Science.gov

Sample records for longitudinal health insurance

  1. Impact of health insurance status changes on healthcare utilisation patterns: a longitudinal cohort study in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Kwang-Soo; Jang, Sung-In; Cho, Kyung-Hee; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study examined medical care utilisation by health insurance status changes. Setting The Korean Welfare Panel Study (KoWePs) was used. Participants This study analysed 14 267 participants at baseline (2006). Interventions The individuals were categorised into four health insurance status groups: continuous health insurance, change from health insurance to Medical Aid, change from Medical Aid to health insurance, or continuous Medical Aid. Primary and secondary outcome measures Three dependent variables were also analysed: days spent in hospital; number of outpatient visits; and hospitalisations per year. Longitudinal data analysis was used to determine whether changes in health insurance status were associated with healthcare utilisation. Results The number of outpatient visits per year was 0.1.363 times higher (p<0.0001) in the continuous Medical Aid than in the continuous health insurance group. The number of hospitalisations per year was 1.560 times higher (p<0.001) in new Medical Aid and −0.636 times lower (p<0.001) in new health insurance than in continuous health insurance group. The number of days spent in hospital per year was −0.567 times lower (p=0.021) in the new health insurance than in the continuous health insurance group. Conclusions Health insurance beneficiaries with a coverage level lower than Medical Aid showed lower healthcare utilisation, as measured by the number of hospitalisations and days spent in hospital per year. PMID:27036140

  2. Health Insurance

    MedlinePlus

    Health insurance helps protect you from high medical care costs. It is a contract between you and your ... Many people in the United States get a health insurance policy through their employers. In most cases, the ...

  3. Health Insurance

    MedlinePlus

    Health insurance helps protect you from high medical care costs. It is a contract between you and ... Many people in the United States get a health insurance policy through their employers. In most cases, ...

  4. Longitudinal Changes in Access to Health Care by Immigrant Status among Older Adults: The Importance of Health Insurance as a Mediator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Sunha

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This longitudinal study examined the role of health insurance in access to health care among older immigrants. Design and Methods: Using data from the Second Longitudinal Study of Aging, the longitudinal trajectories of having a usual source of care were compared between 3 groups (all 70+ years): (a) late-life immigrants with less than 15…

  5. Making health insurers insure.

    PubMed

    Ortolon, Ken

    2010-12-01

    A section of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires health plans to maintain a minimum "medical loss ratio," or MLR, of between 80 percent and 85 percent. If they don't, they could be ordered to refund some premium dollars to their beneficiaries. Texas Medical Association officials say the new MLR provision could force health plans to spend more time providing insurance and less time meddling in patient care. But that is still unclear. PMID:21174243

  6. Health Insurance Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Health Insurance Basics Print ... thought advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  7. Does the Universal Health Insurance Program Affect Urban-Rural Differences in Health Service Utilization among the Elderly? Evidence from a Longitudinal Study in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Pei-An; Chang, Hung-Hao; Yang, Fang-An

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of the introduction of Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) on urban-rural inequality in health service utilization among the elderly. Methods: A longitudinal data set of 1,504 individuals aged 65 and older was constructed from the Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly. A difference-in-differences…

  8. Understanding health insurance plans

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000879.htm Understanding health insurance plans To use the sharing features on this ... plan for you and your family. Types of Health Insurance Plans Depending on how you get your health ...

  9. CHIP Utilization in South Texas: A Prospective Longitudinal Study of the Children's Health Insurance Program. JSRI Research Report No. 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Ann V.; Mier, Nelda; Gabriel, Olga; Flores, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) began as a federal stopgap measure to assist families whose incomes were too high to qualify for Medicaid, but too low to make health insurance for their children affordable. In 2002, efforts were launched around the United States to recruit eligible children into the program. This pilot study…

  10. Health insurance reform legislation.

    PubMed

    DiSimone, R L

    1997-01-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), enacted on August 21, 1996 (Public Law 104-19), provides for improved access and renewability with respect to employment-related group health plans, to health insurance coverage sold in connection with group plans, and to the individual market (by amending the Public Health Service Act). The Act's provisions include improvements in portability and continuity of health insurance coverage; combatting waste, fraud, and abuse in health insurance and health care delivery; promoting the use of medical savings accounts; improving access to long-term care services and insurance coverage; administrative simplification; and addressing duplication and coordination of Medicare benefits. PMID:9483710

