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Sample records for longitudinal breathing motion

  1. A free-breathing lung motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tianyu

    Lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer deaths for decades in the United States. Although radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments, side effects from error in delivery of radiation due to organ motion during breathing remain a significant issue. To compensate the breathing motion during the treatment, a free breathing lung motion model, x= x0+αv+betaf, was developed and discussed, where x is the position of a piece of tissue located at reference position x0. α is a parameter which characterizes the motion due to local air filling (motion as a function of tidal volume) and beta is the parameter that accounts for the motion due to the imbalance of dynamical stress distributions during inspiration and exhalation which cause lung motion hysteresis (motion as a function of airflow). The parameters α and beta together provide a quantitative characterization of breathing motion that inherently includes the complex hysteresis interplay. The theoretical foundation of the model was built by investigating the stress distribution inside of a lung and the biomechanical properties of the lung tissues. Accuracy of the model was investigated by using 49 free-breathing patient data sets. Applications of the model in localizing lung cancer, monitoring radiation damage and suppressing artifacts in free-breathing PET images were also discussed. This work supported in part by NIHR01CA096679 and NIHR01CA116712.

  2. Influence of Continuous Table Motion on Patient Breathing Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Richter, Anne; Herrmann, Christian; Ma Lei; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of continuous table motion on patient breathing patterns for compensation of moving targets by a robotic treatment couch. Methods and Materials: Fifteen volunteers were placed on a robotic treatment couch, and the couch was moved on different breathing-correlated and -uncorrelated trajectories. External abdominal breathing motion of the patients was measured using an infrared camera system. The influence of table motion on breathing range and pattern was analyzed. Results: Continuous table motion was tolerated well by all test persons. Volunteers reacted differently to table motion. Four test persons showed no change of breathing range and pattern. Increased irregular breathing was observed in 4 patients; however, irregularity was not correlated with table motion. Only 4 test persons showed an increase in mean breathing amplitude of more than 2mm during motion of the couch. The mean cycle period decreased by more than 1 s for 2 test persons only. No abrupt changes in amplitude or cycle period could be observed. Conclusions: The observed small changes in breathing patterns support the application of motion compensation by a robotic treatment couch.

  3. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  4. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  5. Breathing exercises: influence on breathing patterns and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Danielle S. R.; Mendes, Liliane P. S.; Elmiro, Nathália S.; Velloso, Marcelo; Britto, Raquel R.; Parreira, Verônica F.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms underlying breathing exercises have not been fully elucidated. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of four on breathing exercises (diaphragmatic breathing, inspiratory sighs, sustained maximal inspiration and intercostal exercise) the on breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects. METHOD: Fifteen subjects of both sexes, aged 23±1.5 years old and with normal pulmonary function tests, participated in the study. The subjects were evaluated using the optoelectronic plethysmography system in a supine position with a trunk inclination of 45° during quiet breathing and the breathing exercises. The order of the breathing exercises was randomized. Statistical analysis was performed by the Friedman test and an ANOVA for repeated measures with one factor (breathing exercises), followed by preplanned contrasts and Bonferroni correction. A p<0.005 value was considered significant. RESULTS: All breathing exercises significantly increased the tidal volume of the chest wall (Vcw) and reduced the respiratory rate (RR) in comparison to quiet breathing. The diaphragmatic breathing exercise was responsible for the lowest Vcw, the lowest contribution of the rib cage, and the highest contribution of the abdomen. The sustained maximal inspiration exercise promoted greater reduction in RR compared to the diaphragmatic and intercostal exercises. Inspiratory sighs and intercostal exercises were responsible for the highest values of minute ventilation. Thoracoabdominal asynchrony variables increased significantly during diaphragmatic breathing. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the breathing exercises investigated in this study produced modifications in the breathing pattern (e.g., increase in tidal volume and decrease in RR) as well as in thoracoabdominal motion (e.g., increase in abdominal contribution during diaphragmatic breathing), among others. PMID:25590447

  6. Bunched beam longitudinal instability: Coherent dipole motion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-04-23

    In this paper, the authors present a new formulation for the longitudinal coherent dipole motion, where a quadrature response of the environmental impedance is shown to be the effective longitudinal impedance for the beam instability. The Robinson-Pedersen formulation for the longitudinal dipole motion is also presented, the difference of the two approaches is discussed in the comparison. The results by using the Sacherer integral equation for the coherent dipole motion can generate the same results as by using the other two approaches, except for a scaling difference. The formulation is further generalized to the rigid bunch motion using signal analysis method, where a form factor shows up naturally. Finally, the formulation is applied to solve the coupled bunch instabilities. Examples of the AGS Booster and the AGS coupled bunch instabilities are used to illustrate the applications of the formulation.

  7. Realistic glottal motion and airflow rate during human breathing.

    PubMed

    Scheinherr, Adam; Bailly, Lucie; Boiron, Olivier; Lagier, Aude; Legou, Thierry; Pichelin, Marine; Caillibotte, Georges; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    The glottal geometry is a key factor in the aerosol delivery efficiency for treatment of lung diseases. However, while glottal vibrations were extensively studied during human phonation, the realistic glottal motion during breathing is poorly understood. Therefore, most current studies assume an idealized steady glottis in the context of respiratory dynamics, and thus neglect the flow unsteadiness related to this motion. This is particularly important to assess the aerosol transport mechanisms in upper airways. This article presents a clinical study conducted on 20 volunteers, to examine the realistic glottal motion during several breathing tasks. Nasofibroscopy was used to investigate the glottal geometrical variations simultaneously with accurate airflow rate measurements. In total, 144 breathing sequences of 30s were recorded. Regarding the whole database, two cases of glottal time-variations were found: "static" or "dynamic" ones. Typically, the peak value of glottal area during slow breathing narrowed from 217 ± 54 mm(2) (mean ± STD) during inspiration, to 178 ± 35 mm(2) during expiration. Considering flow unsteadiness, it is shown that the harmonic approximation of the airflow rate underevaluates the inertial effects as compared to realistic patterns, especially at the onset of the breathing cycle. These measurements provide input data to conduct realistic numerical simulations of laryngeal airflow and particle deposition. PMID:26159687

  8. Molecular crowding inhibits intramolecular breathing motions in proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, L.; Rodi, D. J.; Mandava, S.; Minh, D.; Gore, D. B.; Fischetti, R. F.; Biosciences Division; IIT

    2008-01-11

    In aqueous solution some proteins undergo large-scale movements of secondary structures, subunits or domains, referred to as protein 'breathing', that define a native-state ensemble of structures. These fluctuations are sensitive to the nature and concentration of solutes and other proteins and are thereby expected to be different in the crowded interior of a cell than in dilute solution. Here we use a combination of wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and computational modeling to derive a quantitative measure of the spatial scale of conformational fluctuations in a protein solution. Concentration-dependent changes in the observed scattering intensities are consistent with a model of structural fluctuations in which secondary structures undergo rigid-body motions relative to one another. This motion increases with decreasing protein concentration or increasing temperature. Analysis of a set of five structurally and functionally diverse proteins reveals a diversity of kinetic behaviors. Proteins with multiple disulfide bonds exhibit little or no increase in breathing in dilute solutions. The spatial extent of structural fluctuations appears highly dependent on both protein structure and concentration and is universally suppressed at very high protein concentrations.

  9. Van Kampen modes for bunch longitudinal motion

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Conditions for existence, uniqueness and stability of bunch steady states are considered. For the existence uniqueness problem, simple algebraic equations are derived, showing the result both for the action and Hamiltonian domain distributions. For the stability problem, van Kampen theory is used. Emerging of discrete van Kampen modes show either loss of Landau damping, or instability. This method can be applied for an arbitrary impedance, RF shape and beam distribution function Available areas on intensity-emittance plane are shown for resistive wall wake and single harmonic, bunch shortening and bunch lengthening RF configurations. Language of van Kampen modes is a powerful tool for studying beam stability. Its unique efficiency reveals itself in those complicated cases, when the dielectric function cannot be obtained, as it is for the longitudinal bunch motion. Emergence of a discrete mode means either loss of Landau damping or instability. By definition, the discrete modes lie outside the continuous incoherent spectrum, but they still may stay within the bucket. In the last case, the discrete mode would disappear after a tiny portion of resonant particles would be added. However, if the discrete mode lie outside the bucket, the Landau damping cannot be restored by tiny perturbation of the particle distribution; LLD is called radical in that case. For a given bunch emittance and RF voltage, the intensity is limited either by reduction of the bucket acceptance or by (radical) LLD. In this paper, results are presented for longitudinal bunch stability in weak head-tail approximation and resistive wall impedance; three RF configurations are studied: single harmonic, bunch shortening and bunch lengthening. It is shown that every RF configuration may be preferable, depending on the bunch emittance and intensity.

  10. Human comfort response to dominant random motions in longitudinal modes of aircraft motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of random vertical and longitudinal accelerations and pitching velocity passenger ride comfort responses were examined on the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator. Effects of power spectral density shape were studied for motions where the peak was between 0 and 2 Hz. The subjective rating data and the physical motion data obtained are presented without interpretation or detailed analysis. There existed motions in all other degrees of freedom as well as the particular pair of longitudinal airplane motions studied. These unwanted motions, caused by the characteristics of the simulator may have introduced some interactive effects on passenger responses.

  11. The impact of breathing on HRV measurements: implications for the longitudinal follow-up of athletes.

    PubMed

    Saboul, Damien; Pialoux, Vincent; Hautier, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to compare daily variations of heart rate variability (HRV) parameters between controlled breathing (CB) and spontaneous breathing (SB) sessions during a longitudinal follow-up of athletes. HRV measurements were performed daily on 10 healthy male runners for 21 consecutive days. The signals were recorded during two successive randomised 5-minutes sessions. One session was performed in CB and the other in SB. The results showed significant differences between the two respiration methods in the temporal, nonlinear and frequency domains. However, significant correlations were observed between CB and SB (higher than 0.70 for RMSSD and SD1), demonstrating that during a longitudinal follow-up, these markers provide the same HRV variations regardless of breathing pattern. By contrast, independent day-to-day variations were observed with HF and LF/HF frequency markers, indicating no significant relationship between SB and CB data over time. Therefore, we consider that SB and CB may be used for HRV longitudinal follow-ups only for temporal and nonlinear markers. Indeed, the same daily increases and decreases were observed whatever the breathing method employed. Conversely, frequency markers did not provide the same variations between SB and CB and we propose that these indicators are not reliable enough to be used for day-to-day HRV monitoring. PMID:24050471

  12. Dosimetric effect due to the motion during deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoli; Cullip, Tim; Dooley, John; Zagar, Timothy; Jones, Ellen; Chang, Sha; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Lian, Jun; Marks, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer can reduce cardiac exposure and internal motion. We modified our in-house treatment planning system (TPS) to retrospectively analyze breath-hold motion log files to calculate the dosimetric effect of the motion during breath hold. Thirty left-sided supine DIBH breast patients treated using AlignRT were studied. Breath-hold motion was recorded — three translational and three rotational displacements of the treatment surface — the Real Time Deltas (RTD). The corresponding delivered dose was estimated using the beam-on portions of the RTDs. Each motion was used to calculate dose, and the final estimated dose was the equally weighted average of the multiple resultant doses. Ten of thirty patients had internal mammary nodes (IMN) purposefully included in the tangential fields, and we evaluated the percentage of IMN covered by 40 Gy. The planned and delivered heart mean dose, lungs V20 (volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy), percentage of IMN covered by 40 Gy, and IMN mean dose were compared. The averaged mean and standard deviation of the beam-on portions of the absolute RTDs were 0.81 ± 1.29 mm, 0.68 ± 0.85mm, 0.76 ± 0.85 mm, 0.96° ± 0.49°, 0.93° ± 0.43°, and 1.03° ± 0.50°, for vertical, longitudinal, lateral, yaw, roll, and pitch, respectively. The averaged planned and delivered mean heart dose were 99 and 101 cGy. Lungs V20 were 6.59% and 6.74%. IMN 40 Gy coverage was 83% and 77%, and mean IMN dose was 4642 and 4518 cGy. The averaged mean motion during DIBH was smaller than 1 mm and 1°, which reflects the relative reproducibility of the patient breath hold. On average, the mean heart dose and lungs V20 were reasonably close to what have been planned. IMN 40 Gy coverage might be modestly reduced for certain cases. PMID:26219001

  13. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  14. Characterization of free breathing patterns with 5D lung motion model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Tianyu; Lu Wei; Yang Deshan; Mutic, Sasa; Noel, Camille E.; Parikh, Parag J.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the quiet respiration breathing motion model parameters for lung cancer and nonlung cancer patients. Methods: 49 free breathing patient 4DCT image datasets (25 scans, cine mode) were collected with simultaneous quantitative spirometry. A cross-correlation registration technique was employed to track the lung tissue motion between scans. The registration results were applied to a lung motion model: X-vector=X-vector{sub 0}+{alpha}-vector{beta}-vector f, where X-vector is the position of a piece of tissue located at reference position X-vector{sub 0} during a reference breathing phase (zero tidal volume v, zero airflow f). {alpha}-vector is a parameter that characterizes the motion due to air filling (motion as a function of tidal volume v) and {beta}-vector is the parameter that accounts for the motion due to the imbalance of dynamical stress distributions during inspiration and exhalation that causes lung motion hysteresis (motion as a function of airflow f). The parameters {alpha}-vector and {beta}-vector together provide a quantitative characterization of breathing motion that inherently includes the complex hysteresis interplay. The {alpha}-vector and {beta}-vector distributions were examined for each patient to determine overall general patterns and interpatient pattern variations. Results: For 44 patients, the greatest values of |{alpha}-vector| were observed in the inferior and posterior lungs. For the rest of the patients, |{alpha}-vector| reached its maximum in the anterior lung in three patients and the lateral lung in two patients. The hysteresis motion {beta}-vector had greater variability, but for the majority of patients, |{beta}-vector| was largest in the lateral lungs. Conclusions: This is the first report of the three-dimensional breathing motion model parameters for a large cohort of patients. The model has the potential for noninvasively predicting lung motion. The majority of patients exhibited similar |{alpha}-vector| maps

  15. Compensation of skull motion and breathing motion in CT using data-based and image-based metrics, respectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, H.; Rohkohl, C.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel reconstruction for motion correction of non-cardiac organs. With non-cooperative patients or in emergency case, breathing motion or motion of the skull may compromise image quality. Our algorithm is based on the optimization of either motion artefact metrics or data-driven metrics. This approach was successfully applied in cardiac CTA [1]. While motion correction of the coronary vessels requires a local motion model, global motion models are sufficient for organs like the lung or the skull. The parameter vector for the global affine motion is estimated iteratively, using the open source optimization library NLOPT. The image is updated using motion compensated reconstruction in each of the iterations. Evaluation of the metric value, e.g. the image entropy, provides information for the next iteration loop. After reaching the fixed point of the iteration, the final motion parameters are used for a motion-compensated full quality reconstruction. In head imaging the motion model is based on translation and rotation, in thoracic imaging the rotation is replaced by non-isotropic scaling in all three dimensions. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in thoracic imaging by evaluating PET-CT data from free-breathing patients. In neuro imaging, data from stroke patients showing skull tremor were analyzed. It was shown that motion artefacts can be largely reduced and spatial resolution was restored. In head imaging, similar results can be obtained using motion artefact metrics or data-driven metrics. In case of image-based metrics, the entropy of the image proved to be superior. Breathing motion could also be significantly reduced using entropy metric. However, in this case data driven metrics cannot be applied because the line integrals associated to the ROI of the lung have to be computed using the local ROI mechanism [2] It was shown that the lung signal is corrupted by signals originating from the complement of the lung. Thus a meaningful

  16. Deblurring of breathing motion artifacts in thoracic PET images by deconvolution methods

    SciTech Connect

    Naqa, Issam El; Low, Daniel A.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Vicic, Milos; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2006-10-15

    In FDG-PET imaging of thoracic tumors, blurring due to breathing motion often significantly degrades the quality of the observed image, which then obscures the tumor boundary. We demonstrate a deblurring technique that combines patient-specific motion estimates of tissue trajectories with image deconvolution techniques, thereby partially eliminating breathing-motion induced artifacts. Two data sets were used to evaluate the methodology including mobile phantoms and clinical images. The clinical images consist of PET/CT co-registered images of patients diagnosed with lung cancer. A breathing motion model was used to locally estimate the location-dependent tissue location probability function (TLP) due to breathing. The deconvolution process is carried by an expectation-maximization (EM) iterative algorithm using the motion-based TLP. Several methods were used to improve the robustness of the deblurring process by mitigating noise amplification and compensating for motion estimate uncertainties. The mobile phantom study with controlled settings demonstrated significant reduction in underestimation error of concentration in high activity case without significant superiority between the different applied methods. In case of medium activity concentration (moderate noise levels), less improvement was reported (10%-15% reduction in underestimation error relative to 15%-20% reduction in high concentration). Residual denoising using wavelets offered the best performance for this case. In the clinical data case, the image spatial resolution was significantly improved, especially in the direction of greatest motion (cranio-caudal). The EM algorithm converged within 15 and 5 iterations in the large and small tumor cases, respectively. A compromise between a figure-of-merit and entropy minimization was suggested as a stopping criterion. Regularization techniques such as wavelets and Bayesian methods provided further refinement by suppressing noise amplification. Our initial

  17. Motion sickness susceptibility and aerobic fitness: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Cheung, B S; Money, K E; Jacobs, I

    1990-03-01

    A longitudinal study evaluated the susceptibility to motion sickness in initially unfit subjects before and after an endurance training program. Motion stimulation was provided by the Precision Angular Mover, in which the subject was tumbled head over heels about an Earth-horizontal axis at 20 cycles per minute in darkness. Maximal aerobic power and the blood lactate response to submaximal exercise were evaluated with cycle ergometry. The training program caused significant improvements in VO2max and endurance capacity, and a significant decrease in percent body fat. There was a significant (p less than 0.0125) increase in motion sickness susceptibility after the physical training, suggesting that increased physical fitness caused increased susceptibility to motion sickness in some individuals. PMID:2156490

  18. Effect of Breathing Motion on Radiotherapy Dose Accumulation in the Abdomen Using Deformable Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Eccles, Cynthia L.; Craig, Tim; Sharpe, Michael B.; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of breathing motion and dose accumulation on the planned radiotherapy dose to liver tumors and normal tissues using deformable image registration. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one free-breathing stereotactic liver cancer radiotherapy patients, planned on static exhale computed tomography (CT) for 27-60 Gy in six fractions, were included. A biomechanical model-based deformable image registration algorithm retrospectively deformed each exhale CT to inhale CT. This deformation map was combined with exhale and inhale dose grids from the treatment planning system to accumulate dose over the breathing cycle. Accumulation was also investigated using a simple rigid liver-to-liver registration. Changes to tumor and normal tissue dose were quantified. Results: Relative to static plans, mean dose change (range) after deformable dose accumulation (as % of prescription dose) was -1 (-14 to 8) to minimum tumor, -4 (-15 to 0) to maximum bowel, -4 (-25 to 1) to maximum duodenum, 2 (-1 to 9) to maximum esophagus, -2 (-13 to 4) to maximum stomach, 0 (-3 to 4) to mean liver, and -1 (-5 to 1) and -2 (-7 to 1) to mean left and right kidneys. Compared to deformable registration, rigid modeling had changes up to 8% to minimum tumor and 7% to maximum normal tissues. Conclusion: Deformable registration and dose accumulation revealed potentially significant dose changes to either a tumor or normal tissue in the majority of cases as a result of breathing motion. These changes may not be accurately accounted for with rigid motion.

  19. Impact of aeroelasticity on propulsion and longitudinal flight dynamics of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, David L.; Mcminn, John D.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Wooley, Christine L.

    1993-01-01

    Many air-breathing hypersonic aerospacecraft design concepts incorporate an elongated fuselage forebody acting as the aerodynamic compression surface for a hypersonic combustion module, or scram jet. This highly integrated design approach creates the potential for an unprecedented form of aero-propulsive-elastic interaction in which deflections of the vehicle fuselage give rise to propulsion transients, producing force and moment variations that may adversely impact the rigid body flight dynamics and/or further excite the fuselage bending modes. To investigate the potential for such interactions, a math model was developed which included the longitudinal flight dynamics, propulsion system, and first seven elastic modes of a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle. Perturbation time histories from a simulation incorporating this math model are presented that quantify the propulsive force and moment variations resulting from aeroelastic vehicle deflections. Root locus plots are presented to illustrate the effect of feeding the propulsive perturbations back into the aeroelastic model. A concluding section summarizes the implications of the observed effects for highly integrated hypersonic air-breathing vehicle concepts.

  20. Combined registration and motion correction of longitudinal retinal OCT data

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Al-Louzi, Omar; Bhargava, Pavan; Solomon, Sharon D.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important modality for examination of the eye. To measure layer thicknesses in the retina, automated segmentation algorithms are often used, producing accurate and reliable measurements. However, subtle changes over time are difficult to detect since the magnitude of the change can be very small. Thus, tracking disease progression over short periods of time is difficult. Additionally, unstable eye position and motion alter the consistency of these measurements, even in healthy eyes. Thus, both registration and motion correction are important for processing longitudinal data of a specific patient. In this work, we propose a method to jointly do registration and motion correction. Given two scans of the same patient, we initially extract blood vessel points from a fundus projection image generated on the OCT data and estimate point correspondences. Due to saccadic eye movements during the scan, motion is often very abrupt, producing a sparse set of large displacements between successive B-scan images. Thus, we use lasso regression to estimate the movement of each image. By iterating between this regression and a rigid point-based registration, we are able to simultaneously align and correct the data. With longitudinal data from 39 healthy control subjects, our method improves the registration accuracy by 50% compared to simple alignment to the fovea and 22% when using point-based registration only. We also show improved consistency of repeated total retina thickness measurements. PMID:27231406

  1. Combined registration and motion correction of longitudinal retinal OCT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Al-Louzi, Omar; Bhargava, Pavan; Solomon, Sharon D.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important modality for examination of the eye. To measure layer thicknesses in the retina, automated segmentation algorithms are often used, producing accurate and reliable measurements. However, subtle changes over time are difficult to detect since the magnitude of the change can be very small. Thus, tracking disease progression over short periods of time is difficult. Additionally, unstable eye position and motion alter the consistency of these measurements, even in healthy eyes. Thus, both registration and motion correction are important for processing longitudinal data of a specific patient. In this work, we propose a method to jointly do registration and motion correction. Given two scans of the same patient, we initially extract blood vessel points from a fundus projection image generated on the OCT data and estimate point correspondences. Due to saccadic eye movements during the scan, motion is often very abrupt, producing a sparse set of large displacements between successive B-scan images. Thus, we use lasso regression to estimate the movement of each image. By iterating between this regression and a rigid point-based registration, we are able to simultaneously align and correct the data. With longitudinal data from 39 healthy control subjects, our method improves the registration accuracy by 43% compared to simple alignment to the fovea and 8% when using point-based registration only. We also show improved consistency of repeated total retina thickness measurements.

  2. The effect of the correlation between the contraction of the pelvic floor muscles and diaphragmatic motion during breathing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hankyu; Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effect of the correlation between the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and diaphragmatic motion during breathing. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students who listened to an explanation of the study methods, purpose and agreed to participate in the experiment. [Methods] Radiograph equipment was used to examine diaphragmatic motion with contraction of the PFM during breathing, and a spirometer was used to examine lung vital capacity. [Results] The results revealed a significant change in the diaphragmatic motion and pulmonary function (FEV1, MVV). FEV1 and MVV showed significant differences when the PFM was contracted. Diaphragmatic motion showed a significant difference when the PFM was contracted. [Conclusion] Diaphragmatic motion and contraction of the PFM correlate with breathing. In addition, breathing is much more effective during contraction of the PFM. Therefore, PFM strengthening exercises should be included in respiratory rehabilitation programs. PMID:26311935

  3. Assessing breathing motion by shape matching of lung and diaphragm surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urschler, Martin; Bischof, Horst

    2005-04-01

    Studying complex thorax breating motion is an important research topic for accurate fusion of functional and anatomical data, radiotherapy planning or reduction of breathing motion artifacts. We investigate segmented CT lung, airway and diaphragm surfaces at several different breathing states between Functional Residual and Total Lung Capacity. In general, it is hard to robustly derive corresponding shape features like curvature maxima from lung and diaphragm surfaces since diaphragm and rib cage muscles tend to deform the elastic lung tissue such that e.g. ridges might disappear. A novel registration method based on the shape context approach for shape matching is presented where we extend shape context to 3D surfaces. The shape context approach was reported as a promising method for matching 2D shapes without relying on extracted shape features. We use the point correspondences for a non-rigid thin-plate-spline registration to get deformation fields that describe the movement of lung and diaphragm. Our validation consists of experiments on phantom and real sheep thorax data sets. Phantom experiments make use of shapes that are manipulated with known transformations that simulate breathing behaviour. Real thorax data experiments use a data set showing lungs and diaphragm at 5 distinct breathing states, where we compare subsets of the data sets and qualitatively and quantitatively asses the registration performance by using manually identified corresponding landmarks.

  4. Dual registration of abdominal motion for motility assessment in free-breathing data sets acquired using dynamic MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menys, A.; Hamy, V.; Makanyanga, J.; Hoad, C.; Gowland, P.; Odille, F.; Taylor, S. A.; Atkinson, D.

    2014-08-01

    At present, registration-based quantification of bowel motility from dynamic MRI is limited to breath-hold studies. Here we validate a dual-registration technique robust to respiratory motion for the assessment of small bowel and colonic motility. Small bowel datasets were acquired in breath-hold and free-breathing in 20 healthy individuals. A pre-processing step using an iterative registration of the low rank component of the data was applied to remove respiratory motion from the free breathing data. Motility was then quantified with an existing optic-flow (OF) based registration technique to form a dual-stage approach, termed Dual Registration of Abdominal Motion (DRAM). The benefit of respiratory motion correction was assessed by (1) assessing the fidelity of automatically propagated segmental regions of interest (ROIs) in the small bowel and colon and (2) comparing parametric motility maps to a breath-hold ground truth. DRAM demonstrated an improved ability to propagate ROIs through free-breathing small bowel and colonic motility data, with median error decreased by 90% and 55%, respectively. Comparison between global parametric maps showed high concordance between breath-hold data and free-breathing DRAM. Quantification of segmental and global motility in dynamic MR data is more accurate and robust to respiration when using the DRAM approach.

  5. Longitudinal wave motion in width-constrained auxetic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the longitudinal wave velocity in auxetic plates in comparison to conventional ones, in which the plate is constrained from motion in the width direction. By taking into account the thickness change of the plate and its corresponding change in density, the developed wave velocity is casted not only as a function of Young’s modulus and density, but also in terms of Poisson’s ratio and longitudinal strain. Results show that density and thickness variations compensate for one another when the Poisson’s ratio is positive, but add up when the Poisson’s ratio is negative. Results also reveal that the classical model of longitudinal wave velocity for the plate is accurate when the Poisson’s ratio is about 1/3; at this Poisson’s ratio the influence from density and thickness variations cancel each other. Comparison between the current corrected model and the density-corrected Rayleigh–Lamb model reveals a number of consistent trends, while the discrepancies are elucidated. If the plate material possesses a negative Poisson’s ratio, the deviation of the actual wave velocity from the classical model becomes significant; auxeticity suppresses and enhances the wave velocity in compressive and tensile impacts, respectively. Hence the use of the corrected model is proposed when predicting longitudinal waves in width-constrained auxetic plates, and auxetic materials can be harnessed for effectively controlling wave velocities in thin-walled structures.

