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Sample records for long-term solar activity

  1. Long-term persistence of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Feynman, Joan; Robinson, Paul

    1994-01-01

    We examine the question of whether or not the non-periodic variations in solar activity are caused by a white-noise, random process. The Hurst exponent, which characterizes the persistence of a time series, is evaluated for the series of C-14 data for the time interval from about 6000 BC to 1950 AD. We find a constant Hurst exponent, suggesting that solar activity in the frequency range from 100 to 3000 years includes an important continuum component in addition to the well-known periodic variations. The value we calculate, H approximately 0.8, is significantly larger than the value of 0.5 that would correspond to variations produced by a white-noise process. This value is in good agreement with the results for the monthly sunspot data reported elsewhere, indicating that the physics that produces the continuum is a correlated random process and that it is the same type of process over a wide range of time interval lengths.

  2. Solar activity index for long-term ionospheric forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deminov, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the comparison of solar activity indices (annual average values of the relative number of sunspots Rz 12 and solar radio emission flux at a wavelength of 10.7 cm F 12) with the ionospheric index of solar activity IG 12 for 1954-2013, we have found that the index F 12 is a more accurate (than Rz 12) indicator of solar activity for the long-term forecast of foF2 (the critical frequency of the F2-layer). This advantage of the F 12 index becomes especially significant after 2000 if the specific features of extreme ultraviolet radiation of the Sun are additionally taken into account in the minima of solar cycles, using an appropriate correction to F 12. Qualitative arguments are given in favor of the use of F 12 for the long-term forecast of both foF2 and other ionospheric parameters.

  3. Long-term persistence of solar activity. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Feynman, Joan; Robinson, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The solar irradiance has been found to change by 0.1% over the recent solar cycle. A change of irradiance of about 0.5% is required to effect the Earth's climate. How frequently can a variation of this size be expected? We examine the question of the persistence of non-periodic variations in solar activity. The Huerst exponent, which characterizes the persistence of a time series (Mandelbrot and Wallis, 1969), is evaluated for the series of C-14 data for the time interval from about 6000 BC to 1950 AD (Stuiver and Pearson, 1986). We find a constant Huerst exponent, suggesting that solar activity in the frequency range of from 100 to 3000 years includes an important continuum component in addition to the well-known periodic variations. The value we calculate, H approximately equal to 0.8, is significantly larger than the value of 0.5 that would correspond to variations produced by a white-noise process. This value is in good agreement with the results for the monthly sunspot data reported elsewhere, indicating that the physics that produces the continuum is a correlated random process (Ruzmaikin et al., 1992), and that is is the same type of process over a wide range of time interval lengths. We conclude that the time period over which an irradiance change of 0.5% can be expected to occur is significantly shorter than that which would be expected for variations produced by a white-noise process.

  4. The sunspot cycle no. 24 in relation to long term solar activity variation

    PubMed Central

    Komitov, Boris; Kaftan, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The solar minimum between solar cycles 23 and 24 during the period 2007–2009 has been the longest and deepest one at least since for the last 100 years. We suggest that the Sun is going to his next supercenturial minimum. The main aim of this paper is to tell about arguments concerning this statement. They are based on series of studies, which have been provided during the period since 1997 up to 2010. The progress of solar cycle 24 since its minimum at the end of 2008 up to the end of October 2011 in the light of long term solar activity dynamics is analyzed. PMID:25685429

  5. The sunspot cycle no. 24 in relation to long term solar activity variation.

    PubMed

    Komitov, Boris; Kaftan, Vladimir

    2013-05-01

    The solar minimum between solar cycles 23 and 24 during the period 2007-2009 has been the longest and deepest one at least since for the last 100 years. We suggest that the Sun is going to his next supercenturial minimum. The main aim of this paper is to tell about arguments concerning this statement. They are based on series of studies, which have been provided during the period since 1997 up to 2010. The progress of solar cycle 24 since its minimum at the end of 2008 up to the end of October 2011 in the light of long term solar activity dynamics is analyzed. PMID:25685429

  6. Long-term Fluctuations in The Earth's Rotation And Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banjevic, Boris

    2006-08-01

    The tidal friction is not the only cause to influence the earth's rotation in long term. There is a correlation between solar activity and long term variations of the Earth's rotation. Possible cause is an interaction between solar wind and magnetosphere of the earth. This would produce the angular deceleration of earth's rotation. Long-term fluctuation in the length of the day (LOD) with semi-amplitude of ca. 4 ms and a period of ca. 1480 years may exist. One cause is probably electromagnetic core-mantle coupling. Ice-rafting event during Holocene is found with cyclity of 1470 years. There is also possible connection between solar activity identified in delta ^14C records of 1450 year periodicity and cyclity of the Earth's rotation. Global-sea level changes associated with climatic variations may produce significant effect on long timescales. The non-tidal acceleration may be connected with the rate of change in Earth's oblateness, attributed to viscous rebound of the Earth from the decrease in load in the polar caps following last deglaciation. The average of Earth's dynamic oblateness (J2 dot) for the past 4000 years is larger than the present J2 (dot) from satellite laser ranging, - 2.8x10^-11/yr. Current increase of LOD is on the average by 1.8+/-0.1 milliseconds per century (ms/ cy). According to early Chinese and Babylonian eclipses from 2000-700 BC we obtain an average of LOD 1.67+/-0.05 ms/cy (1820 AD), which is lower than current value. This is very important for evaluating ancient eclipses before 700 BC. We have used singular spectrum analysis, Catterpilar method, to find periodicities from time series of LOD. We have also founded highly correlated relationship between the periods of low solar activity and LOD at centennial time scales. Our calculation before 700 BC implies sudden change of rotation between 850-750 BC. Major increases of ^14C in the atmosphere at ca. 750 BC (Homer minimum) and ca. 1650 AD (Maunder minimum) are caused by the reduction of

  7. Magnetic Flux Transport and the Long-term Evolution of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  8. Long-Term Solar Irradiance Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the solar energy throughout the solar spectrum and understanding its variability provide important information about the physical processes and structural changes in the solar interior and in the solar atmosphere...The aim of this paper is to discuss the solar-cycle-related long-term changes in solar total and UV irradiances. The spaceborne irradiance observations are compared to ground-based indices of solar magnetic activity, such as the Photometric Sunspot Index, full disk magnetic flux, and the Mt. Wilson Magnetic Plage Strength Index.

  9. Long-term solar-terrestrial observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The results of an 18-month study of the requirements for long-term monitoring and archiving of solar-terrestrial data is presented. The value of long-term solar-terrestrial observations is discussed together with parameters, associated measurements, and observational problem areas in each of the solar-terrestrial links (the sun, the interplanetary medium, the magnetosphere, and the thermosphere-ionosphere). Some recommendations are offered for coordinated planning for long-term solar-terrestrial observations.

  10. Long-term variations of the coronal rotation and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. J.; Shi, X. J.; Feng, W.; Xie, J. L.; Gao, P. X.; Zhan, L. S.; Liang, H. F.

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Chandra and Vats have obtained the yearly period length of the solar coronal rotation cycle by analysing the daily adjusted solar radio flux at the 10.7-cm wavelength for the years 1947-2009. In this paper, we use the time series (series I) of the yearly period length to investigate the long-term variation of the rotation of radio emission corona, and we find a weak decreasing trend in the time series. We use the empirical mode decomposition to decompose both the yearly mean value (series II) of the solar radio flux at the 10.7-cm wavelength and series I into different periodical components. There is a secular trend for each of the two series, and we find a negative correlation in the two trends. The decomposed 11-yr-cycle components of the two series show different and complicated periods and there is a phase relation between them. We investigate the cycle-related variation of the coronal rotation length, and we find that there is no Schwable cycle of statistical significance for the long-term variation of the rotation cycle length.

  11. Magnetic activity of six young solar analogues II. Surface Differential Rotation from long-term photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, S.; Guinan, E. F.

    2003-10-01

    . Contrary to theoretical predictions, the cycle length is not correlated to the Dynamo number, it is indeed positively correlated to the SDR amplitude. More precisely, stars tend to concentrate along three different branches with the cycle length increasing with increasing Delta Omega /Omega . Moreover, we found that the SDR amplitude changes from cycle to cycle, which is reminiscent of a wave of excess rotation propagating in latitude; iiii) the apparently different solar and antisolar behaviours are probably due to different inclinations of the stellar rotation axis under which the star is seen. The long-term photometry of the young single star LQ Hya, although not included in the initial project, is also used in the present analysis to enlarge the investigated sample. We determined for LQ Hya three different starspot cycles and an antisolar pattern of SDR.

  12. Validation of Spacecraft Active Cavity Radiometer Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) Long Term Measurement Trends Using Proxy TSI Least Squares Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert Benjamin, III; Wilson, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Long-term, incoming total solar irradiance (TSI) measurement trends were validated using proxy TSI values, derived from indices of solar magnetic activity. Spacecraft active cavity radiometers (ACR) are being used to measure longterm TSI variability, which may trigger global climate changes. The TSI, typically referred to as the solar constant, was normalized to the mean earth-sun distance. Studies of spacecraft TSI data sets confirmed the existence of a 0.1 %, long-term TSI variability component within a 10-year period. The 0.1% TSI variability component is clearly present in the spacecraft data sets from the 1984-2004 time frame. Typically, three overlapping spacecraft data sets were used to validate long-term TSI variability trends. However, during the years of 1978-1984, 1989-1991, and 1993-1996, three overlapping spacecraft data sets were not available in order to validate TSI trends. The TSI was found to vary with indices of solar magnetic activity associated with recent 10-year sunspot cycles. Proxy TSI values were derived from least squares analyses of the measured TSI variability with the solar indices of 10.7-cm solar fluxes, and with limb-darked sunspot fluxes. The resulting proxy TSI values were compared to the spacecraft ACR measurements of TSI variability to detect ACR instrument degradation, which may be interpreted as TSI variability. Analyses of ACR measurements and TSI proxies are presented primarily for the 1984-2004, Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) ACR solar monitor data set. Differences in proxy and spacecraft measurement data sets suggest the existence of another TSI variability component with an amplitude greater than or equal to 0.5 Wm-2 (0.04%), and with a cycle of 20 years or more.

  13. On the high correlation between long-term averages of solar wind speed and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Feynman, J.; Gosling, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    Six-month and yearly averages of solar-wind speed from 1962 to 1975 are shown to be highly correlated with geomagnetic activity as measured by averages of the Ap index. On the same time scale the correlation between the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic activity is poor. Previous studies with hourly averages gave opposite results. The better correlation with the southward component on an hourly time scale is explained by its large variation compared with the relatively constant solar-wind speed. However, on a yearly time scale the magnitude of the variations in both parameters are about the same. This problem can be solved by invoking an energy transfer mechanism which is proportional to the first power of the southward component and a higher power of the solar-wind speed.

  14. The minimal solar activity in 2008-2009 and its implications for long-term climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Livingston, W. C.; Woods, T. N.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2011-03-01

    Variations in the total solar irradiance (TSI) associated with solar activity have been argued to influence the Earth's climate system, in particular when solar activity deviates from the average for a substantial period. One such example is the 17th Century Maunder Minimum during which sunspot numbers were extremely low, as Earth experienced the Little Ice Age. Estimation of the TSI during that period has relied on extrapolations of correlations with sunspot numbers or even more indirectly with modulations of galactic cosmic rays. We argue that there is a minimum state of solar magnetic activity associated with a population of relatively small magnetic bipoles which persists even when sunspots are absent, and that consequently estimates of TSI for the Little Ice Age that are based on scalings with sunspot numbers are generally too low. The minimal solar activity, which measurements show to be frequently observable between active-region decay products regardless of the phase of the sunspot cycle, was approached globally after an unusually long lull in sunspot activity in 2008-2009. Therefore, the best estimate of magnetic activity, and presumably TSI, for the least-active Maunder Minimum phases appears to be provided by direct measurement in 2008-2009. The implied marginally significant decrease in TSI during the least active phases of the Maunder Minimum by 140 to 360 ppm relative to 1996 suggests that drivers other than TSI dominate Earth's long-term climate change.

  15. Multiple dynamo modes as a mechanism for long-term solar activity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, M. J.; Käpylä, P. J.; Olspert, N.; Brandenburg, A.; Warnecke, J.; Karak, B. B.; Pelt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar magnetic activity shows both smooth secular changes, such as the modern Grand Maximum, and quite abrupt drops that are denoted as grand minima, such as the Maunder Minimum. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of convection-driven dynamos offer one way of examining the mechanisms behind these events. Aims: In this work, we analyze a solution of a solar-like DNS that was evolved for roughly 80 magnetic cycles of 4.9 years and where epochs of irregular behavior are detected. The emphasis of our analysis is to find physical causes for such behavior. Methods: The DNS employed is a semi-global (wedge-shaped) magnetoconvection model. For the data analysis tasks we use Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition and phase dispersion methods, as they are well suited for analyzing cyclic (non-periodic) signals. Results: A special property of the DNS is the existence of multiple dynamo modes at different depths and latitudes. The dominant mode is solar-like (equatorward migration at low latitudes and poleward at high latitudes). This mode is accompanied by a higher frequency mode near the surface and at low latitudes, showing poleward migration, and a low-frequency mode at the bottom of the convection zone. The low-frequency mode is almost purely antisymmetric with respect to the equator, while the dominant mode has strongly fluctuating mixed parity. The overall behavior of the dynamo solution is extremely complex, exhibiting variable cycle lengths, epochs of disturbed and even ceased surface activity, and strong short-term hemispherical asymmetries. Surprisingly, the most prominent suppressed surface activity epoch is actually a global magnetic energy maximum; during this epoch the bottom toroidal magnetic field obtains a maximum, demonstrating that the interpretation of grand minima-type events is non-trivial. The hemispherical asymmetries are seen only in the magnetic field, while the velocity field exhibits considerably weaker asymmetry. Conclusions: We interpret

  16. Long-term prediction of solar and geomagnetic activity daily time series using singular spectrum analysis and fuzzy descriptor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmomeni, M.; Kamaliha, E.; Shafiee, M.; Lucas, C.

    2009-09-01

    Of the various conditions that affect space weather, Sun-driven phenomena are the most dominant. Cyclic solar activity has a significant effect on the Earth, its climate, satellites, and space missions. In recent years, space weather hazards have become a major area of investigation, especially due to the advent of satellite technology. As such, the design of reliable alerting and warning systems is of utmost importance, and international collaboration is needed to develop accurate short-term and long-term prediction methodologies. Several methods have been proposed and implemented for the prediction of solar and geomagnetic activity indices, but problems in predicting the exact time and magnitude of such catastrophic events still remain. There are, however, descriptor systems that describe a wider class of systems, including physical models and non-dynamic constraints. It is well known that the descriptor system is much tighter than the state-space expression for representing real independent parametric perturbations. In addition, the fuzzy descriptor models as a generalization of the locally linear neurofuzzy models are general forms that can be trained by constructive intuitive learning algorithms. Here, we propose a combined model based on fuzzy descriptor models and singular spectrum analysis (SSA) (FD/SSA) to forecast a number of geomagnetic activity indices in a manner that optimizes a fuzzy descriptor model for each of the principal components obtained from singular spectrum analysis and recombines the predicted values so as to transform the geomagnetic activity time series into natural chaotic phenomena. The method has been applied to predict two solar and geomagnetic activity indices: geomagnetic aa and solar wind speed (SWS) of the solar wind index. The results demonstrate the higher power of the proposed method-- compared to other methods -- for predicting solar activity.

  17. Long term solar activity and ionospheric prediction services rendered by the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, B. M.; Aggarwal, S.; Lakshmi, D. R.; Shastri, S.; Mitra, A. P.

    1979-01-01

    The data base used in solar and ionospheric prediction services is described. Present prediction techniques are discussed and compared with actual observations. Future prediction techniques using computers are also discussed.

  18. Long-term variability of solar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd Hoeksema, J.; Scherrer, P. H.

    The solar magnetic field varies on all time scales. Recent analysis of 600 million year-old Australian varves shows terrestrial evidence for not only the familiar 22-year magnetic cycle, but variations with periods of 300-400 years as well. The Maunder minimum is but one of several long intervals showing atypical levels of solar activity. Recently a 151-day periodicity in flare activity has been found. Active regions, sunspots, ephemeral regions, and flares cover a broad range of shorter time scale variations in the solar magnetic field. Long-term variations can be interpreted in at least two ways. One outlook regards the large-scale and long-term variations of the photospheric field as more-or-less direct guides to the organization of the solar field as it evolves through a solar cycle. The slowly varying field reveals the fundamental interior structure of the Sun. An alternative view interprets the surface manifestation of the magnetic field primarily as the result of the convective motions in the solar atmosphere. The evolving distribution of photospheric flux depends upon the locations of emerging flux and the subsequent motions and interactions of the fields in the moving plasma. Information about the interior field comes largely from analysis of emerging flux. We discuss interpretation of the phenomenology of the long-term variability in the context of these contrasting views.

  19. Long-term Solar Irradiance Variability: 1984-1989 Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1990-01-01

    Long-term variability in the total solar irradiance has been observed in the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) solar monitor measurements. The monitors have been used to measure the irradiance from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft platforms since October 25, 1984, January 23, 1985, and October 22, 1986, respectively. Before September 1986, the ERBS irradiance values were found to be decreasing -0.03 percent per year. This period was marked by decreasing solar magnetic activity. Between September 1986 and mid-1989, the irradiance values increased approximately 0.1 percent. The latter period was marked by increasing solar activity which was associated with the initiations of the sunspot cycle number 22 and of a new 22-year Hale solar magnetic cycle. Therefore, long-term solar-irradiance variability appears to be correlated directly with solar activity. The maximum smoothed sunspot number occurred during September 1989, according to the Sunspot Index Data Center. Therefore, the recent irradiance increasing trend should disappear during early 1990 and change into a decreasing trend if the observed irradiance variability is correlated more so with the 11-year sunspot cycle than the 22-year Hale cycle. The ERBE irradiance values are presented and compared with sunspot activity for the 1984 to 1989 period. The ERBE values are compared with those available from the Nimbus-7 and Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft experiments.

  20. Long-term solar irradiance variability: knowns and unknowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria; Leng Yeo, Kok; Wu, Chi-Ju

    2016-07-01

    Long-term reconstructions of solar irradiance variability are crucial to our understanding of solar influence on climate. They are only possible with the help of suitable models, which in turn require a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of this variability. With the advance of such models, also the past reconstructions are becoming more reliable. Nevertheless, the remaining uncertainties spread out when extrapolating back over long periods of time, amplified by the increasingly poorer quality and reliability of the available data that bear information on past solar activity. We will discuss the progress and the reliability of irradiance reconstructions on time scales of decades to millennia.

  1. Characteristics of solar wind control on Jovian UV auroral activity deciphered by long-term Hisaki EXCEED observations: Evidence of preconditioning of the magnetosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Hajime; Kimura, Tomoki; Tao, Chihiro; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-07-01

    While the Jovian magnetosphere is known to have the internal source for its activity, it is reported to be under the influence of the solar wind as well. Here we report the statistical relationship between the total power of the Jovian ultraviolet aurora and the solar wind properties found from long-term monitoring by the spectrometer EXCEED (Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics) on board the Hisaki satellite. Superposed epoch analysis indicates that auroral total power increases when an enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure hits the magnetosphere. Furthermore, the auroral total power shows a positive correlation with the duration of a quiescent interval of the solar wind that is present before a rise in the dynamic pressure, more than with the amplitude of dynamic pressure increase. These statistical characteristics define the next step to unveil the physical mechanism of the solar wind control on the Jovian magnetospheric dynamics.

  2. Long-term reconstructions of total solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria

    2012-07-01

    Solar irradiance is the main external driver of the Earth's climate, although its relative contribution compared to other internal and anthropogenic factors is not yet well determined. Variations of total solar irradiance have being measured for over three decades and are relatively well understood. Reconstructions of the irradiance into the past remain, however, rather uncertain. In particular, the magnitude of the secular change is highly debated. The reason is the lack of direct and well-sampled proxies of solar magnetic activity on time scales longer than a few decades. Reconstructions on time scales of centuries rely on sunspot observations available since 1610. Reconstructions on millennial time scales use concentrations of the cosmogenic isotopes in terrestrial archives. We will review long-term reconstructions of the solar irradiance using the SATIRE set of models, compare them with other recent models and discuss the remaining uncertainties.

  3. Thermospheric hydrogen - The long-term solar influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, E. L.; Sanatani, S.; Hanson, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric Explorer C and E satellite data are employed for a long-term analysis of the behavior of thermospheric hydrogen with respect to the 11 yr solar cycle. The data covered the period 1974-79 (increasing solar activity) and comprised in situ ionospheric (F region) and neutral atmospheric data. The data were analyzed statistically to characterize low latitude hydrogen behavior, e.g., the diurnal variation and mean concentration over the 5 yr data sampling period. Both the mean and daily maximum/minimum ratio (DMMR) varied with the solar F index. The escaping flux of H ions became a contant around 1000 K. Increasing thermospheric temperatures lowered the DMMR value. However, the DMMR values calculated were consistently large enough to require inclusion of neutral winds and/or diurnal variations in charge exchange fluxes moving in and out of the plasmasphere in any model for thermospheric hydrogen behavior.

  4. Interpretation of short and long-term oscillations of solar activity by alpha-omega dynamo model with two macro-cells of meridional fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Solar magnetic activity is related with generation strong magnetic fields in the depths of the Sun and manifested in sunspot occurrence on the solar surface. The amplitude and the spatial configuration of the magnetic field of our star are changing over the years. The most widely known variations of solar magnetic field are 11-years cycles and grand minima. The generation and evolution of the solar magnetic field and other stars is usually related to the dynamo mechanism. This mechanism is based on the consideration of the joint influence of the alpha-effect and differential rotation. Dynamo sources can be located at different depths (active layers) of the convection zone and can have different intensities. Based on such a system, the dynamical system with meridional fluxes in the case of the stellar dynamo with independent active layers has been constructed. We obtained quasi-biennial magnetic field oscillations for middle layer of the convective zone which can account for short term (2.5 years) oscillations often reported for 11 year solar cycles. Magnetic field waves from top and bottom layers of the convective zone are found generated with close frequencies whose interaction leads to beating effects responsible for the grand cycles (350-400 years) superimposed on a standard 22 year cycle. Using our model we made prediction of poloidal and toroidal fields on short (until 2040 year) and long-term timescale (until 3200 year) (V. V. Zharkova, S. J. Shepherd, E. Popova & S. I. Zharkov, Nature SR, 2015).

  5. Going Solar Yields Long-Term Economical, Educational Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Moos, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Going solar is not an easy decision, but a long-term investment with a potentially substantial up-front cost. While some schools have enough capital in reserve, can raise bond money, or can solicit sufficient donations, many schools rely on creative financial programs to make a solar energy system economically feasible. Thinking about going solar…

  6. Long-Term cosmic ray experiment in the atmosphere: Energetic electron precipitation events during the 20-23 solar activity cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhmutov, V. S.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Krainev, M. B.; Storini, M.

    2001-08-01

    More than 400 energetic electron precipitation events (EPEs) were observed in the Earth's Northern polar atmosphere (Murmansk region, 68°57'N, 33°03'E) during a long-term cosmic ray balloon experiment (from 1957 up to now). It is shown that the significant X-ray fluxes, caused by precipitating electrons at the top of the atmosphere, sometimes penetrated down to the atmospheric depth of ~60 g· cm-2 (about 20 km). It means that primary energy of precipitating electrons was more than ~ 6 10 MeV. Here we summarize only the characteristics of the energetic electron precipitation events recorded during solar activity cycles 20 to 23. We dis cuss results from the analyses of the interplanetary and geomagnetic conditions related to these events in the atmosphere.

  7. Long-term monthly statistics of mid-latitudinal NmF2 in the northern geographic hemisphere during geomagnetically quiet and steadily low solar activity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Pavlova, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    Long-term mid-latitude hourly values of NmF2 measured in 1957-2015 by 10 ionosondes in the Northern geographic hemisphere were processed to select periods of geomagnetically quiet and low solar activity conditions to calculate several descriptive statistics of the noon NmF2 for each month, including the mathematical expectation, most probable value, arithmetic average, and arithmetic average median. The month-to-month variability of these descriptors allowed us to identify months of a year when they reach their extremes (maxima, minima). The calculated month-to-month variations of the NmF2 statistical parameters made it possible to study the winter anomaly and spring-autumn asymmetry in these statistical parameters.

  8. Solar Variability and Long-Term Trends in the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uloch, Thomas; Kultima, Johannes

    2000-01-01

    Sunspot numbers have traditionally been used as a measure for solar activity. Recently, a solar activity parameter, viz. the length of the sunspot cycle, was found to correlate well with the long-term evolution of northern hemispheric temperature. The question implied by this result is what is the relative importance of external (e.g. solar), internal (i.e. Earth-bound nature), and anthropogenic effects on climate change. In the first chapter, a novel technique for estimating sunspot cycle length is introduced, which is based upon determining the time at which half of the sunspots of a given cycle have occurred (Median Time). Traditional methods are shown to have uncertainties of several months in sunspot cycle length due to uncertainties in the determination of the times of sunspot minima and maxima. The median method, however, is very stable with respect to the choice of sunspot minima. The method is able to reduce the uncertainty in cycle length by a factor of 30-50. The later chapters discuss the possible ionospheric effects of changed concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The mesosphere and lower thermosphere are expected to cool by up to 50 K if the concentrations of mesospheric carbon dioxide and methane were doubled. Consequently, the height of the maximal electron concentration is predicted to lower down as a consequence of a cooled and thus shrinking upper atmosphere. This so-called F2-layer peak height can be obtained from standard ionosonde parameters by means of different empirical relations. The F2-layer Sodankylii, Finland, has lowered at a rate of about 4 km per decade since 1958. The F2-layer heights differ to some extent from one another depending on the empirical relations employed for their estimation. Moreover, they are governed by a number of other influences, which require possible long-term trends to be extracted by means of multi-parameter models. The composition of these models is somewhat arbitrary and each model yields

  9. LONG-TERM PERIODICITY VARIATIONS OF THE SOLAR RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the long-term periodicity variations of the solar radius, daily solar radius data from 1978 February to 2000 September at the Calern Observatory are used. Continuous observations of the solar radius are difficult due to the weather, seasonal effects, and instrument characteristics. Thus, to analyze these data, we first use the Dixon criterion to reject suspect values, then we measure the cross-correlation between the solar radius and sunspot numbers. The result indicates that the solar radius is in complete antiphase with the sunspot numbers and shows lead times of 74 months relative to the sunspot numbers. The Lomb-Scargle and date compensated discrete Fourier transform methods are also used to investigate the periodicity of the solar radius. Both methods yield similar significance periodicities around {approx}1 yr, {approx}2.6 yr, {approx}3.6 yr, and {approx}11 yr. Possible mechanisms for these periods are discussed. The possible physical cause of the {approx}11 yr period is the cyclic variation of the magnetic pressure of the concentrated flux tubes at the bottom of the solar convection zone.

  10. Long-term goals for solar thermal technology

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Brown, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    This document describes long-term performance and cost goals for three solar thermal technologies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) developed these goals in support of the Draft Five Year Research and Development Plan for the National Solar Thermal Technology Program (DOE 1984b). These technology goals are intended to provide targets that, if met, will lead to the widespread use of solar thermal technologies in the marketplace. Goals were developed for three technologies and two applications: central receiver and dish technologies for utility-generated electricity applications, and central receiver, dish, and trough technologies for industrial process heat applications. These technologies and applications were chosen because they are the primary technologies and applications that have been researched by DOE in the past. System goals were developed through analysis of future price projections for energy sources competing with solar thermal in the middle-to-late 1990's time frame. The system goals selected were levelized energy costs of $0.05/kWh for electricity and $9/MBtu for industrial process heat (1984 $). Component goals established to meet system goals were developed based upon projections of solar thermal component performance and cost which could be achieved in the same time frame.

  11. Long-term goals for solar thermal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. A.; Dirks, J. A.; Brown, D. R.

    1985-05-01

    Long-term performance and cost goals for three solar thermal technologies are discussed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) developed these goals in support of the Draft Five Year Research and Development Plan for the National Solar Thermal Technology Program (DOE 1984b). These technology goals are intended to provide targets that, if met, will lead to the widespread use of solar thermal technologies in the marketplace. Goals were developed for three technologies and two applications: central receiver and dish technologies for utility-generated electricity applications, and central receiver, dish, and trough technologies for industrial process heat applications. These technologies and applications were chosen because they are the primary technologies and applications that have been researched by DOE in the past. System goals were developed through analysis of future price projections for energy sources competing with solar thermal in the middle-to-late 1990's time frame. The system goals selected were levelized energy costs of 0.05/kWh for electricity and $9/MBtu for industrial process heat (1984 $). Component goals established to meet system goals were developed based upon projections of solar thermal component performance and cost which could be achieved in the same time frame.

  12. Solar pulsations and long-term solar variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, P. R.; Logan, J. D.; Hill, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    The seismology of the solar atmosphere is important in relating changes in luminosity to variations in other observables. This approach has already led to the identification of properties which were not previously observed or recognized. Equally important results from solar seismology are expected in the future.

  13. Estimation of long-term density variations in the upper atmosphere of the earth at minimums of solar activity from evolution of the orbital parameters of the earth's artificial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, I. I.; Suevalov, V. V.

    2005-03-01

    Long-term data on the evolution of the parameters of motion of 15 artificial satellites of the Earth in orbits with minimal heights of 400 1100 km were used to study the density variations in the upper atmosphere at minimums of four cycles of solar activity. It was found that the density at these heights considered increased by about 7% at the minimum of solar cycle 20 as compared to solar cycle 19. Later, the density fell rather linearly at the minimums of cycles 21 and 22. The statistical processing of the data for solar cycles 20 22 demonstrated that the density decreased by 4.6% over ten years and by 9.9% over 20 years. Analyzing the density variations during the four cycles of solar activity, we found that the long-term decrease in density observed at the minimums of cycles 20 22 is caused mainly by specific variations of the solar activity parameters (namely, the solar radio flux and the level of geomagnetic disturbance).

  14. Long-term downward trend in total solar irradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, R.C.; Hudson, H.S.; Frohlich, C.; Brusa, R.W.

    1986-11-28

    The first 5 years (from 1980 to 1985) of total solar irradiance observations by the first Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM I) experiment on board the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft show a clearly defined downward trends of -0.019% per year. The existence of this trend has been confirmed by the internal self-calibrations of ACRIM I, by independent measurements from sounding rockets and balloons, and by observations from the Nimbus-7 spacecraft. The trend appears to be due to unpredicted variations of solar luminosity on time scales of years, and it may be related to solar cycle magnetic activity.

  15. Long-term downward trend in total solar irradiance.

    PubMed

    Willson, R C; Hudson, H S; Frohlich, C; Brusa, R W

    1986-11-28

    The first 5 years (from 1980 to 1985) of total solar irradiance observations by the first Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM I) experiment on board the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft show a clearly defined downward trend of -0.019% per year. The existence of this trend has been confirmed by the internal self-calibrations of ACRIM I, by independent measurements from sounding rockets and balloons, and by observations from the Nimbus-7 spacecraft. The trend appears to be due to unpredicted variations of solar luminosity on time scales of years, and it may be related to solar cycle magnetic activity. PMID:17778952

  16. Long-term variations in total solar and UV irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.; Floyd, L.; Lee, R. B.; Parker, D.; Puga, L.; Ulrich, R.; Varadi, F.; Viereck, R.

    1997-01-01

    The variations of total solar and UV irradiances during solar cycles 21 and 22 are compared. The total solar irradiance data used were obtained by the SMM/active cavity radiometer irradiance monitoring (ACRIM) 1, upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS)/ACRIM 2 and ERBS experiments. The space-based irradiance observations are compared to the Mount Wilson Magnetic Plage and Photometric Sunspot Index, which is derived from the area and position of sunspots published by the NOAA World Data Center Solar Geophysical Data Catalog. It is found that the variations in solar UV irradiance were similar during the maximum and minimum of solar cycles 21 and 22. The possible reasons for the differences in the irradiance values during the minima of the two solar cylces are discussed.

  17. Long-Term Seeing Characteristics at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Espinosa, O. D.; Nenow, J.; Marquette, W. H.

    2003-05-01

    We present observations of long-term seeing characteristics from June 1997 to September 2002 obtained with Seykora-type scintillometers at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). BBSO is an ideal site for ground-based campaign-style observations. Since BBSO is situated on a small island in a 2,000 m high mountain lake in the cloudless mountains of Souther California, it benefits from excellent seeing conditions all day long. The atmospheric turbulence that degrades images originates primarily from two layers near the ground and at the level of the jet stream. BBSO's dome is located at the end of a 300 m long causeway jutting into the lake. Since the lake, with its cool waters, provides a natural inversion, and the dome has three kilometers of open water to its west, the boundary layer seeing is effectively suppressed. In addition, the east-west orientation of the Big Bear Valley provides a natural channel for the prevailing winds from the west resulting in a nearly laminar flow at the observatory site. We present a comparison of scintillometer data with climate data and analyze a one year long sub-set for local seeing variations near the lake shore and at the observatory island. We would like to thank Jacques Beckers and the National Solar Observatory for providing the scintillometer data. This work was supported by NSF under grant ATM 00-86999, ATM 00-76602, and ATM 02-36945 and by NASA under grant NAG 5-9682.

  18. Long-term variations in total solar irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M.; Willson, Richard C.; Froelich, Claus; Donnelly, Richard F.; Puga, Larry

    1994-01-01

    For more than a decade total solar irradiance has been monitored simultaneously from space by different satellites. The detection of total solar irradiance variations by satellite-based experiments during the past decade and a half has stimulated modeling efforts to help identify their causes and to provide estimates of irradiance data, using `proxy' indicators of solar activity, for time intervals when no satellite observations exist. In this paper total solar irradiance observed by the Nimbus-7/Earth Radiation Budget (ERB), Solar Maximum Mission (SMM)/Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) 1, and Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)/ACRIM 2 radiometers is modeled with the Photometric Sunspot Index and the Mg II core-to-wing ratio. Since the formation of the Mg II line is very similar to that of the Ca II K line, the Mg core-to-wing ratio, derived from the irradiance observations of the Nimbus-7 and NOAA9 satellites, is used as a proxy for the bright magnetic elements. It is shown that the observed changes in solar irradiance are underestimated by the proxy models at the time of maximum and during the beginning of the declining portion of solar cycle 22 similar to behavior just before the maximum of solar cycle 21. This disagreement between total irradiance observations and their model estimates is indicative of the fact that the underlying physical mechanism of the changes observed in the solar radiative output is not well-understood. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the proxy data used for irradiance modeling and the resulting limitation of the models should be taken into account, especially when the irradiance models are used for climatic studies.

  19. Long-Term Changes in Sunspot Activity, Occurrence of Grand Minima, and Their Future Tendencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordvinov, A. V.; Kramynin, A. P.

