(2)) and the metabolic (lactate and ammonia) responses to maximal exercise after either an intravenous L-ARG hydrochloride salt or placebo load in 8 healthy subjects. Exercise-induced increases in heart rate, VO(2) and VCO(2) were not significantly different after L-ARG or placebo. By contrast, peak plasma ammonia and lactate were significantly decreased after L-ARG load (60.6 +/- 8.2 vs. 73.1 +/- 9.1 micro mol x l(-1), p < 0.01 and 7.1 +/- 0.7 vs. 8.2 +/- 1.1 mmol x l(-1), p < 0.01, for ammonia and lactate, respectively). Plasma L-citrulline increased significantly during exercise only after L-ARG load, despite a concomitant decrease in plasma L-ARG. Furthermore, a significant inverse relationship was observed between changes in lactate and L-citrulline concentrations after L-ARG load (r = -0.84, p = 0.009). These results demonstrate that intravenous L-ARG reduces significantly exercise-induced increase in plasma lactate and ammonia. Taken together, the specific L-citrulline increase and the inverse relationship observed between L-citrulline and plasma lactate after L-ARG might support that L-ARG supplementation enhances the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway during exercise. PMID:12215958

  1. Increased brain L-arginine availability facilitates cutaneous heat loss induced by running exercise.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Leite, Laura Hora Rios; Guimares, Juliana Bohnen; Coimbra, Cndido Celso

    2015-06-01

    The effects of increased brain availability of L-arginine (L-arg), a precursor for nitric oxide synthesis, on core body temperature (Tcore ) and cutaneous heat loss were evaluated in running rats. One week prior to the experiments, adult male Wistar rats received the following implants: a chronic guide cannula in the lateral cerebral ventricle and a temperature sensor in the abdominal cavity. On the day of the experiments, the rats were assigned to receive a 2-?L intracerebroventricular injection of either NaCl (0.15 mol/L) or L-arg solution (0.825, 1.65 or 3.30 mol/L); Tcore and tail skin temperature were measured while the rats ran at a speed of 18 m/min until they were fatigued. L-arginine induced a dose-dependent reduction in the threshold Tcore required for cutaneous heat loss (38.09 0.20C for 3.30-mol/L L-arg vs 38.61 0.10C for saline; P < 0.05), which attenuated the exercise-induced hyperthermia. Although the rats treated with L-arg presented a lower Tcore at the end of exercise (~0.7C lower after treatment with the highest dose), no changes in the time to fatigue were observed relative to the control trial. These results suggest that brain L-arg controls heat loss during exercise, most likely by modulating the sympathetic vasoconstrictor tonus to skin vessels. Furthermore, despite facilitating cutaneous heat loss mechanisms, increased brain L-arg availability did not enhance physical performance. PMID:25881674

  2. Modulatory effects of l-arginine and soy enriched diet on bone homeostasis abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El-Maraghy, Shohda A; Mehana, Noha Ali

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex syndrome which is responsible for numerous complications affecting the whole body. Osteoporosis is regarded as one of the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus that results from reduced bone formation and increased resorption. In this context, we searched for dietary supplements that preserve diabetic bone loss. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been suggested as a possible mechanism affecting bone homeostasis in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The osteoprotective effects of l-arginine and soy enriched diet were also investigated. Male Wistar rats were allocated into four groups; normal control, untreated STZ-diabetic rats and STZ-diabetic rats treated with either l-arginine (10mg/kg/day) or fed soy enriched diet (200 g/kg diet) for 12 weeks. l-Arginine and soy enriched diet normalized serum PTH level and increased serum osteocalcin level; bone osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin and runt-related transcription factor2 mRNA levels compared to diabetic rats. A decrease in serum pyridinoline, C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen, cathepsin k levels and bone cathepsin k mRNA level was observed in both treated groups. Both treatments increased serum insulin and insulin like growth factor-1 levels and decreased urinary calcium excretion. In conclusion, l-arginine and soy enriched diet are effective in prevention of osteoporosis associated with diabetes mellitus. PMID:25617479

  3. The crucial role of l-arginine in macrophage activation: What you need to know about it.

    PubMed

    Pekarova, Michaela; Lojek, Antonin

    2015-09-15

    Nowadays, it is well recognized that amino acids are powerful molecules responsible for regulatory control over fundamental cellular processes. However, our understanding of the signaling cascades involved in amino acid sensing in organisms, as well as signal initiation, is largely limited. This is also the case of semi-essential amino acid l-arginine, which has multiple metabolic fates, and it is considered as one of the most versatile amino acids. Recently, some new and important facts have been published considering the role of l-arginine in the regulation of inflammatory processes in several human and mouse models, mediated also via the regulation of macrophage activation. Therefore, this mini review focuses on the actual summarization of information about (i) l-arginine bioavailability in organism, (ii) l-arginine-dependent regulation of nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production, and importantly (iii) its role in the activation of intracellular signaling pathways and G-protein-coupled receptors in macrophages. PMID:26188591

  4. L-arginine's effect on the hypoxia-induced release of acetylcholine from the in vitro cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert S; Shirahata, Machiko; Chang, Irene; Balbir, Alex

    2005-05-12

    NO is known to reduce the hypoxia-induced increase in carotid body neural activity (CBNA). Acetylcholine (ACh), a known excitatory transmitter in the cat carotid body (CB), is released during hypoxia. This study addressed the impact of an NO precursor on ACh release during hypoxia. Both CBs from nine cats were prepared for incubation, then inserted into a medium and bubbled with three consecutive gas mixtures, hyperoxic, hypoxic, and a final hyperoxic mixture. This series of exposures was performed in the absence of L-arginine, followed by the three exposures in a 1mM L-arginine medium, and followed, thirdly, in a 10mM L-arginine medium. L-Arginine significantly attenuated the hypoxia-induced release of ACh. Two post-arginine procedures suggested strongly that the reduction in the ACh release was not due to a gradual exhaustion of carotid body ACh stores over the course of the experiment. The data are consistent with those reports showing that NO donors and precursors reduce the hypoxia-induced increase in CBNA, and further support a role for ACh in the hypoxia-induced increase in CBNA. PMID:15848119

  5. Dietary L-arginine supplementation during mouse gestation enhances reproductive performance and Vegfr2 transcription activity in the fetoplacental unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regarded as one of the most versatile amino acids, arginine serves as a precursor for many molecules and has been reported to improve the reproductive performance of rats and pigs. To this end, we sought to determine if dietary L-arginine alters fetoplacental vascular endothelial growth factor recep...

  6. Structural basis for the erythro-stereospecificity of the L-arginine oxygenase VioC in viomycin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Helmetag, Verena; Samel, Stefan A.; Thomas, Michael G.; Marahiel, Mohamed A.; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Summary The non-heme iron oxygenase VioC from Streptomyces vinaceus catalyzes Fe(II)- and ?-ketoglutarate-dependent C?-hydroxylation of L-arginine during the biosynthesis of the tuberactinomycin antibiotic viomycin. Crystal structures of VioC were determined in complexes with the cofactor Fe(II), the substrate L-arginine, the product (2S,3S)-hydroxyarginine (hArg), and the coproduct succinate at 1.11.3 resolution. The overall structure reveals a ?-helix core fold with two additional helical subdomains common to nonheme iron oxygenases of the CAS-like (CSL) superfamily. In contrast to other CAS-like oxygenases, which catalyze the formation of threo diastereomers, VioC produces the erythro diastereomer of C?-hydroxylated L-arginine. This unexpected stereospecificity is caused by conformational control of the bound substrate, which enforces a gauche(?) conformer for ?1 instead of the trans conformers observed for the asparagine oxygenase AsnO and other members of the CSL superfamily. Additionally, the substrate specificity of VioC was investigated. The sidechain of the L-arginine substrate projects outward from the active site by making mainly interactions with the C-terminal helical subdomain. Accordingly, VioC exerts broadened substrate specificity by accepting the analogues L-homoarginine and L-canavanine for C?-hydroxylation. PMID:19490124

  7. Comparison of the effect of topical versus systemic L-arginine on wound healing in acute incisional diabetic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zandifar, Alireza; Seifabadi, Sima; Zandifar, Ehsan; Beheshti, Sajedeh Sohrabi; Aslani, Abolfazl; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired wound healing. The amino acid L-arginine is the only substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. The purpose of this study was to compare the topical versus systemic L-arginine treatment on total nitrite (NOx) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations in wound fluid and rate of wound healing in an acute incisional diabetic wound model. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 Sprague-Dawley rats were used of which 32 were rendered diabetic. Animals underwent a dorsal skin incision. Dm-sys-arg group (N = 8, diabetic) and Norm-sys-arg group (N = 8, normoglycemic) were gavaged with L-arginine. Dm-sys-control group (N = 8, diabetic) and Norm-sys-control group (N = 8, normoglycemic) were gavaged with water. Dm-top-arg group (N = 8, diabetic) and norm-top-arg group (N = 8, normoglycemic) received topical L-arginine gel. Dm-top-control group (N = 8, diabetic) received gel vehicle. On the day 5 the amount of NOx in wound fluid was measured by Griess reaction. VEGF/total protein in wound fluids was also measured on day 5 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All wound tissue specimens were fixed and stained to be evaluated for rate of healing. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 18.0, Chicago, IL, USA) through One-way analysis of variance test and Tukey's post-hoc. Results: In dm-sys-arg group, the level of NOx on day 5 was significantly more than dm-top-arg group (P < 0.05). VEGF content in L-arginine treated groups were significantly more than controls (P < 0.05). Rate of diabetic wound healing in dm-sys-arg group was significantly more than dm-top-arg group. Conclusion: Systemic L-arginine is more efficient than topical L-arginine in wound healing. This process is mediated at least in part, by increasing VEGF and NO in the wound fluid. PMID:26109968

  8. L-arginine does not improve biochemical and hormonal response in trained runners after 4 weeks of supplementation.

    PubMed

    Alvares, Thiago Silveira; Conte-Junior, Carlos Adam; Silva, Joab Trajano; Paschoalin, Vnia Margaret Flosi

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that L-arginine improves exercise performance by increasing nitric oxide synthesis and levels of insulin and growth hormone (GH). Metabolic and hormonal responses to chronic L-arginine supplementation may clarify the mechanisms underlying its putative physiologic effects on physical performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects that 4 weeks of supplementation with L-arginine would have on metabolic and hormonal parameters at rest and in response to exercise. Fifteen healthy runners were divided into treatment (ARG; 6 g L-arginine) and placebo (PLA; 6 g cornstarch) groups. On the first visit, blood samples were collected for baseline, and the supplement or placebo was provided. After 4 weeks of supplementation (second visit), blood samples were collected at the following intervals: at rest, immediately after the first 5-km time-trial running test (5km-TT), immediately after the second 5km-TT, and after 20 minutes of recovery (+20). In addition to exercise performance (total running time), plasma nitrate, nitrite, nitrate plus nitrite, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, lactate, ammonia and serum insulin, GH, insulin-like growth factor 1, and cortisol concentrations were evaluated. There were significant increases in plasma nitrite, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, lactate, ammonia and serum GH, and cortisol at the first 5km-TT, immediately after the second 5km-TT, and +20 in both ARG and PLA. Nitrate plus nitrite and nitrate increased only at +20. No significant change was observed in serum insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 in any sample period. Total running time did not differ significantly between the 2 tests, in either ARG or PLA. Thus, according to our results, 4 weeks of L-arginine supplementation did not cause beneficial changes in metabolic and hormonal parameters, beyond those achieved with exercise alone. PMID:24418244

  9. Is the serum l-arginine level during early pregnancy a predictor of pregnancy-induced hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingwen; Kotani, Tomomi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Mano, Yukio; Sumigama, Seiji; Li, Hua; Komatsu, Koji; Miki, Rika; Maruta, Ei; Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Mitsui, Takashi; Yoshida, Shigeru; Yamashita, Mamoru; Tamakoshi, Koji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of serum l-arginine in healthy pregnant women and infant cord blood and to compare them with those in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). The serum concentration of l-arginine in normal pregnant women at early gestation (n = 186) was determined and analyzed based on maternal factors such as the age, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), smoking and alcohol habits before pregnancy. Similarly, the concentration of cord blood of the newborns (n = 142) was also analyzed. These values were compared with those in the PIH group (n = 21). The potential risk factors for PIH were also estimated. The serum concentration of l-arginine at early gestation in normal pregnant women (88.65 ± 19.96 µM) was not affected by the maternal age and BMI before pregnancy. A lower l-arginine concentration at early gestation (<70 µM) significantly elevated PIH risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 4.26, 95% CI 1.29–14.50]. In addition, either women with large body mass before pregnancy (BMI>25 kg/m2) or primipara women also showed a significant association with PIH risk [adjusted OR = 10.55 (2.95–40.68); 5.25 (1.72–19.15), respectively]. In conclusion, a lower l-arginine concentration at early gestation, overweight before pregnancy (BMI>25 kg/m2) and primipara could predict to the development of PIH. PMID:26236104

  10. Long-term solar-terrestrial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The results of an 18-month study of the requirements for long-term monitoring and archiving of solar-terrestrial data is presented. The value of long-term solar-terrestrial observations is discussed together with parameters, associated measurements, and observational problem areas in each of the solar-terrestrial links (the sun, the interplanetary medium, the magnetosphere, and the thermosphere-ionosphere). Some recommendations are offered for coordinated planning for long-term solar-terrestrial observations.

  11. Biomimetic synthesis of ribbon-like hydroxyapatite employing poly(l-arginine).

    PubMed

    Tsiourvas, Dimitris; Tsetsekou, Athena; Kammenou, Maria-Izoldi; Boukos, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Binding of a polypeptide on colloidal particles can affect the dissolution of mineral, initiate crystal nucleation and change the growth kinetics of the precipitated crystal. In this study the synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was performed in the presence of poly(L-arginine), PA. Aqueous solutions of Ca(2+), phosphate, and PA were employed at calcium:PA molar ratios ranging from 2:1 to 1:2 and the resulting suspensions were hydrothermally treated at 80 C for 16 h, or at 130 C for 6h. The resulting nanomaterials were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, SEM, and TGA. It was found that the presence of PA promotes HAP formation and affects its crystal size and morphology possibly through a rather specific interaction between the homopeptide that is positively charged and also that adopts a ?-sheet conformation and the negatively charged c-plane of the growing HAP crystal. In all cases, hexagonal HAP crystals with thin ribbon-like morphology were obtained. Increase of the PA ratio and of the hydrothermal temperature leads to more homogeneous and narrower size distributions with crystallites having widths ranging between 5 to 50 nm and lengths ranging from 50 to 450 nm. PMID:26478425

  12. Bulk growth of high quality nonlinear optical crystals of L-arginine tetrafluoroborate (L-AFB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, C.; Bhat, K.; Wang, W. S.; Tan, A.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    2001-05-01

    Bulk single crystals of L-arginine tetrafluoroborate (L-AFB) a new semiorganic nonlinear optical material has been successfully grown from solution by the temperature lowering method. Solubility of L-AFB was measured in various solvents such as ethanol, methanol, acetone and water. L-AFB was found to have extremely low solubility in acetone, ethanol and methanol. Therefore, it was not feasible to grow L-AFB single crystals using these solvents. However, high quality crystals of L-AFB were successfully grown from aqueous solution by the temperature lowering method, even though the mother liqueur became viscous. Large single crystals of L-AFB were grown with dimensions 785035 mm3 in eight weeks. Growth rate and effects of seed orientation on morphologies of L-AFB crystals were studied. L-AFB crystals belong to a class of organic-inorganic complexes in which the high optical nonlinearity of a pure organic compound is combined with the favorable mechanical and thermally stable properties of an inorganic compound. Bulk single crystals of L-AFB are potential materials for applications in blue-green wavelength region.

  13. Dysregulation of l-arginine metabolism and bioavailability associated to free plasma heme

    PubMed Central

    Cortelezzi, L.; Vommaro, Z.; Scaccabarozzi, D.; Dondorp, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria is associated with hypoargininemia, which contributes to impaired systemic and pulmonary nitric oxide (NO) production and endothelial dysfunction. Since intravascular hemolysis is an intrinsic feature of severe malaria, we investigated whether and by which mechanisms free heme [Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX (FP)] might contribute to the dysregulation of l-arginine (l-Arg) metabolism and bioavailability. Carrier systems “y+” [or cationic amino acid transporter (CAT)] and “y+L” transport l-Arg into red blood cells (RBC), where it is hydrolyzed to ornithine and urea by arginase (isoform I) or converted to NO· and citrulline by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Our results show a significant and dose-dependent impairment of l-Arg transport into RBC pretreated with FP, with a strong inhibition of the system carrier y+L. Despite the impaired l-Arg influx, higher amounts of l-Arg-derived urea are produced by RBC preexposed to FP caused by activation of RBC arginase I. This activation appeared not to be mediated by oxidative modifications of the enzyme. We conclude that l-Arg transport across RBC membrane is impaired and arginase-mediated l-Arg consumption enhanced by free heme. This could contribute to reduced NO production in severe malaria. PMID:20357184

  14. Novel arginine deiminase-based method to assay l-arginine in beverages.

    PubMed

    Stasyuk, N Ye; Gayda, G Z; Fayura, L R; Boretskyy, Y R; Gonchar, M V; Sibirny, A A

    2016-06-15

    A highly selective and sensitive enzymatic method for the quantitative determination of l-arginine (Arg) has been developed. The method is based on the use of recombinant bacterial arginine deiminase (ADI) isolated from the cells of a recombinant strain Escherichia coli and o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) as a chemical reagent. Ammonia, the product of the enzymatic digestion of Arg by ADI, reacts with OPA and forms in the presence of sulfite a product, which can be detected by spectrophotometry (S) and fluorometry (F). The linear concentration range for Arg assay in the final reaction mixture varies for ADI-OPA-F variant of the method from 0.35μM to 24μM with the detection limit of 0.25μM. For ADI-OPA-S variant of the assay, the linearity varies from 0.7μM to 50μM with the detection limit of 0.55μM. The new method was tested on real samples of wines and juices. A high correlation (R=0.978) was shown for the results obtained with the proposed and the reference enzymatic method. PMID:26868583

  15. Regulatory roles for L-arginine in reducing white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bi’e; Li, Xinguo; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Zhenlong; Liu, Chuang; Tekwe, Carmen D.; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-01-01

    As the nitrogenous precursor of nitric oxide, L-arginine regulates multiple metabolic pathways involved in the metabolism of fatty acids, glucose, amino acids, and proteins through cell signaling and gene expression. Specifically, arginine stimulates lipolysis and the expression of key genes responsible for activation of fatty acid oxidation to CO2 and water. The underlying mechanisms involve increases in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha), mitochondrial biogenesis, and the growth of brown adipose tissue growth. Furthermore, arginine regulates adipocyte-muscle crosstalk and energy partitioning via the secretion of cytokines and hormones. In addition, arginine enhances AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) expression and activity, thereby modulating lipid metabolism and energy balance toward the loss of triacylglycerols. Growing evidence shows that dietary supplementation with arginine effectively reduces white adipose tissue in Zucker diabetic fatty rats, diet-induced obese rats, growing-finishing pigs, and obese patients with type II diabetes. Thus, arginine can be used to prevent and treat adiposity and the associated metabolic syndrome. PMID:22652774

  16. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web

  17. Long-term preservation of Anammox bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deposit of useful microorganisms in culture collections requires long-term preservation and successful reactivation techniques. The goal of this study was to develop a simple preservation protocol for the long-term storage and reactivation of the anammox biomass. To achieve this, anammox biomass w...

  18. Long Term TOA - M Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-30

    ... A Long-Term TOA and Constrained Surface Radiation Budget Project A Long-Term TOA and Constrained Surface Readiation ... that span nearly 30 years to date.   The proposed project utilizes knowledge gained in the last 10 years through CERES data ...

  19. Virtual Models of Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phenice, Lillian A.; Griffore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home-care organizations, use web sites to describe their services to potential consumers. This virtual ethnographic study developed models representing how potential consumers may understand this information using data from web sites of 69 long-term-care providers. The content of long-term-care web…

  20. Long Term Preservation of Digital Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorie, Raymond A.

    The preservation of digital data for the long term presents a variety of challenges from technical to social and organizational. The technical challenge is to ensure that the information, generated today, can survive long term changes in storage media, devices, and data formats. This paper presents a novel approach to the problem. It distinguishes

  1. Paying for long-term care.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, C L; Bodenheimer, T

    1994-01-01

    Everyone agrees that insurance for long-term care is inadequate in the United States. Disagreement exists, however, on whether such insurance should be provided through the private or public sector. Private insurance generally uses the experience-rating principle that persons with higher risk of illness are charged higher premiums. For private insurance for long-term care, this principle creates a dilemma. Most policies will be purchased by the elderly; yet, because the elderly have a high risk of needing long-term care, only about 20% of them can afford the cost of premiums. A public-private partnership by which the government partially subsidizes private long-term-care insurance is unlikely to resolve this dilemma. Only a social insurance program for long-term care can provide universal, affordable, and equitable coverage. PMID:8128712

  2. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 Reduces Bleeding and Thrombocytopenia after Amputation in Rats Treated with Heparin, Warfarin, L-NAME and L-Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Stupnisek, Mirjana; Kokot, Antonio; Drmic, Domagoj; Hrelec Patrlj, Masa; Zenko Sever, Anita; Kolenc, Danijela; Radic, Bozo; Suran, Jelena; Bojic, Davor; Vcev, Aleksandar; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    Background BPC 157 is a stable gastric pentadecapeptide recently implicated with a role in hemostasis. While NO is largely implicated in hemostatic mechanisms, in tail-amputation-models under heparin- and warfarin-administration, both the NO-synthase (NOS)-blocker, L-NAME (prothrombotic) and the NOS-substrate L-arginine (antithrombotic), were little investigated. Objective. To investigate the effect of L-NAME and L-arginine on hemostatic parameters, and to reveal the effects of BPC 157 on the L-NAME- and L-arginine-induced hemostatic actions under different pathological condition: tail amputation without or with anticoagulants, heparin or warfarin. Methods Tail amputation, and/or i.v.-heparin (10 mg/kg), i.g.-warfarin (1.5 mg/kg/day for 3 days) were used in rats. Treatment includes BPC 157, L-NAME, L-arginine, per se and their combination. Results After (tail) amputation, with or without i.v.-heparin or i.g.-warfarin, BPC 157 (10 ?g/kg, 10 ng/kg, i.p., i.v. (heparin), 10 ?g/kg i.g. (warfarin)) always reduced bleeding time and/or haemorrhage and counteracted thrombocytopenia. As for L-NAME and/or L-arginine, we noted: L-arginine (100 mg/kg i.p.)rats: more bleeding, less/no thrombocytopenia; L-NAME (5 mg/kg i.p.)-rats: less bleeding (amputation only), but present thrombocytopenia; L-NAME+L-arginine-rats also exhibited thrombocytopenia: L-NAME counteracted L-arginine-increased bleeding, L-arginine did not counteract L-NAME-thrombocytopenia. All animals receiving BPC 157 in addition (BPC 157?g+L-NAME; BPC 157?g+L-arginine, BPC 157?g+L-NAME+L-arginine), exhibited decreased haemorrhage and markedly counteracted thrombocytopenia. Conclusions L-NAME (thrombocytopenia), L-arginine (increased haemorrhage) counteraction and BPC 157 (decreased haemorrhage, counteracted thrombocytopenia) with rescue against two different anticoagulants, implicate a BPC 157 modulatory and balancing role with rescued NO-hemostatic mechanisms. PMID:25897838

  3. Pro-ulcer effects of resveratrol in mice with indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers are reversed by l-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Guha, P; Dey, A; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Bandyopadhyay, SK

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Although resveratrol is currently being evaluated in pre-clinical studies as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent and cardiovascular stress-releasing compound, treatment with resveratrol severely delays healing of pre-existing gastric ulcers. Resveratrol treatment can also induce endothelial NOS (eNOS) expression. Here, we have attempted to modulate NO production via eNOS in order to alleviate the pro-ulcer effects of resveratrol. Experimental approach: Gastric ulcers were induced in mice with a single dose of indomethacin. The effects of pretreatment with l-arginine on the pro-ulcer effects of resveratrol in these mice were then assessed. We measured ulcer damage scores (DS), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and NO, along with a gene expression study. Key results: Resveratrol significantly aggravated damage from indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers, and delayed healing, as shown by increased DS and MPO activity. The mRNA for cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, but not that for COX-2, was inhibited by resveratrol treatment, with reduced synthesis of PGE2 by gastric tissue. However, resveratrol treatment induced eNOS gene expression and shifted the eNOS/iNOS balance. l-Arginine given before resveratrol in mice with indomethacin-induced ulcers significantly increased tissue NO synthesis and improved ulcer healing. Conclusions and implications: Exogenous l-arginine increased NO formation via raised levels of eNOS induced by resveratrol and protected against the pro-ulcer effects of resveratrol. Therefore, l-arginine might be useful for alleviation of the pro-ulcer side effects of resveratrol in patients. PMID:20067468

  4. Effects of dietary l-arginine supplementation to gilts during early gestation on foetal survival, growth and myofiber formation.

    PubMed

    Brard, J; Bee, G

    2010-10-01

    The effects of l-arginine on porcine foetal development and myogenesis were determined. Twenty Swiss Large White gilts were randomly allocated to either the control (C) or l-arginine treatment (A). In addition to the standard gestation diet, A-sows received 26 g l-arginine daily from days 14 to 28 of gestation. At day 75 of pregnancy, sows were sacrificed and the number and weight of foetuses were recorded. From each litter, the lightest, heaviest and the ones with an average foetal weight (FtW) were selected. Primary (P), secondary (S) and total myofiber number as well as S/P ratio were determined in the semitendinosus (ST) and rhomboideus (RH) muscles. In A-sows, the number of viable foetuses (13.0 v. 9.3) and total FtW (4925 v. 3729 g) was greater (P ? 0.04) than in C-sows. Compared to C-sow foetuses, the ST of A-sow foetuses had 7% more (17 699 v. 16 477; P = 0.04) P myofibers and the S/P ratio in both muscles was lower (ST = 20.3 v. 21.5; RH = 24.1 v. 27.1; P ? 0.07). Regardless of the maternal diet, the S myofiber number and the S/P ratio in both muscles were greater (P ? 0.01) in foetuses with a high FtW compared to low FtW. These data suggest that l-arginine supplemented to gilts during early gestation enhanced foetal survival and in the ST positively affected the primary phase of myofiber formation. PMID:22445121

  5. [Effectiveness of midazolam for L-arginine-resistant headaches during stroke-like episodes in MELAS: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Koyo; Yokoi, Satoshi; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hoshiyama, Minoru; Yanagi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl was referred to us with severe migraine-like headaches associated with vomiting and right homonymous hemianopsia. On admission, MRI examination showed high signals in the left occipital cortex and subcortex on T2-weighted images, without reduction of apparent diffusion coefficient suggestive of cerebral infarction. Her EEG demonstrated periodic sharp waves in the left posterior region, and laboratory tests revealed she had increased levels of lactic and pyruvic acid both in blood plasma and CSF. Gene analysis confirmed mitochondrial DNA A3243G mutation. Based on this data, we diagnosed her as having mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and a stroke-like episode (MELAS). L-arginine infusion was unsuccessful for her severe headaches, which remained prolonged. She received a low dose (0.05 mg/kg/h) midazolam infusion, resulting in immediate improvement and the disappearance of headaches and abnormal EEG findings. By the age of 18, she had been readmitted eight times for stroke-like episodes accompanied by headaches. While L-arginine infusions alleviated her headaches when administered on day 1 of her episodes, they were not effective when started on or after day 2. Her L-arginine-resistant headaches were relieved by midazolam. Although the pathogenesis of headaches in MELAS is still unknown, neuronal hyperexcitability and trigeminovascular activation are considered important. Midazolam may play a role in suppressing neuronal hyperexcitability and trigeminovascular activation. Treatment with midazolam is advisable for headaches in patients with MELAS, in the event that L-arginine therapy is unsuccessful. PMID:25420561

  6. Rapid crystallization of L-arginine acetate on engineered surfaces using metal-assisted and microwave-accelerated evaporative crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pinard, Melissa A.; Grell, Tsehai A. J.; Pettis, Danielle; Mohammed, Muzaffer

    2012-01-01

    We report the application of our newly described crystallization technique, which employs silver island films (SIFs) and microwave heating, to rapid crystallization of L-arginine acetate (LAA). Using our technique, LAA crystals (~ 1.2 mm in length) were grown from a 20 ?l solution in 1 min on surface functionalized SIFs. In control experiments (glass slides and at room temperature) the growth of LAA crystals (0.10.3 mm) took ~ 55 min. PMID:22888307

  7. Rapid crystallization of L-arginine acetate on engineered surfaces using metal-assisted and microwave-accelerated evaporative crystallization().

    PubMed

    Pinard, Melissa A; Grell, Tsehai A J; Pettis, Danielle; Mohammed, Muzaffer; Aslan, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    We report the application of our newly described crystallization technique, which employs silver island films (SIFs) and microwave heating, to rapid crystallization of L-arginine acetate (LAA). Using our technique, LAA crystals (~ 1.2 mm in length) were grown from a 20 ?l solution in 1 min on surface functionalized SIFs. In control experiments (glass slides and at room temperature) the growth of LAA crystals (0.1-0.3 mm) took ~ 55 min. PMID:22888307

  8. Mass spectrometric quantification of L-arginine and its pathway related substances in biofluids: the road to maturity.

    PubMed

    Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Bode-Bger, Stefanie M

    2014-08-01

    The amino acid L-arginine together with its metabolites and related substances is in the center of many biologically important pathways, especially the urea cycle and the nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Therefore, the concentrations of these substances in various biological fluids are of great interest as predictive markers for health and disease. Yet, they provide major analytical difficulties as they are very polar in nature and therefore not easily to be separated on standard reversed phase HPLC stationary phases. Furthermore, as endogenous substances, no analyte-free matrix is available, a fact that results in complicated calibration procedures. This review evaluates the analytical literature for the determination of L-arginine, symmetric dimethylarginine, asymmetric dimethylarginine, monomethylarginine, L-citrulline, L-ornithine, L-homoarginine, agmatine and dimethylguanidinovaleric acid in biological fluids. Papers are discussed, which were published since 2007 and describe methods applying capillary electrophoresis (CE), gas chromatography (GC), reversed phase HPLC or polar phase HPLC, coupled to mass spectrometric quantification. Nowadays, many carefully developed and validated methods for L-arginine and its related substances are available to the scientific community. The use of stable isotope labeled internal standards enables high precision and accuracy in mass spectrometry-based quantitative analysis. PMID:24210895

  9. Structure of the complex of carboxypeptidase B and N-sulfamoyl-L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Akparov, Valery; Sokolenko, Nikolay; Timofeev, Vladimir; Kuranova, Inna

    2015-10-01

    Porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B (EC 3.4.23.6) was complexed with a stable transition-state analogue, N-sulfamoyl-L-arginine, in which an S atom imitates the sp(3)-hybridized carbon in the scissile-bond surrogate. Crystals were grown in a form belonging to the same space group, P41212, as the uncomplexed enzyme. X-ray data were collected to a resolution of 1.25?. The molecule was refined and the positions of non-H atoms of the inhibitor and water molecules were defined using difference Fourier maps. The enzyme-inhibitor complex and 329 water molecules were further refined to a crystallographic R factor of 0.159. The differences in conformation between the complexed and uncomplexed forms of carboxypeptidase B are shown. The inhibitor is bound in a curved conformation in the active-site cleft, and the sulfamide group is bound to the Zn ion in an asymmetric bidentate fashion. The complex is stabilized by hydrogen bonds between the N1/N2 guanidine group of the inhibitor and the Asp255 carboxyl of the enzyme. The side-chain CH2 groups of the inhibitor are in van der Waals contact with Leu203 and Ile247 in the enzyme. This study provides useful clues concerning how the transition state of arginine may bind to carboxypeptidase B and therefore provides an insight into the structural basis of carboxypeptidase B selectivity, which is useful for the rational design of a carboxypeptidase with improved selectivity for industrial recombinant pro-insulin processing. PMID:26457527

  10. Addition of L-arginine to the fertilization medium enhances subsequent bovine embryo development rates.

    PubMed

    Santana, Priscila P B; da Silva, Bruno B; Silva, Thiago V G; Costa, Nathalia N; Cordeiro, Marcela S; Santos, Simone S D; Ohashi, Otávio M; Miranda, Moysés S

    2016-04-01

    Although L-Arginine (ARG) has been reported as a promising bovine sperm capacitation agent, its effects on embryo development are still poorly understood. Herein, we compared the effects of ARG and/or heparin (HEP) addition to the fertilization medium for bovine oocytes on sperm capacitation and embryo development. We chose 10 mM ARG based on blastocyst development rates in a titration experiment. Addition of ARG and/or HEP to the fertilization medium resulted in similar rates of blastocyst development (P > 0.05). However, when ARG, but not HEP, was combined with a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor (N-Nitro-L-ARG-methyl ester, 10 mM) blastocyst development was decreased (P < 0.05). To assess the effects on capacitation, bovine sperm were incubated for 0, 3, and 6 hours in fertilization medium containing ARG and/or HEP and/or N-Nitro-L-ARG-methyl esterand acrosomal exocytosis rates were evaluated using fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated Pisum sativum lectin (FITC-PSA) staining and flow cytometry. With HEP, acrosomal exocytosis rates were highest by 3 hours of incubation; however, by 6 hours, rates were similar for HEP and/or ARG (P > 0.05) and higher than those in control media (P < 0.05). Although both ARG and HEP increased sperm NO production (P < 0.05), combination with L-NAME only precluded acrosomal exocytosis when ARG added alone in the medium (P > 0.05). These results suggest that although both ARG and HEP supported sperm capacitation, only the effects of the former were driven via NO production. Moreover, ARG was also as effective as HEP at improving blastocyst development rates. Therefore, ARG may be used as a low-cost alternative sperm capacitation agent for bovine in vitro embryo production. PMID:26733119

  11. L-arginine supplementation improves responses to injury and inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium colitis.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Lori A; Gong, Xue; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Scull, Brooks P; Allaman, Margaret M; Williams, Christopher S; Rosen, Michael J; Washington, M Kay; Barry, Daniel P; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Casero, Robert A; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Zhao, Zhongming; Wilson, Keith T

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC), results in substantial morbidity and is difficult to treat. New strategies for adjunct therapies are needed. One candidate is the semi-essential amino acid, L-arginine (L-Arg), a complementary medicine purported to be an enhancer of immunity and vitality in the lay media. Using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) as a murine colonic injury and repair model with similarities to human UC, we assessed the effect of L-Arg, as DSS induced increases in colonic expression of the y(+) cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) and L-Arg uptake. L-Arg supplementation improved the clinical parameters of survival, body weight loss, and colon weight, and reduced colonic permeability and the number of myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils in DSS colitis. Luminex-based multi-analyte profiling demonstrated that there was a marked reduction in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression with L-Arg treatment. Genomic analysis by microarray demonstrated that DSS-treated mice supplemented with L-Arg clustered more closely with mice not exposed to DSS than to those receiving DSS alone, and revealed that multiple genes that were upregulated or downregulated with DSS alone exhibited normalization of expression with L-Arg supplementation. Additionally, L-Arg treatment of mice with DSS colitis resulted in increased ex vivo migration of colonic epithelial cells, suggestive of increased capacity for wound repair. Because CAT2 induction was sustained during L-Arg treatment and inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) requires uptake of L-Arg for generation of NO, we tested the effect of L-Arg in iNOS(-/-) mice and found that its benefits in DSS colitis were eliminated. These preclinical studies indicate that L-Arg supplementation could be a potential therapy for IBD, and that one mechanism of action may be functional enhancement of iNOS activity. PMID:22428068

  12. Involvement of cationic amino acid transporter 1 in L-arginine transport in rat retinal pericytes.

    PubMed

    Zakoji, Nobuyuki; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a known relaxant, is produced in cells from L-arginine (L-Arg). Because the relaxation of retinal pericytes alters the microcirculatory hemodynamics, it is important to understand the manner of NO production in retinal pericytes. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanism(s) of uptake of L-Arg in retinal pericytes using a conditionally immortalized rat retinal pericyte cell line (TR-rPCT1 cells) which expresses the mRNAs of endothelial NO synthase and inducible NO synthase. L-Arg uptake by TR-rPCT1 cells exhibited Na(+)-independence and concentration-dependence with a Km of 28.9 µM. This process was strongly inhibited by substrates of cationic amino acid transporters (CAT), such as L-ornithine and L-lysine. In contrast, L-valine, L-leucine, and L-glutamine, which are substrates of cation/neutral amino acid transport systems, such as system y(+)L, system B(0,+), and system b(0,+), did not strongly inhibit L-Arg uptake by TR-rPCT1 cells. In addition, the expression of mRNA and protein of CAT1 in TR-rPCT1 cells was observed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses. Taking these results into consideration, it appears that CAT1 is involved in L-Arg uptake by retinal pericytes and this is expected to play an important role in the relaxation of retinal pericytes, thereby modulating the microcirculatory hemodynamics in the retina. PMID:25747984

  13. L-arginine and arginine analogues: effects on isolated blood vessels and cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, H. H.; Baeblich, S. E.; Zernikow, B. C.; Klein, M. M.; Bhme, E.

    1990-01-01

    1. The present study examined effects of arginine (Arg) and various Arg analogues on the vascular tone of rabbit and rat aortic rings, the release of nitrite from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells and the metabolism of L-Arg in bovine and porcine endothelial cell homogenates. The respective D-enantiomers or N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester did not substitute for L-Arg. 2. In bovine aortic endothelial cells, the release of nitrite was only observed in the presence of L-Arg or L-Arg methyl ester in the cell culture medium. 3. In dialyzed homogenates of porcine and bovine aortic endothelial cells, L-Arg was metabolized independently of NADPH and Ca2+ to yield L-ornithine (L-Orn) and L-citrulline (L-Cit). No concomitant nitrite formation was detected. 4. Pretreatment of rabbit and rat aortic rings with L-canavanine (L-Can) or NG-monomethyl-L-Arg (L-NMMA) inhibited ATP- and acetylcholine-induced relaxations (endothelium-dependent) but not glyceryltrinitrate-induced relaxations (endothelium-independent). 5. In rabbit aortic rings, Arg and monomeric Arg analogues induced endothelium-independent relaxations. L-Arg methyl ester induced an endothelium-independent contraction, and L-NMMA induced a relaxation in the absence of endothelium and a contraction in the presence of endothelium. Polymeric basic amino acids such as poly L-Arg induced endothelium-dependent relaxations (inhibited by L-Can), a subsequent refractoriness to endothelium-dependent vasodilators (not prevented by L-Can) and endothelial cell death.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2282457

  14. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang; Liu, Wen Wu; Xiang, Hong Gang; Fan, Lie Ying; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Xin Yun; Cai, Jian Mei; Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin; Sun, Xue Jun; Wang, Qiang

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  15. Long Term Effects of Food Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... develop chronic arthritis. Brain and nerve damage A Listeria infection can lead to meningitis, an inflammation of ... brain. If a newborn infant is infected with Listeria , long-term consequences may include mental retardation, seizures, ...

  16. The L-?-amino acid receptor GPRC6A is expressed in the islets of Langerhans but is not involved in L-arginine-induced insulin release.