  6. Effects of Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Motion in Healthy Subjects Using Cine Breathing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Tsutomu; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Nagaya, Shigeyuki; Sonoda, Masaru; Tanaka, Yuji; Katogi, Takehide; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Minami, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of incentive spirometry on respiratory motion in healthy subjects using cine breathing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Ten non-smoking healthy subjects without any history of respiratory disease were studied. Subjects were asked to perform pulmonary training using incentive spirometry every day for two weeks. To assess the effectiveness of this training, pulmonary function tests and cine breathing MRI were performed before starting pulmonary training and two weeks after its completion. Results After training, there were significant improvements in vital capacity (VC) from 3.58±0.8 L to 3.74±0.8 L and in %VC from 107.4±10.8 to 112.1±8.2. Significant changes were observed in the right diaphragm motion, right chest wall motion, and left chest wall motion, which were increased from 55.7±9.6 mm to 63.4±10.2 mm, from 15.6±6.1 mm to 23.4±10.4 mm, and from 16.3±7.6 mm to 22.0±9.8 mm, respectively. Conclusion Two weeks of training using incentive spirometry provided improvements in pulmonary function and respiratory motion, which suggested that incentive spirometry may be a useful preoperative modality for improving pulmonary function during the perioperative period. PMID:26161341

  7. The impact of breathing motion versus heterogeneity effects in lung cancer treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rosu, Mihaela; Chetty, Indrin J.; Tatro, Daniel S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of tissue heterogeneity and breathing-induced motion/deformation on conformal treatment planning for pulmonary tumors and to compare the magnitude and the clinical importance of changes induced by these effects. Treatment planning scans were acquired at normal exhale/inhale breathing states for fifteen patients. The internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the union of exhale and inhale gross tumor volumes uniformly expanded by 5 mm. Anterior/posterior opposed beams (AP/PA) and three-dimensional (3D)-conformal plans were designed using the unit-density exhale (''static'') dataset. These plans were further used to calculate (a) density-corrected (''heterogeneous'') static dose and (b) heterogeneous cumulative dose, including breathing deformations. The DPM Monte Carlo code was used for dose computations. For larger than coin-sized tumors, relative to unit-density plans, tumor and lung doses increased in the heterogeneity-corrected plans. In comparing cumulative and static plans, larger normal tissue complication probability changes were observed for tumors with larger motion amplitudes and uncompensated breathing-induced hot/cold spots in lung. Accounting for tissue heterogeneity resulted in average increases of 9% and 7% in mean lung dose (MLD) for the 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. Breathing-induced effects resulted in approximately 1% and 2% average decreases in MLD from the static value, for the 6 and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. The magnitude of these effects was not found to correlate with the treatment plan technique, i.e., AP/PA versus 3D-CRT. Given a properly designed ITV, tissue heterogeneity effects are likely to have a larger clinical significance on tumor and normal lung treatment evaluation metrics than four-dimensional respiratory-induced changes.

  8. Breathing Techniques Affect Female but Not Male Hip Flexion Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Alan R; Beck, Katie L; Kaulbach, Jillian; Kenny, Megan; Basset, Fabien A; DiSanto, Mario C; Behm, David G

    2015-11-01

    Two protocols were undertaken to help clarify the effects of breathing techniques on hamstrings (hip flexion) range of motion (ROM). The protocols examined effects of breathing conditions on ROM and trunk muscle activity. Protocol 1: Thirty recreationally active participants (15 male, 15 female, 20-25 years) were monitored for changes in single-leg raise (SLR) ROM with 7 breathing conditions before or during a passive supine SLR stretch. Breathing conditions included prestretch inhale, prestretch exhale, inhale-during stretch, exhale-during stretch, neutral, hyperventilation, and hypoventilation before stretch. Protocol 2: Eighteen recreationally active participants (9 male, 9 female, 20-25 years) were monitored for electromyographic (EMG) activity of the rectus abdominus, external obliques, lower abdominal stabilizers, and lower erector spinae while performing the 7 breathing conditions before or during a passive SLR stretch. Control exhibited less ROM (p = 0.008) than the prestretch inhale (7.7%), inhale-during stretch (10.9%), and hypoventilation (11.2%) conditions with females. Protocol 3: Greater overall muscle activity in the prestretch exhale condition was found compared with inhale-during stretch (43.1%↓; p = 0.029) and hypoventilation (51.2%↓; p = 0.049) conditions. As the inhale-during stretch and hypoventilation conditions produced the lowest levels of muscle activity for both sexes and the highest ROM for the females, it can be assumed that both mechanical and neural factors affect female SLR ROM. Lesser male ROM might be attributed to anatomical differences such as greater joint stiffness. The breathing techniques may have affected intra-abdominal pressure, trunk muscle cocontractions, and sympathetic neural activity to enhance female ROM. PMID:25944455

  9. In-room breathing motion estimation from limited projection views using a sliding deformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmon, V.; Vandemeulebroucke, J.; Pinho, R.; Vila Oliva, M.; Sarrut, D.; Rit, S.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate in-room breathing motion from a limited number of 2D cone-beam (CB) projection images by registering them to a phase of the 4D planning CT. Methods: Breathing motion was modelled using a piecewise continuous B-spline representation [1], allowing to preserve the sliding along the thoracic wall while limiting the degrees of freedom. The deformed target 3D image was subsequently used to generate Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRR). The Normalized Correlation Coefficient (NCC) between the measured projection images and the DRR was computed in the 2D projection space. However, the partial derivatives of the NCC relative to the transform parameters were backprojected into the 3D space, avoiding the projection of the transform Jacobian matrix which is computationally intractable [2]. Results: The method was quantitatively evaluated on 16 lung cancer patients. 40 CB projection images were simulated using the end-exhale phase of the 4D planning CT and the geometric parameters of a clinical CB protocol. The end-inhale phase was deformed to match these simulated projections. The Target Registration Error (TRE) decreased from 8.8 mm to 2.0 mm while the TRE obtained from the 3D/3D registration of the reconstructed CBCT was significantly worse (2.6 mm), due to view aliasing artefacts. We also provide the motion compensated image reconstructed from a real CB acquisition showing the quality improvement brought by the in-room deformation model compared to the planning motion model. Conclusions: We have developed a 2D/3D deformable registration algorithm that enables in-room breathing motion estimation from cone-beam projection images.

  10. Analysis of free breathing motion using artifact reduced 4D CT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, Rene; Frenzel, Thorsten; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Handels, Heinz

    2007-03-01

    The mobility of lung tumors during the respiratory cycle is a source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning. Spatiotemporal CT data sets can be used for studying the motion of lung tumors and inner organs during the breathing cycle. We present methods for the analysis of respiratory motion using 4D CT data in high temporal resolution. An optical flow based reconstruction method was used to generate artifact-reduced 4D CT data sets of lung cancer patients. The reconstructed 4D CT data sets were segmented and the respiratory motion of tumors and inner organs was analyzed. A non-linear registration algorithm is used to calculate the velocity field between consecutive time frames of the 4D data. The resulting velocity field is used to analyze trajectories of landmarks and surface points. By this technique, the maximum displacement of any surface point is calculated, and regions with large respiratory motion are marked. To describe the tumor mobility the motion of the lung tumor center in three orthogonal directions is displayed. Estimated 3D appearance probabilities visualize the movement of the tumor during the respiratory cycle in one static image. Furthermore, correlations between trajectories of the skin surface and the trajectory of the tumor center are determined and skin regions are identified which are suitable for prediction of the internal tumor motion. The results of the motion analysis indicate that the described methods are suitable to gain insight into the spatiotemporal behavior of anatomical and pathological structures during the respiratory cycle.

  11. Quantifying the effect of respiratory motion on lung tumour dosimetry with the aid of a breathing phantom with deforming lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nioutsikou, Elena; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.; Bedford, James L.; Webb, Steve

    2006-07-01

    The contribution of organ and tumour motion to the degradation of planned dose distributions during radiotherapy to the breathing lung has been experimentally investigated and quantified. An anthropomorphic, tissue-equivalent breathing phantom with deformable lungs has been built, in which the lung tumour can be driven in any arbitrary 3D trajectory. The trajectory is programmed into a motion controller connected to a high-precision moving platform that is connected to the tumour. The motion controller is connected to the accelerator's dose counter and the speed of motion is scaled to the dose rate. This ensures consistent delivery despite variation in either the dose rate or inter-segment timing. For this study, the phantom was made to breathe by a set of periodic equations representing respiratory motion by an asymmetric, trigonometric function. Several motion amplitudes were selected to be applied in the primary axis of motion. Five three-dimensional, geometrically conformal (3DCRT) fractions with different starting phases (spaced uniformly in the breathing cycle) were delivered to the phantom and compared to a delivery where the phantom was static at the end-expiration position. A set of intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans (IMRT) was subsequently delivered in the same manner. Bigger amplitudes of motion resulted in a higher degree of dose blurring. Severe underdosages were observed when deliberately selecting the PTV wrongly, their extent being correlated with the degree of margin error. IMRT motion-averaged dose distributions exhibited areas of high dose in the gross tumour volume (GTV) which were not present in the static irradiations, arising from booster segments that the optimizer was creating to achieve planning target volume (PTV) homogeneity during the inverse-planning process. 3DCRT, on the other hand, did not demonstrate such effects. It has been concluded that care should be taken to control the delivered fluence when delivering IMRT to the

  12. Breathing motion compensated reconstruction for C-arm cone beam CT imaging: initial experience based on animal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, D.; Lin, M.; Rao, P. P.; Loffroy, R.; Liapi, E.; Noordhoek, N.; Eshuis, P.; Radaelli, A.; Grass, M.; Geschwind, J.-F. H.

    2012-03-01

    C-arm based tomographic 3D imaging is applied in an increasing number of minimal invasive procedures. Due to the limited acquisition speed for a complete projection data set required for tomographic reconstruction, breathing motion is a potential source of artifacts. This is the case for patients who cannot comply breathing commands (e.g. due to anesthesia). Intra-scan motion estimation and compensation is required. Here, a scheme for projection based local breathing motion estimation is combined with an anatomy adapted interpolation strategy and subsequent motion compensated filtered back projection. The breathing motion vector is measured as a displacement vector on the projections of a tomographic short scan acquisition using the diaphragm as a landmark. Scaling of the displacement to the acquisition iso-center and anatomy adapted volumetric motion vector field interpolation delivers a 3D motion vector per voxel. Motion compensated filtered back projection incorporates this motion vector field in the image reconstruction process. This approach is applied in animal experiments on a flat panel C-arm system delivering improved image quality (lower artifact levels, improved tumor delineation) in 3D liver tumor imaging.

  13. Tracking 'differential organ motion' with a 'breathing' multileaf collimator: magnitude of problem assessed using 4D CT data and a motion-compensation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, J. R.; Webb, S.; McQuaid, D.; Binnie, D. M.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2007-08-01

    Intrafraction tumour (e.g. lung) motion due to breathing can, in principle, be compensated for by applying identical breathing motions to the leaves of a multileaf collimator (MLC) as intensity-modulated radiation therapy is delivered by the dynamic MLC (DMLC) technique. A difficulty arising, however, is that irradiated voxels, which are in line with a bixel at one breathing phase (at which the treatment plan has been made), may move such that they cease to be in line with that breathing bixel at another phase. This is the phenomenon of differential voxel motion and existing tracking solutions have ignored this very real problem. There is absolutely no tracking solution to the problem of compensating for differential voxel motion. However, there is a strategy that can be applied in which the leaf breathing is determined to minimize the geometrical mismatch in a least-squares sense in irradiating differentially-moving voxels. A 1D formulation in very restricted circumstances is already in the literature and has been applied to some model breathing situations which can be studied analytically. These are, however, highly artificial. This paper presents the general 2D formulation of the problem including allowing different importance factors to be applied to planning target volume and organ at risk (or most generally) each voxel. The strategy also extends the literature strategy to the situation where the number of voxels connecting to a bixel is a variable. Additionally the phenomenon of 'cross-leaf-track/channel' voxel motion is formally addressed. The general equations are presented and analytic results are given for some 1D, artificially contrived, motions based on the Lujan equations of breathing motion. Further to this, 3D clinical voxel motion data have been extracted from 4D CT measurements to both assess the magnitude of the problem of 2D motion perpendicular to the beam-delivery axis in clinical practice and also to find the 2D optimum breathing-leaf strategy

  14. SU-E-J-234: Application of a Breathing Motion Model to ViewRay Cine MR Images

    SciTech Connect

    O’Connell, D. P.; Thomas, D. H.; Dou, T. H.; Lamb, J. M.; Yang, L.; Low, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A respiratory motion model previously used to generate breathing-gated CT images was used with cine MR images. Accuracy and predictive ability of the in-plane models were evaluated. Methods: Sagittalplane cine MR images of a patient undergoing treatment on a ViewRay MRI/radiotherapy system were acquired before and during treatment. Images were acquired at 4 frames/second with 3.5 × 3.5 mm resolution and a slice thickness of 5 mm. The first cine frame was deformably registered to following frames. Superior/inferior component of the tumor centroid position was used as a breathing surrogate. Deformation vectors and surrogate measurements were used to determine motion model parameters. Model error was evaluated and subsequent treatment cines were predicted from breathing surrogate data. A simulated CT cine was created by generating breathing-gated volumetric images at 0.25 second intervals along the measured breathing trace, selecting a sagittal slice and downsampling to the resolution of the MR cines. A motion model was built using the first half of the simulated cine data. Model accuracy and error in predicting the remaining frames of the cine were evaluated. Results: Mean difference between model predicted and deformably registered lung tissue positions for the 28 second preview MR cine acquired before treatment was 0.81 +/− 0.30 mm. The model was used to predict two minutes of the subsequent treatment cine with a mean accuracy of 1.59 +/− 0.63 mm. Conclusion: Inplane motion models were built using MR cine images and evaluated for accuracy and ability to predict future respiratory motion from breathing surrogate measurements. Examination of long term predictive ability is ongoing. The technique was applied to simulated CT cines for further validation, and the authors are currently investigating use of in-plane models to update pre-existing volumetric motion models used for generation of breathing-gated CT planning images.

  15. Composite Piezoelectric Rubber Band for Energy Harvesting from Breathing and Limb Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jhih-Jhe; Su, Huan-Jan; Hsu, Chang-I.; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-01

    We have successfully demonstrated the design and microfabrication of piezoelectric rubber bands and their application in energy harvesting from human motions. Composite polymeric and metallic microstructures with embedded bipolar charges are employed to realize the desired stretchability and electromechanical sensitivity. In the prototype demonstration, multilayer PDMS cellular structures coated with PTFE films and stretchable gold electrodes are fabricated and implanted with bipolar charges. The composite structures show elasticity of 300~600 kPa and extreme piezoelectricity of d33 >2000 pC/N and d31 >200 pC/N. For a working volume of 2.5cm×2.5cm×0.3mm, 10% (or 2.5mm) stretch results in effective d31 of >17000 pC/N. It is estimated that electric charge of >0.2 μC can be collected and stored per breath (or 2.5cm deformation). As such, the composite piezoelectric rubber bands (with spring constants of ~200 N/m) can be mounted on elastic waistbands to harvest the circumferential stretch during breathing, or on pads around joints to harvest the elongation during limb motion. Furthermore, the wearable piezoelectric structures can be spread, stacked and connected to charge energy storages and power micro devices.

  16. Respiratory motion compensation algorithm of ultrasound hepatic perfusion data acquired in free-breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kaizhi; Zhang, Xuming; Chen, Guangxie; Weng, Fei; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-10-01

    Images acquired in free breathing using contrast enhanced ultrasound exhibit a periodic motion that needs to be compensated for if a further accurate quantification of the hepatic perfusion analysis is to be executed. In this work, we present an algorithm to compensate the respiratory motion by effectively combining the PCA (Principal Component Analysis) method and block matching method. The respiratory kinetics of the ultrasound hepatic perfusion image sequences was firstly extracted using the PCA method. Then, the optimal phase of the obtained respiratory kinetics was detected after normalizing the motion amplitude and determining the image subsequences of the original image sequences. The image subsequences were registered by the block matching method using cross-correlation as the similarity. Finally, the motion-compensated contrast images can be acquired by using the position mapping and the algorithm was evaluated by comparing the TICs extracted from the original image sequences and compensated image subsequences. Quantitative comparisons demonstrated that the average fitting error estimated of ROIs (region of interest) was reduced from 10.9278 +/- 6.2756 to 5.1644 +/- 3.3431 after compensating.

  17. Tumor Tracking Method Based on a Deformable 4D CT Breathing Motion Model Driven by an External Surface Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Fassi, Aurora; Schaerer, Joël; Fernandes, Mathieu; Riboldi, Marco; Sarrut, David; Baroni, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a tumor tracking method based on a surrogate-driven motion model, which provides noninvasive dynamic localization of extracranial targets for the compensation of respiration-induced intrafraction motion in high-precision radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, derived a priori from 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (CT) images. Model parameters (respiratory baseline, amplitude, and phase) are retrieved and updated at each treatment fraction according to in-room radiography acquisition and optical surface imaging. The baseline parameter is adapted to the interfraction variations obtained from the daily cone beam (CB) CT scan. The respiratory amplitude and phase are extracted from an external breathing surrogate, estimated from the displacement of the patient thoracoabdominal surface, acquired with a noninvasive surface imaging device. The developed method was tested on a database of 7 lung cancer patients, including the synchronized information on internal and external respiratory motion during a CBCT scan. Results: About 30 seconds of simultaneous acquisition of CBCT and optical surface images were analyzed for each patient. The tumor trajectories identified in CBCT projections were used as reference and compared with the target trajectories estimated from surface displacement with the a priori motion model. The resulting absolute differences between the reference and estimated tumor motion along the 2 image dimensions ranged between 0.7 and 2.4 mm; the measured phase shifts did not exceed 7% of the breathing cycle length. Conclusions: We investigated a tumor tracking method that integrates breathing motion information provided by the 4-dimensional planning CT with surface imaging at the time of treatment, representing an alternative approach to point-based external–internal correlation models. Although an in-room radiograph-based assessment of the

  18. Reconstruction of 4D-CT data sets acquired during free breathing for the analysis of respiratory motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, Rene; Frenzel, Thorsten; Säring, Dennis; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Handels, Heinz

    2006-03-01

    Respiratory motion is a significant source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning. 4D-CT data sets can be useful to measure the impact of organ motion caused by breathing. But modern CT scanners can only scan a limited region of the body simultaneously and patients have to be scanned in segments consisting of multiple slices. For studying free breathing motion multislice CT scans can be collected simultaneously with digital spirometry over several breathing cycles. The 4D data set is assembled by sorting the free breathing multislice CT scans according to the couch position and the tidal volume. But artifacts can occur because there are no data segments for exactly the same tidal volume and all couch positions. We present an optical flow based method for the reconstruction of 4D-CT data sets from multislice CT scans, which are collected simultaneously with digital spirometry. The optical flow between the scans is estimated by a non-linear registration method. The calculated velocity field is used to reconstruct a 4D-CT data set by interpolating data at user-defined tidal volumes. By this technique, artifacts can be reduced significantly. The reconstructed 4D-CT data sets are used for studying inner organ motion during the respiratory cycle. The procedures described were applied to reconstruct 4D-CT data sets for four tumour patients who have been scanned during free breathing. The reconstructed 4D data sets were used to quantify organ displacements and to visualize the abdominothoracic organ motion.

  19. Fast-starting after a breath: air-breathing motions are kinematically similar to escape responses in the catfish Hoplosternum littorale.

    PubMed

    Domenici, Paolo; Norin, Tommy; Bushnell, Peter G; Johansen, Jacob L; Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Svendsen, Morten B S; Steffensen, John F; Abe, Augusto S

    2014-01-01

    Fast-starts are brief accelerations commonly observed in fish within the context of predator-prey interactions. In typical C-start escape responses, fish react to a threatening stimulus by bending their body into a C-shape during the first muscle contraction (i.e. stage 1) which provides a sudden acceleration away from the stimulus. Recently, similar C-starts have been recorded in fish aiming at a prey. Little is known about C-starts outside the context of predator-prey interactions, though recent work has shown that escape response can also be induced by high temperature. Here, we test the hypothesis that air-breathing fish may use C-starts in the context of gulping air at the surface. Hoplosternum littorale is an air-breathing freshwater catfish found in South America. Field video observations reveal that their air-breathing behaviour consists of air-gulping at the surface, followed by a fast turn which re-directs the fish towards the bottom. Using high-speed video in the laboratory, we compared the kinematics of the turn immediately following air-gulping performed by H. littorale in normoxia with those of mechanically-triggered C-start escape responses and with routine (i.e. spontaneous) turns. Our results show that air-breathing events overlap considerably with escape responses with a large stage 1 angle in terms of turning rates, distance covered and the relationship between these rates. Therefore, these two behaviours can be considered kinematically comparable, suggesting that air-breathing in this species is followed by escape-like C-start motions, presumably to minimise time at the surface and exposure to avian predators. These findings show that C-starts can occur in a variety of contexts in which fish may need to get away from areas of potential danger. PMID:25527644

  20. Impact of manakin motion on particle transport in the breathing zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current experimental investigation is focused on particle measurements using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) in the breathing zone of a seated, breathing, thermal manikin under stationary and rotational conditions. Particle size, concentration, flux, and velocity data were co...

  1. Respiratory motion guided four dimensional cone beam computed tomography: encompassing irregular breathing.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J

    2014-02-01

    Four dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) images suffer from angular under sampling and bunching of projections due to a lack of feedback between the respiratory signal and the acquisition system. To address this problem, respiratory motion guided 4DCBCT (RMG-4DCBCT) regulates the gantry velocity and projection time interval, in response to the patient's respiratory signal, with the aim of acquiring evenly spaced projections in a number of phase or displacement bins during the respiratory cycle. Our previous study of RMG-4DCBCT was limited to sinusoidal breathing traces. Here we expand on that work to provide a practical algorithm for the case of real patient breathing data. We give a complete description of RMG-4DCBCT including full details on how to implement the algorithms to determine when to move the gantry and when to acquire projections in response to the patient's respiratory signal. We simulate a realistic working RMG-4DCBCT system using 112 breathing traces from 24 lung cancer patients. Acquisition used phase-based binning and parameter settings typically used on commercial 4DCBCT systems (4 min acquisition time, 1200 projections across 10 respiratory bins), with the acceleration and velocity constraints of current generation linear accelerators. We quantified streaking artefacts and image noise for conventional and RMG-4DCBCT methods by reconstructing projection data selected from an oversampled set of Catphan phantom projections. RMG-4DCBCT allows us to optimally trade-off image quality, acquisition time and image dose. For example, for the same image quality and acquisition time as conventional 4DCBCT approximately half the imaging dose is needed. Alternatively, for the same imaging dose, the image quality as measured by the signal to noise ratio, is improved by 63% on average. C-arm cone beam computed tomography systems, with an acceleration up to 200°/s(2), a velocity up to 100°/s and the acquisition of 80 projections per second

  2. SU-E-J-175: Comparison of the Treatment Reproducibility of Tumors Affected by Breathing Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, M; Piotrowski, T; Adamczyk, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the dose distribution simulations was to form a global idea of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) realization, by its comparison to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) delivery for tumors affected by respiratory motion. Methods: In the group of 10patients both 3DCRT and IMRT plans were prepared.For each field the motion kernel was generated with the largest movement amplitude of 4;6 and 8mm.Additionally,the sets of reference measurements were made in no motion conditions(0 mm).The evaluation of plan delivery,using a diode array placed on moving platform,was based on the Gamma Index analysis with distance to agreement of 3mm and dose difference of 3%. Results: IMRT plans tended to spare doses delivered to lungs compared to 3DCRT.Nonetheless,analyzed volumes showed no significant difference between the static and dynamic techniques,except for the volumes of both lungs receiving 10 and 15Gy.After adding the components associated with the respiratory movement,all IMRT lung parameters evaluated for the ipsilateral,contralateral and both lungs together,revealed considerable differences between the 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes.Similar results were obtained for the 3DCRT lung measurements,but without significance between the 0vs.6-mm amplitude.Taking into account the CTV score parameter in 3DCRT and IMRT plans,there was no statistically significant difference between the motion patterns with the smallest amplitudes.The differences were found for the 8-mm amplitude when it was compared both with static conditions and 4-mm amplitude (for 3DCRT) and between 0vs.6, 0vs.8 and 4vs.8-mm amplitudes (for IMRT).All accepted and measured 3DCRT and IMRT doses to spinal cord,esophagus and heart were always below the QUANTEC limits. Conclusion: The application of IMRT technique in lung radiotherapy affords possibilities for reducing the lung doses.For maximal amplitudes of breathing trajectory below 4mm,the disagreement between CTV

  3. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  4. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  5. Joint image reconstruction and motion parameter estimation for free-breathing navigator-gated cardiac MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Basha, Tamer A.; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-09-01

    We propose an acquisition and reconstruction technique for accelerated free-breathing cardiac MRI acquisitions. For the acquisition, a random undersampling pattern, including a fully-sampled center of k-space, is generated prospectively. The k-space lines specified by this undersampling pattern is acquired with respiratory navigating (NAV), where only the central k-space lines are acquired within the prespecified gating window. For the outer k-space lines, if the NAV signal corresponding to a k-space segment is outside the gating window, the segment is rejected, but not re-acquired. The reconstruction approach jointly estimates the underlying image using a compressed-sensing based approach, and the translational motion parameters for each segment for the outer k-space segments acquired outside the gating window. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated in healthy adult subjects using whole-heart coronary MRI with a 3-fold accelerated random undersampling pattern. The proposed acquisition and reconstruction technique is compared to parallel imaging with uniform undersampling with 3-fold undersampling. The two techniques exhibit similar image quality with a shorter acquisition time for the proposed approach (4:25+/-0:31 minutes versus 6:52+/-0:19).

  6. Cardiac Motion During Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold: Implications for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Pan Tinsu; Pinnix, Chelsea; Zhang, Sean X.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sun, Tzouh Liang; Gladish, Gregory; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Hoffman, Karen E.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Many patients with left-sided breast cancer receive adjuvant radiotherapy during deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to minimize radiation exposure to the heart. We measured the displacement of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and heart owing to cardiac motion during DIBH, relative to the standard tangential fields for left breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients who had undergone computed tomography-based coronary angiography with retrospective electrocardiographic gating were randomly selected for the present study. The patients underwent scanning during DIBH to control the influence of respiration on cardiac motion. Standard medial and lateral tangential fields were placed, and the LADs were contoured on the systolic- and diastolic-phase computed tomography data sets by the clinicians. Displacement of the LAD during cardiac contractions was calculated in three directions: toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, left-right, and anteroposterior. Displacement of the entire heart was measured on the maximal and minimal intensity projection computed tomography images. Results: The mean displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction without the influence of respiration for 20 patients was 2.3 mm (range, 0.7-3.8) toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, 2.6 mm (range, 1.0-6.8) in the left-right direction, and 2.3 mm (range, 0.6-6.5) in the anteroposterior direction. At least 30% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in any direction in 2 patients (10%), and <10% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in 10 patients (50%). The extent of displacement of the heart periphery during cardiac motion was negligible near the treatment fields. Conclusions: Displacement of the heart periphery near the treatment fields was negligible during DIBH; however, displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction varied substantially between and within patients. We recommend maintaining {>=}5 mm of distance between

  7. Initial stage of motion in the Lavrent'ev-Ishlinskii problem on longitudinal shock on a rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, N. F.; Belyaev, A. K.; Tovstik, P. E.; Tovstik, T. P.

    2015-11-01

    The transverse motion of a thin rod under a sudden application of a prolonged longitudinal load at the initial stage of motion is considered. The introduction of self-similar variables makes it possible to propose a description of the transverse motion weakly dependent on the longitudinal deformation. Both single dents and periodic systems of dents are considered.