  11. Relative value health insurance.

    PubMed

    Korobkin, Russell

    2014-04-01

    Increases in health costs continue to outpace general inflation, and implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will exacerbate the problem by adding more Americans to the ranks of the insured. The most commonly proposed solutions--bureaucratic controls, greater patient cost sharing, and changes to physician incentives--all have substantial weaknesses. This article proposes a new paradigm for rationalizing health care expenditures called "relative value health insurance," a product that would enable consumers to purchase health insurance that covers cost-effective treatments but excludes cost-ineffective treatments. A combination of legal and informational impediments prevents private insurers from marketing this type of product today, but creative use of comparative effectiveness research, funded as a part of health care reform, could make relative value health insurance possible. Data deficits, adverse selection risks, and heterogeneous values among consumers create obstacles to shifting the health insurance system to this paradigm, but they could be overcome. PMID:24523448

  12. Understanding health insurance plans

    MedlinePlus

    Most insurance companies offer different types of health plans. And when you are comparing plans, it can sometimes seem ... Depending on how you get your health insurance, you may have a ... (HMOs). These plans offer a network of health care providers ...

  13. Theory of health insurance.

    PubMed

    Nyman, J A

    1998-01-01

    The conventional explanation for purchasing insurance is to transfer risk. Psychologists, however, have shown that this explanation does not match actual behavior. They find that people generally prefer the risk of no loss at all to the certainty of a smaller actuarially equivalent loss, a situation exactly opposite to the one represented by the purchase of insurance. Nevertheless, people do purchase insurance, so there must be an explanation other than risk transfer for purchasing it. Of the explanations so far advanced, however, none have yet developed a wide acceptance. Regardless of risk issues, people will be more likely to purchase insurance when the premium is low compared to the value of the coverage to the consumer. Moral hazard raises the premium, as does adverse selection. The presence of either makes the purchase of insurance less likely. With health insurance, the tax subsidy can reduce the effective premium to less than the actuarially fair cost of insurance. This would increase the likelihood that health insurance is purchased. Finally, because of the value we place on our health, we desire access to a full range of health care. Health insurance is often the only affordable way of gaining access to this care, given the high costs of many of these procedures. PMID:10185500

  14. Insuring against health shocks: Health insurance and household choices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence on the role of public health insurance in mitigating adverse outcomes associated with health shocks. Exploiting the rollout of a universal health insurance program in rural China, I find that total household income and consumption are fully insured against health shocks even without access to health insurance. Household labor supply is an important insurance mechanism against health shocks. Access to health insurance helps households to maintain investment in children's human capital during negative health shocks, which suggests that one benefit of health insurance could arise from reducing the use of costly smoothing mechanisms. PMID:26836108

  15. Travel insurance and health.

    PubMed

    Leggat, P A; Carne, J; Kedjarune, U

    1999-12-01

    Travel insurance normally underwrites travel, medical, and dental expenses incurred by travelers abroad and arranges aeromedical evacuation of travelers under conditions specified by the travel insurance policy. Because of the costs of medical and dental treatment abroad and the high cost associated with aeromedical evacuation, all travelers should be advised of the need for comprehensive travel insurance and be advised to read their policies carefully to see what is covered and to check for any exclusions. In particular, those travelers who have known preexisting conditions, who are working overseas, or who are going to undertake any form of hazardous recreational pursuit may need to obtain a special travel insurance policy, which may attract a higher premium. Conservatively, it is estimated that between 30-50% of travelers become ill or injured whilst traveling. Relative estimated monthly incidence rates of various health problems have been compiled elsewhere. The risk of severe injury is thought to be greater for people when traveling abroad. These risks should be covered by travel insurance to protect the traveler, however it is not known what proportion of travel agents or airlines give advice routinely on travel insurance. Travel insurance is the most important safety net for travelers in the event of misadventure, and should be reinforced by travel health advisers. Although only 4% of general practitioners (GPs) in a late 1980's study in the United Kingdom would advise a traveler going to Turkey about travel insurance,4 more recent studies have shown about 60% of GPs in New Zealand and 39% of travel clinics worldwide usually advised travelers concerning travel insurance. In addition, 54% of GPs in New Zealand usually also advised travelers about finding medical assistance abroad, but only 19% of GPs recommended travel insurance companies as a source of medical assistance while traveling. PMID:10575173