    PubMed

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Johansen, Lars Dan; Wellendorph, Petrine; Holst, Jens Juul; Thams, Peter Grevsen; Ogo, Egbuna; Bruner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-02-01

    GPRC6A is a seven-transmembrane receptor activated by a wide range of L-?-amino acids, most potently by L-arginine and other basic amino acids. The receptor is broadly expressed, but its exact physiological role remains to be elucidated. It is well established that L-arginine stimulates insulin secretion; therefore, the receptor has been hypothesized to have a role in regulating glucose metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that GPRC6A is expressed in islets of Langerhans, but activation of the receptor by L-arginine did not stimulate insulin secretion. We also investigated central metabolic parameters in GPRC6A knockout mice compared with wildtype littermates and found no difference in glucose metabolism or body fat percentage when mice were administered a standard chow diet. In conclusion, our data do not support a role for GPRC6A in L-arginine-induced insulin release and glucose metabolism under normal physiological conditions. PMID:22714012

  17. Oral supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine do not change metabolic alterations induced by long-term high-fat diet in the B6.129F2/J mouse model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bock, Patricia Martins; Krause, Mauricio; Schroeder, Helena Trevisan; Hahn, Gabriela Fernandes; Takahashi, Hilton Kenji; Schler, Cinthia Maria; Nicoletti, Graziella; Neto, Luiz Domingos Zavarize; Rodrigues, Maria Ins Lavina; Bruxel, Maciel Alencar; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine in the high-fat diet (HFD)-fed B6.129SF2/J mouse model over insulin sensitivity response and signaling, oxidative stress markers, metabolism and HSP70 expression. Mice were fed in a standard low-fat diet (STA) or a HFD for 20weeks. In the 21th week, mice from the HFD group were allocated in five groups and supplemented for additional 8weeks with different amino acids: HFD control group (HFD-Con), HFD+dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine group (HFD-Dip), HFD+L-alanine group (HFD-Ala), HFD+L-glutamine group (HFD-Gln), or the HFD+L-alanine+L-glutamine (in their free forms) group (HFD-Ala+Gln). HFD induced higher body weight, fat pad, fasted glucose, and total cholesterol in comparison with STA group. Amino acid supplementations did not induce any modifications in these parameters. Although insulin tolerance tests indicated insulin resistance in all HFD groups, amino acid supplementations did not improve insulin sensitivity in the present model. There were also no significant differences in the immunocontents of insulin receptor, Akt, and Toll-like receptor-4. Notably, total 70kDa heat shock protein (HSP72+HSP73) contents in the liver was markedly increased in HFD-Con group as compared to STA group, which might suggest that insulin resistance is only in the beginning. Apparently, B6.129SF2/J mice are more resistant to the harmful effects of HFD through a mechanism that may include gut adaptation, reducing the absorption of nutrients, including amino acids, which may explain the lack of improvements in our intervention. PMID:26530165

  18. L-arginine enhances nitrative stress and exacerbates tumor necrosis factor-alpha toxicity to human endothelial cells in culture: prevention by propofol.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhengyuan; Luo, Tao; Liu, Hui-min; Wang, Fang; Xia, Zhong-yuan; Irwin, Michael G; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2010-04-01

    Supplementation of L-arginine, a nitric oxide precursor, during the late phase of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion increases myocyte apoptosis and exacerbates myocardial injury, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. During myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, apoptosis of endothelial cells precedes that of cardiomyocyte. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) production is increased during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, which may exacerbate myocardial injury by inducing endothelial cell apoptosis. We postulated that L-arginine may exacerbate TNF-induced endothelial cell apoptosis by enhancing peroxynitrite-mediated nitrative stress. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells were either not treated (control) or treated with TNF alone or with TNF in the presence of L-arginine, the nonselective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N (omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), propofol (an anesthetic that scavenges peroxynitrite), or L-arginine plus propofol, respectively, for 24 hours. TNF increased intracellular superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production accompanied by increases of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression and nitric oxide production. This was accompanied by increased protein expression of nitrotyrosine, a fingerprint of peroxynitrite and an index of nitrative stress, and increased endothelial cell apoptosis. L-arginine did not enhance TNF-induced increases of superoxide and peroxynitrite production but further increased TNF-induced increase of nitrotyrosine production and exacerbated TNF-mediated cell apoptosis. L-NNA and propofol, respectively, reduced TNF-induced nitrative stress and attenuated TNF cellular toxicity. The L-arginine-mediated enhancement of nitrative stress and TNF toxicity was attenuated by propofol. Thus, under pathological conditions associated with increased TNF production, L-arginine supplementation may further exacerbate TNF cellular toxicity by enhancing nitrative stress. PMID:20125033

  19. Effects of dietary zinc and L-arginine supplementation on total antioxidants capacity, lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, egg weight, and blood biochemical values in Japanese quails.

    PubMed

    Atakisi, Onur; Atakisi, Emine; Kart, Asim

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of dietary zinc and L-arginine supplementation on blood total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), some blood chemistry parameters, and egg weights of laying quails. Three groups of Japanese quails were fed with a diet containing L-arginine (5 mg/kg), zinc (60 mg/kg), and normal basal diet (control) for 30 days. TAC, lipid peroxidation, and biochemical analysis were performed in the blood of animals. L-Arginine and zinc supplementation improved TAC and reduced MDA concentrations compared to the control (P<0.05). In comparison to the control, blood NO concentrations were increased by Larginine (P<0.01) and zinc treatment (P<0.05). Both zinc (P<0.001) and L-arginine (P< 0.01) supplementation significantly increased egg weight in laying quails. Some of the blood chemistry parameters were also altered by the treatment of L-arginine and zinc supplementation. No difference was found in blood albumin and creatinine levels among the groups. Blood glucose (P=0.833) and total protein (P=0.264) levels in control and Larginine-treated groups were found to be similar. Glucose and total protein levels were decreased in zinc-supplemented animals compared to the control and L-arginine groups (P< 0.05). No difference was found in triglyceride levels between control and zinc-applied groups (P=0.197). However, L-arginine treatment reduced the blood triglyceride levels compared to the control (P<0.05). In conclusion, L-arginine and zinc supplementation could be beneficial and effective for decreasing oxidative stress, boosting antioxidant capacity, and improving egg weight in the blood of the animals. PMID:19396404

  20. Dissociation of castor oil-induced diarrhoea and intestinal mucosal injury in rat: effect of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, F; Mascolo, N; Izzo, A A; Gaginella, T S

    1994-01-01

    1. Castor oil (2 ml orally) produced diarrhoea in rats 1-7 h after challenge, which was associated with gross damage to the duodenal and jejunal mucosa. 2. The injury was accompanied by release of acid phosphatase into the gut lumen, indicating cellular injury. 3. Intraperitoneal injection of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 2.5-50 mg kg-1 twice), prevented the diarrhoea. The dose of L-NAME (50 mg kg-1) completely blocked the diarrhoea but increased the release of acid phosphatase and worsened the gross damage. 4. The NO donating compound, isosorbide-5-mononitrate (IMN, 150 mg kg-1 twice) reversed the effects of L-NAME (50 mg kg-1) on castor oil-induced diarrhoea, gross damage and acid phosphatase release. 5. The apparent dissociation of the diarrhoeal and intestinal mucosal damaging effects of castor oil suggest that NO has a protective effect on the rat duodenal and jejunal mucosa, but that NO mediates, in part, the diarrhoea effect of this laxative. PMID:7889264

  1. Effect of Exercise Training and L-arginine on Oxidative Stress and Left Ventricular Function in the Post-ischemic Failing Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Kamal; Nazem, Farzad; Nazari, Afshin

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of exercise training (ET) and L-arginine on oxidative stress and ventricular function in rat with myocardial infarction (MI). Four weeks after the surgical procedures, 40 Wistar male rats were randomized to the following groups: MI-sedentary (Sed); MI-exercise (Ex); MI-sedentary + L-arginine (Sed + LA); and MI-exercise + L-arginine (Ex + LA); the rats were subjected to aerobic training in the form of treadmill running. Rats in the L-arginine-treated groups drank water containing 4 % L-arginine. Before and after the training program, all subjects underwent resting echocardiography. Catalase (CAT) glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured. Cardiac output, stroke volume and fractional shortening in Ex and Ex + LA groups significantly increased in comparison with the Sed group. Cardiac systolic function indices in Ex + LA group were significantly greater than Ex group. Also, GPx activity and MDA, respectively, increased and decreased in response to ET, but no change was observed in MPO and CAT. These results suggest that ET increased LV function by decreasing oxidative stress and increasing antioxidant defense system in rats with MI. In addition in response to training, L-arginine appears to have additive effect on cardiac function, but have no effect on oxidative stress indices. PMID:25762197

  2. Long-term symptom relief after septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sundh, Carolina; Sunnergren, Ola

    2015-10-01

    The results for long-term symptom relief after septoplasty are contradictory in reviewed publications but the findings suggest that results are unsatisfactory. In this study, we analyzed and compared short- and long-term symptom relief after septoplasty and factors possibly associated with symptom relief. 111 patients that underwent septoplasty between 2008 and 2010 were included in the study. Medical charts were reviewed for preoperative characteristics and assessments. Data on short-term symptom relief (6 months) were retrieved from the Swedish National Quality Registry for Septoplasty; data on long-term symptom relief (34-70 months) were collected through a questionnaire. Upon the 34-70 month follow-up, 53% of the patients reported that symptoms either remained or had worsened and 83% reported nasal obstruction. Degree of symptom relief was significantly higher among patients not reporting nasal obstruction than among patients reporting nasal obstruction at long-term follow-up. The proportion of patients that reported "my symptoms are gone" declined from 53% after 6 months to 18% after 34-70 months. None of the factors taken into consideration, age at surgery, gender, follow-up time, primary operation/reoperation, history of nasal trauma, self-reported allergy, rhinometric obstruction, or same sided rhinometric, clinical and subjective nasal obstruction were associated with symptom relief. The long-term results after septoplasty are unsatisfactory. A majority of patients report that their symptoms remain after septoplasty. PMID:25432640

  3. L-Arginine ameliorates cardiac left ventricular oxidative stress by upregulating eNOS and Nrf2 target genes in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Hamenth Kumar, Palani; Syed Mohamed Puhari, Shanavas; Senthil Murugan, Ponniah; Vasudevan, Varadaraj; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antioxidant marker proteins were found high in myocardium by L-arginine treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated antioxidant status, mediates the reduced TBA-reactivity in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment enhanced the Nrf2 and eNOS signaling in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved cell survival signaling by arginine, offers a novel tactic for targeting. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia is independently related with excessive morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disorders. L-Arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the involvement of NO in modulating nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling were well established. In the present study we investigated, whether L-arginine supplementation would improve the myocardial antioxidant defense under hyperglycemia through activation of Nrf2 signaling. Diabetes was induced by alloxan monohydrate (90 mg kg{sup -1} body weight) in rats. Both non-diabetic and diabetic group of rats were divided into three subgroups and they were administered either with L-arginine (2.25%) or L-NAME (0.01%) in drinking water for 12 days. Results showed that L-arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic rats. Antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels were found to be increased in heart left ventricles, thereby reduction of lipid peroxidation by L-arginine treatment. Heart histopathological analysis further validates the reversal of typical diabetic characteristics consisting of alterations in myofibers and myofibrillary degeneration. qRT-PCR studies revealed that L-arginine treatment upregulated the transcription of Akt and downregulated NF-{kappa}B. Notably, transcription of eNOS and Nrf2 target genes was also upregulated, which were accompanied by enhanced expression of Nrf2 in left ventricular tissue from diabetic and control rats. Under these findings, we suggest that targeting of eNOS and Nrf2 signaling by L-arginine supplementation could be used as a potential treatment method to alleviate the late diabetic complications.

  4. Dose-Dependent Effects of L-Arginine on PROP Bitterness Intensity and Latency and Characteristics of the Chemical Interaction between PROP and L-Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Melania; Arca, Massimiliano; Aragoni, Maria Carla; Cabras, Tiziana; Caltagirone, Claudia; Castagnola, Massimo; Crnjar, Roberto; Messana, Irene; Tepper, Beverly J.; Tomassini Barbarossa, Iole

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in the ability to taste the bitterness of 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) is a complex trait that has been used to predict food preferences and eating habits. PROP tasting is primarily controlled by polymorphisms in the TAS2R38 gene. However, a variety of factors are known to modify the phenotype. Principle among them is the salivary protein Ps-1 belonging to the basic proline-rich protein family (bPRP). Recently, we showed that oral supplementation with Ps-1 as well as its related free amino acids (L-Arg and L-Lys) enhances PROP bitterness perception, especially for PROP non-tasters who have low salivary levels of Ps-1. Here, we show that salivary L-Arg levels are higher in PROP super-tasters compared to medium tasters and non-tasters, and that oral supplementation with free L-Arg enhances PROP bitterness intensity as well as reduces bitterness latency in a dose-dependent manner, particularly in individuals with low salivary levels of both free L-Arg and Ps-1 protein. Supplementation with L-Arg also enhanced the bitterness of caffeine. We also used 1H-NMR spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical calculations carried out by Density Functional Theory (DFT) to characterize the chemical interaction between free L-Arg and the PROP molecule. Results showed that the –NH2 terminal group of the L-ArgH+ side chain interacts with the carbonyl or thiocarbonyl groups of PROP by forming two hydrogen bonds with the resulting charged adduct. The formation of this PROP•ArgH+ hydrogen-bonded adduct could enhance bitterness intensity by increasing the solubility of PROP in saliva and its availability to receptor sites. Our data suggest that L-Arg could act as a ‘carrier’ of various bitter molecules in saliva. PMID:26103639

  5. Long-term consequences of foodborne infections.

    PubMed

    Batz, Michael B; Henke, Evan; Kowalcyk, Barbara

    2013-09-01

    Foodborne infections with Campylobacter, E. coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Shigella, Toxoplasma gondii, and other pathogens can result in long-term sequelae to numerous organ systems. These include irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, reactive arthritis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, Guillain-Barré Syndrome, neurological disorders from acquired and congenital listeriosis and toxoplasmosis, and cognitive and developmental deficits due to diarrheal malnutrition or severe acute illness. A full understanding of the long-term sequelae of foodborne infection is important both for individual patient management by clinicians, as well as to inform food safety and public health decision making. PMID:24011832

  6. Scenarios for long-term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Data Preservation and Long-Term Analysis of High Energy Physics (HEP) Experiments data is described and summarized in this talk. The summary covers information presented at the First Workshop on Data Preservation and Long-Term Analysis. Experiments representing e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions (LEP, B Factories and CLEO), ep collisions (H1 and ZEUS), p{bar p} collisions (CDF and D0) and others presented interesting information related to utilizing the large datasets collected over many years at these HEP facilities. Many questions and issues remain to be explored.

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study of L-Arginine and Dimethylarginines Reveals Novel Metabolic Pathway for Symmetric Dimethylarginine

    PubMed Central

    Lüneburg, Nicole; Lieb, Wolfgang; Zeller, Tanja; Chen, Ming-Huei; Maas, Renke; Carter, Angela M.; Xanthakis, Vanessa; Glazer, Nicole L; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Longstreth, W.T.; Fornage, Myriam; König, Inke R.; Loley, Christina; Ojeda, Francisco M.; Schillert, Arne; Wang, Thomas J.; Sticht, Heinrich; Kittel, Anja; König, Jörg; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Sullivan, Lisa M.; Bernges, Isabel; Anderssohn, Maike; Ziegler, Andreas; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Meisinger, Christa; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Schunkert, Heribert; Psaty, Bruce M.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Smith, Nicholas; Lackner, Karl; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Erdmann, Jeanette; Munzel, Thomas; Grant, Peter J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Böger, Rainer H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dimethylarginines (DMA) interfere with nitric oxide (NO) formation by inhibiting NO synthase (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA) and L-arginine uptake into the cell (ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine, SDMA). In prospective clinical studies ADMA has been characterized as a cardiovascular risk marker whereas SDMA is a novel marker for renal function and associated with all-cause mortality after ischemic stroke. The aim of the current study was to characterise the environmental and genetic contributions to inter-individual variability of these biomarkers. Methods and Results This study comprised a genome-wide association analysis of 3 well-characterized population-based cohorts (FHS (n=2992), GHS (n=4354) and MONICA/KORA F3 (n=581)) and identified replicated loci (DDAH1, MED23, Arg1 and AGXT2) associated with the inter-individual variability in ADMA, L-arginine and SDMA. Experimental in-silico and in-vitro studies confirmed functional significance of the identified AGXT2 variants. Clinical outcome analysis in 384 patients of the Leeds stroke study demonstrated an association between increased plasma levels of SDMA, AGXT2 variants and various cardiometabolic risk factors. AGXT2 variants were not associated with post-stroke survival in the Leeds study, nor were they associated with incident stroke in the CHARGE consortium. Conclusion These GWAS support the importance of DDAH1 and MED23/Arg1 in regulating ADMA and L-arginine metabolism, respectively, and identify a novel regulatory renal pathway for SDMA by AGXT2. AGXT2 variants might explain part of the pathogenic link between SDMA, renal function, and outcome. An association between AGXT2 variants and stroke is unclear and warrants further investigation. PMID:25245031

  8. Long-term survival of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension recovering to World Health Organization functional class I or II: a historical comparison between intravenous epoprostenol and oral agents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intravenous epoprostenol is the only drug proved in a randomized study to reduce mortality in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, administration of this drug has procedural difficulties and a risk of sepsis. Oral drugs provide simple treatment, but their benefit for survival has not been proven. A recovery of patients with PAH to World Health Organization functional class (WHO-FC) I or II may predict favorable survival. Methods Survival analyses were performed on a historical cohort of 41 patients with PAH. The patients were 43??22years old, 23 had idiopathic or heritable PAH, and 18 had connective tissue disease-associated PAH. The baseline was defined as the initial visit to a medical facility. Results The median duration of follow-up was 1276days (108 to 5389days) and 21 patients died during this period. The estimated survival times for patients who received intravenous epoprostenol and did and did not recover to WHO-FC I or II were 4371??577days and 1172??404days, respectively. These times for patients who were not treated with intravenous epoprostenol and did and did not recover to WHO-FC I or II were 4717??554days and 925??230days, respectively. A Cox proportional hazard analysis gave a hazard ratio for death after recovery to WHO-FC I or II of 0.07 (P?

  9. Long-Term Stability of Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyyppa, Markku T.; Maki, Juhani; Alanen, Erkki; Impivaara, Olli; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability of social participation was investigated in a representative urban population of 415 men and 579 women who had taken part in the nationwide Mini-Finland Health Survey in the years 1978-1980 and were re-examined 20 years later. Stability was assessed by means of the following tracking coefficients: kappa, proportion of

  10. Long-Term Memory and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, John

    2011-01-01

    The English National Curriculum Programmes of Study emphasise the importance of knowledge, understanding and skills, and teachers are well versed in structuring learning in those terms. Research outcomes into how long-term memory is stored and retrieved provide support for structuring learning in this way. Four further messages are added to the…

  11. Who Recommends Long-Term Care Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Bershadsky, Boris; Bershadsky, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Making good consumer decisions requires having good information. This study compared long-term-care recommendations among various types of health professionals. Design and Methods: We gave randomly varied scenarios to a convenience national sample of 211 professionals from varying disciplines and work locations. For each scenario, we

  12. TOXIC MODELING SYSTEM LONG-TERM (TOXLT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxic Modeling System Long-Term (TOXLT) is a personal-computer- based model that has been developed in conjunction with the release of the new version of the EPAs Industrial Source Complex (ISC2) Dispersion Models (EPA, 1992) and the promulgation of the EPAs A Tiered Modeling...

  13. LONG TERM HYDROLOGICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (LTHIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    LTHIA is a universal Urban Sprawl analysis tool that is available to all at no charge through the Internet. It estimates impacts on runoff, recharge and nonpoint source pollution resulting from past or proposed land use changes. It gives long-term average annual runoff for a lan...

  14. Long-Term Impacts of Educational Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deming, David James

    2010-01-01

    The school accountability movement has led to a marked increase in the use of standardized test scores to measure school and teacher productivity, yet little is known about the correlation between test score gains and improvements in long-term outcomes. In the first chapter of my dissertation, I study the impact of a school choice policy in

  15. Professionalism in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubinski, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists who serve elders in a variety of long-term care settings have a variety of professional skills and responsibilities. Fundamental to quality service is knowledge of aging and communication changes and disorders associated with this process, institutional alternatives, and the changing nature of today's elders in

  16. Truancy: Short and Long-Term Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    This book offers guidance on dealing with the problem of truancy and non-attendance. It provides examples of the latest ways that schools, teachers, education welfare officers, and local education authorities in the United Kingdom have worked to overcome their attendance problems, identifying 120 short-term solutions and several long-term

  17. Long-term lysimeter data on evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term crop evapotranspiration (ET) data measured using large weighing lysimeters have only been gathered in a few places in the world, yet are of great importance for ground truthing of many models of plant water use, mesoscale climate, remote sensing estimation of ET, climate change and climate...

  18. Long-term risks of bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Watts, Nelson B

    2014-07-01

    The objective this study was to summarize long-term risks associated with bisphosphonate therapy. Search of relevant medical publications for data from clinical trials, trial extensions, observational studies and post-marketing reports. Trial extensions and modifications did not reveal significant long-term safety issues. Observational data suggest at least as many benefits as risks. Post-marketing reports of musculoskeletal pain, osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been widely circulated in the lay press. Most focus on long-terms risks has been on osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures which occur in patients who have not received bisphosphonate therapy but may be more frequent (though still uncommon) in patients who have been on treatment for 5 years or longer. Lower-risk patients may be able to stop treatment after 3-5 years for a "drug holiday," which mitigates these long-term risks; for higher risk patients, therapy through 6-10 years appears to be advisable and offers more benefits than risks. PMID:25166043

  19. Who Recommends Long-Term Care Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Bershadsky, Boris; Bershadsky, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Making good consumer decisions requires having good information. This study compared long-term-care recommendations among various types of health professionals. Design and Methods: We gave randomly varied scenarios to a convenience national sample of 211 professionals from varying disciplines and work locations. For each scenario, we…

  20. Long-Term Care Research and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Peter

    2003-01-01

    This article provides a framework for understanding how long-term care (LTC) research contributes to policy, develops a typology of research contributions to policy with examples of each type, and suggests ways to ensure that contributions continue in the future. The article draws on in-depth interviews with LTC experts working at the interface…

  1. NATIONAL LONG TERM CARE SURVEY (NLTCS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Long Term Care Surveys (NLTCS) are surveys of the entire aged population with a particular emphasis on the functionally impaired. Longitudinal study of the health and well-being of elderly Americans. Information about the population of chronically disabled elderly person...

  2. Long-Term Stability of Tutor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the extent to which tutor ratings remained stable in the long term by evaluating 291 ratings of 140 tutors at Maastricht University in the Netherlands between 1992 and 1995. The results indicated that, if the aggregated score and overall judgement are used to interpret the precision of individual scores, four and two occasions,…

  3. Professionalism in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubinski, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists who serve elders in a variety of long-term care settings have a variety of professional skills and responsibilities. Fundamental to quality service is knowledge of aging and communication changes and disorders associated with this process, institutional alternatives, and the changing nature of today's elders in…

  4. The antinociceptive activity of Muntingia calabura aqueous extract and the involvement of L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in its observed activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Jais, Abdul Manan Mat; Somchit, Muhammad Nazrul; Jayaraman, Kogilla Vani; Balakhrisnan, Ganesh; Abdullah, Fatimah Corazon

    2006-08-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate on the possible involvement of L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (L-arginine/NO/cGMP) pathway in the aqueous extract of Muntingia calabura (AEMC) leaves antinociception in mice assessed by abdominal constriction test. The AEMC, obtained by soaking the dried leaves in distilled water (DH(2)O) (1 : 2; w/v) for 24 h, was prepared in concentrations of 10%, 50% and 100% that were approximately equivalent to doses of 27, 135 and 270 mg/kg, and administered subcutaneously (s.c.) 5 min after pre-treatment (s.c.) of mice with DH(2)O, L-arginine (20 mg/kg), N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine acetate (L-NMMA; 20 mg/kg), N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl esters (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg), methylene blue (MB) (20 mg/kg), respectively. The AEMC was found to exhibit a concentration-dependent antinociception after pre-challenge with DH(2)O. Interestingly, pre-treatment with L-arginine was found to block significantly (P < 0.05) the AEMC antinociception but only at the highest concentration (100%) of AEMC used. On the other hand, pre-treatment with L-NAME was found to significantly (P < 0.05) enhance the low concentration but inhibit the high concentration AEMC antinociception. MB was found to significantly (P < 0.05) enhance AEMC antinociception at all concentrations used. Except for the higher concentration of AEMC used, co-treatment with L-NAME was found to insignificantly and significantly (P < 0.05) reverse the L-arginine effect when given alone or with low concentration AEMC, respectively. In addition, co-treatment with MB significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the L-arginine effect when given alone or with 10% concentration AEMC but failed to affect the activity of the rest of concentrations used. As a conclusion, this study has demonstrated the involvement of L-arginine/NO/cGMP pathway in AEMC antinociception. PMID:16867020

  5. Bioinspired synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in the presence of collagen and l-arginine: Candidates for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Brasinika, Despoina; Tsigkou, Olga; Tsetsekou, Athena; Missirlis, Yiannis F

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at the bioinspired synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals in the presence of both collagen and l-arginine, in an effort to obtain a homogeneous hybrid material, having a bone-like nanostructure. Collagen (Col) is the most commonly utilized protein in most species of life, while l-arginine (Arg) encourages cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation on HAp surfaces. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy were used to analyze surface morphology and structure of nanocrystals obtained under different synthesis conditions. It was shown that collagen and arginine content affect HAp crystallization. Collagen has an inhibition effect since HAp crystal size is reduced with the increase of collagen content. The presence of arginine is crucial as a critical content exists (Ca(2+) :Arg = 1:1) under which HAp nanocrystals coexist with brushite. Under the optimum synthesis conditions (HAp/Col weight ratio 70/30 and Ca(2+) :Arg molar ratio 1:1) HAp nanoplates of a uniform size (around 10 × 10 nm) were obtained. The biocompatibility of this hybrid powder was assessed using human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Cell response in terms of MSC attachment (scanning electron microscopy) and viability/proliferation (Alamar Blue) demonstrated a noncytotoxic effect of the new material. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 458-469, 2016. PMID:25891542

  6. Crystal growth, structural, thermal and mechanical behavior of l-arginine 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol dihydrate (LAPP) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, M; Ramachandran, K; Anandan, P; Arivanandhan, M; Bhagavannarayana, G; Hayakawa, Y

    2014-12-10

    Single crystals of l-arginine 4-nitrophenolate 4-nitrophenol dihydrate (LAPP) have been grown successfully from the solution of l-arginine and 4-nitrophenol. Slow evaporation of solvent technique was adopted to grow the bulk single crystals. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the grown crystal has monoclinic crystal system with space group of P21. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis shows the good crystalline nature. The crystalline perfection of the grown single crystals was analyzed by HRXRD by employing a multicrystal X-ray diffractometer. The functional groups were identified from proton NMR spectroscopic analysis. Linear and nonlinear optical properties were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer and Kurtz powder technique respectively. It is found that the grown crystal has no absorption in the green wavelength region and the SHG efficiency was found to be 2.66 times that of the standard KDP. The Thermal stability of the crystal was found by obtaining TG/DTA curve. The mechanical behavior of the grown crystal has been studied by Vicker's microhardness method. PMID:24967545

  7. Effects of L-arginine immobilization on the anticoagulant activity and hemolytic property of polyethylene terephthalate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Yun; Wu, Feng

    2010-04-01

    Surface modification of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films was performed with L-arginine ( L-Arg) to gain an improved anticoagulant surface. The surface chemistry changes of modified films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The in vitro anticoagulant activities of the surface-modified PET films were evaluated by blood clotting test, hemolytic test, and the measurement of clotting time including plasma recalcification time (PRT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and prothrombin time (PT). The data of blood coagulation index (BCI) for L-arginine modified PET films (PET-Arg) was larger than that for PET at the same blood-sample contact time. The hemolysis ratio for PET-Arg was less than that for PET and within the accepted standard for biomaterials. The PRT and APTT for PET-Arg were significantly prolonged by 189 s and 25 s, respectively, compared to those for the unmodified PET. All results suggested that the currently described modification method could be a possible candidate to create antithrombogenic PET surfaces which would be useful for further medical applications.

  8. Nitric oxide control of steroidogenesis: Endocrine effects of N sup G -nitro-L-arginine and comparisons to alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.L.; Nock, B.; Truong, R.; Cicero, T.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) may regulate hormone biosynthesis and secretion. This was tested by treating male rats with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (NAME), a NO synthase inhibitor, and measuring serum and testicular interstitial fluid testosterone and serum corticosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and prolactin (PRL). The effect of N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (NA), a less-soluble form of the same NO synthase inhibitor, on the reproductive suppressant actions of alcohol was also examined. NAME increased testosterone and corticosterone secretion dose-dependently without affecting LH and PRL secretion. The alcohol-induced suppression of testosterone or LH secretion was not altered by treatment with NA. Although effects of NAME and NA on other systems may be involved, these results indicate that testicular and adrenal steroidogenesis are negatively regulated by endogenous NO and that NO does not regulate LH and PRL secretion or inhibit the testicular steroidogenic pathway in the same way as alcohol.

  9. A novel nitric oxide-based anticancer therapeutics by macrophage-targeted poly(l-arginine)-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shinpei; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-11-10

    In the immune system, macrophages in tumor tissue generate nitric oxide (NO), producing versatile effects including apoptosis of tumor cells, because inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the cytoplasm of a macrophage produces NO using l-arginine as a substrate. Here, we propose novel NO-triggered immune therapeutics based on our newly designed nanoparticle system. We designed a poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-arginine) (i.e., PEG-b-P(l-Arg)) block copolymer and prepared polyion complex micelles (PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m) composed of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) and chondroitin sulfate for systemic anticancer immunotherapy. iNOS treatment of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) did not generate NO, but NO molecules were detected after trypsin pretreatment, indicating that hydrolysis of P(l-Arg) to monomeric arginine was taking place in vitro. RAW264.7 macrophages abundantly generated NO from the PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m in comparison with control micelles; this finding is indicative of robustness of the proposed method. It is interesting to note that systemic administration of PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m had no noticeable adverse effects and suppressed the tumor growth rate in C26 tumor-bearing mice in a dose-dependent manner. Our newly designed nanoparticle-assisted arginine delivery system seems to hold promise as an NO-mediated anticancer immunotherapy. PMID:26386436

  10. Alterations of insulin secretion following long-term manipulation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels by diazoxide and nateglinide.

    PubMed

    Ball, Andrew J; Flatt, Peter R; McClenaghan, Neville H

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that prolonged exposure to drugs, which act via blocking KATP channels, can desensitize the insulinotropic effects of drugs and nutrients acting via KATP channels. In this study, effects of prolonged exposure to diazoxide, a KATP channel opener, on beta cell function were examined using clonal BRIN-BD11 cells. The findings were compared to the long-term effects of KATP channel blockers nateglinide and tolbutamide. Following 18 h exposure to 200 microM diazoxide, the amounts of insulin secreted in response to glucose, amino acids and insulinotropic drugs were increased. Secretory responsiveness to a variety of agents acting via KATP channels was retained following prolonged diazoxide exposure. In contrast, 18 h exposure to 100 microM nateglinide significantly attenuated the insulin secretory responses to tolbutamide, nateglinide and BTS 67 582. Glucose- and L-alanine-stimulated insulin release were unaffected by prolonged nateglinide exposure, however responsiveness to L-leucine and L-arginine was diminished. Prolonged exposure to nateglinide had no effect on forskolin- and PMA-stimulated insulin release, and the overall pattern of desensitization was similar to that induced by 100 microM tolbutamide. We conclude that in contrast to chronic long-term KATP channel blockade, long-term diazoxide treatment is not harmful to KATP channel mediated insulin secretion and may have beneficial protective effects on beta cell function. PMID:15588714

  11. Reversible weakness and encephalopathy while on long-term valproate treatment due to carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-sharefi, Ahmed; Bilous, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with bilateral leg weakness and encephalopathy while on long-term valproate therapy. She was diagnosed with valproate-induced encephalopathy due to carnitine deficiency. Clinical improvement occurred with oral carnitine supplementation. Our case report highlights the importance of considering carnitine deficiency in patients presenting with unexplained neurological signs while on long-term valproate treatment. PMID:26336183

  12. [Bariatric surgery - significance, risks, long term consequences].

    PubMed

    Schubert, T; Jahn, U; Eben, E; Deuber, H J

    2013-03-21

    In recent years the number of bariatric surgery has markedly increased in industrial nations. Surgery provides a more rapid decrease of body weight than conservative approach. However a long term conservative follow up therapy is mandatory to stabilize reduced weight. Due to increasing knowledge from long term follow up of surgically treated obese patients there is a growing body of evidence that frequently there is necessity of reoperations and of substitution both of trace elementsand of minerals or vitamins due to their hampered enteral resorption. Additionally therapy of surgery induced endocrine alterations not seldom is necessary.These insights are of outstanding importance because meanwhile an enlargement of the indications for bariatric surgery as a therapeutic option for metabolic disorders is being discussed. This review refers to the recent internationally published papers concerning consequences of bariatric surgery. PMID:23678666

  13. Long term mortality in burned children

    PubMed Central

    Stamboulian, Daniel; Lede, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Studies about risk factors for mortality in burn children are scarce and are even less in the follow up of this population across time. Usually, after complete event attendance, children are not follow-up as risk patients, burn injury affects all facets of life. Integration of professionals from different disciplines has enabled burn centers to develop collaborative methods of assessing the quality of care delivered to patients with burns. In this editorial we comment the paper of Duke et al. The authors highlight the importance of maintaining a long-term monitoring of children who suffered burns. The importance of this original study is to promote the reconsideration of clinical guides of long-term follow-up of burn patients. PMID:26835375

  14. Case presentation: long-term treatment.

    PubMed

    Glucksman, Myron L

    2013-01-01

    The long-term (14 years) psychodynamic psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy of a depressed, suicidal, self-mutilating female patient is described. Her diagnoses included Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, and Recurrent Major Depression. Treatment was punctuated with repeated hospitalizations for self-mutilation (cutting) and suicidal ideation. A major determinant for her psychopathology was sexual abuse by her father from ages 6 to 14. This resulted in feelings of guilt and rage that she repressed and acted out through self-mutilating and suicidal behavior. A prolonged negative transference gradually became ambivalent, then positive. This was associated with her internalization of the healing qualities of the therapeutic relationship. She also gained insight into the reasons for her need to punish herself. Her initial self-representation as unworthy and bad was transformed into perceiving herself as a worthwhile, loving person. This case illustrates the role of long-term treatment for a complex, life-threatening, psychiatric disorder. PMID:24001161

  15. Long-term course of opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Evans, Elizabeth; Grella, Christine; Ling, Walter; Anglin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Opioid addiction is associated with excess mortality, morbidities, and other adverse conditions. Guided by a life-course framework, we review the literature on the long-term course of opioid addiction in terms of use trajectories, transitions, and turning points, as well as other factors that facilitate recovery from addiction. Most long-term follow-up studies are based on heroin addicts recruited from treatment settings (mostly methadone maintenance treatment), many of whom are referred by the criminal justice system. Cumulative evidence indicates that opioid addiction is a chronic disorder with frequent relapses. Longer treatment retention is associated with a greater likelihood of abstinence, whereas incarceration is negatively related to subsequent abstinence. Over the long term, the mortality rate of opioid addicts (overdose being the most common cause) is about 6 to 20 times greater than that of the general population; among those who remain alive, the prevalence of stable abstinence from opioid use is low (less than 30% after 10-30 years of observation), and many continue to use alcohol and other drugs after ceasing to use opioids. Histories of sexual or physical abuse and comorbid mental disorders are associated with the persistence of opioid use, whereas family and social support, as well as employment, facilitates recovery. Maintaining opioid abstinence for at least five years substantially increases the likelihood of future stable abstinence. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment options (buprenorphine and naltrexone) include depot formulations offering longer duration of medication; their impact on the long-term course of opioid addiction remains to be assessed. PMID:25747921

  16. Long-term orbital lifetime predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, P. E.; Lyons, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term orbital lifetime predictions are analyzed. Predictions were made for three satellites: the Solar Max Mission (SMM), the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), and the Pegasus Boiler Plate (BP). A technique is discussed for determining an appropriate ballistic coefficient to use in the lifetime prediction. The orbital decay rate should be monitored regularly. Ballistic coefficient updates should be done whenever there is a significant change in the actual decay rate or in the solar activity prediction.

  17. Titanium for long-term tritium storage

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1994-12-01

    Due to the reduction of nuclear weapon stockpile, there will be an excess of tritium returned from the field. The excess tritium needs to be stored for future use, which might be several years away. A safe and cost effective means for long term storage of tritium is needed. Storing tritium in a solid metal tritide is preferred to storing tritium as a gas, because a metal tritide can store tritium in a compact form and the stored tritium will not be released until heat is applied to increase its temperature to several hundred degrees centigrade. Storing tritium as a tritide is safer and more cost effective than as a gas. Several candidate metal hydride materials have been evaluated for long term tritium storage. They include uranium, La-Ni-Al alloys, zirconium and titanium. The criteria used include material cost, radioactivity, stability to air, storage capacity, storage pressure, loading and unloading conditions, and helium retention. Titanium has the best combination of properties and is recommended for long term tritium storage.

  18. Links between short and long term tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Traor, Nafissatou; Lecomte, Emmanuel; Saleeby, Jason

    2013-04-01

    In the quest for understanding the rheology of the lithosphere a central question that can be addressed is the existence of a parameterisation of the rheology, which could reflect both the response of the lithosphere over the large time scale (10's Myr) and the time scale of earthquakes and faulting. The gap existing between these observational time scales is mainly due to modelling approximations which in each separate fields permit to fit the data but which rely on simplification of the physics, the rheology and set of boundary conditions which are not always compatible one with each other. The long-term community, i.e. the geodynamics community, tend to use Mohr-Coulomb non-associated plasticity to model self-consistent shear zone localisation. This type of rheology corresponds, in the limit of a discrete fault plan, to a slip weakening/hardening formulation in which weakening rate depends on fault plan orientation. The short term community, i.e. the earthquake community, has stopped using this kind of formulation and rather uses the rate and state formulation to model the activity of faults. Rate and State is limited because it cannot self-consistently generate an earthquake, the triggering, i.e. the initial slip acceleration must be imposed. This contribution is a synthesis of several geological case studies at different length-scale, in which we suspects a strong link between long term geodynamic processes and current seismological and geodetic observations. We make use of these case studies together with quantitative numerical models to understand how the seismic and inter-seismic behaviour reflects the rather long-term geodynamic setting than the internal rheological properties of faults. After briefly revisiting the different modelling approaches from geodynamic seismologic and geodetic communities, we show how modelling results obtained with the long term modelling approach brings new insights and alternative models for both the seismological and geodetic behaviour of active faults. The first example will concern the seismic activity on low angle normal faults focussing on the case of the Gulf of Corinth. Then focusing on strike slip tectonic, I will compare data from active and exhumed strike slip faults and discuss how a single model can explain their behaviour. The last example will focus on the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault to discuss how heterogeneities in the long-term tectonic loading (in that instance flexure of the lithosphere) may influence the seismic behaviour of strike slip fault.

  19. Enhanced expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the myocardium ameliorates the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy in L-arginine treated Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A; Sattar, M A; Rathore, H A; Abdulla, M H; Khan, S A; Abdullah, N A; Johns, E J

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigated the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) enzyme in the development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in Wistar-Kyoto rats. The effect of L-arginine administration on cardiac structure, arterial stiffness, renal and systemic hemodynamic parameters was studied and the change in expression of eNOS and cystathione γ lyase (CSE) in the myocardium of LVH rats was evaluated. LVH was induced using isoprenaline (5 mg/kg, S.C.) and caffeine (62 mg/L in drinking water) for 14 days. Following to that, L-arginine (1.25g/L in drinking water) was given for 5 weeks as a donor of NO. eNOS and CSE gene expressions were down regulated in the LVH group by about 35% and 67% respectively when compared to control. However, in the LVH group treated with L-arginine there was up regulation of eNOS by almost 27% and down regulation in CSE by 24% when compared to control (all P < 0.05). Heart index and H2S plasma levels were reduced by almost 53% in the L-arginine treated LVH group compared to the control (all P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and pulse wave velocity were reduced while renal blood perfusion increased in L-arginine treated LVH rats compared to their untreated counterparts (all P < 0.05). The enhanced expression of eNOS in L-arginine treated LVH rats resulted in the amelioration of oxidative and haemodynamic parameters suggesting that NO system is an important therapeutic target in cardiac and LV hypertrophies. PMID:27010893

  20. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model for the Effect of l-Arginine on Endothelial Function in Patients with Moderately Severe Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Brussee, Janneke M; Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Anstey, Nicholas M; Duffull, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    Impaired organ perfusion in severe falciparum malaria arises from microvascular sequestration of parasitized cells and endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction in malaria is secondary to impaired nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, in part due to decreased plasma concentrations of l-arginine, the substrate for endothelial cell NO synthase. We quantified the time course of the effects of adjunctive l-arginine treatment on endothelial function in 73 patients with moderately severe falciparum malaria derived from previous studies. Three groups of 10 different patients received 3 g, 6 g, or 12 g of l-arginine as a half-hour infusion. The remaining 43 received saline placebo. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model was developed to describe the time course of changes in exhaled NO concentrations and reactive hyperemia-peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) index values describing endothelial function and then used to explore optimal dosing regimens for l-arginine. A PK model describing arginine concentrations in patients with moderately severe malaria was extended with two pharmacodynamic biomeasures, the intermediary biochemical step (NO production) and endothelial function (RH-PAT index). A linear model described the relationship between arginine concentrations and exhaled NO. NO concentrations were linearly related to RH-PAT index. Simulations of dosing schedules using this PKPD model predicted that the time within therapeutic range would increase with increasing arginine dose. However, simulations demonstrated that regimens of continuous infusion over longer periods would prolong the time within the therapeutic range even more. The optimal dosing regimen for l-arginine is likely to be administration schedule dependent. Further studies are necessary to characterize the effects of such continuous infusions of l-arginine on NO and microvascular reactivity in severe malaria. PMID:26482311

  1. The nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) attenuates nicotine abstinence syndrome in the rat.

    PubMed

    Malin, D H; Lake, J R; Shenoi, M; Upchurch, T P; Johnson, S C; Schweinle, W E; Cadle, C D

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide synthesis contributes to opiate tolerance and dependence. Nicotine dependence and abstinence syndrome in the rat appear to involve opiate mechanisms. Therefore, it was postulated that nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity might be essential for the expression of nicotine abstinence syndrome. Twenty-one rats were rendered dependent by SC infusion of 9 mg/kg per day nicotine tartrate via Alzet osmotic minipump. Rats were pretreated SC with vehicle alone, or with 18 or 30 mg/kg of the NOS inhibitor L-NNA (nitro-L-arginine). Thirty minutes later, rats were challenged by 1 mg/kg of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine SC and observed for 30 additional minutes. Rats pretreated with vehicle displayed a total of 68.7+/-8.0 mecamylamine-precipitated abstinence signs (mean+/-SEM), while those receiving 18 or 30 mg/kg L-NNA had 12.7+/-2.0 and 5.1+/-1.7 signs, respectively. All three groups differed significantly from one another according to Dunn's post-hoc procedure. Rats pretreated with L-NNA combined with an excess of the NOS substrate L-arginine had significantly more mecamylamine-precipitated abstinence signs than rats receiving L-NNA combined with D-arginine. Also, D-NNA, which does not selectively bind to NOS, was significantly less effective than L-NNA in preventing mecamylamine-precipitated abstinence syndrome. Additional studies determined the effect of L-NNA on spontaneous nicotine abstinence syndrome. Rats were assessed for abstinence signs at 17 and 20 h after termination of nicotine infusion. They received injections of 9, 18, or 30 mg/kg L-NNA SC or vehicle alone immediately before the 20-h observation; all rats were observed for 30 min. Signs at 20 h (post-injection) as a percentage of signs at 17 h (pre-injection) declined significantly as a function of L-NNA dose. Once again, this effect was attenuated significantly more by co-administration of L-arginine than by D-arginine. The overall pattern of results suggests that nitric oxide synthesis is critical to the expression of nicotine abstinence syndrome. PMID:9877017

  2. The metabolism of L-arginine and its significance for the biosynthesis of endothelium-derived relaxing factor: L-glutamine inhibits the generation of L-arginine by cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sessa, W.C.; Hecker, M.; Mitchell, J.A. Vane, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The mechanism by which L-glutamine (L-Gln) inhibits the release of endothelium-derived factor from bovine aortic cultured endothelial cells was investigated. The intracellular concentration of L-arginine (L-Arg) in Arg-depleted endothelial cells was inversely related to the level of L-Gln. Removal of L-Gln from the culture medium (usually containing L-Gln at 2 mM) abolished the inhibitory effect of the culture medium on L-Arg generation. L-Gln (0.2 and 2 mM) but not D-Gln inhibited the generation of L-Arg by both Arg-depleted and nondepleted endothelial cells. L-Gln did not interfere with the uptake of L-Arg or the metabolism of L-Arg-L-Phe to L-Arg but inhibited the formation of L-Arg from L-citrulline (L-Cit), L-Cit-L-Phe, and N{sup G}-monomethyl-L-arginine. L-Gln also inhibited the conversion of L-({sup 14}C)Cit to L-({sup 14}C)Arg by Arg-depleted endothelial cells. However, L-Gln did not inhibit the conversion of L-argininosuccinic acid to L-Arg by endothelial cell homogenates. Thus, L-Gln interferes with the conversion of L-Cit to L-Arg probably by acting on argininosuccinate synthetase rather than argininosuccinate lyase. L-Gln also inhibited the generation of L-Arg by the monocyte-macrophage cell line J774 but had no effect on the conversion of L-Cit to L-Arg by these cells. As the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor from cultured and non-cultured endothelial cells is limited by the availability of L-Arg, endogenous L-Gln may play a regulatory role in the biosynthesis of endothelium-derived relaxing factor.