    2010-06-01

    Long-term changes in the magnetic activity of the Sun were studied in terms of the empirical mode decomposition that revealed their essential modes. The occurrence of grand minima was also studied in their relation to long-term changes in sunspot activity throughout the past 11 000 yr. Characteristic timescales of long-term changes in solar activity manifest themselves in the occurrence of grand minima. A quantitative criterion has been defined to identify epochs of grand minima. This criterion reveals the important role of secular and bicentennial activity variations in the occurrence of grand minima and relates their amplitudes with the current activity level, which is variable on a millennial timescale. We have revealed specific patterns in the magnetic activity between successive grand minima which tend to recur approximately every 2300 yr but occasionally alternate with irregular changes. Such intermittent activity behavior indicates low dimensional chaos in the solar dynamo due to the interplay of its dominant modes. The analysis showed that in order to forecast activity level in forthcoming cycles, one should take into account long-term changes in sunspot activity on a ≈2300-yr timescale. The regularities revealed suggest solar activity to decrease in the foreseeable future.

  20. Applying activity-based costing in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Wodchis, W P

    1998-01-01

    As greater numbers of the elderly use health services, and as health care costs climb, effective financial tracking is essential. Cost management in health care can benefit if costs are linked to the care activities where they are incurred. Activity-based costing (ABC) provides a useful approach. The framework aligns costs (inputs), through activities (process), to outputs and outcomes. It allocates costs based on client care needs rather than management structure. The ABC framework was tested in a residential care facility and in supportive housing apartments. The results demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of ABC for long term care agencies, including community-based care. PMID:10339203

  1. Long term study of solar wind proton dynamics near 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Etienne; Nilsson, Hans; Steinberg Wieser, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    The Rosetta mission has been escorting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since early August 2014, spanning heliocentric distances from 3.65AU to 1.24AU (the comet perihelion, reached on August 2015). Data presented here were collected during this phase: as the heliocentric distance decreases with time, the nucleus activity increases, and the interaction between the solar wind and the atmosphere of 67P evolves and becomes more complex. At low activity, the partially ionized coma is permeated by the solar wind. It adds mass to this plasma flow, which in turn is slowed down and deflected. As coma densities get gradually higher, this mass loading phenomenon intensifies, to the point where the solar wind is not observed anymore in the inner region of the coma. We present a long term study of the solar wind protons, focusing on their deflection and plasma parameters.

  2. Quantitative study of long-term solar and climatic changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Long term variations in the diameter and the shape of the Sun were studied. Daily observations of the Sun's diameter made at the Greenwich Observatory between 1836 and 1953 were analysed and interpreted. The data was converted into digital form and then screened and processed. It was found that the horizontal diameter of the Sun measured at Greenwich appears to have decreased systematically between 1880 and 1953 at a rate of 1.2 plus or minus 0.6 minutes of arc per century.

  3. Correcting Radial Velocities for Long-Term Magnetic Activity Variations.

    PubMed

    Saar; Fischer

    2000-05-01

    We study stars in the Lick planetary survey for correlations between simultaneous measurements of high-precision radial velocities vr and magnetic activity (as measured in an SIR emission index from Ca ii lambda8662). We find significant correlations in approximately 30% of the stars. After removing linear trends between SIR and vr, we find that the dispersion in vr in these stars is decreased by an average of 17%, or approximately 45% of the dispersion above the measurement noise. F stars and less active stars with variable Ca ii H and K lines are the most successfully corrected. The magnitude of the slope of the SIR versus vr relations increases proportional to vsini and (excepting M dwarfs) tends to decrease with decreasing Teff. We argue that the main cause of these effects is modification of the mean line bisector shape brought on by long-term, magnetic activity-induced changes in the surface brightness and convective patterns. The correlations can be used to partially correct vr data for the effects of long-term activity variations, potentially permitting study of planets around some (higher mass) younger stars and planets producing smaller stellar reflex velocities. PMID:10790082

  4. The Importance of Long-Term Synoptic Observations and Data Sets for Solar Physics and Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Yvonne; Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Gosain, Sanjay; Roth, Markus; Jefferies, Stuart M.; Hill, Frank

    2015-12-01

    A casual single glance at the Sun would not lead an observer to conclude that it varies. The discovery of the 11-year sunspot cycle was only made possible through systematic daily observations of the Sun over 150 years and even today historic sunspot drawings are used to study the behavior of past solar cycles. The origin of solar activity is still poorly understood as shown by the number of different models that give widely different predictions for the strength and timing of future cycles. Our understanding of the rapid transient phenomena related to solar activity, such as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is also insufficient and making reliable predictions of these events, which can adversely impact technology, remains elusive. There is thus still much to learn about the Sun and its activity that requires observations over many solar cycles. In particular, modern helioseismic observations of the solar interior currently span only 1.5 cycles, which is far too short to adequately sample the characteristics of the plasma flows that govern the dynamo mechanism underlying solar activity. In this paper, we review some of the long-term solar and helioseismic observations and outline some future directions.

  5. Simulated long-term climate response to idealized solar geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Long; Duan, Lei; Bala, Govindasamy; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Solar geoengineering has been proposed as a potential means to counteract anthropogenic climate change, yet it is unknown how such climate intervention might affect the Earth's climate on the millennial time scale. Here we use the HadCM3L model to conduct a 1000 year sunshade geoengineering simulation in which solar irradiance is uniformly reduced by 4% to approximately offset global mean warming from an abrupt quadrupling of atmospheric CO2. During the 1000 year period, modeled global climate, including temperature, hydrological cycle, and ocean circulation of the high-CO2 simulation departs substantially from that of the control preindustrial simulation, whereas the climate of the geoengineering simulation remains much closer to that of the preindustrial state with little drift. The results of our study do not support the hypothesis that nonlinearities in the climate system would cause substantial drift in the climate system if solar geoengineering was to be deployed on the timescale of a millennium.

  6. Long term variability of the solar wind speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.; Ahluwalia, H. S.; Fikani, M. M.; Xue, S. .S.

    1995-01-01

    We have reviewed the solar wind data obtained over a period of more than three decades. The data coverage on the Omnitape begins on 27 November 1963 and ends on 31 December 1993, for the version used by us. The coverage is very uneven, ranging from less than 40% to greater than 80%. We find that a correlation continues to exist between the measured values of the solar wind speed (V) and the geomagnetic index Ap. For the period when the coverage is greater than or equal to 85%, the data fit the equation: V (km/s) = 11.7 A(sub p) + 260. The correlation coefficient is 0.8, at a confidence level of 99.95%. However, we find that the predicted value of V may differ from the observed value by as much as 15% for a year in which the coverage is poorer. A comparison of IMP 8 with Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) data indicates that the average values at the former are systematically higher by as much as 35 km/s (approximately 8%) for an overlapping time period. Also, we draw attention to the observed three solar cycle periodicity in A(sub p) data for the 1932 to 1994 period and its implications for forecasting the parameters for solar cycle 23 as well as on the computations of the modulation parameters for cosmic rays.

  7. Long-Term Activity Recognition from Wristwatch Accelerometer Data *

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ceja, Enrique; Brena, Ramon F.; Carrasco-Jimenez, Jose C.; Garrido, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    With the development of wearable devices that have several embedded sensors, it is possible to collect data that can be analyzed in order to understand the user's needs and provide personalized services. Examples of these types of devices are smartphones, fitness-bracelets, smartwatches, just to mention a few. In the last years, several works have used these devices to recognize simple activities like running, walking, sleeping, and other physical activities. There has also been research on recognizing complex activities like cooking, sporting, and taking medication, but these generally require the installation of external sensors that may become obtrusive to the user. In this work we used acceleration data from a wristwatch in order to identify long-term activities. We compare the use of Hidden Markov Models and Conditional Random Fields for the segmentation task. We also added prior knowledge into the models regarding the duration of the activities by coding them as constraints and sequence patterns were added in the form of feature functions. We also performed subclassing in order to deal with the problem of intra-class fragmentation, which arises when the same label is applied to activities that are conceptually the same but very different from the acceleration point of view. PMID:25436652

  8. Long-term activity recognition from wristwatch accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ceja, Enrique; Brena, Ramon F; Carrasco-Jimenez, Jose C; Garrido, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    With the development of wearable devices that have several embedded sensors, it is possible to collect data that can be analyzed in order to understand the user's needs and provide personalized services. Examples of these types of devices are smartphones, fitness-bracelets, smartwatches, just to mention a few. In the last years, several works have used these devices to recognize simple activities like running, walking, sleeping, and other physical activities. There has also been research on recognizing complex activities like cooking, sporting, and taking medication, but these generally require the installation of external sensors that may become obtrusive to the user. In this work we used acceleration data from a wristwatch in order to identify long-term activities. We compare the use of Hidden Markov Models and Conditional Random Fields for the segmentation task. We also added prior knowledge into the models regarding the duration of the activities by coding them as constraints and sequence patterns were added in the form of feature functions. We also performed subclassing in order to deal with the problem of intra-class fragmentation, which arises when the same label is applied to activities that are conceptually the same but very different from the acceleration point of view. PMID:25436652

  9. Long-term physical activity trends in breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Caitlin; Alfano, Catherine M.; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Wang, C.Y.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Duggan, Catherine; Bernstein, Leslie; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Baumgartner, Richard N.; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; McTiernan, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is associated with reduced mortality and higher quality of life in breast cancer survivors; however, limited data on the prevalence of activity and long-term trends after diagnosis are available. Methods A multi-ethnic cohort of 631 women (18–64 years) with stage 0-IIIA breast cancer were followed for 10 years. Recreational aerobic activity (MET-hrs/week) was ascertained for the year before diagnosis (baseline), 24 months, 5 and 10 years after enrollment. Women were classified according to U.S. physical activity guidelines (≥150 mins/week moderate or ≥75 mins/week vigorous activity). The odds ratios (OR) for meeting guidelines at 5 and 10 years according to baseline factors was estimated using logistic regression. The change in MET-hrs/wk was predicted using linear regression. Results Pre-diagnosis, 34% of women met physical activity guidelines; 34.0%, 39.5%, and 21.4% met guidelines at 24 months, 5 years, and 10 years post-enrollment, respectively. Fewer than 8% of survivors met guidelines at all follow-up periods. Over 10 years, recreational aerobic activity decreased by a mean(SD) 4.3(16.2) MET-hrs/wk.. Meeting guidelines pre-diagnosis was strongly associated with meeting guidelines at 5 years [OR (95% CI): 2.76 (1.85–4.1)] and 10 years [OR (95% CI): 3.35 (2.13–5.28)]. No other demographic or prognostic factors were significantly associated with the 10-year change in MET-hrs/wk. Conclusion The vast majority of early breast cancer survivors do not meet national exercise recommendations 10 years post-diagnosis. Impact Physical activity levels are low in breast cancer survivors across the 10 years post-diagnosis, yet the predictors of activity in this population remain poorly understood. PMID:23576689

  10. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embley, R.W.; Chadwick, W.W., Jr.; Baker, E.T.; Butterfield, D.A.; Resing, J.A.; De Ronde, C. E. J.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Lupton, J.E.; Juniper, S.K.; Rubin, K.H.; Stern, R.J.; Lebon, G.T.; Nakamura, K.-I.; Merle, S.G.; Hein, J.R.; Wiens, D.A.; Tamura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. The Long-term Middle Atmospheric Influence of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Randall, Cora E.; Fleming, Eric L.; Frith, Stacey M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone originates from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) and has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the long-term (> few months) influences of solar proton events from 1963 through 2004 on stratospheric ozone and temperature. There were extremely large solar proton events in 1972, 1989,2000,2001, and 2003. These events caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen-containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The nitrogen-containing compounds, called odd nitrogen, lasted much longer than the hydrogen-containing compounds and led to long-lived stratospheric impacts. An extremely active period for these events occurred in the five-year period, 2000- 2004, and caused increases in odd nitrogen which lasted for several months after individual events. Associated stratospheric ozone decreases of >lo% were calculated

  12. Photometric Variations in Spotted Pleiades Stars as Probes of Long-Term Activity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenett, E.; Milingo, J. B.; Marschall, L. A.; Backman, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Through the collaborative efforts of undergraduates and faculty at Franklin & Marshall and Gettysburg Colleges, we present new photometric data for 3 K-type stars in the Pleiades. Continuing 8+ years of observations, this data contributes to the long-term study of photometric variations in these stars. These young stars have rotational light curves with V-band amplitudes of a few percent (up to 10% in the most active stars) due to large photospheric active regions or "starspots". Quantifying the level of starspot activity from year to year allows us to look for long-term trends analogous to the solar sunspot cycle. These observations were acquired with the National Undergraduate Research Observatory's (NURO) 31" telescope, which is operated by Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University. This work is supported by Franklin & Marshall College, the Delaware Space Grant Consortium, and Arizona Space Grant (NASA Space Grant programs).

  13. Long-term variation in the ionosphere and lower thermosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hori, T.; Nose, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate characteristics of the long-term variation in the ionosphere and lower thermosphere, we analyzed the amplitude of geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) field daily variation using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic stations within the period of 1947-2013. In the present data analysis, we took advantage of the Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET) products (metadata database and analysis software) for finding and handling the long-term observation data obtained at many observatories. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear solar activity dependence and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008-2009. This significant depression implies that the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation responsible for ionization of the upper atmosphere decreased during this solar cycle minimum. In order to examine a global distribution of the long-term trend in the Sq amplitude, we derived the residual Sq amplitude from the deviation from the fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude. As a result, a majority of the trends in the residual Sq amplitude showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. Moreover, we estimate the neutral wind in the lower thermosphere from the Sq amplitude and height-integrated ionospheric conductivity in order to know the physical mechanism of the long-term trend in the residual Sq amplitude. As a result, the estimated thermospheric zonal and meridional winds showed a seasonal variation with a period of one year or less, but the solar activity dependence was unclear. This result suggests that the solar cycle dependence of the Sq amplitude may be mainly attributed to the variation of the ionospheric conductivity.

  14. Long-term monthly statistics of the mid-latitude ionospheric E-layer peak electron density in the Northern geographic hemisphere during geomagnetically quiet and steadily low solar activity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli; Pavlova, Nadezhda

    2016-07-01

    Long-term hourly values of the ionospheric E-layer peak electron density, NmE, measured during the time period of 1957-2014 by 4 mid-latitude ionosondes (Wallops Island, Boulder, de l'Ebre, and Rome) in the Northern geographic hemisphere were processed to select periods of geomagnetically quiet and low solar activity conditions to calculate several descriptive statistics of NmE close to noon for each month in a year, including the mathematical expectation of NmE, the standard deviations of NmE from the mathematically expected NmE, and the NmE variation coefficient. The month-to-month variability of these descriptors allowed us to identify months of a year when they reach their extremes (maxima, minima). We found that the most probable NmE cannot be considered as the best statistical parameter among the most probable NmE and the mathematically expected NmE in statistical studies of month-to-month variations of NmE. Depending on a choice of an ionosonde and a month, the calculated NmE variation coefficient changes from 5 to 12 %.

  15. Two-Dimensional Assimilation Of Solar Occultation Satellite Data To Study Long-Term Ozone Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, M. A.; Zhou, X.; Smyshlyaev, S.

    The methodology of two-dimensional chemistry-transport model driven data assimilation is used to evaluate atmospheric ozone changes for several decades. The SUNY-SPb two-dimensional transport-chemistry model, using the same mathematical framework, has been used to assimilate atmospheric composition data from two different solar occultation satellite instruments. The associated errors of the satellite observations are objectively calculated based on estimation theory. Two-dimensional data assimilation results for ozone are shown for SAGE II Version 6.2 and for HALOE Version 19 data. SAGE II was launched in October of 1984, and HALOE was launched on September of 1991. The SAGE II data spans two periods of high stratospheric aerosol loading (from El Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo), almost 10 QBO periods, 4 major ENSO events, and almost two complete solar cycles. The HALOE data spans one period of high stratospheric aerosol loading, almost 6 QBO periods, 3 major ENSO events, and about 1 1/2 solar cycles. HALOE and SAGE II results will be compared for the same periods. Assimilated satellite data are used to study the role of solar activity variations, atmospheric dynamics, and aerosol effects for long-term ozone variability in the lower and upper stratosphere and mesosphere.

  16. Long-term stabilization of organic solar cells using hydroperoxide decomposers as additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkovic, Vida; Engmann, Sebastian; Tsierkezos, Nikos; Hoppe, Harald; Madsen, Morten; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Ritter, Uwe; Gobsch, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    Stability of organic solar cells (OPV) remains a big problem on the way to their commercialization. Different approaches are being investigated: development of intrinsically more photochemically stable materials, optimization of encapsulation, and implementation of getter and UV blocking layers. In this study, we investigate stabilization of OPV devices using hydroperoxide decomposers as stabilizing additives. A set of five commercially available additives of organophosphorus, organosulfur, Ni chelate, and blocked thiol type are compared, ternary blended into the active layer, under exposure to aging under ISOS-3 degradation conditions. Improvements in long-term performance of OPV devices were observed upon stabilization with Advapak NEO-1120, lifetime was prolonged by a factor of 1.7, and accumulated power generation increased by a factor of 1.4. The stabilizing mechanisms are discussed using spectroscopic and microscopic measurements.

  17. Towards an Improved High Resolution Global Long-Term Solar Resource Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W.; Cox, Stephen J.; Chandler, William S.; Hoell, James M.; Zhang, Taiping; Westburg, David J.; Perez, Richard; Hemker, Charles; Schlemmer, James; Renne, D.; Sengupta, Manajit; Bates, John J.; Knapp, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an ongoing project to develop and deliver a solar mapping processing system to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using the data sets that are planned for production at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). NCDC will be producing a long-term radiance and cloud property data set covering the globe every three hours at an approximate resolution of 10 x 10 km. NASA, the originators of the Surface meteorology and Solar Energy web portal are collaborating with SUNY-Albany to develop the production system and solar algorithms. The initial result will be a global long-term solar resource data set spanning over 25 years. The ultimate goal of the project is to also deliver this data set and production system to NREL for continual production. The project will also assess the impact of providing these new data to several NREL solar decision support tools.

  18. Worldwide impact of aerosol's time scale on the predicted long-term concentrating solar power potential.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A; Gueymard, Christian A; Santos-Alamillos, Francisco J; Pozo-Vázquez, David

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating solar technologies, which are fuelled by the direct normal component of solar irradiance (DNI), are among the most promising solar technologies. Currently, the state-of the-art methods for DNI evaluation use datasets of aerosol optical depth (AOD) with only coarse (typically monthly) temporal resolution. Using daily AOD data from both site-specific observations at ground stations as well as gridded model estimates, a methodology is developed to evaluate how the calculated long-term DNI resource is affected by using AOD data averaged over periods from 1 to 30 days. It is demonstrated here that the use of monthly representations of AOD leads to systematic underestimations of the predicted long-term DNI up to 10% in some areas with high solar resource, which may result in detrimental consequences for the bankability of concentrating solar power projects. Recommendations for the use of either daily or monthly AOD data are provided on a geographical basis. PMID:27507711

  19. Future Long-term Measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability: Achievements and Lessons from the SORCE SIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, E. C.; Harder, J. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T. N.; Lykke, K.; Brown, S.

    2010-12-01

    In order to advance understanding of how natural and anthropogenic process affect Earth’s climate system there is a strong scientific importance of maintaining accurate, long-term records of climate forcing. The continuation of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements are needed to characterize poorly understood wavelength dependent climate processes. A major challenge quantifying the influence of SSI variability relates directly to the radiometric absolute accuracy and long-term precision of the measurements. The strong reliance on radiative transfer modeling for interpretation and quantification of the deposition of solar radiation in the atmosphere makes it imperative that the spectral distribution of radiant energy entering the atmosphere be known to a high degree of absolute accuracy (tied directly to international standards). The Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) is a solar spectral radiometer that continuously monitors the SSI across the wavelength region spanning the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared (200 nm - 2400 nm, a region encompassing 96% of the total solar irradiance). A future SIM instrument is included as part of the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) to continue the measurement of SSI, which began with the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), launched in 2003. SORCE SIM measurements have now monitored SSI for a sufficiently long time and over a wide range in solar activity to quantify wavelength-dependent variability form the UV to the near IR. The analysis of the SORCE SIM measurements of solar spectral variability have resulted in a number of instrument design refinements central to maintaining the long-term calibration to SI irradiance standards and achieve the necessary measurement precision and long-term reproducibility (0.05-0.01% per year) to meet the needs for establishing a climate record of solar spectral irradiance into the future.

  20. Long-term stable polymer solar cells with significantly reduced burn-in loss.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jaemin; Song, Suhee; Yoo, Minji; Lee, Ga Young; Kwon, Obum; Park, Jin Kuen; Back, Hyungcheol; Kim, Geunjin; Lee, Seoung Ho; Suh, Hongsuk; Lee, Kwanghee

    2014-01-01

    The inferior long-term stability of polymer-based solar cells needs to be overcome for their commercialization to be viable. In particular, an abrupt decrease in performance during initial device operation, the so-called 'burn-in' loss, has been a major contributor to the short lifetime of polymer solar cells, fundamentally impeding polymer-based photovoltaic technology. In this study, we demonstrate polymer solar cells with significantly improved lifetime, in which an initial burn-in loss is substantially reduced. By isolating trap-embedded components from pristine photoactive polymers based on the unimodality of molecular weight distributions, we are able to selectively extract a trap-free, high-molecular-weight component. The resulting polymer component exhibits enhanced power conversion efficiency and long-term stability without abrupt initial burn-in degradation. Our discovery suggests a promising possibility for commercial viability of polymer-based photovoltaics towards real solar cell applications. PMID:25483206

  1. Long-term temperature effects on GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Hong, K. H.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal degradation of AlGaAs solar cells resulting from a long-term operation in a space environment is investigated. The solar cell degradation effects caused by zinc and aluminum diffusion as well as deterioration by arsenic evaporation are presented. Also, the results are presented of experimental testing and measurements of various GaAs solar cell properties while the solar cell was operating in the temperature range of 27 C to 350 C. In particular, the properties of light current voltage curves, dark current voltage curves, and spectral response characteristics are given. Finally, some theoretical models for the annealing of radiation damage over various times and temperatures are included.

  2. Home health, long-term care, and other compliance activities.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T D; Sadoff, J W

    1999-04-01

    The Federal government continues to crack down on fraud and abuse in the healthcare industry with such initiatives and tools as Operation Restore Trust and intermediate tax sanctions. Home health and long-term care organizations are the latest entities under study by the Office of Inspector General, and the result of these studies likely will be more antifraud and abuse measures being taken against these entities. All healthcare organizations should pay particular attention to their tax risk exposure. Healthcare organizations that put effective compliance programs in place should be able to reduce the overall risk of challenges to their financial practices. PMID:10557979

  3. Future Long-term Measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance by JPSS TSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, E. C.; Harber, D.; Harder, J. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Brown, S.; Smith, A.; Lykke, K.

    2011-12-01

    To advance scientific understanding of how solar variability affects climate processes it is important to maintain accurate, long-term records of solar irradiance. Continuation of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements is needed to characterize poorly understood wavelength-dependent climate processes. Measurement challenges in quantifying the influence of SSI variability on climate are achieving sufficient radiometric absolute accuracy and maintaining the long-term relative accuracy. The Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is a dual-instrument package that will acquire solar irradiance as part of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The TSIS Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) instrument will continue the SSI measurements that began with the SORCE SIM in 2003. The TSIS SIM incorporates design and calibration improvements to better quantify long-term SSI variability. Specific improvements include the pre-launch SI-traceable calibration, the measurement precision, and the long-term relative stability needed to meet the requirements for establishing a climate record of SSI into the future. To quantify the absolute accuracy over the full spectral range, we have developed a SIM Radiometer Facility (SIMRF) utilizing the NIST Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations using Uniform Sources (SIRCUS). This comprehensive facility includes tuneable laser light sources from the ultraviolet to the near infrared matched in radiant power to the solar spectrum and tied to a cryogenic radiometer traceable to the NIST Primary Optical Watt Radiometer (POWR). The full characterization and calibration follows a measurement equation approach at the unit-level for full validation of the end-to-end performance at the instrument-level to achieve a combined standard uncertainty of 0.25% .

  4. A long-term strategic plan for development of solar thermal electric technology

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.A.; Burch, G.D.; Chavez, J.M.; Mancini, T.R.; Tyner, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Solar thermal electric (STE) technologies--parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish/engine systems--can convert sunlight into electricity efficiently and with minimum effect on the environment. These technologies currently range from developmental to early commercial stages of maturity. This paper summarizes the results of a recent strategic planning effort conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a long-term strategy for the development of STE technologies (DOE, 1996). The planning team led by DOE included representatives from the solar thermal industry, domestic utilities, state energy offices, and Sun-Lab (the cooperative Sandia National Laboratories/National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnership that supports the STE Program) as well as project developers. The plan was aimed at identifying specific activities necessary to achieve the DOE vision of 20 gigawatts of installed STE capacity by the year 2020. The planning team developed five strategies that both build on the strengths of, and opportunities for, STE technology and address weaknesses and threats. These strategies are to support future commercial opportunities for STE technologies; demonstrate improved performance and reliability of STE components and systems; reduce STE energy costs; develop advanced STE systems and applications; and address nontechnical barriers and champion STE power. The details of each of these strategies are discussed.

  5. A long-term strategic plan for development of solar thermal electric technology

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.A.; Burch, G.; Chavez, J.M.; Mancini, T.R.; Tyner, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Solar thermal electric (STE) technologies--parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish/engine systems--can convert sunlight into electricity efficiently and with minimum effect on the environment. These technologies currently range from developmental to early commercial stages of maturity. This paper summarizes the results of a recent strategic planning effort conducted by the US department of Energy (DOE) to develop a long-term strategy for the development of STE technologies. The planning team led by DOE included representatives from the solar thermal industry, domestic utilities, state energy offices, and Sun{center_dot}Lab (the cooperative Sandia National laboratories/National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnership that supports the STE Program) as well as project developers. The plan was aimed at identifying specific activities necessary to achieve the DOE vision of 20 gigawatts of installed STE capability by the year 2020. The planning team developed five strategies that both build on the strengths of, and opportunities for, STE technology and address weaknesses and threats. These strategies are to: support future commercial opportunities for STE technologies; demonstrate improved performance and reliability of STE components and systems; reduce STE energy costs; develop advanced STE systems and applications; and address nontechnical barriers and champion STE power. The details of each of these strategies are discussed.

  6. Quasi-decadal variability of the stratosphere: Influence of long-term solar ultraviolet variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Jirikowic, J. L.; Mccormack, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    A multiple regression statistical model is applied to investigate the existence of upper-stratospheric ozone, temperature, and zonal wind responses to long-term (solar cycle) changes in solar ultraviolet radiation using 11.5 years of reprocessed Nimbus-7 Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet (SBUV) data and 12.4 years of National Meteorological Center (NMC) data. A positive solar cycle variation of independently measured ozone and temperature occurs with maximum amplitude near the low-latitude stratopause. The seasonal solar regression coefficients near 1 mb for both ozone and temperature occur at low latitudes supporting a role for photochemical and radiative forcing in their origin. Zonal wind perturbations that correlate with long-term solar ultraviolet variations are a strong function of season and pressure level. Above approximately 2 mbar, the largest solar-correlated zonal wind enhancements occur at middle winter latitudes near the time of winter solstice in both hemispheres. The Northern Hemisphere December enhancement at 1 mb was especially large, 23 +/- 9 m/s from solar minimum to maximum during the last solar cycle. The derived ozone, temperature, and zonal wind increases with increasing solar ultraviolet flux near the stratopause are larger than predicted by models that consider primarily photochemical and radiative processes. The higher ozone and temperature response amplitudes at low latitudes may be due to modified ozone transport and adiabatic temperature changes induced by the dynamical response. If the midlatitude winter solstice wind enhancements are solar induced, their high amplitudes require a positive feedback due to wave-mean flow interaction such that the planetary wave drag on the flow is reduced under solar maximum conditions.

  7. Long-term reliability of screen printed CdS/CdTe solar-cell modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, A.; Ikegami, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Uda, H.; Komatsu, Y.

    1986-05-01

    Long-term reliability tests have been carried out screen-printed CdS/CdTe solar-cell modules under rooftop conditions in three countries at different latitudes (Japan, India and Australia). Test results on 118 modules, over periods of 140 to 800 days, have shown that such modules are fundamentally stable under these conditions. The only exception was one large module tested in India. The degradation of this module appears to have resulted from water which was able to enter because of poor sealing. Studies on waterproofing are necessary if the long-term reliability of screen-printed CdS/CdTe solar-cell modules is to be improved.

  8. Long-term Trend of Solar Coronal Hole Distribution from 1975 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, K.; Tokumaru, M.; Hayashi, K.; Satonaka, D.; Hakamada, K.

    2016-08-01

    We developed an automated prediction technique for coronal holes using potential magnetic field extrapolation in the solar corona to construct a database of coronal holes appearing from 1975 February to 2015 July (Carrington rotations from 1625 to 2165). Coronal holes are labeled with the location, size, and average magnetic field of each coronal hole on the photosphere and source surface. As a result, we identified 3335 coronal holes and found that the long-term distribution of coronal holes shows a similar pattern known as the magnetic butterfly diagram, and polar/low-latitude coronal holes tend to decrease/increase in the last solar minimum relative to the previous two minima.

  9. Progress Towards Deriving an Improved Long-Term Global Solar Resource

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Stephen J.; Mikovitz, J. Colleen; Zhang, Taiping; Sorlie, Susan; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Perez, Richard; Hemker, Karl, Jr.; Schlemmer, James; Kivalov, Sergey; Renne, David; Sengupta, Manajit; Bates, John; Knapp, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing project to provide the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with a global long-term advanced global solar mapping production system for improved depiction of historical solar resources and to provide a mechanism for continual updates. This new production system is made possible by the efforts of NASA and NOAA to completely reprocess the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data set that provides satellite visible and infrared radiances together with retrieved cloud and surface properties on a 10 km, 3-hourly basis beginning July 1983. We provide a general overview of this project, samples of the new solar irradiance mapped data products, and comparisons to surface measurements. Samples of the use of the SUNY-Albany solar irradiance algorithm applied to the ISCCP data show very good agreement with high quality surface measurements. We identify the next steps in the production of the data set.

  10. Long Term Variation of Cosmic Ray Anisotropy and Soalr Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richharia, M. K.; Shrivastava, S. K.; Jain, Alka; Jain, Manju

    The cosmic Ray CR intensity data recorded with Goose Bay Neutron Monitoring station have been investigate on 60 quietest days QD in a year for studying the variation in tri-diurnal and quart diurnal anisotropy during solar cycle 21 and 22 It has been observed that in spite of abrupt change in the amplitude and phase of tri-diurnal and quart diurnal anisotropy in CR intensity the amplitude is quite significant throughout period of investigation The tri-diurnal anisotropy clearly shows 11 year type of variation at Mid latitude neutron monitoring station

  11. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, Atsuki; Koyama, Yukinobu; Nose, Masahito; Hori, Tomoaki; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yatagai, Akiyo

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of long-term variation in the amplitude of solar quiet (Sq) geomagnetic field daily variation have been investigated using 1-h geomagnetic field data obtained from 69 geomagnetic observation stations within the period of 1947 to 2013. The Sq amplitude observed at these geomagnetic stations showed a clear dependence on the 10- to 12-year solar activity cycle and tended to be enhanced during each solar maximum phase. The Sq amplitude was the smallest around the minimum of solar cycle 23/24 in 2008 to 2009. The relationship between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude was approximately linear but about 53% of geomagnetic stations showed a weak nonlinear relation to the solar F10.7 index. In order to remove the effect of solar activity seen in the long-term variation of the Sq amplitude, we calculated a linear or second-order fitting curve between the solar F10.7 index and Sq amplitude during 1947 to 2013 and examined the residual Sq amplitude, which is defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. As a result, the majority of trends in the residual Sq amplitude that passed through a trend test showed negative values over a wide region. This tendency was relatively strong in Europe, India, the eastern part of Canada, and New Zealand. The relationship between the magnetic field intensity at 100-km altitude and residual Sq amplitude showed an anti-correlation for about 71% of the geomagnetic stations. Furthermore, the residual Sq amplitude at the equatorial station (Addis Ababa) was anti-correlated with the absolute value of the magnetic field inclination. This implies movement of the equatorial electrojet due to the secular variation of the ambient magnetic field.

  12. Long Term Activity Analysis in Surveillance Video Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ming-yu

    2010-01-01

    Surveillance video recording is becoming ubiquitous in daily life for public areas such as supermarkets, banks, and airports. The rate at which surveillance video is being generated has accelerated demand for machine understanding to enable better content-based search capabilities. Analyzing human activity is one of the key tasks to understand and…

  13. Long term behavior of trapped relativistic electrons and their correlation with solar wind speed

    SciTech Connect

    Belian, R.D.; Cayton, T.E.; Christensen, R.A.; Ingraham, J.C.; Reeves, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    We examine Los Alamos energetic electron data from 1979 through the present to show long term trends in the trapped relativistic electron populations at geosynchronous Earth orbit. Such populations are thought to be associated with high-speed solar wind structures typically present near solar minimum. We will show that high-energy electron fluxes, E > 1.4 MeV, displayed a solar-like cycle of about 10.5 years, but that the behavior is out of phase with the sunspot cycle. We will also compare relativistic electrons during the cycle with solar wind speed from the MIT plasma analyzers on IMP-8. It will be shown that relativistic electrons correlate well with high solar winds only during limited, short periods of time. We will also confirm the observation that the higher-energy electrons occur with a longer delay after the establishment of the high-speed solar wind. Comparison of our data with previously published data indicate that the higher the solar wind speed, the sooner the relativistic electrons occur.

  14. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.

    2012-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by the global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region, which are generated by dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere. Recently, Elias et al. [2010] reported that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes in a period of 1961-2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is due to ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effect in the thermosphere due to increasing greenhouse gas. In the present study, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 solar flux as a good indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range as well as geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour observed at 184 geomagnetic stations. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum every day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude at all the geomagnetic stations shows a strong correlation with the solar F10.7 flux which depends on 11-year solar activity. The relationship between the Sq amplitude and F10.7 flux was not linear but nonlinear. This nonlinearity could be interpreted as the decrease of production rate of electrons and ions in the ionosphere for the strong EUV and UV fluxes as already reported by Balan et al. [1993]. In order to minimize the solar

  15. Long-Term International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodroci, M. P.; Gafka, G. K.; Lutomski, M. G.; Maher, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the initial ISS requirements and design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to further reduce risk - given the determination, commitment, and resources to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS, and to reduce risk to all crewmembers. While years of work went into the development of ISS requirements, there are many things associated with risk reduction in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity Hazard Level- 4 [THL] materials, emergency procedures, emergency equipment, control of drag-throughs) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards) Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of more than a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery for years

  16. Long-Term International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forroci, Michael P.; Gafka, George K.; Lutomski, Michael G.; Maher, Jacilyn S.

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the initial ISS requirements and design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to further reduce risk given the determination, commitment, and resources to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS, and to reduce risk to all crewmembers. While years of work went into the development of ISS requirements, there are many things associated with risk reduction in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity hazard level-4 materials, emergency procedures, emergency equipment, control of drag-throughs) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards). Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of more than a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery for years to come.