  8. Rapid estimation of 4DCT motion-artifact severity based on 1D breathing-surrogate periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Caraveo, Marshall; Wei, Jie; Rimner, Andreas; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Yorke, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Motion artifacts are common in patient four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images, leading to an ill-defined tumor volume with large variations for radiotherapy treatment and a poor foundation with low imaging fidelity for studying respiratory motion. The authors developed a method to estimate 4DCT image quality by establishing a correlation between the severity of motion artifacts in 4DCT images and the periodicity of the corresponding 1D respiratory waveform (1DRW) used for phase binning in 4DCT reconstruction. Methods: Discrete Fourier transformation (DFT) was applied to analyze 1DRW periodicity. The breathing periodicity index (BPI) was defined as the sum of the largest five Fourier coefficients, ranging from 0 to 1. Distortional motion artifacts (excluding blurring) of cine-scan 4DCT at the junctions of adjacent couch positions around the diaphragm were classified in three categories: incomplete, overlapping, and duplicate anatomies. To quantify these artifacts, discontinuity of the diaphragm at the junctions was measured in distance and averaged along six directions in three orthogonal views. Artifacts per junction (APJ) across the entire diaphragm were calculated in each breathing phase and phase-averaged APJ¯, defined as motion-artifact severity (MAS), was obtained for each patient. To make MAS independent of patient-specific motion amplitude, two new MAS quantities were defined: MASD is normalized to the maximum diaphragmatic displacement and MASV is normalized to the mean diaphragmatic velocity (the breathing period was obtained from DFT analysis of 1DRW). Twenty-six patients’ free-breathing 4DCT images and corresponding 1DRW data were studied. Results: Higher APJ values were found around midventilation and full inhalation while the lowest APJ values were around full exhalation. The distribution of MAS is close to Poisson distribution with a mean of 2.2 mm. The BPI among the 26 patients was calculated with a value ranging from 0.25 to

  9. Rapid estimation of 4DCT motion-artifact severity based on 1D breathing-surrogate periodicity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guang Caraveo, Marshall; Wei, Jie; Rimner, Andreas; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Yorke, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Motion artifacts are common in patient four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images, leading to an ill-defined tumor volume with large variations for radiotherapy treatment and a poor foundation with low imaging fidelity for studying respiratory motion. The authors developed a method to estimate 4DCT image quality by establishing a correlation between the severity of motion artifacts in 4DCT images and the periodicity of the corresponding 1D respiratory waveform (1DRW) used for phase binning in 4DCT reconstruction. Methods: Discrete Fourier transformation (DFT) was applied to analyze 1DRW periodicity. The breathing periodicity index (BPI) was defined as the sum of the largest five Fourier coefficients, ranging from 0 to 1. Distortional motion artifacts (excluding blurring) of cine-scan 4DCT at the junctions of adjacent couch positions around the diaphragm were classified in three categories: incomplete, overlapping, and duplicate anatomies. To quantify these artifacts, discontinuity of the diaphragm at the junctions was measured in distance and averaged along six directions in three orthogonal views. Artifacts per junction (APJ) across the entire diaphragm were calculated in each breathing phase and phase-averaged APJ{sup ¯}, defined as motion-artifact severity (MAS), was obtained for each patient. To make MAS independent of patient-specific motion amplitude, two new MAS quantities were defined: MAS{sup D} is normalized to the maximum diaphragmatic displacement and MAS{sup V} is normalized to the mean diaphragmatic velocity (the breathing period was obtained from DFT analysis of 1DRW). Twenty-six patients’ free-breathing 4DCT images and corresponding 1DRW data were studied. Results: Higher APJ values were found around midventilation and full inhalation while the lowest APJ values were around full exhalation. The distribution of MAS is close to Poisson distribution with a mean of 2.2 mm. The BPI among the 26 patients was calculated with a value

  10. Dirhythmic breathing.

    PubMed

    Flemister, G; Goldberg, N B; Sharp, J T

    1981-01-01

    Four patients with severe chronic obstructive lung disease and recent respiratory failure are described in whom two distinct simultaneous respiratory rhythms were identified, one at 8 to 13 breaths per minute and the other at 39 to 65 per minute. Magnetometer measurements of thoracoabdominal motion together with simultaneous electromyograms of multiple inspiratory muscles suggested that both rhythms were the result of coordinated action of several inspiratory muscles. We suggest that this phenomenon, which we have called dirhythmic breathing, results from the conflicting influence upon respiratory centers and motoneurons of two or more stimuli, some favoring rapid shallow breaths and others slow deep breaths. PMID:7449504

  11. Present-day crustal motion along the Longitudinal Valley Fault, eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shui-Beih; Kuo, Long-Chen

    2001-04-01

    The NNE-striking Longitudinal Valley Fault (LVF) in eastern Taiwan is an extremely active high-angle thrust fault. It bounds the Coastal Range and the Longitudinal Valley, which is considered a collision boundary between the Philippine Sea and the Eurasian plates. Repeated GPS data in the Longitudinal Valley area from 1992 to 1999 are utilized to study the spatial variation of crustal motion along the LVF. With respect to Penghu in the Chinese continental margin, velocities for stations on the western side of the LVF (Longitudinal Valley and eastern Central Range) are 18-35 mm/yr in directions 283-311°, whereas those on the eastern side of the LVF, the Coastal Range, are 28-68 mm/yr in directions 303-324°. A major discontinuity of about 30 mm/yr on the rate of crustal motion across the Longitudinal Valley is attributed to the aseismic slip along the LVF as revealed by trilateration data previously. To the south of Fengping, the block motions of the Coastal Range are 31-40 mm/yr in 317-330° relative to the Central Range, while the near-fault motions are 13-33 mm/yr in 309-336°. Various partitions on the left-lateral strike-slip and convergent components along the LVF are found. In the southern Longitudinal Valley crustal motion is mainly accommodated on the LVF and the Luyeh Fault. In contrast, those in the central and northern Longitudinal Valley are partly taken up on the faults to the east of the LVF or result in the elastic deformation of the Coastal Range. The crustal motion in the northern Longitudinal Valley area is likely to be distributed in the several NE-striking thrusts in a horsetail pattern and obliquely cut the northern Coastal Range, with a small portion of fault-slips along the LVF. Data from dense-deployed GPS networks across the LVF can be employed to give better estimates of near-fault motions and delineate the surface traces of the LVF. Repeated GPS and leveling data from two stations on both ends of the Yuli Bridge that are 575 m apart

  12. Motion management within two respiratory-gating windows: feasibility study of dual quasi-breath-hold technique in gated medical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Kim, Siyong; Park, Yang-Kyun; Youn, Kaylin K.; Keall, Paul; Lee, Rena

    2014-11-01

    A dual quasi-breath-hold (DQBH) technique is proposed for respiratory motion management (a hybrid technique combining breathing-guidance with breath-hold task in the middle). The aim of this study is to test a hypothesis that the DQBH biofeedback system improves both the capability of motion management and delivery efficiency. Fifteen healthy human subjects were recruited for two respiratory motion measurements (free breathing and DQBH biofeedback breathing for 15 min). In this study, the DQBH biofeedback system utilized the abdominal position obtained using an real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) to audio-visually guide a human subject for 4 s breath-hold at EOI and 90% EOE (EOE90%) to improve delivery efficiency. We investigated the residual respiratory motion and the delivery efficiency (duty-cycle) of abdominal displacement within the gating window. The improvement of the abdominal motion reproducibility was evaluated in terms of cycle-to-cycle displacement variability, respiratory period and baseline drift. The DQBH biofeedback system improved the abdominal motion management capability compared to that with free breathing. With a phase based gating (mean ± std: 55  ±  5%), the averaged root mean square error (RMSE) of the abdominal displacement in the dual-gating windows decreased from 2.26 mm of free breathing to 1.16 mm of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.007). The averaged RMSE of abdominal displacement over the entire respiratory cycles reduced from 2.23 mm of free breathing to 1.39 mm of DQBH biofeedback breathing in the dual-gating windows (p-value = 0.028). The averaged baseline drift dropped from 0.9 mm min-1 with free breathing to 0.09 mm min-1 with DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.048). The averaged duty-cycle with an 1 mm width of displacement bound increased from 15% of free breathing to 26% of DQBH biofeedback (p-value = 0.003). The study demonstrated that the DQBH biofeedback

  13. Modulational instability and breathing motion in the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a one-dimensional harmonic potential.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Kageyama, Yusuke

    2013-11-01

    Modulational instability and breathing motion are studied in the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation trapped by the one-dimensional harmonic potential. The trapping potential is uniform in the y direction and the wave function is confined in the x direction. A breathing motion appears when the initial condition is close to a stationary solution which is uniform in the y direction. The amplitude of the breathing motion is larger in the two-dimensional system than that in the corresponding one-dimensional system. Coupled equations of the one-dimensional NLS equation and two variational parameters are derived by the variational approximation to understand the amplification of the breathing motion qualitatively. On the other hand, there is a breathing solution in the x direction which is uniform in the y direction to the two-dimensional NLS equation. It is shown that the modulational instability along the y direction is suppressed when the breathing motion is sufficiently strong, even if the norm is above the critical value of the collapse. PMID:24329371

  14. Hamiltonian Analysis of the Particle Motion in an Accelerator with the Longitudinal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Reva, V. B.

    2006-03-20

    The particle motion at a presence of a large magnetic field directed along the particle trajectory demands the special description. This article deals with the decomposition of the Hamiltonian on the two parts: fast and slow motion. The first part describes the fast rotation around the magnetic line of longitudinal field. The second part describes the slow drift of rotation center from one magnetic line to another. The supposed method enables to write the simple Hamiltonian to each motion type and to formulate the matrix formalism for any element of an accelerator device (quadruple, skew- quadruple, drift gap, bend with a filed index). The Hamiltonian decomposition has physical clearness when the longitudinal field is larger than another fields but it is correct for the arbitrary parameters. At the small longitudinal field the coupling term in Hamiltonian between two modes is essential. The dispersion property of fast and slow modes is derived easy from Hamiltonian also. This method expands easily for nonlinear motion of such modes. This results may be used at analyzed the electron motion in the cooling device, the muon motion in the muon ionization cooler or another system with strong solenoidal coupling.

  15. Model-based lasso catheter tracking in monoplane fluoroscopy for 3D breathing motion compensation during EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Rui

    2010-02-01

    Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of the pulmonary veins (PVs) attached to the left atrium (LA) is usually carried out under fluoroscopy guidance. Overlay of detailed anatomical structures via 3-D CT and/or MR volumes onto the fluoroscopy helps visualization and navigation in electrophysiology procedures (EP). Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of static overlay of the volume with fluoroscopy for catheter navigation. In this paper, we propose a B-spline based method for tracking the circumferential catheter (lasso catheter) in monoplane fluoroscopy. The tracked motion can be used for the estimation of the 3-D trajectory of breathing motion and for subsequent motion compensation. A lasso catheter is typically used during EP procedures and is pushed against the ostia of the PVs to be ablated. Hence this method does not require additional instruments, and achieves motion estimation right at the site of ablation. The performance of the proposed tracking algorithm was evaluated on 340 monoplane frames with an average error of 0.68 +/- 0.36 mms. Our contributions in this work are twofold. First and foremost, we show how to design an effective, practical, and workflow-friendly 3-D motion compensation scheme for EP procedures in a monoplane setup. In addition, we develop an efficient and accurate method for model-based tracking of the circumferential lasso catheter in the low-dose EP fluoroscopy.

  16. Dosimetric impact of motion in free-breathing and gated lung radiotherapy: A 4D Monte Carlo study of intrafraction and interfraction effects

    PubMed Central

    Seco, Joao; Sharp, Greg C.; Wu, Ziji; Gierga, David; Buettner, Florian; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if interfraction and intrafraction motion in free-breathing and gated lung IMRT can lead to systematic dose differences between 3DCT and 4DCT. Dosimetric effects were studied considering the breathing pattern of three patients monitored during the course of their treatment and an in-house developed 4D Monte Carlo framework. Imaging data were taken in free-breathing and in cine mode for both 3D and 4D acquisition. Treatment planning for IMRT delivery was done based on the free-breathing data with the corvus (North American Scientific, Chatsworth, CA) planning system. The dose distributions as a function of phase in the breathing cycle were combined using deformable image registration. The study focused on (a) assessing the accuracy of the corvus pencil beam algorithm with Monte Carlo dose calculation in the lung, (b) evaluating the dosimetric effect of motion on the individual breathing phases of the respiratory cycle, and (c) assessing intrafraction and interfraction motion effects during free-breathing or gated radiotherapy. The comparison between (a) the planning system and the Monte Carlo system shows that the pencil beam algorithm underestimates the dose in low-density regions, such as lung tissue, and overestimates the dose in high-density regions, such as bone, by 5% or more of the prescribed dose (corresponding to approximately 3–5 Gy for the cases considered). For the patients studied this could have a significant impact on the dose volume histograms for the target structures depending on the margin added to the clinical target volume (CTV) to produce either the planning target (PTV) or internal target volume (ITV). The dose differences between (b) phases in the breathing cycle and the free-breathing case were shown to be negligible for all phases except for the inhale phase, where an underdosage of the tumor by as much as 9.3 Gy relative to the free-breathing was observed. The large difference was due to

  17. Mid-Ventilation Concept for Mobile Pulmonary Tumors: Internal Tumor Trajectory Versus Selective Reconstruction of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Frames Based on External Breathing Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of direct reconstruction of mid-ventilation and peak-phase four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) frames based on the external breathing signal. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 15 pulmonary targets, a respiration-correlated CT study (4D CT) was acquired for treatment planning. After retrospective time-based sorting of raw projection data and reconstruction of eight CT frames equally distributed over the breathing cycle, mean tumor position (P{sub mean}), mid-ventilation frame, and breathing motion were evaluated based on the internal tumor trajectory. Analysis of the external breathing signal (pressure sensor around abdomen) with amplitude-based sorting of projections was performed for direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases of the breathing cycle. Results: On the basis of the eight 4D CT frames equally spaced in time, tumor motion was largest in the craniocaudal direction, with 12 {+-} 7 mm on average. Tumor motion between the two frames reconstructed at peak phases was not different in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions but was systematically smaller in the left-right direction by 1 mm on average. The 3-dimensional distance between P{sub mean} and the tumor position in the mid-ventilation frame based on the internal tumor trajectory was 1.2 {+-} 1 mm. Reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame at the mean amplitude position of the external breathing signal resulted in tumor positions 2.0 {+-} 1.1 mm distant from P{sub mean}. Breathing-induced motion artifacts in mid-ventilation frames caused negligible changes in tumor volume and shape. Conclusions: Direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases based on the external breathing signal was reliable. This makes the reconstruction of only three 4D CT frames sufficient for application of the mid-ventilation technique in clinical practice.

  18. Quality Assurance Challenges for Motion-Adaptive Radiation Therapy: Gating, Breath Holding, and Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Steve B. Wolfgang, John; Mageras, Gig S.

    2008-05-01

    Compared with conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments, quality assurance (QA) for motion-adaptive radiation therapy involves various challenges because of the added temporal dimension. Here we discuss those challenges for three specific techniques related to motion-adaptive therapy: namely respiratory gating, breath holding, and four-dimensional computed tomography. Similar to the introduction of any other new technologies in clinical practice, typical QA measures should be taken for these techniques also, including initial testing of equipment and clinical procedures, as well as frequent QA examinations during the early stage of implementation. Here, rather than covering every QA aspect in depth, we focus on some major QA challenges. The biggest QA challenge for gating and breath holding is how to ensure treatment accuracy when internal target position is predicted using external surrogates. Recommended QA measures for each component of treatment, including simulation, planning, patient positioning, and treatment delivery and verification, are discussed. For four-dimensional computed tomography, some major QA challenges have also been discussed.

  19. Breathing-Based Meditation Decreases Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in U.S. Military Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    M Seppälä, Emma; B Nitschke, Jack; L Tudorascu, Dana; Hayes, Andrea; R Goldstein, Michael; T H Nguyen, Dong; Perlman, David; J Davidson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Given the limited success of conventional treatments for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), investigations of alternative approaches are warranted. We examined the effects of a breathing-based meditation intervention, Sudarshan Kriya yoga, on PTSD outcome variables in U.S. male veterans of the Iraq or Afghanistan war. We randomly assigned 21 veterans to an active (n = 11) or waitlist control (n = 10) group. Laboratory measures of eye-blink startle and respiration rate were obtained before and after the intervention, as were self-report symptom measures; the latter were also obtained 1 month and 1 year later. The active group showed reductions in PTSD scores, d = 1.16, 95% CI [0.20, 2.04], anxiety symptoms, and respiration rate, but the control group did not. Reductions in startle correlated with reductions in hyperarousal symptoms immediately postintervention (r =. 93, p <. 001) and at 1-year follow-up (r =. 77, p =. 025). This longitudinal intervention study suggests there may be clinical utility for Sudarshan Kriya yoga for PTSD. PMID:25158633

  20. Breathing-based meditation decreases posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in U.S. military veterans: a randomized controlled longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Emma M; Nitschke, Jack B; Tudorascu, Dana L; Hayes, Andrea; Goldstein, Michael R; Nguyen, Dong T H; Perlman, David; Davidson, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    Given the limited success of conventional treatments for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), investigations of alternative approaches are warranted. We examined the effects of a breathing-based meditation intervention, Sudarshan Kriya yoga, on PTSD outcome variables in U.S. male veterans of the Iraq or Afghanistan war. We randomly assigned 21 veterans to an active (n = 11) or waitlist control (n = 10) group. Laboratory measures of eye-blink startle and respiration rate were obtained before and after the intervention, as were self-report symptom measures; the latter were also obtained 1 month and 1 year later. The active group showed reductions in PTSD scores, d = 1.16, 95% CI [0.20, 2.04], anxiety symptoms, and respiration rate, but the control group did not. Reductions in startle correlated with reductions in hyperarousal symptoms immediately postintervention (r = .93, p < .001) and at 1-year follow-up (r = .77, p = .025). This longitudinal intervention study suggests there may be clinical utility for Sudarshan Kriya yoga for PTSD. PMID:25158633

  1. Exhaled breath analysis in childhood rheumatic disorders--a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Hendel, N; Akmatov, M K; Hamel, J; Vogelberg, C; Pessler, F

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO50) and deaerated exhaled breath condensate pH (dEBCpH) as non-invasive markers of subclinical airway inflammation in pediatric patients with rheumatologic disorders. We determined FENO50 and dEBCpH in a prospective study spanning at least 12 months, comprising 85 pediatric patients with rheumatologic disorders, including juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, n  =  63), chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO, n  =  6), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n  =  3), juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM, n  =  1) and other rheumatic disorders (n  =  12). dEBCpH was determined once in a group of children without evidence of rheumatologic or pulmonary disease (controls, n  =  90). Findings were correlated with results of pulmonary function tests. Atopic sensitization was assessed by RAST or skin prick test in 76 patients. Atopic sensitization was detected in 34% (26/76) of patients. Neither FENO50 nor dEBCpH correlated with disease activity, but intermediately (20-35 ppb) or highly elevated (>35 ppb) levels were observed at least once in 26 patients (31%), 19 of whom had atopic sensitization. Median dEBCpH did not differ between cases and controls (8.05 versus 8.02; p  =  0.48). Median dEBCpH decreased slightly over the study period (p  =  0.02), whereas FENO50 values did not change significantly (p  =  0.89). There were several patients with significantly abnormal dEBCpH values that could not be readily explained by diagnosis, higher disease activity, medications, or atopic sensitization. Thus, there were no consistent abnormalities in FENO50 or dEBCpH in this cohort of Caucasian patients with relatively stable rheumatologic disorders, but there were some patients with abnormal values of unknown significance. PMID:27093271

  2. Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?

    SciTech Connect

    Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C.; Bluett, Jaques; Chen, Yi Pei; Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E.; Liao, Zhongxing; Li, Heng; Mohan, Radhe

    2013-11-01

    dosimetric error caused by breathing motion.

  3. The Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy vs. IMRT for Stage III Lung Cancer - Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?

    PubMed Central

    Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C.; Bluett, Jaques; Chen, Yi-Pei; Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E.; Liao, Zhongxing; Li, Heng; Mohan, Radhe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose (1) To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans. (2) To establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiotherapy plans have been designed following common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging 3-17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19/20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the two modalities were not statistically significant (p <0.05) for all DVH indices (mean ± SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1±0.9%, IMRT: +0.4±1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5±2.9 Gy, IMRT: 0.0±0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only two indices: Dose to 95% PTV, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2/11 of 4D-3D indices (Lung V5 and spinal cord max) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Due to the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential dosimetric error caused by breathing motion. PMID:24074932

  4. Variability in Diaphragm Motion During Normal Breathing, Assessed With B-Mode Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Caitlin J; Shahgholi, Leili; Cieslak, Kathryn; Hellyer, Nathan J.; Strommen, Jeffrey A.; Boon, Andrea J.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Clinical measurement, cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES To establish a set of normal values for diaphragm thickening with tidal breathing in healthy subjects. BACKGROUND Normal values for diaphragm contractility, as imaged sonographically, have not been described, despite the known role of the diaphragm in contributing to spinal stability. If the normal range of diaphragm contractility can be defined in a reliable manner, ultrasound has the potential to be used clinically and in research as a biofeedback tool to enhance diaphragm activation/contractility. METHODS B-mode ultrasound was performed on 150 healthy subjects to visualize and measure hemi-diaphragm thickness on each side at resting inspiration and expiration. Primary outcome measures were hemi-diaphragm thickness and thickening ratio, stratified for age, gender, and body mass index. Interrater and intrarater reliability were also measured. RESULTS Normal thickness of the diaphragm at rest ranged from 0.12 to 1.18 cm, with slightly greater thickness in men but no effect of age. Average ± SD change in thickness from resting expiration to resting inspiration was 20.0% ± 15.5% on the right and 23.5% ± 24.4% on the left; however, almost one third of healthy subjects had no to minimal diaphragm thickening with tidal breathing. CONCLUSION There is wide variability in the degree of diaphragm contractility during quiet breathing. B-mode ultrasound appears to be a reliable means of determining the contractility of the diaphragm, an important muscle in spinal stability. Further studies are needed to validate this imaging modality as a clinical tool in the neuromuscular re-education of the diaphragm to improve spinal stability in both healthy subjects and in patients with low back pain. PMID:24175600

  5. Evaluation of a motion artifacts removal approach on breath-hold cine-magnetic resonance images of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancur, Julián.; Simon, Antoine; Schnell, Frédéric; Donal, Erwan; Hernández, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2013-11-01

    The acquisition of ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance images of the heart is routinely performed in apnea in order to suppress the motion artifacts caused by breathing. However, many factors including the 2D nature of the acquisition and the use of di erent beats to acquire the multiple-view cine images, cause this kind of artifacts to appear. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of a method aiming to remove motion artifacts in multipleview cine images acquired on patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosis. The approach uses iconic registration to reduce for in-plane artifacts in long-axis-view image stacks and in-plane and out-of-plane motion artifacts in sort-axis-view image stack. Four similarity measures were evaluated: the normalized correlation, the normalized mutual information, the sum of absolute voxel di erences and the Slomka metric proposed by Slomka et al. The qualitative evaluation assessed the misalignment of di erent anatomical structures of the left ventricle as follows: the misalignment of the interventricular septum and the lateral wall for short-axis-view acquisitions and the misalignment between the short-axis-view image and long-axis-view images. Results showed the correction using the normalized correlation as the most appropriated with an 80% of success.

  6. Dosimetric consequences of inter-fraction breathing-pattern variation on radiotherapy with personalized motion-assessed margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, A.; McQuaid, D.; Evans, P.; Webb, S.; Guckenberger, M.

    2011-11-01

    The data from eight patients who had undergone stereotactic body radiotherapy were selected due to their 4D-CT planning scans showing that their tumours had respiratory induced motion trajectories of large amplitude (greater than 9 mm in cranio-caudal direction). Radiotherapy plans with personalized motion-assessed margins were generated for these eight patients. The margins were generated by inverse 4D planning on an eight-bin phase-sorted 4D-CT scan. The planning was done on an in-house software system with a non-rigid registration stage being completed using freely available software. The resultant plans were then recalculated on a 4D-CT scan taken later during the course of treatment. Simulated image-guided patient set-up was used to align the geometric centres of the tumour region and minimize any misalignment between the two reconstructions. In general, the variation in the patient breathing patterns was found to be very small. Consequently, the degradation of the mean dose to the tumour region was found to be around a few percent (<3%) and hence was not a large effect.

  7. Shapiro steps for skyrmion motion on a washboard potential with longitudinal and transverse ac drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2015-12-01

    We numerically study the behavior of two-dimensional skyrmions in the presence of a quasi-one-dimensional sinusoidal substrate under the influence of externally applied dc and ac drives. In the overdamped limit, when both dc and ac drives are aligned in the longitudinal direction parallel to the direction of the substrate modulation, the velocity-force curves exhibit classic Shapiro step features when the frequency of the ac drive matches the washboard frequency that is dynamically generated by the motion of the skyrmions over the substrate, similar to previous observations in superconducting vortex systems. In the case of skyrmions, the additional contribution to the skyrmion motion from a nondissipative Magnus force shifts the location of the locking steps to higher dc drives, and we find that the skyrmions move at an angle with respect to the direction of the dc drive. For a longitudinal dc drive and a perpendicular or transverse ac drive, the overdamped system exhibits no Shapiro steps; however, when a finite Magnus force is present, we find pronounced transverse Shapiro steps along with complex two-dimensional periodic orbits of the skyrmions in the phase-locked regimes. Both the longitudinal and transverse ac drives produce locking steps whose widths oscillate with increasing ac drive amplitude. We examine the role of collective skyrmion interactions and find that additional fractional locking steps occur for both longitudinal and transverse ac drives. At higher skyrmion densities, the system undergoes a series of dynamical order-disorder transitions, with the skyrmions forming a moving solid on the phase locking steps and a fluctuating dynamical liquid in regimes between the steps.

  8. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  9. TH-C-18A-11: Investigating the Minimum Scan Parameters Required to Generate Free-Breathing Fast-Helical CT Scans Without Motion-Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D; Neylon, J; Dou, T; Jani, S; Lamb, J; Low, D; Tan, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A recently proposed 4D-CT protocol uses deformable registration of free-breathing fast-helical CT scans to generate a breathing motion model. In order to allow accurate registration, free-breathing images are required to be free of doubling-artifacts, which arise when tissue motion is greater than scan speed. This work identifies the minimum scanner parameters required to successfully generate free-breathing fast-helical scans without doubling-artifacts. Methods: 10 patients were imaged under free breathing conditions 25 times in alternating directions with a 64-slice CT scanner using a low dose fast helical protocol. A high temporal resolution (0.1s) 4D-CT was generated using a patient specific motion model and patient breathing waveforms, and used as the input for a scanner simulation. Forward projections were calculated using helical cone-beam geometry (800 projections per rotation) and a GPU accelerated reconstruction algorithm was implemented. Various CT scanner detector widths and rotation times were simulated, and verified using a motion phantom. Doubling-artifacts were quantified in patient images using structural similarity maps to determine the similarity between axial slices. Results: Increasing amounts of doubling-artifacts were observed with increasing rotation times > 0.2s for 16×1mm slice scan geometry. No significant increase in doubling artifacts was observed for 64×1mm slice scan geometry up to 1.0s rotation time although blurring artifacts were observed >0.6s. Using a 16×1mm slice scan geometry, a rotation time of less than 0.3s (53mm/s scan speed) would be required to produce images of similar quality to a 64×1mm slice scan geometry. Conclusion: The current generation of 16 slice CT scanners, which are present in most Radiation Oncology departments, are not capable of generating free-breathing sorting-artifact-free images in the majority of patients. The next generation of CT scanners should be capable of at least 53mm/s scan speed

  10. The longitudinal equations of motion of a tilt prop/rotor aircraft including the effects of wing and prop/rotor blade flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The equations of motion for the longitudinal dynamics of a tilting prop/rotor aircraft are developed. The analysis represents an extension of the equations of motion. The effects of the longitudinal degrees of freedom of the body (pitch, heave and horizontal velocity) are included. The results of body freedom can be added to the equations of motion for the flexible wing propeller combination.