  16. Deductibles in health insurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriyadis, I.; Öney, Ü. N.

    2009-11-01

    This study is an extension to a simulation study that has been developed to determine ruin probabilities in health insurance. The study concentrates on inpatient and outpatient benefits for customers of varying age bands. Loss distributions are modelled through the Allianz tool pack for different classes of insureds. Premiums at different levels of deductibles are derived in the simulation and ruin probabilities are computed assuming a linear loading on the premium. The increase in the probability of ruin at high levels of the deductible clearly shows the insufficiency of proportional loading in deductible premiums. The PH-transform pricing rule developed by Wang is analyzed as an alternative pricing rule. A simple case, where an insured is assumed to be an exponential utility decision maker while the insurer's pricing rule is a PH-transform is also treated.

  17. Insurance Incentives for Health Promotion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosokawa, Michael C.

    1984-01-01

    To reduce the cost of reimbursements, many insurance companies have begun to use insurance incentives as a way to motivate individuals to participate in health promotion activities. Traditional health education, research and demonstration, and policy-premium incentives are methods of health promotion used by life and health insurance companies.…

  18. Is It Really Worse to Have Public Health Insurance than to Have No Insurance at All? Health Insurance and Adult Health in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quesnel-Vallee, Amelie

    2004-01-01

    Using prospective cohort data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study examines the extent to which health insurance coverage and the source of that coverage affect adult health. While previous research has shown that privately insured nonelderly individuals enjoy better health outcomes than their uninsured counterparts, the…

  19. Self-insured health plans

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Patricia; Guttenberg, Abbie; Greenberg, Leonard; Arnett, Ross H.

    1986-01-01

    Nationwide, 8 percent of all employment-related health plans were self-insured in 1984, which translates into more than 175,000 self-insured plans according to our latest study of independent health plans. The propensity of an organization to self-insure differs primarily by its size, with large establishments more likely to self-insure. In the overwhelming majority of cases, the self-insured benefit was hospital and/or medical. Among employers who self-insure, 23 percent self-administer, and the remaining 77 percent hire a commercial insurance company, Blue Cross/Blue Shield plan, or an independent third-party administrator to administer the health plan. PMID:10312008

  20. The economics of health insurance.

    PubMed

    Jha, Saurabh; Baker, Tom

    2012-12-01

    Insurance plays an important role in the United States, most importantly in but not limited to medical care. The authors introduce basic economic concepts that make medical care and health insurance different from other goods and services traded in the market. They emphasize that competitive pricing in the marketplace for insurance leads, quite rationally, to risk classification, market segmentation, and market failure. The article serves as a springboard for understanding the basis of the reforms that regulate the health insurance market in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. PMID:23206642

  1. Social health insurance reexamined.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Social health insurance (SHI) is enjoying something of a revival in parts of the developing world. Many countries that have in the past relied largely on tax finance (and out-of-pocket payments) have introduced SHI, or are thinking about doing so. And countries with SHI already in place are making vigorous efforts to extend coverage to the informal sector. Ironically, this revival is occurring at a time when the traditional SHI countries in Europe have either already reduced payroll financing in favor of general revenues, or are in the process of doing so. This paper examines how SHI fares in health-care delivery, revenue collection, covering the formal sector, and its impacts on the labor market. It argues that SHI does not necessarily deliver good quality care at a low cost, partly because of poor regulation of SHI purchasers. It suggests that the costs of collecting revenues can be substantial, even in the formal sector where non-enrollment and evasion are commonplace, and that while SHI can cover the formal sector and the poor relatively easily, it fares badly in terms of covering the non-poor informal sector workers until the economy has reached a high level of economic development. The paper also argues that SHI can have negative labor market effects. PMID:19399789