  3. Hip fracture prevention strategies in long-term care

    PubMed Central

    Sawka, Anna M.; Ismaila, Nofisat; Raina, Parminder; Thabane, Lehana; Straus, Sharon; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Gafni, Amiram; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To garner Canadian physicians’ opinions on strategies to reduce hip fractures in long-term care (LTC) facilities, focusing on secondary prevention. DESIGN A cross-sectional survey using a mailed, self-administered, written questionnaire. SETTING Canada. PARTICIPANTS Family physician members of the Ontario Long-Term Care Association (n = 165) and all actively practising geriatricians registered in the Canadian Medical Directory (n = 81). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The strength of recommendations for fracture-reduction strategies in LTC and barriers to implementing these strategies. RESULTS Of the 246 physicians sent the questionnaire, 25 declined study materials and were excluded. Of the 221 remaining, 120 responded for a response rate of 54%. About two-thirds of respondents were family physicians (78 of 120) and the rest were mostly geriatricians. Most respondents strongly recommended the following secondary prevention strategies for use in LTC after hip fracture: calcium, vitamin D, oral aminobisphosphonates, physical therapy, and environmental modification (such as handrails). Most respondents either did not recommend or recommended limited use of etidronate, intravenous bisphosphonates, calcitonin, raloxifene, testosterone (for hypogonadal men), and teriparatide. Postmenopausal hormone therapy was discouraged or not recommended by most respondents. Support was mixed for the use of hip protectors, B vitamins, and folate. Barriers to implementation identified by most respondents included a lack of strong evidence of hip fracture reduction (for B vitamins and folate, cyclic etidronate, and testosterone), side effects (for postmenopausal hormone therapy), poor compliance (for hip protectors), and expense (for intravenous bisphosphonates and teriparatide). Some respondents cited side effects or poor compliance as barriers to using calcium and potent oral bisphosphonates. CONCLUSION Canadian physicians favour the use of calcium, vitamin D, potent oral bisphosphonates, physical therapy, and evironmental modifications for LTC residents after hip fracture. Further study at the clinical and administrative levels is required to find ways to overcome the specific barriers to implementation and effectiveness of these interventions. PMID:21075980

  4. Long-term EARLINET dust observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Amiridis, Vassilis; Amodeo, Aldo; Binietoglou, Ioannis; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Schwarz, Anja; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Papayannis, Alexandros; Sicard, Michael; Comeron, Adolfo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Systematic observations of Saharan dust events over Europe are performed from May 2000 by EARLINET, the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork. EARLINET is a coordinated network of stations that make use of advanced lidar methods for the vertical profiling of aerosols. The backbone of EARLINET network is a common schedule for performing the measurements and the quality assurance of instruments/data. Particular attention is paid to monitoring the Saharan dust intrusions over the European continent. The geographical distribution of the EARLINET stations is particularly appealing for the dust observation, with stations located all around the Mediterranean and in the center of the Mediterranean (Italian stations) where dust intrusions are frequent, and with several stations in the central Europe where dust penetrates occasionally. All aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles related to observations collected during these alerts are grouped in the devoted "Saharan dust" category of the EARLINET database. This category consists of about 4700 files (as of December 2013). Case studies involving several stations around Europe selected from this long-term database have been provided the opportunity to investigate dust modification processes during transport over the continent. More important, the long term EARLINET dust monitoring allows the investigation of the horizontal and vertical extent of dust outbreaks over Europe and the climatological analysis of dust optical intensive and extensive properties at continental scale. This long-term database is also a unique tool for a systematic comparison with dust model outputs and satellite-derived dust products. Because of the relevance for both dust modeling and satellite retrievals improvement, results about desert dust layers extensive properties as a function of season and source regions are investigated and will be presented at the conference. First comparisons with models outputs and CALIPSO dust products will be presented. ACKNOWLEDGMENTs The financial support by the European Community through the ACTRIS Research Infrastructure Action under the 7th Framework Programme under ACTRIS Grant Agreement n° 262254 is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Long-term mortality after pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Eric M; Metersky, Mark L

    2012-06-01

    Although pneumonia is currently considered the eighth leading cause of death in the United States this estimate includes only short-term mortality. Evidence suggests that pneumonia may have significant longer-term effects and that hospitalization for pneumonia is associated with higher long-term mortality than for many other major medical conditions. Reasons for this increased mortality appear to be due to several factors, including cardiovascular disease, neoplasms, and alterations in immune function. Clinicians need to be aware that even for those patients who survive the initial episode of pneumonia there will still be an impact upon their potential survival for the coming years. PMID:22718218

  6. Quantifying long-term scientific impact.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dashun; Song, Chaoming; Barabsi, Albert-Lszl

    2013-10-01

    The lack of predictability of citation-based measures frequently used to gauge impact, from impact factors to short-term citations, raises a fundamental question: Is there long-term predictability in citation patterns? Here, we derive a mechanistic model for the citation dynamics of individual papers, allowing us to collapse the citation histories of papers from different journals and disciplines into a single curve, indicating that all papers tend to follow the same universal temporal pattern. The observed patterns not only help us uncover basic mechanisms that govern scientific impact but also offer reliable measures of influence that may have potential policy implications. PMID:24092745

  7. Long term cryogenic storage system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonemetz, R. E.; Pratt, J. H.; Winstead, T. W.

    1971-01-01

    Investigations have revealed significant increases in performance when a reliquefier and solar shield in conjunction with a zero-gravity vapor vent system are utilized. Application of a reliquefier and solar shield in long term deep space missions may effect a 60% reduction in propellant loss, compared to that associated with the vapor vent system only. Significant improvements in storage system performance are possible for low earth orbit applicatons; for the typical system that was evaluated, system performance gains were realized for mission durations exceeding 7 days. Spherical solar shields are generally not competitive for low earth orbit applications.

  8. Long-Term Wind Power Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

  9. [Malaria prevention for long-term travelers].

    PubMed

    Rossi, I; Genton, B

    2009-05-01

    The risk of malaria increases with the duration of stay. Long-term travelers need to know the risk of malaria and the effective measures to reduce this risk: personal protective measures against mosquito bites and chemoprophylaxis. The use of insecticide-impregnated mosquito nets and window screens should be emphasized. When chemoprophylaxis is indicated it should be prescribed at least for the first 3 to 6 months. Then, alternative strategies can be discussed with the traveler: continuous chemoprophylaxis, seasonal chemoprophylaxis and/or standby emergency treatment. PMID:19530531

  10. Performance considerations in long-term spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    Maintenance of skilled performance during extended space flight is of critical importance to both the health and safety of crew members and to the overall success of mission goals. An examination of long term effects and performance requirements is therefore a factor of immense importance to the planning of future missions. Factors that were investigated include: definition of performance categories to be investigated; methods for assessing and predicting performance levels; in-flight factors which can affect performance; and factors pertinent to the maintenance of skilled performance.

  11. Human Behaviour in Long-Term Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session WP1, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Psychological Support for International Space Station Mission; Psycho-social Training for Man in Space; Study of the Physiological Adaptation of the Crew During A 135-Day Space Simulation; Interpersonal Relationships in Space Simulation, The Long-Term Bed Rest in Head-Down Tilt Position; Psychological Adaptation in Groups of Varying Sizes and Environments; Deviance Among Expeditioners, Defining the Off-Nominal Act in Space and Polar Field Analogs; Getting Effective Sleep in the Space-Station Environment; Human Sleep and Circadian Rhythms are Altered During Spaceflight; and Methodological Approach to Study of Cosmonauts Errors and Its Instrumental Support.

  12. Extremely high damage threshold of a new nonlinear crystal L-arginine phosphate and its deuterium compound

    SciTech Connect

    Yokotani, A.; Sasaki, T.; Yoshida, K.; Nakai, S. )

    1989-12-25

    L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) and deuterated LAP (DLAP) are new organic nonlinear optical materials useful for higher harmonics of radiation from high-power lasers. We measured the bulk laser damage threshold of these crystals using light from a 1.05 {mu}m laser with 1 and 25 ns pulse widths and 0.53 {mu}m laser light with 0.6 and 20 ns pulse widths. In every case, these crystals show much higher thresholds than potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) and fused silica. These crystals are very interesting not only as a frequency converter but also as other optical components of high-power lasers, because of their extremely high damage threshold.

  13. Crystal growth, structural and thermal studies of amino acids admixtured L-arginine phosphate monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, P.; Saravanan, T.; Parthipan, G.; Kumar, R. Mohan; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ravi, G.; Jayavel, R.

    2011-05-01

    To study the improved characteristics of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystals, amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been grown by slow cooling method. Amino acids like glycine, L-alanine, and L-valine have been selected for doping. Optical quality bulk crystals have been harvested after a typical growth period of about twenty days. The effect of amino acids in the crystal lattice and molecular vibrational frequencies of various functional groups in the crystals have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) analyses respectively. Thermal behavior of the amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been studied from the TG and DTG analyses. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies have been carried out to find the crystalline nature. Optical transmission studies have been carried out by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The cut off wavelength is below 240 nm for the grown crystals.

  14. Benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester (BAME)-esterase activity in human plasma during the gravidic-puerperal cycle.

    PubMed

    Salles Meirelles, R

    1977-01-01

    Benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester (BAME)-esterase activity of plasma was measured in women going through the gravidic-puerperal cycle and compared with plasma of non-pregnant women. Plasma from women in the 36th to 40th week of pregnancy hydrolyzes BAME two times more rapidly than that from non-pregnant women. During pregnancy, BAME-esterase activity in plasma increases progressively up to the 40th week, decreases during labor, and after delivery reaches the same level as in non-pregnant women. The BAME-esterase activity of plasma was affected by the storage temperature, with differences demonstrable between -20 and -4 C and between pregnant and non-pregnant women. PMID:754510

  15. 17 CFR 256.224 - Other long-term debt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other long-term debt. 256.224... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 6. Long-Term Debt § 256.224 Other long-term debt. This account shall include all long-term debt to nonassociates and not subject to current settlement. Note: Subaccounts shall be...

  16. Inhibition of hypoxia-induced relaxation of rabbit isolated coronary arteries by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine but not glibenclamide.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, C.; Collins, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, tetrodotoxin and glibenclamide on hypoxia-induced coronary artery relaxation, induced by bubbling Krebs solution with 95% N2 and 5% CO2 instead of 95% O2 and 5% CO2, were assessed by measuring the changes in isometric tension in isolated epicardial coronary artery rings of the rabbit. In addition, the effects of glibenclamide on the relaxation induced by adenosine were investigated. 2. Hypoxia caused a transient relaxation of 38 +/- 3% (P < 0.01) and 17 +/- 2% (P < 0.01) in endothelium-intact or -denuded arteries respectively. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (30 and 100 microM) inhibited the relaxation in endothelium-intact rings to 31 +/- 2% (P < 0.05) and 16 +/- 2% (P < 0.01) respectively and slightly but significantly attenuated the relaxation in endothelium-denuded rings to 15 +/- 1% and 13 +/- 1% (P < 0.05) respectively. 3. Glibenclamide, a potassium channel inhibitor, did not significantly after the hypoxia-induced relaxation. 4. Incubation with tetrodotoxin (3 and 10 microM) for 30 min reduced the relaxation to 31 +/- 3% (P < 0.05) and 14 +/- 2% (P < 0.01), and 14 +/- 2% (P < 0.05) and 11 +/- 1% (P < 0.05) in endothelium-intact and -denuded rings respectively. However, indomethacin (10 microM), atropine (1 microM), propranolol (10 microM) and phentolamine (10 microM) did not significantly affect the relaxation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019749

  17. Voluntary wheel running augments aortic l-arginine transport and endothelial function in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martens, Christopher R; Kuczmarski, James M; Kim, Jahyun; Guers, John J; Harris, M Brennan; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon; Edwards, David G

    2014-08-15

    Reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis contributes to risk for cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular uptake of the NO precursor l-arginine (ARG) is attenuated in rodents with CKD, resulting in reduced substrate availability for NO synthesis and impaired vascular function. We tested the effect of 4 wk of voluntary wheel running (RUN) and/or ARG supplementation on endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) in rats with CKD. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent ⅚ ablation infarction surgery to induce CKD, or SHAM surgery as a control. Beginning 4 wk following surgery, CKD animals either remained sedentary (SED) or received one of the following interventions: supplemental ARG, RUN, or combined RUN+ARG. Animals were euthanized 8 wk after surgery, and EDR was assessed. EDR was significantly impaired in SED vs. SHAM animals after 8 wk, in response to ACh (10(-9)-10(-5) M) as indicated by a reduced area under the curve (AUC; 44.56 ± 9.01 vs 100 ± 4.58, P < 0.05) and reduced maximal response (Emax; 59.9 ± 9.67 vs. 94.31 ± 1.27%, P < 0.05). AUC was not improved by ARG treatment but was significantly improved above SED animals in both RUN and RUN+ARG-treated animals. Maximal relaxation was elevated above SED in RUN+ARG animals only. l-[(3)H]arginine uptake was impaired in both SED and ARG animals and was improved in RUN and RUN+ARG animals. The results suggest that voluntary wheel running is an effective therapy to improve vascular function in CKD and may be more beneficial when combined with l-arginine. PMID:24966085

  18. Voluntary wheel running augments aortic l-arginine transport and endothelial function in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Christopher R.; Kuczmarski, James M.; Kim, Jahyun; Guers, John J.; Brennan Harris, M.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis contributes to risk for cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular uptake of the NO precursor l-arginine (ARG) is attenuated in rodents with CKD, resulting in reduced substrate availability for NO synthesis and impaired vascular function. We tested the effect of 4 wk of voluntary wheel running (RUN) and/or ARG supplementation on endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) in rats with CKD. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent ? ablation infarction surgery to induce CKD, or SHAM surgery as a control. Beginning 4 wk following surgery, CKD animals either remained sedentary (SED) or received one of the following interventions: supplemental ARG, RUN, or combined RUN+ARG. Animals were euthanized 8 wk after surgery, and EDR was assessed. EDR was significantly impaired in SED vs. SHAM animals after 8 wk, in response to ACh (10?9-10?5 M) as indicated by a reduced area under the curve (AUC; 44.56 9.01 vs 100 4.58, P < 0.05) and reduced maximal response (Emax; 59.9 9.67 vs. 94.31 1.27%, P < 0.05). AUC was not improved by ARG treatment but was significantly improved above SED animals in both RUN and RUN+ARG-treated animals. Maximal relaxation was elevated above SED in RUN+ARG animals only. l-[3H]arginine uptake was impaired in both SED and ARG animals and was improved in RUN and RUN+ARG animals. The results suggest that voluntary wheel running is an effective therapy to improve vascular function in CKD and may be more beneficial when combined with l-arginine. PMID:24966085

  19. Acute L-arginine alpha ketoglutarate supplementation fails to improve muscular performance in resistance trained and untrained men

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary supplements containing L-arginine are marketed to improve exercise performance, but the efficacy of such supplements is not clear. Therefore, this study examined the efficacy of acute ingestion of L-arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG) muscular strength and endurance in resistance trained and untrained men. Methods Eight resistance trained and eight untrained healthy males ingested either 3000mg of AAKG or a placebo 45 minutes prior to a resistance exercise protocol in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. One-repetition maximum (1RM) on the standard barbell bench press and leg press were obtained. Upon determination of 1RM, subjects completed repetitions to failure at 60% 1RM on both the standard barbell bench press and leg press. Heart rate was measured pre and post exercise. One week later, subjects ingested the other supplement and performed the identical resistance exercise protocol. Results Our data showed statistical significant differences (p<0.05) between resistance trained and untrained males for both 1RM and total load volume (TLV; multiply 60% of 1RM times the number of repetitions to failure) for the upper body. However, 1RM and TLV were not statistically different (p>0.05) between supplementation conditions for either resistance trained or untrained men in the bench press or leg press exercises. Heart rate was similar at the end of the upper and lower body bouts of resistance exercise with AAKG vs. placebo. Conclusion The results from our study indicate that acute AAKG supplementation provides no ergogenic benefit on 1RM or TLV as measured by the standard barbell bench press and leg press, regardless of the subjects training status. PMID:22510253

  20. Exercise training in doxorubicin-induced heart failure: effects on the L-arginine-NO pathway and vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Cristiane; Brunini, Tatiana M C; Carvalho, Lenize C M M; Resende, Angela C; Carvalho, Jorge J; de Castro, João Pedro Werneck; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antonio C

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the end-stage of cardiovascular disease and is associated with a high incidence of thrombotic events. Nitric oxide (NO) mediates vasodilation and prevents platelet activation, providing an important antithrombotic effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic training on survival, platelet L-arginine-NO pathway, and vasodilator properties in doxorubicin (DOX)-induced HF. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to saline/sedentary (SAL/SED), saline/exercise (SAL/EX), DOX/sedentary (DOX/SED), and DOX/exercise (DOX/EX) groups. Four weeks after intraperitoneal DOX injection (1mg/kg(-1)/d(-1); 10 days), shortening fraction in DOX/SED and DOX/EX was significantly reduced. Treadmill exercise was performed during 6 weeks, 5 days/week(-1), 30minutes/day(-1), 50% to 60% of maximum velocity. Survival was higher in DOX/EX (67%) than DOX/SED (33%). No differences were observed in intraplatelet L-arginine transport assessed by incubation with L- [(3)H]-arginine, nor in NOS activity measured by the conversion of L- [(3)H]-arginine into L- [(3)H]-citrulline among the groups. Vasodilation response to acetylcholine was impaired in DOX/SED and DOX/EX; in nitroglycerine, it was limited to DOX/SED. Aerobic training reduced mortality in DOX-induced HF animals and restored vascular smooth muscle relaxation properties. However, it did not ameliorate intraplatelet NO bioavailability and endothelial function during the period studied. PMID:20374946

  1. INSULIN, GLUCOSE, CORTISOL, GROWTH HORMONE AND PROLACTIN RESPONSES TO ORAL L-ARGININE SUPPLEMENTATION TO LACTATING SOWS UNDER HEAT STRESS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to determine whether dietary arginine (Arg) decreases weight loss of lactating sows via regulation of key metabolic hormones. Sows were exposed to a thermoneutral (TN = 20º C) or hot (HT = 29.4º C) environment and fed one of three dietary treatments in a 2 x 3 factori...

  2. Long term changes in the polar vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2015-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented.

  3. Toward a comprehensive long term nicotine policy.

    PubMed

    Gray, N; Henningfield, J E; Benowitz, N L; Connolly, G N; Dresler, C; Fagerstrom, K; Jarvis, M J; Boyle, P

    2005-06-01

    Global tobacco deaths are high and rising. Tobacco use is primarily driven by nicotine addiction. Overall tobacco control policy is relatively well agreed upon but a long term nicotine policy has been less well considered and requires further debate. Reaching consensus is important because a nicotine policy is integral to the target of reducing tobacco caused disease, and the contentious issues need to be resolved before the necessary political changes can be sought. A long term and comprehensive nicotine policy is proposed here. It envisages both reducing the attractiveness and addictiveness of existing tobacco based nicotine delivery systems as well as providing alternative sources of acceptable clean nicotine as competition for tobacco. Clean nicotine is defined as nicotine free enough of tobacco toxicants to pass regulatory approval. A three phase policy is proposed. The initial phase requires regulatory capture of cigarette and smoke constituents liberalising the market for clean nicotine; regulating all nicotine sources from the same agency; and research into nicotine absorption and the role of tobacco additives in this process. The second phase anticipates clean nicotine overtaking tobacco as the primary source of the drug (facilitated by use of regulatory and taxation measures); simplification of tobacco products by limitation of additives which make tobacco attractive and easier to smoke (but tobacco would still be able to provide a satisfying dose of nicotine). The third phase includes a progressive reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes, with clean nicotine freely available to take the place of tobacco as society's main nicotine source. PMID:15923465

  4. Clinical review: Long-term noninvasive ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Dominique; Argaud, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Noninvasive positive ventilation has undergone a remarkable evolution over the past decades and is assuming an important role in the management of both acute and chronic respiratory failure. Long-term ventilatory support should be considered a standard of care to treat selected patients following an intensive care unit (ICU) stay. In this setting, appropriate use of noninvasive ventilation can be expected to improve patient outcomes, reduce ICU admission, enhance patient comfort, and increase the efficiency of health care resource utilization. Current literature indicates that noninvasive ventilation improves and stabilizes the clinical course of many patients with chronic ventilatory failure. Noninvasive ventilation also permits long-term mechanical ventilation to be an acceptable option for patients who otherwise would not have been treated if tracheostomy were the only alternative. Nevertheless, these results appear to be better in patients with neuromuscular/-parietal disorders than in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This clinical review will address the use of noninvasive ventilation (not including continuous positive airway pressure) mainly in diseases responsible for chronic hypoventilation (that is, restrictive disorders, including neuromuscular disease and lung disease) and incidentally in others such as obstructive sleep apnea or problems of central drive. PMID:17419882

  5. Postpartum evaluation and long term implications.

    PubMed

    Firoz, Tabassum; Melnik, Tanya

    2011-08-01

    Hypertension, proteinuria and biochemical changes caused by pre-eclampsia may persist for several weeks and even months postpartum. Hypertension and pre-eclampsia may even develop for the first time postpartum. Care in the six weeks postpartum should include management of hypertension and screening for secondary causes of hypertension including renal disease if abnormalities persist beyond six weeks. Optimal postpartum monitoring for patients with preeclampsia has not been determined, and care needs to be individualized. The postpartum period also provides a window of opportunity for planning for the next pregnancy in addition to discussing long term implications of pre-eclampsia. Increased risk for the development of premature cardiovascular disease is the most significant long term implication of pre-eclampsia. Pre-eclampsia and cardiovascular disease share a common disease pathophysiology. Women who develop pre-eclampsia have pre-existing metabolic abnormalities or may develop them later in life. Women with early onset pre-eclampsia are at the highest risk of ischemic heart disease. Women with a history of pre-eclampsia should adopt a heart healthy lifestyle and should be screened and treated for traditional cardiovascular risk factors according to locally accepted guidelines. PMID:21536498

  6. Long-term reductions in tinnitus severity

    PubMed Central

    Folmer, Robert L

    2002-01-01

    Background This study was undertaken to assess long-term changes in tinnitus severity exhibited by patients who completed a comprehensive tinnitus management program; to identify factors that contributed to changes in tinnitus severity within this population; to contribute to the development and refinement of effective assessment and management procedures for tinnitus. Methods Detailed questionnaires were mailed to 300 consecutive patients prior to their initial appointment at the Oregon Health & Science University Tinnitus Clinic. All patients were then evaluated and treated within a comprehensive tinnitus management program. Follow-up questionnaires were mailed to the same 300 patients 6 to 36 months after their initial tinnitus clinic appointment. Results One hundred ninety patients (133 males, 57 females; mean age 57 years) returned follow-up questionnaires 6 to 36 months (mean = 22 months) after their initial tinnitus clinic appointment. This group of patients exhibited significant long-term reductions in self-rated tinnitus loudness, Tinnitus Severity Index scores, tinnitus-related anxiety and prevalence of current depression. Patients who improved their sleep patterns or Beck Depression Inventory scores exhibited greater reductions of tinnitus severity scores than patients who continued to experience insomnia and depression at follow-up. Conclusions Individualized tinnitus management programs that were designed for each patient contributed to overall reductions in tinnitus severity exhibited on follow-up questionnaires. Identification and treatment of patients experiencing anxiety, insomnia or depression are vital components of an effective tinnitus management program. Utilization of acoustic therapy also contributed to improvements exhibited by these patients. PMID:12234379

  7. Long-Term Care Policy: Singapore's Experience.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chee Wei Winston; Phua, Kai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Singapore, like many developed countries, is facing the challenge of a rapidly aging population and the increasing need to provide long-term care (LTC) services for elderly in the community. The Singapore government's philosophy on care for the elderly is that the family should be the first line of support, and it has relied on voluntary welfare organizations (VWOs) or charities for the bulk of LTC service provision. For LTC financing, it has emphasized the principles of co-payment and targeting of state support to the low-income population through means-tested government subsidies. It has also instituted ElderShield, a national severe disability insurance scheme. This paper discusses some of the challenges facing LTC policy in Singapore, particularly the presence of perverse financial incentives for hospitalization, the pitfalls of over-reliance on VWOs, and the challenges facing informal family caregivers. It discusses the role of private LTC insurance in LTC financing, bearing in mind demand- and supply-side failures that have plagued the private LTC insurance market. It suggests the need for more standardized needs assessment and portable LTC benefits, with reference to the Japanese Long-Term Care Insurance program, and also discusses the need to provide more support to informal family caregivers. PMID:26808468

  8. Sleep facilitates long-term face adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ditye, Thomas; Javadi, Amir Homayoun; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Walsh, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is an automatic neural mechanism supporting the optimization of visual processing on the basis of previous experiences. While the short-term effects of adaptation on behaviour and physiology have been studied extensively, perceptual long-term changes associated with adaptation are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the integration of adaptation-dependent long-term shifts in neural function is facilitated by sleep. Perceptual shifts induced by adaptation to a distorted image of a famous person were larger in a group of participants who had slept (experiment 1) or merely napped for 90 min (experiment 2) during the interval between adaptation and test compared with controls who stayed awake. Participants' individual rapid eye movement sleep duration predicted the size of post-sleep behavioural adaptation effects. Our data suggest that sleep prevented decay of adaptation in a way that is qualitatively different from the effects of reduced visual interference known as ‘storage’. In the light of the well-established link between sleep and memory consolidation, our findings link the perceptual mechanisms of sensory adaptation—which are usually not considered to play a relevant role in mnemonic processes—with learning and memory, and at the same time reveal a new function of sleep in cognition. PMID:23986109

  9. Craniopharyngioma in Children: Long-term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    STEINBOK, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The survival rate for childhood craniopharyngioma has been improving, with more long-term survivors. Unfortunately it is rare for the patient to be normal, either from the disease itself or from the effects of treatment. Long-term survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma suffer a number of impairments, which include visual loss, endocrinopathy, hypothalamic dysfunction, cerebrovascular problems, neurologic and neurocognitive dysfunction. Pituitary insufficiency is present in almost 100%. Visual and hypothalamic dysfunction is common. There is a high risk of metabolic syndrome and increased risk of cerebrovascular disease, including stroke and Moyamoya syndrome. Cognitive, psychosocial, and emotional problems are prevalent. Finally, there is a higher risk of premature death among survivors of craniopharyngioma, and often this is not from tumor recurrence. It is important to consider craniopharyngioma as a chronic disease. There is no perfect treatment. The treatment has to be tailored to the individual patient to minimize dysfunction caused by tumor and treatments. So cure of the tumor does not mean a normal patient. The management of the patient and family needs multidisciplinary evaluation and should involve ophthalmology, endocrinology, neurosurgery, oncology, and psychology. Furthermore, it is also important to address emotional issues and social integration. PMID:26345668

  10. Long term differential consequences of miglustat therapy on intestinal disaccharidases.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mahdi; Naim, Hassan Y

    2014-11-01

    Miglustat is an oral medication for treatment of lysosomal storage diseases such as Gaucher disease type I and Niemann Pick disease type C. In many cases application of Miglustat is associated with symptoms similar to those observed in intestinal carbohydrate malabsorption. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal disaccharidases are inhibited immediately by Miglustat in the intestinal lumen. Nevertheless, the multiple functions of Miglustat hypothesize long term effects of Miglustat on intracellular mechanisms, including glycosylation, maturation and trafficking of the intestinal disaccharidases. Our data show that a major long term effect of Miglustat is its interference with N-glycosylation of the proteins in the ER leading to a delay in the trafficking of sucrase-isomaltase. Also association with lipid rafts and plausibly apical targeting of this protein is partly affected in the presence of Miglustat. More drastic is the effect of Miglustat on lactase-phlorizin hydrolase which is partially blocked intracellularly. The de novo synthesized SI and LPH in the presence of Miglustat show reduced functional efficiencies according to altered posttranslational processing of these proteins. However, at physiological concentrations of Miglustat (≤50 μM) a major part of the activity of these disaccharidases is found to be still preserved, which puts the charge of the observed carbohydrate maldigestion mostly on the direct inhibition of disaccharidases in the intestinal lumen by Miglustat as the immediate side effect. PMID:24863482

  11. Asthma Medicines: Long-Term Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention ... they are not very effective for acute symptoms. Systemic corticosteroids taken by mouth as pills or liquid, or injected, are sometimes ...

  12. Long-term management of gastroesophageal reflux disease with pantoprazole.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Theo

    2007-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic, relapsing disease that can progress to major complications. Affected patients have poorer health-related quality of life than the general population. As GERD requires continued therapy to prevent relapse and complications, most patients with erosive esophagitis require long-term acid suppressive treatment. Thus GERD results in a significant cost burden and poor health-related quality of life. The effective treatment of GERD provides symptom resolution and high rates of remission in erosive esophagitis, lowers the incidence of GERD complications, improves health-related quality of life, and reduces the cost of this disease. Proton pump inhibitors are accepted as the most effective initial and maintenance treatment for GERD. Oral pantoprazole is a safe, well tolerated and effective initial and maintenance treatment for patients with nonerosive GERD or erosive esophagitis. Oral pantoprazole has greater efficacy than histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists and generally similar efficacy to other proton pump inhibitors for the initial and maintenance treatment of GERD. In addition, oral pantoprazole has been shown to improve the quality of life of patients with GERD and is associated with high levels of patient satisfaction with therapy. GERD appears to be more common and more severe in the elderly, and pantoprazole has shown to be an effective treatment for this at-risk population. PMID:18360632

  13. Effect of L-arginine supplementation to gestation and lactation diets on the expression of immune related genes in white blood cells of lactating sows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of L-arginine HCl supplementation on immune related gene expression in leukocytes of first parity sows. Nineteen first parity sows (BW of 180.7 ± 2.7 kg and BF of 15.3 ± 0.2 mm) were used in this study. On d 30 of gestation, pregnant gilts were assign...

  14. Managing soils for long-term productivity

    PubMed Central

    Syers, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Meeting the goal of long-term agricultural productivity requires that soil degradation be halted and reversed. Soil fertility decline is a key factor in soil degradation and is probably the major cause of declining crop yields. There is evidence that the contribution of declining soil fertility to soil degradation has been underestimated.
    Sensitivity to soil degradation is implicit in the assessment of the sustainability of land management practices, with wide recognition of the fact that soils vary in their ability to resist change and recover subsequent to stress. The concept of resilience in relation to sustainability requires further elaboration and evaluation.
    In the context of soil degradation, a decline in soil fertility is primarily interpreted as the depletion of organic matter and plant nutrients. Despite a higher turnover rate of organic matter in the tropics there is no intrinsic difference between the organic matter content of soils from tropical and temperate regions. The level of organic matter in a soil is closely related to the above and below ground inputs. In the absence of adequate organic material inputs and where cultivation is continuous, soil organic matter declines progressively. Maintaining the quantity and quality of soil organic matter should be a guiding principle in developing management practices.
    Soil microbial biomass serves as an important reservoir of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S), and regulates the cycling of organic matter and nutrients. Because of its high turnover rate, microbial biomass reacts quickly to changes in management and is a sensitive indicator for monitoring and predicting changes in soil organic matter. Modelling techniques have been reasonably successful in predicting changes in soil organic matter with different organic material inputs, but there is little information from the tropics.
    Nutrient depletion through harvested crop components and residue removal, and by leaching and soil erosion accentuates the often very low inherent fertility of many soils in the tropics. An integrated approach involving inorganic and organic inputs is required where animal and plant residues are returned, as far as practicable. Chemical fertilizers alone cannot achieve long-term productivity on many soils and organic material inputs are required to maintain soil organic matter levels and crop productivity. A major research effort is required to develop improved strategies for halting and reversing soil degradation if long-term productivity is to be secured.

  15. Activation and potentiation of the NO/cGMP pathway by NG-hydroxyl-L-arginine in rabbit corpus cavernosum under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Javier; Cuevas, Pedro; Fernández, Argentina; Gabancho, Sonia; Allona, Antonio; Martín-Morales, Antonio; Moncada, Ignacio; Tejada, Iñigo Sáenz de

    2003-01-01

    When nitric oxide synthase (NOS) produces NO from NG-hydroxy-L-arginine (OH-arginine) instead of L-arginine, the total requirement of molecular oxygen and NADPH to form NO is reduced. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of OH-arginine on the contractility of rabbit corpus cavernosum (RCC) and to compare the capacities of L-arginine and OH-arginine to enhance NO-mediated responses under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and in ageing, as models of defective NO production. OH-arginine, but not L-arginine, was able to relax phenylephrine-contracted rabbit trabecular smooth muscle. OH-arginine-induced relaxation was inhibited by the NOS-inhibitor, L-NNA (300 μM), and by the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (20 μM), while it was not affected by the cytochrome P450 oxygenase inhibitor, miconazole (0.1 mM). Administration of OH-arginine, but not L-arginine, produced a significant increment of cGMP accumulation in RCC tissue. Relaxation elicited by OH-arginine (300 μM) was still observed at low oxygen tension. The increase of cGMP levels induced by ACh (30 μM) in RCC was significantly enhanced by addition of OH-arginine (300 μM) in normoxic conditions, as well as under hypoxia, while L-arginine did not alter the effects of ACh on cGMP accumulation. Endothelium-dependent and nitrergic nerve-mediated relaxations were both significantly reduced in RCC from aged animals (>20-months-old) when compared with young adult rabbits (5-months-old). Treatment with OH-arginine (300 μM) significantly potentiated endothelium-dependent and neurogenic relaxation in corpus cavernosum from aged rabbits, while L-arginine (300 μM) did not have significant effects. Results show that OH-arginine promotes NO-mediated relaxation of RCC and potentiates the NO-mediated responses induced by stimulation of endogenous NO generation in hypoxic and aged tissues. We propose that the use of OH-arginine could be of interest in the treatment of erectile dysfunction, at least in those secondary to defective NO production. PMID:12522074

  16. Long-term care reimbursement issues.

    PubMed

    Stone, D; Reublinger, V

    1995-08-01

    There have been dramatic changes in long-term care funding recently. Considered only an insignificant part of the continuum of care system just a few years ago, this level of care is now looked to as a wellspring for desperately needed health care cost reductions. Government, insurance companies, intermediaries, large providers, and consumer and physician groups are actively focused on the development and expansion of alternative care provision sites; sub-acute care; hospice; home health care; social, medical, and rehabilitative day care; assisted living and adult congregate care facilities; risk or capitation contracting; expanded health maintenance organizations; alternative care providers; and alternative care approaches. In addition, the improvement in reimbursement is reviewed and is one aspect in ensuring that the economics are right for those needed services to continue to be provided. PMID:7585394

  17. [Femoral angioplasty. Long-term results].

    PubMed

    Foucart, H; Carlier, C; Baudrillard, J C; Joffre, F; Ccile, J P

    1990-01-01

    A study on the long-term efficacy of femoral-popliteal angioplasty was carried out on 185 angioplasty cases over a 5 year follow-up period. A classification of data according to the type of lesion treated, revealed that results were favorable in case of stenosis (87%), short obstruction (70%) and long obstruction (35%). A special study of the outcome of treatments for stage IV arteritis was carried out. After comparing results with those obtained by other teams, the authors list the complications encountered, hematomas, and thromboses, and show their current tendency for regression. Lastly, the authors stress the advantages of angioscopy, which permits to identify the nature of the treated lesions and to predict possible complications, which are usually underrated by angiography. PMID:2145379

  18. Advanced long term cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Norman S.

    1987-01-01

    Long term, cryogenic fluid storage facilities will be required to support future space programs such as the space-based Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), Telescopes, and Laser Systems. An orbital liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen storage system with an initial capacity of approximately 200,000 lb will be required. The storage facility tank design must have the capability of fluid acquisition in microgravity and limit cryogen boiloff due to environmental heating. Cryogenic boiloff management features, minimizing Earth-to-orbit transportation costs, will include advanced thick multilayer insulation/integrated vapor cooled shield concepts, low conductance support structures, and refrigeration/reliquefaction systems. Contracted study efforts are under way to develop storage system designs, technology plans, test article hardware designs, and develop plans for ground/flight testing.

  19. Long term performance of radon mitigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-03-01

    Researchers installed radon mitigation systems in 12 houses in Spokane, Washington and Coeur d'Alene, Idaho during the heating season 1985--1986 and continued to monitor indoor radon quarterly and annually for ten years. The mitigation systems included active sub-slab ventilation, basement over-pressurization, and crawlspace isolation and ventilation. The occupants reported various operational problems with these early mitigation systems. The long-term radon measurements were essential to track the effectiveness of the mitigation systems over time. All 12 homes were visited during the second year of the study, while a second set 5 homes was visited during the fifth year to determine the cause(s) of increased radon in the homes. During these visits, the mitigation systems were inspected and measurements of system performance were made. Maintenance and modifications were performed to improve system performance in these homes.

  20. Long-term monitoring for closed sites

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Sedlet, J.; Veluri, V.R.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is presented for planning and implementing a long-term environmental monitoring program for closed low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. The initial task in this procedure is to collect the available information on the legal/regulatory requirements, site and area characteristics, source term, pathway analysis, and prior monitoring results. This information is coupled with parameters such as half-life and retardation factors to develop a monitoring program. As examples, programs are presented for a site that has had little or no waste migration, and for sites where waste has been moved by suface water, by ground water, and by air. Sampling techniques and practices are discussed relative to how a current program would be structured and projections are made on techniques and practices expected to be available in the future. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Networking: a long-term management strategy.

    PubMed

    Gumbus, Andra

    2003-01-01

    As we face a changing health-care landscape of mergers and acquisitions during these tough economic times, it is more important than ever to cultivate a network of individuals who can assist you in your career development efforts. How do you manage your career in a shrinking economy? What is networking and how can you use it to enhance your career and professional competencies? Many myths surround the networking process; this article clarifies those misperceptions and tells you the truth about networking and the positive results you can achieve. Networking can be used to get a new job, but it has much wider application as a long-term career management strategy. Learn how you can manage your own career while building professional relationships and coaching your employees. PMID:12813955

  2. [Childhood liver transplantation. Long-term results].