  17. Solar Drivers of 11-yr and Long-Term Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Richardson, I. G.; Ling, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    In the current paradigm for the modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), diffusion is taken to be the dominant process during solar maxima while drift dominates at minima. Observations during the recent solar minimum challenge the pre-eminence of drift: at such times. In 2009, the approx.2 GV GCR intensity measured by the Newark neutron monitor increased by approx.5% relative to its maximum value two cycles earlier even though the average tilt angle in 2009 was slightly larger than that in 1986 (approx.20deg vs. approx.14deg), while solar wind B was significantly lower (approx.3.9 nT vs. approx.5.4 nT). A decomposition of the solar wind into high-speed streams, slow solar wind, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs; including postshock flows) reveals that the Sun transmits its message of changing magnetic field (diffusion coefficient) to the heliosphere primarily through CMEs at solar maximum and high-speed streams at solar minimum. Long-term reconstructions of solar wind B are in general agreement for the approx. 1900-present interval and can be used to reliably estimate GCR intensity over this period. For earlier epochs, however, a recent Be-10-based reconstruction covering the past approx. 10(exp 4) years shows nine abrupt and relatively short-lived drops of B to < or approx.= 0 nT, with the first of these corresponding to the Sporer minimum. Such dips are at variance with the recent suggestion that B has a minimum or floor value of approx.2.8 nT. A floor in solar wind B implies a ceiling in the GCR intensity (a permanent modulation of the local interstellar spectrum) at a given energy/rigidity. The 30-40% increase in the intensity of 2.5 GV electrons observed by Ulysses during the recent solar minimum raises an interesting paradox that will need to be resolved.

  18. Long-term differential energy spectrum for solar-flare iron-group particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, G. E.; Fruland, R. M.; Morrison, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A long-term solar-flare differential energy spectrum for iron-group nuclei from approximately 0.1 to approximately 600 MeV/amu is derived from track density profile measurements in sample 64455 and sample 68815. Measurements from uneroded surfaces were obtained from quench crystals of plagioclase in 64455, and a Kr-81/Kr method indicates that the exposure age of this sample is 2,010,000 yrs. The power laws which best fit the normalized track density data are reported; the energy spectrum consists of two power law curves smoothly joined together which in turn are smoothly connected to a modulated galactic cosmic-ray spectrum. Standard track production versus depth profiles can be used to determine solar-flare track exposure ages and erosion rates for lunar samples.

  19. Solar cycle dynamics of solar, magnetospheric, and heliospheric particles, and long-term atmospheric coupling: SAMPLEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M. (Principal Investigator); Hamilton, D. C.; Blake, J. B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Baker, D. N.; VonRosenvinge, T. T.; Callis, L. B.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes science analysis activities by the SAMPEX mission science team during the period during the period July 1, 1995 through July 1, 1996. Bibliographic entries for 1995 and 1996 to date (July 1996) are included. The SAMPEX science team was extremely active, with 20 articles published or submitted to refereed journals, 18 papers published in their entirety in Conference Proceedings, and 53 contributed papers, seminars, and miscellaneous presentations. The bibliography at the end of this report constitutes the primary description of the research activity. Science highlights are given under the major activity headings of anomalous cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, magnetospheric precipitating electrons, trapped H and He isotopes, and data analysis activities.

  20. Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the amplitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet daily variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Tsuda, T.

    2011-12-01

    It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) daily variation is produced by global ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region from middle latitudes to the magnetic equator. These currents are generated by a dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the thermosphere and ionosphere. From the Ohm's equation, the ionospheric currents strongly depend on the ionospheric conductivity, polarization electric field and neutral wind. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the thermosphere and ionosphere. Elias et al. [2010] found that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes from 1961 to 2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effects in the thermosphere due to increasing the greenhouse gases. In this talk, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. These observation data have been provided by the IUGONET (Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork) project. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 flux as an indicator of the variation in the solar irradiance in the EUV and UV range, geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum per day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the Sq amplitude at all the stations strongly depends on 11-year solar activity, and tends to enhance more during the high activities (19- and 22- solar cycles) than during the low activity (20-solar cycle). The Fourier spectra of the F10.7 flux and Sq

  1. SeaWiFS long-term solar diffuser reflectance and sensor noise analyses.

    PubMed

    Eplee, Robert E; Patt, Frederick S; Barnes, Robert A; McClain, Charles R

    2007-02-10

    The NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group's Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) team has undertaken an analysis of the mission-long Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) solar calibration time series to assess the long-term degradation of the solar diffuser reflectance over 9 years on orbit. The SeaWiFS diffuser is an aluminum plate coated with YB71 paint. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the diffuser was not fully characterized before launch, so the Cal/Val team has implemented a regression of the solar incidence angles and the drift in the node of the satellite's orbit against the diffuser time series to correct for solar incidence angle effects. An exponential function with a time constant of 200 days yields the best fit to the diffuser time series. The decrease in diffuser reflectance over the mission is wavelength dependent, ranging from 9% in the blue (412 nm) to 5% in the red and near infrared (670-865 nm). The Cal/Val team has developed a methodology for computing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for SeaWiFS on orbit from the diffuser time series corrected for both the varying solar incidence angles and the diffuser reflectance degradation. A sensor noise model is used to compare on-orbit SNRs computed for radiances reflected from the diffuser with prelaunch SNRs measured at typical radiances specified for the instrument. To within the uncertainties in the measurements, the SNRs for SeaWiFS have not changed over the mission. The on-orbit performance of the SeaWiFS solar diffuser should offer insight into the long-term on-orbit performance of solar diffusers on other instruments, such as the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer [currently flying on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites], the Visible and Infrared Radiometer Suite [scheduled to fly on the NASA National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) and NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellites] and the Advanced

  2. SeaWiFS long-term solar diffuser reflectance and sensor noise analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Eplee, Robert E. Jr.; Patt, Frederick S.; Barnes, Robert A.; McClain, Charles R

    2007-02-10

    The NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group's Calibration and Validation(Cal/Val) team has undertaken an analysis of the mission-long Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS)solar calibration time series to assess the long-term degradation of the solar diffuser reflectance over 9 years on orbit. The SeaWiFS diffuser is an aluminum plate coated with YB71 paint. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the diffuser was not fully characterized before launch,so the Cal/Val team has implemented a regression of the solar incidence angles and the drift in the node of the satellite's orbit against the diffuser time series to correct for solar incidence angle effects. An exponential function with a time constant of 200 days yields the best fit to the diffuser time series.The decrease in diffuser reflectance over the mission is wavelength dependent,ranging from 9% in the blue(412 nm) to 5% in the red and near infrared(670-865 nm). The Cal/Val team has developed a methodology for computing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for SeaWiFS on orbit from the diffuser time series corrected for both the varying solar incidence angles and the diffuser reflectance degradation. A sensor noise model is used to compare on-orbit SNRs computed for radiances reflected from the diffuser with prelaunch SNRs measured at typical radiances specified for the instrument. To within the uncertainties in the measurements, the SNRs for SeaWiFS have not changed over the mission. The on-orbit performance of the SeaWiFS solar diffuser should offer insight into the long-term on-orbit performance of solar diffusers on other instruments, such as the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer [currently flying on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites], the Visible and Infrared Radiometer Suite [scheduled to fly on the NASA National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) and NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellites] and the Advanced Baseline

  3. The Solar Neighborhood. XXXVI. The Long-term Photometric Variability of Nearby Red Dwarfs in the VRI Optical Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosey, Altonio D.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Dieterich, Sergio B.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Lurie, John C.; Riedel, Adric R.; Subasavage, John P.

    2015-07-01

    We present an analysis of long-term photometric variability for nearby red dwarf stars at optical wavelengths. The sample consists of 264 M dwarfs south of decl. = +30 with V-K = 3.96-9.16 and MV ≈ 10-20, corresponding to spectral types M2V-M8V, most of which are within 25 pc. The stars have been observed in the VRI filters for ˜4-14 yr at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9 m telescope. Of the 238 red dwarfs within 25 pc, we find that only ˜8% are photometrically variable by at least 20 mmag (˜2%) in the VRI bands. Only four stars have been found to vary by more than 50 mmag, including GJ 1207 at 8.6 pc, which experienced a single extraordinary flare, and GJ 2006 A, TWA 8 A, and TWA 8 B, which are all young stars beyond 25 pc linked to moving groups. We find that high variability at optical wavelengths over the long term can in fact be used to identify young stars. Overall, however, the fluxes of most red dwarfs at optical wavelengths are steady to a few percent over the long term. The low overall rate of photometric variability for red dwarfs is consistent with results found in previous work on similar stars on shorter timescales, with the body of work indicating that most red dwarfs are only mildly variable. As expected, we find that the degree of photometric variability is greater in the V band than in the R or I bands, but we do not find any obvious trends in variability over the long term with red dwarf luminosity or temperature. We highlight 17 stars that show long-term changes in brightness, sometimes because of flaring activity or spots, and sometimes because of stellar cycles similar to our Sun's solar cycle. Remarkably, two targets show brightnesses that monotonically increase (G 169-029) or decrease (WT 460AB) by several percent over a decade. We also provide long-term variability measurements for seven M dwarfs within 25 pc that host exoplanets, none of which vary by more than 20 mmag. Both as a population, and for the specific red dwarfs with exoplanets observed

  4. Design and long-term monitoring of DSC/CIGS tandem solar module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vildanova, M. F.; Nikolskaia, A. B.; Kozlov, S. S.; Shevaleevskiy, O. I.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the design and development of tandem dye-sensitized/Cu(In, Ga)Se (DSC/CIGS) PV modules. The tandem PV module comprised of the top DSC module and a bottom commercial 0,8 m2 CIGS module. The top DSC module was made of 10 DSC mini-modules with the field size of 20 × 20 cm2 each. Tandem DSC/CIGS PV modules were used for providing the long-term monitoring of energy yield and electrical parameters in comparison with standalone CIGS modules under outdoor conditions. The outdoor test facility, containing solar modules of both types and a measurement unit, was located on the roof of the Institute of Biochemical Physics in Moscow. The data obtained during monitoring within the 2014 year period has shown the advantages of the designed tandem DSC/CIGS PV-modules over the conventional CIGS modules, especially for cloudy weather and low-intensity irradiation conditions.

  5. Long-Term Dynamics of Small Bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Steve (Technical Monitor); Holman, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics program Prof. Norm Murray (CITA) and I have been conducting investigations of the long-term dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system. This grant, and its predecessor NAG5-7761, supported travel for collaboration by the Investigators and also supports Murray during an annual one month visit to the CfA for further collaboration. In the course of this grant we made a number of advances in solar system dynamics. For example, we developed an analytic model for the origin and consequence of chaos associated with three-body resonances in the asteroid belt. This has been shown to be important for the delivery of near Earth objects. We later extended this model to three-body resonances among planets. We were able to show that the numerically identified chaos among the outer planets results from a three-body resonance involving Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The resulting paper was awarded the 1999 Newcomb Cleveland award from the AAAS. This award singles out one paper published in Science each year for distinction. This grant has also supported, in part, my participate in other solar system dynamics projects. The results from those collaborations are also listed.

  6. LONG-TERM CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY IN SOUTHERN M DWARFS: Gl 229 A AND Gl 752 A

    SciTech Connect

    Buccino, Andrea P.; Luoni, MarIa Luisa; Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; DIaz, Rodrigo F.

    2011-02-15

    Several late-type stars present activity cycles similar to that of the Sun. However, these cycles have been mostly studied in F to K stars. Due to their small intrinsic brightness, M dwarfs are not usually the targets of long-term observational studies of stellar activity, and their long-term variability is generally not known. In this work, we study the long-term activity of two M dwarf stars: Gl 229 A (M1/2) and Gl 752 A (M2.5). We employ medium-resolution echelle spectra obtained at the 2.15 m telescope at the Argentinian observatory CASLEO between 2000 and 2010, and photometric observations obtained from the ASAS database. We analyze Ca II K line-core fluxes and the mean V magnitude with the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, and we obtain possible activity cycles of {approx}4 yr for Gl 229 A and {approx}7 yr for Gl 752 A.

  7. Developing Long-Term Physical Activity Participation: A Grounded Theory Study with African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Amy E.; Buckworth, Janet; Katz, Mira L.; Willis, Sharla K.; Odoms-Young, Angela; Heaney, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Regular physical activity is linked to a reduced risk of obesity and chronic disease. African American women bear a disproportionate burden from these conditions and many do not get the recommended amount of physical activity. Long-term success of interventions to initiate and maintain a physically active lifestyle among African American women has…

  8. Effect of Long-Term Physical Activity Practice after Cardiac Rehabilitation on Some Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyssin, Celine, Jr.; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sebastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity…

  9. Long-Term Dynamics of Small Bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics program Prof. Norm Murray (CITA) and I have been conducting investigations of the long-term dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system. This grant, and its predecessor NAG5- 7761, supports travel for collaboration by the Investigators and also supports Murray during an annual one month visit to the CfA for further collaboration. In the course of this grant we made a number of advances in solar system dynamics. For example, we developed an analytic model for the origin and consequence of chaos associated with three-body resonances in the asteroid belt. This has been shown to be important for the delivery of near Earth objects. We later extended this model to three- body resonances among planets. We were able to show that the numerically identified chaos among the outer planets results from a three-body resonance involving Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The resulting paper was awarded the 1999 Newcomb Cleveland award from the AAAS. This award singles out one paper published in Science each year for distinction.

  10. Long-Term Dynamics of Small Bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics program, Prof. Norm Murray (CITA (Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics)) and I have been conducting investigations of the long-term dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system. This grant, and its successor NAG5-10365, supports travel for collaboration by the Investigators and also supports Murray during an annual one month visit to the CfA (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) for further collaboration. In the course of this grant we made a number of advances in solar system dynamics. For example, we developed an analytic model for the origin and consequence of chaos associated with three-body resonances in the asteroid belt. This has been shown to be important for the delivery of near Earth objects (NEO). We later extended this model to three-body resonances among planets. We were able to show that the numerically identified chaos among the outer planets results from a three-body resonance involving Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The resulting paper was awarded the 1999 Newcomb Cleveland award from the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science). This award singles out one paper published in Science each year for distinction. A list of grant-related publications is presented, with abstracts included.

  11. Long-Term Modeling of Solar Energy: Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) and PV Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

    2007-08-16

    This report presents an overview of research conducted on solar energy technologies and their implementation in the ObjECTS framework. The topics covered include financing assumptions and selected issues related to the integration of concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics PV technologies into the electric grid. A review of methodologies for calculating the levelized energy cost of capital-intensive technologies is presented, along with sensitivity tests illustrating how the cost of a solar plant would vary depending on financing assumptions. An analysis of the integration of a hybrid concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) system into the electric system is conducted. Finally a failure statistics analysis for PV plants illustrates the central role of solar irradiance uncertainty in determining PV grid integration characteristics.

  12. A Reliable and Accurate Long-term Climate Record: Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottman, G. J.; Woods, T. N.; Snow, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Solar irradiance - both total irradiance and spectral irradiance— are primary climate data variables. Because of absorption and scattering by our intervening atmosphere accurate measurements of the Sun are only realized from space observations beginning in about 1978. The long-term accuracies of the resulting data sets are limited by unidentified and uncertain on-orbit instrument degradation. Nevertheless, from numerous observing programs solar variability has been well established for short and intermediate times scales, with additional clear indications of decadal variability associated with the 11-year solar cycle. How can today's solar irradiance measurements be reliably compared with those made in the future, and how will the resulting comparison stand the test of time? There is one technique that shows great promise. The Sun is a star — more or less variable like any and all other stars. Stellar astronomers have a technique of establishing a star's variability with precision of 0.01%, and over arbitrarily long periods of time. From the ground and from space they have success by simply comparing the irradiance of a target star to that of a number of standard stars. (The key here is that there exist many standard stars, and outliers are easily identified and removed from the ensemble.) For stellar comparisons it is straightforward to use a single instrument — same optics and detectors — to observe stars differing by several orders of magnitude in brightness. To observe the Sun and stars with a single instrument is far more problematic as there are easily eight to twelve orders of magnitude differences in brightness. The SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) has now been flown twice — on UARS from 1991 to 2005 and on SORCE from 2003 to the present. The SOLSTICE is an ultraviolet spectral instrument measuring irradiance from 115 nm to 300 nm, and it is intentionally designed to observe both the Sun and selected standard stars. In

  13. Motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life in long-term lung cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Clark, Matthew M; Novotny, Paul J; Patten, Christi A; Rausch, Sarah M; Garces, Yolanda I; Jatoi, Aminah; Sloan, Jeff A; Yang, Ping

    2008-07-01

    Little is known about the relationship between motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life (QOL) in long-term lung cancer survivors. Long-term survivors are considered those who are living 5 years or more following a cancer diagnosis. This project examined the relationship between a self-report measure of motivational readiness for physical activity and QOL in a sample of 272 long-term lung cancer survivors. Participants (54% male, average age 70 years old) completed the mailed survey an average of 6 years after being diagnosed with lung cancer. Survey measures included the stage of change for physical activity and a set of single item QOL and symptom scales. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported they currently engaged in regular physical activity (a total of 30 min or more per day, at least 5 days per week). Kruskal-Wallis tests revealed that those who reported engaging in regular physical activity reported a better overall QOL, better QOL on all five domains of QOL functioning (mental, physical, social, emotional, and spiritual), and fewer symptoms compared to those with a sedentary lifestyle. Physical activity level may have important QOL and symptom management benefits for long-term lung cancer survivors. PMID:18243406

  14. NASA's Long-term Debris Environment and Active Debris Removal Modeling Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the modeling activities for modeling of the long-term debris environment, the updated assessments of the environment, and the necessity to model the effectiveness of the technologies aimed at the removal of orbital debris. The model being used is named a LEO to GEO environment debris (LEGEND). It is a high fidelity three dimensional numerical simulation model with the capability to treat objects individually. It uses a Monte Carlo approach and a collision probability evaluation algorithm to simulate future satellite breakups and the growth of the debris populations.

  15. Worldwide impact of aerosol’s time scale on the predicted long-term concentrating solar power potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Gueymard, Christian A.; Santos-Alamillos, Francisco J.; Pozo-Vázquez, David

    2016-08-01

    Concentrating solar technologies, which are fuelled by the direct normal component of solar irradiance (DNI), are among the most promising solar technologies. Currently, the state-of the-art methods for DNI evaluation use datasets of aerosol optical depth (AOD) with only coarse (typically monthly) temporal resolution. Using daily AOD data from both site-specific observations at ground stations as well as gridded model estimates, a methodology is developed to evaluate how the calculated long-term DNI resource is affected by using AOD data averaged over periods from 1 to 30 days. It is demonstrated here that the use of monthly representations of AOD leads to systematic underestimations of the predicted long-term DNI up to 10% in some areas with high solar resource, which may result in detrimental consequences for the bankability of concentrating solar power projects. Recommendations for the use of either daily or monthly AOD data are provided on a geographical basis.

  16. Worldwide impact of aerosol’s time scale on the predicted long-term concentrating solar power potential

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Gueymard, Christian A.; Santos-Alamillos, Francisco J.; Pozo-Vázquez, David

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating solar technologies, which are fuelled by the direct normal component of solar irradiance (DNI), are among the most promising solar technologies. Currently, the state-of the-art methods for DNI evaluation use datasets of aerosol optical depth (AOD) with only coarse (typically monthly) temporal resolution. Using daily AOD data from both site-specific observations at ground stations as well as gridded model estimates, a methodology is developed to evaluate how the calculated long-term DNI resource is affected by using AOD data averaged over periods from 1 to 30 days. It is demonstrated here that the use of monthly representations of AOD leads to systematic underestimations of the predicted long-term DNI up to 10% in some areas with high solar resource, which may result in detrimental consequences for the bankability of concentrating solar power projects. Recommendations for the use of either daily or monthly AOD data are provided on a geographical basis. PMID:27507711

  17. Stimulation of raphe (obscurus) nucleus causes long-term potentiation of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E

    1986-12-01

    1. The respiratory response, measured as integrated phrenic nerve activity, during and for up to an hour following 10 min of continuous electrical stimulation of raphe obscurus was quantitated in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated cats whose carotid sinus nerves and vagus nerves had been cut. End-tidal PCO2 and body temperature were kept constant with servocontrollers. 2. Stimulation of raphe obscurus caused a significant increase in both phrenic tidal activity and respiratory frequency that persisted following cessation of the stimulus. This persistent facilitation is referred to as 'long-term potentiation' of respiration. 3. Control stimulations in the parenchyma of the medulla oblongata failed to stimulate respiration and cause the long-term potentiation. 4. Both the direct facilitatory effects of raphe obscurus stimulation on phrenic nerve activity and the long-term potentiation of respiration following the stimulus were prevented by pre-treating cats with methysergide, a serotonin receptor antagonist. 5. The results are discussed in terms of the raphe obscurus being the potential source of the long-term potentiation of respiration that occurs following stimulation of carotid body afferents (Millhorn, Eldridge & Waldrop, 1980a, b). PMID:3114470

  18. Stellar activity cycles from long-term data by robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, K.

    2014-03-01

    automated photometry+manual data from the literature, resulting in the detection of positive correlation between the rotational rates and cycle length(s) in the sense that faster rotating stars have shorter cycle(s). The long-term, B-V and U-B color index changes of active stars were thoroughly studied by Messina (2008). Direct connection between the magnetic behavior and the orbit of a system containing an active star is seldom observed; such examples are presented by Strassmeier et al. (2011) and Oláh et al. (2013). Based on the data from the DASCH (Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard) project, three active K-giants' long-term variability on the timescale of decades to 100 years have beed discovered by Tang et al. (2010). The ASAS database was used to study the cyclic behavior of field M-dwarf stars by Savanov (2012) who found no correlation between the rotation rates and cycle lengths of these objects, suggesting a different type of dynamo to those that drive the dynamo in the RS CVn systems and related active stars, e.g., in Oláh et al. (2009). Recently, Vida & Oláh (2013) determined cycles on the timescale of a year on fast rotating, late-type dwarf stars measured by the Kepler space telescope. However, despite the extremely high precision and time cadence, the Kepler data do not allow to study very long- term phenomena, such as the activity cycles of solar-like stars, due to the limited lifetime of the mission. One of the most important factors in studying stellar activity cycles is time, which cannot be overtaken by any means. It needs systematic, uninterrupted observations for dozens of years, preferably with the same instrument, to avoid systematic effects in the observed long-term variations. Another point is that most of the known magnetically active stars are quite bright objects needing a small telescope to be observed. The construction of automated photometric and spectroscopic telescopes is one of the major, and at the same time low

  19. Preserving a Unique Archive for Long-Term Solar Variability Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; Hewins, Ian; McFadden, Robert; Emery, Barbara; Gibson, Sarah; Denig, William

    2016-05-01

    In 1964 (solar cycle 20) Patrick McIntosh began creating hand-drawn synoptic maps of solar activity, based on Hydrogen alpha (Hα) imaging measurements. These synoptic maps were unique because they traced the polarity inversion lines (PILs), connecting widely separated filaments, fibril patterns and plage corridors to reveal the large-scale organization of the solar magnetic field. He and his assistants later included coronal hole (CH) boundaries to the maps, usually from ground-based He-I 10830 images. They continued making these maps until 2010 (the start of solar cycle 24), yielding more than 40 years (~ 540 Carrington rotations) or nearly four complete solar cycles (SCs) of synoptic maps. The McIntosh collection of maps forms a unique and consistent set of global solar magnetic field data, and are unique tools for studying the structure and evolution of the large-scale solar fields and polarity boundaries, because: 1) they have excellent spatial resolution for defining polarity boundaries, 2) the organization of the fields into long-lived, coherent features is clear, and 3) the data are relatively homogeneous over four solar cycles. After digitization and archiving, these maps -- along with computer codes permitting efficient searches of the map arrays -- will be made publicly available at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) in their final, searchable form. This poster is a progress report of the project so far and some suggested scientific applications.

  20. Implications of solar irradiance variability upon long-term changes in the Earth's atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1992-01-01

    From 1979 through 1987, it is believed that variability in the incoming solar energy played a significant role in changing the Earth's climate. Using high-precision spacecraft radiometric measurements, the incoming total solar irradiance (total amount of solar power per unit area) and the Earth's mean, global atmospheric temperatures were found to vary in phase with each other. The observed irradiance and temperature changes appeared to be correlated with the 11-year cycle of solar magnetic activity. During the period from 1979 through 1985, both the irradiance and temperature decreased. From 1985 to 1987, they increased. The irradiance changed approximately 0.1 percent, while the temperature varied as much as 0.6 C. During the 1979-1987 period, the temperatures were forecasted to rise linearly because of the anthropogenic build-up of carbon dioxide and the hypothesized 'global warming', 'greenhouse effect', scenarios. Contrary to these scenarios, the temperatures were found to vary in a periodic manner in phase with the solar irradiance changes. The observed correlations between irradiance and temperature variabilily suggest that the mean, global temperature of the Earth may decline between 1990 and 1997 as solar magnetic activity decreases.

  1. Solar Cycle Dynamics of Solar, Magnetospheric, and Heliospheric Particles, and Long-Term Atmospheric Coupling: SAMPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Blake, J. B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Baker, D. N.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Callis, L. B.; Hamilton, D. C.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes science analysis activities by the SAMPEX mission science team during the period during the period July 1, 1997 through July 1, 1997. Bibliographic entries for 1996 and 1997 to date (July 1997) are included. The SAMPEX science team was extremely active, with 27 articles published or submitted to refereed journals, 17 papers published in their entirety in Conference Proceedings, and 74 contributed papers, seminars, and miscellaneous presentations. The bibliography at the end of this report constitutes the primary description of the research activity. Science highlights are given under the major activity headings, as well as other activities of the team.

  2. Solar Cycle Dynamics of Solar, Magnetospheric, and Heliospheric Particles, and Long-Term Atmospheric Coupling: SAMPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Blake, J. B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Baker, D. N.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes science analysis activities by the SAMPEX mission science team during the period during the period July 1, 1997 through July 1, 1998. Bibliographic entries for 1997 and 1998 to date (July 1998) are included. The SAMPEX science team was extremely active, with 20 articles published or submitted to refereed journals, 11 papers published in their entirety in Conference Proceedings, and 49 contributed papers, seminars, and miscellaneous presentations. The bibliography at the end of this report constitutes the primary description of the research activity. Science highlights are given under the major activity headings, as well as other activities of the team.

  3. Identifying Feasible Physical Activity Programs for Long-Term Care Homes in the Ontario Context

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Saad; Newhouse, Ian; Malik, Ali; Heckman, George

    2015-01-01

    Background Structured exercise programs for frail institutionalized seniors have shown improvement in physical, functional, and psychological health of this population. However, the ‘feasibility’ of implementation of such programs in real settings is seldom discussed. The purpose of this systematic review was to gauge feasibility of exercise and falls prevention programs from the perspective of long-term care homes in Ontario, given the recent changes in funding for publically funded physiotherapy services. Method Six electronic databases were searched by two independent researchers for randomized controlled trials that targeted long-term care residents and included exercise as an independent component of the intervention. Results A total of 39 studies were included in this review. A majority of these interventions were led by physiotherapist(s), carried out three times per week for 30–45 minutes per session. However, a few group-based interventions that were led by long-term care staff, volunteers, or trained non-exercise specialists were identified that also required minimal equipment. Conclusion This systematic review has identified ‘feasible’ physical activity and falls prevention programs that required minimal investment in staff and equipment, and demonstrated positive outcomes. Implementation of such programs represents cost-effective means of providing long-term care residents with meaningful gains in physical, psychological, and social health. PMID:26180563

  4. Highly Efficient Organic Hole Transporting Materials for Perovskite and Organic Solar Cells with Long-Term Stability.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Saripally Sudhaker; Gunasekar, Kumarasamy; Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Chang Su; Kim, Dong-Ho; Moon, Jong Hun; Lee, Jin Yong; Song, Myungkwan; Jin, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-27

    Small molecules based on N-atom-linked phenylcarbazole-fluorene as the main scaffold, end-capped with spirobifluorene derivatives, are developed as organic hole-transporting materials for highly efficient perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and bulk heterojunction (BHJ) inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs). The CzPAF-SBF-based devices show remarkable device performance with excellent long-term stability in PSCs and BHJ IOSCs with a maximum PCE of 17.21% and 7.93%, respectively. PMID:26619180

  5. Long term endurance test and contact degradation of CIGS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Thomas; Schönberger, Francillina; Walter, Thomas; Hariskos, Dimitrios; Kiowski, Oliver; Schäffler, Raymund

    2013-09-01

    CIGS is the most promising technology for thin-film solar cells with record efficiencies of 20.4 % on laboratory scale and 17.8 % aperture area efficiency on a 900 cm² module. Another important factor besides the cell efficiency is the reliability and long term stability of the manufactured modules, which can be assessed by accelerated ageing. In this contribution the accelerated ageing of CIGS mini modules has been investigated. Therefore, modules were dark annealed under dry heat conditions at different temperatures. During the endurance test a positive or negative bias was applied to the cells. In regular intervals the IV- and CV-characteristics were measured at room temperature. After an overall stress time of 3500 h the IV-characteristics were determined under different illumination conditions (intensity, spectral illumination). Our previous publications suggest a barrier at the back contact to explain the observed parameter drifts. This contribution is focused on the influence of different bias conditions during the endurance test on the generation of a back diode and on the change of the acceptor concentration. These parameter drifts have an impact on the open circuit voltage, fill factor and on the appearance of a cross over between dark and illuminated IV-characteristics. The interpretation of the observed parameter drifts was supported by SCAPS simulations based on the above mentioned back barrier model. As an outcome of the simulations signatures for the existence of a back barrier diode were established. IVmeasurements, temperature dependent Voc measurements and SunsVoc measurements are helpful means to detect such back diodes.

  6. Solar Cycle Dynamics of Solar, Magnetospheric, and Heliospheric Particles, and Long-Term Atmospheric Coupling: SAMPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Blake, J. B.; Mazur, J. E.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Baker, D. N.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Callis, L. B.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.

    2000-01-01

    This final technical report summarizes science analysis activities by the SAMPEX mission science team during the period July 1, 1995 through September 30, 2000. Bibliographic entries for 1995 to date (October 2000) are included. The SAMPEX science team was extremely active, with 72 articles published or submitted to referred journals, 38 papers published in their entirety in Conference Proceedings, and 260 contributed papers, seminars, and miscellaneous presentations. The bibliography at the end of this report constitutes the primary description of the research activity. Science highlights are given under the major activity headings, as well as other activities of the team. One Ph.D. student, Mr. Daniel Williams, completed his thesis at California Institute of Technology based on data from the MAST instrument.

  7. Elimination of dendritic spines with long-term memory is specific to active circuits

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Jeff; Cowansage, Kiriana; Baumgärtel, Karsten; Mayford, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Structural changes in brain circuits active during learning are thought to be important for long-term memory storage. If these changes support long-term information storage they might be expected to be present at distant timepoints after learning, as well as specific to the circuit activated with learning, and sensitive to the contingencies of the behavioral paradigm. Here, we show such changes in the hippocampus as a result of contextual fear conditioning. There were significantly fewer spines specifically on active neurons of fear-conditioned mice. This spine loss did not occur in homecage mice or in mice exposed to the training context alone. Mice exposed to unpaired shocks showed a generalized reduction in spines. These learning-related changes in spine density could reflect a direct mechanism of encoding or alternately could reflect a compensatory adaptation to previously described enhancement in transmission due to glutamate receptor insertion. PMID:22956846

  8. Long-term Exposure to Air Pollution and Markers of Inflammation, Coagulation, and Endothelial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hajat, Anjum; Allison, Matthew; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Jorgensen, Neal W.; Szpiro, Adam A.; Vedal, Sverre; Kaufman, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Air pollution is associated with cardiovascular disease, and systemic inflammation may mediate this effect. We assessed associations between long- and short-term concentrations of air pollution and markers of inflammation, coagulation, and endothelial activation. Methods We studied participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis from 2000 to 2012 with repeat measures of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), fibrinogen, D-dimer, soluble E-selectin, and soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1. Annual average concentrations of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5), individual-level ambient PM2.5 (integrating indoor concentrations and time–location data), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and black carbon were evaluated. Short-term concentrations of PM2.5 reflected the day of blood draw, day prior, and averages of prior 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-day periods. Random-effects models were used for long-term exposures and fixed effects for short-term exposures. The sample size was between 9,000 and 10,000 observations for CRP, IL-6, fibrinogen, and D-dimer; approximately 2,100 for E-selectin; and 3,300 for soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1. Results After controlling for confounders, 5 µg/m3 increase in long-term ambient PM2.5 was associated with 6% higher IL-6 (95% confidence interval = 2%, 9%), and 40 parts per billion increase in long-term NOx was associated with 7% (95% confidence interval = 2%, 13%) higher level of D-dimer. PM2.5 measured at day of blood draw was associated with CRP, fibrinogen, and E-selectin. There were no other positive associations between blood markers and short- or long-term air pollution. Conclusions These data are consistent with the hypothesis that long-term exposure to air pollution is related to some markers of inflammation and fibrinolysis. PMID:25710246

  9. Low-power sensor module for long-term activity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Kaspar; Gassert, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Wearable sensor modules are a promising approach to collecting data on functional motor activities, both for repeated and long-term assessments, as well as to investigate the transfer of therapy to activities of daily living at home, but have so far either had limited sensing capabilities, or were not laid out for long-term monitoring. This paper presents ReSense, a miniature sensor unit optimized for long-term monitoring of functional activity. Inertial MEMS sensors capture accelerations along six degrees of freedom and a barometric pressure sensor serves as a precise altimeter. Data is written to an integrated memory card. The realized module measures Ø25 × 10 mm, weighs 10 g and can record continuously for 27 h at 25 Hz and over 22 h at 100 Hz. The integrated power-management system detects inactivity and extends the operating time by about a factor of two, as shown by initial 24 h recordings on five energetic healthy adults. The integrated barometric pressure sensor allowed to identify activities incorporating a change in altitude, such as going up/down stairs or riding an elevator. By taking into account data from the inertial sensors during the altitude changes, it becomes possible to distinguish between these two activities. PMID:22254785

  10. Coincident Activity of Converging Pathways Enables Simultaneous Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in Hippocampal CA1 Network In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Zhang, Xia; Xu, Lin

    2008-01-01

    Memory is believed to depend on activity-dependent changes in the strength of synapses, e.g. long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), which can be determined by the sequence of coincident pre- and postsynaptic activity, respectively. It remains unclear, however, whether and how coincident activity of converging efferent pathways can enable LTP and LTD in the pathways simultaneously. Here, we report that, in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, stimulation (600 pulses, 5 Hz) to Schaffer preceding to commissural pathway within a 40-ms timing window induced similar magnitudes of LTP in both pathways onto synapses of CA1 neurons, with varied LTP magnitudes after reversal of the stimulation sequence. In contrast, in urethane-anesthetized or freely-moving rats, the stimulation to Schaffer preceding to commissural pathway induced Schaffer LTP and commissural LTD simultaneously within a 40-ms timing window, without affecting synaptic efficacy in the reversed stimulation sequence. Coincident activity of Schaffer pathways confirmed the above findings under pentobarbital and urethane anesthesia. Thus, coincident activity of converging afferent pathways tends to switch the pathways to be LTP only or LTP/LTD depending on the activity states of the hippocampus. This network rule strengthens the view that activity-dependent synaptic plasticity may well contribute to memory process of the hippocampal network with flexibility or stability from one state to another. PMID:18682723

  11. The Role of Hippocampal NMDA Receptors in Long-Term Emotional Responses following Muscarinic Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hoeller, Alexandre A.; Costa, Ana Paula R.; Bicca, Maíra A.; Matheus, Filipe C.; Lach, Gilliard; Spiga, Francesca; Lightman, Stafford L.; Walz, Roger; Collingridge, Graham L.; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; de Lima, Thereza C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates the influence of the cholinergic system on emotional processing. Previous findings provided new insights into the underlying mechanisms of long-term anxiety, showing that rats injected with a single systemic dose of pilocarpine—a muscarinic receptor (mAChR) agonist—displayed persistent anxiogenic-like responses when evaluated in different behavioral tests and time-points (24 h up to 3 months later). Herein, we investigated whether the pilocarpine-induced long-term anxiogenesis modulates the HPA axis function and the putative involvement of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) following mAChRs activation. Accordingly, adult male Wistar rats presented anxiogenic-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) after 24 h or 1 month of pilocarpine injection (150 mg/kg, i.p.). In these animals, mAChR activation disrupted HPA axis function inducing a long-term increase of corticosterone release associated with a reduced expression of hippocampal GRs, as well as consistently decreased NMDAR subunits expression. Furthermore, in another group of rats injected with memantine–an NMDARs antagonist (4 mg/kg, i.p.)–prior to pilocarpine, we found inhibition of anxiogenic-like behaviors in the EPM but no further alterations in the pilocarpine-induced NMDARs downregulation. Our data provide evidence that behavioral anxiogenesis induced by mAChR activation effectively yields short- and long-term alterations in hippocampal NMDARs expression associated with impairment of hippocampal inhibitory regulation of HPA axis activity. This is a novel mechanism associated with anxiety-like responses in rats, which comprise a putative target to future translational studies. PMID:26795565

  12. Non-linear analysis of the long-term behaviour of solar filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng; Li, Qi-Xiu; Wu, Nan

    2014-01-01

    The correlation dimension and K2 entropy of solar filaments are investigated using the Carte Synoptique catalogue of solar filaments from 1919 March to 1989 December. It is found that the correlation dimension of full-disc, low-latitude (<50°) and high-latitude (≥50°) filament numbers is about 4.05 ± 0.35, 4.1 ± 0.45 and 4.0 ± 0.4, respectively and shows very similar fractal properties when compared with values derived from Wolf sunspot numbers. All K2 entropies of full-disc, low-latitude and high-latitude filament numbers are positive, though larger than the K2 entropy of Wolf sunspot numbers. On the basis of the correlation dimension, positive K2 entropy, chaotic solar dynamo and solar filament-sunspot relationship, it is concluded that the coronal activity of the high layer of the Sun described by solar filament numbers is chaotic and has very complex behaviour.