  2. Impact of Market Competition on Continuity of Care and Hospital Admissions for Asthmatic Children: A Longitudinal Analysis of Nationwide Health Insurance Data 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Hee; Park, Eun-Cheol; Nam, Young Soon; Lee, Seon-Heui; Nam, Chung Mo; Lee, Sang Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, including asthma, can be managed with timely and effective outpatient care, thereby reducing the need for hospitalization. Objective This study assessed the relationship between market competition, continuity of care (COC), and hospital admissions in asthmatic children according to their health care provider. Methods A longitudinal design was employed with a 5-year follow-up period, between 2009 and 2013, under a Korean universal health insurance program. A total of 253 geographical regions were included in the analysis, according to data from the Korean Statistical Office. Data from 9,997 patients, aged ≤ 12 years, were included. We measured the COC over a 5-year period using the Usual Provider Continuity (UPC) index. Random intercept models were calculated to assess the temporal and multilevel relationship between market competition, COC, and hospital admission rate. Results Of the 9,997 patients, 243 (2.4%) were admitted to the hospital in 2009. In the multilevel regression analysis, as the Herfindahl–Hirschman Index increased by 1,000 points (denoting decreased competitiveness), UPC scores also increased (ß = 0.001; p < 0.0001). In multilevel logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for hospital admissions for individuals with lower COC scores (≥ 2 ambulatory visits and a UPC index score of < 1) was 3.61 (95% CI: 2.98–4.38) relative to the reference group (≥ 2 ambulatory visits and a UPC index score of 1). Conclusions Market competition appears to reduce COC; decreased COC was associated with a higher OR for hospital admissions. PMID:26958850

  3. Individual insurance: health insurers try to tap potential market growth.

    PubMed

    November, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Genna R; Ginsburg, Paul B; Quinn, Brian C

    2009-11-01

    Individual insurance is the only source of health coverage for people without access to employer-sponsored insurance or public insurance. Individual insurance traditionally has been sought by older, sicker individuals who perceive the need for insurance more than younger, healthier people. The attraction of a sicker population to the individual market creates adverse selection, leading insurers to employ medical underwriting--which most states allow--to either avoid those with the greatest health needs or set premiums more reflective of their expected medical use. Recently, however, several factors have prompted insurers to recognize the growth potential of the individual market: a declining proportion of people with employer-sponsored insurance, a sizeable population of younger, healthier people forgoing insurance, and the likelihood that many people receiving subsidies to buy insurance under proposed health insurance reforms would buy individual coverage. Insurers are pursuing several strategies to expand their presence in the individual insurance market, including entering less-regulated markets, developing lower-cost, less-comprehensive products targeting younger, healthy consumers, and attracting consumers through the Internet and other new distribution channels, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Insurers' strategies in the individual insurance market are unlikely to meet the needs of less-than-healthy people seeking affordable, comprehensive coverage. Congressional health reform proposals, which envision a larger role for the individual market under a sharply different regulatory framework, would likely supersede insurers' current individual market strategies. PMID:19899193

  4. Health policy basics: health insurance marketplaces.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Ryan A; Tape, Thomas G

    2013-12-01

    Starting on 1 October 2013, most individuals and small businesses will be able to shop for and enroll in health insurance coverage through their state's health insurance marketplace, also known as an exchange. The health insurance marketplaces will serve as a one-stop resource to help the uninsured and the underinsured find comprehensive health coverage that fits their needs and budget and determine whether they qualify for health insurance tax credits provided by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Physicians may benefit because insured patients are more likely to have a regular source of care, adhere to medical regimens, and access preventive care. However, implementation of the marketplaces may prove challenging if enrollment numbers are insufficient, technical problems arise, and patients are unable to access providers. Despite these potential issues, physicians are encouraged to educate themselves about how the marketplaces work so they can direct their patients to find the coverage that best meets their medical needs. PMID:24061932

  5. Health Insurance Stability and Health Status: Do Family-Level Coverage Patterns Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Robert B.; Garasky, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Being uninsured affects one's ability to access medical services and maintain health. Using longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the authors investigated how individual and family insurance coverage affects adult health. They found that health insurance coverage often varies across family members and changes…

  6. How to Shop for Health Insurance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know About Zika & Pregnancy How to Shop for Health Insurance KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Shop for Health Insurance Print A A A Text Size What's in ... seguro médico? In America today, we all need health insurance. You do. Your kids do. It's not a " ...