    PubMed

    Jara, Paloma; Hierro, Loreto

    2010-05-01

    Liver transplantation allows long-term survival (10 years or more) in 75% of children receiving transplants before 2000. The risk of mortality after the first year is 4-10% in the next 10-20 years. Chronic rejection affects 6%. The need for late retransplantation is 3-5%. However, the follow-up of these patients involves the management of diverse problems in the graft (immunological, biliary, vascular) and others related to the use of immunosuppressants (renal dysfunction, lymphoproliferative syndrome). The transition from pediatric to adult care generates special needs. Adolescence and young adulthood are associated with a lack of compliance. Adult specialists should be aware of the special features of the original diagnosis and the surgical techniques used in childhood transplantation. Final quality of life is good overall but is lower than that in healthy young persons. PMID:20122757

  3. Long-term cryogenic space storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. A.; Chronic, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the design, fabrication and testing of a 225-cu ft spherical cryogenic storage system for long-term subcritical applications under zero-g conditions in storing subcritical cryogens for space vehicle propulsion systems. The insulation system design, the analytical methods used, and the correlation between the performance test results and analytical predictions are described. The best available multilayer insulation materials and state-of-the-art thermal protection concepts were applied in the design, providing a boiloff rate of 0.152 lb/hr, or 0.032% per day, and an overall heat flux of 0.066 Btu/sq ft hr based on a 200 sq ft surface area. A six to eighteen month cryogenic storage is provided by this system for space applications.

  4. Long term cryogenic storage facility systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, John R.

    1987-01-01

    The Long Term Cryogenic Storage Facility Systems Study (LTCSFSS) is a Phase A study of a large capacity propellant depot for the space based, cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle. The study is being performed for Marshall Space Flight Center by General Dynamics Space Systems Division and has five principal objectives: (1) Definition of preliminary concept designs for four storage facility concepts; (2) Selection of preferred concepts through the application of trade studies to candidate propellant management system components; (3) Preparation of a conceptual design for an orbital storage facility; (4) Development of supporting research and technology requirements; and (5) Development of a test program to demonstrate facility performance. The initial study has been completed, and continuation activities are just getting under way to provide greater detail in key areas and accommodate changes in study guidelines and assumptions.

  5. [Strongyloidiasis following long-term corticosteroid therapy].

    PubMed

    Yamori, S; Yamamoto, M; Kawabata, A; Nakashima, K; Iinuma, Y; Satake, T; Shimokata, K

    1989-10-01

    A 64-year-old man who was born and raised in Fukuoka Prefecture was admitted because of dyspnea. The chest X-ray film showed multiple pulmonary cysts. Corticosteroid therapy was given because of repeated episodes of dyspnea and wheezing. He complained of epigastric pain 20 months after administration of corticosteroid therapy. Gastro-endoscopic examination showed inflammatory changes of the gastric mucosa and the biopsy specimens revealed the filariform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. Furthermore, the larvae were frequently detected in both sputum specimens and stools. Pyrvinium pamoate was initially administered and was switched to thiabendazole because of the presence of hyperinfection. Although two cycles of thiabendazole treatment were given, the larvae were not eradicated. This case report suggests that long term corticosteroid therapy caused the hyperinfection syndrome of Strongyloides stercoralis in a patient who was auto-infected with this nematode. PMID:2615077

  6. Long-term control of root growth

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin. 7 figs.

  7. Long-term control of root growth

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G. (West Richland, WA); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Cline, John F. (Prosser, WA); Skiens, W. Eugene (Richland, WA)

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  8. Reducing long-term reservoir performance uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.

    1988-04-01

    Reservoir performance is one of the key issues that have to be addressed before going ahead with the development of a geothermal field. In order to select the type and size of the power plant and design other surface installations, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the production wells and of the produced fluids, and to predict the changes over a 10--30 year period. This is not a straightforward task, as in most cases the calculations have to be made on the basis of data collected before significant fluid volumes have been extracted from the reservoir. The paper describes the methodology used in predicting the long-term performance of hydrothermal systems, as well as DOE/GTD-sponsored research aimed at reducing the uncertainties associated with these predictions. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  9. NO system dependence of atropine-induced mydriasis and L-NAME- and L-arginine-induced miosis: Reversal by the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in rats and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kokot, Antonio; Zlatar, Mirna; Stupnisek, Mirjana; Drmic, Domagoj; Radic, Radivoje; Vcev, Aleksandar; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2016-01-15

    We revealed an immediate and hours-lasting particular NO-specific parallel miotic effect of L-NAME and L-arginine in rats and guinea pigs and a stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 157-particular effect vs. that of atropine-induced mydriasis while examining the NO system role in the normal pupils responses and pupils with atropine-induced mydriasis. We also assessed the responses to BPC 157 and its possible modulation of the changes caused by L-NAME/L-arginine and atropine. We administered locally (two drops/eye) or systemically (intraperitoneally/kg) [BPC 157 (0.4g/eye; 10g, 10ng, 10pg/kg), L-NAME (0.1mg/eye; 5mg/kg), and L-arginine (2mg/eye; 100mg/kg) alone and combined] at 3min prior to assessment (normal pupils) or alternatively at maximal 1% atropine-induced mydriasis (30min after two drops were administered to each eye). L-NAME/L-arginine. Normal pupil. L-NAME-miosis and L-arginine-miosis shortened and attenuated each other's responses when combined (L-NAME+L-arginine) (except with guinea pigs treated locally) and were thereby NO-specific. Atropine-pupil. Both L-NAME and L-arginine counteracted atropine-induced mydriasis. With few exceptions, the atropine+L-NAME+L-arginine-animals showed a consistent shift toward the left. BPC 157. Normal pupil. Always, BPC 157 alone (both species; locally; systemically; all regimens) did not affect normal pupils. Despite specific exceptions, BPC 157 distinctively affects L-arginine-miosis (prolongation) and L-NAME-miosis (shortening). When L-arginine and L-NAME were combined (L-NAME+L-arginine+BPC 157), the effect was less pronounced. Atropine-pupil. BPC 157 alone counteracted atropine-induced mydriasis. With few exceptions (when administered with L-NAME or L-arginine or L-NAME+L-arginine), BPC 157 augments their counteracting effects. Thus, along with its l-NAME/L-arginine effects, BPC 157 participates in ocular control, potentially via NO-mediated and cholinergic mechanisms. PMID:26698393

  10. Managing Records for the Long Term - 12363

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, John V.; Gueretta, Jeanie

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing vast amounts of information documenting historical and current operations. This information is critical to the operations of the DOE Office of Legacy Management. Managing legacy records and information is challenging in terms of accessibility and changing technology. The Office of Legacy Management is meeting these challenges by making records and information management an organizational priority. The Office of Legacy Management mission is to manage DOE post-closure responsibilities at former Cold War weapons sites to ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. These responsibilities include environmental stewardship and long-term preservation and management of operational and environmental cleanup records associated with each site. A primary organizational goal for the Office of Legacy Management is to 'Preserve, Protect, and Share Records and Information'. Managing records for long-term preservation is an important responsibility. Adequate and dedicated resources and management support are required to perform this responsibility successfully. Records tell the story of an organization and may be required to defend an organization in court, provide historical information, identify lessons learned, or provide valuable information for researchers. Loss of records or the inability to retrieve records because of poor records management processes can have serious consequences and even lead to an organisation's downfall. Organizations must invest time and resources to establish a good records management program because of its significance to the organization as a whole. The Office of Legacy Management will continue to research and apply innovative ways of doing business to ensure that the organization stays at the forefront of effective records and information management. DOE is committed to preserving records that document our nation's Cold War legacy, and the Office of Legacy Management will keep records management as a high priority. (authors)

  11. Long-term dynamics of Typha populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, J.B.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    The zonation of Typha populations in an experimental pond in Michigan was re-examined 15 years after the original sampling to gain insight into the long-term dynamics. Current distributions of Typha populations were also examined in additional experimental ponds at the site that have been maintained for 23 years. The zonation between T. latifolia and T. angustifolia in the previously studied pond 15 years after the initial sampling revealed that the density and distribution of shoots had not changed significantly. Thus, it appears that previously reported results (based on 7- year old populations) have remained consistent over time. Additional insight into the interaction between these two taxa was sought by comparing mixed and monoculture stands in five experimental ponds that have remained undisturbed for their 23-year history. The maximum depth of T. latifolia, the shallow- water species, was not significantly reduced when growing in the presence of the more flood tolerant T. angustifolia. In contrast, the minimum depth of T. angustifolia was reduced from 0 to 37 cm when in the presence of T. latifolia. When total populations were compared between monoculture and mixed stands, the average density of T. angustifolia shoots was 59.4 percent lower in mixed stands while the density of T. latifolia was 32 percent lower, with T. angustifolia most affected at shallow depths (reduced by 92 percent) and T. latifolia most affected at the deepest depths (reduced by 60 percent). These long-term observations indicate that competitive displacement between Typha taxa has remained stable over time.

  12. Long-term changes in tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Lefohn, A. S.; Harris, J. M.; Galbally, I.; Scheel, H. E.; Bodeker, G.; Brunke, E.; Claude, H.; Tarasick, D.; Johnson, B. J.; Simmonds, P.; Shadwick, D.; Anlauf, K.; Hayden, K.; Schmidlin, F.; Fujimoto, T.; Akagi, K.; Meyer, C.; Nichol, S.; Davies, J.; Redondas, A.; Cuevas, E.

    Tropospheric ozone changes are investigated using a selected network of surface and ozonesonde sites to give a broad geographic picture of long-term variations. The picture of long-term tropospheric ozone changes is a varied one in terms of both the sign and magnitude of trends and in the possible causes for the changes. At mid latitudes of the S.H. three time series of ˜20 years in length agree in showing increases that are strongest in the austral spring (August-October). Profile measurements show this increase extending through the mid troposphere but not into the highest levels of the troposphere. In the N.H. in the Arctic a period of declining ozone in the troposphere through the 1980s into the mid-1990s has reversed and the overall change is small. The decadal-scale variations in the troposphere in this region are related in part to changes in the lowermost stratosphere. At mid latitudes in the N.H., continental Europe and Japan showed significant increases in the 1970s and 1980s. Over North America rises in the 1970s are less than those seen in Europe and Japan, suggesting significant regional differences. In all three of these mid latitude, continental regions tropospheric ozone amounts appear to have leveled off or in some cases declined in the more recent decades. Over the North Atlantic three widely separated sites show significant increases since the late-1990s that may have peaked in recent years. In the N.H. tropics both the surface record and the ozonesondes in Hawaii show a significant increase in the autumn months in the most recent decade compared to earlier periods that drives the overall increase seen in the 30-year record. This appears to be related to a shift in the transport pattern during this season with more frequent flow from higher latitudes in the latest decade.

  13. Long-term control of paraffin deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, G.T.; Cushner, M.C.; Garbis, S.J.; Gray, T.C.

    1984-09-01

    Paraffin-related problems occur in almost all oil producing areas throughout the world. These problems can be encountered in any part of the production system from the time the crude leaves the reservoir until it reaches the refinery. As a result, operators spend a large amount of time and money to correct paraffin-related problems. Traditionally, operators have been forced to remove paraffin deposits from downhole equipment, tubular goods and surface equipment using mechanical, thermal or chemical methods. In many cases, a combination of two or more methods are employed. The major disadvantages of these methods is that they treat paraffin-related problems after they have occured. The treatment of wells with dispersants and paraffin deposition inhibitors generally reduces or slows paraffin build-up. However, this inhibition is often very short-lived, because the well production quickly carries the chemicals to the surface. The addition of a long-term solid paraffin deposition inhibitor with the proppant during a hydraulic fracturing treatment has proven to extend this inhibition time. The solid paraffin inhibitor slowly releases the paraffin inhibitor chemical throughout the early production of a well. This paper describes a laboratory simulation of paraffin deposition used to evaluate two paraffin inhibitors in nine crudes. The two paraffin inhibitors evaluated were: (1) a blend of crystal modifiers in a controlled-release matrix form and (2) a commercially available ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer solid. One field evaluation presented compares the long-term effectiveness of both paraffin inhibitors. In a second field evaluation, the blend of crystal modifiers was used in two wells to successfully control paraffin deposition. In both field evaluations, the blend of crystal modifiers in a controlled-release matrix form has successfully prevented paraffin deposition.

  14. [Primary hyperparathyroidism: postoperative long-term evolution].

    PubMed

    Spivacow, Francisco R; Martnez, Carolina; Polonsky, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The long-term postoperative outcome of 87 patients with primary hyperparathyrodism is here presented. Of the total 78 were females and 9 males, ratio: 8.7:1. Mean age 55.3 10.2 years. Before surgery, 44% had kidney stones, 70% had osteopenia or osteoporosis and 71.2% had hypercalciuria. Decrease renal glomerular filtration was found in 12.6%. Of the total, 72 patients had a single adenoma, two double adenoma, two hyperplasia, four had normal histology and seven could not dispose of the result. Serum calcium, ionized calcium, phosphorus and intact parathyroid hormone were normalized in all post surgery patients. Bone mineral density increased by 6.9% in lumbar spine and 3% in femoral neck. Markers of bone remodeling were normalized and persisted normal 23 months of follow-up, coinciding with the normal intact parathyroid hormone. Same thing happened with the values of 25 OH D. When patients whith initial hypercalciuria were compared with those with normocalciuria, no differences were found in the basal values and postsurgery in both groups. In 11 patients with previous renal glomerular filtration < 60 ml min, we found a higher intact parathyroid hormone and lower bone mineral density than the rest. The glomerular filtration rate did not change significantly after surgery. In conclusion, the surgical primary hyperparathyroidism, operated by specialized surgeons has an excellent long-term outcome, with normalization of all parameters of phosphocalcic metabolism and bone remodeling and significant improvement in bone mineral density. Adverse effects were scarce and had spontaneous resolution. PMID:20920956

  15. Amino acid transport and metabolism in mycobacteria: cloning, interruption, and characterization of an L-Arginine/gamma-aminobutyric acid permease in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Seth, A; Connell, N D

    2000-02-01

    Genes encoding L-arginine biosynthetic and transport proteins have been shown in a number of pathogenic organisms to be important for metabolism within the host. In this study we describe the cloning of a gene (Rv0522) encoding an amino acid transporter from Mycobacterium bovis BCG and the effects of its deletion on L-arginine transport and metabolism. The Rv0522 gene of BCG was cloned from a cosmid library by using primers homologous to the rocE gene of Bacillus subtilis, a putative arginine transporter. A deletion mutant strain was constructed by homologous recombination with the Rv0522 gene interrupted by a selectable marker. The mutant strain was complemented with the wild-type gene in single copy. Transport analysis of these strains was conducted using (14)C-labeled substrates. Greatly reduced uptake of L-arginine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) but not of lysine, ornithine, proline, or alanine was observed in the mutant strain compared to the wild type, grown in Middlebrook 7H9 medium. However, when the strains were starved for 24 h or incubated in a minimal salts medium containing 20 mM arginine (in which even the parent strain does not grow), L-[(14)C]arginine uptake by the mutant but not the wild-type strain increased strongly. Exogenous L-arginine but not GABA, lysine, ornithine, or alanine was shown to be toxic at concentrations of 20 mM and above to wild-type cells growing in optimal carbon and nitrogen sources such as glycerol and ammonium. L-Arginine supplied in the form of dipeptides showed no toxicity at concentrations as high as 30 mM. Finally, the permease mutant strain showed no defect in survival in unactivated cultured murine macrophages compared with wild-type BCG. PMID:10648515

  16. Long-term prevention of estrus in the bitch and queen using chlormadinone acetate.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Hiromichi; Kawate, Noritoshi; Inaba, Toshio; Sawada, Tsutomu

    2003-05-01

    Estrus was prevented with weekly oral administration of 2 mg chlormadinone acetate for 2.0 to 9.8 y in bitches and queens. Abnormalities, including mammary or uterine disorders, or both, were noted in 7 out of 14 bitches and 9 out of 24 queens during this long-term treatment. PMID:12757134

  17. Long-term Changes in Tropospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmans, S.; Lefohn, A.; Galbally, I.; Scheel, E.; Bodeker, G.; Brunke, E.; Claude, H.; Tarasick, D.; Simmonds, P.; Anlauf, K.; Schmidlin, F.; Akagi, K.; Redondas, A.

    2006-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone measurements from a selected network of surface and ozonesonde sites are used to give a broad geographic picture of long-term variations. The picture of long-term tropospheric ozone changes is a varied one in terms of both the sign and magnitude of trends and in the possible causes for the changes. At mid latitudes of the S.H. three time series of ~20 years in length agree in showing increases that are strongest in the austral spring (August-October). Profile measurements show this increase extending through the mid troposphere but not into the highest levels of the troposphere. In the N.H. in the Arctic a period of declining ozone in the troposphere through the 1980s into the mid 1990s has reversed and the overall change is small. The decadal-scale variations in the troposphere in this region are related in part to changes in the lowermost stratosphere. At mid latitudes in the N.H., continental Europe and Japan showed significant increases in the 1970s and 1980s. Over North America rises in the 1970s are less than those seen in Europe and Japan, suggesting significant regional differences. In all three of these mid latitude, continental regions tropospheric ozone amounts appear to have leveled off or in some cases declined in the more recent decades. Over the North Atlantic three widely separated sites show significant increases since the late 1990s that may have peaked in recent years. In the N.H. tropics both the surface record and the ozonesondes in Hawaii show a significant increase in the autumn months in the most recent decade compared to earlier periods that drives the overall increase seen in the 30 year record. This appears to be related to a shift in the transport pattern during this season with more frequent flow from higher latitudes in the latest decade. The pattern of change, with the largest increases in the N.H. coming prior to the mid 1980s, suggests that increased positive radiative forcing due to tropospheric ozone was felt most significantly in the period from the 1950s through the 1980s and has not been spread uniformly over the period since the industrial revolution.

  18. Robotics for Long-Term Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, Sarkis; Duran, Celso

    2002-07-01

    While long-term monitoring and stewardship means many things to many people, DOE has defined it as The physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where DOE has completed or plans to complete cleanup (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, and facility stabilization). Across the United States, there are thousands of contaminated sites with multiple contaminants released from multiple sources where contaminants have transported and commingled. The U.S. government and U.S. industry are responsible for most of the contamination and are landowners of many of these contaminated properties. These sites must be surveyed periodically for various criteria including structural deterioration, water intrusion, integrity of storage containers, atmospheric conditions, and hazardous substance release. The surveys, however, are intrusive, time-consuming, and expensive and expose survey personnel to radioactive contamination. In long-term monitoring, there's a need for an automated system that will gather and report data from sensors without costly human labor. In most cases, a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) unit is used to collect and report data from a remote location. A SCADA unit consists of an embedded computer with data acquisition capabilities. The unit can be configured with various sensors placed in different areas of the site to be monitored. A system of this type is static, i.e., the sensors, once placed, cannot be moved to other locations within the site. For those applications where the number of sampling locations would require too many sensors, or where exact location of future problems is unknown, a mobile sensing platform is an ideal solution. In many facilities that undergo regular inspections, the number of video cameras and air monitors required to eliminate the need for human inspections is very large and far too costly. HCET's remote harsh-environment surveyor (RHES) is a robotic platform with SCADA capabilities equipped with a sonar-imaging scanner, a high-resolution color CCD camera, and various combinations of sensors. The RHES is controlled remotely via a PC. This paper will discuss the development and application of this system. (authors)

  19. LONG-TERM MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Farrington; John W. Haas; Neal Van Wyck

    2003-10-16

    Long-term monitoring (LTM) associated with subsurface contamination sites is a key element of Long Term Stewardship and Legacy Management across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. However, both within the DOE and elsewhere, LTM is an expensive endeavor, often exceeding the costs of the remediation phase of a clean-up project. The primary contributors to LTM costs are associated with labor. Sample collection, storage, preparation, analysis, and reporting can add a significant financial burden to project expense when extended over many years. Development of unattended, in situ monitoring networks capable of providing quantitative data satisfactory to regulatory concerns has the potential to significantly reduce LTM costs. But survival and dependable operation in a difficult environment is a common obstacle to widespread use across the DOE complex or elsewhere. Deploying almost any sensor in the subsurface for extended periods of time will expose it to chemical and microbial degradation. Over the time-scales required for in situ LTM, even the most advanced sensor systems may be rendered useless. Frequent replacement or servicing (cleaning) of sensors is expensive and labor intensive, offsetting most, if not all, of the cost savings realized with unattended, in situ sensors. To enable facile, remote monitoring of contaminants and other subsurface parameters over prolonged periods, Applied Research Associates, Inc has been working to develop an advanced LTM sensor network consisting of three key elements: (1) an anti-fouling sensor chamber that can accommodate a variety of chemical and physical measurement devices based on electrochemical, optical and other techniques; (2) two rapid, cost effective, and gentle means of emplacing sensor packages either at precise locations directly in the subsurface or in pre-existing monitoring wells; and (3) a web browser-based data acquisition and control system (WebDACS) utilizing field-networked microprocessor-controlled smart sensors housed in anti-fouling sensor chambers. The monitoring network is highly versatile and can be applied to a variety of subsurface sensing scenarios in different media. However, the current project focused on monitoring water quality parameters of pH, oxidation-reduction potential, conductivity, and temperature in groundwater.

  20. Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition by NG-Nitro-l-Arginine Methyl Ester Inhibits Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis in Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jadeski, Lorraine C.; Lala, Peeyush K.

    1999-01-01

    Using a murine breast cancer model, we earlier found a positive correlation between the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and tumor progression; treatment with inhibitors of NOS, NG-methyl-l-arginine (NMMA) and NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), had antitumor and antimetastatic effects that were partly attributed to reduced tumor cell invasiveness. In the present study, we used a novel in vivo model of tumor angiogenesis using subcutaneous implants of tumor cells suspended in growth factor-reduced Matrigel to examine the angiogenic role of NO in a highly metastatic murine mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. This cell line, C3L5, expresses endothelial (e) NOS in vitro and in vivo, and inducible (i) NOS in vitro on stimulation with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-?. Female C3H/HeJ mice received subcutaneous implants of growth factor-reduced Matrigel inclusive of C3L5 cells on one side, and on the contralateral side, Matrigel alone; L-NAME and D-NAME (inactive enantiomer) were subsequently administered for 14 days using osmotic minipumps. Immediately after sacrifice, implants were removed and processed for immunolocalization of eNOS and iNOS proteins, and measurement of angiogenesis. Neovascularization was quantified in sections stained with Massons trichrome or immunostained for the endothelial cell specific CD31 antigen. While most tumor cells and endothelial cells expressed immunoreactive eNOS protein, iNOS was localized in endothelial cells and some macrophages within the tumor-inclusive implants. Measurable angiogenesis occurred only in implants containing tumor cells. Irrespective of the method of quantification used, tumor-induced neovascularization was significantly reduced in L-NAME-treated mice relative to those treated with D-NAME. The quantity of stromal tissue was lower, but the quantity of necrotic tissue higher in L-NAME relative to D-NAME-treated animals. The total mass of viable tissue (ie, stroma and tumor cells) was lower in L-NAME relative to D-NAME-treated animals. These data suggest that NO is a key mediator of C3L5 tumor-induced angiogenesis, and that the antitumor effects of L-NAME are partly mediated by reduced tumor angiogenesis. PMID:10514420

  1. The L-arginine/NO pathway and homoarginine are altered in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and improved by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Hrster, Irina; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Carmann, Christina; Chobanyan-Jrgens, Kristine; Khler, Cornelia; Schara, Ulrike; Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Beckmann, Bibiana; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Lcke, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The L-arginine/nitric oxide (L-Arg/NO) pathway regulates endothelial function and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Yet, this pathway is poorly investigated in children suffering from DMD. Endothelial dysfunction can affect the perfusion of contracting muscles, thus leading to ischemia and hypoxia. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that reduced NO production due to elevated synthesis of N (G),N (G)-dimethyl-L-arginine (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthesis, is a possible pathophysiological mechanism for progressive intramuscular muscle ischemia and disturbed endothelial function in children with DMD. Given the possible antagonistic action of homoarginine (hArg) on ADMA, we also analyzed this amino acid. We investigated 55 male patients with DMD and 54 healthy male controls (HC; aged 11.9 4.8 vs. 11.1 4.9 years, mean SD). Urinary creatinine and metabolites of the L-Arg/NO pathway were measured in plasma and urine by GC-MS or GC-MS/MS. Urine levels of ADMA and its major urinary metabolite dimethylamine (DMA), nitrite and nitrate (P < 0.001 for all) and hArg (P = 0.002) were significantly higher in DMD patients compared to HC, while the urinary DMA/ADMA molar ratio was lower (P = 0.002). In plasma, nitrate (P < 0.001), hArg (P = 0.002) and the hArg/ADMA ratio (P < 0.001) were lower in DMD than in HC. In plasma, ADMA (631 119 vs. 595 129 nM, P = 0.149), arginine and nitrite did not differ between DMD and HC. In DMD, positive correlations between ADMA, DMA or nitrate excretion and the stage of disease (according to Vignos and Thompson) were found. In DMD patients on steroid medication, lower concentrations of ADMA in plasma, and of DMA, ADMA, nitrate and hArg in urine were observed compared to non-treated patients. The L-Arg/NO pathway is impaired in DMD patients, with the disease progression being clinically negatively correlated with the extent of impairment. One of the underlying mechanisms in DMD may involve insufficient antagonism of ADMA by hArg. Steroids, but not creatine supplementation, seems to improve the L-Arg/NO pathway in DMD. PMID:26066683

  2. Insulin secretion stimulated by l-arginine and its metabolite l-ornithine depends on G?i2

    PubMed Central

    Leiss, Veronika; Flockerzie, Katarina; Novakovic, Ana; Rath, Michaela; Schnsiegel, Annika; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Schrmann, Annette; Harteneck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis toxin (PTx), also known as islet-activating protein, induces insulin secretion by ADP-ribosylation of inhibitory G proteins. PTx-induced insulin secretion may result either from inactivation of G?o proteins or from combined inactivation of G?o, G?i1, G?i2, and G?i3 isoforms. However, the specific role of G?i2 in pancreatic ?-cells still remains unknown. In global (G?i2?/?) and ?-cell-specific (G?i2?cko) gene-targeted G?i2 mouse models, we studied glucose homeostasis and islet functions. Insulin secretion experiments and intracellular Ca2+ measurements were used to characterize G?i2 function in vitro. G?i2?/? and G?i2?cko mice showed an unexpected metabolic phenotype, i.e., significantly lower plasma insulin levels upon intraperitoneal glucose challenge in G?i2?/? and G?i2?cko mice, whereas plasma glucose concentrations were unchanged in G?i2?/? but significantly increased in G?i2?cko mice. These findings indicate a novel albeit unexpected role for G?i2 in the expression, turnover, and/or release of insulin from islets. Detection of insulin secretion in isolated islets did not show differences in response to high (16 mM) glucose concentrations between control and ?-cell-specific G?i2-deficient mice. In contrast, the two- to threefold increase in insulin secretion evoked by l-arginine or l-ornithine (in the presence of 16 mM glucose) was significantly reduced in islets lacking G?i2. In accord with a reduced level of insulin secretion, intracellular calcium concentrations induced by the agonistic amino acid l-arginine did not reach control levels in ?-cells. The presented analysis of gene-targeted mice provides novel insights in the role of ?-cell G?i2 showing that amino acid-induced insulin-release depends on G?i2. PMID:25205820

  3. Copper(II) complexes of L-arginine as netropsin mimics showing DNA cleavage activity in red light.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashis K; Bhowmick, Tuhin; Roy, Sovan; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2009-04-01

    Copper(II) complexes [Cu(L-arg)(2)](NO(3))(2) (1) and [Cu(L-arg)(B)Cl]Cl (2-5), where B is a heterocyclic base, namely, 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, 2), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 3), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 4), and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 5), are prepared and their DNA binding and photoinduced DNA cleavage activity studied. Ternary complex 3, structurally characterized using X-ray crystallography, shows a square-pyramidal (4 + 1) coordination geometry in which the N,O-donor L-arginine and N,N-donor 1,10-phenanthroline form the basal plane with one chloride at the elongated axial site. The complex has a pendant cationic guanidinium moiety. The one-electron paramagnetic complexes display a metal-centered d-d band in the range of 590-690 nm in aqueous DMF. They show quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response due to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple in the range of -0.1 to -0.3 V versus a saturated calomel electrode in a DMF-Tris HCl buffer (pH 7.2). The DNA binding propensity of the complexes is studied using various techniques. Copper(II) bis-arginate 1 mimics the minor groove binder netropsin by showing preferential binding to the AT-rich sequence of double-strand (ds) DNA. DNA binding study using calf thymus DNA gives an order: 5 (L-arg-dppz) > or = 1 (bis-L-arg) > 4 (L-arg-dpq) > 3 (L-arg-phen) > 2 (L-arg-bpy). Molecular docking calculations reveal that the complexes bind through extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions with ds-DNA. The complexes cleave supercoiled pUC19 DNA in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid as a reducing agent forming hydroxyl ((*)OH) radicals. The complexes show oxidative photoinduced DNA cleavage activity in UV-A light of 365 nm and red light of 647.1 nm (Ar-Kr mixed-gas-ion laser) in a metal-assisted photoexcitation process forming singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) species in a type-II pathway. All of the complexes, barring complex 2, show efficient DNA photocleavage activity. Complexes 4 and 5 exhibit significant double-strand breaks of DNA in red light of 647.1 nm due to the presence of two photosensitizers, namely, L-arginine and dpq or dppz in the molecules. PMID:19254037

  4. Long-Term Control Medications for Lung Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Term Control Medications Long-Term Control Medications for Lung Diseases Long-term control medications are taken daily to control and prevent lung disease symptoms. These medicines should be taken every ...

  5. Long-Term Control Medications for Lung Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Term Control Medications Long-Term Control Medications for Lung Diseases Long-term control medications are taken daily to control and prevent lung disease symptoms. These medicines should be taken every day ...

  6. Secondary effluent disinfection: PAA long term efficiency.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M; Rossi, S; Mezzanotte, V; Nurizzo, C

    2006-08-01

    The paper summarizes the results of a bench-scale study to evaluate the long-term disinfection efficiency of peracetic acid (PAA). Bacterial counts were repeated 5, 24, and 29 h after the end of the disinfection test, to simulate real re-growth conditions (no residual quenching) and, for the 5 h interval, the potential re-growth (quenching of residual PAA). Fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, and total heterotrophic bacteria (THB) were enumerated by traditional plate count technique; THB were also enumerated by cytometry. After disinfection, the residual PAA concentration became negligible in about 5 to 11 h, depending on the tested doses. Microbial counts showed that no appreciable re-growth took place after 29 h for coliform group bacteria. For THB, the previously cited enumeration techniques gave different results in re-growth tests, especially for the lowest PAA doses. Indeed plate count technique evaluates the ability to form colonies, while cytometry enumerates intact membrane cells. No regrowth took place, even when no residual disinfectant was present, suggesting that bacteria are unable, even at the lowest doses, to repair damage caused by the PAA disinfecting action. PAA was found to be an efficient disinfecting agent, not only as a bacteriostatic, but also as a bactericide. PMID:16913137

  7. Long-term plutonium storage: Design concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkey, D.D.; Wood, W.T.; Guenther, C.D.

    1994-08-01

    An important part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Program is the development of facilities for long-term storage of plutonium. The WCR design goals are to provide storage for metals, oxides, pits, and fuel-grade plutonium, including material being held as part of the Strategic Reserve and excess material. Major activities associated with plutonium storage are sorting the plutonium inventory, material handling and storage support, shipping and receiving, and surveillance of material in storage for both safety evaluations and safeguards and security. A variety of methods for plutonium storage have been used, both within the DOE weapons complex and by external organizations. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of proposed storage concepts based upon functional criteria. The concepts discussed include floor wells, vertical and horizontal sleeves, warehouse storage on vertical racks, and modular storage units. Issues/factors considered in determining a preferred design include operational efficiency, maintenance and repair, environmental impact, radiation and criticality safety, safeguards and security, heat removal, waste minimization, international inspection requirements, and construction and operational costs.

  8. Transuranic waste: long-term planning

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.C.

    1985-07-01

    Societal concerns for the safe handling and disposal of toxic waste are behind many of the regulations and the control measures in effect today. Transuranic waste, a specific category of toxic (radioactive) waste, serves as a good example of how regulations and controls impact changes in waste processing - and vice versa. As problems would arise with waste processing, changes would be instituted. These changes improved techniques for handling and disposal of transuranic waste, reduced the risk of breached containment, and were usually linked with regulatory changes. Today, however, we face a greater public awareness of and concern for toxic waste control; thus, we must anticipate potential problems and work on resolving them before they can become real problems. System safety analyses are valuable aids in long-term planning for operations involving transuranic as well as other toxic materials. Examples of specific system safety analytical methods demonstrate how problems can be anticipated and resolution initiated in a timely manner having minimal impacts upon allocation of resource and operational goals. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Long-Term Consequences of Neonatal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The maturation of the central nervous systems (CNSs) sensory connectivity is driven by modality-specific sensory input in early life. For the somatosensory system, this input is the physical, tactile interaction with the environment. Nociceptive circuitry is functioning at the time of birth; however, there is still considerable organization and refinement of this circuitry that occurs postnatally, before full discrimination of tactile and noxious input is possible. This fine-tuning involves separation of tactile and nociceptive afferent input to the spinal cords dorsal horn and the maturation of local and descending inhibitory circuitry. Disruption of that input in early postnatal life (for example, by tissue injury or other noxious stimulus), can have a profound influence on subsequent development, and consequently the mature functioning of pain systems. In this review, the impact of neonatal surgical incision on nociceptive circuitry is discussed in terms of the underlying developmental neurobiology. The changes are complex, occurring at multiple anatomical sites within the CNS, and including both neuronal and glial cell populations. The altered sensory input from neonatal injury selectively modulates neuronal excitability within the spinal cord, disrupts inhibitory control, and primes the immune system, all of which contribute to the adverse long-term consequences of early pain exposure. PMID:26174217

  10. Intermediate- and long-term earthquake prediction.

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, L R

    1996-01-01

    Progress in long- and intermediate-term earthquake prediction is reviewed emphasizing results from California. Earthquake prediction as a scientific discipline is still in its infancy. Probabilistic estimates that segments of several faults in California will be the sites of large shocks in the next 30 years are now generally accepted and widely used. Several examples are presented of changes in rates of moderate-size earthquakes and seismic moment release on time scales of a few to 30 years that occurred prior to large shocks. A distinction is made between large earthquakes that rupture the entire downdip width of the outer brittle part of the earth's crust and small shocks that do not. Large events occur quasi-periodically in time along a fault segment and happen much more often than predicted from the rates of small shocks along that segment. I am moderately optimistic about improving predictions of large events for time scales of a few to 30 years although little work of that type is currently underway in the United States. Precursory effects, like the changes in stress they reflect, should be examined from a tensorial rather than a scalar perspective. A broad pattern of increased numbers of moderate-size shocks in southern California since 1986 resembles the pattern in the 25 years before the great 1906 earthquake. Since it may be a long-term precursor to a great event on the southern San Andreas fault, that area deserves detailed intensified study. Images Fig. 1 PMID:11607658

  11. Economic efficiency, IRPs and long term contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1993-04-30

    There is no market failure that warrants utility regulation of the construction of new generating plants, the supply of energy efficiency or the purchase of fuel under contract. The natural monopoly problem applies to the distribution of electricity and gas, not to generation, energy conservation, or gas purchases. Utility regulation magnifies a market failure, which is the principal agent problem. Regulatory allowance of utilities signing long term fixed price contracts and undertaking conservation measures result in costs and risks being shifted to ratepayers that would not occur under competitive market conditions. Economic efficiency would be enhanced if cost of service regulation of electric and gas utilities were replaced by a competitive market process for the construction of new power plants, utility conservation programs and contracts to purchase fuel. Conservation measures could be supplied by energy service companies. Gas merchants could provide gas and energy conservation directly to ultimate customers, if they had access to LDC pipelines. With a competitive market established to sell gas and energy services, contracts and conservation measures would not require cost-of- service regulation.

  12. Long-term adequacy of metal resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Although the earth's crust contains vast quantities of metals, extraction technologies and associated costs are inextricably bound to three fundamental geological factors - the amount of metal available in the earth's crust in each range of grades, the mineralogical form and chemical state of the metal, and the spatial distribution of the metal. The energy required to recover a given amount of metal increases substantially as grade declines. Most metal is produced from sulphide or oxide minerals, whereas most metal in the crust may be locked in the structures of the more refractory silicates. Recovery from silicate minerals could require orders of magnitude more energy than that used at present as also could exploitation of small, widely scattered or thin, deeply buried deposits. Although specific information on the fundamental factors is not available, each factor must in turn tend to further restrict exploitation. Independence of average grade and tonnage for many deposit types further reduces the availability of rock as a source of metal. In the long term, effects of these factors will be large increases in price for many metals. ?? 1977.

  13. Long Term Storage of Lyophilized Liposomal Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Payton, N.M.; Wempe, M.F.; Xu, Y.; Anchordoquy, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Because aqueous liposomal formulations containing multiply unsaturated lipids are susceptible to chemical degradation, these formulations are often lyophilized. Despite their limited chemical stability, interest in the use of multiply unsaturated lipids to promote intracellular delivery has increased considerably in recent years. The goal of the current study was to examine the long term storage stability of lyophilized formulations containing lipids with increasing levels of unsaturation, and various strategies which can be employed to improve stability. Aqueous lipid-trehalose formulations containing 1,2-dilinolenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC), 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLinPC) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) were lyophilized and stored at temperatures ranging from 4°C to 60°C. We observed that the lipid degradation rate increased as the storage temperature and unsaturation level were increased. Even the cleanest sugars which are available commercially contain iron contaminants, and it was observed that the chelation of these iron contaminants significantly improved the stability of DLPC during storage. However, the glass transition temperature of the sugar which was included in the formulation, the reduction of the oxygen in the aqueous sample prior to lyophilization, the inclusion of helper lipids (i.e., cholesterol), and the rate of freezing did not significantly improve stability. PMID:25308534

  14. [Long term adherence to HAART in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Bastard, M; Fall, M Basty Koita

    2014-10-01

    Adherence is one of the main predictors of antiretroviral treatment success. A governmental initiative was launched in 1998 for HIV-infected patients in Senegal to provide access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Adherence measurements, defined as pills taken/pills prescribed, were assessed between November 1999 and June 2010 using a pill count along with a questionnaire for 330 patients. Predictors of adherence and identification of adherence trajectories were explored through latent class mixed model. We also performed a survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard model. Three adherence behaviours were revealed as well as a better adherence for women. A third of patients had a high adherence trajectory over time and a third had an intermediate one. Male gender and low adherence behaviour over time were independently associated with a higher mortality rate. This study shows that an overall good adherence can be obtained in the long term in Senegal, suggests a better adherence for women and points out a large subsample of patients with intermediate level of adherence behaviour who are at risk for developing resistance to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:24615434

  15. The long-term variability of Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkovskaya, V.; Plachinda, S.; Valyavin, G.; Baklanova, D.; Lee, B.-C.

    2011-12-01

    Over the time of 60 years Vega (α Lyrae = HD 172167, A0V) has been generally accepted as a standard star in the near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet regions. But is the spectrophotometric standard Vega really non-variable star? Researchers give very different answers to this question. We aim to search a periodicity in our results of spectropolarimetric study of Vega, namely periodic variations in equivalent width of the spectral lines and longitudinal magnetic field measurements. High-accuracy spectropolarimetric observations of Vega have been performed during 26 nights from 1997 to 2010 using the Coudé spectrograph of the 2.6-m Shain reflector at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO, Ukraine) and during 4 nights in 2007 and 2008 using the echelle spectrograph BOES at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO, South Korea). The long-term (year-to-year) variability of Vega was confirmed. It was concluded that this variability does not have magnetic nature. The paper is dedicated to the memory of V.P. Merezhin.

  16. Long-term corrosion testing plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2009-02-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

  17. Long-term corrosion testing pan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2008-08-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

  18. Neurological long term consequences of deep diving.

    PubMed Central

    Todnem, K; Nyland, H; Skeidsvoll, H; Svihus, R; Rinck, P; Kambestad, B K; Riise, T; Aarli, J A

    1991-01-01

    Forty commercial saturation divers, mean age 34.9 (range 24-49) years, were examined one to seven years after their last deep dive (190-500 metres of seawater). Four had by then lost their divers' licence because of neurological problems. Twenty seven (68%) had been selected by neurological examination and electroencephalography before the deep dives. The control group consisted of 100 men, mean age 34.0 (range 22-48) years. The divers reported significantly more symptoms from the nervous system. Concentration difficulties and paraesthesia in feet and hands were common. They had more abnormal neurological findings by neurological examination compatible with dysfunction in the lumbar spinal cord or roots. They also had a larger proportion of abnormal electroencephalograms than the controls. The neurological symptoms and findings were highly significantly correlated with exposure to deep diving (depth included), but even more significantly correlated to air and saturation diving and prevalence of decompression sickness. Visual evoked potentials, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show more abnormal findings in the divers. Four (10%) divers had had episodes of cerebral dysfunction during or after the dives; two had had seizures, one had had transitory cerebral ischaemia and one had had transitory global amnesia. It is concluded that deep diving may have a long term effect on the nervous system of the divers. PMID:2025592

  19. Alpine Soils as long-term Bioindicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestroy, O.

    2009-04-01

    Alpine soils as long-term bioindicators The introductory words concern the definitions and peculiarities of alpine soils and their position in the Austrian Soil Classification 2000 in comparison with the World Reference Base for Soil Resources 2006. The important parameters for genesis and threats for these soils in steep and high positions are discussed. It must be emphasized that the main threats are the very different kinds of erosion e.g. by water, wind and snow, and also by skiing (end of season) as well as and mountain-biking (mainly summer-sport). Due the very slow regeneration and - in this connection - due to the very slow changes of the soil entities, these soils give an utmost importance as a long-time bioindicator. With regard to the climate change one can assume an increase in the content of organic matter on site, but also an increase of erosion and mass movement on the other site, e. g. in kind of "plaiken" (soil slide) as result of an increasing intensity of rainfall. It lies partly in our hands to diminish the number and the intensity of the threats, we can influence the soil development, but the result to reach a new ecological equilibrium is very long - in case of alpine soil more than two generations.