  11. Free-Breathing 3D Whole Heart Black Blood Imaging with Motion Sensitized Driven Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subashini; Hu, Peng; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Kozerke, Sebastian; Nezafat, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy and robustness of motion sensitized driven equilibrium (MSDE) for blood suppression in volumetric 3D whole heart cardiac MR. Materials and Methods To investigate the efficacy of MSDE on blood suppression and myocardial SNR loss on different imaging sequences. 7 healthy adult subjects were imaged using 3D ECG-triggered MSDE-prep T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE), and spoiled gradient echo (GRE), after optimization of MSDE parameters in a pilot study of 5 subjects. Imaging artifacts, myocardial and blood SNR were assessed. Subsequently, the feasibility of isotropic spatial resolution MSDE-prep black-blood was assessed in 6 subjects. Finally, 15 patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease were recruited to be imaged using conventional multi-slice 2D DIR TSE imaging sequence and 3D MSDE-prep spoiled GRE. Results The MSDE-prep yields significant blood suppression (75-92%), enabling a volumetric 3D black-blood assessment of the whole heart with significantly improved visualization of the chamber walls. The MSDE-prep also allowed successful acquisition of black-blood images with isotropic spatial resolution. In the patient study, 3D black-blood MSDE-prep and DIR resulted in similar blood suppression in LV and RV walls but the MSDE prep had superior myocardial signal and wall sharpness. Conclusion MSDE-prep allows volumetric black-blood imaging of the heart. PMID:22517477

  12. SU-D-BRE-01: A Realistic Breathing Phantom of the Thorax for Testing New Motion Mitigation Techniques with Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, R; Peroni, M; Bernatowicz, K; Zakova, M; Knopf, A; Safai, S; Parkel, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A prototype breathing phantom (named LuCa) has been developed which simulates the anatomy and motion of a patient thorax.In this work, we describe the results of the first commissioning tests with LuCa. Methods: The phantom provides a close representation of the human thorax. The lungs,contained within a tissue-equivalent ribcage and skin,are made from a polymer foam,which is inflated and deflated using a custommade ventilator. A tumor is simulated using a wooden ball with cutplanes for placing GafChromic films. The ventilator,controlled with Labview software,simulates a full range of breathing motion types.Commissioning tests were performed to assess its performance using imaging (CT and radiographic) and film dosimetry as follows:i)maximum Tumor excursion at acceptable pressure ranges, ii)tumor Motion repeatability between breathing periods,iii)reproducibility between measurement days,iv)tumor-to-surface motion correlation and v)reproducibility of film positioning in phantom. Results: The phantom can generate repeatable motion patterns with sin{sup 4},sin,breath-hold (tumor amplitude repeatability <0.5mm over 10min),aswell as patient-specific motion types. Maximum excursions of the tumor are 20mm and 14mm for the large and small tumor inserts respectively. Amplitude reproducibility (Coefficient of Variation) averaged at 16% for the workable pressure range over 2 months. Good correlation between tumor and surface motion was found with R{sup 2}=0.92. Reproducibility of film positioning within the thorax was within 0.9mm, and maximum 3° error from the coronal plane. Film measurements revealed that the film repositioning error yields relative errors in the mean dose over the planned target volume (PTV) of up to 2.5% and 4.5% for films at the center and on the edge of the PTV respectively. Conclusion: Commissioning tests have shown that the LuCa phantom can produce tumor motion with excellent repeatability. However,a poorer performance in reproducibility of

  13. Degradation of the z- resolution due to a longitudinal motion with a 64-channel CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Romain; Sauer, Benoît; Guerra, Rui Matias; Blum, Alain; Felblinger, Jacques; Hubert, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Isotropic acquisitions are routinely achievable with 64- channel CT scanners,. As it predecessors, it includes MultiPlanar Reformation (MPR) projection for the reconstruction of two-dimensional images and volume rendering for the creation of three dimensional images. The accuracy of images obtained with these postprocessing methods depends on the spatial resolution of image data acquired along the long axis of the patient (ie longitudinal, or z-inis spatial resolution). But physiologic motions can appear during a Computed Tomography (CT) exam and can leacd to a degradation of this spatial resolution. By using two different phantoms and a dynamic platform, we have studied the influence of a z-axis linear motion on the MPR images quality. Our results show that the corruption of the data results in the loss of information about the form, the contrast and/or the size of the scanned object. This corruption of data can lead to diagnostic errors by mimicking diseases or by masking physiologic details. PMID:18002987

  14. The impact of breathing guidance and prospective gating during thoracic 4DCT imaging: an XCAT study utilizing lung cancer patient motion.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Sean; Kipritidis, John; Lee, Danny; Bernatowicz, Kinga; Keall, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Two interventions to overcome the deleterious impact irregular breathing has on thoracic-abdominal 4D computed tomography (4DCT) are (1) facilitating regular breathing using audiovisual biofeedback (AVB), and (2) prospective respiratory gating of the 4DCT scan based on the real-time respiratory motion. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of AVB and gating on 4DCT imaging using the 4D eXtended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom driven by patient breathing patterns. We obtained simultaneous measurements of chest and abdominal walls, thoracic diaphragm, and tumor motion from 6 lung cancer patients under two breathing conditions: (1) AVB, and (2) free breathing. The XCAT phantom was used to simulate 4DCT acquisitions in cine and respiratory gated modes. 4DCT image quality was quantified by artefact detection (NCCdiff), mean square error (MSE), and Dice similarity coefficient of lung and tumor volumes (DSClung, DSCtumor). 4DCT acquisition times and imaging dose were recorded. In cine mode, AVB improved NCCdiff, MSE, DSClung, and DSCtumor by 20% (p  =  0.008), 23% (p  <  0.001), 0.5% (p  <  0.001), and 4.0% (p  <  0.003), respectively. In respiratory gated mode, AVB improved NCCdiff, MSE, and DSClung by 29% (p  <  0.001), 34% (p  <  0.001), 0.4% (p  <  0.001), respectively. AVB increased the cine acquisitions by 15 s and reduced respiratory gated acquisitions by 31 s. AVB increased imaging dose in cine mode by 10%. This was the first study to quantify the impact of breathing guidance and respiratory gating on 4DCT imaging. With the exception of DSCtumor in respiratory gated mode, AVB significantly improved 4DCT image analysis metrics in both cine and respiratory gated modes over free breathing. The results demonstrate that AVB and respiratory-gating can be beneficial interventions to improve 4DCT for cancer radiation therapy, with the biggest gains achieved when these interventions are used

  15. The management of tumor motions in the stereotactic irradiation to lung cancer under the use of Abches to control active breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Tarohda, Tohru I.; Ishiguro, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Kouhei; Kohda, Yukihiko; Onishi, Hiroaki; Aoki, Tetsuya; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Breathing control is crucial to ensuring the accuracy of stereotactic irradiation for lung cancer. This study monitored respiration in patients with inoperable nonsmall-cell lung cancer using a respiration-monitoring apparatus, Abches, and investigated the reproducibility of tumor position in these patients. Methods: Subjects comprised 32 patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer who were administered stereotactic radiotherapy under breath-holding conditions monitored by Abches. Computed tomography (CT) was performed under breath-holding conditions using Abches (Abches scan) for treatment planning. A free-breathing scan was performed to determine the range of tumor motions in a given position. After the free-breathing scan, Abches scan was repeated and the tumor position thus defined was taken as the intrafraction tumor position. Abches scan was also performed just before treatment, and the tumor position thus defined was taken as the interfraction tumor position. To calculate the errors, tumor positions were compared based on Abches scan for the initial treatment plan. The error in tumor position was measured using the BrainSCAN treatment-planning device, then compared for each lung lobe. Results: Displacements in tumor position were calculated in three dimensions (i.e., superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) dimensions) and recorded as absolute values. For the whole lung, average intrafraction tumor displacement was 1.1 mm (L-R), 1.9 mm (A-P), and 2.0 mm (S-I); the average interfraction tumor displacement was 1.1 mm (L-R), 2.1 mm (A-P), and 2.0 mm (S-I); and the average free-breathing tumor displacement was 2.3 mm (L-R), 3.5 mm (A-P), and 7.9 mm (S-I). The difference between using Abches and free breathing could be reduced from approximately 20 mm at the maximum to approximately 3 mm in the S-I direction for both intrafraction and interfraction positions in the lower lobe. In addition, maximum intrafraction tumor

  16. LPV H-infinity Control for the Longitudinal Dynamics of a Flexible Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Hunter Douglas

    This dissertation establishes the method needed to synthesize and simulate an Hinfinity Linear Parameter-Varying (LPV) controller for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle model. A study was conducted to gain the understanding of the elastic effects on the open loop system. It was determined that three modes of vibration would be suitable for the hypersonic vehicle model. It was also discovered from the open loop study that there is strong coupling in the hypersonic vehicle states, especially between the angle of attack, pitch rate, pitch attitude, and the exible modes of the vehicle. This dissertation outlines the procedure for synthesizing a full state feedback Hinfinity LPV controller for the hypersonic vehicle. The full state feedback study looked at both velocity and altitude tracking for the exible vehicle. A parametric study was conducted on each of these controllers to see the effects of changing the number of gridding points in the parameter space and changing the parameter variation rate limits in the system on the robust performance of the controller. As a result of the parametric study, a 7 x 7 grid ranging from Mach 7 to Mach 9 in velocity and from 70,000 feet to 90,000 feet in altitude, and a parameter variation rate limit of [.5 200]T was used for both the velocity tracking and altitude tracking cases. The resulting Hinfinity robust performances were gamma = 2.2224 for the velocity tracking case and = 1:7582 for the altitude tracking case. A linear analysis was then conducted on five different selected trim points from the Hinfinity LPV controller. This was conducted for the velocity tracking and altitude tracking cases. The results of linear analysis show that there is a slight difference in the response of the Hinfinity LPV controller and the fixed point H infinity controller. For the tracking task, the Hinfinity controller responds more quickly, and has a lower Hinfinity performance value. Next, the H infinity LPV controller was simulated

  17. Impact of scanning parameters and breathing patterns on image quality and accuracy of tumor motion reconstruction in 4D CBCT: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soyoung; Yan, Guanghua; Lu, Bo; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan G; Sanjiv, Samat S

    2015-01-01

    Four-dimensional, cone-beam CT (4D CBCT) substantially reduces respiration-induced motion blurring artifacts in three-dimension (3D) CBCT. However, the image quality of 4D CBCT is significantly degraded which may affect its accuracy in localizing a mobile tumor for high-precision, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of scanning parameters hereinafter collectively referred to as scanning sequence) and breathing patterns on the image quality and the accuracy of computed tumor trajectory for a commercial 4D CBCT system, in preparation for its clinical implementation. We simulated a series of periodic and aperiodic sinusoidal breathing patterns with a respiratory motion phantom. The aperiodic pattern was created by varying the period or amplitude of individual sinusoidal breathing cycles. 4D CBCT scans of the phantom were acquired with a manufacturer-supplied scanning sequence (4D-S-slow) and two in-house modified scanning sequences (4D-M-slow and 4D-M-fast). While 4D-S-slow used small field of view (FOV), partial rotation (200°), and no imaging filter, 4D-M-slow and 4D-M-fast used medium FOV, full rotation, and the F1 filter. The scanning speed was doubled in 4D-M-fast (100°/min gantry rotation). The image quality of the 4D CBCT scans was evaluated using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and motion blurring ratio (MBR). The trajectory of the moving target was reconstructed by registering each phase of the 4D CBCT with a reference CT. The root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) analysis was used to quantify its accuracy. Significant decrease in CNR and SNR from 3D CBCT to 4D CBCT was observed. The 4D-S-slow and 4D-M-fast scans had comparable image quality, while the 4D-M-slow scans had better performance due to doubled projections. Both CNR and SNR decreased slightly as the breathing period increased, while no dependence on the amplitude was observed. The difference of both CNR and SNR

  18. Longitudinal study (32 years) of exercise tolerance, breathing response, blood pressure, and blood lipids in young men.

    PubMed

    Gillum, R F; Taylor, H L; Anderson, J; Blackburn, H

    1981-01-01

    Changes in exercise tolerance, blood lipids, and blood pressure from youth to middle age was studied in 106 subjects followed 32 years. In addition, the responses to cold pressor and CO2 stress were studied as correlates of future lipids and blood pressure. Treadmill exercise test, cold pressor test, response to breathing a mixture of 6% CO2, and 21% O2, for 5 minutes, blood pressure, and lipid measurements were performed in 1947 when subjects were 20 +/- 2 years old. Exercise, blood pressure and lipid tests were repeated in 1979. Tracking of blood pressure and pulse response to exercise over the period was demonstrated. Baseline exercise response correlated with future blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, and high density lipoproteins. Change in exercise pulse rate over the period correlated with change in cholesterol. Cold pressor systolic blood pressure response correlated with future systolic blood pressure and triglycerides. Pulse and blood pressure response to CO2 breathing correlated with cholesterol, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein 32 years later. These correlations were independent of baseline values of the variables and body mass index. Individuals who were judged "fit" (exercise pulse rise less than median) at both baseline and follow-up had the best cardiovascular risk profile (blood pressure and lipids). Blood pressure and pulse response to exercise tracked between ages 20 and 50. Exercise, cold pressor, and CO2 responses in youth correlated with blood lipid levels in middle age. PMID:6810858

  19. On the motion of a second grade fluid due to longitudinal and torsional oscillations of a cylinder: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Tran, P.X.

    2008-09-15

    Unsteady problems involving the second grade fluids have received considerable attention in recent years. The present study is an attempt to look at the motion of an oscillating rod in a second grade fluid. Specifically, we solve numerically for the flow of a second grade fluid surrounding a solid cylindrical rod that is suddenly set into longitudinal and torsional motion. The equations are made dimensionless. The results are presented for the shear stresses at the wall, related to the drag force; these are physical quantities of interest, especially in oil-drilling applications.

  20. Implications of free breathing motion assessed by 4D-computed tomography on the delivered dose in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Duma, Marciana Nona; Berndt, Johannes; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Devecka, Michal; Wilkens, Jan J; Geinitz, Hans; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Oechsner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of breathing motion on the delivered dose in esophageal cancer 3-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). We assessed 16 patients with esophageal cancer. All patients underwent 4D-computed tomography (4D-CT) for treatment planning. For each of the analyzed patients, 1 3D-CRT, 1 IMRT, and 1 VMAT (RapidArc-RA) plan were calculated. Each of the 3 initial plans was recalculated on the 4D-CT (for the maximum free inspiration and maximum free expiration) to assess the effect of breathing motion. We assessed the minimum dose (Dmin) and mean dose (Dmean) to the esophagus within the planning target volume, the volume changes of the lungs, the Dmean and the total lung volume receiving at least 40Gy (V40), and the V30, V20, V10, and V5. For the heart we assessed the Dmean and the V25. Over all techniques and all patients the change in Dmean as compared with the planned Dmean (planning CT [PCT]) to the esophagus was 0.48% in maximum free inspiration (CT_insp) and 0.55% in maximum free expiration (CT_exp). The Dmin CT_insp change was 0.86% and CT_exp change was 0.89%. The Dmean change of the lungs (heart) was in CT_insp 1.95% (2.89%) and 3.88% (2.38%) in CT_exp. In all, 4 patients had a clinically relevant change of the dose (≥ 5% Dmean to the heart and the lungs) between inspiration and expiration. These patients had a very cranially or caudally situated tumor. There are no relevant differences in the delivered dose to the regions of interest among the 3 techniques. Breathing motion management could be considered to achieve a better sparing of the lungs or heart in patients with cranially or caudally situated tumors. PMID:26419857

  1. Modeling subject-specific phase-dependent effects and variations in longitudinal responses via a geometric Brownian motion process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Hsieh, Fushing; Li, Juan; Chi, Eric

    2011-08-30

    We address statistical issues regarding modeling a collection of longitudinal response trajectories characterized by the presence of subject-specific phase-dependent effects and variation. To accommodate these two time-varying individual characteristics, we employ a geometric stochastic differential equation for modeling based on a Brownian motion process and develop a two-step paradigm for statistical analysis. This paradigm reverses the order of statistical inference in random effects model. We first extract individual information about phase-dependent treatment effects and volatility parameters for all subjects. Then, we derive the association relationship between the parameters characterizing the individual longitudinal trajectories and the corresponding covariates by means of multiple regression analysis. The stochastic differential equation model and the two-step paradigm together provide significant advantages both in modeling flexibility and in computational efficiency. The modeling flexibility is due to the easy adaptation of temporal change points for subject-specific phase transition in treatment effects, whereas the computational efficiency benefits in part from the independent increment property of Brownian motion that avoids high-dimensional integration. We demonstrate our modeling approach and statistical analysis on a real data set of longitudinal measurements of disease activity scores from a rheumatoid arthritis study. PMID:21751228

  2. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    SciTech Connect

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  3. An acoustic metasurface design for wave motion conversion of longitudinal waves to transverse waves using topology optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Y.; Yamada, T.; Otomori, M.; Izui, K.; Nishiwaki, S.

    2015-11-01

    This letter presents an acoustic metasurface that converts longitudinal acoustic waves into transverse elastic waves in an acoustic-elastic coupled system. Metasurface configurations are obtained by a level set-based topology optimization method, and we describe the mechanism that changes the direction of the wave motion. Numerical examples of 2D problems with prescribed frequencies of incident acoustic waves are provided, and transverse elastic wave amplitudes are maximized by manipulating the propagation of the acoustic waves. Frequency analysis reveals that each of the different metasurface designs obtained for different wavelengths of incident waves provides peak response at the target frequency.

  4. SOCR Motion Charts: An Efficient, Open-Source, Interactive and Dynamic Applet for Visualizing Longitudinal Multivariate Data.

    PubMed

    Al-Aziz, Jameel; Christou, Nicolas; Dinov, Ivo D

    2010-01-01

    The amount, complexity and provenance of data have dramatically increased in the past five years. Visualization of observed and simulated data is a critical component of any social, environmental, biomedical or scientific quest. Dynamic, exploratory and interactive visualization of multivariate data, without preprocessing by dimensionality reduction, remains a nearly insurmountable challenge. The Statistics Online Computational Resource (www.SOCR.ucla.edu) provides portable online aids for probability and statistics education, technology-based instruction and statistical computing. We have developed a new Java-based infrastructure, SOCR Motion Charts, for discovery-based exploratory analysis of multivariate data. This interactive data visualization tool enables the visualization of high-dimensional longitudinal data. SOCR Motion Charts allows mapping of ordinal, nominal and quantitative variables onto time, 2D axes, size, colors, glyphs and appearance characteristics, which facilitates the interactive display of multidimensional data. We validated this new visualization paradigm using several publicly available multivariate datasets including Ice-Thickness, Housing Prices, Consumer Price Index, and California Ozone Data. SOCR Motion Charts is designed using object-oriented programming, implemented as a Java Web-applet and is available to the entire community on the web at www.socr.ucla.edu/SOCR_MotionCharts. It can be used as an instructional tool for rendering and interrogating high-dimensional data in the classroom, as well as a research tool for exploratory data analysis. PMID:21479108

  5. SOCR Motion Charts: An Efficient, Open-Source, Interactive and Dynamic Applet for Visualizing Longitudinal Multivariate Data

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aziz, Jameel; Christou, Nicolas; Dinov, Ivo D.

    2011-01-01

    The amount, complexity and provenance of data have dramatically increased in the past five years. Visualization of observed and simulated data is a critical component of any social, environmental, biomedical or scientific quest. Dynamic, exploratory and interactive visualization of multivariate data, without preprocessing by dimensionality reduction, remains a nearly insurmountable challenge. The Statistics Online Computational Resource (www.SOCR.ucla.edu) provides portable online aids for probability and statistics education, technology-based instruction and statistical computing. We have developed a new Java-based infrastructure, SOCR Motion Charts, for discovery-based exploratory analysis of multivariate data. This interactive data visualization tool enables the visualization of high-dimensional longitudinal data. SOCR Motion Charts allows mapping of ordinal, nominal and quantitative variables onto time, 2D axes, size, colors, glyphs and appearance characteristics, which facilitates the interactive display of multidimensional data. We validated this new visualization paradigm using several publicly available multivariate datasets including Ice-Thickness, Housing Prices, Consumer Price Index, and California Ozone Data. SOCR Motion Charts is designed using object-oriented programming, implemented as a Java Web-applet and is available to the entire community on the web at www.socr.ucla.edu/SOCR_MotionCharts. It can be used as an instructional tool for rendering and interrogating high-dimensional data in the classroom, as well as a research tool for exploratory data analysis. PMID:21479108

  6. Anharmonic longitudinal motion of bases and dynamics of nonlinear excitation in DNA.

    PubMed

    Di Garbo, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the transcription bubble in DNA is studied by using a nonlinear model in which torsional and longitudinal conformations of the biomolecule are coupled. In the absence of forcing and dissipation the torsional dynamics is described by a perturbed kink of the Sine-Gordon DNA model, while the longitudinal conformational energy propagate as phonons. It was found that for random initial conditions of the longitudinal conformational field the presence of the kink promotes the creation of phonons propagating along the chain axis. Moreover, the presence of forcing, describing the active role of RNA polymerase, determines in agreement to the experimental data a modulation of the velocity of the transcription bubble. Lastly, it was shown that the presence of dissipation impacts the dynamic of the phonon by reducing the amplitude of the corresponding conformational field. On the contrary, dissipation and forcing modulate the velocity of the transcription bubble alone. PMID:26453257

  7. Dynamic MRI of Grid-Tagged Hyperpolarized Helium-3 for the Assessment of Lung Motion During Breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Sheng Ke; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M.; Mugler, John P.; Lange, Eduard E. de; Cates, Gordon D.; Miller, G. Wilson

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tagging technique using hyperpolarized helium-3 (HP He-3) to track lung motion. Methods and Materials: An accelerated non-Cartesian k-space trajectory was used to gain acquisition speed, at the cost of introducing image artifacts, providing a viable strategy for obtaining whole-lung coverage with adequate temporal resolution. Multiple-slice two-dimensional dynamic images of the lung were obtained in three healthy subjects after inhaling He-3 gas polarized to 35%-40%. Displacement, strain, and ventilation maps were computed from the observed motion of the grid peaks. Results: Both temporal and spatial variations of pulmonary mechanics were observed in normal subjects, including shear motion between different lobes of the same lung. Conclusion: These initial results suggest that dynamic imaging of grid-tagged hyperpolarized magnetization may potentially be a powerful tool for observing and quantifying pulmonary biomechanics on a regional basis and for assessing, validating, and improving lung deformable image registration algorithms.

  8. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube) in place. The breath may have an ammonia-like odor (also described as urine-like or " ... kidney failure (can cause breath to smell like ammonia ) Diabetes (fruity or sweet chemical smell associated with ...

  9. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... re not getting enough air. Sometimes mild breathing problems are from a stuffy nose or hard exercise. ... emphysema or pneumonia cause breathing difficulties. So can problems with your trachea or bronchi, which are part ...

  10. Breathing difficulty

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary disease (COPD), such as chronic bronchitis or emphysema Other lung disease Pneumonia Pulmonary hypertension Problems with ... of breath; Breathlessness; Difficulty breathing; Dyspnea Images Lungs Emphysema References Kraft M. Approach to the patient with ...

  11. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a potentially life-threatening condition. Breath that smells like feces can occur with prolonged vomiting , especially ... renal failure Bowel obstruction (can cause breath to smell like feces) Bronchiectasis Chronic kidney failure (can cause ...

  12. Self-Navigation with Compressed Sensing for 2D Translational Motion Correction in Free-Breathing Coronary MRI: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Gabriele; Puy, Gilles; Wiaux, Yves; van Heeswijk, Ruud B.; Piccini, Davide; Stuber, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    conclusion, compressed sensing may become a critical adjunct for 2D translational motion correction in free-breathing cardiac imaging with high spatial resolution. An expansion to modern 3D approaches is now warranted. PMID:25171369

  13. A Study of Longitudinal Control Problems at Low and Negative Damping and Stability with Emphasis on Effects of Motion Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoff, Melvin; McFadden, Norman M.; Heinle, Donovan R.

    1961-01-01

    As part of a general investigation to determine the effects of simulator motions on pilot opinion and task performance over a wide range of vehicle longitudinal dynamics, a cooperative NASA-AMAL program was conducted on the centrifuge at Johnsville, Pennsylvania. The test parameters and measurements for this program duplicated those of earlier studies made at Ames Research Center with a variable-stability airplane and with a pitch-roll chair flight simulator. Particular emphasis was placed on the minimum basic damping and stability the pilots would accept and on the minimum dynamics they considered controllable in the event of stability-augmentation system failure. Results of the centrifuge-simulator program indicated that small positive damping was required by the pilots over most of the frequency range covered for configurations rated acceptable for emergency conditions only (e.g., failure of a pitch damper). It was shown that the pilot's tolerance for unstable dynamics was dependent primarily on the value of damping. For configurations rated acceptable for emergency operation only, the allowable instability and damping corresponded to a divergence time to double amplitude of about 1 second. Comparisons were made of centrifuge, pitch-chair and fixed-cockpit simulator tests with flight tests. Pilot ratings indicated that the effects of incomplete or spurious motion cues provided by these three modes of simulation were important only for high-frequency, lightly damped dynamics or unstable, moderately damped dynamics. The pitch- chair simulation, which provided accurate angular-acceleration cues to the pilot, compared most favorably with flight. For the centrifuge simulation, which furnished accurate normal accelerations but spurious pitching and longitudinal accelerations, there was a deterioration of pilots' opinion relative to flight results. Results of simulator studies with an analog pilot replacing the human pilot illustrated the adaptive capability of human

  14. Effects of corrugation shape on frequency band-gaps for longitudinal wave motion in a periodic elastic layer.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Vladislav S

    2016-04-01

    The paper concerns determining frequency band-gaps for longitudinal wave motion in a periodic waveguide. The waveguide may be considered either as an elastic layer with variable thickness or as a rod with variable cross section. As a result, widths and locations of all frequency band-gaps are determined by means of the method of varying amplitudes. For the general symmetric corrugation shape, the width of each odd band-gap is controlled only by one harmonic in the corrugation series with its number being equal to the number of the band-gap. Widths of even band-gaps, however, are influenced by all the harmonics involved in the corrugation series, so that the lower frequency band-gaps can emerge. These are band-gaps located below the frequency corresponding to the lowest harmonic in the corrugation series. For the general non-symmetric corrugation shape, the mth band-gap is controlled only by one, the mth, harmonic in the corrugation series. The revealed insights into the mechanism of band-gap formation can be used to predict locations and widths of all frequency band-gaps featured by any corrugation shape. These insights are general and can be valid also for other types of wave motion in periodic structures, e.g., transverse or torsional vibration. PMID:27106336

  15. Vibration analysis of vector piezoresponse force microscopy with coupled flexural-longitudinal and lateral-torsional motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Jalili, Nader; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2009-05-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has evolved into a useful tool for measurement of local properties of piezoelectric materials with great potential in applications such as data storage, ferroelectric lithography and nonvolatile memories. In order to utilize PFM for low dimensional materials characterization, a comprehensive analytical modeling based on the coupled motion of PFM in all three directions is proposed. In this respect, the mechanical properties of sample are divided into viscoelastic and piezoelectric parts. The viscoelastic part is modeled as a spring and damper in the longitudinal, transversal and lateral directions, while the piezoelectric part is replaced with resistive forces acting at the end of microcantilever. It is shown that there is a geometrical coupling between flexural-longitudinal and lateral-torsional vibrations of microcantilever used in PFM. Moreover, assuming a general friction between tip and sample, additional coupling effect is also taken into account. Through an energy-based approach, it is seen that the PFM system can be governed by a set of coupled partial differential equations along with nonhomogeneous and coupled boundary conditions. A general formulation is then derived for the mode shape, frequency response, and state-space representation of system. Numerical simulations indicate that mode shapes, natural frequencies and time responses of microcantilever beam are heavily dependent on the viscoelastic and piezoelectric properties of the samples. Moreover, the results demonstrate that utilizing only transversal vibration is not a valid strategy for quantifying mechanical properties of materials with arbitrary crystallographic orientation. Hence, the proposed model with the built-in coupling effects can be a key development for acquiring precise measurements.

  16. Small amplitude transverse waves on taut strings: exploring the significant effects of longitudinal motion on wave energy location and propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, David R.