  7. Tensions in private health insurance regulation.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Sharon

    2003-02-01

    This article provides an analysis of the regulatory framework of Australian private health insurance linked to four major implicit regulatory objectives: promoting access to health insurance for consumers; promoting financial solvency and industry viability of registered health benefits organisations; promoting competition between registered health benefits organisations; and promoting accountability to consumers. Through an analysis of regulatory changes, case law and policy documents on the performance of the health insurance industry, it is argued that existing health insurance regulation exhibits inevitable tensions due to shifting and often conflicting government objectives about the role of private health insurance. PMID:12650003

  8. Health insurance: widespread copayment abuse.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1995-09-01

    Major health insurance companies using typical 80/20 plans are negotiating huge discounts with doctors. This results in the companies paying much less than the eighty percent amount, and sometimes nothing at all. However, these companies use the eighty percent amounts to measure whether a person has reached their insurance limits. All of these machinations are done in secret without patient knowledge. Other companies are using similar practices across the nation. Activists should try to document these abuses by using friendly physicians and hospitals and/or urging the medical societies to develop ethical codes governing such practices. PMID:11362763

  9. Issues in national health insurance.

    PubMed Central

    Donabedian, A

    1976-01-01

    Health insurance, by reducing net price to the consumer and increasing the opportunities for revenue to the provider, has profound effects, among other things, on the volume, content and distribution of services, their prices, and the capacity of providers to produce them. The magnitude and nature of these effects depend, partly, on the design of insurance benefits and, partly, on the nature of the health care system, particularly its current and potential capacity and the methods it uses to pay providers. Those who believe that the unique aim of insurance is to protect against unpredictable expenses attempt to suppress these effects, mainly by imposing financial disincentives to utilization which, in turn, reduce protection for those who need it most. Those who wish to reform the system have a broader range of objectives which include protective efficacy, cost control, quantitative adequacy, qualitative adequacy, efficiency of production, efficiency of allocation, equity, and redistribution of capacity. An analysis of the effects of insurance in the light of these objectives reveals favorable as well as unfavorable consequences. The provision of comprehensive benefits generates the necessity for a fundamental change in the organization of health services, if the advantages are to be fully realized and the disadvantages minimized. PMID:817614

  10. 78 FR 14034 - Health Insurance Providers Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... applicable to student health insurance, see Student Health Insurance Coverage, 77 FR 16453, 16455-56 (March... definition of covered entity is also Sec. 2520.101-2(c)(2)(ii)(B) (RIN 1210-AB51). See 76 FR 76222. If and... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 57 RIN 1545-BL20 Health Insurance Providers Fee AGENCY:...

  11. Health Insurance and Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szilagyi, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Few people would disagree that children with disabilities need adequate health insurance. But what kind of health insurance coverage would be optimal for these children? Peter Szilagyi surveys the current state of insurance coverage for children with special health care needs and examines critical aspects of coverage with an eye to helping policy…

  12. Private health insurance: implications for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sekhri, Neelam; Savedoff, William

    2005-02-01

    Private health insurance is playing an increasing role in both high- and low-income countries, yet is poorly understood by researchers and policy-makers. This paper shows that the distinction between private and public health insurance is often exaggerated since well regulated private insurance markets share many features with public insurance systems. It notes that private health insurance preceded many modern social insurance systems in western Europe, allowing these countries to develop the mechanisms, institutions and capacities that subsequently made it possible to provide universal access to health care. We also review international experiences with private insurance, demonstrating that its role is not restricted to any particular region or level of national income. The seven countries that finance more than 20% of their health care via private health insurance are Brazil, Chile, Namibia, South Africa, the United States, Uruguay and Zimbabwe. In each case, private health insurance provides primary financial protection for workers and their families while public health-care funds are targeted to programmes covering poor and vulnerable populations. We make recommendations for policy in developing countries, arguing that private health insurance cannot be ignored. Instead, it can be harnessed to serve the public interest if governments implement effective regulations and focus public funds on programmes for those who are poor and vulnerable. It can also be used as a transitional form of health insurance to develop experience with insurance institutions while the public sector increases its own capacity to manage and finance health-care coverage. PMID:15744405