  20. Long-term intraperitoneal insulin delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, H A; Saudek, C D; Zacur, H A

    1992-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, 21 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus have been managed at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions with variable rate, remotely controlled implanted insulin pumps. To date, nearly 70 patient-years of experience has been gained with intraperitoneal delivery of a new U-400 insulin with a surfactant. All 21 patients are alive after a mean of 39.3 months (range, 10 to 65 months) after insulin pump implantation. Nineteen of the 21 patients remain on intraperitoneal insulin, for a 5-year actuarial system survival of 90%. Glucose control was improved, especially during the first 16 months after pump implantation, without an increased incidence of severe hypoglycemia. Catheter blockage has been a significant problem, occurring in nine of the 21 patients (43%). Catheter occlusion has been successfully managed, however, with laparoscopic repair in seven of 10 attempts or with catheter change in four of five patients. Nevertheless, quality of life and patient acceptance remain excellent. Moreover, pre-existing nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy have been surprisingly stable. With an aggressive policy of catheter change or laparoscopic clearance of catheter blockage, long-term intraperitoneal insulin delivery is now a safe and effective treatment for type I diabetics. PMID:1417197

  1. Long-term outcomes of reversal of laryngotracheal separation.

    PubMed

    Zocratto, Orlando B; Savassi-Rocha, Paulo R; Paixo, Rafael M

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of the reversal of laryngotracheal separation (LTS) in patients who underwent extensive resection of tumors located in the upper aerodigestive tract. We performed a retrospective analysis of the medical records of eight patients who had LTS reversal. The operation was successful in six patients who were followed up for a period of 17-99 months (mean = 46.3 26.2). The mean interval between LTS and surgical reversal was 16.6 9.1 months. Four patients had postoperative complications: mild to moderate transient aspiration in two, tracheal stenosis in one, and severe aspiration followed by tracheal stenosis in one. In the last two cases, surgical reversal was not successful. The patients whose surgery was effective maintained oral feeding and comprehensible speech until the end of the follow-up period. We conclude that reversal of LTS is technically simple and, when successful, permits the return to oral feeding and comprehensible speech for an indefinite period of time. However, the frequency of complications and inefficacy of LTS reversal should not be overlooked. PMID:20614223

  2. Propionyl-L-carnitine, L-arginine and niacin in sexual medicine: a nutraceutical approach to erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gianfrilli, D; Lauretta, R; Di Dato, C; Graziadio, C; Pozza, C; De Larichaudy, J; Giannetta, E; Isidori, A M; Lenzi, A

    2012-05-01

    The application of nutraceuticals in the field of male sexual function -in particular for erectile dysfunction (ED)--remains relatively underexplored. In a group of 54 unselected men (35-75 years), consecutively presenting to our ED clinic and naive to other ED treatments, we carried out a single-blind, one-arm study to evaluate the effects of a 3-month supplementation with propionyl-L-carnitine, L-arginine and niacin on their sexual performance. All patients had the short-international index of erectile function (IIEF) questionnaire, global assessment questions (GAQs) and routine laboratory testing, at baseline and 3 months afterward. 51 (92%) patients of 54 completed the entire study period. After 3 months of treatment, a small, but statistically significant improvement in total and single items of the IIEF was found (? = 5.7 4.1 P < 0.01). Analyses on GAQs revealed that treatment improved erections in 40% of cases, with a partial response occurring in up to 77% of subjects enrolled. These preliminary findings indicate that the favourable cardiovascular effects of nutraceuticals might also reflect on male sexual function with possible implication in the treatment and prevention of ED. This study documents a considerable patient's interest toward nutritional supplementation--as first-line or adjunctive treatment to PDE5 inhibitors--that goes beyond the measurable increment in penile rigidity. PMID:21966881

  3. Comparative Proteomics Analysis Reveals L-Arginine Activates Ethanol Degradation Pathways in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guokai; Lestari, Retno; Long, Baisheng; Fan, Qiwen; Wang, Zhichang; Guo, Xiaozhen; Yu, Jie; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xingya; Chen, Changqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Xiuzhi; Purnomoadi, Agung; Achmadi, Joelal; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    L-Arginine (Arg) is a versatile amino acid that plays crucial roles in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. In this study, to investigate the alteration induced by Arg supplementation in proteome scale, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based proteomic approach was employed to comparatively characterize the differentially expressed proteins between Arg deprivation (Ctrl) and Arg supplementation (+Arg) treated human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. A total of 21 proteins were identified as differentially expressed proteins and these 21 proteins were all up-regulated by Arg supplementation. Six amino acid metabolism-related proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, showed differential expressions. Intriguingly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) based pathway analysis suggested that the three ethanol degradation pathways were significantly altered between Ctrl and +Arg. Western blotting and enzymatic activity assays validated that the key enzymes ADH1C, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2, which are mainly involved in ethanol degradation pathways, were highly differentially expressed, and activated between Ctrl and +Arg in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, 10 mM Arg significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by 100 mM ethanol treatment (P < 0.0001). This study is the first time to reveal that Arg activates ethanol degradation pathways in HepG2 cells. PMID:26983598

  4. Comparative Proteomics Analysis Reveals L-Arginine Activates Ethanol Degradation Pathways in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guokai; Lestari, Retno; Long, Baisheng; Fan, Qiwen; Wang, Zhichang; Guo, Xiaozhen; Yu, Jie; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xingya; Chen, Changqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Xiuzhi; Purnomoadi, Agung; Achmadi, Joelal; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    L-Arginine (Arg) is a versatile amino acid that plays crucial roles in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. In this study, to investigate the alteration induced by Arg supplementation in proteome scale, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based proteomic approach was employed to comparatively characterize the differentially expressed proteins between Arg deprivation (Ctrl) and Arg supplementation (+Arg) treated human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. A total of 21 proteins were identified as differentially expressed proteins and these 21 proteins were all up-regulated by Arg supplementation. Six amino acid metabolism-related proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, showed differential expressions. Intriguingly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) based pathway analysis suggested that the three ethanol degradation pathways were significantly altered between Ctrl and +Arg. Western blotting and enzymatic activity assays validated that the key enzymes ADH1C, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2, which are mainly involved in ethanol degradation pathways, were highly differentially expressed, and activated between Ctrl and +Arg in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, 10 mM Arg significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by 100 mM ethanol treatment (P < 0.0001). This study is the first time to reveal that Arg activates ethanol degradation pathways in HepG2 cells. PMID:26983598

  5. l-Arginine-Triggered Self-Assembly of CeO2 Nanosheaths on Palladium Nanoparticles in Water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Yibo; Song, Shuyan; Yang, Xiangguang; Wang, Zhuo; Jin, Rongchao; Zhang, Hongjie

    2016-03-24

    Pd@CeO2 core-shell nanostructures with a tunable Pd core size, shape, and nanostructure as well as a tunable CeO2 sheath thickness were obtained by a biomolecule-assisted method. The synthetic process is simple and green, as it involves only the heating of a mixture of Ce(NO3 )3 , l-arginine, and preformed Pd seeds in water without additives. Importantly, the synthesis is free of thiol groups and halide ions, thus providing a possible solution to the problem of secondary pollution by Pd nanoparticles in the sheath-coating process. The Pd/CeO2 nanostructures can be composited well with γ-Al2 O3 to create a heterogeneous catalyst. In subsequent tests of catalytic NO reduction by CO, Pd@CeO2 /Al2 O3 samples based on Pd cubes (6, 10, and 18 nm), Pd octahedra (6 nm), and Pd cuboctahedra (9 nm) as well as a simply loaded Pd cube (6 nm)-CeO2 /Al2 O3 sample were used as catalysts to investigate the effects of the Pd core size and shape and the hybrid nanostructure on the catalytic performance. PMID:26948848

  6. Scientific Understanding from Long Term Observations: Insights from the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosz, J.

    2001-12-01

    The network dedicated to Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) in the United States has grown to 24 sites since it was formed in 1980. Long-term research and monitoring are performed on parameters thatare basic to all ecosystems and are required to understand patterns, processes, and relationship to change. Collectively, the sites in the LTER Network provide opportunities to contrast marine, coastal, and continental regions, the full range of climatic gradients existing in North America, and aquatic and terrestrial habitats in a range of ecosystem types. The combination of common core areas and long-term research and monitoring in many habitats have allowed unprecedented abilities to understand and compare complex temporal and spatial dynamics associated with issues like climate change, effects of pollution, biodiversity and landuse. For example, McMurdo Dry Valley in the Antarctic has demonstrated an increase in glacier mass since 1993 which coincides with a period of cooler than normal summers and more than average snowfall. In contrast, the Bonanza Creek and Toolik Lake sites in Alaska have recorded a warming period unprecedented in the past 200 years. Nitrogen deposition effects have been identified through long-term watershed studies on biogeochemical cycles, especially at Coweeta Hydrological Lab, Harvard Forest, and the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest. In aquatic systems, such as the Northern Temperate Lakes site, long-term data revealed time lags in effects of invaders and disturbance on lake communities. Biological recovery from an effect such as lake acidification was shown to lag behind chemical recovery. The long-term changes documented over 2 decades have been instrumental in influencing management practices in many of the LTER areas. In Puerto Rico, the Luquillo LTER demonstrated that dams obstruct migrations of fish and freshwater shrimp and water abstraction at low flows can completely obliterate downstream migration of juveniles and damage estuaries below by removing all incoming freshwater. At Toolik Lake, long-term experiments of removing top predators from the good web of lakes showed dramatic alterations of lake populations of small fish and zooplankton. In New Mexico, LTER research on small mammal populations is successfully predicting rodent increases and the potential for increased zoonotic diseases such as Hantavirus and bubonic plague. This ability to forecast based on El Nino prediction is being used to increase scientific awareness and public health awareness through media based communication with the public. In Oregon, the Andrews Forest LTER program has had long, strong links with natural resource policy and management. Basic understanding of forest-stream interactions, characteristics of old-growth forests, roles of woody debris in temperate forest ecosystems, invertebrate biodiversity and ecosystem function have been incorporated in management guidelines, plans and regulations for public and private lands throughout the Pacific Northwest. Other examples of the values of long-term research and monitoring will be presented.

  7. Long-term safety and efficacy of teriflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Comi, Giancarlo; Freedman, Mark S.; Miller, Aaron E.; Kappos, Ludwig; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Mares, Jan; Benamor, Myriam; Thangavelu, Karthinathan; Liang, Jinjun; Truffinet, Philippe; Lawson, Victoria J.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report safety and efficacy outcomes from up to 9 years of treatment with teriflunomide in an extension (NCT00803049) of the pivotal phase 3 Teriflunomide Multiple Sclerosis Oral (TEMSO) trial (NCT00134563). Methods: A total of 742 patients entered the extension. Teriflunomide-treated patients continued the original dose; those previously receiving placebo were randomized 1:1 to teriflunomide 14 mg or 7 mg. Results: By June 2013, median (maximum) teriflunomide exposure exceeded 190 (325) weeks per patient; 468 patients (63%) remained on treatment. Teriflunomide was well-tolerated with continued exposure. The most common adverse events (AEs) matched those in the core study. In extension year 1, first AEs of transient liver enzyme increases or reversible hair thinning were generally attributable to patients switching from placebo to teriflunomide. Approximately 11% of patients discontinued treatment owing to AEs. Twenty percent of patients experienced serious AEs. There were 3 deaths unrelated to teriflunomide. Soon after the extension started, annualized relapse rates and gadolinium-enhancing T1 lesion counts fell in patients switching from placebo to teriflunomide, remaining low thereafter. Disability remained stable in all treatment groups (median Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≤2.5; probability of 12-week disability progression ≤0.48). Conclusions: In the TEMSO extension, safety observations were consistent with the core trial, with no new or unexpected AEs in patients receiving teriflunomide for up to 9 years. Disease activity decreased in patients switching from placebo and remained low in patients continuing on teriflunomide. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that long-term treatment with teriflunomide is well-tolerated and efficacy of teriflunomide is maintained long-term. PMID:26865517

  8. Long term observations of Saturn's northern auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Jonathan

    2011-10-01

    Auroral emissions are a vital tool in diagnosing the dynamics of planetary magnetospheres. While SaturnA?s southern UV auroras have been observed with high-sensitivity cameras onboard the Hubble Space Telescope {HST}, the northern auroras have only been observed at very oblique angles. Our understanding of SaturnA?s auroral emissions is thus only half complete. However, Saturn has now passed equinox and is moving toward summer in the northern hemisphere, such that the northern auroras are now visible from Earth, and recent results from HST have indicated that SaturnA?s northern auroras are not simply mirror images of the southern. The changing seasons are also expected to result in significant changes in magnetospheric phenomena related to the auroras. Observing these changes is a specific goal of the Cassini Solstice Mission {CSM} and, since joint HST-Cassini observations have repeatedly proved to be invaluable, CSM operations are currently being planned specifically with joint HST observations in mind. The observations proposed here will thus execute over Cycles 18-20, and will address the following science questions:What is the morphology of SaturnA?s northern auroras? Do SaturnA?s auroras change with the planetA?s season? How are the auroral emissions of different wavelengths related?The importance of long term HST observations of SaturnA?s northern auroras are highlighted by the fact that recent key discoveries would have been missed without the multiyear archive of observations of the planetA?s southern auroras. The opportunity to obtain HST images while Cassini makes specifically-tailored supporting observations is an extremely valuable opportunity, and HST is the only instrument capable of providing sustained, high time resolution observations of Saturns auroral emission.

  9. [Long-term toxicity of benorylate].

    PubMed

    Reiter, W

    1975-01-01

    A long term study was carried out to determine the possible toxic effects of therapeutic doses of a suspension of benorilate on bone marrow, liver and kidneys in 33 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 14 were male and 19 femal patients. 11 of the male and 14 of the female patients presented a positive rheumatoid factor. The duration of the treatment was first limited to 6 months. In 20 of the 33 patients duration of treatment was extended to 7 and 91/2 months. Three patients interrupted treatment after respectively 2, 3 and 5 months. Benorilate was given in a daily dosage varying from 6-8-12 g (as a suspension containing 40% benorilate). The following parameters were used to determine the effect of the drug on bone marrow: Hemoglobin, erythrocyte count, leucocyte count, thrombocyte count. Tests were done at regular intervals to determine a possible toxic effect on the kidney: urea nitrogen, uric acid, creatinine and urineanalysis were performed at regular intervals. To determine any possible hepatic toxicity, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase and prothrombin time were done at regular intervals. On the basis of the laboratory results, no toxicity could be demonstrated in bone marrow, liver and kidneys when benorilate was given in therapeutic doses for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Rare temporary abnormal laboratory values are not statistically significant and can be considered part of systemic involvement secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. The combination of the two active substances of benorilate decreases to a minimum on the one hand the above mentioned side effects and on the other potentiates the therapeutic and especially the analgetic effect. After resorption, the preparation is hydrolized in the plasma to acetylic salicylic acid and paracetamol. The hydrolysis takes place in the gastrointestinal tract which probably explains why the drug is so well tolerated. PMID:241174

  10. Long term observations of Saturn's northern auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    Auroral emissions are a vital tool in diagnosing the dynamics of planetary magnetospheres. While Saturn|*|s southern UV auroras have been observed with high-sensitivity cameras onboard the Hubble Space Telescope {HST}, the northern auroras have only been observed at very oblique angles. Our understanding of Saturn|*|s auroral emissions is thus only half complete. However, Saturn has now passed equinox and is moving toward summer in the northern hemisphere, such that the northern auroras are now visible from Earth, and recent results from HST have indicated that Saturn|*|s northern auroras are not simply mirror images of the southern. The changing seasons are also expected to result in significant changes in magnetospheric phenomena related to the auroras. Observing these changes is a specific goal of the Cassini Solstice Mission {CSM} and, since joint HST-Cassini observations have repeatedly proved to be invaluable, CSM operations are currently being planned specifically with joint HST observations in mind. The observations proposed here will thus execute over Cycles 18-20, and will address the following science questions:What is the morphology of Saturn|*|s northern auroras? Do Saturn|*|s auroras change with the planet|*|s season? How are the auroral emissions of different wavelengths related?The importance of long term HST observations of Saturn|*|s northern auroras are highlighted by the fact that recent key discoveries would have been missed without the multiyear archive of observations of the planet|*|s southern auroras. The opportunity to obtain HST images while Cassini makes specifically-tailored supporting observations is an extremely valuable opportunity, and HST is the only instrument capable of providing sustained, high time resolution observations of Saturns auroral emission.

  11. Long term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöger, Julia; Eder, Wolfgang; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Antonino, Briguglio; Carles, Ferrandes-Cañadell; Hohenegger, Johann

    2015-04-01

    Benthic Foraminifera are used in a variety of applications employing numerous different methods, i.e. ecological monitoring, studying the effects of ocean acidification, reconstructing palaeo-bathymetry or investigating palaeo-salinity and palaeo-temperature to name only a few. To refine our understanding of ecological influences on larger benthic foraminiferal biology and to review inferences from field observations, culture experiments have become an indispensable tool. While culture experiments on smaller benthic foraminifera have become increasingly frequent in the past century, reports of the cultivation of symbiont bearing larger Foraminifera are rare. Generally, cultivation experiments can be divided into two groups: Culturing of populations and cultivation of single specimens allowing individual investigation. The latter differ form the former by several restrictions resulting from the need to limit individual motility without abridging microenvironmental conditions in the Foraminiferans artificial habitat, necessary to enable the individual to development as unfettered as possible. In this study we present first experiences and preliminary results of the long-term cultivation of larger benthic Foraminifera conducted at the 'Tropical Biosphere Research Station Sesoko Island, University of the Ryukyus', Japan, trying to reproduce natural conditions as closely as possible. Individuals of three species of larger benthic Foraminifera (Heterostegina depressa, Palaeonummulites venosus and Operculina complanata) have been cultured since April 2014. At the time of the general assembly the cultivation experiments will have been going on for more than one year, with the aim to investigate growth rates, longevities and reproduction strategies for comparison with results statistically inferred from application of the of the 'natural laboratory' method. The most important factor influencing foraminiferal health and development was found to be light intensity and light spectrum. The light intensities reaching the Foraminifera in cultivation however largely depend on the substrate provided (e.g. sand and silt where individuals dig close to the surface or coral rubble used as shelter by the Foraminiferans and as an easy way of retaining the organisms within a designated container by the investigator).

  12. LONG TERM IN SITU DISPOSAL ENGINEERING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS; CARLSON; BROCKMAN

    2003-07-23

    Patent application pulled per Ken Norris (FH General Counsel). The objective of this study is to devise methods, produce conceptual designs, examine and select alternatives, and estimate costs for the demonstration of long-term (300-year) in situ disposal of an existing waste disposal site. The demonstration site selected is the 216-A-24 Crib near the 200 East Area. The site contains a fission product inventory and has experienced plant, animal, and inadvertent than intrusion. Of the potential intrusive events and transport pathways at the site, potential human intrusion has been given primary consideration in barrier design. Intrusion by wind, plants, and animals has been given secondary consideration. Groundwater modeling for a number of barrier configurations has been carried out to help select a barrier that will minimize water infiltration and waste/water contact time. The estimated effective lifetime and cost of 20 barrier schemes, using a variety of materials, have been evaluated. The schemes studied include single component surface barriers, multicomponent barriers, and massively injected grout barriers. Five barriers with high estimated effective lifetimes and relatively low costs have been selected for detailed evaluation. They are basalt riprap barriers, massive soil barriers, salt basin barriers, multi-component fine/coarse barriers, and cemented basalt barriers. A variety of materials and configurations for marking the site have also been considered. A decision analysis was completed to select a barrier scheme for demonstration. The analysis indicated that the basalt riprap alternative would be the preferred choice for a full-scale demonstration. The recommended approach is to demonstrate the basalt riprap barrier at the 216-A-24 Crib as soon as possible. Methods and costs of assessing effectiveness of the demonstration are also described. Preliminary design modifications and costs for applying the five selected barrier schemes to other site types are also presented.

  13. A new long-term care manifesto.

    PubMed

    Kane, Robert L

    2015-04-01

    This article argues for a fresh look at how we provide long-term care (LTC) for older persons. Essentially, LTC offers a compensatory service that responds to frailty. Policy debate around LTC centers on costs, but we are paying for something we really don't want. Building societal enthusiasm (or even support) for LTC will require re-inventing and re-branding. LTC has three basic components: personal care, housing, and health care (primarily chronic disease management). They can be delivered in a variety of settings. It is rare to find all three done well simultaneously. Personal care (PC) needs to be both competent and compassionate. Housing must provide at least minimal amenities and foster autonomy; when travel time for PC raises costs dramatically, some form of clustered housing may be needed. Health care must be proactive, aimed at preventing exacerbations of chronic disease and resultant hospitalizations. Enhancing preferences means allowing taking informed risks. Payment incentives should reward both quality of care and quality of life, but positive outcomes must be defined as slowing decline. Paying for services but not for housing under Medicaid would automatically level the playing field between nursing homes (NH) and community-based services. Regulations should achieve greater parity between NH and community care and include both positive and negative feedback. Providing post-acute care should be separate from LTC. Using the tripartite LTC framework, we can create innovative flexible approaches to providing needed services for frail older persons in formats that are both desirable and affordable. Such care will be more socially desirable and hence worth paying for. PMID:26035606

  14. Modeling Maintenance of Long-Term Potentiation in Clustered Synapses: Long-Term Memory without Bistability

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Memories are stored, at least partly, as patterns of strong synapses. Given molecular turnover, how can synapses maintain strong for the years that memories can persist? Some models postulate that biochemical bistability maintains strong synapses. However, bistability should give a bimodal distribution of synaptic strength or weight, whereas current data show unimodal distributions for weights and for a correlated variable, dendritic spine volume. Thus it is important for models to simulate both unimodal distributions and long-term memory persistence. Here a model is developed that connects ongoing, competing processes of synaptic growth and weakening to stochastic processes of receptor insertion and removal in dendritic spines. The model simulates long-term (>1?yr) persistence of groups of strong synapses. A unimodal weight distribution results. For stability of this distribution it proved essential to incorporate resource competition between synapses organized into small clusters. With competition, these clusters are stable for years. These simulations concur with recent data to support the clustered plasticity hypothesis which suggests clusters, rather than single synaptic contacts, may be a fundamental unit for storage of long-term memory. The model makes empirical predictions and may provide a framework to investigate mechanisms maintaining the balance between synaptic plasticity and stability of memory. PMID:25945261

  15. Long Term Administration of Endothelin Receptor Antagonist Improves Coronary Endothelial Function in Patients with Early Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Reriani, Martin; Raichlin, Eugenia; Prasad, Abhiram; Mathew, Verghese; Pumper, Geralyn M.; Nelson, Rebecca E.; Lennon, Ryan; Rihal, Charanjit; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Background Endothelin (ET-1) is one of the most potent vasoconstrictors, and plays a seminal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that long term treatment with an endothelin-A (ETA) receptor antagonist improves coronary endothelial function in patients with early coronary atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Forty seven patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, nonobstructive coronary artery disease and coronary endothelial dysfunction were randomized in a double-blind manner to either the ETA receptor antagonist Atrasentan (10mg) or placebo for six months. Coronary endothelium-dependent vasodilation was examined by infusing acetylcholine (ACh10−6 ml/L to 10−4 mol/L) in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) was administered to a sub group of patients. Endothelium independent coronary flow reserve (CFR) was examined using intracoronary adenosine and nitroglycerin. Baseline characteristics and incidence of adverse effects were similar between the two groups. There was a significant improvement in percent change of coronary blood flow (% Δ CBF) in response to ACh at six months from baseline in the Atrasentan group as compared to the placebo group (39.67 % (23.23, 68.21) vs.−2.22 % (−27.37, 15.28), P<0.001). No significant difference in the percent change of coronary artery diameter or change in coronary flow reserve (Δ CFR) was demonstrated. CBF, coronary artery diameter and the effect of L-NMMA were similar between the groups at baseline and at six months. Conclusion This study demonstrates that six month treatment with Atrasentan improves coronary microvascular endothelial function and support the role of the endogenous endothelin system in the regulation of endothelial function in early atherosclerosis in humans. PMID:20733096

  16. Nitric Oxide Is Associated with Long-Term Zinc Tolerance in Solanum nigrum1[W

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Yin, Hengxia; Li, Yulong; Liu, Xiaojing

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been identified as a signal molecule that interplays with reactive oxygen species in response to heavy metal stresses. Roles of NO in regulating cadmium toxicity and iron deficiency have been proposed; however, the function of NO in zinc (Zn) tolerance in plants remains unclear. Here, we investigated NO accumulation and its role in plant Zn tolerance. Zn-induced NO production promoted an increase in reactive oxygen species accumulation in Solanum nigrum roots by modulating the expression and activity of antioxidative enzymes. Subsequently, programmed cell death (PCD) was observed in primary root tips. Inhibiting NO accumulation by 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (a specific NO scavenger) or NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyl ester (a NO synthase inhibitor) prevented the increase of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide as well as the subsequent cell death in the root tips, supporting the role of NO in Zn-induced PCD in the root tips. Zn-induced NO production affected the length of primary roots, the number of lateral roots, and root hair growth and thereby modulated root system architecture and activity. Investigation of metal contents in Zn-treated roots suggests that NO is required for metal (especially iron) uptake and homeostasis in plants exposed to excess Zn. Taken together, our results indicate that NO production and the subsequent PCD in root tips exposed to excess Zn are favorable for the S. nigrum seedling response to long-term Zn toxicity by modulating root system architecture and subsequent adaptation to Zn stress. PMID:20855519

  17. Synthesis of a novel Fmoc-protected nucleoaminoacid for the solid phase assembly of 4-piperidyl glycine/L-arginine-containing nucleopeptides and preliminary RNA: interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Roviello, Giovanni N; Crescenzo, Claudia; Capasso, Domenica; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Franco, Simona; Bucci, Enrico M; Pedone, Carlo

    2010-08-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis of a novel Fmoc-protected nucleoaminoacid, based on 4-piperidinyl glycine, carrying the DNA nucleobase on the secondary amino group, suitable for the solid-phase synthesis of nucleopeptides. After ESI-MS and NMR characterization this building block was used for the assembly of a thymine-functionalized tetrapeptide, composed of 4-piperidinyl glycine and L-arginine moieties alternated in the backbone. The ability to interact with RNA and the efficiency in interfering with the reverse transcription of eukaryotic mRNA of the novel nucleo-tetrapeptide found in this study are in favour of the employment of chiral nucleopeptides based on alternate 4-piperidinyl glycine/L-arginine backbone in biomedicine. PMID:20204432

  18. Control of utilization of L-arginine, L-ornithine, agmatine, and putrescine as nitrogen sources in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Shaibe, E; Metzer, E; Halpern, Y S

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of the synthesis of the enzymes involved in the utilization of L-arginine, L-ornithine, agmatine, and putrescine as a sole nitrogen source in Escherichia coli K-12 was examined. The synthesis of agmatine ureohydrolase, putrescine aminotransferase, and pyrroline dehydrogenase is dually controlled by catabolite repression and nitrogen availability. Catabolite repression of agmatine ureohydrolase, but not that of putrescine aminotransferase or pyrroline dehydrogenase, is relieved by the addition of cAMP. Agmatine ureohydrolase synthesis in addition is subject to induction by L-arginine and agmatine. Arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase synthesis is not sensitive to catabolite repression or to stimulation by nitrogen limitation or subject to substrate induction. PMID:3897202

  19. Amphoteric, prevailingly cationic L-arginine polymers of poly(amidoamino acid) structure: synthesis, acid/base properties and preliminary cytocompatibility and cell-permeating characterizations.

    PubMed

    Ferruti, Paolo; Mauro, Nicol; Falciola, Luigi; Pifferi, Valentina; Bartoli, Cristina; Gazzarri, Matteo; Chiellini, Federica; Ranucci, Elisabetta

    2014-03-01

    A linear amphoteric poly(amidoamino acid), L-ARGO7, is prepared by Michael-type polyaddition of L-arginine with N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide. Chain-extension of acrylamide end-capped L-ARGO7 oligomers with piperazine leads to high-molecular-weight copolymers in which L-arginine maintains its absolute configuration. Acid/base properties of L-ARGO7 polymers show isolectric points of ? 10 and positive net average charges per repeating unit at pH = 7.4 from 0.25 to 0.40. These arginine-rich synthetic polymers possibly share some of the unique biological properties of polyarginine cell-permeating peptides. In vitro tests with mouse embryo fibroblasts balb/3T3 clone A31 show that L-ARGO7 polymers are endowed with effective cell internalization ability combined with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:24821667

  20. Long-Term Mortality Trends Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the National Cancer Institute 10-year Mortality Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent of Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Liver & IBD: 2.6*, Soft Tissue inc. Heart: 0.8*, Pancreas: 0.3*, Melanoma: 0.3*, Bladder: 0, Brain & ONS: -0.4, Oral Cavity: -0.5, Esophagus: -0.5*, Kidney: -0.8*, Leukemia: -0.9*, Myeloma: -1.1*, All Sites: -1.8*, Non Hodgkin Lymphoma: -2.3*, Larynx: -2.5*, Lung and Bronchus: -2.6*, Colon and Rectum: -3.9*, Stomach: -3.1*, and Prostate: -3.3*. For Women, Liver & IBD: 1.9*, Corpus & Uterus: 1.0*, Pancreas: 0.4*, Bladder: -0.4*, Kidney: -0.9*, Brain & ONS: -0.9*, Leukemia: -1.1*, Gallbladder: -1.2*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.2*, Cervix: -1.3*, All Sites: -1.4*, Esophagus: -1.5*, Myeloma: -1.6*, Breast: -1.9*, Oral Cavity: -2.0*, Ovary: -2.0*, Stomach: -2.7*, Colon & Rectum: -2.9*, and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -3.1*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011

  1. Comparative study on the protective role of vitamin C and L-arginine in experimental renal ischemia reperfusion in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Abd El-Hamid A; Lasheen, Noha N

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury is a main cause of transplanted kidney dysfunction and rejection. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a causal role in cellular damage induced by I/R. Antioxidant vitamins and Nitric oxide (NO) were postulated to play renoprotective effects against I/R. This study compares the protective effects of vitamin C with that of the nitric oxide donor, L-arginine, on renal I/R injury in adult rats. The study was performed on 50 adult Wistar rats of both sexes, divided into 5 groups: I: Control group, receive daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) saline for 3 days. II: Renal I/R group, received i.p saline for 3 days and subjected to renal I/R. III: L-arginine Pretreated, 400 mg/kg/day i.p. for 3 days prior to I/R. IV: Vitamin C Pretreated, 500 mg/kg/day i.p. 24 hours prior to I/R. V: combined L-arginine and Vitamin C Pretreated, exposed to Renal I/R group. At the end of the experiment, plasma urea and creatinine were determined. Kidney tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), NO, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured and kidneys were examined histologically. Results: I/R group showed significant increase in plasma urea, creatinine, and renal MDA, and a significant decrease in renal catalase with marked necrotic epithelial cells and infiltration by inflammatory cells in kidney section compared to the control group. All the treated groups showed significant decrease in urea, creatinine, and MDA, and a significant increase in catalase with less histopathological changes in kidney sections compared to I/R group. However, significant improvements in urea, MDA, and catalase were found in vitamin C pretreated and combined treated groups than L-arginine pretreated group. Conclusion: Oxidative stress is the primary element involved in renal I/R injury. So, antioxidants play an important renoprotective effects than NO donors. PMID:25349638

  2. Fabrication of a biodegradable polysaccharide hydrogel with riboflavin, vitamin B2, as a photo-initiator and L-arginine as coinitiator upon UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sin-Hee; Chu, Chih-Chang

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a completely natural material based photo-initiation system for fabricating biologically compatible hydrogels, that is, free of any synthetic materials like conventional synthetic photo-initiators. The resulting biodegradable hydrogels would be completely free of conventional toxic synthetic substances. Dextran-based precursor was used as a model system for this study. The natural material based photo-initiation system used riboflavin (vitamin B2) as photo-initiator and L-arginine as a coinitiator. Dextran-methacrylate precursor was prepared to introduce photosensitive unsaturated moieties into dextran for subsequent photo-induced gel formation. Riboflavin alone could not initiate the photo-crosslinking reaction of the dextran methacrylate solution upon UV irradiation. L-arginine, which can act as an electron donor in the photo-initiation process, was used as a coinitiator. The optimum gel formulation conditions in terms of the concentrations of riboflavin and L-arginine as well as different pH media were extensively investigated. The dextran-methacrylate hydrogels were formed well and fast at low riboflavin concentration range (0.2-1 wt %), and L-arginine promoted the photo-initiation at all concentrations. The gelation was promoted most in the neutral pH and the least in the alkaline pH. The turbidity of the dextran-methacrylate hydrogel precursor solution affected the polymerization because UV penetration was significantly hindered as the opacity of the solution increased. The swelling property and structural visualization of the prepared hydrogels were also investigated. PMID:19517533

  3. Analysis of L-citrulline and L-arginine in Ficus deltoidea leaf extracts by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Shafaei, Armaghan; Aisha, Abdalrahim F. A.; Siddiqui, Mohammad Jamshed Ahmad; Ismail, Zhari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ficus deltoidea (FD) is one of the native plants widely distributed in several countries in Southeast Asia. Previous studies have shown that FD leaf possess antinociceptive, wound healing and antioxidant properties. These beneficial effects have been attributed to the presence of primary and secondary metabolites such as polyphenols, amino acids and flavonoids. Objective: The aim was to develop a reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography method with ultraviolet detection that involves precolumn derivatisation with O-phthaladehyde for simultaneous analysis of two amino acids L-citrulline and L-arginine in FD leaf extracts. Materials and Methods: An isocratic elution program consisting of methanol: acetonitrile: Water at 45:45:10 v/v (solvent A) and 0.1 M phosphate buffer pH 7.5 (solvent B) at A: B v/v ratio of 80:20 on Zorbax Eclipse C18 SB-Aq column (250 4.6 mm, 5 ?m) were used. The flow rate was set at 1 ml/min and detection was carried out at 338 nm with 30 min separation time. Results: Good linearity for L-citrulline and L-arginine was obtained in the range 0.1-1000 ?g/ml at R2 ? 0.998. The limit of detection and limit of quantification values for both L-citrulline and L-arginine were 1 and 5 ?g/ml, respectively. The average of recoveries was in the range 94.94-101.95%, with relative standard deviation (%RSD) less than 3%. Intra- and inter-day precision was in the range 96.36-102.43% with RSD less than 2%. Conclusion: All validation parameters of the developed method indicate the method is reliable and efficient for simultaneous determination of L-citrulline and L-arginine for routine analysis of FD. PMID:25598632

  4. A comparative study on pure, L-arginine and glycine doped ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate single crystals grown by slow solvent evaporation and temperature-gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaboonmee, N.; Ramasamy, P.; Yimnirun, R.; Manyum, P.

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of pure, L-arginine and glycine doped ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate (ADP) were grown by both the slow solvent evaporation method and the temperature-gradient method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR). The metastable zone width for different saturation temperatures of pure glycine and L-arginine added solutions were carried out. The grown crystals were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical transmission, dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and Vickers microhardness. The DSC and TG curves of the grown crystals indicated that they were stable up to 200 C. The XRD study confirmed the structure of the grown crystal. The optical transmission analysis revealed that the pure and doped ADP crystals had very high percentage of transmission in the entire visible region. The important optical parameters such as reflectance and extinction coefficients of the grown crystals were calculated. L-arginine and glycine were used as dopants to reduce dielectric constant of ADP. The a.c. resistivity and a.c. conductivity were calculated. Dielectric loss of the doped ADP crystals grown by the SR method is lower than the doped ADP crystals grown by the conventional method. Larger hardness value for the SR method grown crystals confirmed greater crystalline perfection.

  5. Structure-based molecular design for thermostabilization of N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 involved in a novel pathway of l-arginine synthesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nasuno, Ryo; Hirase, Saeka; Norifune, Saki; Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Previously, N-Acetyltransferase Mpr1 was suggested to be involved in a novel pathway of l-arginine biosynthesis in yeast. Our recent crystallographic analysis demonstrated that the overall structure of Mpr1 is a typical folding among proteins in the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily, and also provided clues to the design of mutations for improvement of the enzymatic functions. Here, we constructed new stable variants, Asn203Lys- and Asn203Arg-Mpr1, which exhibited 2.4-fold and 2.2-fold longer activity half-lives than wild-type Mpr1, respectively, by structure-based molecular design. The replacement of Asn203 with a basic amino acid was suggested to stabilize ?-helix 2, which is important for the Mpr1 structure, probably by neutralizing its dipole. In addition, the combination of two amino acid substitutions at positions 65 and 203 in Mpr1, Phe65Leu, which was previously isolated by the screening from PCR random mutagenesis library of MPR1, and Asn203Lys or Asn203Arg, led to further stabilization of Mpr1. Our growth assay suggests that overexpression of the stable Mpr1 variants increase l-arginine synthesis in yeast cells. Our finding is the first report on the rational engineering of Mpr1 for thermostabilization and could be useful in the construction of new yeast strains with higher l-arginine synthetic activity and also improved fermentation ability. PMID:26454877

  6. Inhibition of hypoxia-induced relaxation of rabbit isolated coronary arteries by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine but not glibenclamide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, C; Collins, P

    1994-03-01

    1. The effects of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, tetrodotoxin and glibenclamide on hypoxia-induced coronary artery relaxation, induced by bubbling Krebs solution with 95% N2 and 5% CO2 instead of 95% O2 and 5% CO2, were assessed by measuring the changes in isometric tension in isolated epicardial coronary artery rings of the rabbit. In addition, the effects of glibenclamide on the relaxation induced by adenosine were investigated. 2. Hypoxia caused a transient relaxation of 38 +/- 3% (P < 0.01) and 17 +/- 2% (P < 0.01) in endothelium-intact or -denuded arteries respectively. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (30 and 100 microM) inhibited the relaxation in endothelium-intact rings to 31 +/- 2% (P < 0.05) and 16 +/- 2% (P < 0.01) respectively and slightly but significantly attenuated the relaxation in endothelium-denuded rings to 15 +/- 1% and 13 +/- 1% (P < 0.05) respectively. 3. Glibenclamide, a potassium channel inhibitor, did not significantly after the hypoxia-induced relaxation. 4. Incubation with tetrodotoxin (3 and 10 microM) for 30 min reduced the relaxation to 31 +/- 3% (P < 0.05) and 14 +/- 2% (P < 0.01), and 14 +/- 2% (P < 0.05) and 11 +/- 1% (P < 0.05) in endothelium-intact and -denuded rings respectively. However, indomethacin (10 microM), atropine (1 microM), propranolol (10 microM) and phentolamine (10 microM) did not significantly affect the relaxation. 5. Adenosine (1, 10 and 100 MicroM) caused relaxation of 6 +/- 1%, 52 +/-3% and 97 +/-2% respectively in endothelium-denuded rings precontracted with prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2 alpha, 3 MicroM) and the relaxation was markedly inhibited by 8-phenyltheophylline. Furthermore, glibenclamide (1 and 10 MicroM) reduced the relaxation induced by adenosine (1, 10 and 100 MicroM) to 2 +/-1% (P<0.05), 38 =/-3% (P<0.05) and 85 +/-2%(P<0.05), and 0.6 +/- 0.4% (P<0.05), 27 +/- 4% (P<0.05) and 72 +/- 4% (P<0.01) respectively, in these endothelium-denuded preparations.6. These data suggest that hypoxia-induced relaxation is mediated by the release of nitric oxide rather than by the activation of glibenclamide-sensitive potassium channels in rabbit isolated coronary arteries. A neurogenic mechanism partially modulates the relaxation, possibly by activating non-adrenergic and noncholinergic nerve endings. The inhibition by glibenclamide on adenosine-induced relaxation in isolated coronary arteries may help to explain the fact that glibenclamide inhibits hypoxic coronary relaxation in perfused hearts but not in isolated coronary preparations. PMID:8019749

  7. Long-term ozone monitoring from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Johnson, J.; Serafino, G.; McPeters, R.