    2013-03-01

    Introductory discussions of energy transport due to transverse waves on taut strings universally assume that the effects of longitudinal motion can be neglected, but this assumption is not even approximately valid unless the string is idealized to have a zero relaxed length, a requirement approximately met by the slinky spring. While making this additional idealization is probably the best approach to take when discussing waves on strings at the introductory level, for intermediate to advanced undergraduate classes in continuum mechanics and general wave phenomena where somewhat more realistic models of strings can be investigated, this paper makes the following contributions. First, various approaches to deriving the general energy continuity equation are critiqued and it is argued that the standard continuum mechanics approach to deriving such equations is the best because it leads to a conceptually clear, relatively simple derivation which provides a unique answer of greatest generality. In addition, a straightforward algorithm for calculating the transverse and longitudinal waves generated when a string is driven at one end is presented and used to investigate a cos2 transverse pulse. This example illustrates much important physics regarding energy transport in strings and allows the ‘attack waves’ observed when strings in musical instruments are struck or plucked to be approximately modelled and analysed algebraically. Regarding the ongoing debate as to whether the potential energy density in a string can be uniquely defined, it is shown by coupling an external energy source to a string that a suggested alternative formula for potential energy density requires an unphysical potential energy to be ascribed to the source for overall energy to be conserved and so cannot be considered to be physically valid.

  17. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    When you're short of breath, it's hard or uncomfortable for you to take in the oxygen your body needs. You may feel as if you're ... stuffy nose or hard exercise. But shortness of breath can also be a sign of a serious ...

  18. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth and between your teeth produce the bad odor. Other problems in your mouth, such as gum ... and medicines are associated with a specific breath odor. Having good dental habits, like brushing and flossing ...

  19. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles are left in your mouth, they can rot ... Flossing once a day helps get rid of particles wedged between your teeth. Also, visit your dentist ...

  20. Breath sounds

    MedlinePlus

    The lung sounds are best heard with a stethoscope. This is called auscultation. Normal lung sounds occur ... the bottom of the rib cage. Using a stethoscope, the doctor may hear normal breathing sounds, decreased ...

  1. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  2. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  3. A method to determine the orientation of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis during dynamic motions.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brian J; Dapena, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Inaccuracy in determining the orientation of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis (twist orientation) has been a pervasive problem in sport biomechanics research. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to improve the calculation of the upper arm twist orientation in dynamic sports activities. The twist orientation of the upper arm is defined by the orientation of its mediolateral axis. The basis for the new method is that at any angle in the flexion/extension range of an individual's elbow, it is possible to define a true mediolateral axis and also a surrogate mediolateral axis perpendicular to the plane containing the shoulder, elbow and wrist joints. The difference between the twist orientations indicated by these two versions of the mediolateral axis will vary from one elbow angle to another, but if the elbow joint deforms equally in different activities, for any given subject the difference should be constant at any given value of the elbow angle. Application of the new method required individuals to execute sedate elbow extension trials prior to the dynamic trials. Three-dimensional motion analysis of the sedate extension trials allowed quantification of the difference between the true and surrogate mediolateral axes for all angles in the entire flexion/extension range of an individual's elbow. This made it possible to calculate in any dynamic trial the twist orientation defined by the true mediolateral axis from the twist orientation defined by the surrogate mediolateral axis. The method was tested on a wooden model of the arm. PMID:23141956

  4. SU-E-J-172: A Quantitative Assessment of Lung Tumor Motion Using 4DCT Imaging Under Conditions of Controlled Breathing in the Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mohatt, D; Gomez, J; Singh, A; Malhotra, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study breathing related tumor motion amplitudes by lung lobe location under controlled breathing conditions used in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for NSCLC. Methods: Sixty-five NSCLC SBRT patients since 2009 were investigated. Patients were categorized based on tumor anatomic location (RUL-17, RML-7, RLL-18, LUL-14, LLL-9). A 16-slice CT scanner [GE RT16 Pro] along with Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) software was used to acquire the 4DCT data set using 1.25 mm slice width. Images were binned in 10 phases, T00 being at maximum inspiration ' T50 at maximum expiration phase. Tumor volume was segmented in T50 using the CT-lung window and its displacement were measured from phase to phase in all three axes; superiorinferior, anterior-posterior ' medial-lateral at the centroid level of the tumor. Results: The median tumor movement in each lobe was as follows: RUL= 3.8±2.0 mm (mean ITV: 9.5 cm{sup 3}), RML= 4.7±2.8 mm (mean ITV: 9.2 cm{sup 3}), RLL=6.6±2.6 mm (mean ITV: 12.3 cm{sup 3}), LUL=3.8±2.4 mm (mean ITV: 18.5 cm{sup 3}), ' LLL=4.7±2.5 mm (mean ITV: 11.9 cm{sup 3}). The median respiratory cycle for all patients was found to be 3.81 ± 1.08 seconds [minimum 2.50 seconds, maximum 7.07 seconds]. The tumor mobility incorporating breathing cycle was RUL = 0.95±0.49 mm/s, RML = 1.35±0.62 mm/s, RLL = 1.83±0.71 mm/s, LUL = 0.98 ±0.50 mm/s, and LLL = 1.15 ±0.53 mm/s. Conclusion: Our results show that tumor displacement is location dependent. The range of motion and mobility increases as the location of the tumor nears the diaphragm. Under abdominal compression, the magnitude of tumor motion is reduced by as much as a factor of 2 in comparison to reported tumor magnitudes under conventional free breathing conditions. This study demonstrates the utility of abdominal compression in reducing the tumor motion leading to reduced ITV and planning tumor volumes (PTV)

  5. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    MedlinePlus

    Pursed lip breathing; COPD - pursed lip breathing; Emphysema - pursed lip breathing; Chronic bronchitis - pursed lip breathing; Pulmonary fibrosis - pursed lip breathing; Interstitial lung disease - pursed lip breathing; Hypoxia - pursed lip breathing; ...

  6. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    MedlinePlus

    ... breath; Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea; PND; Difficulty breathing while lying down; Orthopnea ... Obesity (does not directly cause difficulty breathing while lying down but often worsens other conditions that lead ...

  7. Traveling with breathing problems

    MedlinePlus

    If you have breathing problems and you: Are short of breath most of the time Get short of breath when you walk 150 ... or less Have been in the hospital for breathing problems recently Use oxygen at home, even if ...

  8. Numerical evaluation of longitudinal motions of Wigley hulls advancing in waves by using Bessho form translating-pulsating source Green'S function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenbin; Dong, Wencai

    2016-06-01

    In the framework of 3D potential flow theory, Bessho form translating-pulsating source Green's function in frequency domain is chosen as the integral kernel in this study and hybrid source-and-dipole distribution model of the boundary element method is applied to directly solve the velocity potential for advancing ship in regular waves. Numerical characteristics of the Green function show that the contribution of local-flow components to velocity potential is concentrated at the nearby source point area and the wave component dominates the magnitude of velocity potential in the far field. Two kinds of mathematical models, with or without local-flow components taken into account, are adopted to numerically calculate the longitudinal motions of Wigley hulls, which demonstrates the applicability of translating-pulsating source Green's function method for various ship forms. In addition, the mesh analysis of discrete surface is carried out from the perspective of ship-form characteristics. The study shows that the longitudinal motion results by the simplified model are somewhat greater than the experimental data in the resonant zone, and the model can be used as an effective tool to predict ship seakeeping properties. However, translating-pulsating source Green function method is only appropriate for the qualitative analysis of motion response in waves if the ship geometrical shape fails to satisfy the slender-body assumption.

  9. Shortness of Breath in Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... object? Yes Any small object can block an airway and cause shortness of breath or CHOKING. Take ... remove the object). If necessary, carefully clear the airway with a sweeping motion of your finger. If ...

  10. Infants' Evolving Representations of Object Motion during Occlusion: A Longitudinal Study of 6- to 12-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gredeback, Gustaf; von Hofsten, Claes

    2004-01-01

    Infants' ability to track temporarily occluded objects that moved on circular trajectories was investigated in 20 infants using a longitudinal design. They were first seen at 6 months and then every 2nd month until the end of their 1st year. Infants were presented with occlusion events covering 20% of the target's trajectory (effective occlusion…

  11. Fractional Brownian motion and multivariate-t models for longitudinal biomedical data, with application to CD4 counts in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Stirrup, Oliver T; Babiker, Abdel G; Carpenter, James R; Copas, Andrew J

    2016-04-30

    Longitudinal data are widely analysed using linear mixed models, with 'random slopes' models particularly common. However, when modelling, for example, longitudinal pre-treatment CD4 cell counts in HIV-positive patients, the incorporation of non-stationary stochastic processes such as Brownian motion has been shown to lead to a more biologically plausible model and a substantial improvement in model fit. In this article, we propose two further extensions. Firstly, we propose the addition of a fractional Brownian motion component, and secondly, we generalise the model to follow a multivariate-t distribution. These extensions are biologically plausible, and each demonstrated substantially improved fit on application to example data from the Concerted Action on SeroConversion to AIDS and Death in Europe study. We also propose novel procedures for residual diagnostic plots that allow such models to be assessed. Cohorts of patients were simulated from the previously reported and newly developed models in order to evaluate differences in predictions made for the timing of treatment initiation under different clinical management strategies. A further simulation study was performed to demonstrate the substantial biases in parameter estimates of the mean slope of CD4 decline with time that can occur when random slopes models are applied in the presence of censoring because of treatment initiation, with the degree of bias found to depend strongly on the treatment initiation rule applied. Our findings indicate that researchers should consider more complex and flexible models for the analysis of longitudinal biomarker data, particularly when there are substantial missing data, and that the parameter estimates from random slopes models must be interpreted with caution. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26555755

  12. Assessing and accounting for the impact of respiratory motion on FDG uptake and viable volume for liver lesions in free-breathing PET using respiration-suspended PET images as reference

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guang Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Humm, John L.; Burger, Irene A.; Ridge, Carole A.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess and account for the impact of respiratory motion on the variability of activity and volume determination of liver tumor in positron emission tomography (PET) through a comparison between free-breathing (FB) and respiration-suspended (RS) PET images. Methods: As part of a PET/computed tomography (CT) guided percutaneous liver ablation procedure performed on a PET/CT scanner, a patient's breathing is suspended on a ventilator, allowing the acquisition of a near-motionless PET and CT reference images of the liver. In this study, baseline RS and FB PET/CT images of 20 patients undergoing thermal ablation were acquired. The RS PET provides near-motionless reference in a human study, and thereby allows a quantitative evaluation of the effect of respiratory motion on PET images obtained under FB conditions. Two methods were applied to calculate tumor activity and volume: (1) threshold-based segmentation (TBS), estimating the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the segmented volume and (2) histogram-based estimation (HBE), yielding the background-subtracted lesion (BSL) activity and associated volume. The TBS method employs 50% of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) as the threshold for tumors with SUV{sub max} ≥ 2× SUV{sub liver-bkg}, and tumor activity above this threshold yields TLG{sub 50%}. The HBE method determines local PET background based on a Gaussian fit of the low SUV peak in a SUV-volume histogram, which is generated within a user-defined and optimized volume of interest containing both local background and lesion uptakes. Voxels with PET intensity above the fitted background were considered to have originated from the tumor and used to calculate the BSL activity and its associated lesion volume. Results: Respiratory motion caused SUV{sub max} to decrease from RS to FB by −15% ± 11% (p = 0.01). Using TBS method, there was also a decrease in SUV{sub mean} (−18% ± 9%, p = 0.01), but an increase in TLG{sub 50%} (18%

  13. TU-F-17A-04: Respiratory Phase-Resolved 3D MRI with Isotropic High Spatial Resolution: Determination of the Average Breathing Motion Pattern for Abdominal Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Yang, W; Yue, Y; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Li, D; Fan, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a retrospective 4D-MRI technique (respiratory phase-resolved 3D-MRI) for providing an accurate assessment of tumor motion secondary to respiration. Methods: A 3D projection reconstruction (PR) sequence with self-gating (SG) was developed for 4D-MRI on a 3.0T MRI scanner. The respiration-induced shift of the imaging target was recorded by SG signals acquired in the superior-inferior direction every 15 radial projections (i.e. temporal resolution 98 ms). A total of 73000 radial projections obtained in 8-min were retrospectively sorted into 10 time-domain evenly distributed respiratory phases based on the SG information. Ten 3D image sets were then reconstructed offline. The technique was validated on a motion phantom (gadolinium-doped water-filled box, frequency of 10 and 18 cycles/min) and humans (4 healthy and 2 patients with liver tumors). Imaging protocol included 8-min 4D-MRI followed by 1-min 2D-realtime (498 ms/frame) MRI as a reference. Results: The multiphase 3D image sets with isotropic high spatial resolution (1.56 mm) permits flexible image reformatting and visualization. No intra-phase motion-induced blurring was observed. Comparing to 2D-realtime, 4D-MRI yielded similar motion range (phantom: 10.46 vs. 11.27 mm; healthy subject: 25.20 vs. 17.9 mm; patient: 11.38 vs. 9.30 mm), reasonable displacement difference averaged over the 10 phases (0.74mm; 3.63mm; 1.65mm), and excellent cross-correlation (0.98; 0.96; 0.94) between the two displacement series. Conclusion: Our preliminary study has demonstrated that the 4D-MRI technique can provide high-quality respiratory phase-resolved 3D images that feature: a) isotropic high spatial resolution, b) a fixed scan time of 8 minutes, c) an accurate estimate of average motion pattern, and d) minimal intra-phase motion artifact. This approach has the potential to become a viable alternative solution to assess the impact of breathing on tumor motion and determine appropriate treatment margins

  14. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body & lifestyle changes > Shortness of breath Shortness of breath E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... oxygen your baby gets. Causes of shortness of breath during pregnancy Early pregnancy In the first few ...

  15. What Controls Your Breathing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... To a limited degree, you can change your breathing rate, such as by breathing faster or holding your ... oxygen levels in your blood and change your breathing rate as needed. Sensors in the airways detect lung ...

  16. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  17. Rapid shallow breathing

    MedlinePlus

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  18. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... less than a minute before a child regains consciousness and resumes breathing normally. Breath-holding spells can ... spells cause kids to stop breathing and lose consciousness for up to a minute. In the most ...

  19. Dosimetric Impact of Breathing Motion in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Treatment Using Image-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao Min; Wu Jianzhou; Cao Daliang; Wong, Tony; Mehta, Vivek; Shepard, David; Ye Jinsong

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of tumor motion on dose delivery in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer, using fixed field intensity- modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: For each of 10 patients with stage I/II non-small-cell pulmonary tumors, a respiration-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) study was carried out. The internal target volume was delineated on the maximum intensity projection CT, which was reconstructed from the 4DCT dataset. A 5-mm margin was used for generation of the planning target volume. VMAT and five-field IMRT plans were generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} SmartArc and direct machine parameter optimization, respectively. All plans were generated for an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator using 6-MV photons. Simulation was performed to study the interplay between multileaf collimator (MLC) sequences and target movement during the delivery of VMAT and IMRT. For each plan, 4D dose was calculated using deformable image registration of the 4DCT images. Target volume coverage and doses to critical structures calculated using 4D methodology were compared with those calculated using 3D methodology. Results: For all patients included in this study, the interplay effect was found to present limited impact (less than 1% of prescription) on the target dose distribution, especially for SBRT, in which fewer fractions (three fractions) are delivered. Dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) was, on average, slightly decreased (1% of prescription) in the 4D calculation compared with the 3D calculation. The motion impact on target dose homogeneity was patient-dependent and relatively small. Conclusions: Both VMAT and IMRT plans experienced negligible interplay effects between MLC sequence and tumor motion. For the most part, the 3D doses to the GTV and critical structures provided good approximations of the 4D dose calculations.

  20. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  1. Motion of a charged particle in an axisymmetric longitudinal magnetic field that is inversely proportional to the radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabin, K.; Bonner, G.

    2015-04-01

    An exact solution to the equations of motion of a charged particle in an axisymmetric magnetic field inversely proportional to the distance from the axis of symmetry is described and a FORTRAN code computing this solution is provided. This solution involves only elementary mathematical functions, however, it requires finding a root of a transcendental equation numerically. Although not particularly complicated in principle, this process is tedious in implementation as it requires considering several distinct types of solutions determined by the initial conditions as well as developing procedures for selecting the correct branches of the inverse trigonometric functions at multiple turning points. While this exact solution has been mentioned in the literature, its detailed description has been lacking.

  2. Multicenter trial of motion analysis for injury risk prediction: lessons learned from prospective longitudinal large cohort combined biomechanical - epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Roewer, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Myer, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Our biodynamics laboratory group has conducted large cohort biomechanical-epidemiological studies targeted at identifying the complex interactions among biomechanical, biological, hormonal, and psychosocial factors that lead to increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The findings from our studies have revealed highly sensitive and specific predictors for ACL injury. Despite the high incidence of ACL injuries among young athletes, larger cohorts are needed to reveal the underlying mechanistic causes of increased risk for ACL injury. In the current study, we have outlined key factors that contribute to the overall success of multicenter, biomechanical-epidemiological investigations designed to test a larger number of athletes who otherwise could not be recruited, screened, or tested at a single institution. Twenty-five female volleyball players were recruited from a single high school team and tested at three biodynamics laboratories. All athletes underwent three-dimensional motion capture analysis of a drop vertical jump task. Kinematic and kinetic variables were compared within and among laboratories. Reliability of peak kinematic variables was consistently rated good-to-excellent. Reliability of peak kinetic variables was consistently rated goodto-excellent within sites, but greater variability was observed between sites. Variables measured in the sagittal plane were typically more reliable than variables measured in the coronal and transverse planes. This study documents the reliability of biomechanical variables that are key to identification of ACL injury mechanisms and of athletes at high risk. These findings indicate the feasibility of executing multicenter, biomechanical investigations that can yield more robust, reliable, and generalizable findings across larger cohorts of athletes. PMID:26537810

  3. Multicenter trial of motion analysis for injury risk prediction: lessons learned from prospective longitudinal large cohort combined biomechanical - epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Roewer, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Myer, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Our biodynamics laboratory group has conducted large cohort biomechanical-epidemiological studies targeted at identifying the complex interactions among biomechanical, biological, hormonal, and psychosocial factors that lead to increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The findings from our studies have revealed highly sensitive and specific predictors for ACL injury. Despite the high incidence of ACL injuries among young athletes, larger cohorts are needed to reveal the underlying mechanistic causes of increased risk for ACL injury. In the current study, we have outlined key factors that contribute to the overall success of multicenter, biomechanical-epidemiological investigations designed to test a larger number of athletes who otherwise could not be recruited, screened, or tested at a single institution. Twenty-five female volleyball players were recruited from a single high school team and tested at three biodynamics laboratories. All athletes underwent three-dimensional motion capture analysis of a drop vertical jump task. Kinematic and kinetic variables were compared within and among laboratories. Reliability of peak kinematic variables was consistently rated good-to-excellent. Reliability of peak kinetic variables was consistently rated goodto-excellent within sites, but greater variability was observed between sites. Variables measured in the sagittal plane were typically more reliable than variables measured in the coronal and transverse planes. This study documents the reliability of biomechanical variables that are key to identification of ACL injury mechanisms and of athletes at high risk. These findings indicate the feasibility of executing multicenter, biomechanical investigations that can yield more robust, reliable, and generalizable findings across larger cohorts of athletes. PMID:26537810

  4. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... confronted Breath holding spells are more common in children with: Genetic conditions, such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath holding spells (parents ...

  5. Minimizing Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  6. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  7. Fundamentals of breath malodour.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Roldán, S; Herrera, D

    2001-11-15

    Breath malodour is a condition that has health and social implications. The origin of breath malodour problems are related to both systemic and oral conditions. The advice of dental professionals for treatment of this condition occurs with regularity since 90% of breath odor problems emanate from the oral cavity. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the etiology of breath odor, its prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for the condition. PMID:12167916

  8. What Causes Bad Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? Print A A A Text Size en ... Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  9. Theoretical and Analog Studies of the Effects of Nonlinear Stability Derivatives on the Longitudinal Motions of an Aircraft in Response to Step Control Deflections and to the Influence of Proportional Automatic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curfman, Howard J , Jr

    1955-01-01

    Through theoretical and analog results the effects of two nonlinear stability derivatives on the longitudinal motions of an aircraft have been investigated. Nonlinear functions of pitching-moment and lift coefficients with angle of attack were considered. Analog results of aircraft motions in response to step elevator deflections and to the action of the proportional control systems are presented. The occurrence of continuous hunting oscillations was predicted and demonstrated for the attitude stabilization system with proportional control for certain nonlinear pitching-moment variations and autopilot adjustments.

  10. Improving accuracy of markerless tracking of lung tumours in fluoroscopic video by incorporating diaphragm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Teske, H.; Stoll, M.; Bendl, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation of moving tumours is a challenging task in radiotherapy. Tumour motion induced by respiration can be visualized in fluoroscopic images recorded during patients breathing. Markerless methods making use of registration techniques can be used to estimate tumour motion. However, registration methods might fail when the tumour is hidden by ribs. Using motion of anatomical surrogates, like the diaphragm, is promising to model tumour motion. Methods: A sequence of 116 fluoroscopic images was analyzed and the tumour positions were manually defined by three experts. A block matching (BM) technique is used to calculate the displacement vector relatively to a selected reference image of the first breathing cycle. An enhanced method was developed: Positions, when the tumour is not located behind a rib, are taken as valid estimations of the tumour position. Furthermore, these valid estimations are used to establish a linear model of tumour position and diaphragm motion. For invalid estimations the calculated tumour positions are not taken into consideration, and instead the model is used to determine tumour motion. Results: Enhancing BM with a model of tumour motion from diaphragm motion improves the tracking accuracy when the tumour moves behind a rib. The error (mean ± SD) in longitudinal dimension was 2.0 ± 1.5mm using only BM and 1.0 ± 1.1mm when the enhanced approach was used. Conclusion: The enhanced tracking technique is capable to improve tracking accuracy compared to BM in the case that the tumour is occluded by ribs.

  11. Evaluation of the influence of cardiac motion on the accuracy and reproducibility of longitudinal measurements and the corresponding image quality in optical frequency domain imaging: an ex vivo investigation of the optimal pullback speed.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kohei; Yoneyama, Kihei; Mitarai, Takanobu; Kuwata, Shingo; Kongoji, Ken; Harada, Tomoo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J

    2015-08-01

    Longitudinal measurement using intravascular ultrasound is limited because the motorized pullback device assumes no cardiac motion. A newly developed intracoronary imaging modality, optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI), has higher resolution and an increased auto-pullback speed with presumably lesser susceptibility to cardiac motion artifacts during pullback for longitudinal measurement; however, it has not been fully investigated. We aimed to clarify the influence of cardiac motion on the accuracy and reproducibility of longitudinal measurements obtained using OFDI and to determine the optimal pullback speed. This ex vivo study included 31 stents deployed in the mid left anterior descending artery under phantom heartbeat and coronary flow simulation. Longitudinal stent lengths were measured twice using OFDI at three pullback speeds. Differences in stent lengths between OFDI and microscopy and between two repetitive pullbacks were assessed to determine accuracy and reproducibility. Furthermore, three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction was used for evaluating image quality. With regard to differences in stent length between OFDI and microscopy, the intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.985, 0.994, and 0.995 at 10, 20, and 40 mm/s, respectively. With regard to reproducibility, the values were 0.995, 0.996, and 0.996 at 10, 20, and 40 mm/s, respectively. 3D reconstruction showed a superior image quality at 10 and 20 mm/s compared with that at 40 mm/s. OFDI demonstrated high accuracy and reproducibility for longitudinal stent measurements. Moreover, its accuracy and reproducibility were remarkable at a higher pullback speed. A 20-mm/s pullback speed may be optimal for clinical and research purposes. PMID:25971841

  12. Upper limb kinematic differences between breathing and non-breathing conditions in front crawl sprint swimming.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Carla B; Sanders, Ross H; Psycharakis, Stelios G

    2015-11-26

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the breathing action in front crawl (FC) sprint swimming affects the ipsilateral upper limb kinematics relative to a non-breathing stroke cycle (SC). Ten male competitive swimmers performed two 25m FC sprints: one breathing to their preferred side (Br) and one not breathing (NBr). Both swim trials were performed through a 6.75m(3) calibrated space and recorded by six gen-locked JVC KY32 CCD cameras. A paired t-test was used to assess statistical differences between the trials, with a confidence level of p<0.05 accepted as significant. Swimmers were slower (3%) when breathing. Within the entry phase, swimmers had a slower COM horizontal velocity (3.3%), less shoulder flexion (8%), abduction (33%) and roll (4%) when breathing. The pull phase was longer in duration (14%) swimmers had a shallower hand path (11%), less shoulder abduction (11%), a slower hand vertical acceleration (30%) and slower centre of mass (COM) horizontal velocity (3%) when breathing. In the push phase, swimmers had a smaller elbow range of motion (ROM) (38%), faster backwards hand speed (25%) and faster hand vertical acceleration (33%) when breathing. Swimmers rolled their shoulders more (12%) in the recovery phase when breathing. This study confirms that swim performance is compromised by the inclusion of taking a breath in sprint FC swimming. It was proposed that swimmers aim to orient their ipsilateral shoulder into a stronger position by stretching and rolling the shoulders more in the entry phase whilst preparing to take a breath. Swimmers should focus on lengthening the push phase by extending the elbow more and not accelerating the hand too quickly upwards when preparing to inhale. PMID:26456423

  13. In vivo micro-CT imaging of the murine lung via a computer controlled intermittent iso-pressure breath hold (IIBH) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namati, Eman; Chon, Deokiee; Thiesse, Jacqueline; McLennan, Geoffrey; Sieren, Jered; Ross, Alan; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2006-03-01

    Micro-CT, a technique for imaging small objects at high resolution using micro focused x-rays, is becoming widely available for small animal imaging. With the growing number of mouse models of pulmonary pathology, there is great interest in following disease progression and evaluating the alteration in longitudinal studies. Along with the high resolution associated with micro CT comes increased scanning times, and hence minimization of motion artifacts is required. We propose a new technique for imaging mouse lungs in vivo by inducing an intermittent iso-pressure breath hold (IIBH) with a fixed level of positive airway pressure during image acquisition, to decrease motion artifacts and increase image resolution and quality. Mechanical ventilation of the respiratory system for such a setup consists of three phases, 1) tidal breathing (hyperventilated), 2) a breath hold during a fixed level of applied positive airway pressure, 3) periodic deep sighs. Image acquisition is triggered over the stable segment of the IIBH period. Comparison of images acquired from the same mouse lung using three imaging techniques (normal breathing / no gating, normal breathing with gating at End Inspiration (EI) and finally the IIBH technique) demonstrated substantial improvements in resolution and quality when using the IIBH gating. Using IIBH triggering the total image acquisition time increased from 15 minutes to 35 minutes, although total x-ray exposure time and hence animal dosage remains the same. This technique is an important step in providing high quality lung imaging of the mouse in vivo, and will provide a good foundation for future longitudinal studies.

  14. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  15. Breathing metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a breathing metabolic simulator (BMS) is reported. This BMS simulates all of the breathing and metabolic parameters required for complete evaluation and test of life support and resuscitation equipment. It is also useful for calibrating and validating mechanical and gaseous pulmonary function test procedures. Breathing rate, breathing depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake, and carbon dioxide release are all variable over wide ranges simulating conditions from sleep to hard work with respiratory exchange ratios covering the range from hypoventilation. In addition, all of these parameters are remotely controllable to facilitate use of the device in hostile or remote environments. The exhaled breath is also maintained at body temperature and a high humidity. The simulation is accurate to the extent of having a variable functional residual capacity independent of other parameters.

  16. Breathing-metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Breathing-metabolic simulator was developed to be used for evaluation of life support equipment. Apparatus simulates human breathing rate and controls temperature and humidity of exhaled air as well as its chemical composition. All functions are designed to correspond to various degrees of human response.

  17. Simulated breath waveform control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Subsystem was developed which provides twelve waveform controls to breath drive mechanism. Twelve position, magnetically actuated rotary switch is connected to one end of crankshaft drive, such that it makes one complete revolution for each simulated breath. Connections with common wired point are included in modifications made to standard motor speed controller.