  13. Private health insurance: implications for developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Neelam; Savedoff, William

    2005-01-01

    Private health insurance is playing an increasing role in both high- and low-income countries, yet is poorly understood by researchers and policy-makers. This paper shows that the distinction between private and public health insurance is often exaggerated since well regulated private insurance markets share many features with public insurance systems. It notes that private health insurance preceded many modern social insurance systems in western Europe, allowing these countries to develop the mechanisms, institutions and capacities that subsequently made it possible to provide universal access to health care. We also review international experiences with private insurance, demonstrating that its role is not restricted to any particular region or level of national income. The seven countries that finance more than 20% of their health care via private health insurance are Brazil, Chile, Namibia, South Africa, the United States, Uruguay and Zimbabwe. In each case, private health insurance provides primary financial protection for workers and their families while public health-care funds are targeted to programmes covering poor and vulnerable populations. We make recommendations for policy in developing countries, arguing that private health insurance cannot be ignored. Instead, it can be harnessed to serve the public interest if governments implement effective regulations and focus public funds on programmes for those who are poor and vulnerable. It can also be used as a transitional form of health insurance to develop experience with insurance institutions while the public sector increases its own capacity to manage and finance health-care coverage. PMID:15744405

  14. Health Insurance and Risk of Divorce: Does Having Your Own Insurance Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Heeju

    2016-01-01

    Most American adults under 65 obtain health insurance through their employers or their spouses’ employers. The absence of a universal healthcare system in the United States puts Americans at considerable risk for losing their coverage when transitioning out of jobs or marriages. Scholars have found evidence of reduced job mobility among individuals who are dependent on their employers for healthcare coverage. This paper finds similar relationships between insurance and divorce. I apply the hazard model to married individuals in the longitudinal Survey of Income Program Participation (N=17,388) and find lower divorce rates among people who are insured through their partners’ plans without alternative sources of their own. Furthermore, I find gender differences in the relationship between healthcare coverage and divorce rates: insurance dependent women have lower rates of divorce than men in similar situations. These findings draw attention to the importance of considering family processes when debating and evaluating health policies. PMID:26949269

  15. Health Insurance: Understanding Your Health Plan's Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... have to pay more for it. Your insurance company can give you a list of drugs that are on the formulary. If necessary, show the list to your doctor when he or she writes you a ... for help. SourceInformation adapted from "Understanding Your Health ...

  16. Medical insurance policy organized by Chinese government and the health inequity of the elderly: longitudinal comparison based on effect of New Cooperative Medical Scheme on health of rural elderly in 22 provinces and cities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The alarming progression of the aging trend in China attracts much attention in the country and abroad. In 2003, the Chinese central government launched the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) to resolve the inequity problem of health in regions with inadequate infrastructure and relative poverty. The rural elderly are the main beneficiaries of this policy; the improvement of their health through the medical insurance policy require exploration. Methods This study used data obtained from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) conducted in 2005 and 2008. Elderly people living in rural areas and aged 60 and above were screened for the investigation. A total of 8658 and 9904 elderly people were selected from 2005 and 2008, respectively. By establishing models and employing multi-logistic analysis, stereotype logistic analysis, we examined the effect of NCMS organized by Chinese government on three domains of the health of the rural elderly. Results A total of 948 and 6361 elderly people participated in NCMS in 2005 (n = 8658) and 2008 (n = 9904), respectively. With regard to the independent variables, the number of participants in NCMS increased, whereas province distribution, gender, and years of education only slightly changed. As for the dependent variables, the rural elderly in 2005 had poor general health but good psychological health. Differences were found between different moods. Old people who engage in much outdoor activity can take care of themselves. After three-year promotion of NCMS, the differences between 2005 and 2008 indicate that the physical function of the rural elderly worsen, whereas the general health and psychological health improves. Conclusions (1) In the 2005 data and 2008 data, result shows that NCMS participation can promote the self-rated quality and health change of the elderly. (2) After three years, the alleviation effect on anxiety and loneliness changed from insignificant to significant