    Global monitoring of ozone is important since ozone shields the biosphere from the harmful effects of solar radiation by absorbing the ultraviolet radiation below 320 nanometers (UV-B wavelength regions). By absorbing UV, visible, and infrared radiation, ozone also heats the stratosphere and affects the circulation of air masses and dynamics of the upper atmosphere. Ozone also plays an important role in the chemical cycles of the other trace gases. In the last two decades a number of sensors have been flown on satellites to monitor ozone from space. Daily global ozone maps of total column ozone were obtained from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments flown on the Nimbus-7, Meteor-3, Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) and Earth Probe (EP) satellites, and from the Global Ozone Monitoring experiment (GOME) onboard the second European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-2). The high quality measurements of the first TOMS instrument (flown on Nimbus-7 in 1978) played an instrumental role in the detection of a small but steady ozone decline since the early 1980s. This has led to investigation of the cause of ozone depletion in an effort to quantify how much of this could be attributed to human made processes as opposed to natural processes. The significance of this issue was underscored by the signing of the Montreal Protocol in 1987 restricting the production of ozone destroying chemicals. Furthermore, in September 1991, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was launched containing a comprehensive suite of instruments designed to collectively determine the impact of chemical, dynamic and energy input processes on ozone creation and destruction. The continuity of ozone, other trace species, and solar UV measurements will be provided with the launch of the Aura spacecraft in early 2004. Standard ozone products from a series of TOMS missions, UARS sensors, Nimbus-4 Backscatter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (BUV), and Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (SBUV), are archived at the Goddard DAAC and are freely available to the public. Standard products from TOMS include daily global total ozone and effective UV reflectivity of the earth-atmosphere system. Data products from future upper atmospheric research missions, e.g., the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) aboard Aura, will also be archived at the Goddard DAAC. For ozone trend analysis, a long-term data set consisting of over twenty years of ozone measurements from space and some value added research products have been produced by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scientists (Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Branch/ Code 916) and are made available to the research community (http://code916.gsfc.nasa.gov). Examples of some of these research products are:1) daily erythermal UV exposure -estimates of harmful UV-B radiation at the surface, 2) an index to track the global transport of ash and sulfur dioxide resulting from volcanic eruptions, 3) another index to track smoke emanating from large fires and dust plumes originating from desert regions, 4) aerosol optical depth, 5) tropospheric ozone obtained from cloud-slicing techniques, and 6) a merged total ozone data product consisting of monthly mean ozone merged from six satellite instruments. The Upper Atmospheric Data Support Team has been providing science and data support to assist users in accessing and using the upper atmospheric data products. A number of tools for data access, subsetting, reprojection and mapping of orbital (Level-2) products, visualization of global gridded (Level-3) products, and data analysis have been developed at the Goddard DAAC and are freely available to the data user (http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov) This presentation will provide highlights of the standard and value-added ozone and ancillary products, and the data services provided by the DAAC Upper Atmosphere Data Support Team.

  8. Long-term Ozone monitoring from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Johnson, J.; Serafino, G.; McPeters, R.

    Global monitoring of ozone is important since ozone shields the biosphere from the harmful effects of solar radiation by absorbing the ultraviolet radiation below 320 nanometers (UV-B wavelength regions). By absorbing UV, visible, and infrared radiation, ozone also heats the stratosphere and affects the circulation of air masses and dynamics of the upper atmosphere. Ozone also plays an important role in the chemical cycles of the other trace gases. In the last two decades a number of sensors have been flown on satellites to monitor ozone from space. Daily global ozone maps of total column ozone were obtained from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments flown on the Nimbus-7, Meteor-3, Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) and Earth Probe (EP) satellites, and from the Global Ozone Monitoring experiment (GOME) onboard the second European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-2). The high quality measurements of the first TOMS instrument (flown on Nimbus-7 in 1978) played an instrumental role in the detection of a small but steady ozone decline since the early 1980s. This has led to investigation of the cause of ozone depletion in an effort to quantify how much of this could be attributed to human made processes as opposed to natural processes. The significance of this issue was underscored by the signing of the Montreal Protocol in 1987 restricting the production of ozone destroying chemicals. Furthermore, in September 1991, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was launched containing a comprehensive suite of instruments designed to collectively determine the impact of chemical, dynamic and energy input processes on ozone creation and destruction. The continuity of ozone, other trace species, and solar UV measurements will be provided with the launch of the Aura spacecraft in early 2004. Standard ozone products from a series of TOMS missions, UARS sensors, Nimbus-4 Backscatter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (BUV), and Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (SBUV), are archived at the Goddard DAAC and are freely available to the public. Standard products from TOMS include daily global total ozone and effective UV reflectivity of the earth-atmosphere system. Data products from future upper atmospheric research missions, e.g., the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) aboard Aura, will also be archived at the Goddard DAAC. For ozone trend analysis, a long-term data set consisting of over twenty years of ozone measurements from space and some value added research products have been produced by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scientists (Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Branch/ Code 916) and are made available to the research community (http://code916.gsfc.nasa.gov). Examples of some of these research products are:1) daily erythermal UV exposure -estimates of harmful UV-B radiation at the surface, 2) an index to track the global transport of ash and sulfur dioxide resulting from volcanic eruptions, 3) another index to track smoke emanating from large fires and dust plumes originating from desert regions, 4) aerosol optical depth, 5) tropospheric ozone obtained from cloud-slicing techniques, and 6) a merged total ozone data product consisting of monthly mean ozone merged from six satellite instruments. The Upper Atmospheric Data Support Team has been providing science and data support to assist users in accessing and using the upper atmospheric data products. A number of tools for data access, subsetting, reprojection and mapping of orbital (Level-2) products, visualization of global gridded (Level-3) products, and data analysis have been developed at the Goddard DAAC and are freely available to the data user (http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov) This presentation will provide highlights of the standard and value-added ozone and ancillary products, and the data services provided by the DAAC Upper Atmosphere Data Support Team.

  9. Cardiovascular Action of Insulin in Health and Disease: Endothelial L-Arginine Transport and Cardiac Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Dubó, Sebastián; Gallegos, David; Cabrera, Lissette; Sobrevia, Luis; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure, and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1) is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involves increases in hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus. This generates a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval, which is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. Impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K(+) (Ito) and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur) currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5) or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP) of K(+) channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular system and in cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:27014078

  10. Cardiovascular Action of Insulin in Health and Disease: Endothelial L-Arginine Transport and Cardiac Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dubó, Sebastián; Gallegos, David; Cabrera, Lissette; Sobrevia, Luis; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure, and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1) is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involves increases in hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus. This generates a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval, which is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. Impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K+ (Ito) and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur) currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5) or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP) of K+ channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular system and in cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:27014078

  11. The effect of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester on cocaine-induced hormonal changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Budziszewska, B; Le?kiewicz, M; Jaworska-Feil, L; Laso?, W

    1998-01-01

    Effects of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-nitroL-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 30 mg/kg i.p.), on cocaine-induced changes in corticosterone and testosterone plasma levels were studied in male mice. Acute (30 mg/kg i.p.) and repeated cocaine (30 mg/kg i.p., twice a day for four days) enhanced the corticosterone level after 45 min and 2 hr, respectively. Single administration of L-NAME had no effect on corticosterone level, whereas its repeated injections (30 mg/kg i.p., twice a day for four days) elevated the hormone concentration at 2 hr after the last dose. Pretreatment of mice with L-NAME enhanced the stimulatory effects of both acute and repeated cocaine on corticosterone level. D-NAME (30 mg/kg i.p.), an inactive form of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, was without effect on the cocaine-induced changes in corticosterone level. Acute cocaine administration (30 mg/kg) moderately decreased the testosterone plasma level after 45 min and 2 hr; however, that effect disappeared upon repeated cocaine administration. Single and repeated L-NAME administration did not influence the testosterone level in control animals. Single L-NAME injection abolished the decrease in testosterone level evoked by acute cocaine administration. The above results show that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase enhances the stimulatory effect of cocaine on corticosterone secretion, but abolishes the inhibitory effect of this psychostimulant on the plasma testosterone concentration in mice. On the other hand, a weak--if any--effect of L-NAME alone on corticosterone and testosterone levels suggests that nitric oxide plays a minor role in the tonic regulation of these hormones' secretion. PMID:9792468

  12. L-Arginine depletion blunts anti-tumor T cell responses by inducing myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Matthew; Ramirez, Maria E.; Sierra, Rosa A.; Raber, Patrick; Thevenot, Paul; Al-Khami, Amir A.; Sanchez-Pino, Dulfary; Hernandez, Claudia; Wyczechowska, Dorota D.; Ochoa, Augusto C.; Rodriguez, Paulo C.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic depletion of the non-essential amino acid L-Arginine (L-Arg) in cancer patients by the administration of a pegylated form of the catabolic enzyme arginase I (peg-Arg I) has shown some promise as a therapeutic approach. However, L-Arg deprivation also suppresses T-cell responses in tumors. In this study, we sought to reconcile these observations by conducting a detailed analysis of the effects of peg-Arg I on normal T-cells. Strikingly, we found that peg-Arg I blocked proliferation and cell cycle progression in normal activated T-cells without triggering apoptosis or blunting T-cell activation. These effects were associated with an inhibition of aerobic glycolysis in activated T-cells, but not with significant alterations in mitochondrial oxidative respiration, which thereby regulated survival of T-cells exposed to peg-Arg I. Further mechanistic investigations showed that addition of citrulline, a metabolic precursor for L-Arg, rescued the anti-proliferative effects of peg-Arg I on T-cells in vitro. Moreover, serum levels of citrulline increased after in vivo administration of peg-Arg I. In support of the hypothesis that peg-Arg I acted indirectly to block T-cell responses in vivo, peg-Arg I inhibited T-cell proliferation in mice by inducing accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). MDSC induction by peg-Arg I occurred through the general control non-repressed-2 eIF2? kinase. Moreover, we found that peg-Arg I enhanced the growth of tumors in mice in a manner that correlated with higher MDSC numbers. Taken together, our results highlight the risks of the L-Arg-depleting therapy for cancer treatment and suggest a need for co-targeting MDSC in such therapeutic settings. PMID:25406192

  13. Treatment with the arginase inhibitor Nw-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine restores endothelial function in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endothelial dysfunction (ED) participates to atherogenesis associated to rheumatoid arthritis. We recently reported increased arginase activity/expression in vessels from adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a curative treatment with the arginase inhibitor Nw-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) on vascular dysfunction in AIA rats. Methods AIA rats were treated with nor-NOHA (40 mg/kg/d, ip) for 21 days after the onset of arthritis. A group of untreated AIA rats and a group of healthy rats served as controls. ED was assessed by the vasodilatory effect of acetylcholine (Ach) on aortic rings. The role of superoxide anions, prostanoids, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) pathway was studied. Plasma levels of IL-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined by ELISA kits. Arthritis severity was estimated by a clinical, radiological and histological analysis. Results Nor-NOHA treatment fully restored the aortic response to Ach to that of healthy controls. The results showed that this beneficial effect is mediated by an increase in NOS activity and EDHF and reduced superoxide anion production as well as a decrease in the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, thromboxane and prostacyclins synthases. In addition, nor-NOHA decreased IL-6 and VEGF plasma levels in AIA rats. By contrast, the treatment did not modify arthritis severity in AIA rats. Conclusions The treatment with an arginase inhibitor has a potent effect on ED in AIA independently of the severity of the disease. Our results suggest that this new pharmacological approach has the potential as a novel add-on therapy in the treatment of RA. PMID:22647483

  14. GPRC6A Mediates the Effects of l-Arginine on Insulin Secretion in Mouse Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yunpeng; Lenchik, Nataliya I; Gerling, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine (l-Arg) is an insulin secretagogue, but the molecular mechanism whereby it stimulates insulin secretion from ?-cells is not known. The possibility that l-Arg regulates insulin secretion through a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated mechanism is suggested by the high expression of the nutrient receptor GPCR family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A) in the pancreas and TC-6 ?-cells and the finding that Gprc6a?/]minus] mice have abnormalities in glucose homeostasis. To test the direct role of GPRC6A in regulating insulin secretion, we evaluated the response of pancreatic islets derived from Gprc6a?/]minus] mice to l-Arg. We found that the islet size and insulin content were decreased in pancreatic islets from Gprac6a?/]minus] mice. These alterations were selective for ?-cells, because there were no abnormalities in serum glucagon levels or glucagon content of islets derived from Gprac6a?/]minus] mice. Significant reduction was observed in both the pancreatic ERK response to l-Arg administration to Gprc6a?/]minus] mice in vivo and l-Arg-induced insulin secretion and production ex vivo in islets isolated from Gprc6a?/]minus] mice. l-Arg stimulation of cAMP accumulation in isolated islets isolated from Gprc6a?/]minus] mice was also diminished. These findings suggest that l-Arg stimulation of insulin secretion in ?-cells is mediated, at least in part, through GPRC6A activation of cAMP pathways. PMID:22872579

  15. GPRC6A mediates the effects of L-arginine on insulin secretion in mouse pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Pi, Min; Wu, Yunpeng; Lenchik, Nataliya I; Gerling, Ivan; Quarles, L Darryl

    2012-10-01

    L-arginine (l-Arg) is an insulin secretagogue, but the molecular mechanism whereby it stimulates insulin secretion from ?-cells is not known. The possibility that l-Arg regulates insulin secretion through a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated mechanism is suggested by the high expression of the nutrient receptor GPCR family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A) in the pancreas and TC-6 ?-cells and the finding that Gprc6a(-/]minus]) mice have abnormalities in glucose homeostasis. To test the direct role of GPRC6A in regulating insulin secretion, we evaluated the response of pancreatic islets derived from Gprc6a(-/]minus]) mice to L-Arg. We found that the islet size and insulin content were decreased in pancreatic islets from Gprac6a(-/]minus]) mice. These alterations were selective for ?-cells, because there were no abnormalities in serum glucagon levels or glucagon content of islets derived from Gprac6a(-/]minus]) mice. Significant reduction was observed in both the pancreatic ERK response to L-Arg administration to Gprc6a(-/]minus]) mice in vivo and L-Arg-induced insulin secretion and production ex vivo in islets isolated from Gprc6a(-/]minus]) mice. L-Arg stimulation of cAMP accumulation in isolated islets isolated from Gprc6a(-/]minus]) mice was also diminished. These findings suggest that l-Arg stimulation of insulin secretion in ?-cells is mediated, at least in part, through GPRC6A activation of cAMP pathways. PMID:22872579

  16. Diagnosis, management, and long-term outcomes of rectovaginal endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Moawad, Nash S; Caplin, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Rectovaginal endometriosis is the most severe form of endometriosis. Clinically, it presents with a number of symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, deep dyspareunia, dyschezia, and rectal bleeding. The gold standard for diagnosis is laparoscopy with histological confirmation; however, there are a number of options for presurgical diagnosis, including clinical examination, transvaginal/transrectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imagining, colonoscopy, and computed tomography colonography. Treatment can be medical or surgical. Medical therapies include birth control pills, oral progestins, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, danazol, and injectable progestins. Analgesics are often used as well. Surgery improves up to 70% of symptoms. Surgery is either ablative or excisional, and is conducted via transvaginal, laparoscopic, laparotomy, or combined approaches. Common surgical techniques involve shaving of the superficial rectal lesion, laparoscopic anterior discoid resection, and low anterior bowel resection and reanastomosis. Outcomes are generally favorable, but postoperative complications may include intra-abdominal bleeding, anastomotic leaks, rectovaginal fistulas, strictures, chronic constipation, and the need for reoperation. Recurrence of rectal endometriosis is a possibility as well. Other outcomes are improved pain-related symptoms and fertility. Long-term outcomes vary according to the management strategy used. This review will provide the most recent approaches and techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of rectovaginal endometriosis. PMID:24232977

  17. Diagnosis, management, and long-term outcomes of rectovaginal endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Moawad, Nash S; Caplin, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Rectovaginal endometriosis is the most severe form of endometriosis. Clinically, it presents with a number of symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, deep dyspareunia, dyschezia, and rectal bleeding. The gold standard for diagnosis is laparoscopy with histological confirmation; however, there are a number of options for presurgical diagnosis, including clinical examination, transvaginal/transrectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imagining, colonoscopy, and computed tomography colonography. Treatment can be medical or surgical. Medical therapies include birth control pills, oral progestins, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, danazol, and injectable progestins. Analgesics are often used as well. Surgery improves up to 70% of symptoms. Surgery is either ablative or excisional, and is conducted via transvaginal, laparoscopic, laparotomy, or combined approaches. Common surgical techniques involve shaving of the superficial rectal lesion, laparoscopic anterior discoid resection, and low anterior bowel resection and reanastomosis. Outcomes are generally favorable, but postoperative complications may include intra-abdominal bleeding, anastomotic leaks, rectovaginal fistulas, strictures, chronic constipation, and the need for reoperation. Recurrence of rectal endometriosis is a possibility as well. Other outcomes are improved pain-related symptoms and fertility. Long-term outcomes vary according to the management strategy used. This review will provide the most recent approaches and techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of rectovaginal endometriosis. PMID:24232977

  18. Consider long-term care as service alternative.

    PubMed

    Loria, L S

    1987-04-01

    The increasing demand for elderly care services, pressures on inpatient average length of stay and payment levels, and potential financial rewards from providing additional services, makes long-term care look attractive to hospitals. Long-term care, however, is not for every hospital. Before deciding to establish long-term care services, management should examine how the service fits within the hospital's strategic plan. The action plan below provides guidance in evaluating a decision to use hospital facilities for long-term care. Examine how long-term care services fit within the hospital's strategic plan. Study area demographics and competitors to assess the need and supply of long-term care services. Survey the medical staff, consumers and payers to determine attitudes, perceptions and interests regarding long-term care services. Develop a facility plan that identifies areas of excess capacity that can be most easily converted into long-term care with minimal effects on hospital operations. Prepare a financial feasibility analysis of the contribution margin and return on investment attributable to long-term care services. Include an impact analysis on hospital operations. Establish a management task force to develop a detailed implementation plan including assigned individual responsibilities and related timetable. Develop an effective marketing plan designed to generate increased patient market share. PMID:10312056

  19. Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.; Rossow, W.; Fung, I.

    1993-09-01

    A workshop on Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks was held February 3-4, 1992, at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies to discuss the measurements required to interpret long-term global temperature changes, to critique the proposed contributions of a series of small satellites (Climsat), and to identify needed complementary monitoring. The workshop concluded that long-term (several decades) of continuous monitoring of the major climate forcings and feedbacks is essential for understanding long-term climate change. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  20. Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J. (Editor); Rossow, W. (Editor); Fung, I. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    A workshop on Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks was held February 3-4, 1992, at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies to discuss the measurements required to interpret long-term global temperature changes, to critique the proposed contributions of a series of small satellites (Climsat), and to identify needed complementary monitoring. The workshop concluded that long-term (several decades) of continuous monitoring of the major climate forcings and feedbacks is essential for understanding long-term climate change.

  1. Oral citrulline as arginine precursor may be beneficial in sickle cell disease: early phase two results.

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, W. H.; Daeschner, C. W.; Files, B. A.; McConnell, M. E.; Strandjord, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    L-Arginine may be a conditionally essential amino acid in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease, particularly as required substrate in the arginine-nitric oxide pathway for endogenous nitrovasodilation and vasoprotection. Vasoprotection by arginine is mediated partly by nitric oxide-induced inhibition of endothelial damage and inhibition of adhesion and activation of leukocytes. Activated leukocytes may trigger many of the complications, including vasoocclusive events and intimal hyperplasias. High blood leukocyte counts during steady states in the absence of infection are significant laboratory risk factors for adverse complications. L-Citrulline as precursor amino acid was given orally twice daily in daily doses of approximately 0.1 g/kg in a pilot Phase II clinical trial during steady states in four homozygous sickle cell disease subjects and one sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease patient (ages 10-18). There soon resulted dramatic improvements in symptoms of well-being, raised plasma arginine levels, and reductions in high total leukocyte and high segmented neutrophil counts toward or to within normal limits. Continued L-citrulline supplementation in compliant subjects continued to lessen symptomatology, to maintain plasma arginine concentrations greater than control levels, and to maintain nearly normal total leukocyte and neutrophil counts. Side effects or toxicity from citrulline were not experienced. Oral L-citrulline may portend very useful for palliative therapy in sickle cell disease. Placebo-controlled, long-term trials are now indicated. PMID:11688916

  2. Stimulation of growth and polyamine biosynthesis of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. Regulation by L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Eichler, W

    1989-10-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila cells grown in a synthetic nutrient medium for 9 h removed 97% of the free L-arginine but less than 50% of any of the other essential amino acids. The major portion of the arginine was degraded rapidly (76-92%) whereas 5-15% was conserved as intact and only 2.5-10% were incorporated into protein. However, if bovine serum albumin (BSA) was present in the medium as a macromolecular arginine source the incorporation of free arginine into protein was reduced to less than 1% but the degraded fraction was increased. Apparently, the uptake mode of arginine determines its fate: arginine taken up by phagocytosis is bound for protein biosynthesis, arginine taken up by membrane receptors is chanelled to degradation. Media without arginine did not support growth of Tetrahymena. Citrulline and ornithine, the precursors of arginine biosynthesis in yeast and vertebrates, were not able to substitute for arginine. Pronounced morphological changes, e.g. greatly reduced ribosome content, were observed in Tetrahymena cells after 24 h of arginine starvation in otherwise complete medium, but not in cells starved in water, salt solution, or buffer. Thus, arginine is an essential nutrient component for Tetrahymena and the rapid degradation of this compound involving the enzymes arginine deiminase (ADI) and citrulline hydrolase (CH) might be of regulatory importance for the unicellular, as it is the case with acetylcholine and catecholamines in mammalian organisms. Since the product of these enzymes, L-ornithine, is the substrate for the regulatory key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the effects of the presence of absence of arginine on the activities of each particular enzyme of the pathway were studied, including ODC and the enzyme ornithine-oxo-acid aminotransferase (O delta T), which is a competitor of ODC for the common substrate. The arginine-degradative pathway was stimulated by extracellular free but not by peptide-bound arginine and was modulated by extracellular protein which induced phagocytosis; O delta T was stimulated with a time lag. The stimulation of ODC was in a reciprocal relation to the arginine concentration and enhanced by phagocytosis and previous arginine starvation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2610929

  3. Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Integrated Care Models: Final Report 07/31/2015 The Risk of Needing LTSS: DYNASIM Projections Aging , Disabled Persons , Evaluation Studies , Hawaii , Health , Income , Insurance , Long-Term Care , Longevity , ... Population 07/30/2015 Long-Term Care Awareness and Planning: What Do ...

  4. DYNAMIC CROPPING SYSTEMS IMPLICATIONS FOR LONG-TERM RESEARCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term cropping systems research provides critical information to producers regarding the sustainability of management practices. Fixed cropping sequences in long-term cropping systems research, while useful from the standpoint of understanding specific crop rotation effects on agronomic and env...

  5. Factors Affecting Long-Term Abstinence from Substances Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsheikh, Salah Elgaily

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to explore the attitudes of abstainers from drug use that relate to the factors leading to long-term abstinence. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study was carried out in Al-Amal Hospital to examine, which attitudes of abstainers related to long-term abstinence. A random survey was conducted on 62…

  6. Standards for Psychological Services in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Smith, Michael; Frazer, Deborah; Molinari, Victor; Rosowsky, Erlene; Crose, Royda; Stillwell, Nick; Kramer, Nanette; Hartman-Stein, Paula; Qualls, Sara; Salamon, Michael; Duffy, Michael; Parr, Joyce; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of standards for psychological practice in long-term care facilities. The standards, which were developed by Psychologists in Long-Term Care, address provider characteristics, methods of referral, assessment practices, treatment, and ethical issues. Offers suggestions for use of the standards. (MKA)

  7. Developmental Dyslexia and Explicit Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menghini, Deny; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Marotta, Luigi; Finzi, Alessandra; Vicari, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The reduced verbal long-term memory capacities often reported in dyslexics are generally interpreted as a consequence of their deficit in phonological coding. The present study was aimed at evaluating whether the learning deficit exhibited by dyslexics was restricted only to the verbal component of the long-term memory abilities or also involved

  8. Developmental Dyslexia and Explicit Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menghini, Deny; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Marotta, Luigi; Finzi, Alessandra; Vicari, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The reduced verbal long-term memory capacities often reported in dyslexics are generally interpreted as a consequence of their deficit in phonological coding. The present study was aimed at evaluating whether the learning deficit exhibited by dyslexics was restricted only to the verbal component of the long-term memory abilities or also involved…

  9. 3 CFR - Long-Term Gulf Coast Restoration Support Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Long-Term Gulf Coast Restoration Support Plan Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of June 30, 2010 Long-Term Gulf Coast Restoration Support Plan Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies The oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the worst...

  10. Long-term trends in precipitation and surface water chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter shows long-term data and trends in precipitation and surface water chemistry for each site. It contains a brief introduction to the topic, and methods of measurements, selection of variables, and their data source. It consists primarily of a large number of figures showing long-term da...

  11. Factors Affecting Long-Term Abstinence from Substances Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsheikh, Salah Elgaily

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to explore the attitudes of abstainers from drug use that relate to the factors leading to long-term abstinence. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study was carried out in Al-Amal Hospital to examine, which attitudes of abstainers related to long-term abstinence. A random survey was conducted on 62

  12. Long-Term Retention of Electronic Theses and Dissertations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teper, Thomas H.; Kraemer, Beth

    2002-01-01

    Examines the increasing trend of universities to pursue electronic thesis and dissertation (ETD) programs. Although the goal of most programs is similar, procedural variations impact a program's long-term success. As primary research generators, responsibility for providing long-term access to unique materials must be borne by universities.

  13. Long-term Ecological Monitoring in Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doberski, Julian; Brodie, Iain D. S.

    1991-01-01

    The value and difficulties of long-term ecological monitoring studies undertaken in schools and colleges are reviewed. Rookeries, stream ecology, sand dune succession, fish population, and seed production and survival are presented as examples of successful studies. This is followed by a discussion of points to consider when setting up a long-term

  14. Long Term Agroecosystem Research in the southern plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Southern Plains (SP) site of the Long Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) network is headquartered at USDA-ARS’s Grazinglands Research Laboratory (GRL) in El Reno, Oklahoma. The GRL was established in 1948. A long-term watershed and climate research program was established in the Little Washita ...

  15. Helping People Make Better Long-Term-Care Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Boston, Krista; Chilvers, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative online system to support long-term-care decision making. Design and Methods: The Long-Term Care Choices tool is a web-based system that uses expert opinion and structures decision making. Results: The system has been well accepted, and most users find it easy to use. Implications:…

  16. LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES: A CORNUCOPIA OF VIRAL PATHOGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our study sought to determine the frequency and types of respiratory viruses circulating in 33 Boston long term care facilities during a three year period and correlate rates of infection with serum zinc levels. Participants were residents of long term care that had previously participated in a tria...

  17. Ensuring climate information guides long-term development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lindsey; Dougill, Andrew; Jones, Richard G.; Steynor, Anna; Watkiss, Paul; Kane, Cheikh; Koelle, Bettina; Moufouma-Okia, Wilfran; Padgham, Jon; Ranger, Nicola; Roux, Jean-Pierre; Suarez, Pablo; Tanner, Thomas; Vincent, Katharine

    2015-09-01

    Many sub-Saharan countries are failing to include climate information in long-term development planning. Ensuring climate-resilient development requires a step change in how medium- to long-term climate information is produced, communicated and utilized in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere.

  18. 7 CFR 1773.44 - Long-term debt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Long-term debt. 1773.44 Section 1773.44 Agriculture...-term debt. The CPA's workpapers must document that he/she: (a) Confirmed RUS, FFB, and RTB debt to the...); (b) Confirmed other long-term debt directly with the lender; (c) Examined notes executed or...

  19. Helping People Make Better Long-Term-Care Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Boston, Krista; Chilvers, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative online system to support long-term-care decision making. Design and Methods: The Long-Term Care Choices tool is a web-based system that uses expert opinion and structures decision making. Results: The system has been well accepted, and most users find it easy to use. Implications:

  20. The relationship between interannual and long-term cloud feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Chen; Zelinka, Mark D.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Klein, Stephen A.

    2015-12-11

    The analyses of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 simulations suggest that climate models with more positive cloud feedback in response to interannual climate fluctuations also have more positive cloud feedback in response to long-term global warming. Ensemble mean vertical profiles of cloud change in response to interannual and long-term surface warming are similar, and the ensemble mean cloud feedback is positive on both timescales. However, the average long-term cloud feedback is smaller than the interannual cloud feedback, likely due to differences in surface warming pattern on the two timescales. Low cloud cover (LCC) change in response to interannual and long-term global surface warming is found to be well correlated across models and explains over half of the covariance between interannual and long-term cloud feedback. In conclusion, the intermodel correlation of LCC across timescales likely results from model-specific sensitivities of LCC to sea surface warming.

  1. The relationship between interannual and long-term cloud feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Zelinka, Mark D.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Klein, Stephen A.

    2015-12-01

    Analyses of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 simulations suggest that climate models with more positive cloud feedback in response to interannual climate fluctuations also have more positive cloud feedback in response to long-term global warming. Ensemble mean vertical profiles of cloud change in response to interannual and long-term surface warming are similar, and the ensemble mean cloud feedback is positive on both timescales. However, the average long-term cloud feedback is smaller than the interannual cloud feedback, likely due to differences in surface warming pattern on the two timescales. Low cloud cover (LCC) change in response to interannual and long-term global surface warming is found to be well correlated across models and explains over half of the covariance between interannual and long-term cloud feedback. The intermodel correlation of LCC across timescales likely results from model-specific sensitivities of LCC to sea surface warming.

  2. Long-term variation of energetic electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asikainen, Timo

    2015-04-01

    The long-term evolution of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) is of considerable interest, e.g., because of its atmospheric and climatic effects. However, the long-term evolution of EEP over several solar cycles has been problematic due to the lack of reliable long-term data. The NOAA/POES satellites have measured energetic particles for more than 35 years. This dataset has been used widely but it has been plagued by several instrumental problems, which have restricted its use for long-term studies. However, we have recently corrected and recalibrated the entire NOAA/POES energetic particle dataset. Using this unique dataset we present here an overview of the long-term evolution of EEP paying particular attention to the role of different types of solar wind disturbances in driving the EEP.

  3. Environmental Management Long-Term Stewardship Transition Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Kristofferson, Keith

    2001-11-01

    Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after the completion of facility cleanup. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. This report describes the background of long-term stewardship and gives general guidance about considerations when ownership and/or responsibility of a site should be transferred to a long-term stewardship program. This guidance document will assist the U.S. Department of Energy in: (a) ensuring that the long-term stewardship program leads transition planning with respect to facility and site areas, and (b) describing the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete.

  4. BCSC Grants: Long-Term Antibiotic Use As A Breast Cancer Risk Factor

    Cancer.gov

    Oral antibiotic use disrupts normal intestinal microflora and can interfere with a number of metabolic processes potentially relevant to breast cancer development, such as steroid hormone metabolism and formation of several bioactive phytochemicals. The only reported epidemiologic study of antibiotic use and breast cancer risk was a Finnish cohort study that found a modest association in pre-menopausal women. The purpose of this 2-year study is to examine the association between long-term oral antibiotic use and primary, invasive breast cancer.

  5. Fracture risk assessment in long-term care: a survey of long-term care physicians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The majority of frail elderly who live in long-term care (LTC) are not treated for osteoporosis despite their high risk for fragility fractures. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis provide guidance for the management of individuals 50 years and older at risk for fractures, however, they cannot benefit LTC residents if physicians perceive barriers to their application. Our objectives are to explore current practices to fracture risk assessment by LTC physicians and describe barriers to applying the recently published Osteoporosis Canada practice guidelines for fracture assessment and prevention in LTC. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with the Ontario Long-Term Care Physicians Association using an online questionnaire. The survey included questions that addressed members’ attitudes, knowledge, and behaviour with respect to fracture risk assessment in LTC. Closed-ended responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and thematic framework analysis for open-ended responses. Results We contacted 347 LTC physicians; 25% submitted completed surveys (81% men, mean age 60 (Standard Deviation [SD] 11) years, average 32 [SD 11] years in practice). Of the surveyed physicians, 87% considered prevention of fragility fractures to be important, but a minority (34%) reported using validated fracture risk assessment tools, while 33% did not use any. Clinical risk factors recommended by the OC guidelines for assessing fracture risk considered applicable included; glucocorticoid use (99%), fall history (93%), age (92%), and fracture history (91%). Recommended clinical measurements considered applicable included: weight (84%), thyroid-stimulating hormone (78%) and creatinine (73%) measurements, height (61%), and Get-Up-and-Go test (60%). Perceived barriers to assessing fracture risk included difficulty acquiring necessary information, lack of access to tests (bone mineral density, x-rays) or obtaining medical history; resource constraints, and a sentiment that assessing fracture risk is futile in this population because of short life expectancy and polypharmacy. Conclusion Perceived barriers to fracture risk assessment and osteoporosis management in LTC have not changed recently, contributing in part to the ongoing care gap in osteoporosis management. Our findings highlight the importance to adapt guidelines to be applicable to the LTC environment, and to develop partnerships with stakeholders to facilitate their use in clinical practice. PMID:24138565

  6. Effects of Long-Term Ayahuasca Administration on Memory and Anxiety in Rats.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Vanessa Manchim; Yonamine, Maurício; Soares, Juliana Carlota Kramer; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic beverage that combines the action of the 5-HT2A/2C agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) from Psychotria viridis with the monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) induced by beta-carbonyls from Banisteriopsis caapi. Previous investigations have highlighted the involvement of ayahuasca with the activation of brain regions known to be involved with episodic memory, contextual associations and emotional processing after ayahuasca ingestion. Moreover long term users show better performance in neuropsychological tests when tested in off-drug condition. This study evaluated the effects of long-term administration of ayahuasca on Morris water maze (MWM), fear conditioning and elevated plus maze (EPM) performance in rats. Behavior tests started 48h after the end of treatment. Freeze-dried ayahuasca doses of 120, 240 and 480 mg/kg were used, with water as the control. Long-term administration consisted of a daily oral dose for 30 days by gavage. The behavioral data indicated that long-term ayahuasca administration did not affect the performance of animals in MWM and EPM tasks. However the dose of 120 mg/kg increased the contextual conditioned fear response for both background and foreground fear conditioning. The tone conditioned response was not affected after long-term administration. In addition, the increase in the contextual fear response was maintained during the repeated sessions several weeks after training. Taken together, these data showed that long-term ayahuasca administration in rats can interfere with the contextual association of emotional events, which is in agreement with the fact that the beverage activates brain areas related to these processes. PMID:26716991

  7. Effects of Long-Term Ayahuasca Administration on Memory and Anxiety in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Favaro, Vanessa Manchim; Yonamine, Maurício; Soares, Juliana Carlota Kramer; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic beverage that combines the action of the 5-HT2A/2C agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) from Psychotria viridis with the monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) induced by beta-carbonyls from Banisteriopsis caapi. Previous investigations have highlighted the involvement of ayahuasca with the activation of brain regions known to be involved with episodic memory, contextual associations and emotional processing after ayahuasca ingestion. Moreover long term users show better performance in neuropsychological tests when tested in off-drug condition. This study evaluated the effects of long-term administration of ayahuasca on Morris water maze (MWM), fear conditioning and elevated plus maze (EPM) performance in rats. Behavior tests started 48h after the end of treatment. Freeze-dried ayahuasca doses of 120, 240 and 480 mg/kg were used, with water as the control. Long-term administration consisted of a daily oral dose for 30 days by gavage. The behavioral data indicated that long-term ayahuasca administration did not affect the performance of animals in MWM and EPM tasks. However the dose of 120 mg/kg increased the contextual conditioned fear response for both background and foreground fear conditioning. The tone conditioned response was not affected after long-term administration. In addition, the increase in the contextual fear response was maintained during the repeated sessions several weeks after training. Taken together, these data showed that long-term ayahuasca administration in rats can interfere with the contextual association of emotional events, which is in agreement with the fact that the beverage activates brain areas related to these processes. PMID:26716991

  8. Abstracts 1987. New Horizons in Long Term Care: A Report on the Long Term Care Research and Demonstration Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Aid, Springfield.

    This booklet provides a description of 14 projects which were awarded funds during fiscal year 1987 for collaborative research in long-term care to find new ways to treat long-term care patients in Illinois nursing homes. It includes the organization or institution receiving the award, an abstract of the research proposal, and the name of the…

  9. Oxidation of Nitric Oxide in Aqueous Solution to Nitrite but not Nitrate: Comparison with Enzymatically Formed Nitric Oxide From L-Arginine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignarro, Louis J.; Fukuto, Jon M.; Griscavage, Jeannete M.; Rogers, Norma E.; Byrns, Russell E.

    1993-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in oxygen-containing aqueous solution has a short half-life that is often attributed to a rapid oxidation to both NO^-_2 and NO^-_3. The chemical fate of NO in aqueous solution is often assumed to be the same as that in air, where NO is oxidized to NO_2 followed by dimerization to N_2O_4. Water then reacts with N_2O_4 to form both NO^-_2 and NO^-_3. We report here that NO in aqueous solution containing oxygen is oxidized primarily to NO^-_2 with little or no formation of NO^-_3. In the presence of oxyhemoglobin or oxymyoglobin, however, NO and NO^-_2 were oxidized completely to NO^-_3. Methemoglobin was inactive in this regard. The unpurified cytosolic fraction from rat cerebellum, which contains constitutive NO synthase activity, catalyzed the conversion of L-arginine primarily to NO^-_3 (NO^-_2/NO^-_3 ratio = 0.25). After chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel or affinity chromatography using 2',5'-ADP-Sepharose 4B, active fractions containing NO synthase activity catalyzed the conversion of L-arginine primarily to NO^-_2 (NO^-_2/NO^-_3 ratio = 5.6) or only to NO^-_2, respectively. Unpurified cytosol from activated rat alveolar macrophages catalyzed the conversion of L-arginine to NO^-_2 without formation of NO^-_3. Addition of 30 ?M oxyhemoglobin to all enzyme reaction mixtures resulted in the formation primarily of NO^-_3 (NO^-_2/NO^-_3 ratio = 0.09 to 0.20). Cyanide ion, which displaces NO^-_2 from its binding sites on oxyhemoglobin, inhibited the formation of NO^-_3, thereby allowing NO^-_2 to accumulate. These observations indicate clearly that the primary decomposition product of NO in aerobic aqueous solution is NO^-_2 and that further oxidation to NO^-_3 requires the presence of additional oxidizing species such as oxyhemoproteins.