  13. Long-term correlation in single calcium-activated potassium channel kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos de Oliveira, R. A.; Barbosa, C. T. F.; Consoni, L. H. A.; Rodrigues, A. R. A.; Varanda, W. A.; Nogueira, R. A.

    2006-05-01

    Ion channels are protein molecules found in biological membranes, which can assume distinct open and closed conformational states, a phenomenon called ion channel kinetics. The transitions from one state to another are dependent on the potential energy barrier that separates them and can be controlled by the electrical field, ions and/or drugs. Both Markovian and fractal models have been used for modeling the ion channel kinetics. Ion single channel records are characterized by successive openings and closings, which are correlated in time. Here the rescaled range analysis ( R/S Hurst analysis) is used to test for the occurrence of long-term correlation in the kinetics of a calcium-activated potassium channel of Leydig cells. A Hurst coefficient H=0.640±0.064 ( n=5) was found for the single calcium-activated potassium channel clamped at -80 mV and exposed to a free Ca 2+ concentration equal to 10 nM. This numerical value indicates the presence of long-term correlation (memory) in this kinetic process. However, when the R/ S analysis was applied to ion channel data simulated using Markovian and fractal models, it could not account for the long-term correlation previously found in the experimental data. In summary, in this work we show that: (i) opening and closing dwell times for the single calcium-activated potassium channel of Leydig cells present long-term correlation and (ii) Markovian and fractal models, which describe well the dwell time distributions, are not adequate to describe the memory found in the kinetics of this channel.

  14. Long-term modulations of Saturn's auroral radio emissions by the solar wind and seasonal variations controlled by the solar ultraviolet flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.; Lamy, L.; Tao, C.; Badman, S. V.; Kasahara, S.; Cecconi, B.; Zarka, P.; Morioka, A.; Miyoshi, Y.; Maruno, D.; Kasaba, Y.; Fujimoto, M.

    2013-11-01

    Saturn's auroral activities have been suggested to be controlled by the seasonal variations of the polar ionospheric conductivities and atmospheric conditions associated with the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flux. However, they have not yet been explained self-consistently by only the seasonal solar EUV effects. This study investigates the long-term variations of Saturnian Kilometric Radiation (SKR) as a proxy of the auroral activities, which were observed by Cassini's Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment mostly during the southern summer (DOY (day of year) 001 2004 to DOY 193 2010). We deduced the height distribution of the SKR source region in the Northern (winter) and Southern (summer) Hemispheres from the remote sensing of SKR spectra. The peak spectral density of the southern (summer) SKR was found to be up to 100 times greater than that of the northern (winter) SKR, and the altitude of the peak flux was similar (˜ 0.8 Rs) in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The spectral densities in both hemispheres became comparable with each other around equinox in August 2009. These results suggest a stronger SKR source region during the summer than the winter related to the seasonal EUV effect, which is opposite to the trend observed in the Earth's kilometric radiation. A long-term correlation analysis was performed for the SKR, solar EUV flux, and solar wind parameters extrapolated from Earth's orbit by an magnetohydrodynamical simulation focusing on variations on timescales longer than several weeks. We confirmed clear positive correlations between the solar wind dynamic pressure and peak flux density in both the Southern and Northern Hemispheres during the declining phase of the solar cycle. We conclude that the solar wind variations on the timescale of the solar cycle control the SKR source region. In addition, it was also confirmed that the south-to-north ratios of SKR power flux and source altitudes are positively correlated with the solar EUV flux

  15. Long term variations and solar variability of atomic oxygen and hydrogen in the mesosphere / lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Kaufmann, Martin; Lehmann, Catrin; Riese, Martin; Smith, Anne; Marsh, Daniel

    Global measurements of the hydroxyl mesospheric airglow as observed by the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument are presented. SCIAMACHY is mounted on ESA's Envisat launched in March 2002 into a polar, sun-synchronous orbit with an inclination of 98.7deg and an ascending node at 22:00 local solar time. Limb observations on the night side cover about 70 degrees in terms of latitude during each orbit, covering 30S-70N, depending on season. Based on these measurements altitude profiles of atomic oxygen and hydrogen are retrieved by means of an OH non-LTE model. These data are analyzed with respect to solar illumination conditions and global wave activity. A windowed space-time Fourier analysis is carried out to investigate seasonal changes in mesopause wave activity. First comparisons with simulations of the NCAR ROSE model are shown.

  16. Physical Activity and Function in Older, Long-term Colorectal Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brent L.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Koltyn, Kelli F.; Colbert, Lisa H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Increasing age and cancer history are related to impaired physical function. Since physical activity has been shown to ameliorate age-related functional declines, we evaluated the association between physical activity and function in older, long-term colorectal cancer survivors. Methods In 2006–2007, mailed surveys were sent to colorectal cancer survivors, aged ≥65 years when diagnosed during 1995 – 2000, and identified through a state cancer registry. Information on physical activity, physical function and relevant covariates was obtained and matched to registry data. Analysis of covariance and linear regression were used to compare means and trends in physical function across levels of activity in the final analytic sample of 843 cases. Results A direct, dose-dependent association between physical activity and function was observed (ptrend <.001), with higher SF-36 physical function subscores in those reporting high vs. low activity levels (65.0 ± 1.7 vs. 42.7 ± 1.7 (mean ± standard error)). Walking, gardening, housework, and exercise activities were all independently related to better physical function. Moderate-vigorous intensity activity (ptrend <.001) was associated with function, but light activity (ptrend =0.39) was not. Conclusion Results from this cross-sectional study indicate significant associations between physical activity and physical function in older, long-term colorectal cancer survivors. PMID:19123055

  17. Long-term reproductive and behavioral toxicity of anthracene to fish in the presence of solar ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, A.T.; Oris, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    The long-term, low-level effects of anthracene in the presence of solar ultraviolet radiation (SUVR) were examined in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Adult fish exposed to anthracene exhibited reduced egg laying capacity, with altered oocyte maturation as a potential mechanism of action. Eggs and larvae maternally exposed to anthracene exhibited reduced hatching success and severe developmental abnormalities when incubated under SUVR. The combination of reduced egg output and developmental effects resulted in an inhibition in reproductive capacity in the range of 70--100%. Maternal transfer of anthracene to eggs was efficient; the BCF was 717 for maternally exposed eggs. However, anthracene deputation from eggs after oviposition with only maternal PAH exposure was rapid; anthracene half-life from eggs equaled 1.3 days. Exposure to anthracene under SUVR altered locomotor activity patterns in fathead minnows by inducing hyperactivity or hypoactivity during the light or dark phases of the photoperiod, respectively. Altered activity patterns indicated potential effects of anthracene on the nervous system and/or pineal gland. These alterations disrupted normal activity patterns and reproductive behaviors, and thus have major implications on a fish`s ability to survive and reproduce. Anthracene, a model phototoxic PAH, has many potential sites of toxic action, and any organism exposed to such contaminants will be an considerable SUVR-enhanced risk in the environment.

  18. Using larval fish community structure to guide long-term monitoring of fish spawning activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritt, Jeremy J.; Roseman, Edward F.; Ross, Jason E.; DeBruyne, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Larval fishes provide a direct indication of spawning activity and may therefore be useful for long-term monitoring efforts in relation to spawning habitat restoration. However, larval fish sampling can be time intensive and costly. We sought to understand the spatial and temporal structure of larval fish communities in the St. Clair–Detroit River system, Michigan–Ontario, to determine whether targeted larval fish sampling can be made more efficient for long-term monitoring. We found that larval fish communities were highly nested, with lower river segments and late-spring samples containing the highest genus richness of larval fish. We created four sampling scenarios for each river system: (1) using all available data, (2) limiting temporal sampling to late spring, (3) limiting spatial sampling to lower river segments only, and (4) limiting both spatial and temporal sampling. By limiting the spatial extent of sampling to lower river sites and/or limiting the temporal extent to the late-spring period, we found that effort could be reduced by more than 50% while maintaining over 75% of the observed and estimated total genus richness. Similarly, limiting the sampling effort to lower river sites and/or the late-spring period maintained between 65% and 93% of the observed richness of lithophilic-spawning genera and invasive genera. In general, community composition remained consistent among sampling scenarios. Targeted sampling offers a lower-cost alternative to exhaustive spatial and temporal sampling and may be more readily incorporated into long-term monitoring.

  19. Determining the amount of physical activity needed for long-term weight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wier, L. T.; Ayers, G. W.; Jackson, A. S.; Rossum, A. C.; Poston, W. S.; Foreyt, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate prospectively the influence of habitual physical activity on body weight of men and women and to develop a model that defines the role of physical activity on longitudinal weight change. DESIGN AND SETTING: Occupational cohort study conducted for a mean of 5.5 y. SUBJECTS: A total of 496 (341 male and 155 female) NASA/Johnson Space Center employees who completed the 3 month education component of the employee health-related fitness program and remained involved for a minimum of 2 y. MEASUREMENTS: Body weights were measured at baseline (T1) and follow-up (T2), and habitual physical activity was obtained from the mean of multiple ratings of the 11-point (0-10) NASA Activity Scale (NAS) recorded quarterly between T1 and T2. Other measures included age, gender, VO(2 max) obtained from maximal treadmill testing, body mass index (BMI), and body fat percentage. RESULTS: Multiple regression demonstrated that mean NAS, T1 weight, aging and gender all influence long-term T2 weight. T1 age was significant for the men only. Independently, each increase in mean NAS significantly (P<0.01) reduced T2 weight in men (b=-0.91 kg; 95% CI:-1.4 to-0.42 kg) and women (b=-2.14 kg; 95% CI:-2.93 to-1.35 kg). Mean NAS had a greater effect on T2 weight as T1 weight increased, and the relationship was dose-dependent. CONCLUSIONS: Habitual physical activity is a significant source of long-term weight change. The use of self-reported activity level is helpful in predicting long-term weight changes and may be used by health care professionals when counseling patients about the value of physical activity for weight control.

  20. Long-Term Predictors of Social and Leisure Activity 10 Years after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Norlander, Anna; Carlstedt, Emma; Jönsson, Ann-Cathrin; Lexell, Eva M.; Ståhl, Agneta; Lindgren, Arne; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Restrictions in social and leisure activity can have negative consequences for the health and well-being of stroke survivors. To support the growing number of people who are ageing with stroke, knowledge is needed about factors that influence such activity in a long-term perspective. Aim To identify long-term predictors of the frequency of social and leisure activities 10 years after stroke. Method 145 stroke survivors in Sweden were followed-up at16 months and 10 years after a first-ever stroke. Data representing body functions, activities & participation, environmental factors and personal factors at 16 months after stroke, were used in multiple linear regression analyses to identify predictors of the activity frequency after 10 years, as assessed by the ‘Community, social and civic life’ sub-domain of the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI-CSC). Results At the 10-year follow-up the frequency of social and leisure activities varied considerably among the participants, with FAI-CSC scores spanning the entire score range 0–9 (mean/median 4.9/5.0). Several factors at 16 months post stroke were independently related to the long-term activity frequency. The final regression model included four significant explanatory variables. Driving a car (B = 0.999), ability to walk a few hundred meters (B = 1.698) and extent of social network (B = 1.235) had a positive effect on activity frequency, whereas an age ≥ 75 years had a negative effect (B = -1.657). This model explained 36.9% of the variance in the FAI-CSC (p<0.001). Conclusion Stroke survivors who drive a car, have the ability to walk a few hundred meters and have a wide social network at 16 months after a first-ever stroke are more likely to have a high frequency of social and leisure activities after 10 years, indicating that supporting outdoor mobility and social anchorage of stroke survivors during rehabilitation is important to counteract long-term inactivity. PMID:26901501

  1. Intervention to increase physical activity in irritable bowel syndrome shows long-term positive effects

    PubMed Central

    Johannesson, Elisabet; Ringström, Gisela; Abrahamsson, Hasse; Sadik, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the long-term effects of physical activity on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and on quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. METHODS: Seventy-six patients from a previous randomized controlled interventional study on increased physical activity in IBS were asked to participate in this long-term follow-up study. The included patients attended one visit in which they filled out questionnaires and they underwent a submaximal cycle ergometer test. The primary end point was the change in the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) at baseline, i.e., before the intervention and at follow-up. The secondary endpoints were changes in quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. RESULTS: A total of 39 [32 women, median age 45 (28-61) years] patients were included in this follow-up. Median follow-up time was 5.2 (range: 3.8-6.2) years. The IBS symptoms were improved compared with baseline [IBS-SSS: 276 (169-360) vs 218 (82-328), P = 0.001]. This was also true for the majority of the dimensions of psychological symptoms such as disease specific quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. The reported time of physical activity during the week before the visit had increased from 3.2 (0.0-10.0) h at baseline to 5.2 (0.0-15.0) h at follow-up, P = 0.019. The most common activities reported were walking, aerobics and cycling. There was no significant difference in the oxygen uptake 31.8 (19.7-45.8) mL per min per kg at baseline vs 34.6 (19.0-54.6) mL/min per kg at follow-up. CONCLUSION: An intervention to increase physical activity has positive long-term effects on IBS symptoms and psychological symptoms. PMID:25593485

  2. Long-Term Tracking of Physical Activity Behaviors in Women: The WIN Study

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, James R.; Bain, Tyson M.; Frierson, Georita M.; Trudelle-Jackson, Elaine; Haskell, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Interest lies in the prevalence of community-living women meeting 2008 Department of Health and Human Services physical activity guidelines across time. The purpose was to report prevalence and stability of long-term (up to 125 weeks) tracking of physical activity behaviors and compare self-reported physical activity behaviors using different measures. Methods The WIN study tracks nearly real-time physical activity behaviors in community-living women. At baseline, 918 women began weekly Internet reporting of physical activity behaviors, accessing a secure Internet site and answering 8 questions about physical activity behaviors for the previous week. Measures included days and minutes of moderate, vigorous, walking, and strengthening activities, and pedometer steps recorded weekly. Results Prevalence of meeting physical activity guidelines depended on the criterion used. Weekly averages across the surveillance period indicated 25% reported ≥150 mins of moderate physical activity, 47% reported ≥75 mins of vigorous physical activity, 57% reported ≥150 mins of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, 63% conducted ≥500 MET-mins of physical activity, 15% reported ≥2 days of strengthening activities per week, and 39% reported ≥7500 steps per week. Alpha coefficients (≥.97) indicated stable physical activity behaviors across all measures. Conclusion Across reporting methods, it is estimated that approximately 50% or more of these community-living women engage in sufficient physical activity for health benefits weekly across long-term follow-up. Self-report physical activity behaviors are stable across long periods in these community-living women not participating in a specific physical activity intervention. PMID:20473221

  3. DNA nanoparticles: detection of long-term transgene activity in brain using bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Yurek, David M; Fletcher, Anita M; McShane, Matthew; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Padegimas, Linas; Weatherspoon, Marcy R; Kaytor, Michael D; Cooper, Mark J; Ziady, Assem G

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we used bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to track long-term transgene activity following the transfection of brain cells using a nonviral gene therapy technique. Formulations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) combined with 30-mer lysine polymers (substituted with 10 kDa polyethylene glycol) form nanoparticles that transfect brain cells in vivo and produce transgene activity. Here we show that a single intracerebral injection of these DNA nanoparticles (DNPs) into the rat cortex, striatum, or substantia nigra results in long-term and persistent luciferase transgene activity over an 8- to 11-week period as evaluated by in vivo BLI analysis, and single injections of DNPs into the mouse striatum showed stable luciferase transgene activity for 1 year. Compacted DNPs produced in vivo signals 7- to 34-fold higher than DNA alone. In contrast, ex vivo BLI analysis, which is subject to less signal quenching from surrounding tissues, demonstrated a DNP to DNA alone ratio of 76- to 280-fold. Moreover, the ex vivo BLI analysis confirmed that signals originated from the targeted brain structures. In summary, BLI permits serial analysis of luciferase transgene activity at multiple brain locations following gene transfer with DNPs. Ex vivo analysis may permit more accurate determination of relative activities of gene transfer vectors. PMID:21521549

  4. Properties of the long-term optical activity of the prototype polar AM Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimon, Vojtěch

    2016-08-01

    AM Her displays strong long-term activity with the high and low states. This investigation uses AAVSO optical data for a time-series analysis of the long-term variations. Rapid changes of brightness (e.g. the orbital modulation) were smoothed out to emphasise the activity on super-orbital time-scale. I show that the character of this activity changed considerably on time-scales of years, which is reflected in a large evolution of the complicated histogram of the optical brightness. The high states are not the well-defined, narrow levels of brightness. I also show that AM Her displays transitions between the high and low states with the intermittently existing cycles. The longest uninterrupted series of transitions from the high to low state consists of seven episodes (about six years). The existence of this series can be controlled by the lifetime of the active regions on the donor, which modulates the mass transfer rate. I show that the episodes of the high and low states accumulate in clusters, which produces an additional cycle after smoothing by the moving averages. The cycles of activity of the donor can explain this modulation. A single isolated short episode of the low state does not imply a break of this cycle. I also argue that the specific properties of star spots and their migration caused by the differential rotation of the donor would be needed to explain the complex activity of AM Her.

  5. Long term results of mechanical prostheses for treatment of active infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, J; Tornos, M; Permanyer-Miralda, G; Almirante, B; Murtra, M; Soler-Soler, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the long term results of mechanical prostheses for treating active infective endocarditis.
DESIGN—Prospective cohort study of a consecutive series of patients diagnosed with infective endocarditis and operated on in the active phase of the infection for insertion of a mechanical prosthesis.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre in a metropolitan area.
RESULTS—Between 1975 and 1997, 637 cases of infective endocarditis were diagnosed in the centre. Of these, 436 were left sided (with overall mortality of 20.3%). Surgical treatment in the active phase of the infection was needed in 141 patients (72% native, 28% prosthetic infective endocarditis). Mechanical prostheses were used in 131 patients. Operative mortality was 30.5% (40 patients). Ninety one survivors were followed up prospectively for (mean (SD)) 5.4 (4.5) years. Thirteen patients developed prosthetic valve dysfunction. Nine patients suffered reinfection: four of these (4%) were early and five were late. The median time from surgery for late reinfection was 1.4 years. During follow up, 12 patients died. Excluding operative mortality, actuarial survival was 86.6% at five years and 83.7% at 10 years; actuarial survival free from death, reoperation, and reinfection was 73.1% at five years and 59.8% at 10 years.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients surviving acute infective endocarditis and receiving mechanical prostheses, the rate of early reinfection compares well with reported results of homografts. In addition, prosthesis dysfunction rate is low and long term survival is good. These data should prove useful for comparison with long term studies, when available, using other types of valve surgery in active infective endocarditis.


Keywords: infective endocarditis; surgery; mechanical prosthesis PMID:11410564

  6. Enhanced photovoltaic properties and long-term stability in plasmonic dye-sensitized solar cells via noncorrosive redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heesuk; Koo, Bonkee; Kim, Jae-Yup; Kim, Taehee; Son, Hae Jung; Kim, BongSoo; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Kim, Honggon; Cho, Jinhan; Ko, Min Jae

    2014-11-12

    We demonstrate the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect, which can enhance the photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the long-term stability of size-controlled plasmonic structures using a noncorrosive redox mediator. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were synthesized with a phase transfer method based on ligand exchange. This synthetic method is advantageous because the uniformly sized Au NPs, can be mass produced and easily applied to DSSC photoanodes. The plasmonic DSSCs showed an 11% improvement of power conversion efficiency due to the incorporation of 0.07 wt % Au NPs, compared to the reference DSSCs without Au NPs. The improved efficiency was primarily due to the enhanced photocurrent generation by LSPR effect. With the cobalt redox mediator, the long-term stability of the plasmonic structures also significantly increased. The plasmonic DSSCs with cobalt(II/III) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) ([Co(bpy)3](2+/3+)) redox mediator maintained the LSPR effect with stable photovoltaic performance for 1000 h. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of the long-term stability of plasmonic nanostructures in plasmonic DSSCs based on liquid electrolytes. As a result, the enhanced long-term stability of plasmonic NPs via a noncorrosive redox mediator will increase the feasibility of plasmonic DSSCs. PMID:25296336

  7. Long-term weathering effects on the thermal performance of the Lennox/Honeywell (liquid) solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The test procedures used and the results obtained during the evaluation test program of the Lennox/Honeywell double covered liquid solar collector. The tests were performed under simulated conditions, following long-term exposure to natural weathering conditions. The Lennox/Honeywell collector is a flat-plate solar collector. The absorber plate is steel with copper tubes bonded on the upper surface, and is coated with black chrome. Visual inspection of the collector indicated slight discoloration of the absorber plate. Results indicate that performance degradation had occurred. Absorptivity and/or transmissivity decreased as a result of the weathering.

  8. The impact of materials selection on long-term activation in fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. P.; Forty, C. B. A.; Petti, D. A.; McCarthy, K. A.

    2000-12-01

    Neutron-induced transmutation of materials in a D-T fusion power plant will give rise to the potential for long-term activation. To ensure that the attractive safety and environmental characteristics of fusion power are not degraded, careful design choices are necessary. An aim of optimising power plant design must be to minimise both the level of activation and the total volume of active material that might ultimately be categorised as waste requiring disposal. Materials selection is central to this optimisation. In this paper we assess the influence of materials choices for a power plant on the waste volume and the potential to clear (i.e. remove from regulatory control) and recycle material. Although the use of low activation materials in regions of high neutron flux is an important part of the strategy to minimise the level of activation, different choices may result from a strategy aimed at minimising the volume of active waste.

  9. Long-term insulinotropic activity of glucagon-like peptide-1/polymer conjugate on islet microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Bae, You Han

    2004-01-01

    The biohybrid artificial pancreas (BAP), a promising therapy for type 1 diabetes, faces several obstacles such as the need for a large implantation volume of encapsulated islets because of low functionality. To address such problems, in this study we examined long-term insulinotropic activity of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/polymer conjugate [VAPG: poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone-co-acrylic acid-g-PEG) (VAP)-GLP-1] as well as GLP-1/Zn(2+) crystal by coencapsulation with islets. Microcapsules with VAPG or crystal produced round-shaped beads whereas free GLP-1 showed poor capsule morphology. A perfusion experiment suggested that VAPG showed higher bioactivity than did microcapsules with GLP-1/Zn(2+). In long-term culture (200 mg of glucose/dL [G]), VAPG also enhanced insulinotropic activity over 5 weeks compared with the crystal form of GLP-1. However, maintenance of the high bioactivity of VAPG suddenly declined after week 5, possibly because of degradation, metabolism, and overstimulation. Basal (50 G) and glucose-stimulated (300 G) levels of insulin secretion confirmed a see-saw pattern in which the VAPG gradually decreased insulin secretion from encapsulated islets and then fell below the insulin level secreted from microcapsules containing GLP-1/Zn(2+) crystal. Viability of the microcapsulated islets of each group was not significantly different. Consequently, the coencapsulation of VAPG or GLP-1/Zn(2+) crystal can be a potential approach to reducing BAP volume with further optimization of activity duration. PMID:15684669

  10. Long-Term Operation Tests of Organic Solid-State Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Masaaki; Hiramoto, Masahiro

    The long-term operation tests of two types of solid-state organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, p-n heterojunction type cells and p-i-n junction type cells, were performed. In both cells, a drastic decrease in photocurrent within 1 h was observed in air. This rapid decrease was revealed to be caused by oxygen molecules which act as a electron trap in the electron transporting organic layer. Initial decrease of photocurrent was effectively suppressed under high vacuum (10-7 Torr). In the case of a p-n type cell, the decrease in short-circuit photocurrent was only 15% even under prolonged light irradiation of 260 h.

  11. Amygdala activity at encoding correlated with long-term, free recall of emotional information.

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, L; Haier, R J; Fallon, J; Alkire, M T; Tang, C; Keator, D; Wu, J; McGaugh, J L

    1996-01-01

    Positron emission tomography of cerebral glucose metabolism in adult human subjects was used to investigate amygdaloid complex (AC) activity associated with the storage of long-term memory for emotionally arousing events. Subjects viewed two videos (one in each of two separate positron emission tomography sessions, separated by 3-7 days) consisting either of 12 emotionally arousing film clips ("E" film session) or of 12 relatively emotionally neutral film clips ("N" film session), and rated their emotional reaction to each film clip immediately after viewing it. Three weeks after the second session, memory for the videos was assessed in a free recall test. As expected, the subjects' average emotional reaction to the E films was higher than that for the N films. In addition, the subjects recalled significantly more E films than N films. Glucose metabolic rate of the right AC while viewing the E films was highly correlated with the number of E films recalled. AC activity was not significantly correlated with the number of N films recalled. The findings support the view derived from both animal and human investigations that the AC is selectively involved with the formation of enhanced long-term memory associated with emotionally arousing events. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8755595

  12. Involvement of microglia activation in the lead induced long-term potentiation impairment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Chao; Liu, Xin-Qin; Wang, Wen; Shen, Xue-Feng; Che, Hong-Lei; Guo, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Chen, Jing-Yuan; Luo, Wen-Jing

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Lead (Pb), a known neurotoxicant, can impair spatial learning and memory probably via impairing the hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as hippocampal neuronal injury. Activation of hippocampal microglia also impairs spatial learning and memory. Thus, we raised the hypothesis that activation of microglia is involved in the Pb exposure induced hippocampal LTP impairment and neuronal injury. To test this hypothesis and clarify its underlying mechanisms, we investigated the Pb-exposure on the microglia activation, cytokine release, hippocampal LTP level as well as neuronal injury in in vivo or in vitro model. The changes of these parameters were also observed after pretreatment with minocycline, a microglia activation inhibitor. Long-term low dose Pb exposure (100 ppm for 8 weeks) caused significant reduction of LTP in acute slice preparations, meanwhile, such treatment also significantly increased hippocampal microglia activation as well as neuronal injury. In vitro Pb-exposure also induced significantly increase of microglia activation, up-regulate the release of cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in microglia culture alone as well as neuronal injury in the co-culture with hippocampal neurons. Inhibiting the microglia activation with minocycline significantly reversed the above-mentioned Pb-exposure induced changes. Our results showed that Pb can cause microglia activation, which can up-regulate the level of IL-1β, TNF-α and iNOS, these proinflammatory factors may cause hippocampal neuronal injury as well as LTP deficits. PMID:22952811

  13. The development of ferritic-martensitic steels with reduced long-term activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kelzenberg, S.; Röhrig, H.-D.; Schäfer, L.; Schirra, M.

    1994-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic 9-12% CrMoVNb steels of MANET type possess a number of advantageous properties for fusion reactor application. Their optimization has led to improved creep and fracture-toughness properties. New 9-10% CrWVTa alloys have been developed by KfK/IMF in collaboration with the SAARSTAHL GmbH which have a reduced long-term activation and show in addition superior fracture toughness properties. The calculation of dose rate and other radiological parameters with the presently available FISPACT/EAF codes, extended by KfK files for sequential reactions has shown that the long-term dose-rate in these alloys is governed by the remaining 'impurity level' of Nb and the alloying elements W and Ta. Sequential reactions — though relevant for single alloying elements like Cr, Mn, V and N — provide only a second order effect in Fe-based alloys. A challenge for the future materials development is the production of alloys with the desired narrow specification of elements and impurities, which necessitates new ways of steelmaking.

  14. Multitargeting activity of miR-24 inhibits long-term melatonin anticancer effects

    PubMed Central

    Sacconi, Andrea; Goeman, Frauke; Pallocca, Matteo; Pulito, Claudio; Korita, Etleva; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Muti, Paola; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that melatonin exerts tumor suppressor activities by inducing the p38-p53 axis. This occurred within a few hours while no data are available on how melatonin pathway can be sustained on the long term. Here we show that miR-24, which has been demonstrated to target genes involved in the DNA repair process, targets p38, p53, PML and H2AX simultaneously. We show that long-term treatment with melatonin can decrease miR-24 levels post-transcriptionally, which pairs with a long-wave regulation of genes involved in cell proliferation, DNA damage, RNA metabolism and cell shape and transformation. Moreover, we show that melatonin can inhibit cell proliferation and migration, at least in part, by downregulating miR-24. Furthermore, we propose the involvement of hnRNP A1, which is downregulated by melatonin and involved in miRNA processing, in the regulation of miR-24 levels by melatonin. We conclude showing that miR-24 is upregulated in colon, breast and head and neck datasets and its levels negatively correlate with overall survival. PMID:26967561

  15. Long Term Preservation of Earth Observation Data in Europe - Challenge and Cooperation Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molch, K.; Albani, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earth observation data are unique snapshots of the Earth and the atmosphere. As such they constitute a humankind asset in their importance for monitoring changes in global environmental conditions. With spaceborne Earth observation (EO) missions dating back to the 1970s, 40 years worth of observations are now available in EO data archives worldwide. Data holdings are growing exponentially, e.g. with the Sentinel series of high resolution EO satellites of the European Copernicus Program - which introduces a new dimension of data volumes to be handled. As other EO data holders around the globe, the European Space Agency (ESA) and its member states are committed to keeping the valuable EO data assets safe, accessible, and useable for an unlimited timespan. Rapidly evolving information technology and changing user requirements call for a dedicated and coordinated approach to EO data long term preservation. In Europe collaborative EO data stewardship activities are coordinated by ESA within the ESA long term data preservation (LTDP) program. With a view to the entire data set life cycle of historic and current missions an active LTDP working group addresses a wide range of relevant technical and organizational topics. Studies investigate archiving and access technologies, user expectations, or applicable standards; guidelines and best practices recommend preservation workflows, steps to take in curating individual data sets, the composition of the preserved data set, or concepts for introducing persistent identifiers. Fostering an active international exchange, the activities and documents developed within this European LTDP framework extend beyond Europe by being introduced to the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) and the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). The paper describes the European LTDP cooperation framework, discusses individual focus areas and current activities, and highlights the interaction with global data stewardship initiatives.

  16. The Contribution of the Solcon Instrument to the Long Term Total Solar Irradiance Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitte, S.; Joukoff, A.; Crommelynck, D.; Lee, R. B., III; Helizon, R.

    1999-01-01

    On century time scales, the variation in the total solar irradiance received by the earth is believed to be a major climate change driver. Therefore accurate and time stable measurements of the total solar irradiance are necessary. We present the latest contribution of the SOLar CONstant (SOLCON) instrument to these measurements, namely its measurements during the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker (IEH) 3 space shuttle flight, and its results: the verification of the ageing of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and the measurement of the Space Absolute Radiometric Reference (SARR) adjustment coefficients for the Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations (VIRGO) radiometers.

  17. Long-term assessment of No Evidence of Disease Activity with natalizumab in relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prosperini, Luca; Fanelli, Fulvia; Pozzilli, Carlo

    2016-05-15

    In this study we assessed the proportion of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis (R-MS) who had No Evidence of Disease Activity (NEDA-3), defined as absence of relapses, absence of confirmed disability worsening, and absence of radiological activity (detected by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord) up to 7years after starting natalizumab. Out of 152 patients considered, 58 were still on treatment and 94 discontinued treatment after a median time of 3years. According to an intention-to-treat approach, 52 (34%) patients maintained the NEDA status at the end of follow-up. The proportion of patients with NEDA increases to 41% after excluding from the analysis 64 patients who discontinued natalizumab due to concerns about progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Our findings suggest that natalizumab may ensure higher proportion of patients achieving sustained long-term disease remission than that previously reported with self-injectable treatments (<10%). PMID:27084235

  18. Long-term explosive degassing and debris flow activity at West Mata submarine volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Matsumoto, H.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Embley, R. W.; Merle, S. G.; Walker, S. L.; Lau, T.-K.; Chadwick, W. W.