  18. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with: Genetic conditions, such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breathing Problems Rett Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  19. Breathing metabolic simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a device for simulation of the human breathing and metabolic parameters required for the evaluation of respiratory diagnostic, monitoring, support and resuscitation equipment. The remotely controlled device allows wide variations in breathing rate and depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide release to simulate conditions from sleep to hard work, with respiration exchange ratios ranging from hypoventilation to hyperventilation. It also reduces the cost of prolonged testing when simulation chambers with human subjects require three shifts of crews and standby physicians. Several block diagrams of the device and subsystems are given.

  20. Breathing-Synchronized Delivery: A Potential Four-Dimensional Tomotherapy Treatment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tiezhi . E-mail: tiezhi.zhang@beaumont.edu; Lu Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Keller, Harry; Jeraj, Robert; Manon, Rafael; Mehta, Minesh; Mackie, Thomas R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To introduce a four-dimensional (4D) tomotherapy treatment technique with improved motion control and patient tolerance. Methods and Materials: Computed tomographic images at 10 breathing phases were acquired for treatment planning. The full exhalation phase was chosen as the planning phase, and the CT images at this phase were used as treatment-planning images. Region of interest delineation was the same as in traditional treatment planning, except that no breathing motion margin was used in clinical target volume-planning target volume expansion. The correlation between delivery and breathing phases was set assuming a constant gantry speed and a fixed breathing period. Deformable image registration yielded the deformation fields at each phase relative to the planning phase. With the delivery/breathing phase correlation and voxel displacements at each breathing phase, a 4D tomotherapy plan was obtained by incorporating the motion into inverse treatment plan optimization. A combined laser/spirometer breathing tracking system has been developed to monitor patient breathing. This system is able to produce stable and reproducible breathing signals representing tidal volume. Results: We compared the 4D tomotherapy treatment planning method with conventional tomotherapy on a static target. The results showed that 4D tomotherapy can achieve dose distributions on a moving target similar to those obtained with conventional delivery on a stationary target. Regular breathing motion is fully compensated by motion-incorporated breathing-synchronized delivery planning. Four-dimensional tomotherapy also has close to 100% duty cycle and does not prolong treatment time. Conclusion: Breathing-synchronized delivery is a feasible 4D tomotherapy treatment technique with improved motion control and patient tolerance.

  1. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... a high altitude Blood clot in the lung Collapsed lung (pneumothorax) Heart attack Injury to the neck, chest wall, ... cavity with each breath. This can cause a collapsed lung . Bandage the wound with plastic wrap, a plastic ...

  2. Breathing - slowed or stopped

    MedlinePlus

    ... can occur with obstructive sleep apnea, for example. Prolonged apnea means a person has stopped breathing. If ... that requires immediate medical attention and first aid. Prolonged apnea with no heart activity in a person ...

  3. Shortness-of-Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... can lead to shortness of breath include anxiety, panic attacks, anemia and even constipation. The experience of shortness ... are used to treat patients with anxiety or panic attacks. Other commonly used drugs include bronchodilators to widen ...

  4. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... deep breath, which usually results in retention of carbon dioxide and not enough oxygen in blood (obesity hypoventilation ... for anemia), and oximetry or blood oxygen or carbon dioxide levels. Your doctor also may obtain a chest ...

  5. Numerical solution of equations governing longitudinal suspension line wave motion during the parachute unfurling process. Ph.D. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Washington, D. C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Equations are presented which govern the dynamics of the lines-first parachute unfurling process, including wave motion in the parachute suspension lines. Techniques are developed for obtaining numerical solutions to the governing equations. Histories of tension at test data, and generally good agreement is observed. Errors in computed results are attributed to several areas of uncertainty, the most significant being a poorly defined boundary condition on the wave motion at the vehicle-suspension line boundary.

  6. A miniature optical breathing sensor

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Jinesh; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel miniature optical breathing sensor based on an Agarose infiltrated photonic crystal fiber interferometer. The sensor detects the variation in relative humidity that occurs between inhaled and exhaled breath. The sensor interrogation system can determine the breathing pattern in real time and can also predict the breathing rate and the breathing status during respiration. The sensor is suitable for monitoring patients during a magnetic resonance imaging scan where use of sedatives and anesthetics necessitates breathing monitoring; electronic sensors are not suitable in such an environment and a visual observation of the patient's respiratory efforts is often difficult. PMID:23243581

  7. Breathing: Rhythmicity, Plasticity, Chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jack L.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Nattie, Eugene E.

    2010-01-01

    Breathing is a vital behavior that is particularly amenable to experimental investigation. We review recent progress on three problems of broad interest. (i) Where and how is respiratory rhythm generated? The preBötzinger Complex is a critical site, whereas pacemaker neurons may not be essential. The possibility that coupled oscillators are involved is considered. (ii) What are the mechanisms that underlie the plasticity necessary for adaptive changes in breathing? Serotonin-dependent long-term facilitation following intermittent hypoxia is an important example of such plasticity, and a model that can account for this adaptive behavior is discussed. (iii) Where and how are the regulated variables CO2 and pH sensed? These sensors are essential if breathing is to be appropriate for metabolism. Neurons with appropriate chemosensitivity are spread throughout the brainstem; their individual properties and collective role are just beginning to be understood. PMID:12598679

  8. A clinical evaluation of visual feedback-guided breath-hold reproducibility of tumor location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Ohga, Saiji; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Terashima, Kotaro; Arimura, Hidetaka; Hirata, Hideki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of visual feedback-guided breath-hold using a machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera and a monocular head-mounted display. Sixteen patients with lung tumors who were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were enrolled. A machine vision system with a charge-coupled device camera was used for monitoring respiration. A monocular head-mounted display was used to provide the patient with visual feedback about the breathing trace. The patients could control their breathing so that the breathing waveform would fall between the upper and lower threshold lines. Planning and treatment were performed under visual feedback-guided expiratory breath-hold. Electronic portal images were obtained during treatment. The range of cranial-caudal motion of the tumor location during each single breath-hold was calculated as the intra-breath-hold (intra-BH) variability. The maximum displacement between the two to five averaged tumor locations of each single breath-hold was calculated as the inter-breath-hold (inter-BH) variability. All 16 patients tolerated the visual feedback-guided breath-hold maneuvers well. The intra- and inter-BH variability of all patients was 1.5 ± 0.6 mm and 1.2 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. A visual feedback-guided breath-hold technique using the machine vision system is feasible with good breath-hold reproducibility.

  9. Computational Motion Phantoms and Statistical Models of Respiratory Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian

    Breathing motion is not a robust and 100 % reproducible process, and inter- and intra-fractional motion variations form an important problem in radiotherapy of the thorax and upper abdomen. A widespread consensus nowadays exists that it would be useful to use prior knowledge about respiratory organ motion and its variability to improve radiotherapy planning and treatment delivery. This chapter discusses two different approaches to model the variability of respiratory motion. In the first part, we review computational motion phantoms, i.e. computerized anatomical and physiological models. Computational phantoms are excellent tools to simulate and investigate the effects of organ motion in radiation therapy and to gain insight into methods for motion management. The second part of this chapter discusses statistical modeling techniques to describe the breathing motion and its variability in a population of 4D images. Population-based models can be generated from repeatedly acquired 4D images of the same patient (intra-patient models) and from 4D images of different patients (inter-patient models). The generation of those models is explained and possible applications of those models for motion prediction in radiotherapy are exemplified. Computational models of respiratory motion and motion variability have numerous applications in radiation therapy, e.g. to understand motion effects in simulation studies, to develop and evaluate treatment strategies or to introduce prior knowledge into the patient-specific treatment planning.

  10. Metabolic breath analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument measures metabolic breathing rate and dynamics of human beings in atmospheres ranging from normal air to 100 percent oxygen at ambient pressures from 14.7 to 3.0 psia. Measurements are made at rest or performing tasks up to maximum physical capacity under either zero or normal gravity.

  11. Firefighter's Breathing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlan, P. B.; Giorgini, E. A.; Sullivan, J. L.; Simmonds, M. R.; Beck, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    System, based on open-loop demand-type compressed air concept, is lighter and less bulky than former systems, yet still provides thirty minutes of air supply. Comfort, visibility, donning time, and breathing resistance have been improved. Apparatus is simple to recharge and maintain and is comparable in cost to previously available systems.

  12. Life and Breath

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Helen D.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a public education program combining the screening process and a follow-up program for teaching victims of emphysema and other respiratory diseases how to better their living condition through proper breathing, avoidance of air pollutants and cigarette smoking, and taking better care of themselves physically. (PD)

  13. Oronasal breathing during exercise.

    PubMed

    Saibene, F; Mognoni, P; Lafortuna, C L; Mostardi, R

    1978-12-15

    The shift from nasal to oronasal breathing (ONBS) has been observed on 73 subjects with two independent methods. A first group of 63 subjects exercising on a bicycle ergometer at increasing work load (98--196 W) has been observed. On 35 subjects the highest value of ventilation attained with nasal breathing was 40.2 +/- 9.41 . min-1 S.D. Ten subjects breathed through the mouth at all loads, while 5 never opened the mouth. On 13 subjects it was not possible to make reliable measurements. On a second group of 10 subjects utilizing a different techniques which did not need a face mask, the ventilation at which one changes the pattern of breathing was found to be 44.2 +/- 13.51 . min-1 S.D. On the same subjects nasal resistance did not show any correlation with ONBS. It is concluded that ONBS is not solely determined by nasal resistance, though an indirect effect due to hypoventilation and hence to changes in alveolar air composition cannot be ruled out. It is likely that ONBS is also influenced by psychological factors. PMID:569826

  14. Breathing Like a Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Being able to dive and breathe underwater has been a challenge for thousands of years. In 1980, Fuji Systems of Tokyo developed a series of prototype gills for divers as a way of demonstrating just how good its membranes are. Even though gill technology has not yet reached the point where recipients can efficiently use implants to dive underwater,…

  15. INTERMITTENT POSITIVE PRESSURE BREATHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efficacy of long-term intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) treatment when used as an adjunct to the overall care of ambulatory outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The evaluation compared the use of IPPB with use of a powered nebulizer.

  16. Motion simulator study of longitudinal stability requirements for large delta wing transport airplanes during approach and landing with stability augmentation systems failed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Fry, E. B.; Drinkwater, F. J., III; Forrest, R. D.; Scott, B. C.; Benefield, T. D.

    1972-01-01

    A ground-based simulator investigation was conducted in preparation for and correlation with an-flight simulator program. The objective of these studies was to define minimum acceptable levels of static longitudinal stability for landing approach following stability augmentation systems failures. The airworthiness authorities are presently attempting to establish the requirements for civil transports with only the backup flight control system operating. Using a baseline configuration representative of a large delta wing transport, 20 different configurations, many representing negative static margins, were assessed by three research test pilots in 33 hours of piloted operation. Verification of the baseline model to be used in the TIFS experiment was provided by computed and piloted comparisons with a well-validated reference airplane simulation. Pilot comments and ratings are included, as well as preliminary tracking performance and workload data.

  17. Emergency Response Breathing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace Design & Development, Inc.'s (ADD's) SCAMP was developed under an SBIR contract through Kennedy Space Center. SCAMP stands for Supercritical Air Mobility Pack. The technology came from the life support fuel cell support systems used for the Apollo and Space Shuttle programs. It uses supercritical cryogenic air and is able to function in microgravity environments. SCAMP's self-contained breathing apparatus(SCBA) systems are also ground-based and can provide twice as much air than traditional SCBA's due to its high-density capacity. The SCAMP system was designed for use in launch pad emergency rescues. ADD also developed a protective suit for use with SCAMP that is smaller and lighter system than the old ones. ADD's SCAMP allows for body cooling and breathing from the supercritical cryogenic air, requiring no extra systems. The improvement over the traditional SCBA allows for a reduction of injuries, such as heat stress, and makes it easier for rescuers to save lives.

  18. Mapleson's Breathing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Tej K; Mittal, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Mapleson breathing systems are used for delivering oxygen and anaesthetic agents and to eliminate carbon dioxide during anaesthesia. They consist of different components: Fresh gas flow, reservoir bag, breathing tubes, expiratory valve, and patient connection. There are five basic types of Mapleson system: A, B, C, D and E depending upon the different arrangements of these components. Mapleson F was added later. For adults, Mapleson A is the circuit of choice for spontaneous respiration where as Mapleson D and its Bains modifications are best available circuits for controlled ventilation. For neonates and paediatric patients Mapleson E and F (Jackson Rees modification) are the best circuits. In this review article, we will discuss the structure of the circuits and functional analysis of various types of Mapleson systems and their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:24249884

  19. Clinical implementation of target tracking by breathing synchronized delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Tewatia, Dinesh; Zhang Tiezhi; Tome, Wolfgang; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Metha, Minesh

    2006-11-15

    Target-tracking techniques can be categorized based on the mechanism of the feedback loop. In real time tracking, breathing-delivery phase correlation is provided to the treatment delivery hardware. Clinical implementation of target tracking in real time requires major hardware modifications. In breathing synchronized delivery (BSD), the patient is guided to breathe in accordance with target motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Violations of mechanical limitations of hardware are to be avoided at the treatment planning stage. Hardware modifications are not required. In this article, using sliding window IMRT delivery as an example, we have described step-by-step the implementation of target tracking by the BSD technique: (1) A breathing guide is developed from patient's normal breathing pattern. The patient tries to reproduce this guiding cycle by following the display in the goggles; (2) 4D-CT scans are acquired at all the phases of the breathing cycle; (3) The average tumor trajectory is obtained by deformable image registration of 4D-CT datasets and is smoothed by Fourier filtering; (4) Conventional IMRT planning is performed using the images at reference phase (full exhalation phase) and a leaf sequence based on optimized fluence map is generated; (5) Assuming the patient breathes with a reproducible breathing pattern and the machine maintains a constant dose rate, the treatment process is correlated with the breathing phase; (6) The instantaneous average tumor displacement is overlaid on the dMLC position at corresponding phase; and (7) DMLC leaf speed and acceleration are evaluated to ensure treatment delivery. A custom-built mobile phantom driven by a computer-controlled stepper motor was used in the dosimetry verification. A stepper motor was programmed such that the phantom moved according to the linear component of tumor motion used in BSD treatment planning. A conventional plan was delivered on the phantom with and without

  20. SU-E-T-326: The Oxygen Saturation (SO2) and Breath-Holding Time Variation Applied Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, G; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the oxygen saturation (SO2) and breath-holding time variation applied active breathing control (ABC) in radiotherapy of tumor. Methods: 24 volunteers were involved in our trials, and they all did breath-holding motion assisted by ELEKTA Active Breathing Coordinator 2.0 for 10 times respectively. And the patient monitor was used to observe the oxygen saturation (SO2) variation. The variation of SO2, and length of breath-holding time and the time for recovering to the initial value of SO2 were recorded and analyzed. Results: (1) The volunteers were divided into two groups according to the SO2 variation in breath-holding: A group, 14 cases whose SO2 reduction were more than 2% (initial value was 97% to 99%, while termination value was 91% to 96%); B group, 10 cases were less than 2% in breath-holding without inhaling oxygen. (2) The interfraction breath holding time varied from 8 to 20s for A group compared to the first breath-holding time, and for B group varied from 4 to 14s. (3) The breathing holding time of B group prolonged mean 8s, compared to A group. (4) The time for restoring to the initial value of SO2 was from 10s to 30s. And the breath-holding time shortened obviously for patients whose SO2 did not recover to normal. Conclusion: It is very obvious that the SO2 reduction in breath-holding associated with ABC for partial people. It is necessary to check the SO2 variation in breath training, and enough time should be given to recover SO2.

  1. Breather solutions of a nonlinear DNA model including a longitudinal degree of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, J.; Hennig, D.

    2003-05-01

    We present a model of the DNA double helix assigning three degrees of freedom to each pair of nucleotides. The model is an extension of the Barbi-Cocco-Peyrard (BCP) model in the sense that the current model allows for longitudinal motions of the nucleotides parallel to the helix axis. The molecular structure of the double helix is modelled by a system of coupled oscillators. The nucleotides are represented by point masses and coupled via point-point interaction potentials. The latter describe the covalent and hydrogen bonds responsible for the secondary structure of DNA. We obtain breather solutions using an established method for the construction of breathers on nonlinear lattices starting from the anti-coupling limit. In order to apply this method we analyse the phonon spectrum of the linearised system corresponding to our model. The obtained breathing motion consists of a local opening and re-closing of base pairs combined with a local untwist of the helix. The motions in longitudinal direction are of much lower amplitudes than the radial and angular elongations.

  2. Remote monitoring of breathing dynamics using infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carina Barbosa; Yu, Xinchi; Czaplik, Michael; Rossaint, Rolf; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    An atypical or irregular respiratory frequency is considered to be one of the earliest markers of physiological distress. In addition, monitoring of this vital parameter plays a major role in diagnosis of respiratory disorders, as well as in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome. Nevertheless, the current measurement modalities require attachment of sensors to the patient’s body, leading to discomfort and stress. The current paper presents a new robust algorithm to remotely monitor breathing rate (BR) by using thermal imaging. This approach permits to detect and to track the region of interest (nose) as well as to estimate BR. In order to study the performance of the algorithm, and its robustness against motion and breathing disorders, three different thermal recordings of 11 healthy volunteers were acquired (sequence 1: normal breathing; sequence 2: normal breathing plus arbitrary head movements; and sequence 3: sequence of specific breathing patterns). Thoracic effort (piezoplethysmography) served as “gold standard” for validation of our results. An excellent agreement between estimated BR and ground truth was achieved. Whereas the mean correlation for sequence 1–3 were 0.968, 0.940 and 0.974, the mean absolute BR errors reached 0.33, 0.55 and 0.96 bpm (breaths per minute), respectively. In brief, this work demonstrates that infrared thermography is a promising, clinically relevant alternative for the currently available measuring modalities due to its performance and diverse remarkable advantages. PMID:26601003

  3. Remote monitoring of breathing dynamics using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carina Barbosa; Yu, Xinchi; Czaplik, Michael; Rossaint, Rolf; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-11-01

    An atypical or irregular respiratory frequency is considered to be one of the earliest markers of physiological distress. In addition, monitoring of this vital parameter plays a major role in diagnosis of respiratory disorders, as well as in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome. Nevertheless, the current measurement modalities require attachment of sensors to the patient's body, leading to discomfort and stress. The current paper presents a new robust algorithm to remotely monitor breathing rate (BR) by using thermal imaging. This approach permits to detect and to track the region of interest (nose) as well as to estimate BR. In order to study the performance of the algorithm, and its robustness against motion and breathing disorders, three different thermal recordings of 11 healthy volunteers were acquired (sequence 1: normal breathing; sequence 2: normal breathing plus arbitrary head movements; and sequence 3: sequence of specific breathing patterns). Thoracic effort (piezoplethysmography) served as "gold standard" for validation of our results. An excellent agreement between estimated BR and ground truth was achieved. Whereas the mean correlation for sequence 1-3 were 0.968, 0.940 and 0.974, the mean absolute BR errors reached 0.33, 0.55 and 0.96 bpm (breaths per minute), respectively. In brief, this work demonstrates that infrared thermography is a promising, clinically relevant alternative for the currently available measuring modalities due to its performance and diverse remarkable advantages. PMID:26601003

  4. Probing plasmonic breathing modes optically

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Markus K. Reisecker, Michael; Hohenau, Andreas; Ditlbacher, Harald; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Krenn, Joachim R.

    2014-10-27

    The confinement of surface plasmon modes in flat nanoparticles gives rise to plasmonic breathing modes. With a vanishing net dipole moment, breathing modes do not radiate, i.e., they are optically dark. Having thus escaped optical detection, breathing modes were only recently revealed in silver nanodisks with electron energy loss spectroscopy in an electron microscope. We show that for disk diameters >200 nm, retardation induced by oblique optical illumination relaxes the optically dark character. This makes breathing modes and thus the full plasmonic mode spectrum accessible to optical spectroscopy. The experimental spectroscopy data are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  5. Patient-specific simulation of tidal breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, M.; Wells, A. K.; Jones, I. P.; Hamill, I. S.; Veeckmans, B.; Vos, W.; Lefevre, C.; Fetitia, C.

    2016-03-01

    Patient-specific simulation of air flows in lungs is now straightforward using segmented airways trees from CT scans as the basis for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. These models generally use static geometries, which do not account for the motion of the lungs and its influence on important clinical indicators, such as airway resistance. This paper is concerned with the simulation of tidal breathing, including the dynamic motion of the lungs, and the required analysis workflow. Geometries are based on CT scans obtained at the extremes of the breathing cycle, Total Lung Capacity (TLC) and Functional Residual Capacity (FRC). It describes how topologically consistent geometries are obtained at TLC and FRC, using a `skeleton' of the network of airway branches. From this a 3D computational mesh which morphs between TLC and FRC is generated. CFD results for a number of patient-specific cases, healthy and asthmatic, are presented. Finally their potential use in evaluation of the progress of the disease is discussed, focusing on an important clinical indicator, the airway resistance.

  6. Imaging of cardiac perfusion of free-breathing small animals using dynamic phase-correlated micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sawall, Stefan; Kuntz, Jan; Socher, Michaela; Knaup, Michael; Hess, Andreas; Bartling, Soenke; Kachelriess, Marc

    2012-12-15

    Purpose:Mouse models of cardiac diseases have proven to be a valuable tool in preclinical research. The high cardiac and respiratory rates of free breathing mice prohibit conventional in vivo cardiac perfusion studies using computed tomography even if gating methods are applied. This makes a sacrification of the animals unavoidable and only allows for the application of ex vivo methods. Methods: To overcome this issue the authors propose a low dose scan protocol and an associated reconstruction algorithm that allows for in vivo imaging of cardiac perfusion and associated processes that are retrospectively synchronized to the respiratory and cardiac motion of the animal. The scan protocol consists of repetitive injections of contrast media within several consecutive scans while the ECG, respiratory motion, and timestamp of contrast injection are recorded and synchronized to the acquired projections. The iterative reconstruction algorithm employs a six-dimensional edge-preserving filter to provide low-noise, motion artifact-free images of the animal examined using the authors' low dose scan protocol. Results: The reconstructions obtained show that the complete temporal bolus evolution can be visualized and quantified in any desired combination of cardiac and respiratory phase including reperfusion phases. The proposed reconstruction method thereby keeps the administered radiation dose at a minimum and thus reduces metabolic inference to the animal allowing for longitudinal studies. Conclusions: The authors' low dose scan protocol and phase-correlated dynamic reconstruction algorithm allow for an easy and effective way to visualize phase-correlated perfusion processes in routine laboratory studies using free-breathing mice.

  7. Longitudinal dynamics in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The single-particle equations of motion are derived for charged particles in a storage ring. Longitudinal space charge is included in the potential assuming an infinitely conducting circular beam pipe with a distributed inductance. The framework uses Hamilton's equations with the canonical variables phi and W. The Twiss parameters for longitudinal motion are also defined for the small amplitude synchrotron oscillations. The space-charge Hamiltonian is calculated for both parabolic bunches and ''matched'' bunches. A brief analysis including second-harmonic rf contributions is also given. The final sections supply calculations of dynamical quantities and particle simulations with the space-charge effects neglected.

  8. Motion magnification using the Hermite transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieva, Jorge; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Gomez-Coronel, Sandra L.; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Ponce, Hiram; Mora Esquivel, Juan I.

    2015-12-01

    We present an Eulerian motion magnification technique with a spatial decomposition based on the Hermite Transform (HT). We compare our results to the approach presented in.1 We test our method in one sequence of the breathing of a newborn baby and on an MRI left ventricle sequence. Methods are compared using quantitative and qualitative metrics after the application of the motion magnification algorithm.

  9. Volatile Biomarkers in Breath Associated With Liver Cirrhosis — Comparisons of Pre- and Post-liver Transplant Breath Samples

    PubMed Central

    Fernández del Río, R.; O'Hara, M.E.; Holt, A.; Pemberton, P.; Shah, T.; Whitehouse, T.; Mayhew, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of liver disease in the UK has risen dramatically and there is a need for improved diagnostics. Aims To determine which breath volatiles are associated with the cirrhotic liver and hence diagnostically useful. Methods A two-stage biomarker discovery procedure was used. Alveolar breath samples of 31 patients with cirrhosis and 30 healthy controls were mass spectrometrically analysed and compared (stage 1). 12 of these patients had their breath analysed after liver transplant (stage 2). Five patients were followed longitudinally as in-patients in the post-transplant period. Results Seven volatiles were elevated in the breath of patients versus controls. Of these, five showed statistically significant decrease post-transplant: limonene, methanol, 2-pentanone, 2-butanone and carbon disulfide. On an individual basis limonene has the best diagnostic capability (the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) is 0.91), but this is improved by combining methanol, 2-pentanone and limonene (AUROC curve 0.95). Following transplant, limonene shows wash-out characteristics. Conclusions Limonene, methanol and 2-pentanone are breath markers for a cirrhotic liver. This study raises the potential to investigate these volatiles as markers for early-stage liver disease. By monitoring the wash-out of limonene following transplant, graft liver function can be non-invasively assessed. PMID:26501124

  10. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  11. Clinical applications of breath testing

    PubMed Central

    Paschke, Kelly M; Mashir, Alquam

    2010-01-01

    Breath testing has the potential to benefit the medical field as a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool for diseases of the lung and beyond. With growing evidence of clinical worth, standardization of methods, and new sensor and detection technologies the stage is set for breath testing to gain considerable attention and wider application in upcoming years. PMID:21173863

  12. BREATHE to Understand©

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swisa, Maxine

    2015-01-01

    BREATHE is an acronym for Breathe, Reflect, Empathize, Accept, Thank, Hearten, Engage. The addition of Understand allows for a holistic approach to living a healthy and balanced life both inside and outside the classroom. This paper took form as a result of my personal, spiritual journey, as well as my teaching practice. I noticed that the…

  13. SU-E-J-185: A Systematic Review of Breathing Guidance in Radiation Oncology and Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, S; Keall, P; Keall, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has led to dramatic improvements in the accuracy of treatment delivery in radiotherapy. Such advancements have highlighted the deleterious impact tumor motion can have on both image quality and radiation treatment delivery. One approach to reducing tumor motion is the use of breathing guidance systems during imaging and treatment. A review of such research had not yet been performed, it was therefore our aim to perform a systematic review of breathing guidance interventions within the fields of radiation oncology and radiology. Methods: Results of online database searches were filtered in accordance to a set of eligibility criteria. The search, filtration, and analysis of articles were conducted in accordance with the PRISMAStatement reporting standard (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) utilizing the PICOS approach (Participants, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, Study design). Participants: Cancer patients, healthy volunteers. Intervention: Biofeedback breathing guidance systems. Comparison: No breathing guidance of the same breathing type. Outcome: Regularity of breathing signal and anatomic/tumor motion, medical image quality, radiation treatment margins and coverage, medical imaging and radiation treatment times. Study design: Quantitative and controlled prospective or retrospective trials. Results: The systematic search yielded a total of 479 articles, which were filtered down to 27 relevant articles in accordance to the eligibility criteria. The vast majority of investigated outcomes were significantly positively impacted by the use of breathing guidance; however, this was dependent upon the nature of the breathing guidance system and study design. In 25/27 studies significant improvements from the use of breathing guidance were observed. Conclusion: The results found here indicate that further clinical studies are warranted which quantify more comprehensively the

  14. Respiration-correlated treatment delivery using feedback-guided breath hold: A technical study

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Christopher; Starkschall, George; Balter, Peter; Fitzpatrick, Mathew J.; Antolak, John A.; Tolani, Naresh; Prado, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes movement of internal structures in the thorax and abdomen, making accurate delivery of radiation therapy to tumors in those areas a challenge. To reduce the uncertainties caused by this motion, we have developed feedback-guided breath hold (FGBH), a novel delivery technique in which radiation is delivered only during a voluntary breath hold that is sustained for as long as the patient feels comfortable. Here we present the technical aspects of FGBH, which involve (1) fabricating the hardware so the respiratory trace can be displayed to the patient, (2) assembling a delay box to be used as a breath-hold detector, and (3) performing quality control tests to ensure that FGBH can be delivered accurately and safely. A commercial respiratory tracking system that uses an external fiducial to monitor abdominal wall motion generates and displays the breathing trace and specific positions in the breathing cycle where a breath hold needs to occur. Hardware was developed to present this display to the patient in the treatment position. Patients view the presentation either on a liquid crystal display or through a pair of virtual reality goggles. Using the respiratory trace as a visual aid, the patient performs a breath hold so that the position representing the location of a fiducial is held within a specified gating window. A delay box was fabricated to differentiate between gating signals received during free breathing and those received during breath hold, allowing radiation delivery only when the fiducial was within the breath-hold gating window. A quality control analysis of the gating delay box and the integrated system was performed to ensure that all of the hardware and components were ready for clinical use.