  10. Metabolically induced heteroplasmy shifting and L-arginine treatment reduce the energetic defect in a neuronal-like model of MELAS

    PubMed Central

    Desquiret-Dumas, Valerie; Gueguen, Naig; Barth, Magalie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Hancock, Saege; Wallace, Douglas C; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Henrion, Daniel; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The m.3243A>G variant in the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR) gene is a common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. Phenotypic manifestations depend mainly on the heteroplasmy, i.e. the ratio of mutant to normal mtDNA copies. A high percentage of mutant mtDNA is associated with a severe, life-threatening neurological syndrome known as MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). MELAS is described as a neurovascular disorder primarily affecting the brain and blood vessels, but the pathophysiology of the disease is poorly understood. We developed a series of cybrid cell lines at two different mutant loads: 70% and 100% in the nuclear background of a neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y). We investigated the impact of the mutation on the metabolism and mitochondrial respiratory chain activity of the cybrids. The m.3243A>G mitochondrial mutation induced a metabolic switch towards glycolysis in the neuronal cells and produced severe defects in respiratory chain assembly and activity. We used two strategies to compensate for the biochemical defects in the mutant cells: one consisted of lowering the glucose content in the culture medium, and the other involved the addition of L-arginine. The reduction of glucose significantly shifted the 100% mutant cells towards the wild-type, reaching a 90% mutant level and restoring respiratory chain complex assembly. The addition of L-arginine, a nitric oxide (NO) donor, improved complex I activity in the mutant cells in which the defective NO metabolism had led to a relative shortage of NO. Thus, metabolically induced heteroplasmy shifting and L-arginine therapy may constitute promising therapeutic strategies against MELAS. PMID:22306605

  11. Insulin requires A1 adenosine receptors expression to reverse gestational diabetes-increased L-arginine transport in human umbilical vein endothelium.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Armella, Axel; Toledo, Fernando; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) associates with increased L-arginine transport and extracellular concentration of adenosine in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In this study we aim to determine whether insulin reverses GDM-increased L-arginine transport requiring adenosine receptors expression in HUVECs. Primary cultured HUVECs from full-term normal (n = 38) and diet-treated GDM (n = 38) pregnancies were used. Insulin effect was assayed on human cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT1) expression (protein, mRNA, SLC7A1 promoter activity) and activity (initial rates of L-arginine transport) in the absence or presence of adenosine receptors agonists or antagonists. A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR) and A2AAR expression (Western blot, quantitative PCR) was determined. Experiments were done in cells expressing or siRNA-suppressed expression of A1AR or A2AAR. HUVECs from GDM exhibit higher maximal transport capacity (maximal velocity (V max)/apparent Michaelis Menten constant (K m), V max/K m), which is blocked by insulin by reducing the V max to values in cells from normal pregnancies. Insulin also reversed the GDM-associated increase in hCAT-1 protein abundance and mRNA expression, and SLC7A1 promoter activity for the fragment -606 bp from the transcription start point. Insulin effects required A1AR, but not A2AAR expression and activity in this cell type. In the absence of insulin, GDM-increased hCAT-1 expression and activity required A2AAR expression and activity. HUVECs from GDM pregnancies exhibit a differential requirement of A1AR or A2AAR depending on the level of insulin, a phenomenon that represent a condition where adenosine or analogues of this nucleoside could be acting as helpers of insulin biological effects in GDM. PMID:26710791

  12. Inhibition of the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway mediates the antidepressant effects of ketamine in rats in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Fen; Wang, Nan; Shi, Jin-Yun; Xu, Shi-Xia; Li, Xiao-Min; Ji, Mu-Huo; Zuo, Zhi-Yi; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Jian-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Converging evidence shows that the acute administration of a sub-anaesthetic dose ketamine produces fast-acting and robust antidepressant properties in patients suffering from major depressive disorder. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the role of the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway in the antidepressant effects of ketamine in rats performing the forced swimming test (FST). Ketamine (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased immobility times in the FST and the activities of total nitric oxide synthases (T-NOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the rat hippocampus. Interestingly, the plasma activities of T-NOS, iNOS, and eNOS increased after administration of ketamine. Furthermore, the activities of neuronal NOS (nNOS) did not change significantly in either the hippocampus or plasma after ketamine administration. The antidepressant effects of ketamine were prevented by pre-treatment with l-arginine (750 mg/kg). Pre-treatment with the NOS inhibitor L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester at a sub-antidepressant dose of 50 mg/kg and ketamine at a sub-antidepressant dose of 3 mg/kg reduced immobility time in the FST compared to treatment with either drug alone. None of the drugs affected crossing and rearing scores in the open field test. These results suggest that the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway is involved in the antidepressant effects of ketamine observed in rats in the FST and this involvement is characterised by the inhibition of brain T-NOS, iNOS, and eNOS activities. PMID:23711590

  13. Frog urinary bladder epithelial cells express TLR4 and respond to bacterial LPS by increase of iNOS expression and L-arginine uptake.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Bachteeva, Vera; Fock, Ekaterina; Herterich, Sabine; Lavrova, Elena; Borodkina, Alexandra; Gambaryan, Stepan; Parnova, Rimma

    2012-11-15

    As in mammals, epithelium of the amphibian urinary bladder forms a barrier to pathogen entry and is a first line of defense against penetrating microorganisms. We investigated the effect of Escherichia coli LPS on generation of nitric oxide (NO), a critically important mediator during infectious processes, by primary cultured frog (Rana temporaria) urinary bladder epithelial cells (FUBEC). It was found that FUBEC constitutively express Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a receptor of LPS, and respond to LPS (10 ?g/ml) by stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA/protein expression and NOS activity measured by nitrite produced in the culture medium and by citrulline assay. We characterized uptake of l-arginine, a precursor in NO synthesis, by FUBEC and showed that it is mediated mainly by the y+ cationic amino acid transport system. LPS stimulated l-arginine uptake, and this effect was blocked by the iNOS inhibitor 1400W. Arginase II was found to be expressed in FUBEC. Inhibition of arginase activity by (S)-(boronoethyl)-l-cysteine increased generation of NO, suggesting contribution of arginase to NO production via competing with NOS for the substrate. LPS altered neither total arginase activity nor arginase II expression. Among epithelial cells, phagocytic macrophage-like cells were observed, but they did not contribute to LPS-induced NO production. These data demonstrate that amphibian urinary bladder epithelial cells recognize LPS and respond to it by increased generation of NO via stimulation of iNOS expression and l-arginine uptake, which appears to be essential for the regulation of the innate immune response and the inflammation in bladder epithelium. PMID:23019216

  14. Enzymatic and Cryoreduction EPR Studies of the Hydroxylation of Methylated N?-Hydroxy-l-arginine Analogues by Nitric Oxide Synthase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) catalyzes the conversion of l-arginine to l-citrulline and NO in a two-step process involving the intermediate N?-hydroxy-l-arginine (NHA). It was shown that Cpd I is the oxygenating species for l-arginine; the hydroperoxo ferric intermediate is the reactive intermediate with NHA. Methylation of the N?-OH and N?-H of NHA significantly inhibits the conversion of NHA into NO and l-citrulline by mammalian NOS. Kinetic studies now show that N?-methylation of NHA has a qualitatively similar effect on H2O2-dependent catalysis by bacterial gsNOS. To elucidate the effect of methylating N?-hydroxy l-arginine on the properties and reactivity of the one-electron-reduced oxy-heme center of NOS, we have applied cryoreduction/annealing/EPR/ENDOR techniques. Measurements of solvent kinetic isotope effects during 160 K cryoannealing cryoreduced oxy-gsNOS/NHA confirm the hydroperoxo ferric intermediate as the catalytically active species of step two. Product analysis for cryoreduced samples with methylated NHAs, NHMA, NMOA, and NMMA, annealed to 273 K, show a correlation of yields of l-citrulline with the intensity of the g 2.26 EPR signal of the peroxo ferric species trapped at 77 K, which converts to the reactive hydroperoxo ferric state. There is also a correlation between the yield of l-citrulline in these experiments and kobs for the H2O2-dependent conversion of the substrates by gsNOS. Correspondingly, no detectable amount of cyanoornithine, formed when Cpd I is the reactive species, was found in the samples. Methylation of the NHA guanidinium N?-OH and N?-H inhibits the second NO-producing reaction by favoring protonation of the ferric-peroxo to form unreactive conformers of the ferric-hydroperoxo state. It is suggested that this is caused by modification of the distal-pocket hydrogen-bonding network of oxy gsNOS and introduction of an ordered water molecule that facilitates delivery of the proton(s) to the one-electron-reduced oxy-heme moiety. These results illustrate how variations in the properties of the substrate can modulate the reactivity of a monooxygenase. PMID:25251261

  15. Role of healthcare in Korean long-term care insurance.

    PubMed

    Kang, Im-Oak; Park, Chong Yon; Lee, Yunhwan

    2012-05-01

    With the rapid aging of the population, Korea introduced public long-term care insurance for older people in 2008. The long-term care insurance was designed as a separate scheme from the national health insurance, with eligibility qualifications and the certification process based on functional disability, benefits and coverage of community-based and institutional care, and a financing structure through multi-party contributions. Delivering appropriate health services to long-term care beneficiaries who manifest a high prevalence of comorbid chronic conditions with rising healthcare costs, however, presents a particular challenge. The lack of coordination between the health and long-term care sectors, limited consideration of physicians' assessments in the certification process, inadequate provision of health services in long-term care facilities, and overlapping and inefficient use of care resources act as barriers to providing comprehensive healthcare for older beneficiaries. Through active participation in the long-term care system, health professionals can help older patients navigate through the complex long-term care terrain to obtain quality healthcare. PMID:22661870

  16. Long-Term Stewardship Baseline Report and Transition Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Kristofferson, Keith

    2001-11-01

    Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after facility cleanup is complete. As the Department of Energy’s (DOE) lead laboratory for environmental management programs, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) administers DOE’s long-term stewardship science and technology efforts. The INEEL provides DOE with technical, and scientific expertise needed to oversee its long-term environmental management obligations complexwide. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. The INEEL Long-Term Stewardship Program is currently developing the management structures and plans to complete INEEL-specific, long-term stewardship obligations. This guidance document (1) assists in ensuring that the program leads transition planning for the INEEL with respect to facility and site areas and (2) describes the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete. Additionally, this document summarizes current information on INEEL facilities, structures, and release sites likely to enter long-term stewardship at the completion of DOE’s cleanup mission. This document is not intended to function as a discrete checklist or local procedure to determine readiness to transition. It is an overarching document meant as guidance in implementing specific transition procedures. Several documents formed the foundation upon which this guidance was developed. Principal among these documents was the Long-Term Stewardship Draft Technical Baseline; A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship, Volumes I and II; Infrastructure Long-Range Plan; Comprehensive Facility Land Use Plan; INEEL End-State Plan; and INEEL Institutional Plan.

  17. Space ventures and society long-term perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    A futuristic evaluation of mankind's potential long term future in space is presented. Progress in space will not be inhibited by shortages of the Earth's physical resources, since long term economic growth will be focused on ways to constrain industrial productivity by changing social values, management styles, or government competence. Future technological progress is likely to accelerate with an emphasis on international cooperation, making possible such large joint projects as lunar colonies or space stations on Mars. The long term future in space looks exceedingly bright even in relatively pessimistic scenarios. The principal driving forces will be technological progress, commercial and public-oriented satellites, space industrialization, space travel, and eventually space colonization.

  18. Natural history of multiple sclerosis: long-term prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Renoux, Christel

    2011-05-01

    Several prognostic factors of long-term irreversible disability, mainly demographic and clinical, have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). Most predictors have a minor influence on the long-term prognosis, and efforts are currently shifting toward finding relevant paraclinical predictors. By contrast, the study of prognostic factors has given some insights into the pathogenesis of MS, notably regarding the relation between relapses and long-term disability, and has emphasized the need to elucidate the exact mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration for the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:21439442

  19. Long-term correlations in the surface behavior of dolphins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancho, R. Ferrer i.; Lusseau, D.

    2006-06-01

    Here we study the sequences of surface behavioral patterns of dolphins (Tursiops sp.) and find long-term correlations. We show that the long-term correlations are not of a trivial nature, i.e. they cannot be explained by the repetition of the same surface behavior many times in a row. Our findings suggest that dolphins have a long collective memory extending back at least to the 7-th past behavior. As far as we know, this is the first evidence of long-term correlations in the behavior of a non-human species.

  20. LONG-TERM OUTCOMES IN ELDERLY SURGICAL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Deiner, Stacie; Silverstein, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    Anesthesia has developed to the point where long term outcomes are important endpoints. Elderly patients are becoming an increasingly large part of most surgical practices, consistent with demographic shifts. Long term outcomes are particularly important for this group. In this review, we discuss functional outcomes in the elderly. We describe the areas of cognitive change and frailty, both of which are specific to the elderly. We also discuss prevention of surgical infections and emerging evidence around hemodynamic alterations in the operating room and their impact on long term outcomes. PMID:22238042

  1. Does long-term use of proton pump inhibitors cause hypomagnesaemia in Japanese outpatients?

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yasuhito; Doyama, Hisashi; Tsuji, Kunihiro; Yamada, Shinya; Takemura, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Aim Hypomagnesaemia has been reported associated with long-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. However, there have been no studies in Japanese patients. We therefore assessed the effects of long-term PPI use on serum magnesium concentrations in Japanese patients. Methods Data from 481 outpatients who visited our centre in October and November 2011 were reviewed to determine their underlying diseases, oral medications, including PPIs, and serum magnesium concentrations. The association between PPI use and serum Mg concentrations was assessed by multiple linear regression analysis. Results Serum magnesium concentrations were significantly lower in PPI users (n=199) than in PPI non-users (n=282; 1.860.21 vs 1.910.19?mg/dL, p<0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the presence or absence of cirrhosis and PPI use was a significant predictor of magnesium concentration. In evaluating magnesium concentrations among PPI users and non-users with and without cirrhosis, we found that mean serum magnesium concentrations in patients with cirrhosis were significantly lower in PPI users than non-users (1.780.22 vs 1.870.22?mg/dL, p=0.03). Conclusions Outpatients receiving long-term PPI treatment had significantly lower serum magnesium concentrations than those not treated with PPI. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to show hypomagnesaemia in Japanese patients with cirrhosis receiving long-term PPI treatment. PMID:26462261

  2. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Citrulline Supplementation on Renal Transcriptome Prevention of Nitric Oxide Depletion-Related Programmed Hypertension: The Impact of Gene-Nutrient Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tain, You-Lin; Lee, Chien-Te; Huang, Li-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition can elicit gene expression leading to fetal programming. l-citrulline (CIT) can be converted to l-arginine to generate nitric oxide (NO). We examined whether maternal CIT supplementation can prevent NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyl ester (l-NAME, NO synthase inhibitor)-induced programmed hypertension and examined their effects on the renal transcriptome in male offspring using next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received l-NAME administration at 60mg/kg/day subcutaneously via osmotic minipump during pregnancy alone or with additional 0.25% l-citrulline solution in drinking water during the whole period of pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were assigned to three groups: control, l-NAME, and l-NAME + CIT. l-NAME exposure induced hypertension in the 12-week-old offspring, which CIT therapy prevented. Identified differentially expressed genes in l-NAME and CIT-treated offspring kidneys, including Guca2b, Hmox1, Hba2, Hba-a2, Dusp1, and Serpine1 are related to regulation of blood pressure (BP) and oxidative stress. In conclusion, our data suggests that the beneficial effects of CIT supplementation are attributed to alterations in expression levels of genes related to BP control and oxidative stress. Our results suggest that early nutritional intervention by CIT has long-term impact on the renal transcriptome to prevent NO depletion-related programmed hypertension. However, our RNA-Seq results might be a secondary phenomenon. The implications of epigenetic regulation at an early stage of programming deserve further clarification. PMID:25517031

  3. The Long-Term Effects of Approval Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilden-Hart, Marion

    1970-01-01

    Using approval plans, professional selection can start where the work of the jobber leaves off. Librarians should evaluate service received and the long-terms effects on collection development. (Author/NH)

  4. Long-term monitoring for nanomedicine implants and drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michaela; Lynch, Iseult

    2016-03-01

    Increasing globalization means that traditional occupational epidemiological approaches may no longer apply, suggesting a need for an alternative model to assess the long-term impact of nanomaterial exposure on health.

  5. Long-term memories in online users' selecting activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xue; Hou, Lei; Stephen, Mutua; Yang, Huijie

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the long-term memory effect in the behavior of online users. Two user-oriented online movie systems are used in this study. Due to the short length of the series, the balanced estimation of diffusion entropy approach is used to evaluate scaling-invariance in selecting activities of users in the two online movie systems. Our results indicate that persistence (long-term memory) exists widely in the movie selecting series. However, there is generally significant difference between a user's objective and subjective behaviors. Additionally, statistically, the long-term memory depends on activity levels, as results show that the much more active a users' group, the stronger the long-term memory will be. These findings provide a new criterion for constructing reasonable models, and can help understand how individuals' behaviors form a collective behavior of an online society.

  6. Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007

    SciTech Connect

    T. Haney R. VanHorn

    2007-07-31

    This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

  7. Long-Term Quiescent Fibroblast Cells Transit into Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Marthandan, Shiva; Priebe, Steffen; Hemmerich, Peter; Klement, Karolin; Diekmann, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is described to be a consequence of telomere erosion during the replicative life span of primary human cells. Quiescence should therefore not contribute to cellular aging but rather extend lifespan. Here we tested this hypothesis and demonstrate that cultured long-term quiescent human fibroblasts transit into senescence due to similar cellular mechanisms with similar dynamics and with a similar maximum life span as proliferating controls, even under physiological oxygen conditions. Both, long-term quiescent and senescent fibroblasts almost completely fail to undergo apoptosis. The transition of long-term quiescent fibroblasts into senescence is also independent of HES1 which protects short-term quiescent cells from becoming senescent. Most significantly, DNA damage accumulates during senescence as well as during long-term quiescence at physiological oxygen levels. We suggest that telomere-independent, potentially maintenance driven gradual induction of cellular senescence during quiescence is a counterbalance to tumor development. PMID:25531649

  8. Examining Long-Term Global Climate Change on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntoon, Jacqueline E.; Ridky, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a web-based, inquiry-oriented activity that enables students to examine long-term global climate change. Supports instruction in other topics such as population growth. (Contains 34 references.) (DDR)

  9. The Long Term Agroecosystem Research Network - Shared research strategy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture faces tremendous challenges in meeting multiple societal goals, including a safe and plentiful food supply; climate change adaptation and mitigation; supplying sources of bioenergy; improving water, air, and soil quality; and maintaining biodiversity. The Long Term Agroecosystem Research...

  10. Malaria prophylaxis in long-term expatriate mineworkers in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Fegan, D; Glennon, J

    1993-08-01

    The role of malaria chemoprophylaxis for long-term expatriates has not been re-evaluated since the emergence of widespread multidrug resistance. A survey of 106 expatriates working in a mine in Ghana (holoendemic for malaria) was conducted to determine the compliance with malaria chemoprophylaxis. Overall 64 per cent took regular chemoprophylaxis. Of the long-term expatriates (5 or more years in areas with holoendemic malaria), 48.4 per cent either took malaria prophylaxis very irregularly or not at all. The main reasons for failing to comply were fear of long-term side effects and conflicting advice on prophylaxis. This reluctance to take long-term chemoprophylaxis highlights the need to re-emphasise the importance of anti-mosquito measures, prompt treatment of fevers, and perhaps consider abandoning chemoprophylaxis in those expatriate workers with ready access to hospital care. PMID:8400208

  11. Informed Consent to Research in Long-Term Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Rita A.; Bourbonniere, Meg; Kolanowski, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Informed consent to nursing home research is a two-tiered process that begins with obtaining the consent of a long-term care community at the institutional level and progresses to the engagement of individuals in the consent process. Drawing on a review of the literature and the authors research experiences and institutional review board service, this paper describes the practical implications of nurse investigators obligation to ensure informed consent among participants in long-term care research. Recommendations focus on applying a community consent model to long-term care research, promoting an evidence-based approach to the protection of residents with decisional impairment, and increasing investigators attention to ethical issues involving long-term care staff. PMID:20078005

  12. Long-term Career Goals for Professional Women in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klepper, Betty

    1986-01-01

    Encourages the formation of long-term career goals for women in agronomy. Offers perspectives and practical suggestions for obtaining positions, maintaining professional credentials, and managing personal and career related obligations. (ML)

  13. The market for long-term care services.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, David C

    2008-01-01

    Although a large literature has established the importance of market and regulatory forces within the long-term care sector, current research in this field is limited by a series of data, measurement, and methodological issues. This paper provides a comprehensive review of these issues with an emphasis on identifying initiatives that will increase the volume and quality of long-term care research. Recommendations include: the construction of standard measures of long-term care market boundaries, the broader dissemination of market and regulatory data, the linkage of survey-based data with market measures, the encouragement of further market-based studies of noninstitutional long-term care settings, and the standardization of Medicaid cost data. PMID:18524292

  14. Retrieval Processes for Organized Long-Term Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seamon, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    Research based on doctoral dissertation submitted at the University of Massachusetts. Experiment findings show that serial processes are present in recall and recognition for short-term and long-term storage. (DS)

  15. 'Preemie' Babies May Face Long-Term Anesthesia Risks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 157464.html 'Preemie' Babies May Face Long-Term Anesthesia Risks Study tracked higher rate of complications up ... prematurely may be at risk for complications from anesthesia and sedation at least into young adulthood, a ...

  16. Acupuncture May Ease Neck Pain Over Long Term

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155500.html Acupuncture May Ease Neck Pain Over Long Term 'Alexander ... Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two alternative therapies -- acupuncture and the Alexander technique -- appear equally beneficial for ...

  17. The L-arginine/NO pathway, homoarginine, and nitrite-dependent renal carbonic anhydrase activity in young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carmann, Christina; Lilienthal, Eggert; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Schmidt-Choudhury, Anjona; Hrster, Irina; Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Beckmann, Bibiana; Chobanyan-Jrgens, Kristine; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Lcke, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    High circulating levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and low circulating levels of homoarginine (hArg) are known cardiovascular risk factors in adults. While in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) circulating ADMA is significantly elevated, in children and adolescents the reported ADMA data are contradictory. In 102 children with T1DM and 95 healthy controls (HC) serving as controls, we investigated the L-arginine (Arg)/nitric oxide (NO) pathway. Children with T1DM were divided into two groups, i.e., in children with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus [T1DM-ND; n = 10; age, 8.8 (4.4-11.2) years; HbA1c, 13 (8.9-13.9) %] and in those with long-term treatment [T1DM-T; n = 92; age, 12.5 (10.5-15.4) years; HbA1c, 8.0 (7.2-8.6) %]. The age of the HC was 11.3 (8-13.3) years. Amino acids and NO metabolites of the Arg/NO pathway, creatinine and the oxidative stress biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by GC-MS or GC-MS/MS. Plasma hArg, ADMA and the hArg/ADMA molar ratio did not differ between the T1DM and HC groups. There was a significant difference between T1DM-T and HC with regard to plasma nitrite [0.53 (0.48-0.61) vs 2.05 (0.86-2.36) M, P < 0.0001] as well as to urinary nitrite [0.09 (0.06-0.17) vs 0.22 (0.13-0.37) ?mol/mmol creatinine, P < 0.0001]. Plasma, but not urinary nitrite, differed between T1DM-ND and HC [0.55 (0.50-0.66) vs 2.05 (0.86-2.36) M, P < 0.0001]. Plasma MDA did not differ between the groups. The urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio (UNOXR), a measure of nitrite-dependent renal carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity, was higher in T1DM-T [1173 (738-1481), P < 0.0001] and T1DM-ND [1341 (1117-1615), P = 0.0007] compared to HC [540 (324-962)], but did not differ between T1DM-T and T1DM-ND (P = 0.272). The lower nitrite excretion in the children with T1DM may indicate enhanced renal CA-dependent nitrite reabsorption compared with healthy children. Yet, lower plasma nitrite concentration in the T1DM patients may have also contributed to the higher UNOXR. Patients' age correlated positively with plasma hArg and hArg/ADMA and urinary DMA/ADMA. Plasma ADMA and urinary ADMA, DMA, nitrite and nitrate correlated negatively with age of the T1DM-T children. Significant correlations were found between plasma hArg and plasma Arg (r = 0.468, P < 0.0001), and urinary DMA (r = -0.426, P = 0.0001), ADMA (r = -0.266, P = 0.021) and nitrate (r = -0.234, P = 0.043). Plasma hArg correlated positively with age at diagnosis (r = +0.337, P = 0.002). ADMA, but not hArg, correlated with HbA1c in T1DM-T (r = -0.418, P < 0.0001) and T1DM-ND (r = +0.879, P = 0.0016). The greatest differences between T1DM-T and T1DM-ND were observed for urinary ADMA, DMA/ADMA ratio, nitrite and nitrate. The Arg/NO pathway is altered in T1DM in childhood and adolescence, yet the role and the importance of hArg and ADMA in T1DM remain to be elucidated. In young T1DM patients, oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation) is not elevated. PMID:26123986

  18. Maintaining Engagement in Long-term Interventions with Relational Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bickmore, Timothy; Schulman, Daniel; Yin, Langxuan

    2011-01-01

    We discuss issues in designing virtual humans for applications which require long-term voluntary use, and the problem of maintaining engagement with users over time. Concepts and theories related to engagement from a variety of disciplines are reviewed. We describe a platform for conducting studies into long-term interactions between humans and virtual agents, and present the results of two longitudinal randomized controlled experiments in which the effect of manipulations of agent behavior on user engagement was assessed. PMID:21318052

  19. A new image for long-term care.

    PubMed

    Wager, Richard; Creelman, William

    2004-04-01

    To counter widely held negative images of long-term care, managers in the industry should implement quality-improvement initiatives that include six key strategies: Manage the expectations of residents and their families. Address customers' concerns early. Build long-term customer satisfaction. Allocate resources to achieve exceptional outcomes in key areas. Respond to adverse events with compassion. Reinforce the facility's credibility. PMID:15098291

  20. Planning long-term vegetation studies at landscape scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Long-term ecological research is receiving more attention now than ever before. Two recent books, Long-term Studies in Ecology: Approaches and Alternatives, edited by Gene Likens (1989), and Long-term Ecological Research: An International Perspective, edited by Paul Risser (1991), prompt the question, “Why are these books so thin?” Except for data from paleoecological, retrospective studies (see below), there are exceptionally few long-term data sets in terrestrial ecology (Strayer et al. 1986; Tilman 1989; this volume). In a sample of 749 papers published in Ecology, Tilman (1989) found that only 1.7% of the studies lasted at least five field seasons. Only one chapter in each of the review books dealt specifically with expanding both the temporal and the spatial scales of ecological research (Berkowitz et al. 1989; Magnuson et al. 1991). Judging by the growing number of landscape-scale long-term studies, however, such as the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program (Callahan 1991), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP; Palmer et al. 1991), the U.S. Army’s Land Condition-Trend Analysis (LCTA) Program (Diersing et al. 1992), and various agencies’ global change research programs (CEES 1993), there is a growing interest to expand ecological research both temporally and spatially.

  1. Single crystal structural and absorption spectral characterizations of nitric oxide synthase complexed with Nω-hydroxy-L-arginine and diatomic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Doukov, Tzanko; Li, Huiying; Soltis, Michael; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    The X-ray structures of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) with Nω-hydroxy-L-arginine (L-NHA) and CO (or NO) bound have been determined at 1.91 to 2.2 Å resolution. Microspectrophotometric techniques confirmed reduced redox state and the status of diatomic ligand complexes during X-ray diffraction data collection. The structure of nNOS-NHA-NO, a close mimic to the dioxygen complex, provides a picture of the potential interactions between the heme-bound diatomic ligand, substrate L-NHA, and the surrounding protein and solvent structure environment. Since the OH group of L-NHA in the X-ray structures deviates from the plane of the guanidinium moiety substantially indicating that the OH-bearing, protonated guanidine Nω nitrogen of L-NHA has substantial sp3 hybridization character. This nitrogen geometry, different from that of the guanidinium Nω nitrogen of L-arginine, allows a hydrogen bond to be donated to the proximal oxygen of the heme-bound dioxygen complex thus preventing cleavage of the O-O bond. Instead, it favors the stabilization of the ferric-hydroperoxy intermediate, Fe3+-OOH-, which serves as the active oxidant in the conversion of L-NHA to NO and citrulline in the second reaction of the NOS. PMID:19791770

  2. Electrochemical immunosensor for casein based on gold nanoparticles and poly(L-Arginine)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite film functionalized interface.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qian; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yimin; He, Yujian; Ding, Nan; Wang, Jian; Wu, Zhijiao; Xiang, Kaixiang; Wang, Guangwei

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, a novel electrochemical immunosensor for the determination of casein based on gold nanoparticles and poly(L-Arginine)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (P-L-Arg/MWCNTs) composite film was proposed. The P-L-Arg/MWCNTs composite film was used to modify glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to fabricate P-L-Arg/MWCNTs/GCE through electropolymerization of L-Arginine on MWCNTs/GCE. Gold nanoparticles were adsorbed on the modified electrode to immobilize the casein antibody and to construct the immunosensor. The stepwise assembly process of the immunosensor was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Results demonstrated that the peak currents of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) redox pair decreased due to the formation of antibody-antigen complex on the modified electrode. The optimization of the adsorption time of gold nanoparticles, the pH of supporting electrolyte and the incubation time were investigated in details. Under optimal conditions, the peak currents obtained by DPV decreased linearly with the increasing casein concentrations in the range from 1 10(-7) to 1 10(-5) g mL(-1) with a linear coefficiency of 0.993. This electrochemical immunoassay has a low detection limit of 5 10(-8) g mL(-1) and was successfully applied to the determination of casein in cheese samples. PMID:21334187

  3. Amino acids (L-arginine and L-alanine) passivated CdS nanoparticles: Synthesis of spherical hierarchical structure and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Gambhire, A. B.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) passivated with amino acids (L-alanine and L-arginine) having spherical hierarchical morphology were synthesized by room temperature wet chemical method. Synthesized NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to study the variation of band gaps with concentration of surface modifying agents. Increase in band gap has been observed with the increase in concentration of surface modifying agents and was found more prominent for CdS NPs passivated with L-alanine. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were carried out for the study of crystal structure and morphology of CdS NPs. The average particle size of CdS NPs calculated from Debye-Scherer formula was found to less than 5 nm and agrees well with those determined from UV-vis spectra and TEM data. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to know the functional groups of the grown NPs. Peaks in FT-IR spectra indicate the formation of CdS NPs and capping with L-alanine and L-arginine. Photoluminescence spectra of these NPs were also studied. Finally, colloidal solution of CdS-PVAc was subjected to Z-scan experiment under low power cw laser illumination to characterize them for third order nonlinear optical properties. CdS-PVAc colloidal solution shows enhanced nonlinear absorption due to RSA and weak FCA on account of two photon absorption processes triggered by thermal effect.

  4. Effects of L-arginine pre-treatment in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced Parkinsons diseases in Balb/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Hami, Javad; Hosseini, Mehran; Shahi, Sekineh; Lotfi, Nassim; Talebi, Abolfazl; Afshar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Parkinsons disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease resulting from the degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Increasing evidence demonstrated that mice treated intranasally with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) suffered impairments in motor functions associated with disruption of DA neurons in SNc conceivably analogous to those observed in PD. L-arginine has been proposed as a novel neuroprotective agent that plays protective roles in several models of neuronal cellular damage. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of L-arginine on the numerical density of dark neurons (DNs) in the SNc of Balb/c mice subjected to MPTP administration. Methods: In the present study, we demonstrated that repeated treatment with L-arginine (300 mg/kg, i.p.) during 7 consecutive days attenuated the production of DNs in SNc of adult male Balb/c mice infused with a single intranasal administration of MPTP (1 mg/nostril). Results: Pre-treatment with L-arginine significantly decreased the numerical density of DNs in SNc of mice 21 days after intranasal MPTP administration. Conclusion: This investigation provides new insights in experimental models of PD, indicating that L-arginine represents a potential neuroprotective agent for the prevention of DA neuron degeneration in SNc observed in PD patients. PMID:26885338

  5. Long-term efficacy of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ault, Kevin A

    2007-11-01

    Achieving long-term protection following vaccination is crucial to ensuring that high levels of immunity are maintained within a population while eliminating the need to introduce booster vaccinations. Based on an analysis of the hepatitis B virus vaccine, several factors have been shown to contribute to long-term protection, namely: specific lymphoproliferation, the in vivo humoral response, and immune memory. To ensure protection against persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the subsequent development of cervical lesions, an effective HPV vaccine must be able to induce strong humoral immune responses. Mathematical modeling analyses based on a three-dose regimen of HPV type 16 prophylactic vaccine indicated that 99% of 16- to 23-year-old women would have almost life-long detectable anti-HPV-16 levels. Available data on the quadrivalent HPV vaccine demonstrated that long-term immune memory was induced, with anti-HPV geometric mean titers after 5 years remaining at or above those observed with natural infection. Vaccination also resulted in a substantial reduction in the combined incidence of HPV-6/11/16/18 related persistent infection or disease, and there were no cases of precancerous cervical dysplasia compared with six cases in women receiving placebo. Similarly the bivalent HPV vaccine has been shown to induce long-term immunity with >98% seropositivity maintained after 4.5 years of follow-up and geometric mean titres at this time point remaining substantially higher than those noted with naturally acquired infection. Countrywide registration regarding population and health events in a stable population of approximately 25 million makes the Nordic countries an ideal setting for the evaluation of long-term cervical cancer control. Population-based long-term efficacy trials conducted in these countries aim to investigate the long-term efficacy of HPV vaccination with regard to invasive cervical cancer, and the results of these trials are awaited with interest. PMID:17938016

  6. Long-term impact of reproductive factors on cancer risk.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, C; Negri, E; Franceschi, S; Parazzini, F

    1993-01-21

    The relationship between reproductive variables (parity, age at first birth, number of induced and spontaneous abortions) and cancer risk has been analysed using data from an integrated series of case-control studies conducted in northern Italy between 1983 and 1992. The overall data-set included women below age 75 with histologically confirmed cancers of the following sites: oesophagus, 58; stomach, 280; colon, 405; rectum, 210; liver, 82; gall-bladder, 29; pancreas, 129; breast, 3,415; cervix, 742; endometrium, 725; ovary, 953; bladder, 68; kidney, 56; thyroid, 180; lymphomas, 80; myelomas, 57; and a total of 5,619 controls admitted to hospital for acute non-neoplastic, non-gynaecological, non-hormone-related conditions. Multivariate odds ratios, as estimators of relative risks (RR), were obtained after allowance for age, education, use of oral contraceptives and oestrogen replacement treatments, plus various reproductive factors. Direct significant trends with parity were observed for cancer of the liver (RR for women with > or = 4 births vs. nulliparae = 3.3) and cervix uteri (RR = 4.1). The risk of gall-bladder cancer was also elevated for multiparae (RR = 1.9). No significant inverse trend in risk emerged. However, the RRs in multiparae were significantly below unity for breast (RR = 0.8), endometrium (RR = 0.7), and ovary (RR = 0.8). With reference to age at first birth, a significant trend in risk was observed for breast cancer (RR = 1.4 for 25 to 29 and 1.5 for > or = 30 vs. < 25 years). In contrast, the risk of cervical cancer was inversely related to age at first birth. For spontaneous abortions, the only significant inverse trend was for ovarian cancer (RR = 0.7 for > or = 2 vs. 0 abortions), but also the point estimate for endometrial cancer in women with > or = 2 abortions was below unity. For induced abortions, there was a strong inverse trend in risk for endometrial cancer (RR = 0.5), and the RRs were below unity also for colon and breast cancer. In contrast, cervical cancer was directly associated with the number of spontaneous abortions. Although the underlying aetiological interpretations are different for various cancer sites, this study provides, in a large and uniform data-set, quantitative information on the long-term impact of reproductive factors on cancer risk. PMID:8425757

  7. The relationship between interannual and long-term cloud feedbacks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Chen; Zelinka, Mark D.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Klein, Stephen A.

    2015-12-11

    The analyses of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 simulations suggest that climate models with more positive cloud feedback in response to interannual climate fluctuations also have more positive cloud feedback in response to long-term global warming. Ensemble mean vertical profiles of cloud change in response to interannual and long-term surface warming are similar, and the ensemble mean cloud feedback is positive on both timescales. However, the average long-term cloud feedback is smaller than the interannual cloud feedback, likely due to differences in surface warming pattern on the two timescales. Low cloud cover (LCC) change in response to interannual andmore » long-term global surface warming is found to be well correlated across models and explains over half of the covariance between interannual and long-term cloud feedback. In conclusion, the intermodel correlation of LCC across timescales likely results from model-specific sensitivities of LCC to sea surface warming.« less

  8. Long-Term Stewardship Program Science and Technology Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Joan McDonald

    2002-09-01

    Many of the United States’ hazardous and radioactively contaminated waste sites will not be sufficiently remediated to allow unrestricted land use because funding and technology limitations preclude cleanup to pristine conditions. This means that after cleanup is completed, the Department of Energy will have long-term stewardship responsibilities to monitor and safeguard more than 100 sites that still contain residual contamination. Long-term stewardship encompasses all physical and institutional controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms required to protect human health and the environment from the hazards remaining. The Department of Energy Long-Term Stewardship National Program is in the early stages of development, so considerable planning is still required to identify all the specific roles and responsibilities, policies, and activities needed over the next few years to support the program’s mission. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was tasked with leading the development of Science and Technology within the Long-Term Stewardship National Program. As part of that role, a task was undertaken to identify the existing science and technology related requirements, identify gaps and conflicts that exist, and make recommendations to the Department of Energy for future requirements related to science and technology requirements for long-term stewardship. This work is summarized in this document.

  9. Common Calibration Source for Monitoring Long-term Ozone Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalewski, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Accurate long-term satellite measurements are crucial for monitoring the recovery of the ozone layer. The slow pace of the recovery and limited lifetimes of satellite monitoring instruments demands that datasets from multiple observation systems be combined to provide the long-term accuracy needed. A fundamental component of accurately monitoring long-term trends is the calibration of these various instruments. NASA s Radiometric Calibration and Development Facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center has provided resources to minimize calibration biases between multiple instruments through the use of a common calibration source and standardized procedures traceable to national standards. The Facility s 50 cm barium sulfate integrating sphere has been used as a common calibration source for both US and international satellite instruments, including the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments, Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV), Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) (ESA), Scanning Imaging SpectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) (ESA), and others. We will discuss the advantages of using a common calibration source and its effects on long-term ozone data sets. In addition, sphere calibration results from various instruments will be presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the long-term characterization of the source itself.

  10. Managing frailty as a long-term condition.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jennifer K; Clegg, Andrew; Conroy, Simon P; Young, John

    2015-09-01

    Frailty is a distinctive late-life health state in which apparently minor stressor events are associated with adverse health outcomes. This article considers how the conceptualisation of frailty as a long-term condition offers new management approaches based on systematically applied preventative and proactive interventions. Frailty shares the key features of the common long-term conditions: it can be ameliorated but not cured; it is costly at an individual and societal level; it is progressive; it impacts adversely on life experience and it has episodic crises. The recognition of frailty as a long-term condition is not merely a semantic issue-a wide range of benefits can be anticipated. Primary care-based registers for frailty could be established and chronic disease models applied systematically for co-ordinated and person-centred preventative and proactive care. A team approach is a key component of long-term condition management, incorporating support, follow-up and behaviour change interventions that go beyond the scope of a traditional medical approach. This approach would ideally require changes in secondary care to embrace greater community-based working and closer relationships with the primary health and care team. Although our understanding of interventions to modify or treat frailty has improved, there is considerable scope for further development. Identifying frailty as a long-term condition would be an important step in distinguishing people with frailty as a discrete population for new research. PMID:26175349

  11. Long Term Stability Following Genioplasty: A Cephalometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, B Lakshman; Raju, G Kranthi Praveen; Kumar, N Dilip; Reddy, G Vivek; Naik, B Ravindra; Achary, C Ravindranath

    2015-01-01

    Background: A receding chin associated with an orthognathic mandible is a common situation and surgical changes in chin position are often required to improve the overall harmony of the face. Genioplasty is one such procedure. Stability of hard and soft tissue changes following genioplasty on a long term basis needs to be assessed. Studies on the stability of hard and soft tissue changes following genioplasty on a short term basis have revealed it as a procedure with good stability. This study is done to assess the stability of hard and soft tissue changes following genioplasty on a long term basis. Materials and Methods: Pre-surgical, postsurgical and long term post-surgical cephalograms of 15 cases treated by vertical reduction augmentation genioplasty were obtained. Paired t-test was used to compare the changes between pre-surgical, postsurgical and long term postsurgical cephalograms. Results: Findings of this study demonstrated that genioplasty is a stable procedure. After long term follow-up period, there was a relapse of 1.5 mm at the pogonion accounting for 24% of the surgical advancement. This is attributed to the remodeling that occurs at the surgical site, but not the instability due to the surgical procedure. Conclusion: With the present study, it can be concluded that vertical reduction and advancement genioplasty can be considered as an adjunctive procedure that produces predictable results and the bony and soft tissue stability were generally very good. PMID:25954070

  12. Working with families in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Bluestein, Daniel; Latham Bach, Patricia

    2007-05-01

    Effective communication with families can improve clinical process and outcomes in long-term care. Such communication may be challenging to long-term care clinicians, who may feel they lack requisite skills or are uncomfortable with potentially charged and negative emotions that may result. These barriers can be overcome by using models of family behavior and of physician involvement in family counseling to foster understanding and organize family meetings. We present such models in this article. The first of these, the Pearlin Stress Process Model offers a framework for understanding family adaptation to long-term care. Within the Pearlin model, family function is a critical intervening variable. Structural Family Systems Theory is therefore examined next to guide to recognition of family characteristics that impact communication. We focus on translation of these theories to long-term care practice through clinical case vignettes. Applying the Levels of Physician Involvement in family oriented care to long-term care, we then suggest an organizing, stepwise process for the family meeting itself. We conclude with strategies for conflict management and a discussion of the importance of the interdisciplinary team in family care. PMID:17498612

  13. An Exotic Long-Term Pattern in Stock Price Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jianrong; Huang, Jiping

    2012-01-01

    Background To accurately predict the movement of stock prices is always of both academic importance and practical value. So far, a lot of research has been reported to help understand the behavior of stock prices. However, some of the existing theories tend to render us the belief that the time series of stock prices are unpredictable on a long-term timescale. The question arises whether the long-term predictability exists in stock price dynamics. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we analyze the price reversals in the US stock market and the Chinese stock market on the basis of a renormalization method. The price reversals are divided into two types: retracements (the downward trends after upward trends) and rebounds (the upward trends after downward trends), of which the intensities are described by dimensionless quantities, and , respectively. We reveal that for both mature and emerging markets, the distribution of either retracements or rebounds shows two characteristic values, 0.335 and 0.665, both of which are robust over the long term. Conclusions/Significance The methodology presented here provides a way to quantify the stock price reversals. Our findings strongly support the existence of the long-term predictability in stock price dynamics, and may offer a hint on how to predict the long-term movement of stock prices. PMID:23284734

  14. Nitric-oxide supplementation for treatment of long-term complications in argininosuccinic aciduria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is required for the synthesis and channeling of L-arginine to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for nitric oxide (NO) production. Congenital ASL deficiency causes argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA), the second most common urea cycle disorder, and leads to deficiency of both urea...

  15. Data Analysis in the LOFAR Long Term Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holties, H. A.; van Diepen, G.; van Dok, D.; Dijkstra, F.; Loose, M.; Renting, G. A.; Schrijvers, C.; Vriend, W.-J.