    2015-03-01

    West Mata is a 1200 m deep submarine volcano where explosive boninite eruptions were observed in 2009. The acoustic signatures from the volcano's summit eruptive vents Hades and Prometheus were recorded with an in situ (~25 m range) hydrophone during ROV dives in May 2009 and with local (~5 km range) moored hydrophones between December 2009 and August 2011. The sensors recorded low frequency (1-40 Hz), short duration explosions consistent with magma bubble bursts from Hades, and broadband, 1-5 min duration signals associated with episodes of fragmentation degassing from Prometheus. Long-term eruptive degassing signals, recorded through May 2010, preceded a several month period of declining activity. Degassing episodes were not recorded acoustically after early 2011, although quieter effusive eruption activity may have continued. Synchronous optical measurements of turbidity made between December 2009 and April 2010 indicate that turbidity maxima resulted from occasional south flank slope failures triggered by the collapse of accumulated debris during eruption intervals.

  19. Study of long term effect of Solar UV and X-ray radiation on the VLF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sanki, Dipak

    2016-07-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) is one of the bands of Radio waves having frequencies lying between 3-30 KHz, with wavelengths 100-10 Km. It propagates through the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide which is formed by lower part of the ionosphere and upper part of Earth's surface. Ionosphere is the ionized component of upper atmosphere. In the present work, we have studied the long term effect of the high energy solar UV and X-ray radiation on the VLF signals. We have analyzed the VLF signal transmitted at 24 KHz from NAA (Cutler, Maine) and received at Moore Observatory in Brownsboro, Kentucky. Also we have collected X-ray and UV data to study the long term effect of UV and X-ray radiation on the VLF signal. We have analyzed the VLF signal for 2007 to 2015. We calculate the average diurnal peak amplitude of the VLF signal for each day and compare it with the UV and X-ray solar radiation. We found that the correlation coefficient of diurnal peak VLF signal amplitude with both solar X-ray and UV radiation is 0.7 indicating a strong correlation between these two phenomena.

  20. PICARD SOL mission, a ground-based facility for long-term solar radius measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Corbard, T.; Morand, F.; Thuillier, G.; Hauchecorne, A.; Ikhlef, R.; Rouze, M.; Renaud, C.; Djafer, D.; Abbaki, S.; Assus, P.; Chauvineau, B.; Cissé, E. M.; Dalaudier, F.; D'Almeida, Eric; Fodil, M.; Laclare, F.; Lesueur, P.; Lin, M.; Marcovici, J. P.; Poiet, G.

    2012-09-01

    For the last thirty years, ground time series of the solar radius have shown different variations according to different instruments. The origin of these variations may be found in the observer, the instrument, the atmosphere and the Sun. These time series show inconsistencies and conflicting results, which likely originate from instrumental effects and/or atmospheric effects. A survey of the solar radius was initiated in 1975 by F. Laclare, at the Calern site of the Observatoire de la Cˆote d'Azur (OCA). PICARD is an investigation dedicated to the simultaneous measurements of the absolute total and spectral solar irradiance, the solar radius and solar shape, and to the Sun's interior probing by the helioseismology method. The PICARD mission aims to the study of the origin of the solar variability and to the study of the relations between the Sun and the Earth's climate by using modeling. These studies will be based on measurements carried out from orbit and from the ground. PICARD SOL is the ground segment of the PICARD mission to allow a comparison of the solar radius measured in space and on ground. PICARD SOL will enable to understand the influence of the atmosphere on the measured solar radius. The PICARD Sol instrumentation consists of: SODISM II, a replica of SODISM (SOlar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper), a high resolution imaging telescope, and MISOLFA (Moniteur d'Images SOLaires Franco-Alǵerien), a seeing monitor. Additional instrumentation consists in a Sun photometer, which measures atmospheric aerosol properties, a pyranometer to measure the solar irradiance, a visible camera, and a weather station. PICARD SOL is operating since March 2011. First results from the PICARD SOL mission are briefly reported in this paper.

  1. Diverse impact of acute and long-term extracellular proteolytic activity on plasticity of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Brzdąk, Patrycja; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory require alteration in number and strength of existing synaptic connections. Extracellular proteolysis within the synapses has been shown to play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity by determining synapse structure, function, and number. Although synaptic plasticity of excitatory synapses is generally acknowledged to play a crucial role in formation of memory traces, some components of neural plasticity are reflected by nonsynaptic changes. Since information in neural networks is ultimately conveyed with action potentials, scaling of neuronal excitability could significantly enhance or dampen the outcome of dendritic integration, boost neuronal information storage capacity and ultimately learning. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. With this regard, several lines of evidence and our most recent study support a view that activity of extracellular proteases might affect information processing in neuronal networks by affecting targets beyond synapses. Here, we review the most recent studies addressing the impact of extracellular proteolysis on plasticity of neuronal excitability and discuss how enzymatic activity may alter input-output/transfer function of neurons, supporting cognitive processes. Interestingly, extracellular proteolysis may alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and excitation/inhibition balance both rapidly (time of minutes to hours) and in long-term window. Moreover, it appears that by cleavage of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents, proteases may modulate function of ion channels or alter inhibitory drive and hence facilitate active participation of dendrites and axon initial segments (AISs) in adjusting neuronal input/output function. Altogether, a picture emerges whereby both rapid and long-term extracellular proteolysis may influence some aspects of information processing in neurons, such as initiation of action potential, spike frequency adaptation, properties of action potential and dendritic

  2. Long Term Seismic Observation in Mariana by OBSs : Activity of Deep Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Ohki, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Fukao, Y.; Sugioka, H.; Suyehiro, K.

    2003-12-01

    In order to obtain the deep arc structural image of Mariana, a large-scale seismic observation by using 58 long-term ocean bottom seismometers (LTOBS) has been started since June 2003 for about one year. It is a part of the MARGINS program (US-JAPAN COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: MULTI-SCALE SEISMIC IMAGING OF THE MARIANA SUBDUCTION FACTORY), and the aim of this observation is the crustal and mantle structure modeling by using passive and active seismic sources. The 50 and 8 LTOBSs are owned by LDEO and ERI, respectively, and they were deployed during the cruise of R/V Kaiyo (Jamstec), KY03-06. Prior to this experiment, we made a pilot long-term seismic array observation in the same area by using 10 LTOBSs, deployed in Oct. 2001 by R/V Yokosuka (Jamstec) and recovered in Feb. 2003 by R/V Kaiyo. This LTOBS has been developed by ERI, which has the PMD sensor (WB2023LP) and a titanium sphere housing (D=50cm) and was already used in several long-term observations (ex. trans-PHS array observation presented at the AGU fall meeting, 2000, S51B-02). Two of 10 LTOBSs could not be recovered due to malfunction of the releasing system, and one recovered had a trouble in the sensor control unit. But, seven others have obtained more than 11 months long data continuously. As passive source studies of these observations use characteristic deep earthquakes in this area, the activity of them will be introduced in this presentation, from the data obtained just above them. At the first step, difference of hypocenters of known events, listed on the PDE catalog, is examined. There are 59 events of epicenters within a circular area centered at 19° N, 145° E with radius of 1000km from the catalog during the observation. P and S arrivals are picked by using the WIN system, and the iasp91 model (only {VP} with {{VP}/{V_S}=1.732}) is used for the hypocenter determination. Station corrections are applied only for the sediment layer, estimated from several arrival time data of P and P-S converted

  3. Impact of microbial activity on the radioactive waste disposal: long term prediction of biocorrosion processes.

    PubMed

    Libert, Marie; Schütz, Marta Kerber; Esnault, Loïc; Féron, Damien; Bildstein, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    This study emphasizes different experimental approaches and provides perspectives to apprehend biocorrosion phenomena in the specific disposal environment by investigating microbial activity with regard to the modification of corrosion rate, which in turn can have an impact on the safety of radioactive waste geological disposal. It is found that iron-reducing bacteria are able to use corrosion products such as iron oxides and "dihydrogen" as new energy sources, especially in the disposal environment which contains low amounts of organic matter. Moreover, in the case of sulphate-reducing bacteria, the results show that mixed aerobic and anaerobic conditions are the most hazardous for stainless steel materials, a situation which is likely to occur in the early stage of a geological disposal. Finally, an integrated methodological approach is applied to validate the understanding of the complex processes and to design experiments aiming at the acquisition of kinetic data used in long term predictive modelling of biocorrosion processes. PMID:24177136

  4. Long-term radiation effects on GaAs solar cell characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Doviak, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    This report investigates preliminary design considerations which should be considered for a space experiment involving Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) solar cells. The electron radiation effects on GaAs solar cells were conducted in a laboratory environment, and a statistical analysis of the data is presented. In order to augment the limited laboratory data, a theoretical investigation of the effect of radiation on GaAs solar cells is also developed. The results of this study are empirical prediction equations which can be used to estimate the actual damage of electrical characteristics in a space environment. The experimental and theoretical studies also indicate how GaAs solar cell parameters should be designed in order to withstand the effects of electron radiation damage.

  5. Towards more reliable long-term indices of geomagnetic activity: correcting a new inhomogeneity problem in early geomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holappa, Lauri; Mursula, Kalevi

    2016-07-01

    For the time before the space era our knowledge of the centennial evolution of solar wind (SW) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is based on proxies derived from geomagnetic indices. The reliability of these proxies is dependent on the homogeneity of magnetic field data. In this paper we study the interhourly (IHV) and interdiurnal (IDV_{1d}) variability indices calculated from the data of two British observatories, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, and compare them to the corresponding indices of the German Niemegk observatory. We find an excess of about 14 ± 4% (5.8 ± 2%) and 27 ± 10% (15 ± 6%) in the IHV (IDV_{1d}) in the indices of Eskdalemuir and Lerwick in 1935-1969. The timing of this excess accurately coincides with instrument changes made in these observatories, strongly supporting the interpretation that the excess is indeed caused by instrument related inhomogeneities in the data of Eskdalemuir and Lerwick. We show that the detected excess notably modifies the long-term trend of geomagnetic activity and the centennial evolution of IMF strength and solar wind speed estimated using these indices. We note that the detected inhomogeneity problem may not be limited to the data of the two studied observatories, but may be quite common to long series of geomagnetic measurements. These results question the reliability of the present measures of the centennial change in solar wind speed and IMF.

  6. Toward more reliable long-term indices of geomagnetic activity: Correcting a new inhomogeneity problem in early geomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holappa, L.; Mursula, K.

    2015-10-01

    For the time before the space era, our knowledge of the centennial evolution of solar wind (SW) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is based on proxies derived from geomagnetic indices. The reliability of these proxies is dependent on the homogeneity of magnetic field data. In this paper, we study the interhourly (IHV) and interdiurnal (IDV1d) variability indices calculated from the data of two British observatories, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, and compare them to the corresponding indices of the German Niemegk observatory. We find an excess of about 14 ± 4% (5.8 ± 2%) and 27 ± 10% (15 ± 6%) in the IHV (IDV1d) in the indices of Eskdalemuir and Lerwick in 1935-1969. The timing of this excess accurately coincides with instrument changes made in these observatories, strongly supporting the interpretation that the excess is indeed caused by instrument related inhomogeneities in the data of Eskdalemuir and Lerwick. We show that the detected excess notably modifies the long-term trend of geomagnetic activity and the centennial evolution of IMF strength and solar wind speed estimated using these indices. We note that the detected inhomogeneity problem may not be limited to the data of the two studied observatories but may be quite common to long series of geomagnetic measurements. These results question the reliability of the present measures of the centennial change in solar wind speed and IMF.

  7. Rapid activation of hippocampal casein kinase II during long-term potentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Charriaut-Marlangue, C; Otani, S; Creuzet, C; Ben-Ari, Y; Loeb, J

    1991-01-01

    Several studies suggest that protein kinase C and type II Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase are activated during induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). We now report that casein kinase II (CK-II), which is present in high concentration in the hippocampus, is also activated in the CA1 region during LTP. CK-II activity increased within 2 min after a train of high-frequency electrical stimulations and reached a maximum (2-fold increase) 5 min later before returning to baseline value. The stimulated protein kinase activity, which was blocked by a selective antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, exhibited specific properties of CK-II, including phosphorylation of the specific substrates of CK-II, marked inhibition by a low heparin concentration, and the use of GTP as a phosphate donor. CK-II activity was also selectively and rapidly augmented in another form of LTP produced by bath application of tetraethylammonium; this LTP (called LTPk) is Ca2+ dependent but N-methyl-D-aspartate independent. Phosphorylation of casein that was not inhibited by heparin (i.e., casein kinase I) remained unchanged. We suggest that an increase in CK-II activity is important in LTP induction. Images PMID:1946443

  8. Predicting the ageing and the long-term durability of organic polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardette, Jean-Luc; Rivaton, Agnès; Thérias, Sandrine; Chambon, Sylvain; Manceau, Matthieu; Gaume, Julien

    2010-06-01

    Organic solar cells based on conductive polymers exhibit a unique combination of properties which include low cost, flexibility and large surface processability. Organic photovoltaic could then prevail for some applications alongside silicon, such as nomad or indoor. To achieve this objective, the sustainability of the initial properties in conditions of use of the cell is required, since it could be a lock to the emergence of these devices in the market. The polymers used in solar cells are indeed known to exhibit low resistance to environmental constraints, in particular to the combined action of sunlight, oxygen and water. We present recent results on both the accelerated artificial and the natural outdoors ageing of MDMO-PPV (Poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-Phenylenevinylene) and P3HT/PCBM blends poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) (methano-fullerene[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester) ([60] PCBM). The influence of various parameters such as the temperature and the presence of oxygen were studied. The modifications of the chemical structure of both the components of the blend were monitored by spectroscopic analysis (infrared, UV-visible), the morphology of the blends was analysed by AFM and XRD and the photovoltaic performances all along the exposure were recorded. Two important results have been pointed out: on one hand, the Achilles heel of the chemical structure of MDMO-PPV and P3HT under the impact of light has been evidenced. On the other hand, it has been shown that P3HT:PCBM blends are much more stable than MDMO:PCBM blends whatever the conditions of ageing are. Results show that a convenient encapsulation can ensure a promising lifetime of P3HT/PCBM blends in real conditions of use. This work also focuses on this last point and proposes to study and try to understand the behavior of the materials used in the active layer when submitted to photoaging and thermal aging in the absence of oxygen. To fulfil very good encapsulation, glass

  9. Covalent functionalization of graphene by azobenzene with molecular hydrogen bonds for long-term solar thermal storage

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yiyu; Liu, Hongpo; Luo, Wen; Liu, Enzuo; Zhao, Naiqin; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide-azobenzene (RGO-AZO) hybrids were prepared via covalent functionalization for long-term solar thermal storage. Thermal barrier (ΔEa) of cis to tran reversion and thermal storage (ΔH) were improved by molecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) through ortho- or para-substitution of AZO. Intramolecular H-bonds thermally stabilized cis-ortho-AZO on RGO with a long-term half-life of 5400 h (ΔEa = 1.2 eV), which was much longer than that of RGO-para-AZO (116 h). RGO-para-AZO with one intermolecular H-bond showed a high density of thermal storage up to 269.8 kJ kg−1 compared with RGO-ortho-AZO (149.6 kJ kg−1) with multiple intra- and intermolecular H-bonds of AZO according to relaxed stable structures. Thermal storage in experiment was the same order magnitude to theoretical data based on ΔH calculated by density functional theory and packing density. Photoactive RGO-AZO hybrid can be developed for high-performance solar thermal storage by optimizing molecular H-bonds. PMID:24247355

  10. Covalent functionalization of graphene by azobenzene with molecular hydrogen bonds for long-term solar thermal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yiyu; Liu, Hongpo; Luo, Wen; Liu, Enzuo; Zhao, Naiqin; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Reduced graphene oxide-azobenzene (RGO-AZO) hybrids were prepared via covalent functionalization for long-term solar thermal storage. Thermal barrier (ΔEa) of cis to tran reversion and thermal storage (ΔH) were improved by molecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) through ortho- or para-substitution of AZO. Intramolecular H-bonds thermally stabilized cis-ortho-AZO on RGO with a long-term half-life of 5400 h (ΔEa = 1.2 eV), which was much longer than that of RGO-para-AZO (116 h). RGO-para-AZO with one intermolecular H-bond showed a high density of thermal storage up to 269.8 kJ kg-1 compared with RGO-ortho-AZO (149.6 kJ kg-1) with multiple intra- and intermolecular H-bonds of AZO according to relaxed stable structures. Thermal storage in experiment was the same order magnitude to theoretical data based on ΔH calculated by density functional theory and packing density. Photoactive RGO-AZO hybrid can be developed for high-performance solar thermal storage by optimizing molecular H-bonds.

  11. Covalent functionalization of graphene by azobenzene with molecular hydrogen bonds for long-term solar thermal storage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yiyu; Liu, Hongpo; Luo, Wen; Liu, Enzuo; Zhao, Naiqin; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide-azobenzene (RGO-AZO) hybrids were prepared via covalent functionalization for long-term solar thermal storage. Thermal barrier (ΔEa) of cis to tran reversion and thermal storage (ΔH) were improved by molecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) through ortho- or para-substitution of AZO. Intramolecular H-bonds thermally stabilized cis-ortho-AZO on RGO with a long-term half-life of 5400 h (ΔEa = 1.2 eV), which was much longer than that of RGO-para-AZO (116 h). RGO-para-AZO with one intermolecular H-bond showed a high density of thermal storage up to 269.8 kJ kg(-1) compared with RGO-ortho-AZO (149.6 kJ kg(-1)) with multiple intra- and intermolecular H-bonds of AZO according to relaxed stable structures. Thermal storage in experiment was the same order magnitude to theoretical data based on ΔH calculated by density functional theory and packing density. Photoactive RGO-AZO hybrid can be developed for high-performance solar thermal storage by optimizing molecular H-bonds. PMID:24247355

  12. Long-term effect of temperature on N2O emission from the denitrifying activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, Xiaoru; Zhang, Zhaoji; Ye, Xin; Kao, Chih Ming; Chen, Shaohua

    2014-03-01

    The long-term effect of various temperature (4°C, 12°C, 20°C, 25°C and 34°C) on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from lab-scale denitrifying activated sludge was studied in terms of activation energy, abundance of functional gene nosZ and its transcription. Results showed that temperature had a positive effect on N2O emissions as well as the maximum biomass-specific reduction rates of N2O and NO3(-), ranging from 0.006% to 0.681% of (N2O + N2), 17.3-116.2 and 5.2-66.2 mg N g(-1) VSS h(-1), respectively. The activation energies (Ea) for N2O and NO3(-) reduction of 44.1 kJ mol(-1) and 54.9 kJ mol(-1), shed light on differences in denitrifying rate variation. The maximum NO3(-) reduction rates were more sensitive to temperature variation than the corresponding N2O reduction rates under long-term acclimation. As a result, the ratio between N2O and NO3(-) reduction rates declined to 1.87 at 34°C from 3.31 at 4°C, suggesting great potential capacity for N2O losses at high temperature. The copy numbers of denitrifiers as nosZ gene (×10(8) copies mL(-1)) and total bacteria as 16S rRNA gene (×10(10) copies mL(-1)) did not show obvious relationship with temperature, having relative abundance of 0.42% on average. The transcriptional regulation of nosZ gene, in the range of 10(8)-10(5) copies mL(-1), was affected by reductase activity, substrate concentration as well as its duration. The active nosZ gene expression was accompanied with low reductase capacity, high dissolved N2O and the duration of N2O accumulation. These results provide insights into activation energy and gene expression responsible for N2O emission. PMID:24480748

  13. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M.; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J.; Felder, Christian C.; Broad, Lisa M.; Fitzjohn, Steve M.; Isaac, John T.R.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans. PMID:26472558

  14. Activated mTORC1 promotes long-term cone survival in retinitis pigmentosa mice

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Aditya; Ma, Shan; Le, Yun Z.; Hall, Michael N.; Rüegg, Markus A.; Punzo, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited photoreceptor degenerative disorder that results in blindness. The disease is often caused by mutations in genes that are specific to rod photoreceptors; however, blindness results from the secondary loss of cones by a still unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrated that the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is required to slow the progression of cone death during disease and that constitutive activation of mTORC1 in cones is sufficient to maintain cone function and promote long-term cone survival. Activation of mTORC1 in cones enhanced glucose uptake, retention, and utilization, leading to increased levels of the key metabolite NADPH. Moreover, cone death was delayed in the absence of the NADPH-sensitive cell death protease caspase 2, supporting the contribution of reduced NADPH in promoting cone death. Constitutive activation of mTORC1 preserved cones in 2 mouse models of RP, suggesting that the secondary loss of cones is caused mainly by metabolic deficits and is independent of a specific rod-associated mutation. Together, the results of this study address a longstanding question in the field and suggest that activating mTORC1 in cones has therapeutic potential to prolong vision in RP. PMID:25798619

  15. The development of structural materials for reduced long-term activation

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, K.; Cierjacks, S.W.; Kelzenberg, S.; Moeslang, A.

    1996-12-31

    A reliable calculation of neutron-induced activation of materials requires the inclusion of all kinematically allowed reactions and subsequent reaction chains. While neutron-induced reactions have been sufficiently covered in the past, sequential (x,n) reactions with charged particles x, produced in a first-step reaction, were neglected. To include this type of reaction three new libraries and a preparatory code were developed to produce pseudo cross sections for the European reference code FISPACT. Inventory calculations with the updated FISPACT code, done for all stable elements, showed for 30 elements an increase of at least one of the radiological quantities activity, dose rate and decay heat. Two types of candidate structural materials were investigated: ferritic-martensitic steels and vanadium-based alloys. While V-Cr-Ti alloys without impurities are known to have far superior long-term activation properties, a realistic assumption of technically achievable amounts of tramp elements leads nearly to the same level of activation as for the optimized ferritic-martensitic steels.

  16. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Siobhan H; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J; Felder, Christian C; Broad, Lisa M; Fitzjohn, Steve M; Isaac, John T R; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans. PMID:26472558

  17. Exchange Protein Activated by cAMP Enhances Long-Term Memory Formation Independent of Protein Kinase A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Nan; Abel, Ted; Hernandez, Pepe J.

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that cAMP signaling within neurons plays a major role in the formation of long-term memories--signaling thought to proceed through protein kinase A (PKA). However, here we show that exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) is able to enhance the formation of long-term memory in the hippocampus and appears to do so…

  18. Therapeutic intraspinal stimulation to generate activity and promote long-term recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, Sarah E.; Kasten, Michael R.; Horner, Philip J.; Moritz, Chet T.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic approaches have tremendous potential for the treatment of injuries to the brain and spinal cord by inducing appropriate neural activity in otherwise disordered circuits. Substantial work has demonstrated that stimulation applied to both the central and peripheral nervous system leads to immediate and in some cases sustained benefits after injury. Here we focus on cervical intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS) as a promising method of activating the spinal cord distal to an injury site, either to directly produce movements or more intriguingly to improve subsequent volitional control of the paretic extremities. Incomplete injuries to the spinal cord are the most commonly observed in human patients, and these injuries spare neural tissue bypassing the lesion that could be influenced by neural devices to promote recovery of function. In fact, recent results have demonstrated that therapeutic ISMS leads to modest but sustained improvements in forelimb function after an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). This therapeutic spinal stimulation may promote long-term recovery of function by providing the necessary electrical activity needed for neuron survival, axon growth, and synaptic stability. PMID:24578680

  19. Manipulation of long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system using speckle light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pince, Ercag; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    Particles undergoing a stochastic motion within a disordered medium is a ubiquitous physical and biological phenomena. Examples can be given from organelles performing tasks in the cytoplasm to large animals moving in patchy environment. Here, we use speckle light fields to study the anomalous diffusion in an active matter system consisting of micron-sized silica particles(diameter 5 μm) and motile bacterial cells (E. coli). The speckle light fields are generated by mode mixing inside a multimode optical fiber where a small amount of incident laser power is needed to obtain an effective disordered optical landscape for the purpose of optical manipulation. We experimentally show how complex potentials contribute to the long-term dynamics of the active matter system and observed an enhanced diffusion of particles interacting with the active bacterial bath in the speckle light fields. We showed that this effect can be tuned and controlled by varying the intensity and the statistical properties of the speckle pattern. Potentially, these results could be of interest for many technological applications, such as the manipulation of microparticles inside optically disordered media of biological interest.

  20. Plasticity of Neuron-Glial Transmission: Equipping Glia for Long-Term Integration of Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Wayne; Dobson, Katharine L.; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of synaptic networks to express activity-dependent changes in strength and connectivity is essential for learning and memory processes. In recent years, glial cells (most notably astrocytes) have been recognized as active participants in the modulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, implicating these electrically nonexcitable cells in information processing in the brain. While the concept of bidirectional communication between neurons and glia and the mechanisms by which gliotransmission can modulate neuronal function are well established, less attention has been focussed on the computational potential of neuron-glial transmission itself. In particular, whether neuron-glial transmission is itself subject to activity-dependent plasticity and what the computational properties of such plasticity might be has not been explored in detail. In this review, we summarize current examples of plasticity in neuron-glial transmission, in many brain regions and neurotransmitter pathways. We argue that induction of glial plasticity typically requires repetitive neuronal firing over long time periods (minutes-hours) rather than the short-lived, stereotyped trigger typical of canonical long-term potentiation. We speculate that this equips glia with a mechanism for monitoring average firing rates in the synaptic network, which is suited to the longer term roles proposed for astrocytes in neurophysiology. PMID:26339509

  1. The Long-Term Market Potential of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.

    2012-10-30

    This chapter will examine the conditions under which thermal CSP systems might play a large role in the global energy system. CSP technologies, such as troughs or power towers, have a large advantage over other solar technologies in that they offer the potential for firm power delivery, mitigating intermittency issues. These systems require relatively cloud-free conditions to operate, which limits their geographic applicability.

  2. Long-term facilitation of expiratory and sympathetic activities following acute intermittent hypoxia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lemes, Eduardo V.; Aiko, Simone; Orbem, Caroline B.; Formentin, Cleiton; Bassi, Mirian; Colombari, Eduardo; Zoccal, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) promotes persistent increases in ventilation and sympathetic activity, referred as long-term facilitation (LTF). Augmented inspiratory activity is suggested as a major component of respiratory LTF. In the present study, we hypothesized that AIH also elicits a sustained increase in expiratory motor activity. We also investigated whether the expiratory LTF contributes to the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH. Methods Rats were exposed to AIH (10 × 6–7 % O2 for 45 s, every 5 min) and the cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated during 60 min using in vivo and in situ approaches. Results In unanesthetized conditions (n=9), AIH elicited a modest but sustained increase in baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP, 104±2 vs 111±3 mmHg, P<0.05) associated with enhanced sympathetic and respiratory-related variabilities. In the in situ preparations (n=9), AIH evoked LTF in phrenic (33±12%), thoracic sympathetic (75±25%) and abdominal nerve activities (69±14%). The sympathetic overactivity after AIH was phase-locked with the emergence of bursts in abdominal activity during the late-expiratory phase. In anesthetized vagus-intact animals, AIH increased baseline MAP (113±3 vs 122±2 mmHg, P<0.05) and abdominal muscle activity (535±94%), which were eliminated after pharmacological inhibition of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG). Conclusion These findings indicate that increased expiratory activity is also an important component of AIH-elicited respiratory LTF. Moreover, the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH is linked to the emergence of active expiratory pattern and depends on the integrity of the neurones of the RTN/pFRG. PMID:26910756

  3. Long-term climbing fibre activity induces transcription of microRNAs in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Barmack, Neal H; Qian, Zuyuan; Yakhnitsa, Vadim

    2014-09-26

    Synaptic activation of central neurons is often evoked by electrical stimulation leading to post-tetanic potentiation, long-term potentiation or long-term depression. Even a brief electrical tetanus can induce changes in as many as 100 proteins. Since climbing fibre activity is often associated with cerebellar behavioural plasticity, we used horizontal optokinetic stimulation (HOKS) to naturally increase synaptic input to floccular Purkinje cells in mice for hours, not minutes, and investigated how this activity influenced the transcription of microRNAs, small non-coding nucleotides that reduce transcripts of multiple, complementary mRNAs. A single microRNA can reduce the translation of as many as 30 proteins. HOKS evoked increases in 12 microRNA transcripts in floccular Purkinje cells. One of these microRNAs, miR335, increased 18-fold after 24 h of HOKS. After HOKS stopped, miR335 transcripts decayed with a time constant of approximately 2.5 h. HOKS evoked a 28-fold increase in pri-miR335 transcripts compared with an 18-fold increase in mature miR335 transcripts, confirming that climbing fibre-evoked increases in miR335 could be attributed to increases in transcription. We used three screens to identify potential mRNA targets for miR335 transcripts: (i) nucleotide complementarity, (ii) detection of increased mRNAs following microinjection of miR335 inhibitors into the cerebellum, and (iii) detection of decreased mRNAs following HOKS. Two genes, calbindin and 14-3-3-θ, passed these screens. Transfection of N2a cells with miR335 inhibitors or precursors inversely regulated 14-3-3-θ transcripts. Immunoprecipitation of 14-3-3-θ co-immunoprecipitated PKC-γ and GABAAγ2. Knockdown of either 14-3-3-θ or PKC-γ decreased the serine phosphorylation of GABAAγ2, suggesting that 14-3-3-θ and PKC-γ under the control of miR335 homeostatically regulate the phosphorylation and insertion of GABAAγ2 into the Purkinje cell post-synaptic membrane. PMID:25135969

  4. Relationship between Relativistic Electron Flux in the Inner Magnetosphere and ULF Pulsation on the Ground Associated with Long-term Variations of Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, K.; Nagatsuma, T.; Troshichev, O. A.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Saita, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Yumoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study the relativistic electron flux (0.59-1.18MeV) measured by Standard Dose Monitor (SDOM) onboard DRTS (KODAMA) satellite at the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) is analyzed to investigate the long term (from 2002 to 2014) variations of the electron flux enhancement (REF) during the passage of Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) and/or Coronal Mass Ejection (CMEs). The long term variations of the REF clearly shows the 27-days period associated with the high speed solar wind velocity caused by the CIRs, whereas it is very few that the enhancement of REF lasts for several days after passage of CMEs. The 27-days period enhancement of REF represents the quite strong peak in 2003 when the high speed stream of the solar wind were quit active. We also conducted the same analysis for the Pc5 pulsations observed on the ground. The ground magnetic variations data globally observed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and International Center for Space Weather Science and Education (ICSWSE) Kyushu University are used to investigate the long term variations of Pc5 power. The same signature in the REF variations is shown in the time variability of the Pc5 power on the ground. These results indicate that the solar wind condition strongly affects the acceleration process of the relativistic electron flux by the ULF wave. In particular the dependence of the REF and Pc5 variations on the sector structures and their seasonal variations strongly suggest that the relationship between Pc5 and REF variations could be controlled by the Russell-McPherron effect.

  5. Long-term transportation noise annoyance is associated with subsequent lower levels of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Foraster, Maria; Eze, Ikenna C; Vienneau, Danielle; Brink, Mark; Cajochen, Christian; Caviezel, Seraina; Héritier, Harris; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Schindler, Christian; Wanner, Miriam; Wunderli, Jean-Marc; Röösli, Martin; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    Noise annoyance (NA) might lead to behavioral patterns not captured by noise levels, which could reduce physical activity (PA) either directly or through impaired sleep and constitute a noise pathway towards cardiometabolic diseases. We investigated the association of long-term transportation NA and its main sources (aircraft, road, and railway) at home with PA levels. We assessed 3842 participants (aged 37-81) that attended the three examinations (SAP 1, 2, and 3 in years 1991, 2001 and 2011, respectively) of the population-based Swiss cohort on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA). Participants reported general 24-h transportation NA (in all examinations) and source-specific NA at night (only SAP 3) on an ICBEN-type 11-point scale. We assessed moderate, vigorous, and total PA from a short-questionnaire (SAP 3). The main outcome was moderate PA (active/inactive: cut-off≥150min/week). We used logistic regression including random effects by area and adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and lifestyles (main model) and evaluated potential effect modifiers. We analyzed associations with PA at SAP 3 a) cross-sectionally: for source-specific and transportation NA in the last year (SAP 3), and b) longitudinally: for 10-y transportation NA (mean of SAP 1+2), adjusting for prior PA (SAP 2) and changes in NA (SAP 3-2). Reported NA (score≥5) was 16.4%, 7.5%, 3%, and 1.1% for 1-year transportation, road, aircraft, and railway at SAP 3, respectively. NA was greater in the past, reaching 28.5% for 10-y transportation NA (SAP 1+2). The 10-y transportation NA was associated with a 3.2% (95% CI: 6%-0.2%) decrease in moderate PA per 1-NA rating point and was related to road and aircraft NA at night in cross-sectional analyses. The longitudinal association was stronger for women, reported daytime sleepiness or chronic diseases and it was not explained by objectively modeled levels of road traffic noise at SAP 3. In conclusion, long-term NA

  6. Roche tomography of cataclysmic variables - VII. The long-term magnetic activity of AE Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C. A.; Watson, C. A.; Steeghs, D.; Dhillon, V. S.; Shahbaz, T.

    2016-06-01

    We present a long-term study of the secondary star in the cataclysmic variable AE Aqr, using Roche tomography to indirectly image starspots on the stellar surface spanning 8 years of observations. The seven maps show an abundance of spot features at both high and low latitudes. We find that all maps have at least one large high-latitude spot region, and we discuss its complex evolution between maps, as well as its compatibility with current dynamo theories. Furthermore, we see the apparent growth in fractional spot coverage, fs, around 45° latitude over the duration of observations, with a persistently high fs near latitudes of 20°. These bands of spots may form as part of a magnetic activity cycle, with magnetic flux tubes emerging at different latitudes, similar to the `butterfly' diagram for the Sun. We discuss the nature of flux tube emergence in close binaries, as well as the activity of AE Aqr in the context of other stars.