  15. Archosaurian respiration and the pelvic girdle aspiration breathing of crocodyliforms.

    PubMed Central

    Claessens, Leon P. A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Birds and crocodylians, the only living archosaurs, are generally believed to employ pelvic girdle movements as a component of their respiratory mechanism. This in turn provides a phylogenetic basis for inferring that extinct archosaurs, including dinosaurs, also used pelvic girdle breathing. I examined lung ventilation through cineradiography (high-speed X-ray filming) and observed that alligators indeed rotate the pubis to increase tidal volume, but did not observe pelvic girdle movement contributing to lung ventilation in guinea fowl, emus or tinamous, despite extensive soft-tissue motion. Re-examination of fossil archosaurs reveals that pubic rotation evolved in basal crocodyliforms and that pelvic girdle breathing is not a general archosaurian mechanism. The appearance of pelvic aspiration in crocodyliforms is a striking example of the ability of amniotes to increase gas exchange or circumvent constraints on respiration through the evolution of novel accessory breathing mechanisms. PMID:15306317

  16. Nonrigid registration method to assess reproducibility of breath-holding with ABC in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David . E-mail: dsarrut@univ-lyon2.fr; Boldea, Vlad; Ayadi, Myriam; Badel, Jean-Noel; Ginestet, Chantal; Clippe, Sebastien; Carrie, Christian

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To study the interfraction reproducibility of breath-holding using active breath control (ABC), and to develop computerized tools to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) intrathoracic motion in each patient. Methods and materials: Since June 2002, 11 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer enrolled in a Phase II trial have undergone four CT scans: one during free-breathing (reference) and three using ABC. Patients left the room between breath-hold scans. The patient's breath was held at the same predefined phase of the breathing cycle (about 70% of the vital capacity) using the ABC device, then patients received 3D-conformal radiotherapy. Automated computerized tools for breath-hold CT scans were developed to analyze lung and tumor interfraction residual motions with 3D nonrigid registration. Results: All patients but one were safely treated with ABC for 7 weeks. For 6 patients, the lung volume differences were <5%. The mean 3D displacement inside the lungs was between 2.3 mm (SD 1.4) and 4 mm (SD 3.3), and the gross tumor volume residual motion was 0.9 mm (SD 0.4) to 5.9 mm (SD 0.7). The residual motion was slightly greater in the inferior part of the lung than the superior. For 2 patients, we detected volume changes >300 cm{sup 3} and displacements >10 mm, probably owing to atelectasia and emphysema. One patient was excluded, and two others had incomplete data sets. Conclusion: Breath-holding with ABC was effective in 6 patients, and discrepancies were clinically accountable in 2. The proposed 3D nonrigid registration method allows for personalized evaluation of breath-holding reproducibility with ABC. It will be used to adapt the patient-specific internal margins.

  17. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  18. Rapid shallow breathing index

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  19. Breathing rhythms and emotions.

    PubMed

    Homma, Ikuo; Masaoka, Yuri

    2008-09-01

    Respiration is primarily regulated for metabolic and homeostatic purposes in the brainstem. However, breathing can also change in response to changes in emotions, such as sadness, happiness, anxiety or fear. Final respiratory output is influenced by a complex interaction between the brainstem and higher centres, including the limbic system and cortical structures. Respiration is important in maintaining physiological homeostasis and co-exists with emotions. In this review, we focus on the relationship between respiration and emotions by discussing previous animal and human studies, including studies of olfactory function in relation to respiration and the piriform-amygdala in relation to respiration. In particular, we discuss oscillations of piriform-amygdala complex activity and respiratory rhythm. PMID:18487316

  20. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  1. Gated CT imaging using a free-breathing respiration signal from flow-volume spirometry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Kwok, Young; Deyoung, Chad; Zacharapoulos, Nicholas; Pepelea, Mark; Klahr, Paul; Yu, Cedric X.

    2005-12-15

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is known to cause artifacts on free-breathing spiral CT images used in treatment planning. This leads to inaccurate delineation of target volumes on planning CT images. Flow-volume spirometry has been used previously for breath-holds during CT scans and radiation treatments using the active breathing control (ABC) system. We have developed a prototype by extending the flow-volume spirometer device to obtain gated CT scans using a PQ 5000 single-slice CT scanner. To test our prototype, we designed motion phantoms to compare image quality obtained with and without gated CT scan acquisition. Spiral and axial (nongated and gated) CT scans were obtained of phantoms with motion periods of 3-5 s and amplitudes of 0.5-2 cm. Errors observed in the volume estimate of these structures were as much as 30% with moving phantoms during CT simulation. Application of motion-gated CT with active breathing control reduced these errors to within 5%. Motion-gated CT was then implemented in patients and the results are presented for two clinical cases: lung and abdomen. In each case, gated scans were acquired at end-inhalation, end-exhalation in addition to a conventional free-breathing (nongated) scan. The gated CT scans revealed reduced artifacts compared with the conventional free-breathing scan. Differences of up to 20% in the volume of the structures were observed between gated and free-breathing scans. A comparison of the overlap of structures between the gated and free-breathing scans revealed misalignment of the structures. These results demonstrate the ability of flow-volume spirometry to reduce errors in target volumes via gating during CT imaging.

  2. Waldorf Education: Breathing Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordlund, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    After 10 years of teaching art in public schools, Carrie Nordlund arrived at a state of query that set in motion her search for alternative approaches to learning. As she was feeling stifled in a seemingly sterile education institution with its overdependence on and pedagogy aimed at standardized tests, she came across a reference to Waldorf…

  3. SU-E-P-41: Imaging Coordination of Cone Beam CT, On-Board Image Conjunction with Optical Image Guidance for SBRT Treatment with Respiratory Motion Management

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Campbell, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue for SBRT lung/liver patients, especially for patients with significant tumor motion, image guided respiratory motion management has been widely implemented in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate imaging coordination of cone beam CT, on-board X-ray image conjunction with optical image guidance for SBRT treatment with motion management. Methods: Currently in our clinic a Varian Novlis Tx was utilized for treating SBRT patients implementing CBCT. A BrainLAB X-ray ExacTrac imaging system in conjunction with optical guidance was primarily used for SRS patients. CBCT and X-ray imaging system were independently calibrated with 1.0 mm tolerance. For SBRT lung/liver patients, the magnitude of tumor motion was measured based-on 4DCT and the measurement was analyzed to determine if patients would be beneficial with respiratory motion management. For patients eligible for motion management, an additional CT with breath holding would be scanned and used as primary planning CT and as reference images for Cone beam CT. During the SBRT treatment, a CBCT with pause and continuing technology would be performed with patients holding breath, which may require 3–4 partially scanned CBCT to combine as a whole CBCT depending on how long patients capable of holding breath. After patients being setup by CBCT images, the ExactTrac X-ray imaging system was implemented with patients’ on-board X-ray images compared to breath holding CT-based DRR. Results: For breath holding patients SBRT treatment, after initially localizing patients with CBCT, we then position patients with ExacTrac X-ray and optical imaging system. The observed deviations of real-time optical guided position average at 3.0, 2.5 and 1.5 mm in longitudinal, vertical and lateral respectively based on 35 treatments. Conclusion: The respiratory motion management clinical practice improved our physician confidence level to give tighter tumor margin for sparing normal

  4. Whole left ventricular functional assessment from two minutes free breathing multi-slice CINE acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, M.; Atkinson, D.; Heathfield, E.; Greil, G.; Schaeffter, T.; Prieto, C.

    2015-04-01

    Two major challenges in cardiovascular MRI are long scan times due to slow MR acquisition and motion artefacts due to respiratory motion. Recently, a Motion Corrected-Compressed Sensing (MC-CS) technique has been proposed for free breathing 2D dynamic cardiac MRI that addresses these challenges by simultaneously accelerating MR acquisition and correcting for any arbitrary motion in a compressed sensing reconstruction. In this work, the MC-CS framework is combined with parallel imaging for further acceleration, and is termed Motion Corrected Sparse SENSE (MC-SS). Validation of the MC-SS framework is demonstrated in eight volunteers and three patients for left ventricular functional assessment and results are compared with the breath-hold acquisitions as reference. A non-significant difference (P > 0.05) was observed in the volumetric functional measurements (end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, ejection fraction) and myocardial border sharpness values obtained with the proposed and gold standard methods. The proposed method achieves whole heart multi-slice coverage in 2 min under free breathing acquisition eliminating the time needed between breath-holds for instructions and recovery. This results in two-fold speed up of the total acquisition time in comparison to the breath-hold acquisition.

  5. Visualizing Breath using Digital Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, P. R.; Reid, I. D.; Wilton, J. B.

    2013-02-01

    Artist Jayne Wilton and physicists Peter Hobson and Ivan Reid of Brunel University are collaborating at Brunel University on a project which aims to use a range of techniques to make visible the normally invisible dynamics of the breath and the verbal and non-verbal communication it facilitates. The breath is a source of a wide range of chemical, auditory and physical exchanges with the direct environment. Digital Holography is being investigated to enable a visually stimulating articulation of the physical trajectory of the breath as it leaves the mouth. Initial findings of this research are presented. Real time digital hologram replay allows the audience to move through holographs of breath-born particles.

  6. Liquid-Air Breathing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    Compact unit supplies air longer than compressed-air unit. Emergency breathing apparatus stores air as cryogenic liquid instead of usual compressed gas. Intended for firefighting or rescue operations becoming necessary during planned potentially hazardous procedures.

  7. Palliative care - shortness of breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control shortness of breath: Call your doctor, palliative care team, or hospice nurse for advice Call 911 ... Bicanovsky L. Comfort care: symptom control in the dying. In: Walsh ... . 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap 181.

  8. Implementing radial motion to the booster simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    It's a puzzle that high intensity beams prefer a particular radial motion during transition in the Booster, and the result of removing such a radial motion is to increase the transition loss. In order to understand this observation, the radial motion should be taken into account in the longitudinal simulation.

  9. SU-E-J-62: Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Cancer: Visually Monitored Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Amplitude Evaluated Using Real-Time Position Management

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, L; Quirk, S; Smith, WL; Yeung, R; Phan, T; Hudson, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We used Real-Time Position Management (RPM) to evaluate breath hold amplitude and variability when gating with a visually monitored deep inspiration breath hold technique (VM-DIBH) with retrospective cine image chest wall position verification. Methods: Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer were treated using VM-DIBH. Respiratory motion was passively collected once weekly using RPM with the marker block positioned at the xiphoid process. Cine images on the tangent medial field were acquired on fractions with RPM monitoring for retrospective verification of chest wall position during breath hold. The amplitude and duration of all breath holds on which treatment beams were delivered were extracted from the RPM traces. Breath hold position coverage was evaluated for symmetric RPM gating windows from ± 1 to 5 mm centered on the average breath hold amplitude of the first measured fraction as a baseline. Results: The average (range) breath hold amplitude and duration was 18 mm (3–36 mm) and 19 s (7–34 s). The average (range) of amplitude standard deviation per patient over all breath holds was 2.7 mm (1.2–5.7 mm). With the largest allowable RPM gating window (± 5 mm), 4 of 10 VM-DIBH patients would have had ≥ 10% of their breath hold positions excluded by RPM. Cine verification of the chest wall position during the medial tangent field showed that the chest wall was greater than 5 mm from the baseline in only 1 out of 4 excluded patients. Cine images verify the chest wall/breast position only, whether this variation is acceptable in terms of heart sparing is a subject of future investigation. Conclusion: VM-DIBH allows for greater breath hold amplitude variability than using a 5 mm gating window with RPM, while maintaining chest wall positioning accuracy within 5 mm for the majority of patients.

  10. Standardization of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection using a feedback regulated breathing pattern

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) fluid by cooling of expired breath is a potentially valuable approach for the detection of biomarkers associated with disease or exposure to xenobiotics. EBC is generally collected using unregulated breathing patterns, perceived to el...

  11. External respiratory motion for abdominal radiotherapy patients: implications for patient alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kearvell, Rachel; Ebert, Martin A

    2003-12-31

    Conformal external beam radiotherapy relies on accurate spatial positioning of the tumor and normal tissues during treatment. For abdominal patients, this is complicated by the motion of internal organs and the external patient contour due to respiration. As external motion influences the degree of accuracy achievable in patient setup, this motion was studied to provide indication of motions occurring during treatment, as well as to assess the technique of breath-holding at exhale (B-HEX). The motion of external abdominal points (anterior and right lateral) of a series of volunteers was tracked in real-time using an infrared tracking system, with the volunteers in treatment position. The resulting motion data was assessed to evaluate (1) the change in position of each point per breath/breath-hold, (2) the change in position between breaths/breath-holds, and (3) the change in position across the whole recording time. Analysis shows that, for the anterior abdominal point, there is little difference in the variation of position with time for free-breathing as opposed to the B-HEX technique. For the lateral point however, the B-HEX technique reduces the motion during each treatment cycle (i.e., during the breath-hold) and over an extended period (i.e., during a series of breath-holds). The B-HEX technique thus provides greater accuracy for setup to lateral markers and provides the opportunity to reduce systematic and random localization errors.

  12. A Study of the Effects of Breath Management Instruction on the Breathing Mode, Knowledge of Breathing, and Performance Skills of College-Level Brass Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Kenneth H.; Sehmann, Karin Harfst

    1990-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of breathing instruction on the breath management, performance, and knowledge of breathing among college-level brass musicians. Finds that breathing instruction significantly improved the breath management and knowledge of the breathing for the experimental groups and the musical range of the trombone players in the…

  13. Sigh-induced changes of breathing pattern in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Kerstin; Latzin, Philipp; Fouzas, Sotirios; Proietti, Elena; Delgado-Eckert, Edgar W; Frey, Urs; Schulzke, Sven M

    2015-01-01

    Sighs are thought to play an important role in control of breathing. It is unclear how sighs are triggered, and whether preterm birth and lung disease influence breathing pattern prior to and after a sigh in infants. To assess whether frequency, morphology, size, and short-term variability in tidal volume (VT) before, during, and after a sigh are influenced by gestational age at birth and lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia, BPD) in former preterm infants and healthy term controls measured at equivalent postconceptional age (PCA). We performed tidal breathing measurements in 143 infants during quiet natural sleep at a mean (SD) PCA of 44.8 (1.3) weeks. A total of 233 sighs were analyzed using multilevel, multivariable regression. Sigh frequency in preterm infants increased with the degree of prematurity and severity of BPD, but was not different from that of term controls when normalized to respiratory rate. After a sigh, VT decreased remarkably in all infants (paired t-test: P < 0.001). There was no major effect of prematurity or BPD on various indices of sigh morphology and changes in VT prior to or after a sigh. Short-term variability in VT modestly increased with maturity at birth and infants with BPD showed an earlier return to baseline variability in VT following a sigh. In early infancy, sigh-induced changes in breathing pattern are moderately influenced by prematurity and BPD in preterm infants. The major determinants of sigh-related breathing pattern in these infants remain to be investigated, ideally using a longitudinal study design. PMID:26564066

  14. Beware Postpartum Shortness of Breath.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Guleser; Ipekci, Afsin; Gulen, Bedia; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is one of the potentially life-threatening complications of pregnancy. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient who presented with shortness of breath, swelling of feet after giving birth to triplets, and her tests revealed that left ventricle is dilated with its diameter on the borderline and she had EF 35% with advanced systolic dysfunction. Anterior wall and septum were severely hypokinetic. In the presence of these findings, the patient was evaluated as PPCM. PPCM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with shortness of breath and swelling of feet, which are also common in pregnancy. PMID:26649031

  15. Beware Postpartum Shortness of Breath

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Guleser; Ipekci, Afsin; Gulen, Bedia; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is one of the potentially life-threatening complications of pregnancy. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient who presented with shortness of breath, swelling of feet after giving birth to triplets, and her tests revealed that left ventricle is dilated with its diameter on the borderline and she had EF 35% with advanced systolic dysfunction. Anterior wall and septum were severely hypokinetic. In the presence of these findings, the patient was evaluated as PPCM. PPCM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with shortness of breath and swelling of feet, which are also common in pregnancy. PMID:26649031

  16. Understanding Lung Problems: Make Each Breath Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Each Breath Healthy Heath and Aging Understanding Lung Problems—Make Each Breath Healthy Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ( ... time your likelihood of having a serious lung problem increases, especially if you smoke. Lung problems that ...

  17. NOTE: Breathing interplay effects during proton beam scanning: simulation and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Joao; Robertson, Daniel; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2009-07-01

    Treatment delivery with active beam scanning in proton radiation therapy introduces the problem of interplay effects when pencil beam motion occurs on a similar time scale as intra-fractional tumor motion. In situations where fractionation may not provide enough repetition to blur the effects of interplay, repeated delivery or 'repainting' of each field several times within a fraction has been suggested. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effectiveness of different repainting strategies in proton beam scanning. To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay effects, we performed a series of simulations considering the following parameters: tumor motion amplitude, breathing period, asymmetry in the motion trajectory for the target and time required to change the beam energy for the delivery system. Several repainting strategies were compared in terms of potential vulnerability to a dose delivery error. Breathing motion perpendicular to the beam direction (representing superior-inferior type tumor motion in patients) was considered and modeled as an asymmetric sine function with a peak-to-peak amplitude of between 10 and 30 mm. The results show that motion effects cause a narrowing of the high-dose profile and widening of the penumbra. The 90% isodose area was reduced significantly when considering a large motion amplitude of 3 cm. The broadening of the penumbra appears to depend only on the amplitude of tumor motion (assuming harmonic motion). The delivered dose exhibits a shift of 10-15% of the tumor amplitude (or 1-5 mm) in the caudal direction due to breathing asymmetry observed for both sin4(x) and sin6(x) motion. Of the five repainting techniques studied, so-called 'breath sampling' turned out to be most effective in reducing dose errors with a minimal increase in treatment time. In this method, each energy level is repainted at several evenly spaced times within one breathing period. To keep dose delivery errors below 5% while minimizing treatment

  18. Submarines, Spacecraft, and Exhaled Breath

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled b...

  19. Breathing Problems: An Individualized Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vodola, Thomas M.

    As one of the components of the Project ACTIVE (All Children Totally Involved Exercising) Teacher Training Model Kit, the manual is designed to enable the educator to organize, conduct, and evaluate individualized-personalized physical education programs for children (prekindergarten through high school) with breathing problems. An introductory…

  20. 21 CFR 868.5620 - Breathing mouthpiece.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing mouthpiece. 868.5620 Section 868.5620...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5620 Breathing mouthpiece. (a) Identification. A breathing mouthpiece is a rigid device that is inserted into a patient's mouth and...

  1. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  2. Monitoring of Heart and Breathing Rates Using Dual Cameras on a Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yunyoung; Kong, Youngsun; Reyes, Bersain; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H

    2016-01-01

    Some smartphones have the capability to process video streams from both the front- and rear-facing cameras simultaneously. This paper proposes a new monitoring method for simultaneous estimation of heart and breathing rates using dual cameras of a smartphone. The proposed approach estimates heart rates using a rear-facing camera, while at the same time breathing rates are estimated using a non-contact front-facing camera. For heart rate estimation, a simple application protocol is used to analyze the varying color signals of a fingertip placed in contact with the rear camera. The breathing rate is estimated from non-contact video recordings from both chest and abdominal motions. Reference breathing rates were measured by a respiration belt placed around the chest and abdomen of a subject; reference heart rates (HR) were determined using the standard electrocardiogram. An automated selection of either the chest or abdominal video signal was determined by choosing the signal with a greater autocorrelation value. The breathing rate was then determined by selecting the dominant peak in the power spectrum. To evaluate the performance of the proposed methods, data were collected from 11 healthy subjects. The breathing ranges spanned both low and high frequencies (6-60 breaths/min), and the results show that the average median errors from the reflectance imaging on the chest and the abdominal walls based on choosing the maximum spectral peak were 1.43% and 1.62%, respectively. Similarly, HR estimates were also found to be accurate. PMID:26963390

  3. Monitoring of Heart and Breathing Rates Using Dual Cameras on a Smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Yunyoung; Kong, Youngsun; Reyes, Bersain; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H.

    2016-01-01

    Some smartphones have the capability to process video streams from both the front- and rear-facing cameras simultaneously. This paper proposes a new monitoring method for simultaneous estimation of heart and breathing rates using dual cameras of a smartphone. The proposed approach estimates heart rates using a rear-facing camera, while at the same time breathing rates are estimated using a non-contact front-facing camera. For heart rate estimation, a simple application protocol is used to analyze the varying color signals of a fingertip placed in contact with the rear camera. The breathing rate is estimated from non-contact video recordings from both chest and abdominal motions. Reference breathing rates were measured by a respiration belt placed around the chest and abdomen of a subject; reference heart rates (HR) were determined using the standard electrocardiogram. An automated selection of either the chest or abdominal video signal was determined by choosing the signal with a greater autocorrelation value. The breathing rate was then determined by selecting the dominant peak in the power spectrum. To evaluate the performance of the proposed methods, data were collected from 11 healthy subjects. The breathing ranges spanned both low and high frequencies (6–60 breaths/min), and the results show that the average median errors from the reflectance imaging on the chest and the abdominal walls based on choosing the maximum spectral peak were 1.43% and 1.62%, respectively. Similarly, HR estimates were also found to be accurate. PMID:26963390

  4. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Breathing Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Agathe; Yu, Lianchun; Klein, Isabelle; De Mazancourt, Marine; Jebrak, Gilles; Mal, Hervé; Brugière, Olivier; Fournier, Michel; Courbage, Maurice; Dauriat, Gaelle; Schouman-Clayes, Elisabeth; Clerici, Christine; Mangin, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Breathing is maintained and controlled by a network of automatic neurons in the brainstem that generate respiratory rhythm and receive regulatory inputs. Breathing complexity therefore arises from respiratory central pattern generators modulated by peripheral and supra-spinal inputs. Very little is known on the brainstem neural substrates underlying breathing complexity in humans. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher these mechanisms in healthy humans and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is the most frequent chronic lung disease in the general population mainly due to tobacco smoke. In patients, airflow obstruction associated with hyperinflation and respiratory muscles weakness are key factors contributing to load-capacity imbalance and hence increased respiratory drive. Unexpectedly, we found that the patients breathed with a higher level of complexity during inspiration and expiration than controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we scanned the brain of the participants to analyze the activity of two small regions involved in respiratory rhythmogenesis, the rostral ventro-lateral (VL) medulla (pre-Bötzinger complex) and the caudal VL pons (parafacial group). fMRI revealed in controls higher activity of the VL medulla suggesting active inspiration, while in patients higher activity of the VL pons suggesting active expiration. COPD patients reactivate the parafacial to sustain ventilation. These findings may be involved in the onset of respiratory failure when the neural network becomes overwhelmed by respiratory overload We show that central neural activity correlates with airflow complexity in healthy subjects and COPD patients, at rest and during inspiratory loading. We finally used a theoretical approach of respiratory rhythmogenesis that reproduces the kernel activity of neurons involved in the automatic breathing. The model reveals how a chaotic activity in neurons can

  5. Welfare support-equipment for character input with head tilting and breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Nobuaki; Yamada, Kou; Matsui, Toshikazu; Itoh, Isao

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes support-equipment of operating a personal computer for users who have an obstacle on the regions of upper limb. The user wears a head set device with an angle sensor, and holds a plastic pipe connected to a pressure sensor in his or her mouth. Tilting his or her head and breathing are used for mouse cursor operation and characters input. Considering user's body conditions, the voluntary angle range of head tilting and strength of breathing are memorized to the controller beforehand, and obtained information is reflected for operations without fatigue. The character display board is used to indicate the Japanese characters and input options such as Back Space or Enter. Tilting motions change the indicated character and breathing actions can select and input the illuminated functions on the character display board. In test trial, it is confirmed that Japanese characters including Kanji and Katakana can be input with head tilting and breathing, instead of a general keyboard.

  6. Drive mechanism for production of simulated human breath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Lambert, J. W.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Simulated breath drive mechanism was developed as subsystem to breathing metabolic simulator. Mechanism reproduces complete range of human breath rate, breath depth, and breath waveform, as well as independently controlled functional residual capacity. Mechanism was found capable of simulating various individual human breathing characteristics without any changes of parts.

  7. Mouth breathing in allergic children: its relationship to dentofacial development.

    PubMed

    Bresolin, D; Shapiro, P A; Shapiro, G G; Chapko, M K; Dassel, S

    1983-04-01

    While there are many claims that abnormal breathing patterns alter facial growth, there are limited controlled data to confirm this. We evaluated forty-five North American Caucasians of both sexes, ranging in age from 6 to 12 years. Thirty chronically allergic mouth-breathing subjects were selected from a pediatric allergy practice, and fifteen nonallergic nose breathers were selected from a general pediatric practice. Each subject underwent an intraoral clinical examination and a cephalometric radiograph analysis. Various skeletal and dental relationships were evaluated for statistical differences related to mode of breathing and age. The upper anterior facial height and the total anterior facial height were significantly larger in the mouth breathers. Angular relationships of the sella-nasion, palatal, and occlusal planes to the mandibular plane were greater in the mouth breathers, and their gonial angles were larger. The mouth breathers' maxillae and mandibles were more retrognathic. Palatal height was higher, and overjet was greater in the mouth breathers. Maxillary intermolar width was narrower in the mouth breathers and was associated with a higher prevalence of posterior cross-bite. Over all, mouth breathers had longer faces with narrower maxillae and retrognathic jaws. This supports previous claims that nasal airway obstruction is associated with aberrant facial growth. Longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of early intervention in preventing these growth alterations. PMID:6573147

  8. Low-cost respiratory motion tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryawala, Mohammed; Del Valle, Misael; Wang, Jiali; Byrne, James; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony

    2008-03-01

    Lung cancer is the cause of more than 150,000 deaths annually in the United States. Early and accurate detection of lung tumors with Positron Emission Tomography has enhanced lung tumor diagnosis. However, respiratory motion during the imaging period of PET results in the reduction of accuracy of detection due to blurring of the images. Chest motion can serve as a surrogate for tracking the motion of the tumor. For tracking chest motion, an optical laser system was designed which tracks the motion of a patterned card placed on the chest by illuminating the pattern with two structured light sources, generating 8 positional markers. The position of markers is used to determine the vertical, translational, and rotational motion of the card. Information from the markers is used to decide whether the patient's breath is abnormal compared to their normal breathing pattern. The system is developed with an inexpensive web-camera and two low-cost laser pointers. The experiments were carried out using a dynamic phantom developed in-house, to simulate chest movement with different amplitudes and breathing periods. Motion of the phantom was tracked by the system developed and also by a pressure transducer for comparison. The studies showed a correlation of 96.6% between the respiratory tracking waveforms by the two systems, demonstrating the capability of the system. Unlike the pressure transducer method, the new system tracks motion in 3 dimensions. The developed system also demonstrates the ability to track a sliding motion of the patient in the direction parallel to the bed and provides the potential to stop the PET scan in case of such motion.

  9. Bending and breathing modes of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widrow, Lawrence M.; Barber, Jarrett; Chequers, Matthew H.; Cheng, Edward

    2014-05-01

    We explore the hypothesis that a passing satellite or dark matter subhalo has excited coherent oscillations of the Milky Way's stellar disc in the direction perpendicular to the Galactic mid-plane. This work is motivated by recent observations of spatially dependent bulk vertical motions within ˜2 kpc of the Sun. A satellite can transfer a fraction of its orbital energy to the disc stars as it plunges through the Galactic mid-plane, thereby heating and thickening the disc. Bulk motions arise during the early stages of such an event when the disc is still in an unrelaxed state. We present simple toy-model calculations and simulations of disc-satellite interactions, which show that the response of the disc depends on the relative velocity of the satellite. When the component of the satellite's velocity perpendicular to the disc is small compared with that of the stars, the perturbation is pre-dominantly a bending mode. Conversely, breathing and higher order modes are excited when the vertical velocity of the satellite is larger than that of the stars. We argue that the compression and rarefaction motions seen in three different surveys are in fact breathing-mode perturbations of the Galactic disc.