    2012-09-01

    The LOFAR Long Term Archive (LTA) is a distributed information system that provides integrated services for data analysis as well as long term preservation of astronomical datasets and their provenance. The data analysis capabilities are provided by a federated system that integrates a central catalog and client user interfaces provided by Astro-Wise with processing pipelines running on Grid based and University HPC clusters. The framework used for data analysis ensures that proper authorization and access rules are applied and that generated data products are ingested into the storage part of the Long Term Archive. The ingest process includes information about data provenance. This paper presents the architecture of the processing framework of the LTA.

  16. Adverse effects of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Edward; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2011-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors have an excellent safety profile and have become one of the most commonly prescribed class of drugs in primary and specialty care. Long-term, sometimes lifetime, use is becoming increasingly common, often without appropriate indications. This paper is a detailed review of the current evidence on this important topic, focusing on the potential adverse effects of long-term proton pump inhibitor use that have generated the greatest concern: B12 deficiency; iron deficiency; hypomagnesemia; increased susceptibility to pneumonia, enteric infections, and fractures; hypergastrinemia and cancer; drug interactions; and birth defects. We explain the pathophysiological mechanisms that may underlie each of these relationships, review the existing evidence, and discuss implications for clinical management. The benefits of proton pump inhibitor use outweigh its risks in most patients. Elderly, malnourished, immune-compromised, chronically ill, and osteoporotic patients theoretically could be at increased risk from long-term therapy. PMID:21365243

  17. Viability of Long-Term Gene Therapy in the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Patrick J.; Wise, Andrew K.; Flynn, Brianna O.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Richardson, Rachael T.

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has been investigated as a way to introduce a variety of genes to treat neurological disorders. An important clinical consideration is its long-term effectiveness. This research aims to study the long-term expression and effectiveness of gene therapy in promoting spiral ganglion neuron survival after deafness. Adenoviral vectors modified to express brain derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3 were unilaterally injected into the guinea pig cochlea one week post ototoxic deafening. After six months, persistence of gene expression and significantly greater neuronal survival in neurotrophin-treated cochleae compared to the contralateral cochleae were observed. The long-term gene expression observed indicates that gene therapy is potentially viable; however the degeneration of the transduced cells as a result of the original ototoxic insult may limit clinical effectiveness. With further research aimed at transducing stable cochlear cells, gene therapy may be an efficacious way to introduce neurotrophins to promote neuronal survival after hearing loss. PMID:24751795

  18. Long-term Synoptic Observations of the Sun.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, Alexei

    2015-08-01

    Does the solar activity vary with time, or it remains constant? How systematic or intermittent solar cycles are? Long-term observations of the Sun are the reason we know answers to these questions. Ultimately, the development of a better understanding of stellar cycles will require similar long-term observations of other sun-like stars. To facilitate international collaboration on synoptic long-term solar observations, IAU created a working group on Coordination of Synoptic Observations of the Sun. The working group provides a forum for discussion of all issues relevant to past, current, and future synoptic programs, preservation, calibration, and access to synoptic solar data products. This talk will provide a summary of recent activity by this IAU WG. It will also present a brief overview of recent research on sun-as-a-star conducted at the US National Solar Observatory.

  19. Long-term urological outcomes in cloacal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Brian T; Wilcox, Duncan T

    2016-04-01

    Cloacal anomalies are the most complex and severe form of congenital anorectal malformations (ARM) and urogenital malformations, and it has been well documented that increased severity of ARM leads to worse outcomes. While short-term data on persistent cloaca are available, a paucity of data on long-term outcomes exists, largely because of a lack of uniform terminology, inclusion with other ARM and evolution of the operative technique. On comprehensive review of the published literature on long-term urological outcomes in patients with cloacal anomalies, we found a significant risk of chronic kidney disease and incontinence, however, with improvements in surgical technique, outcomes have improved. Continence often requires intermittent catheterization and in some cases, bladder augmentation. The complexity of cloacal malformations and associated anomalies make long-term multidisciplinary follow-up imperative. PMID:26969235

  20. Winning market positioning strategies for long term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Higgins, L F; Weinstein, K; Arndt, K

    1997-01-01

    The decision to develop an aggressive marketing strategy for its long term care facility has become a priority for the management of a one-hundred bed facility in the Rocky Mountain West. Financial success and lasting competitiveness require that the facility in question (Deer Haven) establish itself as the preferred provider of long term care for its target market. By performing a marketing communications audit, Deer Haven evaluated its present market position and created a strategy for solidifying and dramatizing this position. After an overview of present conditions in the industry, we offer a seven step process that provides practical guidance for positioning a long term care facility. We conclude by providing an example application. PMID:10179063

  1. [Long-term evolution and complications of eating disorders].

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Isabelle

    2008-01-31

    Eating disorders long-term evolution is good in 50% of cases, middle in 25% (recovery from eating disorders, but still psychological suffering) and bad in 25% of cases, with chronic eating disorders, anxious or depressive comorbid disorder, and bad consequences in social patients' life. Anorexia nervosa has a considerably worse long-term outcome than bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorders. Never the less, purging bulimia nervosa is often associated with other impulsive symptoms, such as addictions and suicide attempts. Chronic undernutrition leads to main long-term medical complications of eating disorders: linear growth in adolescents with anorexia nervosa, infertility, and osteoporosis. These complications need a specific medical follow up, at least once a year, added to the psychiatric and psychotherapist follow-up. PMID:18361276

  2. Long-term multipactor discharge in multicarrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anza, S.; Vicente, C.; Gimeno, B.; Boria, V. E.; Armendariz, J.

    2007-08-15

    A new mechanism of long-term multipactor in multicarrier systems is studied employing both analytical and numerical methods. In particular, the investigation is focused on the impact that a realistic secondary emission yield at low energies produces on the development of long term multipactor. A novel analytical model for this interperiod charge accumulation is presented using the traditional multipactor theory for parallel plates, and approximating the multicarrier signal as a single-carrier signal modulated by a pulsed signal envelope. The analytical predictions are verified by numerical simulations for a typical rectangular waveguide. The analytical and numerical results demonstrate that the susceptibility of the system to develop a long-term multipactor discharge increases with higher values of low-energy secondary emission yield.

  3. Long-term Use of Opioids for Complex Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Von Korff, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Increased opioid prescribing for back pain and other chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions has been accompanied by dramatic increases in prescription opioid addiction and fatal overdose. Opioid-related risks appear to increase with dose. While short-term randomized trials of opioids for chronic pain have found modest analgesic benefits (a one-third reduction in pain intensity on average), the long-term safety and effectiveness of opioids for chronic musculoskeletal pain is unknown. Given the lack of large, long-term randomized trials, recent epidemiologic data suggests the need for caution when considering long-term use of opioids to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain, particularly at higher dosage levels. Principles for achieving more selective and cautious use of opioids for chronic musculoskeletal pain are proposed. PMID:24315147

  4. Stirling engine - Approach for long-term durability assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Halford, Gary R.; Freed, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    The approach employed by NASA Lewis for the long-term durability assessment of the Stirling engine hot-section components is summarized. The approach consists of: preliminary structural assessment; development of a viscoplastic constitutive model to accurately determine material behavior under high-temperature thermomechanical loads; an experimental program to characterize material constants for the viscoplastic constitutive model; finite-element thermal analysis and structural analysis using a viscoplastic constitutive model to obtain stress/strain/temperature at the critical location of the hot-section components for life assessment; and development of a life prediction model applicable for long-term durability assessment at high temperatures. The approach should aid in the provision of long-term structural durability and reliability of Stirling engines.

  5. Sexuality and Physical Intimacy in Long Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality and sexual needs in older adults remains a neglected area of clinical intervention, particularly so in long term care settings. Because older adults in medical rehabilitation and long term care beds present with significant frailties, and often significant neurocognitive disorders it makes it difficult for occupational therapists and other staff to evaluate the capacity of an older adult resident to participate in sexual relationships. The current paper reviews the current literature on sexuality and aging, examines some of the clinical practices and guidelines regarding sexual expression in long term care and presents two case examples. A semi-structured interview and decision tree is presented to assist therapists in making careful and informed decisions and thereby balancing needs for protection with needs for autonomy. PMID:24354331

  6. Long-term Internship through Cooperative Education with Regional Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kenzo; Hase, Hiroyuki

    The long term internship is one of special educational programs for graduate students of Graduate School of Engineering in University of Fukui. This is a collaborative program between university and industries where selected post-graduate students are dispatched to companies for a long term and educated in real business environments. It is the final goal of the program to develop sophisticated specialists who would be able to catch the business strategy in industries and solve any problems by themselves. The program is managed in a semester (6 months) and contains 1.5 month prior education of preliminary special knowledge, ethics and secrecy, about 3 month dispatch with long-term internship, and 1.5 month post-education for complementary education and presentation. This paper presents the effect of this program which has been evolving since 2005.

  7. Long term stability and performance of solar system instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lior, N.; Brish, R.T.; Koffs, S.; Tedori, L.

    1983-11-01

    In an attempt to improve the quality and reliability of methods used for long-term performance evaluation of solar systems, detailed information is provided about the long-term (typically over 2 years) performance and stability of a relatively large number of instruments used in the performance monitoring of a well-instrumented solar heating project. The calibration methods are also described. The instruments include resistance temperature detectors, several types of flowmeters, wattmeters, pyranometers, wind anemometers, a humidity meter, a barometer, differential temperature solar system controllers, and an automatic data acquisition system used to scan, convert and store the data. Recommendations for good instrumentation of solar systems are also provided. It was found that the critical instruments for performance evaluation, and most of the instruments overall, have performed very well over the long term, allowing thermal performance evaluation with an accuracy better than 3% with only one calibration per year.

  8. Long-term citrate anticoagulation in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Gubenek, Jakob; Kova?, Janko; Benedik, Miha; Marn-Pernat, Andreja; Knap, Bojan; Ponikvar, Rafael; Buturovi?-Ponikvar, Jadranka

    2011-06-01

    In some cases, long-term (>3 months) citrate anticoagulation is needed in maintenance hemodialysis patients due to a persistent bleeding risk. In this retrospective observational study, we present our experience and assess its safety and effects on mineral and bone disorder parameters. Sixteen patients (mean age 67 15 years) were treated with long-term citrate anticoagulation. The indications were: recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding in nine patients, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, retroperitoneal hematoma, chronic subdural hematoma, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, vascular malformations in the brain in one patient, and others in two patients. Metabolic complications and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were analyzed. Citrate anticoagulation was performed for 4 months to 6.3 years (median 12 months). Ionized calcium was stable during the procedures; hypocalcemia (<0.9 mmol/L) was rare (2.1% of procedures), and there was one case of severe symptomatic hypocalcemia. There were no clinically significant acid-base disturbances and no clotting problems. In the short term (1-3 months after starting citrate), the iPTH increased in 73% of patients (from 325 310 to 591 793 pg/L, P = 0.11, N = 11). In the long term (1-2 years), an increase in iPTH was observed in 3/6 patients. The time period (before/after starting citrate) was a significant predictor of iPTH using main-effects anova (P < 0.001). To conclude, long-term citrate anticoagulation in chronic hemodialysis patients is safe. Mild hypocalcemia during dialysis with citrate anticoagulation may contribute to a short- and long-term increase in iPTH in these patients. Further studies on long-term citrate anticoagulation are necessary. PMID:21624076

  9. Morphodynamic length scale and long term river meandering dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzoni, S.; Frascati, A.

    2009-12-01

    The fully nonlinear simulation of the lateral migration of meandering channels, combined with an analytical description of the linearized flow field, gives a powerful and yet computationally accessible tool to investigate short and long term evolution of alluvial rivers. In the present contribution we focus on the long term behavior of meandering rivers. This class of dynamical systems is driven by the coexistence of various intrinsically nonlinear mechanisms which determine the possible occurrence of two different morphodynamic regimes: the sub-resonant and the super-resonant regime. Investigating the full range of morphodynamic conditions, we end up with a new morphodynamic length scale associated with spatially oscillating disturbances, accounting for both curvature-forced variations in velocity and depth and alternate bars. Once normalized with this length scale, the relevant morphologic features of the simulated long term patterns (i.e. the probability density function of the local channel curvature and the geometric characteristics of the oxbow lakes) tend to collapse on two distinct behaviors, depending on the dominant morphologic regime. The long term river meandering dynamics is then investigated. The occurrence of cutoff events is a key mechanism in the dynamics of these systems. They introduce a strong source of nonlinearity in the evolution of river meandering, which strongly contributes to the formation of the complex planform patterns usually observed in nature. To detect the possible signatures of a chaotic behavior or a self-organized criticality state triggered in river meandering dynamics by the repeated occurrence of cutoffs, some robust nonlinear methodologies have been applied to both the spatial series of local curvatures and the time series of long term channel sinuosity. The temporal distribution of cutoff inter-arrivals is also investigated. The results are consistent and show that, at least from a modelling point of view, no evidence of low dimensional determinism characterizing chaos or self-organized criticality is detectable in the long term dynamics of meandering rivers.

  10. Comparison of long-term care in an acute care institution and in a long-term care institution

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, R; Kalant, N

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute care hospitals in Quebec are required to reserve 10% of their beds for patients receiving long-term care while awaiting transfer to a long-term care facility. It is widely believed that this is inefficient because it is more costly to provide long-term care in an acute care hospital than in one dedicated to long-term care. The purpose of this study was to compare the quality and cost of long-term care in an acute care hospital and in a long-term care facility. METHODS: A concurrent cross-sectional study was conducted of 101 patients at the acute care hospital and 102 patients at the long-term care hospital. The 2 groups were closely matched in terms of age, sex, nursing care requirements and major diagnoses. Several indicators were used to assess the quality of care: the number of medical specialist consultations, drugs, biochemical tests and radiographic examinations; the number of adverse events (reportable incidents, nosocomial infections and pressure ulcers); and anthropometric and biochemical indicators of nutritional status. Costs were determined for nursing personnel, drugs and biochemical tests. A longitudinal study was conducted of 45 patients who had been receiving long-term care at the acute care hospital for at least 5 months and were then transferred to the long-term care facility where they remained for at least 6 months. For each patient, the number of adverse events, the number of medical specialist consultations and the changes in activities of daily living status were assessed at the 2 institutions. RESULTS: In the concurrent study, no differences in the number of adverse events were observed; however, patients at the acute care hospital received more drugs (5.9 v. 4.7 for each patient, p < 0.01) and underwent more tests (299 v. 79 laboratory units/year for each patient, p < 0.001) and radiographic examinations (64 v. 46 per 1000 patient-weeks, p < 0.05). At both institutions, 36% of the patients showed anthropometric and biochemical evidence of protein-calorie undernutrition; 28% at the acute care hospital and 27% at the long-term care hospital had low serum iron and low transferrin saturation, compatible with iron deficiency. The longitudinal study showed that there were more consultations (61 v. 37 per 1000 patient-weeks, p < 0.02) and fewer pressure ulcers (18 v. 34 per 1000 patient-weeks, p < 0.05) at the acute care hospital than at the long-term care facility; other measures did not differ. The cost per patient-year was $7580 higher at the acute care hospital, attributable to the higher cost of drugs ($42), the greater use of laboratory tests ($189) and, primarily, the higher cost of nursing ($7349). For patients requiring 3.00 nursing hours/day, the acute care hospital provided more hours than the long-term care facility (3.59 v. 3.03 hours), with a higher percentage of hours from professional nurses rather than auxiliary nurses or nursing aides (62% v. 28%). The nurse staffing pattern at the acute care hospital was characteristic of university-affiliated acute care hospitals. INTERPRETATION: The long-term care provided in the acute care hospital involved a more interventionist medical approach and greater use of professional nurses (at a significantly higher cost) but without any overall difference in the quality of care. PMID:9835878

  11. Long-term followup studies of schizophrenia: editors' introduction.

    PubMed

    McGlashan, T H; Carpenter, W T

    1988-01-01

    What are the major long-term followup studies of schizophrenia from around the world? What have we learned about schizophrenia and its vicissitudes over a lifetime? Does the lifelong vantage point help us to identify the primary psychopathologic components of schizophrenia and to distinguish it from other forms of mental illness? What are the implications of the longitudinal perspective for reducting heterogeneity, for transcultural comparisons, and for updating nosology? Is it time to emphasize hypothesis testing in longitudinal studies? These and other questions about schizophrenia are addressed in the Bulletin issue which focuses upon the long-term followup study, its productivity, and its promise. PMID:3217764

  12. Preventing infection with long-term indwelling urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Slater, Rebecca

    2011-04-01

    This article sets out to inform readers on the care and management of indwelling catheters. The reason for urinary catheter insertion is discussed and the decision to use a long-term indwelling urinary catheter is explained. This article focuses on the risk of urinary tract infections (UTI) associated with the use of long-term indwelling catheters and how these may be avoided. Examples of current products are detailed and how the selection of the right product may be achieved is also outlined. PMID:21471917

  13. Leadership: the Winnipeg Community and Long-Term Care Authority.

    PubMed

    Suski, M; Hack, T; Heaman, M

    1999-01-01

    The Winnipeg Community and Long Term Care Authority (WCA) was established in 1998 under the Regional Health Authorities Act of the Province of Manitoba. The WCA's role is to provide for the successful integration of Winnipeg's community-based healthcare delivery services through its three main portfolios: Community Care and Public Health, Home Care and Mental Health, and Long Term Care and Specialized Services. The WCA is dedicated to building a quality health future for Winnipeg. Various initiatives undertaken in the pursuit of quality are described. PMID:10538544

  14. Long-term conditions. 3: Being an expert patient.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Vina

    2006-02-01

    This third article in the series focusing on long-term conditions explores the patient perspective. Drawing on the experiences of seven people affected by a variety of long-term conditions, it illustrates how the journey towards being an expert patient is often lengthy and traumatic. Pre- and post-diagnosis phases are narrated, and the process of becoming an expert patient described. The articles suggests that there is significant potential for the development of a reciprocal relationship between patients and health professionals framed by mutual learning and advice. PMID:16493308

  15. Long-term preservation of native arteriovenous dialysis fistulas.

    PubMed

    Mallios, Alexandros; Costanzo, Alessandro; Boura, Benoit; Combes, Myriam; Alomran, Faris; de Blic, Romain; Jennings, William C

    2014-04-01

    Preservation of native arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) in the long term can be technically challenging. Various anatomic or functional problems can occur and multiple open and/or endovascular interventions may be required for extended preservation of native accesses. In this report, we review vascular access maintenance in a 72-year-old woman during a 5-year period. Multiple complications of her native radiocephalic AVF included recurrent occlusions, a central venous stent fracture and symptomatic venous outflow stenosis. We present this case to illustrate the various techniques and combination of approaches used in the long-term preservation of a native AVF. PMID:24360937

  16. Long-term effects of childhood sexual exploitation.

    PubMed

    Rew, L

    1989-01-01

    In this article two conceptual frameworks for understanding the effects of childhood sexual exploitation are presented: the traumagenic dynamics model and the model of information processing. Various research studies of the long-term effects of this problem are reviewed and summarized. Results of these studies show that survivors of childhood sexual exploitation experience a variety of long-term effects, including low self-esteem, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, suicidal attempts, and drug and alcohol abuse. Implications for nursing practice and research are suggested. PMID:2676906

  17. Long-term Outcomes in Youths with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    White, Neil H

    2015-08-01

    In this article, the author reviews the long-term outcomes and their precursors of type 1 diabetes starting in youth. The author also contrasts the changing incidence of these long-term complications as we have moved from the pre-Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) to the post-DCCT standard of care and reviews the emerging data related to complications in youths with type 2 diabetes. Finally, the author reviews the recent understanding related to the effects of diabetes on the brain and cognition. PMID:26210623

  18. Mobile wearable device for long term monitoring of vital signs.

    PubMed

    Klingeberg, T; Schilling, M

    2012-05-01

    In long-term prevention and in rehabilitation of health of elderly people the recording of vital signs plays an important role. Especially the progress of rehabilitation can be deduced from the recording of an electrocardigram (ECG), blood pressure and body temperature. In this paper we present a wireless coupled recording device for long-term monitoring of these vital sign signals. We record the ECG, the blood pressure and the skin temperature and include a 3D-acceleration sensor for the determination of the movements during recording. To deal with motion artifacts in all recorded properties we use data fusion to reject or correct distorted vital sign signals. PMID:22285459

  19. Long-term results of compartmental arthroplasties of the knee: Long term results of partial knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parratte, S; Ollivier, M; Lunebourg, A; Abdel, M P; Argenson, J-N

    2015-10-01

    Partial knee arthroplasty (PKA), either medial or lateral unicompartmental knee artroplasty (UKA) or patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) are a good option in suitable patients and have the advantages of reduced operative trauma, preservation of both cruciate ligaments and bone stock, and restoration of normal kinematics within the knee joint. However, questions remain concerning long-term survival. The goal of this review article was to present the long-term results of medial and lateral UKA, PFA and combined compartmental arthroplasty for multicompartmental disease. Medium- and long-term studies suggest reasonable outcomes at ten years with survival greater than 95% in UKA performed for medial osteoarthritis or osteonecrosis, and similarly for lateral UKA, particularly when fixed-bearing implants are used. Disappointing long-term outcomes have been observed with the first generation of patellofemoral implants, as well as early Bi-Uni (i.e., combined medial and lateral UKA) or Bicompartmental (combined UKA and PFA) implants due to design and fixation issues. Promising short- and med-term results with the newer generations of PFAs and bicompartmental arthroplasties will require long-term confirmation. PMID:26430081

  20. Long-term nitric oxide deficiency causes muscarinic supersensitivity and reduces β3-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation, causing rat detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Mónica, F Z T; Bricola, A A O; Báu, F R; Freitas, L L Lopes; Teixeira, S A; Muscará, M N; Abdalla, F M F; Porto, C S; De Nucci, G; Zanesco, A; Antunes, E

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Overactive bladder is a complex and widely prevalent condition, but little is known about its physiopathology. We have carried out morphological, biochemical and functional assays to investigate the effects of long-term nitric oxide (NO) deficiency on muscarinic receptor and β-adrenoceptor modulation leading to overactivity of rat detrusor muscle. Experimental approach: Male Wistar rats received Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in drinking water for 7–30 days. Functional responses to muscarinic and β-adrenoceptor agonists were measured in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) strips in Krebs–Henseleit solution. Measurements of [3H]inositol phosphate, NO synthase (NOS) activity, [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB) binding and bladder morphology were also performed. Key results: Long-term L-NAME treatment significantly increased carbachol-induced DSM contractile responses after 15 and 30 days; relaxing responses to the β3-adrenoceptor agonist BRL 37-344 were significantly reduced at 30 days. Constitutive NOS activity in bladder was reduced by 86% after 7 days and maintained up to 30 days of L-NAME treatment. Carbachol increased sixfold the [3H]inositol phosphate in bladder tissue from rats treated with L-NAME. [3H]QNB was bound with an apparent KD twofold higher in bladder membranes after L-NAME treatment compared with that in control. No morphological alterations in DSM were found. Conclusions and implications: Long-term NO deficiency increased rat DSM contractile responses to a muscarinic agonist, accompanied by significantly enhanced KD values for muscarinic receptors and [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation in bladder. This supersensitivity for muscarinic agonists along with reductions of β3-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxations indicated that overactive DSM resulted from chronic NO deficiency. PMID:18297104

  1. Design, Synthesis, Antiviral Activity, and Pre-formulation Development of Poly-L-Arginine-Fatty acyl Derivatives of Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pemmaraju, Bhanu P.; Malekar, Swapnil; Agarwal, Hitesh K.; Tiwari, Rakesh K.; Oh, Donghoon; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Worthen, David R.; Parang, Keykavous

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to design conjugates of anti-HIV nucleosides conjugated with fatty acids and cell penetrating poly-L-arginine (polyArg) peptides. Three conjugates of polyArg cell-penetrating peptides with fatty acyl derivatives of alovudine (FLT), lamivudine (3TC), and emtricitabine (FTC) were synthesized. In general, the compounds exhibited anti-HIV activity against X4 and R5 cell-free virus with EC50 values of 1.516.6 ?M. FLT-CO-(CH2)12-CO-(Arg)7 exhibited EC50 values of 2.9 ?M and 3.1 ?M against X4 and R5 cell-free virus, respectively. The FLT conjugate was selected for further preformulation studies by determination of solution state degradation and lipid solubility. The compound was found to be stable in neutral and oxidative conditions and moderately stable in heated conditions. PMID:25513860

  2. Supplying dextrose before insemination and L-arginine during the last third of pregnancy in sow diets: effects on within-litter variation of piglet birth weight.

    PubMed

    Quesnel, H; Quiniou, N; Roy, H; Lottin, A; Boulot, S; Gondret, F

    2014-04-01

    Preweaning piglet mortality is largely attributed to the incidence of low birth weight and birth weight variation within the litter. Therefore, developing strategies to increase within-litter uniformity of piglet birth weight is important. This study investigated the effects of different feeding strategies based on specific nutrient supplies in sow diet on the within-litter variation of piglet birth weight (BW0). Four batches of highly prolific crossbred Landrace Large White sows were used. Three dietary treatments were compared: supplies of dextrose during the week before insemination (190 g/d) and of L-arginine (25.5 g/d) from d 77 of pregnancy until term (DEXA, n = 26); a dietary supplementation of L-arginine only (25.5 g/d), from d 77 of pregnancy until term (ARGI, n = 24); and no supplementation to a standard gestation diet (CTL; n = 23). Total born piglets (TB), i.e., piglets born alive (BA) and stillborn piglets, were numbered and weighed at birth and at weaning. Data were analyzed by ANOVA using the MIXED procedure in a model that included dietary treatment (ARGI, DEXA, and CTL), initial parity (1, 2 and 3, 4, and more), and backfat thickness (below or above the average value at the onset of the experiment: 15.7 mm) as the main effects and batch as random effect. The treatment did not influence (P > 0.10) the number of piglets at birth (on average 15.6 3.8 and 14.2 3.6 for TB and BA, respectively) or piglet BW0 (on average 1.48 0.26 and 1.50 0.26 kg for TB and BA, respectively). The coefficient of variation of piglet BW0 (CV(BW0)) was less in litters from ARGI sows than in litters from CTL sows and intermediate in litters from DEXA sows (for TB: 21.4, 23.4, and 25.7%, P = 0.08; for BA: 20.6, 22.5, and 25.4%, P = 0.03, in the ARGI, DEXA, and CTL groups, respectively). Irrespective of diet, CV(BW0) was less (P < 0.01) in litters with 16 TB piglets or less than in the largest litters (20.9 vs. 26.5%). Litter growth rate during lactation and litter size at weaning were not influenced (P > 0.10) by dietary treatments. In conclusion, supplementing gestation diet with L-arginine during the last third of pregnancy reduced within-litter variation of piglet birth weight. Combining L-arginine dietary supply with a supplementation of dextrose before insemination provided no additional benefit. PMID:24492569

  3. N-alpha-Cocoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester, DL-pyroglutamic acid salt, as an inactivator of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Y; Toyoshima, S

    1979-01-01

    N-alpha-Cocoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester, DL-pyroglutamic acid salt (CAE), exhibited a strong inactivating effect on hepatitis B surface antigen. Concentrations of CAE required for 50 and 100% inactivation of the antigen were 0.01 to 0.025% and 0.025 to 0.05% respectively. CAE completely inactivated hepatitis B surface antigen at the lowest concentration compared with various compounds including about 500 amino acid derivatives, sodium hypochlorite, 2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether, and some detergents. Furthermore, CAE inactivated vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and influenza virus, whereas poliovirus was not inactivated at all. The results suggest that the inactivating effects of CAE are related to interaction with lipid-containing viral envelopes. PMID:228595

  4. Hippocampal Focal Knockout of CBP Affects Specific Histone Modifications, Long-Term Potentiation, and Long-Term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Ruth M; Malvaez, Melissa; Kramar, Eniko; Matheos, Dina P; Arrizon, Abraham; Cabrera, Sara M; Lynch, Gary; Greene, Robert W; Wood, Marcelo A

    2011-01-01

    To identify the role of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CREB-binding protein (CBP) in neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus during memory formation, we examine the effects of a focal homozygous knockout of CBP on histone modifications, gene expression, synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We show that CBP is critical for the in vivo acetylation of lysines on histones H2B, H3, and H4. CBP's homolog p300 was unable to compensate for the loss of CBP. Neurons lacking CBP maintained phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB, yet failed to activate CREB:CBP-mediated gene expression. Loss of CBP in dorsal CA1 of the hippocampus resulted in selective impairments to long-term potentiation and long-term memory for contextual fear and object recognition. Together, these results suggest a necessary role for specific chromatin modifications, selectively mediated by CBP in the consolidation of memories. PMID:21508930

  5. Long-term efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability of ibandronate in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Inderjeeth, Charles A; Glendenning, Paul; Ratnagobal, Shoba; Inderjeeth, Diren Che; Ondhia, Chandni

    2015-01-01

    Several second-generation bisphosphonates (BPs) are approved in osteoporosis treatment. Efficacy and safety depends on potency of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS) inhibition, hydroxyapatite affinity, compliance and adherence. The latter may be influenced by frequency and route of administration. A literature search using ibandronate, postmenopausal osteoporosis, fracture, and bone mineral density (BMD) revealed 168 publications. The Phase III BONE study, using low dose 2.5 mg daily oral ibandronate demonstrated 49% relative risk reduction (RRR) in clinical vertebral fracture after 3 years. Non-vertebral fracture (NVF) reduction was demonstrated in a subgroup (pretreatment T-score ? ?3.0; RRR 69%) and a meta-analysis of high annual doses (150 mg oral monthly or intravenous equivalent of ibandronate; RRR 38%). Hip fracture reduction was not demonstrated. Long-term treatment efficacy has been confirmed over 5 years. Long term safety is comparable to placebo over 3 years apart from flu-like symptoms which are more common with oral monthly and intravenous treatments. No cases of atypical femoral fracture or osteonecrosis of the jaw have been reported in randomized controlled trial studies. Ibandronate inhibits FPPS more than alendronate but less than other BPs which could explain rate of action onset. Ibandronate has a higher affinity for hydroxyapatite compared with risedronate but less than other BPs which could affect skeletal distribution and rate of action offset. High doses (150 mg oral monthly or intravenous equivalent) were superior to low doses (oral 2.5 mg daily) according to 1 year BMD change. Data are limited by patient selection, statistical power, under-dosing, and absence of placebo groups in high dose studies. Ibandronate treatment offers different doses and modalities of administration which could translate into higher adherence rates, an important factor when the two main limitations of BP treatment are initiation and adherence rates. However, lack of consistency in NVF reduction and absence of hip fracture data limits more generalized use of this agent. PMID:25565901

  6. Improved Muscle Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy through L-Arginine and Metformin: An Investigator-Initiated, Open-Label, Single-Center, Proof-Of-Concept-Study

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Patricia; Bonati, Ulrike; Erne, Beat; Schmid, Maurice; Rubino, Daniela; Pohlman, Urs; Peters, Thomas; Rutz, Erich; Frank, Stephan; Neuhaus, Cornelia; Deuster, Stefanie; Gloor, Monika; Bieri, Oliver; Fischmann, Arne; Sinnreich, Michael; Gueven, Nuri; Fischer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Altered neuronal nitric oxide synthase function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to impaired mitochondrial function which is thought to be one cause of muscle damage in this disease. The study tested if increased intramuscular nitric oxide concentration can improve mitochondrial energy metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a novel therapeutic approach through the combination of L-arginine with metformin. Five ambulatory, genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients aged between 7–10 years were treated with L-arginine (3 x 2.5 g/d) and metformin (2 x 250 mg/d) for 16 weeks. Treatment effects were assessed using mitochondrial protein expression analysis in muscular biopsies, indirect calorimetry, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry, quantitative thigh muscle MRI, and clinical scores of muscle performance. There were no serious side effects and no patient dropped out. Muscle biopsy results showed pre-treatment a significantly reduced mitochondrial protein expression and increased oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients compared to controls. Post-treatment a significant elevation of proteins of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was observed as well as a reduction in oxidative stress. Treatment also decreased resting energy expenditure rates and energy substrate use shifted from carbohydrates to fatty acids. These changes were associated with improved clinical scores. In conclusion pharmacological stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway leads to improved mitochondria function and clinically a slowing of disease progression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This study shall lead to further development of this novel therapeutic approach into a real alternative for Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02516085 PMID:26799743

  7. l-Arginine and vitamin C attenuate pro-atherogenic effects of high-fat diet on biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Bogda?ski, Pawe?; Suliburska, Joanna; Szuli?ska, Monika; Sikora, Marta; Walkowiak, Jaros?aw; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2015-12-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) is known to cause endothelial dysfunction and contribute to atherosclerosis progression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of l-arginine (l-Arg) and vitamin C supplementation as a potentially useful strategy for modulation of serum homocysteine (Hcy) levels, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), oxidative stress, and insulin resistance induced by HFD in rats. Six weeks-old female and male Wistar rats were divided into five groups of twelve rats each and treated for six weeks with: group 1, standard diet; group 2, HFD; group 3, HFD supplemented with l-Arg (20g/kg diet); group 4, HFD supplemented with l-Arg (20g/kg diet) plus vitamin C (100mg/kg diet); group 5, HFD supplemented with vitamin C (100mg/kg diet). HFD significantly elevated TNF-?, reduced total antioxidant status (TAS), and increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Significant increases of total cholesterol (TCH), LDL cholesterol (LDL), triglyceride (TG) and a decrease of HDL cholesterol (HDL) were observed in HFD rats. Supplementation with l-Arg prevented the decrease of TAS and the increases in HOMA-IR, LDL, and TG levels. Moreover, Hcy and TNF-? levels were reduced in l-Arg supplemented group. Supplementation with vitamin C significantly atenuated TAS decrease and lowered LDL levels. l-Arg plus vitamin C enhanced l-Arg effect on TAS and protected against TNF-? increase. Western blot analysis showed that l-Arg supplementation of HFD rats reduced the level of protein carbonyls. Taken together, these findings indicate that supplemental l-arginine and/or vitamin C, by their abilities to modulate biomarkers of HFD-induced endothelial dysfunction, are anti-atherogenic. PMID:26653556

  8. Influence of Li+ and Nd3+ co-doping on structural and optical properties of uc(l)-arginine-passivated ZnS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-09-01

    We report the effect of Li + and Nd3+ co-doping on structural and optical properties of uc(l)-arginine-passivated ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray diffraction study were used to explore the morphological and structural aspects of prepared NPs. HR-TEM analysis confirmed that the size of ZnS NPs reduces from 5 to 3 nm as the concentration of co-dopant increases from 1 to 5 wt%. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra show absorption peaks in the range of 295-315 nm indicating huge blue shift as compared to the bulk ZnS (340 nm, E g = 3.6 eV) due to the quantum confinement effect. The large optical band gap was estimated in the range of 3.95-4.62 eV and found increasing as the co-dopant concentration increases. Photoluminescence spectra showed that co-doped ZnS NPs emit multiple intense violet-colored (370, 375, 380, 388 and 398 nm) and blue-colored (425, 448, 455 and 465 nm) peaks with increasing intensity. Fourier transform infrared study confirmed the strong interaction between ZnS NPs and uc(l)-arginine ligands. The presence of co-dopant in the sample is confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Based on the results, we proposed that this material is a new class of luminescent material suitable in optoelectronics devices application, especially in light-emitting devices, electroluminescent devices, display devices, etc.

  9. Preparation of water soluble L-arginine capped CdSe/ZnS QDs and their interaction with synthetic DNA: Picosecond-resolved FRET study

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Anupam; Goswami, Nirmal; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Frster resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies on the interaction of water soluble arginine-capped CdSe/ZnS QDs with ethidium bromide (EB) labeled synthetic dodecamer DNA. Highlights: ? We have solubilized CdSe/ZnS QD in water replacing their TOPO ligand by L-arginine. ? We have studied arginine@QDDNA interaction using FRET technique. ? Arginine@QDs act as energy donor and ethidium bromide-DNA acts as energy acceptor. ? We have applied a kinetic model to understand the kinetics of energy transfer. ? Circular dichroism studies revealed negligible perturbation in the DNA B-form in the arg@QD-DNA complex. -- Abstract: We have exchanged TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) ligand of CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) with an amino acid L-arginine (Arg) at the toluene/water interface and eventually rendered the QDs from toluene to aqueous phase. We have studied the interaction of the water soluble Arg-capped QDs (energy donor) with ethidium (EB) labeled synthetic dodecamer DNA (energy acceptor) using picoseconds resolved Frster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. Furthermore, we have applied a model developed by M. Tachiya to understand the kinetics of energy transfer and the distribution of acceptor (EB-DNA) molecules around the donor QDs. Circular dichroism (CD) studies revealed a negligible perturbation in the native B-form structure of the DNA upon interaction with Arg-capped QDs. The melting and the rehybridization pathways of the DNA attached to the QDs have been monitored by the CD which reveals hydrogen bonding is the associative mechanism for interaction between Arg-capped QDs and DNA.

  10. Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Orthopedic Biodegradable Implants

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ami R.; Wallace, James S.; Nukavarapu, Syam P.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, orthopedic and oral/maxillofacial implants represent a combined $2.8 billion market, a figure expected to experience significant and continued growth. Although traditional permanent implants have been proved clinically efficacious, they are also associated with several drawbacks, including secondary revision and removal surgeries. Non-permanent, biodegradable implants offer a promising alternative for patients, as they provide temporary support and degrade at a rate matching tissue formation, and thus, eliminate the need for secondary surgeries. These implants have been in clinical use for nearly 25 years, competing directly with, or maybe even exceeding, the performance of permanent implants. The initial implantation of biodegradable materials, as with permanent materials, mounts an acute host inflammatory response. Over time, the implant degradation profile and possible degradation product toxicity mediate long-term biodegradable implant-induced inflammation. However, unlike permanent implants, this inflammation is likely to cease once the material disappears. Implant-mediated inflammation is a critical determinant for implant success. Thus, for the development of a proactive biodegradable implant that has the ability to promote optimal bone regeneration and minimal detrimental inflammation, a thorough understanding of short- and long-term inflammatory events is required. Here, we discuss an array of biodegradable orthopedic implants, their associated short- and long- term inflammatory effects, and methods to mediate these inflammatory events. PMID:22043969

  11. Long-Term Sensitization Training Primes "Aplysia" for Further Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Leonard J.; Byrne, John H.; Antzoulatos, Evangelos G.; Wainwright, Marcy L.

    2006-01-01

    Repetitive, unilateral stimulation of "Aplysia" induces long-term sensitization (LTS) of ipsilaterally elicited siphon-withdrawal responses. Whereas some morphological effects of training appear only on ipsilateral sensory neurons, others appear bilaterally. We tested the possibility that contralateral morphological modifications may have

  12. Sexuality and Aging: Implications for Long Term Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkley, Nancy E.

    With increasing emphasis on treating the whole person, on the maintenance of an individual's former life style, and on patients' rights, long-term care personnel need to become aware that many nursing home residents experience needs related to their sexuality. A model two-day workshop is presented wlth a focus on the following topics: (1) a broad

  13. Long term agro-ecosystem research: The Southern Plains partnership

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is coordinating ten well-established research sites as a Long Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) Network. The goal of the LTAR is to sustain a land-based infrastructure for research, environmental management testing, and education, that enables understan...

  14. 7 CFR 1773.44 - Long-term debt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Required Audit Procedures and Documentation 1773.44 Long-term debt. The CPA's workpapers must document that he/she: (a) Confirmed RUS, FFB, and RTB debt to the appropriate confirmation schedule (RUS Form 690, Confirmation Schedule Obligation to the FFB as of: or...

  15. 7 CFR 1773.44 - Long-term debt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Required Audit Procedures and Documentation 1773.44 Long-term debt. The CPA's workpapers must document that he/she: (a) Confirmed RUS, FFB, and RTB debt to the appropriate confirmation schedule (RUS Form 690, Confirmation Schedule Obligation to the FFB as of: or...

  16. Infection Control in the Long Term Care Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara

    This booklet is intended to increase the awareness of persons working in long-term care facilities regarding the danger of infectious disease and the ways in which it can be spread. Materials in this booklet include: (1) a brief discussion of historical events in the study of microorganisms; (2) information about how microorganisms cause infection

  17. A Plea for Long-term Orientation in Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaninger, Markus; Ambroz, Kristjan

    2010-11-01

    The stress field between short- and long-term orientations is the epitome of organizational problematics: In many enterprises the latter is dominated by the former. The consequences of a dominant short-term orientation are negative in the best case, but the cases that result in destruction and catastrophe are legion. Few sustainable solutions for the conflict between the short- and long-term perspectives have been developed, and among those concerned many have not sufficiently reflected on this shortfall, or even become aware of it. Frequently, practical constraints obstruct a balance between short- and long-term orientations. The aim of this contribution is to enquire into this dilemma and to find a way of coping with it. Any progress in that direction would help to further the viability of organizations and the quality of life within them. As a pertinent contribution we present the Model of Systemic Control, a framework with a long-term view for the governance of organizations. Even though we are emphasizing the conceptual aspect, our theoretical statement is underpinned by an empirical approach and simulation experiments.

  18. Long-Term Impact of Service Learning in Environmental Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFall, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Long-term impacts from a senior course in Environmental Studies were evaluated by a survey of program graduates (36 respondents, 50% response rate) who had participated in the course over an 8-year permiod. Each year, the Senior Seminar used a service-learning pedagogy with a different environmentally focused project ranging from web resource…