  7. NADPH oxidase activity is necessary for acute intermittent hypoxia-induced phrenic long-term facilitation

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, P M; Satriotomo, I; Windelborn, J A; Mitchell, G S

    2009-01-01

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) is a form of spinal, serotonin-dependent synaptic plasticity that requires reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We tested the hypothesis that spinal NADPH oxidase activity is a necessary source of ROS for pLTF. Sixty minutes post-AIH (three 5-min episodes of 11% O2, 5 min intervals), integrated phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve burst amplitudes were increased from baseline, indicative of phrenic and XII LTF. Intrathecal injections (∼C4) of apocynin or diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), two structurally and functionally distinct inhibitors of the NADPH oxidase complex, attenuated phrenic, but not XII, LTF. Immunoblots from soluble (cytosolic) and particulate (membrane) fractions of ventral C4 spinal segments revealed predominantly membrane localization of the NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit, gp91phox, whereas membrane and cytosolic expression were both observed for the regulatory subunits, p47phox and RAC1. Immunohistochemical analysis of fixed tissues revealed these same subunits in presumptive phrenic motoneurons of the C4 ventral horn, but not in neighbouring astrocytes or microglia. Collectively, these data demonstrate that NADPH oxidase subunits localized within presumptive phrenic motoneurons are a major source of ROS necessary for AIH-induced pLTF. Thus, NADPH oxidase activity is a key regulator of spinal synaptic plasticity, and may be a useful pharmaceutical target in developing therapeutic strategies for respiratory insufficiency in patients with, for example, cervical spinal injury. PMID:19237427

  8. Phrenic long-term facilitation requires spinal serotonin receptor activation and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Baker-Herman, Tracy L; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2002-07-15

    Respiratory long-term facilitation (LTF) is a form of serotonin-dependent plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia. LTF is manifested as a long-lasting increase in respiratory amplitude (and frequency) after the hypoxic episodes have ended. We tested the hypotheses that LTF of phrenic amplitude requires spinal serotonin receptor activation and spinal protein synthesis. A broad-spectrum serotonin receptor antagonist (methysergide) or protein synthesis inhibitors (emetine or cycloheximide) were injected intrathecally in the cervical spinal cord of anesthetized rats. Control rats, injected with vehicle (artificial CSF), exhibited an augmented phrenic burst amplitude after three 5 min episodes of hypoxia (78 +/- 15% above baseline, 60 min after hypoxia; p < 0.05), indicating LTF. Pretreatment with methysergide, emetine, or cycloheximide attenuated or abolished phrenic LTF (20 +/- 4, 0.2 +/- 11, and 20 +/- 2%, respectively; all p > 0.05). With protein synthesis inhibitors, phrenic LTF differed from control by 15 min after intermittent hypoxia. As an internal control against unintended drug distribution, we measured respiratory LTF in hypoglossal (XII) motor output. At 60 min after intermittent hypoxia, all treatment groups exhibited similar XII LTF (artificial CSF, 44 +/- 10%; methysergide, 40 +/- 5%; emetine, 35 +/- 9%; and cycloheximide, 57 +/- 29%; all p < 0.05), suggesting that drugs were restricted at effective doses to the spinal cord. We conclude that phrenic LTF requires spinal serotonin receptor activation and protein synthesis. Serotonin receptors on phrenic motoneuron dendrites may induce new protein synthesis, thereby giving rise to phrenic LTF. PMID:12122082

  9. Mouse Short- and Long-term Locomotor Activity Analyzed by Video Tracking Software

    PubMed Central

    York, Jason M.; Blevins, Neil A.; McNeil, Leslie K.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Locomotor activity (LMA) is a simple and easily performed measurement of behavior in mice and other rodents. Improvements in video tracking software (VTS) have allowed it to be coupled to LMA testing, dramatically improving specificity and sensitivity when compared to the line crossings method with manual scoring. In addition, VTS enables high-throughput experimentation. While similar to automated video tracking used for the open field test (OFT), LMA testing is unique in that it allows mice to remain in their home cage and does not utilize the anxiogenic stimulus of bright lighting during the active phase of the light-dark cycle. Traditionally, LMA has been used for short periods of time (mins), while longer movement studies (hrs-days) have often used implanted transmitters and biotelemetry. With the option of real-time tracking, long-, like short-term LMA testing, can now be conducted using videography. Long-term LMA testing requires a specialized, but easily constructed, cage so that food and water (which is usually positioned on the cage top) does not obstruct videography. Importantly, videography and VTS allows for the quantification of parameters, such as path of mouse movement, that are difficult or unfeasible to measure with line crossing and/or biotelemetry. In sum, LMA testing coupled to VTS affords a more complete description of mouse movement and the ability to examine locomotion over an extended period of time. PMID:23851627

  10. Stratospheric and solar cycle effects on long-term variability of mesospheric ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, F.-J.; Berger, U.; Baumgarten, G.

    2009-01-01

    Model results of mesospheric ice layers and background conditions at 69°N from 1961 to 2008 are analyzed. The model nudges to European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data below ˜45 km. Greenhouse gas concentrations in the mesosphere are kept constant. At polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) altitudes (83 km) temperatures decrease until the mid 1990s by -0.08 K/yr resulting in trends of PMC brightness, occurrence rates, and, to a lesser extent, in PMC altitudes (-0.0166 km/yr). Ice layer trends are consistent with observations by ground-based and satellite instruments. Water vapor increases at PMC heights and decreases above due to increased freeze-drying caused by the temperature trend. Temperature trends in the mesosphere mainly come from shrinking of the stratosphere and from dynamical effects. A solar cycle modulation of H2O is observed in the model consistent with satellite observations. The effect on ice layers is reduced because of redistribution of H2O by freeze-drying. The accidental coincidence of low temperatures and solar cycle minimum in the mid 1990s leads to an overestimation of solar effects on ice layers. A strong correlation between temperatures and PMC altitudes is observed. Applied to historical measurements this gives negligible temperature trends at PMC altitudes (˜0.01-0.02 K/yr). Strong correlations between PMC parameters and background conditions deduced from the model confirm the standard scenario of PMC formation. The PMC sensitivity on temperatures, water vapor, and Ly-α is investigated. PMC heights show little variation with background parameters whereas brightness and occurrence rates show large variations. None of the background parameters can be ignored regarding its influence on ice layers.

  11. Stratospheric and solar cycle effects on long-term variability of mesospheric ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, F.-J.; Berger, U.; Baumgarten, G.

    2009-11-01

    Model results of mesospheric ice layers and background conditions at 69°N from 1961 to 2008 are analyzed. The model nudges to European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data below ˜45 km. Greenhouse gas concentrations in the mesosphere are kept constant. At polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) altitudes (83 km) temperatures decrease until the mid 1990s by -0.08 K/yr resulting in trends of PMC brightness, occurrence rates, and, to a lesser extent, in PMC altitudes (-0.0166 km/yr). Ice layer trends are consistent with observations by ground-based and satellite instruments. Water vapor increases at PMC heights and decreases above due to increased freeze-drying caused by the temperature trend. Temperature trends in the mesosphere mainly come from shrinking of the stratosphere and from dynamical effects. A solar cycle modulation of H2O is observed in the model consistent with satellite observations. The effect on ice layers is reduced because of redistribution of H2O by freeze-drying. The accidental coincidence of low temperatures and solar cycle minimum in the mid 1990s leads to an overestimation of solar effects on ice layers. A strong correlation between temperatures and PMC altitudes is observed. Applied to historical measurements this gives negligible temperature trends at PMC altitudes (˜0.01-0.02 K/yr). Strong correlations between PMC parameters and background conditions deduced from the model confirm the standard scenario of PMC formation. The PMC sensitivity on temperatures, water vapor, and Ly-α is investigated. PMC heights show little variation with background parameters whereas brightness and occurrence rates show large variations. None of the background parameters can be ignored regarding its influence on ice layers.

  12. The Solar Energy Institute: A long-term investment in America's youth

    SciTech Connect

    Arwood, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    Unlike students of a generation ago, today's high school students have had limited personal experience with the energy issues that influence their everyday lives. They have no personal knowledge of the Arab Oil Embargo or the long lines at gas pumps that students in the 1970s encountered. Unlike their counterparts of the 1980s, who demonstrated against nuclear power plant construction projects, today's students have had very little exposure to energy debates of any national or international consequence. What's more, they have only vague memories of the Persian Gulf War and the fight over energy supplies. Fearing that the absence of crucial, real-life experiences has negatively impacted the energy literacy of today's students, numerous entities have implemented programs designed to introduce young people to a cornucopia of diverse energy issues that affect every aspect of daily life. As part of this educational movement, the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office recognized the fact that young people face an increasingly uncertain energy picture and, as such, one must provide them an education that will allow them to make informed energy decisions in the future. To this end, the Energy Office founded the Solar Energy Institute. What the author has gathered from his two years of experience operating the Solar Energy Institute is that the energy IQ of America's youth, specifically their solar energy IQ, is deficient. The other conclusion he has been able to draw from the program of study is that this summer camp is having a positive impact on students' energy literacy as measured by test scores and a follow-up survey of participants.

  13. Seasonal, interannual, and long-term variabilities in biomass burning activity over South Asia.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, P; Naja, M; Kumar, R; Chandola, H C

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal, interannual, and long-term variations in biomass burning activity and related emissions are not well studied over South Asia. In this regard, active fire location retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Terra, and tropospheric column NO2 from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) are used to understand the effects of biomass burning on the tropospheric pollution loadings over South Asia during 2003-2013. Biomass burning emission estimates from Global Fire Emission Database (GFED) and Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) are also used to quantify uncertainties and regional discrepancies in the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and black carbon (BC) due to biomass burning in South Asia. In the Asian continent, the frequency of fire activity is highest over Southeast Asia, followed by South Asia and East Asia. The biomass burning activity in South Asia shows a distinct seasonal cycle that peaks during February-May with some differences among four (north, central, northeast, and south) regions in India. The annual biomass burning activity in north, central, and south regions shows an increasing tendency, particularly after 2008, while a decrease is seen in northeast region during 2003-2013. The increase in fire counts over the north and central regions contributes 24 % of the net enhancement in fire counts over South Asia. MODIS AOD and OMI tropospheric column NO2 retrievals are classified into high and low fire activity periods and show that biomass burning leads to significant enhancement in tropospheric pollution loading over both the cropland and forest regions. The enhancement is much higher (110-176 %) over the forest region compared to the cropland (34-62 %) region. Further efforts are required to understand the implications of biomass burning on the regional air quality and climate of South Asia. PMID:26503008

  14. Solar image parameter data from the SDO: Long-term curation and data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, M. A.; Angryk, R. A.; Martens, P. C.

    2015-11-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission captures thousands of images of the Sun per day, motivating the need for efficient and effective storage, representation, and search over a massive repository of data. This work investigates the general-purpose image parameter data produced by the SDO Feature Finding Team's trainable module, which operates at a fixed six minute cadence over all AIA channels. The data contains ten numerical measures computed for each image cell over a 64 × 64 grid for each image. We analyze all available data and metadata produced over the first three years and present comprehensive statistics and outliers while validating the cleanliness and usability of the data source for future research. We then utilize a database of automated solar event reports to create large-scale region-labeled datasets available to the public. We highlight the new-found potential for data-driven discovery by presenting several best-case labeling scenarios that establish a baseline for comparing machine learning classification and attribute (image parameter) evaluation results. Future work focuses on continued dataset curation and spatiotemporal data mining.

  15. Long-term variations of solar corpuscular fluxes based on lunar soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriev, G. S.

    2013-07-01

    We report the results of age determination of a lunar soil column, delivered by the Luna 16 mission in September 1970 from the Sea of Fertility. We elaborated and applied the soil age determination method using the kinetic parameter, the regolith accumulation rate. The age of the soil delivered by Luna 16 is about 90 Myr. The isotopic ratio of 3He/4He in the column is slightly higher than in the soil column delivered by the Luna 24 mission. The abundance of helium in the fine fraction of the soil (about 100 µm) is significantly higher and is close to the maximum abundance from the Luna 24 soil column. These differences are most likely associated with the variations of solar corpuscular fluxes. Based on the measurements of the helium isotope abundance in the samples of lunar soil columns, we have estimated the values of ancient solar fluxes of protons and helium and variations thereof in the time interval of up to 600 Myr. We demonstrate that during this epoch there were two strong bursts of the helium flux, about 80 and 470 Myr ago, respectively. The existence of the first peak was assumed earlier from the paleodendrochronological data.

  16. Active Motor Training Has Long-term Effects on Infants' Object Exploration.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Sarah E; Watkins, Rachel M; Needham, Amy Work

    2016-01-01

    Long-term changes in infants' behavior as a result of active motor training were studied. Thirty-two infants completed three visits to the laboratory. At the first visit, infants were 3 months old and completed an object exploration assessment. Then the experimenter demonstrated the motor training procedures appropriate for the infant's experimental condition, and parents took home custom infant mittens (either sticky or non-sticky) and a bag of lightweight toys to practice with their infants. Over the course of the following 2 weeks, infants participated in 10 sessions of either active (sticky) or passive (non-sticky) mittens training at home with their parents. Infants who participated in active mittens training wore mittens with the palms covered in Velcro, allowing them to pick up and move around small toys. Infants who participated in passive mittens training wore non-sticky mittens, and their parents moved the toys through their visual fields on their behalf. After completing the training, infants returned to the lab for the second visit. At visit two, infants participated in another object exploration assessment as well as a reaching assessment. Parents returned the training materials to the lab at the second visit, and were told not to continue any specific training regimen from this point forward. Two months later, when infants were about 5.5 months of age, they returned to the lab for a third visit. At the third visit, infants completed the same two assessments as during the second visit. The results of this study indicate that infants who participated in active motor training engaged in more sophisticated object exploration when compared to infants who received passive training. These findings are consistent with others in the literature showing that active motor training at 3 months of age facilitates the processes of object exploration and engagement. The current results and others reveal that the effects of early experience can last long after

  17. Long-term health-enhancing physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis - the PARA 2010 study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer increased risk of disability andpremature mortality. Health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) could be one importantfactor to reduce this risk. Rising health care costs call for the development and evaluation ofnew modes of rehabilitation, including physical activity in settings outside the health caresystem. Methods/Design This cohort study targets 450 patients with RA that do not currently meet HEPA recommendations, recruited from six hospitals reporting to the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Registers (SRQ). We have developed a two-year real-life intervention program including a minimum of twice-weekly circuit training, moderately intense physical activity the remaining days of the week and group meetings to support behavior change every other week. Our hypothesis is that increased physical activity and exercise will improve perceived health, reduce pain and fatigue, increase muscle function and aerobic capacity, impact psychosocial factors and prevent future cardiovascular events. Research questions regard outcomes, retention rates, dose–response matters and the exploration of responder characteristics. This protocol outlines recruitment procedure, design, assessment methods and the intervention program of the study. Discussion The PARA 2010 project is designed to expand the knowledge on HEPA in RA by a progressive approach regarding population, setting, intervention, time frames and outcome measures. To our knowledge this is the first long-term HEPA program based on Social Cognitive Theory, and performed in a real life environment to demonstrate if this new setting can promote increased and maintained physical activity in people with RA. Trial registration number ISRCTN25539102 PMID:22656861

  18. Active Motor Training Has Long-term Effects on Infants’ Object Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Wiesen, Sarah E.; Watkins, Rachel M.; Needham, Amy Work

    2016-01-01

    Long-term changes in infants’ behavior as a result of active motor training were studied. Thirty-two infants completed three visits to the laboratory. At the first visit, infants were 3 months old and completed an object exploration assessment. Then the experimenter demonstrated the motor training procedures appropriate for the infant’s experimental condition, and parents took home custom infant mittens (either sticky or non-sticky) and a bag of lightweight toys to practice with their infants. Over the course of the following 2 weeks, infants participated in 10 sessions of either active (sticky) or passive (non-sticky) mittens training at home with their parents. Infants who participated in active mittens training wore mittens with the palms covered in Velcro, allowing them to pick up and move around small toys. Infants who participated in passive mittens training wore non-sticky mittens, and their parents moved the toys through their visual fields on their behalf. After completing the training, infants returned to the lab for the second visit. At visit two, infants participated in another object exploration assessment as well as a reaching assessment. Parents returned the training materials to the lab at the second visit, and were told not to continue any specific training regimen from this point forward. Two months later, when infants were about 5.5 months of age, they returned to the lab for a third visit. At the third visit, infants completed the same two assessments as during the second visit. The results of this study indicate that infants who participated in active motor training engaged in more sophisticated object exploration when compared to infants who received passive training. These findings are consistent with others in the literature showing that active motor training at 3 months of age facilitates the processes of object exploration and engagement. The current results and others reveal that the effects of early experience can last long after

  19. Long-Term Atmospheric Changes Caused by the Very Large Solar Proton Event in July 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, C. H.; Marsh, D. R.; Garcia, R. R.; Vitt, F. M.; Randall, C. E.; Fleming, F. L.; Labow, G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 was accompanied by eight very large solar proton events (SPEs) between 2000 and 2005, along with numerous smaller events. The very large SPE in July 2000, which was associated with the well-known 'Bastille Day Solar Storm,' caused very substantial changes in the polar mesosphere and stratosphere. Significant downward transport of the SPE-produced NO(x) from the polar lower mesosphere and upper stratosphere during the Southern Hemisphere winter period resulted in huge enhancements (>100%) in middle stratospheric NO(x) (NO+NO2) during September 2000 in the polar vortex, which were measured by UARS HALOE (C. E. Randall et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 28,2385-2388,2001). We have used the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the longer-term impact of the July 2000 SPE, the third largest SPE period in the past 40 years. This very large SPE provided a wonderful opportunity to study the downward transport of energetic particle precipitation effects in the middle atmosphere. Not surprisingly, the WACCM-simulated polar Northern Hemisphere influences from the July (mid-summer) 2000 SPE were significant for a few months, but the constituent changes were not transported below about 20 hPa. However in the polar Southern Hemisphere (SH) region, the persistent downward transport in the vortex during the months of July-August-September resulted in significant modeled influences for about a year past the SPE. The SH odd nitrogen family, NO(y) (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2), was greatly enhanced by this SPE and these increases were transported to the lower stratosphere. The SPE-enhanced polar NO(y) resulted in long-lasting ozone decreases (from catalytic NO(y) destruction of ozone) and ozone increases (from NO(y) interference in the chlorine and bromine catalytic ozone destruction cycles). These ozone changes resulted in simulated SH polar stratospheric temperature decreases (1-2 K) and increases (1-3 K)..

  20. Long-term chromospheric activity of non-eclipsing RS CVn-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The IUE database provides several UV high and low-resolution spectra of RS CVn-type stars from 1978 to 1996. In particular, many of these stars were monitored continuously during several seasons by IUE. Aims: Our main purpose is to study the short and long-term chromospheric activity of the RS CVn systems most observed by IUE: HD 22 468 (V711 Tau, HR 1099, K1IV+G5V), HD 21 242 (UX Ari, K0IV+G5V), and HD 224 085 (II Peg, K2IV). Methods: We first obtained the Mount Wilson index S from the IUE high and low-resolution spectra. Secondly, we used the Lomb-Scargle periodogram to analyse the mean annual index < S> and the amplitude of the rotational modulation of the index S. Results: For HD 22 468 (V711 Tau, HR 1099), we find a possible chromospheric cycle with a period of ~18 years and a shorter cycle with a period of ~3 years, which could be associated to a chromospheric “flip-flop” cycle. The data of HD 224 085 (II Peg) also suggest a chromospheric cycle of ~21 years and a flip-flop cycle of ~9 years. Finally, we obtained a possible chromospheric cycle of ~7 years for HD 21 242 (UX Ari).

  1. Phrenic Long-Term Facilitation Requires PKCθ Activity within Phrenic Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Devinney, Michael J.; Fields, Daryl P.; Huxtable, Adrianne G.; Peterson, Timothy J.; Dale, Erica A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces a form of spinal motor plasticity known as phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF); pLTF is a prolonged increase in phrenic motor output after AIH has ended. In anesthetized rats, we demonstrate that pLTF requires activity of the novel PKC isoform, PKCθ, and that the relevant PKCθ is within phrenic motor neurons. Whereas spinal PKCθ inhibitors block pLTF, inhibitors targeting other PKC isoforms do not. PKCθ is highly expressed in phrenic motor neurons, and PKCθ knockdown with intrapleural siRNAs abolishes pLTF. Intrapleural siRNAs targeting PKCζ, an atypical PKC isoform expressed in phrenic motor neurons that underlies a distinct form of phrenic motor plasticity, does not affect pLTF. Thus, PKCθ plays a critical role in spinal AIH-induced respiratory motor plasticity, and the relevant PKCθ is localized within phrenic motor neurons. Intrapleural siRNA delivery has considerable potential as a therapeutic tool to selectively manipulate plasticity in vital respiratory motor neurons. PMID:26019328

  2. A note on periodicity of long-term variations of optical continuum in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kai-Xing; Li, Yan-Rong; Bi, Shao-Lan; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-06-01

    Graham et al. found a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) that have long-term periodic variations in optical continuum. The nature of the periodicity remains uncertain. We investigate the periodic variability characteristics of the sample by testing the relations of the observed variability periods with AGN optical luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rates, and find no significant correlations. We also test the observed periods in several different aspects related to accretion discs surrounding single black holes, such as the Keplerian rotational periods of 5100 Å photon-emission regions and self-gravity dominated regions and the precessing period of warped discs. These tests shed new lights on understanding AGN variability in general. Under the assumption that the periodic behaviour is associated with supermassive black hole binary systems in particular, we compare the separations (r {D}_{bullet }) against characteristic radii of broad-line regions (R_riptscriptstyle BLR) of the binaries and find r {D}_{bullet }≈ 0.05R_riptscriptstyle BLR. This interestingly implies that these binaries have only circumbinary BLRs.

  3. Long-Term file activity patterns in a UNIX workstation environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Timothy J.; Miller, Ethan L.

    1998-01-01

    As mass storage technology becomes more affordable for sites smaller than supercomputer centers, understanding their file access patterns becomes crucial for developing systems to store rarely used data on tertiary storage devices such as tapes and optical disks. This paper presents a new way to collect and analyze file system statistics for UNIX-based file systems. The collection system runs in user-space and requires no modification of the operating system kernel. The statistics package provides details about file system operations at the file level: creations, deletions, modifications, etc. The paper analyzes four months of file system activity on a university file system. The results confirm previously published results gathered from supercomputer file systems, but differ in several important areas. Files in this study were considerably smaller than those at supercomputer centers, and they were accessed less frequently. Additionally, the long-term creation rate on workstation file systems is sufficiently low so that all data more than a day old could be cheaply saved on a mass storage device, allowing the integration of time travel into every file system.

  4. Phrenic long-term facilitation requires PKCθ activity within phrenic motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Devinney, Michael J; Fields, Daryl P; Huxtable, Adrianne G; Peterson, Timothy J; Dale, Erica A; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-05-27

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces a form of spinal motor plasticity known as phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF); pLTF is a prolonged increase in phrenic motor output after AIH has ended. In anesthetized rats, we demonstrate that pLTF requires activity of the novel PKC isoform, PKCθ, and that the relevant PKCθ is within phrenic motor neurons. Whereas spinal PKCθ inhibitors block pLTF, inhibitors targeting other PKC isoforms do not. PKCθ is highly expressed in phrenic motor neurons, and PKCθ knockdown with intrapleural siRNAs abolishes pLTF. Intrapleural siRNAs targeting PKCζ, an atypical PKC isoform expressed in phrenic motor neurons that underlies a distinct form of phrenic motor plasticity, does not affect pLTF. Thus, PKCθ plays a critical role in spinal AIH-induced respiratory motor plasticity, and the relevant PKCθ is localized within phrenic motor neurons. Intrapleural siRNA delivery has considerable potential as a therapeutic tool to selectively manipulate plasticity in vital respiratory motor neurons. PMID:26019328

  5. A note on periodicity of long-term variations of optical continuum in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kai-Xing; Li, Yan-Rong; Bi, Shao-Lan; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-04-01

    Graham et al. found a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) that have long-term periodic variations in optical continuum, the nature of the periodicity remains uncertain. We investigate the periodic variability characteristics of the sample by testing the relations of the observed variability periods with AGN optical luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rates, and find no significant correlations. We also test the observed periods in several different aspects related to accretion disks surrounding single black holes, such as the Keplerian rotational periods of 5100 Å photon-emission regions and self-gravity dominated regions and the precessing period of warped disks. These tests shed new lights on understanding AGN variability in general. Under the assumption that the periodic behavior is associated with SMBHB systems in particular, we compare the separations (D_{bullet }) against characteristic radii of broad-line regions (RBLR) of the binaries and find D_{bullet }≈ 0.05R_{BLR}. This interestingly implies that these binaries have only circumbinary BLRs.

  6. Long-term facilitation of genioglossus activity is present in normal humans during NREM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhuri, Susmita; Pierchala, Lisa; Aboubakr, Salah E.; Shkoukani, Mahdi; Badr, M. Safwan

    2008-01-01

    Episodic hypoxia (EH) is followed by increased ventilatory motor output in the recovery period indicative of long-term facilitation (LTF). We hypothesized that episodic hypoxia evokes LTF of genioglossus (GG) muscle activity in humans during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) sleep. We studied 12 normal non-flow limited humans during stable NREM sleep. We induced 10 brief (3 minute) episodes of isocapnic hypoxia followed by 5 minutes of room air. Measurements were obtained during control, hypoxia, and at 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes of recovery, respectively, for minute ventilation (V̇I), supraglottic pressure (PSG), upper airway resistance (RUA) and phasic GG electromyogram (EMGGG). In addition, sham studies were conducted on room air. During hypoxia there was a significant increase in phasic EMGGG (202.7±24.1% of control, p<0.01) and in V̇I (123.0±3.3% of control, p<0.05); however, only phasic EMGGG demonstrated a significant persistent increase throughout recovery (198.9±30.9%, 203.6±29.9% and 205.4±26.4% of control, at 5, 10, and 20 minutes of recovery, respectively, p<0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, age and phasic EMGGG activity during hypoxia were significant predictors of EMGGG at recovery 20 minutes. No significant changes in any of the measured parameters were noted during sham studies. Conclusion: 1) EH elicits LTF of GG in normal non-flow limited humans during NREM sleep, without ventilatory or mechanical LTF. 2) GG activity during the recovery period correlates with the magnitude of GG activation during hypoxia, and inversely with age. PMID:17945544

  7. Ryanodine Receptor Activation Induces Long-Term Plasticity of Spine Calcium Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Johenning, Friedrich W; Theis, Anne-Kathrin; Pannasch, Ulrike; Rückl, Martin; Rüdiger, Sten; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2015-06-01

    A key feature of signalling in dendritic spines is the synapse-specific transduction of short electrical signals into biochemical responses. Ca2+ is a major upstream effector in this transduction cascade, serving both as a depolarising electrical charge carrier at the membrane and an intracellular second messenger. Upon action potential firing, the majority of spines are subject to global back-propagating action potential (bAP) Ca2+ transients. These transients translate neuronal suprathreshold activation into intracellular biochemical events. Using a combination of electrophysiology, two-photon Ca2+ imaging, and modelling, we demonstrate that bAPs are electrochemically coupled to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores via ryanodine receptors (RyRs). We describe a new function mediated by spine RyRs: the activity-dependent long-term enhancement of the bAP-Ca2+ transient. Spines regulate bAP Ca2+ influx independent of each other, as bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is compartmentalized and independent of the dendritic Ca2+ transient. Furthermore, this functional state change depends exclusively on bAPs travelling antidromically into dendrites and spines. Induction, but not expression, of bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is a spine-specific function of the RyR. We demonstrate that RyRs can form specific Ca2+ signalling nanodomains within single spines. Functionally, RyR mediated Ca2+ release in these nanodomains induces a new form of Ca2+ transient plasticity that constitutes a spine specific storage mechanism of neuronal suprathreshold activity patterns. PMID:26098891

  8. Ryanodine Receptor Activation Induces Long-Term Plasticity of Spine Calcium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pannasch, Ulrike; Rückl, Martin; Rüdiger, Sten; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of signalling in dendritic spines is the synapse-specific transduction of short electrical signals into biochemical responses. Ca2+ is a major upstream effector in this transduction cascade, serving both as a depolarising electrical charge carrier at the membrane and an intracellular second messenger. Upon action potential firing, the majority of spines are subject to global back-propagating action potential (bAP) Ca2+ transients. These transients translate neuronal suprathreshold activation into intracellular biochemical events. Using a combination of electrophysiology, two-photon Ca2+ imaging, and modelling, we demonstrate that bAPs are electrochemically coupled to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores via ryanodine receptors (RyRs). We describe a new function mediated by spine RyRs: the activity-dependent long-term enhancement of the bAP-Ca2+ transient. Spines regulate bAP Ca2+ influx independent of each other, as bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is compartmentalized and independent of the dendritic Ca2+ transient. Furthermore, this functional state change depends exclusively on bAPs travelling antidromically into dendrites and spines. Induction, but not expression, of bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is a spine-specific function of the RyR. We demonstrate that RyRs can form specific Ca2+ signalling nanodomains within single spines. Functionally, RyR mediated Ca2+ release in these nanodomains induces a new form of Ca2+ transient plasticity that constitutes a spine specific storage mechanism of neuronal suprathreshold activity patterns. PMID:26098891

  9. Long-Term Dosimetry of Solar UV Radiation in Antarctica with Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Puskeppeleit, Monika; Quintern, Lothar E.; el Naggar, Saad; Schott, Jobst-Ulrich; Eschweiler, Ute; Horneck, Gerda; Bücker, Horst

    1992-01-01

    The main objective was to assess the influence of the seasonal stratospheric ozone depletion on the UV climate in Antarctica by using a biological test system. This method is based on the UV sensitivity of a DNA repair-deficient strain of Bacillus subtilis (TKJ 6321). In our field experiment, dried layers of B. subtilis spores on quartz discs were exposed in different seasons in an exposure box open to solar radiation at the German Antarctic Georg von Neumayer Station (70°37′S, 8°22′W). The UV-induced loss of the colony-forming ability was chosen as the biological end point and taken as a measure for the absorbed biologically harmful UV radiation. Inactivation constants were calculated from the resulting dose-response curves. The results of field experiments performed in different seasons indicate a strongly season-dependent trend of the daily UV-B level. Exposures performed at extremely depleted ozone concentrations (October 1990) gave higher biologically harmful UV-B levels than expected from the calculated season-dependent trend, which was determined at normal ozone values. These values were similar to values which were measured during the Antarctic summer, indicating that the depleted ozone column thickness has an extreme influence on the biologically harmful UV climate on ground. PMID:16348742

  10. Long-term dosimetry of solar UV radiation in Antarctica with spores of Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Puskeppeleit, M.; Quintern, L.E.; Naggar, S. el; Schott, J.U.; Eschweiler, U.; Horneck, G.; Buecker, H. )

    1992-08-01

    The main objective was to assess the influence of the seasonal stratospheric ozone depletion on the UV climate in Antarctica by using a biological test system. This method is based on the UV sensitivity of a DNA repair-deficient (TKJ 6321). In the field experiment, dried layers of B. subtilis spores on quartz discs were exposed in different seasons in an exposure box open to solar radiation at the German Antarctic Georg von Neumayer Station (70[degree]37[prime]S, 8[degree]22[prime]W). The UV-induced loss of the colony-forming ability was chosen as the biological end point and taken as a measure for the absorbed biologically harmful UV radiation. Inactivation constants were calculated from the resulting dose-response curves. The results of field experiments performed in different seasons indicate a strongly season-dependent trend of the daily UV-B level. Exposures performed at extremely depleted ozone concentrations gave higher biologically harmful UV-B levels than expected from the calculated season-dependent trend, which was determined at normal ozone values. These values were similar to values which were measured during the Antarctic summer, indicating that the depleted ozone column thickness has an extreme influence on the biologically harmful UV climate on ground.