  10. Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Disease Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-06-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  11. The athlete "out of breath".

    PubMed

    Couto, M; Moreira, A

    2016-03-01

    Athletes often complain about breathing problems. This is a crucial issue due to potential implications not only on their general health, but also on their competing performance. Asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are prevalent conditions in elite athletes, which leads doctors to rely most of the times on asthma medication to treat athletes feeling "out of breath". However, there are several other conditions that may mimic asthma and cause dyspnea in athletes. Effective treatment of dyspnea requires appropriate identification and treatment of all disorders. Proper knowledge and accurate diagnosis of such entities is mandatory, since asthma medication is not effective in those conditions. Herein we review the most common differential diagnosis of dyspnea in athletes, and describe the diagnostic strategies in order to increase awareness and to improve doctor's confidence on dealing with these patients. PMID:26934737

  12. Self-contained breathing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Giorgini, E. A.; Simmonds, M. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A self-contained breathing apparatus with automatic redundant fluid pressure controls and a facemask mounted low pressure whistle alarm is described. The first stage of the system includes pair of pressure regulators connected in parallel with different outlet pressures, both of which reduce the pressure of the stored supply gas to pressures compatible with the second stage breathing demand regulator. A primary regulator in the first stage delivers a low output pressure to the demand regulator. In the event of a failure closed condition of the primary regulator an automatic transfer valve switches on the backup regulator. A warning that the supply pressure has been depleted is also provided by a supply pressure actuated transfer valve which transfers the output of the first stage pressure regulators from the primary to the backup regulator. The alarm is activated in either the failure closed condition or if the supply pressure is reduced to a dangerously low level.

  13. Breathing Dynamics in Heteropolymer DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Banik, Suman K.; Krichevsky, Oleg; Metzler, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    While the statistical mechanical description of DNA has a long tradition, renewed interest in DNA melting from a physics perspective is nourished by measurements of the fluctuation dynamics of local denaturation bubbles by single molecule spectroscopy. The dynamical opening of DNA bubbles (DNA breathing) is supposedly crucial for biological functioning during, for instance, transcription initiation and DNA's interaction with selectively single-stranded DNA binding proteins. Motivated by this, we consider the bubble breathing dynamics in a heteropolymer DNA based on a (2+1)-variable master equation and complementary stochastic Gillespie simulations, providing the bubble size and the position of the bubble along the sequence as a function of time. We utilize new experimental data that independently obtain stacking and hydrogen bonding contributions to DNA stability. We calculate the spectrum of relaxation times and the experimentally measurable autocorrelation function of a fluorophore-quencher tagged basepair, and demonstrate good agreement with fluorescence correlation experiments. A significant dependence of opening probability and waiting time between bubble events on the local DNA sequence is revealed and quantified for a promoter sequence of the T7 phage. The strong dependence on sequence, temperature and salt concentration for the breathing dynamics of DNA found here points at a good potential for nanosensing applications by utilizing short fluorophore-quencher dressed DNA constructs. PMID:17237209

  14. Air-Breathing Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  15. Breathing Mode in Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, K.; Henning, C.; Ludwig, P.; Bonitz, M.; Melzer, A.; Vitkalov, S.

    2007-11-01

    The breathing mode is a fundamental normal mode present in Coulomb systems, and may have utility in identifying particle charge and the Debye length of certain systems. The question remains whether this mode can be extended to strongly coupled Yukawa balls [1]. These systems are characterized by particles confined within a parabolic potential well and interacting through a shielded Coulomb potential [2,3]. The breathing modes for a variety of systems in 1, 2, and 3 dimensions are computed by solving the eigenvalue problem given by the dynamical (Hesse) matrix. These results are compared to theoretical investigations that assume a strict definition for a breathing mode within the system, and an analysis is made of the most fitting model to utilize in the study of particular systems of complex plasmas [1,4]. References [1] T.E. Sheridan, Phys. of Plasmas. 13, 022106 (2006)[2] C. Henning et al., Phys. Rev. E 74, 056403 (2006)[3] M. Bonitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006)[4] C. Henning et al., submitted for publication

  16. Exhaled breath analysis and sleep.

    PubMed

    Carpagnano, Giovanna E

    2011-10-15

    It is currently estimated that the economic burden for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) cases not coming to medical attention is steadily increasing, thus making OSAS a major public health concern. For its increasing incidence among the common population, the interest of researchers and clinicians has been recently directed to the study of pathological mechanisms underlying sleep disorders. Current opinion is that airway inflammation and oxidative stress play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of OSAS. Recently there has been increasing interest in the investigation of lungs by non-invasive means measuring the exhaled breath volatile mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), ethane and pentane and finally the non-volatile substances in the liquid phase of exhalate, termed breath condensate. The non-invasiveness of these techniques for the study of airways affected by different respiratory disorders and among those, the OSAS, makes these ideally suited for the evaluation and serial monitoring of patients. Notwithstanding the increasing number of scientific contributions on the use of the exhaled markers in sleep disorders, at the moment, their use is not completely suitable for clinical application. An important contribution to the increase of our knowledge on exhaled markers and for their possible concrete application in clinical practice may come from future studies using proteomics, genomics and metabolomics. In this review, we focus on exhaled breath analysis giving an update on its general aspects, its application in OSAS, and finally its actual clinical applicability and areas for future direction. PMID:22003329

  17. The surprising influence of longitudinal motion in vibrating strings: Comment on "Video-based spatial portraits of a nonlinear vibrating string" [Am. J. Phys. 80(10), 862-869 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, David R.

    2015-12-01

    An error in the quoted nonlinear coefficient that is commonly found in the literature is identified. The subtle origin of this error is identified as the neglect of longitudinal displacements of points in the string, which leads to a nonlinear coefficient that is a factor of 3/2 too large. A correct derivation is outlined and numerical simulations verify the correction.

  18. Design of a breathing mattress based on the respiratory movement of kangaroo mother care for the development of neonates.

    PubMed

    Schets, M W M; Chen, W; Bambang Oetomo, S

    2015-01-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) benefits the development of neonates. This paper focuses on the design and implementing the extension of KMC for infants at Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). A breathing mattress is proposed to comfort infants and stimulate them to breathe regularly by mimicking the movement of the parent's chest during KMC. The incubator mattress simulates the breathing of the parent's chest with embedded electronics and pneumatic technology for mattress motion actuating systems. The stakeholders, including the child, parents and NICU staff, were directly involved during the concept development, prototyping and evaluation. PMID:26737846

  19. RADON reconstruction in longitudinal phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Wei, J.

    1997-07-01

    Longitudinal particle motion in circular accelerators is typically monitoring by one dimensional (1-D) profiles. Adiabatic particle motion in two dimensional (2-D) phase space can be reconstructed with tomographic techniques, using 1-D profiles. A computer program RADON has been developed in C++ to process digitized mountain range data and perform the phase space reconstruction for the AGS, and later for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  20. Longitudinal tracking with phase and amplitude modulated rf

    SciTech Connect

    Caussyn, D.D.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.

    1993-06-01

    Synchrotron motion was induced by phase shifting the rf of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) cooler-synchrotron. The resulting coherent-bunch motion was tracked in longitudinal phase space for as many as 700,000 turns, or for over 350 synchrotron oscillations. Results of recent experimental studies of longitudinal motion in which the rf phase and amplitude were harmonically modulated are also presented. Comparisons of experimental data with numerical simulations, assuming independent particle motion, are made. Observed multiparticle effects are also discussed.

  1. Bathroom watching using a breath detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Tomofumi; Nakajima, Masato

    2004-10-01

    Recently, domestic accidents have been increasing in Japan. These kinds of accidents occur in private areas such as bedrooms, toilets and bathrooms, and tend to be found too late. Accidents, particularly those occurring in the bathroom, can often result in death. Many systems which have been proposed or which are in use are designed to detect body motion in the bathroom, and determine that a bather has suddenly taken ill when movement ceases. However, the relaxed posture of a person bathing is actually very similar to that of a person who has passed out. It is therefore very difficult to differentiate between the two postures. We have developed a watching system for bathrooms. The new feature of this system lies in its ability to detect a person"s breathing by using an FG vision sensor. From the experiment, it was found that the false alarm rate is expected to reach less than 0.0001% when waiting time is set to 36.8 seconds.

  2. Nonlinear dynamics and health monitoring of 6-DOF breathing cracked Jeffcott rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; DeSmidt, Hans; Yao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Jeffcott rotor is employed to study the nonlinear vibration characteristics of breathing cracked rotor system and explore the possibility of further damage identification. This paper is an extension work of prior study based on 4 degree-of-freedom Jeffcott rotor system. With consideration of disk tilting and gyroscopic effect, 6-dof EOM is derived and the crack model is established using SERR (strain energy release rate) in facture mechanics. Same as the prior work, the damaged stiffness matrix is updated by computing the instant crack closure line through Zero Stress Intensity Factor method. The breathing crack area is taken as a variable to analyze the breathing behavior in terms of eccentricity phase and shaft speed. Furthermore, the coupled vibration among lateral, torsional and longitudinal d.o.f is studied under torsional/axial excitation. The final part demonstrates the possibility of using vibration signal of damaged system for the crack diagnosis and health monitoring.

  3. A programmable motion phantom for quality assurance of motion management in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, L; Kron, T; Johnston, P N; McDermott, L N; Taylor, M L; Callahan, J; Franich, R D

    2012-03-01

    A commercially available motion phantom (QUASAR, Modus Medical) was modified for programmable motion control with the aim of reproducing patient respiratory motion in one dimension in both the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions, as well as, providing controllable breath-hold and sinusoidal patterns for the testing of radiotherapy gating systems. In order to simulate realistic patient motion, the DC motor was replaced by a stepper motor. A separate 'chest-wall' motion platform was also designed to accommodate a variety of surrogate marker systems. The platform employs a second stepper motor that allows for the decoupling of the chest-wall and insert motion. The platform's accuracy was tested by replicating patient traces recorded with the Varian real-time position management (RPM) system and comparing the motion platform's recorded motion trace with the original patient data. Six lung cancer patient traces recorded with the RPM system were uploaded to the motion platform's in-house control software and subsequently replicated through the phantom motion platform. The phantom's motion profile was recorded with the RPM system and compared to the original patient data. Sinusoidal and breath-hold patterns were simulated with the motion platform and recorded with the RPM system to verify the systems potential for routine quality assurance of commercial radiotherapy gating systems. There was good correlation between replicated and actual patient data (P 0.003). Mean differences between the location of maxima in replicated and patient data-sets for six patients amounted to 0.034 cm with the corresponding minima mean equal to 0.010 cm. The upgraded motion phantom was found to replicate patient motion accurately as well as provide useful test patterns to aid in the quality assurance of motion management methods and technologies. PMID:22119931

  4. Coupling of transverse and longitudinal waves in piano strings.

    PubMed

    Etchenique, Nikki; Collin, Samantha R; Moore, Thomas R

    2015-04-01

    The existence of longitudinal waves in vibrating piano strings has been previously established, as has their importance in producing the characteristic sound of the piano. Modeling of the coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motion of strings indicates that the amplitude of the longitudinal waves are quadratically related to the transverse displacement of the string, however, experimental verification of this relationship is lacking. In the work reported here this relationship is tested by driving the transverse motion of a piano string at only two frequencies, which simplifies the task of unambiguously identifying the constituent signals. The results indicate that the generally accepted relationship between the transverse motion and the longitudinal motion is valid. It is further shown that this dependence on transverse displacement is a good approximation when a string is excited by the impact of the hammer during normal play. PMID:25920829

  5. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  6. Amplitude gating for a coached breathing approach in respiratory gated 10 MV flattening filter-free VMAT delivery.

    PubMed

    Viel, Francis; Lee, Richard; Gete, Ermias; Duzenli, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate amplitude gating combined with a coached breathing strategy for 10 MV flattening filter-free (FFF) volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the Varian TrueBeam linac. Ten patient plans for VMAT SABR liver were created using the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). The verification plans were then transferred to a CT-scanned Quasar phantom and delivered on a TrueBeam linac using a 10 MV FFF beam and Varian's real-time position management (RPM) system for respiratory gating based on breathing amplitude. Breathing traces were acquired from ten patients using two kinds of breathing patterns: free breathing and an interrupted (~ 5 s pause) end of exhale coached breathing pattern. Ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were acquired for a gated delivery while the phantom moved under the described breathing patterns, as well as for a nongated stationary phantom delivery. The gate window was set to obtain a range of residual target motion from 2-5 mm. All gated deliveries on a moving phantom have been shown to be dosimetrically equivalent to the nongated deliveries on a static phantom, with differences in point dose measurements under 1% and average gamma 2%/2 mm agreement above 98.7%. Comparison with the treatment planning system also resulted in good agreement, with differences in point-dose measurements under 2.5% and average gamma 3%/3 mm agreement of 97%. The use of a coached breathing pattern significantly increases the duty cycle, compared with free breathing, and allows for shorter treatment times. Patients' free-breathing patterns contain considerable variability and, although dosimetric results for gated delivery may be acceptable, it is difficult to achieve efficient treatment delivery. A coached breathing pattern combined with a 5 mm amplitude gate, resulted in both high-quality dose distributions and overall shortest gated beam delivery times. PMID:26219000

  7. How to interpret hydrogen breath tests.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Uday C

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen breath tests using various substrates like glucose, lactulose, lactose and fructose are being used more and more to diagnose small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and lactose or fructose malabsorption. Though quantitative culture of jejunal aspirate is considered as gold standard for the diagnosis of SIBO, hydrogen breath tests, in spite of their low sensitivity, are popular for their non-invasiveness. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for the diagnosis of SIBO as conventionally accepted double-peak criterion on lactulose hydrogen breath test is very insensitive and recently described early-peak criterion is often false positive. Hydrogen breath test is useful to diagnose various types of sugar malabsorption. Technique and interpretation of different hydrogen breath tests are outlined in this review. PMID:21860825

  8. Multivariate respiratory motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürichen, R.; Wissel, T.; Ernst, F.; Schlaefer, A.; Schweikard, A.

    2014-10-01

    In extracranial robotic radiotherapy, tumour motion is compensated by tracking external and internal surrogates. To compensate system specific time delays, time series prediction of the external optical surrogates is used. We investigate whether the prediction accuracy can be increased by expanding the current clinical setup by an accelerometer, a strain belt and a flow sensor. Four previously published prediction algorithms are adapted to multivariate inputs—normalized least mean squares (nLMS), wavelet-based least mean squares (wLMS), support vector regression (SVR) and relevance vector machines (RVM)—and evaluated for three different prediction horizons. The measurement involves 18 subjects and consists of two phases, focusing on long term trends (M1) and breathing artefacts (M2). To select the most relevant and least redundant sensors, a sequential forward selection (SFS) method is proposed. Using a multivariate setting, the results show that the clinically used nLMS algorithm is susceptible to large outliers. In the case of irregular breathing (M2), the mean root mean square error (RMSE) of a univariate nLMS algorithm is 0.66 mm and can be decreased to 0.46 mm by a multivariate RVM model (best algorithm on average). To investigate the full potential of this approach, the optimal sensor combination was also estimated on the complete test set. The results indicate that a further decrease in RMSE is possible for RVM (to 0.42 mm). This motivates further research about sensor selection methods. Besides the optical surrogates, the sensors most frequently selected by the algorithms are the accelerometer and the strain belt. These sensors could be easily integrated in the current clinical setup and would allow a more precise motion compensation.

  9. SU-E-J-29: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Tumor Motion Consistency for Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Makhija, K; Keall, P; Greer, P; Arm, J; Hunter, P; Kim, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the breathing-guidance system: audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. This will minimize respiratory-induced tumor motion variations across cancer imaging and radiotherapy procedues. This is the first study to investigate the impact of respiratory guidance on tumor motion. Methods: Tumor motion consistency was investigated with five lung cancer patients (age: 55 to 64), who underwent a training session to get familiarized with AV biofeedback, followed by two MRI sessions across different dates (pre and mid treatment). During the training session in a CT room, two patient specific breathing patterns were obtained before (Breathing-Pattern-1) and after (Breathing-Pattern-2) training with AV biofeedback. In each MRI session, four MRI scans were performed to obtain 2D coronal and sagittal image datasets in free breathing (FB), and with AV biofeedback utilizing Breathing-Pattern-2. Image pixel values of 2D images after the normalization of 2D images per dataset and Gaussian filter per image were used to extract tumor motion using image pixel values. The tumor motion consistency of the superior-inferior (SI) direction was evaluated in terms of an average tumor motion range and period. Results: Audiovisual biofeedback improved tumor motion consistency by 60% (p value = 0.019) from 1.0±0.6 mm (FB) to 0.4±0.4 mm (AV) in SI motion range, and by 86% (p value < 0.001) from 0.7±0.6 s (FB) to 0.1±0.2 s (AV) in period. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves both breathing pattern and tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential for facilitating reproducible tumor motion towards achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  10. Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART): improvement of breathing pattern reproducibility using respiratory coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross; Wolfgang, John; Jiang, Steve B.

    2006-02-01

    Recently, at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) we proposed a new treatment technique called synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART) to account for tumour motion during radiotherapy. The basic idea of SMART is to synchronize the moving radiation beam aperture formed by a dynamic multileaf collimator with the tumour motion induced by respiration. The two key requirements for being able to successfully use SMART in clinical practice are the precise and fast detection of tumour position during the simulation/treatment and the good reproducibility of the tumour motion pattern. To fulfil the first requirement, an integrated radiotherapy imaging system is currently being developed at MGH. The results of a previous study show that breath coaching techniques are required to make SMART an efficient technique in general. In this study, we investigate volunteer and patient respiratory coaching using a commercial respiratory gating system as a respiration coaching tool. Five healthy volunteers, observed during six sessions, and 33 lung cancer patients, observed during one session when undergoing 4D CT scans, were investigated with audio and visual promptings, with free breathing as a control. For all five volunteers, breath coaching was well tolerated and the intra- and inter-session reproducibility of the breathing pattern was greatly improved. Out of 33 patients, six exhibited a regular breathing pattern and needed no coaching, four could not be coached at all due to the patient's medical condition or had difficulty following the instructions, 13 could only be coached with audio instructions and 10 could follow the instructions of and benefit from audio-video coaching. We found that, for all volunteers and for those patients who could be properly coached, breath coaching improves the duty cycle of SMART treatment. However, about half of the patients could not follow both audio and video instructions simultaneously, suggesting that the current coaching

  11. Sleep disordered breathing in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Key points Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is common and the severity increases as pregnancy progresses. Frequent snoring, older age and high pre-pregnancy body mass index (>25 kg⋅m−2) could be reliable indicators for SDB in early pregnancy. SDB screening tools, including questionnaires, used in the nonpregnant population have poor predictive ability in pregnancy. Accumulating evidence suggests that SDB during pregnancy may be associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia. However, the results should be interpreted cautiously because several studies failed to adjust for potential maternal confounders and have other study limitations. There are no pregnancy-specific practice guidelines for SDB treatment. Many clinicians and practices follow recommendations for the treatment in the general population. Women with pre-existing SDB might need to be reassessed, particularly after the sixth month of pregnancy, because symptoms can worsen with nasal congestion and weight gain. Educational aims To highlight the prevalence and severity of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in the pregnant population. To inform readers about risk factors for SDB in pregnancy. To explore the impact of SDB on adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, and biological pathways for associated adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. To introduce current management options for SDB in pregnancy, including medical and behavioural approaches. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is very common during pregnancy, and is most likely explained by hormonal, physiological and physical changes. Maternal obesity, one of the major risk factors for SDB, together with physiological changes in pregnancy may predispose women to develop SDB. SDB has been associated with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. Thus, early identification, diagnosis and treatment of SDB are important in pregnancy. This article reviews the pregnancy-related changes affecting the

  12. Calculating rhythmicity of infant breathing using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macey, Katherine E.; Page, Wyatt H.; Harper, Ronald M.; Macey, Paul M.; Ford, Rodney P. K.

    2000-12-01

    Breathing signals are one set of physiological data that may provide information regarding the mechanisms that cause SIDS. Isolated breathing pauses have been implicated in fatal events. Other features of interest include slow amplitude modulation of the breathing signal, a phenomenon whose origin is unclear, and periodic breathing. The latter describes a repetitive series of apnea, and may be considered an extreme manifestation of amplitude modulation with successive cessations of breathing. Rhythmicity is defined to assess the impact of amplitude modulation on breathing signals and describes the extent to which frequency components remain constant for the duration of the signal. The wavelet transform was used to identify sections of constant frequency components within signals. Rhythmicity can be evaluated for all the frequency components in a signal, for individual frequencies. The rhythmicity of eight breathing epochs from sleeping infants at high and low risk for SIDS was calculated. Initial results show breathing from infants at high risk for SIDS exhibits greater rhythmicity of modulating frequencies than breathing from low risk infants.

  13. The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing

    PubMed Central

    Alheid, George F.; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing must ultimately encompass all the various neuronal elements physiologically identified in brainstem respiratory circuits and their apparent aggregation into “compartments” within the medulla and pons. These functionally defined respiratory compartments in the brainstem provide the major source of input to cranial motoneurons controlling the airways, and to spinal motoneurons activating inspiratory and expiratory pump muscles. This review provides an overview of the neuroanatomy of the major compartments comprising brainstem respiratory circuits, and a synopsis of the transmitters used by their constituent respiratory neurons. PMID:18706532

  14. 42 CFR 84.72 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.72...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.72 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with breathing apparatus shall be designed and constructed to prevent: (a)...

  15. 42 CFR 84.85 - Breathing bags; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing bags; minimum requirements. 84.85 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.85 Breathing bags; minimum requirements. (a) Breathing bags shall have.... (b) Breathing bags shall be constructed of materials which are flexible and resistant to...

  16. Breathing

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... size of the thoracic cavity and decreases the pressure inside. As a result, air rushes in and ... volume of the thoracic cavity decreases, while the pressure within it increases. As a result, the lungs ...

  17. Breathing

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... respiratory system conduct air to the lungs, such as the trachea (windpipe) which branches into smaller structures ... the thoracic cavity and decreases the pressure inside. As a result, air rushes in and fills the ...

  18. News from the Breath Analysis Summit 2011.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-05-23

    This special section highlights some of the important work presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2011, which was held in Parma (Italy) from 11 to 14 September 2011. The meeting, which was jointly organized by the International Association for Breath Research and the University of Parma, was attended by more than 250 delegates from 33 countries, and offered 34 invited lectures and 64 unsolicited scientific contributions. The summit was organized to provide a forum to scientists, engineers and clinicians to present their latest findings and to meet industry executives and entrepreneurs to discuss key trends, future directions and technologies available for breath analysis. A major focus was on nitric oxide, exhaled breath condensate, electronic nose, mass spectrometry and newer sensor technologies. Medical applications ranged from asthma and other respiratory diseases to gastrointestinal disease, occupational diseases, critical care and cancer. Most people identify breath tests with breathalysers used by police to estimate ethanol concentration in blood. However, breath testing has far more sophisticated applications. Breath analysis is rapidly evolving as a new frontier in medical testing for disease states in the lung and beyond. Every individual has a breath fingerprint-or 'breathprint'-that can provide useful information about his or her state of health. This breathprint comprises the many thousands of molecules that are expelled with each breath we exhale. Breath research in the past few years has uncovered the scientific and molecular basis for such clinical observations. Relying on mass spectrometry, we have been able to identify many such unique substances in exhaled breath, including gases, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), and a wide array of volatile organic compounds. Exhaled breath also carries aerosolized droplets that can be collected as an exhaled breath condensate that contains endogenously produced non-volatile compounds. Breath

  19. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing... the container. (d) Compressed breathing gas contained valves or a separate charging system or...

  20. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing... the container. (d) Compressed breathing gas contained valves or a separate charging system or...

  1. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing... the container. (d) Compressed breathing gas contained valves or a separate charging system or...

  2. 42 CFR 84.81 - Compressed breathing gas and liquefied breathing gas containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.81 Compressed breathing... the container. (d) Compressed breathing gas contained valves or a separate charging system or...

  3. [Stahl, Leibniz, Hoffmann and breathing].

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XVIII th century, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz and Friedrich Hoffmann criticize Georg Ernst Stahl's medical theory. They differenciate between unsound and true reasonings. Namely, they validate Stahl's definition of breath but extracting it from its animist basis and placing it in an epistemology obeying to the principle of sufficient reason and to the mechanical model. The stahlian discovery consists in understanding breath as a calorific ventilation against the ancient conception; the iatromechanists recognize its accuracy, but they try then to transpose it to a mechanical model of ventilation. Using it in a different epistemological context implies that they analyze the idea of discovery "true" in its contents, but "wrong" in its hypothesis. It impels to examine the epistemology of medical knowledge, as science and therapeutics, and in its links with the other scientific theories. Thus, if Leibniz as philosopher and Hoffmann as doctor consider Stahl's animism so important, it is because its discoveries question the fundamental principles of medicine. PMID:17153053

  4. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; Hortenau, E.F. von.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment is disclosed for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap. 17 figs.

  5. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, Edward L.; von Hortenau, Erik F.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  6. A real-time respiration position based passive breath gating equipment for gated radiotherapy: A preclinical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Weigang; Xu Anjie; Li Guichao; Zhang Zhen; Housley, Dave; Ye Jinsong

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a passive gating system incorporating with the real-time position management (RPM) system for the gated radiotherapy. Methods: Passive breath gating (PBG) equipment, which consists of a breath-hold valve, a controller mechanism, a mouthpiece kit, and a supporting frame, was designed. A commercial real-time positioning management system was implemented to synchronize the target motion and radiation delivery on a linear accelerator with the patient's breathing cycle. The respiratory related target motion was investigated by using the RPM system for correlating the external markers with the internal target motion while using PBG for passively blocking patient's breathing. Six patients were enrolled in the preclinical feasibility and efficiency study of the PBG system. Results: PBG equipment was designed and fabricated. The PBG can be manually triggered or released to block or unblock patient's breathing. A clinical workflow was outlined to integrate the PBG with the RPM system. After implementing the RPM based PBG system, the breath-hold period can be prolonged to 15-25 s and the treatment delivery efficiency for each field can be improved by 200%-400%. The results from the six patients showed that the diaphragm motion caused by respiration was reduced to less than 3 mm and the position of the diaphragm was reproducible for difference gating periods. Conclusions: A RPM based PBG system was developed and implemented. With the new gating system, the patient's breath-hold time can be extended and a significant improvement in the treatment delivery efficiency can also be achieved.

  7. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  8. Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents ... training, I started experiencing decreased exercise endurance, trouble breathing, and coughing. These symptoms affected my ability to ...

  9. Transverse-longitudinal coupling in intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Smith, L.

    1981-03-01

    The coupling between transverse and longitudinal perturbations is studied self-consistently by considering a beam of K-V distribution. The analysis is carried out within the context of linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations and electrostatic approximation. The perturbation is assumed to be azimuthally symmetric but axially non-uniform (k/sub z/ is not equal to 0). It is shown that the coupling affects both the longitudinal and transverse modes significantly in the high density and low frequency region. Two new classes of longitudinal modes are found which would not exist if the transverse motions of particles are neglected. The effect of resistive wall impedance on beam stability is also studied. It is found that the longitudinal impedance can cause the transverse modes also to be weakly unstable.

  10. NASA firefighters breathing system program report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Because of the rising incidence of respiratory injury to firefighters, local governments expressed the need for improved breathing apparatus. A review of the NASA firefighters breathing system program, including concept definition, design, development, regulatory agency approval, in-house testing, and program conclusion is presented.