  11. Long-Term Dosimetry of Solar UV Radiation in Antarctica with Spores of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Puskeppeleit, M; Quintern, L E; El Naggar, S; Schott, J U; Eschweiler, U; Horneck, G; Bücker, H

    1992-08-01

    The main objective was to assess the influence of the seasonal stratospheric ozone depletion on the UV climate in Antarctica by using a biological test system. This method is based on the UV sensitivity of a DNA repair-deficient strain of Bacillus subtilis (TKJ 6321). In our field experiment, dried layers of B. subtilis spores on quartz discs were exposed in different seasons in an exposure box open to solar radiation at the German Antarctic Georg von Neumayer Station (70 degrees 37'S, 8 degrees 22'W). The UV-induced loss of the colony-forming ability was chosen as the biological end point and taken as a measure for the absorbed biologically harmful UV radiation. Inactivation constants were calculated from the resulting dose-response curves. The results of field experiments performed in different seasons indicate a strongly season-dependent trend of the daily UV-B level. Exposures performed at extremely depleted ozone concentrations (October 1990) gave higher biologically harmful UV-B levels than expected from the calculated season-dependent trend, which was determined at normal ozone values. These values were similar to values which were measured during the Antarctic summer, indicating that the depleted ozone column thickness has an extreme influence on the biologically harmful UV climate on ground. PMID:16348742

  12. Delayed noradrenergic activation in the dorsal hippocampus promotes the long-term persistence of extinguished fear.

    PubMed

    Chai, Ning; Liu, Jian-Feng; Xue, Yan-Xue; Yang, Chang; Yan, Wei; Wang, Hui-Min; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Shi, Hai-Shui; Wang, Ji-Shi; Bao, Yan-Ping; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Ding, Zeng-Bo; Wang, Xue-Yi; Lu, Lin

    2014-07-01

    Fear extinction has been extensively studied, but little is known about the molecular processes that underlie the persistence of extinction long-term memory (LTM). We found that microinfusion of norepinephrine (NE) into the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus during the early phase (0 h) after extinction enhanced extinction LTM at 2 and 14 days after extinction. Intra-CA1 infusion of NE during the late phase (12 h) after extinction selectively promoted extinction LTM at 14 days after extinction that was blocked by the β-receptor antagonist propranolol, protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor Rp-cAMPS, and protein synthesis inhibitors anisomycin and emetine. The phosphorylation levels of PKA, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), GluR1, and the membrane GluR1 level were increased by NE during the late phase after extinction that was also blocked by propranolol and Rp-cAMPS. These results suggest that the enhancement of extinction LTM persistence induced by NE requires the activation of the β-receptor/PKA/CREB signaling pathway and membrane GluR1 trafficking. Moreover, extinction increased the phosphorylation levels of Erk1/2, CREB, and GluR1, and the membrane GluR1 level during the late phase, and anisomycin/emetine alone disrupted the persistence of extinction LTM, indicating that the persistence of extinction LTM requires late-phase protein synthesis in the CA1. Propranolol and Rp-cAMPS did not completely disrupt the persistence of extinction LTM, suggesting that another β-receptor/PKA-independent mechanism underlies the persistence of extinction LTM. Altogether, our results showed that enhancing hippocampal noradrenergic activity during the late phase after extinction selectively promotes the persistence of extinction LTM. PMID:24553734

  13. Long-term insecticidal activity and physical integrity of Olyset nets in Tafea Province, Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Shurajit N; Amon, James; Iata, Harry; Cooper, Robert D; Russell, Tanya L

    2014-01-01

    The long-term efficacy of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) depends on both the physical condition of the net and the residual activity of the insecticide. This study focused on monitoring these parameters in Olyset nets (Sumitomo Chemical Co., Osaka, Japan) (n = 101) that had been used for 1-3 yr in Tafea Province, Vanuatu. Net usage and frequency of washing was ascertained by questionnaire; the nets were assessed with regards to cleanliness and damage owing to holes. Insecticide efficacy was determined with cone bioassays using Anophelesfarauti Laveran. Net usage was high and 86.1% (87 of 101) of villages stated that they used the net every night. Washing of nets was low (11.9%, 12 of 101), and most nets (79.2%, 80 of 101) were considered dirty. Most nets were damaged (73.4% had holes), and 22.8% (23 of 101) had large holes (>200 cm2). The 24-h mortality of An. farauti exposed to nets aged 1-2 yr was 79.4%, while the mortality for nets 3 yr of age was significantly lower at 73.7%. There was no difference in the insecticidal activity of clean compared with dirty nets (mean 24-h mortality: Clean = 76.7%, Dirty = 77.1%). Although the majority of nets had holes, the physical condition of 8.9-22.8% of nets was altered so severely to potentially affect efficacy. Although the 3-yr-old nets would still be providing significant levels of insecticidal and personal protection, consideration should be given to replacing nets >3 yr old. PMID:24605466

  14. Long-term recording of external urethral sphincter EMG activity in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats

    PubMed Central

    LaPallo, Brandon K.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2014-01-01

    The external urethral sphincter muscle (EUS) plays an important role in urinary function and often contributes to urinary dysfunction. EUS study would benefit from methodology for longitudinal recording of electromyographic activity (EMG) in unanesthetized animals, but this muscle is a poor substrate for chronic intramuscular electrodes, and thus the required methodology has not been available. We describe a method for long-term recording of EUS EMG by implantation of fine wires adjacent to the EUS that are secured to the pubic bone. Wires pass subcutaneously to a skull-mounted plug and connect to the recording apparatus by a flexible cable attached to a commutator. A force transducer-mounted cup under a metabolic cage collected urine, allowing recording of EUS EMG and voided urine weight without anesthesia or restraint. Implant durability permitted EUS EMG recording during repeated (up to 3 times weekly) 24-h sessions for more than 8 wk. EMG and voiding properties were stable over weeks 2–8. The degree of EUS phasic activity (bursting) during voiding was highly variable, with an average of 25% of voids not exhibiting bursting. Electrode implantation adjacent to the EUS yielded stable EMG recordings over extended periods and eliminated the confounding effects of anesthesia, physical restraint, and the potential for dislodgment of the chronically implanted intramuscular electrodes. These results show that micturition in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats is usually, but not always, associated with EUS bursting. This methodology is applicable to studying EUS behavior during progression of gradually evolving disease and injury models and in response to therapeutic interventions. PMID:24990895

  15. Delayed Noradrenergic Activation in the Dorsal Hippocampus Promotes the Long-Term Persistence of Extinguished Fear

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ning; Liu, Jian-Feng; Xue, Yan-Xue; Yang, Chang; Yan, Wei; Wang, Hui-Min; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Shi, Hai-Shui; Wang, Ji-Shi; Bao, Yan-Ping; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Ding, Zeng-Bo; Wang, Xue-Yi; Lu, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Fear extinction has been extensively studied, but little is known about the molecular processes that underlie the persistence of extinction long-term memory (LTM). We found that microinfusion of norepinephrine (NE) into the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus during the early phase (0 h) after extinction enhanced extinction LTM at 2 and 14 days after extinction. Intra-CA1 infusion of NE during the late phase (12 h) after extinction selectively promoted extinction LTM at 14 days after extinction that was blocked by the β-receptor antagonist propranolol, protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor Rp-cAMPS, and protein synthesis inhibitors anisomycin and emetine. The phosphorylation levels of PKA, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), GluR1, and the membrane GluR1 level were increased by NE during the late phase after extinction that was also blocked by propranolol and Rp-cAMPS. These results suggest that the enhancement of extinction LTM persistence induced by NE requires the activation of the β-receptor/PKA/CREB signaling pathway and membrane GluR1 trafficking. Moreover, extinction increased the phosphorylation levels of Erk1/2, CREB, and GluR1, and the membrane GluR1 level during the late phase, and anisomycin/emetine alone disrupted the persistence of extinction LTM, indicating that the persistence of extinction LTM requires late-phase protein synthesis in the CA1. Propranolol and Rp-cAMPS did not completely disrupt the persistence of extinction LTM, suggesting that another β-receptor/PKA-independent mechanism underlies the persistence of extinction LTM. Altogether, our results showed that enhancing hippocampal noradrenergic activity during the late phase after extinction selectively promotes the persistence of extinction LTM. PMID:24553734

  16. Influence of Long-Term Zinc Administration on Spatial Learning and Exploratory Activity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Piechal, Agnieszka; Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Pyrzanowska, Justyna; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    Animal brain contains a significant amount of zinc, which is a cofactor for more than 300 enzymes. Moreover, it provides the basis for functioning of more than 2000 transcription factors, and it is necessary for memory formation and learning processes in the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of zinc supplementation on behavior in 3-month-old rats. For this purpose, the Morris water maze paradigm, hole-board, and T-maze were used. Wistar rats received a solution of ZnSO4 in drinking water at the doses of 16 mg/kg (Zn16 group) and 32 mg/kg (Zn32 group). In rats pretreated with the lower dose of zinc, the improvement of the mean escape latency was observed in comparison to the control group and Zn32 group. During memory task, both ZnSO4-supplemented groups showed an increase in crossings over the previous platform position. Furthermore, the exploratory activity in Zn16 group was improved in comparison to Zn32 and control group. In the brains of zinc-supplemented rats, we observed the higher content of zinc, both in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Hippocampal zinc level correlated positively with the mean annulus crossings of the Zn16 group during the probe trial. These findings show that the long-term administration of ZnS04 can improve learning, spatial memory, and exploratory activity in rats. Graphical Abstract Improvement of spatial learning, memory, and exploratory behavior. PMID:26740219

  17. Episodic hypoxia evokes long-term facilitation of genioglossus muscle activity in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Leanne C; Janczewski, Wiktor A; Feldman, Jack L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if episodic hypoxia evokes persistent increases of genioglossus muscle (GG) activity, termed long-term facilitation (LTF), in neonatal rats in vivo. Experiments were performed on anaesthetized, spontaneously breathing, intubated neonatal rats (postnatal days (P) 3–7), divided into three groups. The first group (n = 8) was subjected to three 5-min periods of hypoxia (5% O2–95% N2) alternating with 5 min periods of room air. The second group (n = 8) was exposed to 15 min of continuous hypoxia. The third (n = 4) group was not exposed to hypoxia and served as a control. GG EMG activity and airflow were recorded before, during and for 60 min after episodic and continuous hypoxic exposure. During hypoxia, GG EMG burst amplitude and tidal volume (VT) significantly increased compared to baseline levels (episodic protocol: mean ±s.e.m.; 324 ± 59% of control and 0.13 ± 0.007 versus 0.09 ± 0.005 ml, respectively; continuous protocol: 259 ± 30% of control and 0.16 ± 0.005 versus 0.09 ± 0.007 ml, respectively; P < 0.05). After the episodic protocol, GG EMG burst amplitude transiently returned to baseline; over the next 60 min, burst amplitude progressively increased to levels significantly greater than baseline (238 ± 40% at 60 min; P < 0.05), without any significant increase in VT and respiratory frequency (P> 0.05). After the continuous protocol, there was no lasting increase in GG EMG burst amplitude. We conclude that LTF of upper airway muscles is an adaptive respiratory behaviour present from birth. PMID:15047768

  18. Long-term patterns of solar irradiance forcing in model experiments and proxy based surface temperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waple, A. M.; Mann, M. E.; Bradley, R. S.

    2002-02-01

    Comparisons are made of long-term empirical and model-estimated patterns of solar irradiance forcing during a 200-year period (1650-1850), which precedes any apparent anthropogenic influence on climate. This interval encompasses a considerable range (approximately 4 W/m2) of estimated variation in solar output, including the "Maunder" and "Dalton" Minima of solar irradiance, and an intervening interval of relatively high values of irradiance, but does not encroach into the industrial era wherein it is difficult to separate solar and anthropogenic influences. Particular emphasis is placed on comparing empirical and modeled patterns of forced surface temperature variation. The empirical patterns bear a greater similarity to the pattern of forced response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (AOGCM) than with an independent model simulation result using an ocean with specified heat transport, both in terms of the spatial pattern of response and implied global mean sensitivity to forcing. Heightened sensitivity in the western Pacific warm pool apparent in the empirical response pattern, is not observed in the forced response of the coupled model. It is possible that this pattern is the result of feedback processes not currently reproduced in course-resolution coupled models. The greatest empirical response is found at the multidecadal-to-century (> 40 year period) time scale, for which the forcing is dominated by the roughly 90-year Gleissberg Cycle of irradiance. This indicates a global-mean sensitivity (approximately 0.3 K/W/m2), which is close to the coupled model result (approximately 0.4 K/W/m2). At decadal time scales (8-25 year period), for which the forcing is dominated by the 11-year and 22-year period solar cycles), the temperature sensitivity is moderately reduced, and its spatial pattern of response is dominated by an apparent resonance with known decadal modes of climate variability.

  19. Polygalasaponin F induces long-term potentiation in adult rat hippocampus via NMDA receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng; Sun, Jian-dong; Han, Ning; Li, Chuang-jun; Yuan, Yu-he; Zhang, Dong-ming; Chen, Nai-hong

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect and underlying mechanisms of polygalasaponin F (PGSF), a triterpenoid saponin isolated from Polygala japonica, on long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampus dentate gyrus (DG) of anesthetized rats. Methods: Population spike (PS) of hippocampal DG was recorded in anesthetized male Wistar rats. PGSF, the NMDAR inhibitor MK801 and the CaMKII inhibitor KN93 were intracerebroventricularly administered. Western blotting analysis was used to examine the phosphorylation expressions of NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Results: Intracerebroventricular administration of PGSF (1 and 10 μmol/L) produced long-lasting increase of PS amplitude in hippocampal DG in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-injection of MK801 (100 μmol/L) or KN93 (100 μmol/L) completely blocked PGSF-induced LTP. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of NR2B, CaMKII, ERK, and CREB in hippocampus was significantly increased 5–60 min after LTP induction. The up-regulation of p-CaMKII expression could be completely abolished by pre-injection of MK801. The up-regulation of p-ERK and p-CREB expressions could be partially blocked by pre-injection of KN93. Conclusion: PGSF could induce LTP in hippocampal DG in anesthetized rats via NMDAR activation mediated by CaMKII, ERK and CREB signaling pathway. PMID:22286914

  20. SEASONAL PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY IN THREE CHARACTERISTIC SOILS OF THE ENGLISH UPLANDS POLLUTED BY LONG-TERM ATMOSPHERIC NITROGEN DEPOSITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphomonoesterase activities were determined monthly during a seasonal cycle in three characteristic soil types of the English uplands that have been subject to long-term atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Activities (µmol para-nitrophenol per gram soil dry wt per hour) ranged between 83.9 - 307 in...

  1. Factors that Influence Physical Activity in Long-Term Care: Perspectives of Residents, Staff, and Significant Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Kathleen; Edwards, Nancy; Guitard, Paulette; Murray, Mary Ann; Caswell, Wenda; Perrier, Marie Josee

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity has been linked to positive health outcomes for frail seniors. However, our understanding of factors that influence the physical activity of residents in the long-term care (LTC) setting is limited. This article describes our work with focus groups, one component of a multi-component study that examined factors influencing the…

  2. The Calmodulin-Binding Transcription Activator CAMTA1 Is Required for Long-Term Memory Formation in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Bengtson, C. Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by…

  3. The detection and interpretation of long-term atmospheric change: Tasks in association with the shuttle solar backscatter ultraviolet spectral radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, John E.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives are to develop techniques to detect and remove long-term instrument drifts from the operational Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) data base using periodic measurements made by the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Spectral Radiometer and to evaluate the potential effects of scattering by atmospheric aerosols on our ability to detect trends in ozone using SBUV-class instruments.

  4. Long-term variation of the solar diurnal anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays observed with the Nagoya multi-directional muon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Munakata, K.; Kozai, M.; Kato, C.; Kóta, J.

    2014-08-10

    We analyze the three-dimensional anisotropy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities observed independently with a muon detector at Nagoya in Japan and neutron monitors over four solar activity cycles. We clearly see the phase of the free-space diurnal anisotropy shifting toward earlier hours around solar activity minima in A > 0 epochs, due to the reduced anisotropy component parallel to the mean magnetic field. This component is consistent with a rigidity-independent spectrum, while the perpendicular anisotropy component increases with GCR rigidity. We suggest that this harder spectrum of the perpendicular component is due to contribution from the drift streaming. We find that the bi-directional latitudinal density gradient is positive in the A > 0 epoch, while it is negative in the A < 0 epoch, in agreement with the drift model prediction. The radial density gradient of GCRs, on the other hand, varies with a ∼11 yr cycle with maxima (minima) in solar maximum (minimum) periods, but we find no significant difference between the radial gradients in the A > 0 and A < 0 epochs. The corresponding parallel mean free path is larger in A < 0 than in A > 0. We also find, however, that the parallel mean free path (radial gradient) appears to persistently increase (decrease) in the last three cycles of weakening solar activity. We suggest that simple differences between these parameters in A > 0 and A < 0 epochs are seriously biased by these long-term trends.

  5. Surface EMG system for use in long-term vigorous activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luca, G.; Bergman, P.; de Luca, C.

    The purpose of the project was to develop an advanced surface electromyographic (EMG) system that is portable, un-tethered, and able to detect high-fidelity EMG signals from multiple channels. The innovation was specifically designed to extend NASA's capability to perform neurological status monitoring for long-term, vigorous activities. These features are a necessary requirement of ground-based and in-flight studies planned for the International Space Station and human expeditions to Mars. The project consisted of developing 1) a portable EMG digital data logger using a handheld PC for acquiring the signal and storing the data from as many as 8 channels, and 2) an EMG electrode/skin interface to improve signal fidelity and skin adhesion in the presence of sweat and mechanical disturbances encountered during vigorous activities. The system, referred to as a MyoMonitor, was configured with a communication port for downloading the data from the data logger to the PC computer workstation. Software specifications were developed and implemented for programming of acquisition protocols, power management, and transferring data to the PC for processing and graphical display. The prototype MyoMonitor was implemented using a handheld PC that features a color LCD screen, enhanced keyboard, extended Lithium Ion battery and recharger, and 128 Mbytes of F ash Memory. The system was designed to be belt-worn,l thereby allowing its use under vigorous activities. The Monitor utilizes up to 8 differential surface EMG sensors. The prototype allowed greater than 2 hours of continuous 8-channel EMG data to be collected, or 17.2 hours of continuous single channel EMG data. Standardized tests in human subjects were conducted to develop the mechanical and electrical properties of the prototype electrode/interface system. Tests conducted during treadmill running and repetitive lifting demonstrated that the prototype interface significantly reduced the detrimental effects of sweat

  6. Long-term measurement of indoor thermal environment and energy performance in a detached wooden house with passive solar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Yoshimi; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Chikashi

    1998-07-01

    The indoor thermal environment, energy performance and energy consumption for a detached wooden house equipped with two passive solar systems, were investigated over a period of three years. The house with a floor area of 188 m{sup 2} was constructed in the autumn of 1993 in Sendai, Japan; and was well insulated and very airtight compared with other houses in Japan. There are six occupants. Heating equipment is comprises of a thermal storage space heater using night-time electricity and a vented firewood furnace on the first floor. Each room is ventilated all day by a central ventilation system. Two passive solar systems were incorporated: a concrete floor in the southern perimeter of the living room as a direct gain system, and an earth tube embedded around the circumference of the house to supply fresh air. The principal results obtained are as follows: (1) The indoor environment during the heating season was more thermally comfortable, compared with that or ordinary houses in Japan. (2) The concrete floor played a role of thermal storage, which absorbed and released heat for decreasing the fluctuation of room temperature. (3) The earth tube supplied air with lower temperature in the summer and higher temperature in the winter to the room, that the outdoor air temperature. This thermal performance did not decrease in spite of the long-term use. (4) The annual amount of energy consumption of this house was less than that of ordinary houses in the northern part of Japan.

  7. Urea as a long-term stable alternative to guanidium thiocyanate additive in dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mi-Jeong; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-09-01

    Photovoltaic performance of 0.05 M urea-contained redox electrolyte is compared to that of 0.05 M guanidinium thiocyanate (GSCN)-contained one in dye-sensitized solar cell. No significant difference in the initial photovoltaic performance is observed, which means that the role of urea additive is similar to that of GSCN. Initial solar-to-electrical conversion efficiency of the device containing GSCN shows 7% that is diminished to 5.8% after 40 days, whereas the device containing urea exhibits stable photovoltaic performance showing that initial efficiency of 7.2% is almost remained unchanged after 40 days (7.1%). The lowered efficiency of the GSCN-contained device is mainly due to the decreased photocurrent density, which is ascribed to the formation of needle-shaped crystals on TiO2 layer. Infrared spectroscopic study confirms that the crystals are dye analogue, which is indicative of dye desorption in the presence of GSCN. On the other hand, no crystals are formed in the urea-contained electrolyte, which implies that dye desorption is negligible. Urea additive is thus found to be less reactive in dye desorption than GSCN, leading to long-term stability.

  8. Cortical Activation Patterns during Long-Term Memory Retrieval of Visually or Haptically Encoded Objects and Locations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Oliver; Roder, Brigitte; Burke, Michael; Bien, Siegfried; Rosler, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to delineate cortical networks that are activated when objects or spatial locations encoded either visually (visual encoding group, n = 10) or haptically (haptic encoding group, n = 10) had to be retrieved from long-term memory. Participants learned associations between auditorily…

  9. Behavior Change Strategies for Successful Long-Term Weight Loss: Focusing on Dietary and Physical Activity Adherence, Not Weight Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hongu, Nobuko; Kataura, Martha P.; Block, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    This article helps Extension professionals guide individuals in a successful long-term weight loss program. A program should focus on behavioral changes (improving eating habits and physical activity), not just weight loss. In order to do this, Extension professionals should implement behavior change strategies that motivate individuals to…

  10. Long term tillage, cover crop and fertilization effects on microbial community structure and activity: Implications on soil quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced tillage, cover crops and fertilization are associated with greater microbial biomass and activity that are linked to improvements in soil quality, but their impacts vary widely with climate, soils and cropping systems. This study aimed to characterize the impact of long term (31 years) tilla...

  11. Gender-Based Long-Term Surgical Outcome in Patients with Active Infective Aortic Valve Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Pascal M; Binner, Christian; Mende, Meinhart; Daviewala, Piroze; Etz, Christian D; Borger, Michael Andrew; Misfeld, Martin; Eifert, Sandra; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this observational, single-center study was to evaluate the impact of gender on surgical outcome in patients with active infective endocarditis (AIE) of the aortic valve. MATERIAL AND METHODS Between October 1994 and January 2011, 755 patients (558 men and 297 women) underwent surgery for AIE at the Leipzig Heart Center, Germany, according to the modified Duke criteria. Data were collected before surgery and as the study was ongoing. Gender influence on survival was evaluated (Kaplan-Meier curves). Cox proportional models were used to evaluate gender differences in relation to early mortality (within 30 days) and late mortality (up to 10 years). RESULTS The early mortality rate was 15.0% among men and 23.0% among women, which was statistically significant different (p=0.01). In male patients, variables associated with overall mortality were age (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.43-1.86; p<0.001), insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.48-2.75; p<0.001), preoperative low ejection fraction (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.98-0.99; p=0.002), previous cardiac surgery (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.22-2.13; p=0.001), preoperative ventilation (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.14-2.75; p=0.012), preoperative dialysis (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.20-2.98; p=0.006), NYHA Class IV (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.12-2.15; p=0.008), and involvement of multiple valves (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.24-2.19; p=0.001) had a statistically significant influence on the late mortality. Focus identification (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.08-2.77; p=0.023), involvement of multiple valves (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.02-2.26; p=0.040), preoperative dialysis (OR 3.65, 95% CI 1.96-6.77; p<0.001), and age (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.28-1.82; p<0.004) were predictive risk factors for late mortality in women with AIE (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.5-8.4; p<0.004). CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated distinct gender-based differences in risk of mortality in patients with AIE (who were undergoing surgical treatment) with different early and long-term outcomes. PMID:27427831

  12. Threshold responses of songbirds to long-term timber management on an active industrial forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, D.A.; Wood, P.B.; Keyser, P.D.; Wigley, T.B.; Dellinger, R.; Weakland, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Forest managers often seek to balance economic benefits from timber harvesting with maintenance of habitat for wildlife, ecosystem function, and human uses. Most research on the relationship between avian abundance and active timber management has been short-term, lasting one to two years, creating the need to investigate long-term avian responses and to identify harvest thresholds when a small change in habitat results in a disproportionate response in relative abundance and nest success. Our objectives were to identify trends in relative abundance and nest success and to identify landscape-scale disturbance thresholds for avian species and habitat guilds in response to a variety of harvest treatments (clear-cuts, heavy and light partial harvests) over 14 years. We conducted point counts and monitored nests at an industrial forest in the central Appalachians of West Virginia during 1996-1998, 2001-2003, and 2007-2009. Early successional species increased in relative abundance across all three time periods, whereas interior-edge and forest-interior guilds peaked in relative abundance mid-study after which the forest-interior guild declined. Of 41 species with >10 detections, four (10%) declined significantly, 13 (32%) increased significantly (only three species among all periods), and 9 (22%) peaked in abundance mid-study (over the entire study period, four species had no significant change in abundance, four declined, and one increased). Based on piecewise linear models, forest-interior and interior-edge guilds' relative abundance harvest thresholds were 28% total harvests (all harvests combined), 10% clear-cut harvests, and 18% light partial harvests, after which abundances declined. Harvest thresholds for the early successional guild were 42% total harvests, 11% clear-cut harvest, and 10% light partial harvests, and relative abundances increased after surpassing thresholds albeit at a reduced rate of increase after the clear-cut threshold. Threshold confidence

  13. Gender-Based Long-Term Surgical Outcome in Patients with Active Infective Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Binner, Christian; Mende, Meinhart; Daviewala, Piroze; Etz, Christian D.; Borger, Michael Andrew; Misfeld, Martin; Eifert, Sandra; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this observational, single-center study was to evaluate the impact of gender on surgical outcome in patients with active infective endocarditis (AIE) of the aortic valve. Material/Methods Between October 1994 and January 2011, 755 patients (558 men and 297 women) underwent surgery for AIE at the Leipzig Heart Center, Germany, according to the modified Duke criteria. Data were collected before surgery and as the study was ongoing. Gender influence on survival was evaluated (Kaplan-Meier curves). Cox proportional models were used to evaluate gender differences in relation to early mortality (within 30 days) and late mortality (up to 10 years). Results The early mortality rate was 15.0% among men and 23.0% among women, which was statistically significant different (p=0.01). In male patients, variables associated with overall mortality were age (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.43–1.86; p<0.001), insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.48–2.75; p<0.001), preoperative low ejection fraction (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.98–0.99; p=0.002), previous cardiac surgery (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.22–2.13; p=0.001), preoperative ventilation (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.14–2.75; p=0.012), preoperative dialysis (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.20–2.98; p=0.006), NYHA Class IV (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.12–2.15; p=0.008), and involvement of multiple valves (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.24–2.19; p=0.001) had a statistically significant influence on the late mortality. Focus identification (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.08–2.77; p=0.023), involvement of multiple valves (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.02–2.26; p=0.040), preoperative dialysis (OR 3.65, 95% CI 1.96–6.77; p<0.001), and age (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.28–1.82; p<0.004) were predictive risk factors for late mortality in women with AIE (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.5–8.4; p<0.004). Conclusions This study demonstrated distinct gender-based differences in risk of mortality in patients with AIE (who were undergoing surgical treatment) with different early and long-term outcomes. PMID

  14. Long-term magnetic activity in close binary systems. I. Patterns of color variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, S.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:This is the first of a series of papers in which we present the results of a long-term photometric monitoring project carried out at Catania Astrophysical Observatory aimed at studying magnetic activity in late-type components of close binary systems, its dependence on global stellar parameters, and its evolution on different time scales from days to years. In this first paper, we present the complete observation dataset and new results of an investigation into the origin of brightness and color variations observed in the well-known magnetically active close binary stars: AR Psc, VY Ari, UX Ari, V711 Tau, EI Eri, V1149 Ori, DH Leo, HU Vir, RS CVn, V775 Her, AR Lac, SZ Psc, II Peg and BY Dra Methods: About 38 000 high-precision photoelectric nightly observations in the U, B and V filters are analysed. Correlation and regression analyses of the V magnitude vs. U-B and B-V color variations are carried out and a comparison with model variations for a grid of active region temperature and filling factor values is also performed. Results: We find the existence of two different patterns of color variation. Eight stars in our sample: BY Dra, VY Ari, V775 Her, II Peg, V1149 Ori, HU Vir, EI Eri and DH Leo become redder when they become fainter, as is expected from the presence of active regions consisting of cool spots. The other six stars show the opposite behaviour, i.e. they become bluer when they become fainter. For V711 Tau this behaviour could be explained by the increased relative U- and B-flux contribution by the earlier-type component of the binary system when the cooler component becomes fainter. On the other hand, for AR Psc, UX Ari, RS CVn, SZ Psc and AR Lac the existence of hot photospheric faculae must be invoked. We also found that in single-lined and double-lined binary stars in which the fainter component is inactive or much less active the V magnitude is correlated to B-V and U-B color variations in more than 60% of observation seasons. The correlation

  15. Deciphering the Long-Term Trend of Atlantic Basin Intense Hurricanes: More Active Versus Less Active During the Present Epoch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    During the interval of 1944-1997, 120 intense hurricanes (i.e., those of category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane damage potential scale) were observed in the Atlantic basin, having an annual frequency of 0-7 events per year, being more active prior to the mid 1960's than thereafter (hence a possible two-state division: more active versus less active), and being preferentially lower during El Nino years as compared to non-El Nino years. Because decadal averages of the frequency of intense hurricanes closely resemble those of average temperature anomalies for northern hemispheric and global standards and of the average temperature at the Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland), a proxy for climatic change, it is inferred that the long-term trends of the annual frequency of intense hurricanes and temperature may be statistically related. Indeed, on the basis of 4- and 10-yr moving averages, one finds that there exists strong linear associations between the annual frequency of intense hurricanes in the Atlantic basin and temperature (specially, when temperature slightly leads). Because the long-term leading trends of temperature are now decidedly upward, beginning about the mid 1980's, it is inferred that the long-term consequential trends of the annual frequency of intense hurricanes should now also be upward, having begun near 1990, suggesting that a return to the more active state probably has already occurred. However, because of the anomalous El Nino activity of the early to mid 1990's, the switch from the less active to the more active state essentially went unnoticed (a marked increase in the number of intense hurricanes was not observed until the 1995 and 1996 hurricane seasons, following the end of the anomalous El Nino activity). Presuming that a return to the more active state has, indeed, occurred, one expects the number of seasonal intense hurricanes during the present epoch (continuing through about 2012) to usually be higher than average (i

  16. Effects of long-term smoking on the activity and mRNA expression of CYP isozymes in rats

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao-Meng; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Ming-Zhen; Li, Yang; Li, Hu-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect of long-term smoking on the activity and mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to passive smoking 6 cigarettes per day for 180 days. A cocktail solution which contained phenacetin (20 mg/kg), tolbutamide (5 mg/kg), chlorzoxazone (20 mg/kg) and midazolam (10 mg/kg) was given orally to rats. Blood samples were collected at pre-specified time points and the concentrations of probe drugs in plasma were determined by HPLC-MS/MS. The corresponding pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by DAS 3.0. In addition, real-time RT-PCR was used to analyze the mRNA expression of CYP1A2, CYP2C11, CYP2E1 and CYP3A1 in rat liver. Results There were no significant influences of pharmacokinetic profiles of chlorzoxazone in long-term smoking pretreated rats. But many pharmacokinetic profiles of phenacetin, tolbutamide, and midazolam in long-term smoking pretreated rats were affected significantly (P<0.05). The results suggested that long-term smoking had significant inhibition effects on CYP2C11 and CYP3A1 while CYP1A2 enzyme activity was induced. Furthermore, Long-term smoking had no effects on rat CYP2E1. The mRNA expression results were consistent with the pharmacokinetic results. Conclusions Alterations of CYP450 enzyme activities may fasten or slow down excretion with corresponding influence on drug efficacy or toxicity in smokers compared to nonsmokers, which may lead to clinical failures of lung cancer therapy or toxicity in smokers. PMID:26623094

  17. Long-term variability and impact on human health of biologically active UV radiation in Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanova, Ekaterina; Chubarova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    the developed classification for Moscow. Booth, C.R. and S. Madronich, 1994: Radiation amplification factors: improved formulation accounts for large increases in ultraviolet radiation associated with Antarctic ozone depletion. In: Ultraviolet Radiation in Antarctica: Measurements and Biological Research [Weiler, C.S. and P.A. Penhale (eds.)]. AGU Antarctic Research Series, 62, Washington, DC, USA, 39-42. Chubarova N.Y., 2008: UV variability in Moscow according to long-term UV measurements and reconstruction model. Atmos.Chem.Phys., 8, 3025-3031 Oriowo, M. et al., 2001:, Action spectrum for in vitro UV-induced cataract using whole lenses. Invest.Ophthalmol.&Vis.Sci, 42, 2596-2602. CIE, 1993: Reference Action Spectra for Ultraviolet Induced Erythema and Pigmentation of Different Human skin Types. CIE Research Note, CIE Technical Collection., N.3 CIE, 2006: Action spectrum for the production of previtamin D3 in human skin, Technical report 174, International commission on illumination

  18. Long-term abdominal adiposity activates several parameters of cardiac energy function.

    PubMed

    Mourmoura, Evangelia; Rigaudière, Jean-Paul; Couturier, Karine; Hininger, Isabelle; Laillet, Brigitte; Malpuech-Brugère, Corinne; Azarnoush, Kasra; Demaison, Luc

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal obesity increases the incidence of cardiac events but reduces mortality when one of these events occurs. The phenomenon called obesity paradox might be related to myocardial energetics. This study was aimed at determining whether long-term abdominal adiposity alters cardiac energy function. Two groups of male Wistar rats were fed a standard or a Western-type (WD) diet for 8 months. The ex vivo coronary reactivity and mechanical function as well as the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (mOxPhos) and hydrogen peroxide release (mH2O2r) were determined. Abdominal adiposity was augmented by the WD. This was also the case for the coronary reactivity to acetylcholine, but the rate pressure product remained roughly stable despite a reduction of the left ventricle-developed pressure partly compensated by a slight increase in heart rate. The prolonged WD administration resulted in an improvement of mOxPhos, but the mH2O2r was exaggerated which was confirmed in the whole cell by a reduced aconitase to fumarase ratio. This did not modify the plasma oxidative stress due to an increased plasma antioxidant status. In conclusion, long-term WD administration improved the cardiac fitness and might predispose the organism to the obesity paradox. Conversely, the increased mitochondrial mH2O2r can precipitate the heart toward cardiomyopathy if the WD is maintained for a longer duration. PMID:26255304

  19. Labscale anoxic stabilization ponds operated under high organic loads: long term effect of enrichment with activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M S; Dávila, J L; Thalasso, F; Guerrero, A L; Ramírez-López, E M; Esparza-García, F; Avelar, F J

    2007-06-01

    The addition of acclimatized activated sludge has been suggested as an effective enrichment procedure to increase the biological activity of waste stabilization ponds. This enrichment results in higher degradation rates compared to non enriched stabilization ponds. However, the comparison between enriched and non enriched ponds has been observed during short term experiments and it is unknown if this enrichment has long-term effect. This paper compares enriched and non enriched experimental ponds over two years of continuous operation. The enriched pond showed a degradation activity constantly twice higher. The biological indicators such as the heterotrophic and facultative plate count numbers, the chlorophyll "a" concentration and the oxygen consumption rate were also constantly higher in the enriched pond. These results suggest that an initial enrichment has a long term enhancement effect on stabilization ponds treating complex wastewaters. PMID:17624109

  20. Using Active Satellite Observations to Characterize Uncertatinty in Long Term Satellite Cloud Liquid Water Path Climatologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebsock, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Bias between the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) version 2 and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 5.1 cloud liquid water path (Wc)products are explored with the aid of coincident active observations from the CloudSat radar and the CALIPSO lidar. In terms of detection, the active observations provide precise separation of cloudy from clear sky and precipitating from nonprecipitating clouds. In addition, they offer a unique quantification of precipitation water path (Wp) in warm clouds. They also provide an independent quantification of Wc that isbased on an accurate surface reference technique, which is an independent arbiter between the two passive approaches. The results herein establish the potential for CloudSat and CALIPSO to provide an independent assessment of bias between the conventional passive remote sensing methods from reflected solar and emitted microwave radiation. After applying a common data filter to the observations to account for sampling biases, AMSR-E is biased high relative to MODIS in the global mean by 26.4gm2. The RMS difference in the regional patterns is 32.4gm2, which highlights a large geographical dependence in the bias which is related to the tropical transitions from stratocumulus to cumulus cloud regimes. The contributions of four potential sources for this bias are investigated by exploiting the active observations: (1)bias in MODIS related to solar zenith angle dependence accounts for 2.3gm2, (2) bias in MODIS due to undersampling of cloud edges accounts for 4.2gm2, (3) a wind speed and water vapor-dependent "clear-sky bias" in the AMSR-E retrieval accounts for 6.3gm2, and (4) evidence suggests that much of the remaining 18gm2 bias is related to the assumed partitioning of the observed emission signal between cloud and precipitation water in the AMSR-E retrieval. This is most evident through the correlations between the regional mean patterns of Wp and the Wc bias within the

  1. Short-term and long-term reproducibility of lung tumor position using active breathing control (ABC)

    SciTech Connect

    Koshani, Rojano . E-mail: rkashani@umich.edu; Balter, James M.; Hayman, James A.; Henning, George T.; Herk, Marcel van

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the short-term and long-term reproducibility of lung tumor position for scans acquired using an active breathing control (ABC) device. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with lung cancer were scanned over three sessions during the course of treatment. For each session, two scans were acquired at deep inhale, and one scan each at half of deep inhale and at exhale. Long-term reproducibility was evaluated by comparing the same breathing state scans from two sessions, with setup variation removed by skeletal alignment. Tumor alignment was based on intensity matching of a small volume around the tumor. For short-term reproducibility, the two inhale volumes from the same session were compared. Results: For the short-term reproducibility, the mean and the standard deviation (SD) of the displacement of the center of tumor were 0.0 (1.5) mm in anteroposterior (AP), 0.3 (1.4) mm in superior/inferior (SI), and 0.2 (0.7) mm in right/left (RL) directions. For long-term reproducibility, the mean (SD) were -1.3 (3.1) mm AP, -0.5 (3.8) mm SI, and 0.3 (1.6) mm RL for inhale and -0.2 (2.8) mm AP, 0.2 (2.1) mm SI, and -0.7 (1.1) mm RL for exhale. Conclusion: The ABC device demonstrates very good short-term and long-term reproducibility. Increased long-term variability in position, primarily in the SI and AP directions, indicates the role of tumor-directed localization in combination with breath-held immobilization.

  2. Long-term wheel running changes on sensorimotor activity and skeletal muscle in male and female mice of accelerated senescence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Lalanza, Jaume F; Alvarez-López, María Jesús; Cosín-Tomás, Marta; Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Pallàs, Merce; Kaliman, Perla; Escorihuela, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) is considered a useful non-transgenic model for studying aspects of aging. Using SAM resistant 1 (SAMR1) as controls, the long-term effects of wheel running on skeletal muscle adaptations and behavioral traits were evaluated in senescent (P8) and resistant (R1) male and female mice. Long-term wheel running (WR) led to increases in locomotor activity, benefits in sensorimotor function, and changes in body weight in a gender-dependent manner. WR increased body weight and baseline levels of locomotor activity in female mice and improved balance and strength in male mice, compared to sedentary-control mice. WR resulted in key metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle, associated with an increased activity of the sirtuin 1-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-PGC-1 alpha axis and changes in vascular endothelial growth factor A (Vegfa), glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4), and Cluster of Differentiation 36 (Cd36) gene expression. Overall, our data indicate that activity, balance, and strength decrease with age and that long-term WR may significantly improve the motor function in a mouse model of senescence in a gender-dependent manner. PMID:25129573

  3. Effect of long-term industrial waste effluent pollution on soil enzyme activities and bacterial community composition.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, Gangavarapu; Shen, Ju-Pei; Liu, Yu-Rong; Archana, Gattupalli; Zhang, Li-Mei

    2016-02-01

    Although numerous studies have addressed the influence of exogenous pollutants on microorganisms, the effect of long-term industrial waste effluent (IWE) pollution on the activity and diversity of soil bacteria was still unclear. Three soil samples characterized as uncontaminated (R1), moderately contaminated (R2), and highly contaminated (R3) receiving mixed organic and heavy metal pollutants for more than 20 years through IWE were collected along the Mahi River basin, Gujarat, western India. Basal soil respiration and in situ enzyme activities indicated an apparent deleterious effect of IWE on microbial activity and soil function. Community composition profiling of soil bacteria using 16S rRNA gene amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method indicated an apparent bacterial community shift in the IWE-affected soils. Cloning and sequencing of DGGE bands revealed that the dominated bacterial phyla in polluted soil were affiliated with Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria, indicating that these bacterial phyla may have a high tolerance to pollutants. We suggested that specific bacterial phyla along with soil enzyme activities could be used as relevant biological indicators for long-term pollution assessment on soil quality. Graphical Abstract Bacterial community profiling and soil enzyme activities in long-term industrial waste effluent polluted soils. PMID:26803661

  4. Novel approaches to mid-long term weather and climate forecast based on the solar-geomagnetic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Sergey; Baranova, Lubov

    Two possibilities are discussed concerning the use of data on solar-geomagnetic activity for meteorological forecasting (cloudiness, temperature and precipitation). The first possibility is consideration of quasicyclic recurrence of large solar flares and geomagnetic storms with periods of 2 - 5 years. For the periods shorter than one year the second possibility is taking into account: the negative correlation of total global cloud cover with the number of solar spots and positive correlation with the total solar irradiance (TSI) - the contribution of short wave radiation of faculae fields. To justify the mechanism of solar-tropospheric links, it is obviously necessary to provide explanation for the observed dependence of weather and climate on usual cyclic activity of the Sun. Meteorologists and even geophysicists have found no significant correlation between atmospheric parameters and either number of solar spots or variations of solar constant. It was found that temperature did not display any variability with the 11-year period (the basic solar cycle). Instead stable quasi-periodic variations of temperature of air within 2 - 5.5 years and also for the precipitation periods in the interval 2 to 6 years were observed. Each 11-year cycle displays two maxima for the probability of solar X-ray and extreme UV flares and for probability of medium and strong geomagnetic storms (2 to 4 years for the flares and 2 to 6 years for significant magnetic storms), and those induced by solar flares, the latter, as a rule, between the maximum points of the number of geomagnetic storms. On a timescale of about a year or shorter, a correlation is revealed between the occurrence of the total cloudiness and the sunspot and faculae activity (number of solar spots and the value of the solar constant - TSI). From the number of sunspots and the data concerning faculae fields, on the basis of the known statistics for the lifetime of these formation in the solar photosphere, it is possible

  5. Inflammatory activation following interruption of long-term cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Rubaj, Andrzej; Ruciński, Piotr; Oleszczak, Krzysztof; Trojnar, Michał K; Wójcik, Maciej; Wysokiński, Andrzej; Kutarski, Andrzej

    2013-09-01

    Previous observations suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) may exert an anti-inflammatory effect. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of temporary interruption of long-term CRT on plasma concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). The study group consisted of 54 patients (32 male and 22 female, mean age 64 years) with chronic heart failure (HF) treated with CRT. BNP, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and neopterin were measured three times: after 26-28 weeks of continuous CRT (CRT-on), 48 h after its cessation (CRT-off), and 48 h after switching the CRT-on again. CRT interruption resulted in a significant worsening of left ventricular systolic function: reduction of cardiac output (CO), dP/dt, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as deterioration of mitral regurgitation in the CRT responder group. A significant increase in serum concentrations of hs-CRP, neopterin, IL-6, and BNP was noted in this subpopulation. In CRT nonresponders, no significant changes were observed. In responders the changes in serum concentrations of hs-CRP, IL-6, neopterin, and BNP, following CRT interruption, significantly correlated with the respective changes in thoracic fluid content (TFC) and inversely correlated with LVEF changes. Even short (48 h) interruption of long-term CRT led to a significant increase of proinflammatory cytokines and BNP concentrations in responders. The changes in hs-CRP, IL-6, neopterin, and BNP concentrations correlated with the change in TFC-marker of pulmonary congestion and inversely correlated with the change in LVEF. PMID:23242167

  6. Surface electromagnetic impedance and geomagnetic activity: results of long term observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemperger, István; Menvielle, Menvielle; Wesztergom, Viktor; Bencze, Pál; Szendrői, Judit; Novák, Attila; Kis, Árpád; Szalai, Sándor

    2014-05-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method is one of the most useful geophysical tool to discover even the deep subsurface structures. The target function of the MT data processing is the surface electromagnetic (EM) impedance. In case of practical MT exploration the surface EM impedance is computed based on a simplification related to the nature of the ionospheric source of the surface EM signals. Assuming that the ionospheric current systems result in homogeneous surface electromagnetic variations, the uncertainty of the computed surface electromagnetic impedance tensor depends only the duration of the EM observation. However the surface EM field can only be approached by plane waves in certain time periods and besides given uncertainty. The EM impedance may be sensitive to magnetospheric and -indirectly- interplanetary circumstances and solar activity. Four years continuous observation of telluric and surface geomagnetic components allowed to perform a representative survey to discover if geomagnetic activity has any effect on observed EM impedance tensor. Geomagnetic indices (Dst, ULF-index, ASY-H, SYM-H) have been used to classify dates according to geomagnetic activity. Processing to estimate the mean surface EM impedance tensor has been performed in each dataset, each class separately. The sensitivity and the characteristics of the answer of the EM impedance tensor to the geomagnetic disturbances seems to be definite. This presentation aims to briefly summarize the preliminary results of our study based on the unique dataset of the Széchenyi István Geophysical Obsevatory (Intermagnet code:NCK). In addition, pointing out the limitations of the routine way of practical MT data processing and interpretation is an important duty of this study. This study was supported by the TAMOP-4.2.2.C-11/1/KONV-2012-0015 (Earth-system) project sponsored by the EU and European Social Foundation.

  7. Long-term orbital lifetime predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreher, P. E.; Lyons, A. T.

    1990-10-01

    Long-term orbital lifetime predictions are analyzed. Predictions were made for three satellites: the Solar Max Mission (SMM), the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), and the Pegasus Boiler Plate (BP). A technique is discussed for determining an appropriate ballistic coefficient to use in the lifetime prediction. The orbital decay rate should be monitored regularly. Ballistic coefficient updates should be done whenever there is a significant change in the actual decay rate or in the solar activity prediction.

  8. Long-term magnetic activity of a sample of M-dwarf stars from the HARPS program. I. Comparison of activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes da Silva, J.; Santos, N. C.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Udry, S.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The search for extra-solar planets similar to Earth is becoming a reality, but as the level of the measured radial-velocity reaches the sub-m s-1, stellar intrinsic sources of noise capable of hiding the signal of these planets from scrutiny become more important. Aims: Other stars are known to have magnetic cycles similar to that of the Sun. The relationship between these activity variations and the observed radial-velocity is still not satisfactorily understood. Following our previous work, which studied the correlation between activity cycles and long-term velocity variations for K dwarfs, we now expand it to the lower end of the main sequence. In this first paper our aim is to assess the long-term activity variations in the low end of the main sequence, having in mind a planetary search perspective. Methods: We used a sample of 30 M0-M5.5 stars from the HARPS M-dwarf planet search program with a median timespan of observations of 5.2 years. We computed chromospheric activity indicators based on the Ca ii H and K, Hα, He i D3, and Na i D1 and D2 lines. All data were binned to average out undesired effects such as rotationally modulated atmospheric inhomogeneities. We searched for long-term variability of each index and determined the correlations between them. Results: While the SCa II, Hα, and Na i indices showed significant variability for a fraction of our stellar sample (39%, 33%, and 37%, respectively), only 10% of our stars presented significant variability in the He i index. We therefore conclude that this index is a poor activity indicator at least for this type of stars. Although the Hα shows good correlation with SCa II for the most active stars, the correlation is lost when the activity level decreases. This result appears to indicate that the Ca ii - Hα correlation is dependent on the activity level of the star. The Na i lines correlate very well with the SCa II index for the stars with low activity levels we used, and are thus a good

  9. Addressing solar modulation and long-term uncertainties in scaling secondary cosmic rays for in situ cosmogenic nuclide applications [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Bieber, John W.; Clem, John M.; Duldig, Marc L.; Evenson, Paul; Humble, John E.; Pyle, Roger

    2005-10-01

    Solar modulation affects the secondary cosmic rays responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide (CN) production the most at the high geomagnetic latitudes to which CN production rates are traditionally referenced. While this has long been recognized (e.g., D. Lal, B. Peters, Cosmic ray produced radioactivity on the Earth, in: K. Sitte (Ed.), Handbuch Der Physik XLVI/2, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1967, pp. 551-612 and D. Lal, Theoretically expected variations in the terrestrial cosmic ray production rates of isotopes, in: G.C. Castagnoli (Ed.), Proceedings of the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics 95, Italian Physical Society, Varenna 1988, pp. 216-233), these variations can lead to potentially significant scaling model uncertainties that have not been addressed in detail. These uncertainties include the long-term (millennial-scale) average solar modulation level to which secondary cosmic rays should be referenced, and short-term fluctuations in cosmic ray intensity measurements used to derive published secondary cosmic ray scaling models. We have developed new scaling models for spallogenic nucleons, slow-muon capture and fast-muon interactions that specifically address these uncertainties. Our spallogenic nucleon scaling model, which includes data from portions of 5 solar cycles, explicitly incorporates a measure of solar modulation ( S), and our fast- and slow-muon scaling models (based on more limited data) account for solar modulation effects through increased uncertainties. These models improve on previously published models by better sampling the observed variability in measured cosmic ray intensities as a function of geomagnetic latitude, altitude, and solar activity. Furthermore, placing the spallogenic nucleon data in a consistent time-space framework allows for a more realistic assessment of uncertainties in our model than in earlier ones. We demonstrate here that our models reasonably account for the effects of solar modulation on measured

  10. Spot activity on HD 89546 (FG UMa) from long-term photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdarcan, O.; Evren, S.; Henry, G. W.

    2012-02-01

    We present the analysis of 20 years of time-series BV photometry of the SB1 RS CVn binary HD 89546. The system's yearly mean V brightness, the B-V color index, the photometric period, and the light curve amplitude all show clear cyclic variability with an ≈9-year time scale. We also find some evidence for brightness variability on a time scale longer than the 20-year time span of our observations, perhaps indicating a longer cycle analogous to the solar Gleissberg cycle. We estimate the unspotted V magnitude of HD 89546 to be 7.154m, which is ≈0.2m brighter than the observed maximum brightness. Spot modelling of the system shows that spot temperature variations affect the observed B-V color as well as the V brightness. Two active longitudes are observed, centered around 180° and 360° longitude on the G9 III primary, each covering a longitude range of 120°. Furthermore, two inactive longitude zones are seen spanning only 60° between the two active longitudes. The longitudinal distribution of the spots exhibits no strong cyclic variability but does show rapid jumps of 120° that look like the flip-flop phenomenon. We estimate the differential rotation coefficient of the star as k=0.086 by considering the range of observed photometric period variations and assumed latitudinal spot variations over 45°. Based on data obtained with the Tennessee State University T3 0.4 m APT at Fairborn Observatory, operated by Tennessee State University, and T30 0.3 m telescope of the Ege University Observatory in Izmir.

  11. Long-term evolution of space debris under the J_2 effect, the solar radiation pressure and the solar and lunar perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, Daniel; Petit, Alexis; Lemaître, Anne

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is the development of a model to propagate space debris in the geostationary ring considering the J_2 effect due to the Earth oblateness, the Sun and Moon perturbations, and the solar radiation pressure. We justify the importance of considering the J_2 effect when propagating space debris independently of the ratio A / m for short and long-term propagation. We study the role of the Sun and the Moon in the period and amplitude of the inclination for different values of A / m. Thanks to the Hamiltonian formulation of the problem and the use of Poincaré's variables it is possible to express the evolution of the space debris through a simplified dynamical system. We test and validate our obtained analytical solutions with the numerical ones, computed with a powerful integrator named NIMASTEP. We analyse the improvements obtained when we include the J_2 effect and the third body perturbations by a rigorous comparison with a previous model, which only considers the solar radiation pressure. Finally, we study the effect of the area-to-mass ratio on short and long-term propagation.

  12. Propofol, but not etomidate, increases corticosterone levels and induces long-term alteration in hippocampal synaptic activity in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changqing; Seubert, Christoph N; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Martynyuk, Anatoly E

    2016-04-01

    Animal studies provide strong evidence that general anesthetics (GAs), administered during the early postnatal period, induce long-term cognitive and neurological abnormalities. Because the brain growth spurt in rodents is delayed compared to that in humans, a fundamental question is whether the postnatal human brain is similarly vulnerable. Sevoflurane and propofol, GAs that share positive modulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) function cause marked increase in corticosterone levels and induce long-term developmental alterations in synaptic activity in rodents. If synaptogenesis is affected, investigation of mechanisms of the synaptic effects of GAs is of high interest because synaptogenesis in humans continues for several years after birth. Here, we compared long-term synaptic effects of etomidate with those of propofol. Etomidate and propofol both positively modulate GABAAR activity, but in contrast to propofol, etomidate inhibits the adrenal synthesis of corticosterone. Postnatal day (P) 4, 5, or 6 rats received five injections of etomidate, propofol, or vehicle control during 5h of maternal separation. Endocrine effects of the anesthetics were evaluated by measuring serum levels of corticosterone immediately after anesthesia or maternal separation. The frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were measured at P24-40 and P≥80. Only propofol caused a significant increase in serum corticosterone levels (F(4.26)=17.739, P<0.001). In contrast to increased frequency of mIPSCs in the propofol group (F(4.23)=8.731, p<0.001), mIPSC activity in the etomidate group was not different from that in the vehicle groups. The results of this study together with previously published data suggest that anesthetic-caused increase in corticosterone levels is required for GABAergic GAs to induce synaptic effects in the form of a long-term increase in the frequency of hippocampal m

  13. Synoptic data for solar-terrestrial physics: The U.K. contribution to long-term monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, D. M.; Hewish, A.; Rishbeth, H.; Rycroft, M. J.

    1994-05-01

    In 1989 the Council of the Royal Society of London established a Study Group to investigate the current status and future requirements of solar-terrestrial monitoring in the United Kingdom. This paper summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the U.K. Study Group. The rationale for regular synoptic monitoring of the solar terrestrial environment is reviewed briefly. Instruments used for solar-terrestrial monitoring in U.K.-supported research programs are listed, with special emphasis on research instruments that produce monitoring data. Some important applications of solar-terrestrial monitoring are outlined and criteria are presented for determining the priorities of various monitoring operations. High priority is attached to monitoring operations that are important for: (1) deriving geophysical models and reference systems; (2) calculating the principal solar-geophysical indices; (3) producing long time series of good data, especially at sites of particular geophysical interest; (4) detecting global changes; (5) contributing to real-time forecasts of solar-terrestrial conditions, or to longer-term predictions and planning; and (6) providing background data for other observations and experiments. The existing U.K. programs of solar-terrestrial monitoring make a highly prestigious contribution to national and international scientific activity. Synoptic measurements of the solar-terrestrial environment are crucial for underpinning present and future programs of basic, strategic and applied research. Therefore, a core program of synoptic monitoring must be maintained in the U.K. It is recommended that this core program should be financed centrally through the Research Councils and reviewed quinquennially.

  14. A long-term perspective on anthropogenic activities and management strategies in a prairie wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, J. M.; Hobbs, W.; LaFrancois, T.; Edlund, M.; Theissen, K. M.; Zimmer, K.; Hanson, M.

    2012-12-01

    Multiple stressors to shallow lake/wetland ecosystems have the ability to control the relative stability of alternative states (clear, macrophyte-dominated or turbid, algal dominated). As a consequence, the use of remedial biomanipulations to induce trophic cascades and shift a turbid lake to a clear state is often only a temporary solution. Here we show the instability of short-term manipulations in the shallow Lake Christina (a Class V wetland in the prairie ecoregion of western Minnesota, USA) is governed by the long-term state following a regime shift in the lake. During the modern, managed period of the lake, three top-down manipulations (fish kills) were undertaken inducing temporary (5-10 years) unstable clear-water states. Paleoecological remains of diatoms, along with proxies of primary production (total chlorophyll a and total organic carbon accumulation rate) and trophic state (total P) from sediment records clearly show a single regime shift in the lake during the early 1950s; following this shift, the functioning of the lake ecosystem is dominated by a persistent turbid state. We find that multiple stressors contributed to the regime shift. First, the lake began to eutrophy (from agricultural land use and/or increased waterfowl populations), leading to a dramatic increase in primary production. Soon after, the construction of a dam in 1936 effectively doubled the depth of the lake, compounded by increases in regional humidity; this resulted in an increase in planktivorous and benthivorous fish reducing phytoplankton grazers. These factors further conspired to increase the stability of a turbid regime during the modern managed period, such that switches to a clear-water state were inherently unstable and the lake consistently returned to a turbid state. We conclude that while top-down manipulations have had measurable impacts on the lake state, they have not been effective in providing a return to an ecosystem similar to the stable historical period

  15. Long-Term Spatiotemporal Reconfiguration of Neuronal Activity Revealed by Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging in the Cerebellar Granular Layer.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Daniela; Mapelli, Jonathan; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal organization of long-term synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks demands techniques capable of monitoring changes in synaptic responsiveness over extended multineuronal structures. Among these techniques, voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD imaging) is of particular interest due to its good spatial resolution. However, improvements of the technique are needed in order to overcome limits imposed by its low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we show that VSD imaging can detect long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in acute cerebellar slices. Combined VSD imaging and patch-clamp recordings revealed that the most excited regions were predominantly associated with granule cells (GrCs) generating EPSP-spike complexes, while poorly responding regions were associated with GrCs generating EPSPs only. The correspondence with cellular changes occurring during LTP and LTD was highlighted by a vector representation obtained by combining amplitude with time-to-peak of VSD signals. This showed that LTP occurred in the most excited regions lying in the core of activated areas and increased the number of EPSP-spike complexes, while LTD occurred in the less excited regions lying in the surround. VSD imaging appears to be an efficient tool for investigating how synaptic plasticity contributes to the reorganization of multineuronal activity in neuronal circuits. PMID:26294979

  16. Long-Term Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Long-Term Care What Is Long-Term Care? Long-term care involves a variety of services ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) Most Care Provided at Home Long-term care is provided ...

  17. Montessori-based activities for long-term care residents with advanced dementia: effects on engagement and affect.

    PubMed

    Orsulic-Jeras, S; Judge, K S; Camp, C J

    2000-02-01

    Sixteen residents in long-term care with advanced dementia (14 women; average age = 88) showed significantly more constructive engagement (defined as motor or verbal behaviors in response to an activity), less passive engagement (defined as passively observing an activity), and more pleasure while participating in Montessori-based programming than in regularly scheduled activities programming. Principles of Montessori-based programming, along with examples of such programming, are presented. Implications of the study and methods for expanding the use of Montessori-based dementia programming are discussed. PMID:10750318

  18. SWAP OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-TERM, LARGE-SCALE EVOLUTION OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Berghmans, David; Nicula, Bogdan; Shearer, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV solar telescope on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 spacecraft has been regularly observing the solar corona in a bandpass near 17.4 nm since 2010 February. With a field of view of 54 × 54 arcmin, SWAP provides the widest-field images of the EUV corona available from the perspective of the Earth. By carefully processing and combining multiple SWAP images, it is possible to produce low-noise composites that reveal the structure of the EUV corona to relatively large heights. A particularly important step in this processing was to remove instrumental stray light from the images by determining and deconvolving SWAP's point-spread function from the observations. In this paper, we use the resulting images to conduct the first-ever study of the evolution of the large-scale structure of the corona observed in the EUV over a three year period that includes the complete rise phase of solar cycle 24. Of particular note is the persistence over many solar rotations of bright, diffuse features composed of open magnetic fields that overlie polar crown filaments and extend to large heights above the solar surface. These features appear to be related to coronal fans, which have previously been observed in white-light coronagraph images and, at low heights, in the EUV. We also discuss the evolution of the corona at different heights above the solar surface and the evolution of the corona over the course of the solar cycle by hemisphere.

  19. SWAP Observations of the Long-term, Large-scale Evolution of the Extreme-ultraviolet Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Shearer, Paul; Berghmans, David; Nicula, Bogdan

    2013-11-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV solar telescope on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 spacecraft has been regularly observing the solar corona in a bandpass near 17.4 nm since 2010 February. With a field of view of 54 × 54 arcmin, SWAP provides the widest-field images of the EUV corona available from the perspective of the Earth. By carefully processing and combining multiple SWAP images, it is possible to produce low-noise composites that reveal the structure of the EUV corona to relatively large heights. A particularly important step in this processing was to remove instrumental stray light from the images by determining and deconvolving SWAP's point-spread function from the observations. In this paper, we use the resulting images to conduct the first-ever study of the evolution of the large-scale structure of the corona observed in the EUV over a three year period that includes the complete rise phase of solar cycle 24. Of particular note is the persistence over many solar rotations of bright, diffuse features composed of open magnetic fields that overlie polar crown filaments and extend to large heights above the solar surface. These features appear to be related to coronal fans, which have previously been observed in white-light coronagraph images and, at low heights, in the EUV. We also discuss the evolution of the corona at different heights above the solar surface and the evolution of the corona over the course of the solar cycle by hemisphere.

  20. Long-term Trends in Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength and Solar Wind Structure during the 20th Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Lockwood et al have recently reported an approximately 40% increase in the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at Earth between 1964 and 1996. We argue that this increase does not constitute a secular trend but is largely the consequence of lower than average fields during solar cycle 20 (1964-1976) in comparison with surrounding cycles. For times after 1976 the average IMF strength has actually decreased slightly. Examination of the cosmic ray intensity, an indirect measure of the IMF strength, over the last five solar cycles (19-23) also indicates that cycle averages of the IMF strength have been relatively constant since approximately 1954. We also consider the origin of the well-documented increase in the geomagnetic alphaalpha index that occurred primarily during the first half of the twentieth century. We surmise that the coronal mass ejection (CME) rate for recent solar cycles was approximately twice as high as that for solar cycles 100 years ago. However, this change in the CME rate and the accompanying increase in 27-day recurrent storm activity reported by others are unable to account completely for the increase in alphaalpha. Rather, the CMEs and recurrent high-speed streams at the beginning of the twentieth century must have been embedded in a background of slow solar wind that was less geoeffective (having, for example, lower IMF strength and/or flow speed) than its modern counterpart.

  1. Long-term exercise increases the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in rat adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Petridou, Anatoli; Tsalouhidou, Sofia; Tsalis, George; Schulz, Thorsten; Michna, Horst; Mougios, Vassilis

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of 8 weeks of voluntary wheel running on the gene expression, at the protein level, of 2 enzymes involved in lipogenesis (fatty acid synthase [FAS] and diacylglycerol acyl transferase 1), 2 proteins involved in lipolysis (hormone-sensitive lipase [HSL] and perilipin), and 3 transcription factors mediating the induction of genes involved in lipid metabolism (the alpha, gamma, and delta members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, or PPAR, family) in rat liver, gastrocnemius muscle, epididymal fat, and subcutaneous fat. Proteins were measured through Western blot analysis in the tissues of 11 trained and 14 untrained rats. The trained rats had lower FAS in the liver; higher FAS, HSL, and perilipin in epididymal fat; and higher HSL in subcutaneous fat. In addition, the trained rats had higher total protein concentrations in both fat depots. No significant differences in the liver, muscle, or adipose tissue PPAR contents were found between groups. However, the DNA binding activity of PPARgamma, measured through an enzyme immunoassay-based method, was higher in both fat depots of the trained rats. Our findings suggest that long-term wheel running had significant effects on the concentrations of proteins playing key roles in lipogenesis and lipolysis in rat liver and adipose tissue. These effects may be due to PPAR activation rather than induction, rendering the transcriptional regulation of target genes more economical and flexible. The activation of PPARgamma with exercise may mediate its beneficial effect on insulin sensitivity. PMID:17618946

  2. Activation of synaptic group II metabotropic glutamate receptors induces long-term depression at GABAergic synapses in CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Quan; Liu, Yu-Wei; Shi, Wei; Dinh, Emilie Hoang; Hamlet, William R; Curry, Rebecca J; Lu, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) has been studied extensively at glutamatergic synapses in the CNS. However, much less is known about heterosynaptic long-term plasticity induced by mGluRs at inhibitory synapses. Here we report that pharmacological or synaptic activation of group II mGluRs (mGluR II) induces LTD at GABAergic synapses without affecting the excitatory glutamatergic transmission in neurons of the chicken cochlear nucleus. Coefficient of variation and failure rate analysis suggested that the LTD was expressed presynaptically. The LTD requires presynaptic spike activity, but does not require the activation of NMDA receptors. The classic cAMP-dependent protein kinase A signaling is involved in the transduction pathway. Remarkably, blocking mGluR II increased spontaneous GABA release, indicating the presence of tonic activation of mGluR II by ambient glutamate. Furthermore, synaptically released glutamate induced by electrical stimulations that concurrently activated both the glutamatergic and GABAergic pathways resulted in significant and constant suppression of GABA release at various stimulus frequencies (3.3, 100, and 300 Hz). Strikingly, low-frequency stimulation (1 Hz, 15 min) of the glutamatergic synapses induced heterosynaptic LTD of GABAergic transmission, and the LTD was blocked by mGluR II antagonist, indicating that synaptic activation of mGluR II induced the LTD. This novel form of long-term plasticity in the avian auditory brainstem may play a role in the development as well as in temporal processing in the sound localization circuit. PMID:24089501

  3. Evaluating, Migrating, and Consolidating Databases and Applications for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Rocky Flats Site

    SciTech Connect

    Surovchak, S.; Marutzky, S.; Thompson, B.; Miller, K.; Labonte, E.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is assuming responsibilities for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during fiscal year 2006. During the transition, LM is consolidating databases and applications that support these various functions into a few applications which will streamline future management and retrieval of data. This paper discussed the process of evaluating, migrating, and consolidating these databases and applications for LTS and M activities and provides lessons learned that will benefit future transitions. (authors)

  4. Spatial distribution of HTO activity in unsaturated soil depth in the vicinity of long-term release source

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.; Golubeva, V.; Mavrin, S.

    2015-03-15

    Previous studies reported about a correlation between HTO activity distribution in unsaturated soil layer and atmospheric long-term releases of HTO in the vicinity of Savannah River Site. The Tritium Working Group of BIOMASS Programme has performed a model-model intercomparison study of HTO transport from atmosphere to unsaturated soil and has evaluated HTO activity distribution in the unsaturated soil layer in the vicinity of permanent atmospheric sources. The Tritium Working Group has also reported about such a correlation, however the conclusion was that experimental data sets are needed to confirm this conclusion and also to validate appropriate computer models. (authors)

  5. The development of the MIBBO: A measure of resident preferences for physical activity in long term care settings.

    PubMed

    Kleynen, Melanie; Braun, Susy M; van Vijven, Kim; van Rossum, Erik; Beurskens, Anna J

    2015-01-01

    Offering physical activities matching with the preferences of residents in long-term care facilities could increase compliance and contribute to client-centered care. A measure to investigate meaningful activities by using a photo-interview has been developed ("MIBBO"). In two pilot studies including 133 residents living on different wards in long-term care facilities, feasibility, most chosen activities, and consistency of preferences were investigated. It was possible to conduct the MIBBO on average in 30 min with the majority (86.4%) of residents. The most frequently chosen activities were: gymnastics and orchestra (each 28%), preparing a meal (31%), walking (outside, 33%), watering plants (38%), and feeding pets (40%). In a retest one week after the initial interview 69.4% agreement of chosen activities was seen. The MIBBO seems a promising measure to help health care professionals in identifying residents' preferred activities. Future research should focus on the implementation of the tailored activity plan, incorporating it into the daily routine. PMID:25784078

  6. Fate and toxicity of melamine in activated sludge treatment systems after a long-term sludge adaptation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengnan; Zhang, Yanyan; Sims, Atreyee; Bernards, Matthew; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-05-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen-rich (67% nitrogen by mass) heterocyclic aromatic compound that could significantly increase effluent total nitrogen concentrations. In this study, we investigated the degradation of melamine and its impact on activated sludge operations by employing two common activated sludge processes, namely the Modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) process and the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) process. Melamine was dosed continuously from day 125 in both activated sludge treatment systems at an influent concentration of 3 mg/L for about 100 days. Even after such a long period of sludge adaptation, melamine appeared not to be easily biodegradable. The average melamine removal efficiencies in the CSTR and MLE systems were 14 ± 10% and 20 ± 15%, respectively. There was no significant difference in melamine removal between the two different activated sludge processes. The long-term input of melamine resulted in a decrease in the nitrifying bacterial activities (by 82 ± 8%) and population in both systems. Short-term microtiter assay results also showed that melamine reduced activated sludge growth by 80% when supplied at a concentration of 75.6 mg/L. These results suggest that sludge adaptation plays a minimal role in melamine degradation, as the enzymes responsible for hydrolytic deamination of melamine in activated sludge are not easily induced. The insignificant biodegradation of melamine is also attributed to bacterial growth inhibition under long-term dosing conditions with melamine, resulting in a significant decrease in effluent water quality. PMID:23466035

  7. The calmodulin-binding transcription activator CAMTA1 is required for long-term memory formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M M; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-06-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by calcium/calmodulin signaling in the nucleus. Recent studies have drawn attention to a new family of transcriptional regulators, the so-called calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) proteins. CAMTAs are expressed at particularly high levels in the mouse and human brain, and we reasoned that, as calmodulin-binding transcription factors, CAMTAs may regulate the formation of long-term memory by coupling synaptic activity and calcium/calmodulin signaling to memory-related transcriptional responses. This hypothesis is supported by genetic studies that reported a correlation between Camta gene polymorphisms or mutations and cognitive capability in humans. Here, we show that acute knockdown of CAMTA1, but not CAMTA2, in the hippocampus of adult mice results in impaired performance in two memory tests, contextual fear conditioning and object-place recognition test. Short-term memory and neuronal morphology were not affected by CAMTA knockdown. Gene expression profiling in the hippocampus of control and CAMTA knockdown mice revealed a number of putative CAMTA1 target genes related to synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. Patch clamp recordings in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures provided further evidence for CAMTA1-dependent changes in electrophysiological properties. In summary, our study provides experimental evidence that confirms previous human genetic studies and establishes CAMTA1 as a regulator of long-term memory formation. PMID:27194798

  8. Normal activation of the supplementary motor area in patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing long-term treatment with levodopa.

    PubMed Central

    Rascol, O; Sabatini, U; Chollet, F; Fabre, N; Senard, J M; Montastruc, J L; Celsis, P; Marc-Vergnes, J P; Rascol, A

    1994-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes in cortical motor areas were measured during a movement of the dominant right hand in 15 patients with Parkinson's disease deprived of their usual levodopa treatment, in 11 patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing long-term treatment with levodopa, and in 15 normal volunteers. The supplementary motor areas were significantly activated in the normal subjects and in the patients receiving levodopa but not in the patients deprived of levodopa. The contralateral primary sensory motor area was significantly activated in all three groups. The ipsilateral primary sensory motor cortex was not activated in the normal subjects and the non-treated patients but was in the patients treated with levodopa. It is concluded that the supplementary motor area hypoactivation which is observed in akinetic non-treated patients with Parkinson's disease is not present in patients undergoing long-term treatment with levodopa. This result suggests that (a) levodopa improves the functional activity of supplementary motor areas in Parkinson's disease and (b) there is no pharmacological tolerance to this effect. The ipsilateral primary motor cortex activation observed in the patients treated with levodopa could be related to levodopa-induced abnormal involuntary movements. PMID:8201325

  9. Inhibition of long-term memory formation by anti-ependymin antisera after active shock-avoidance learning in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Piront, M L; Schmidt, R

    1988-02-23

    Ependymins are acidic glycoprotein constituents of goldfish brain cytoplasm and extracellular fluid which are known to participate in biochemical reactions of long-term memory formation. In earlier experiments, anti-ependymin antisera were found to cause amnesia when injected into goldfish brain ventricles after the acquisition of a vestibulomotoric training task. To investigate whether they also inhibit memory consolidation after other learning events the anti-ependymin antisera were injected after an active shock-avoidance learning paradigm, as follows: goldfish were trained in a shuttle-box to cross a barrier in order to avoid electric shocks (unconditioned stimulus) applied shortly after a light signal (conditioned stimulus). Anti-ependymin antisera blocked retention of the learned avoidance when injected 0.5, 4.5 or 24 h after acquisition of the new behavior. They had no effect, however, when injected 72 h after learning. Apparently, long-term memory was already consolidated at this point. Antisera injected 0.5 or 72 h prior to training, also did not influence learning or memory. Thirteen percent of the goldfish fled the light stimulus spontaneously. These fish therefore did not experience the unconditioned stimulus and thus were unable to learn the task. When they were treated with the anti-ependymin antisera and tested 3 days later, the spontaneous escape reaction was not affected (active control group). The ability of anti-ependymin antisera to inhibit memory consolidation and their efficacy after administration at specific time intervals are very similar for the active shock-avoidance learning and for the vestibulomotoric training. We conclude that ependymins are not task-specific, but serve a general function in biochemical reactions essential for long-term memory formation. PMID:3359256

  10. Energetic auroral and polar ion outflow at DE 1 altitudes Magnitude, composition, magnetic activity dependence, and long-term variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, A. W.; Lenchyshyn, L.; Shelley, E. G.; Peterson, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    Data acquired from the Dynamics Explorer I Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer in the period from September 1981 to May 1984 are used to determine the magnitude of the terrestrial ion outflow in the 0.01-17 keV/el range. The data are also employed to investigate the mass composition and topology (local time and invariant latitude distributions) of the ion outflow, as well as the outflow's magnetic activity dependence and long-term variation. The relative importance of auroral versus polar cap upflowing ions as a source of energetic plasma for various parts of the magnetosphere is examined.