  17. Designing health insurance exchanges: key decisions.

    PubMed

    Starc, Amanda; Kolstad, Jonathan T

    2012-02-01

    A cornerstone of health care reform is the establishment of state-level insurance exchanges where individuals and small businesses can purchase health insurance in an online marketplace. States are required to develop an exchange by 2014, or participate in a federal one. The exchanges will help people without employer-sponsored insurance find and choose a health plan to meet their needs. This Issue Brief reviews the experience of Massachusetts in developing a health insurance exchange and offers policymakers guidance on key features and likely consumer responses. PMID:22451998

  18. Changing Awareness of the Health Insurance Marketplace

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Parul; Fitzgerald, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The Health Insurance Marketplace was designed to increase the affordability of health insurance. The success of the marketplace depends on people’s awareness and use of it. In a statewide mail survey of West Virginians, we found that respondents’ awareness of the West Virginia Health Insurance Marketplace increased from 2013 to 2014. However, large percentages of respondents continued to be unaware of the availability of federal subsidies and were unsure of their personal eligibility for these subsidies. It is essential that awareness and enrollment efforts continue and that they be expanded in novel ways to continue growth in access to health insurance through the marketplace. PMID:26447917

  19. Changing Awareness of the Health Insurance Marketplace.

    PubMed

    Bias, Thomas K; Agarwal, Parul; Fitzgerald, Paula

    2015-11-01

    The Health Insurance Marketplace was designed to increase the affordability of health insurance. The success of the marketplace depends on people's awareness and use of it. In a statewide mail survey of West Virginians, we found that respondents' awareness of the West Virginia Health Insurance Marketplace increased from 2013 to 2014. However, large percentages of respondents continued to be unaware of the availability of federal subsidies and were unsure of their personal eligibility for these subsidies. It is essential that awareness and enrollment efforts continue and that they be expanded in novel ways to continue growth in access to health insurance through the marketplace. PMID:26447917

  20. 3 CFR - State Children's Health Insurance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State Children's Health Insurance Program Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of February 4, 2009 State Children's Health Insurance Program Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services The State Children's...

  1. BEHAVIORAL HAZARD IN HEALTH INSURANCE*

    PubMed Central

    Baicker, Katherine; Mullainathan, Sendhil; Schwartzstein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental implication of standard moral hazard models is overuse of low-value medical care because copays are lower than costs. In these models, the demand curve alone can be used to make welfare statements, a fact relied on by much empirical work. There is ample evidence, though, that people misuse care for a different reason: mistakes, or “behavioral hazard.” Much high-value care is underused even when patient costs are low, and some useless care is bought even when patients face the full cost. In the presence of behavioral hazard, welfare calculations using only the demand curve can be off by orders of magnitude or even be the wrong sign. We derive optimal copay formulas that incorporate both moral and behavioral hazard, providing a theoretical foundation for value-based insurance design and a way to interpret behavioral “nudges.” Once behavioral hazard is taken into account, health insurance can do more than just provide financial protection—it can also improve health care efficiency. PMID:23930294

  2. Why not private health insurance? 1. Insurance made easy.

    PubMed

    Deber, R; Gildiner, A; Baranek, P

    1999-09-01

    How realistic are proposals to expand the financing of Canadian health care through private insurance, either in a parallel stream or an expanded supplementary tier? Any successful business requires that revenues exceed expenditures. Under a voluntary health insurance plan those at highest risk would be the most likely to seek coverage; insurers working within a competitive market would have to limit their financial risk through such mechanisms as "risk selection" to avoid clients likely to incur high costs and/or imposing caps on the costs covered. It is unlikely that parallel private plans will have a market if a comprehensive public insurance system continues to exist and function well. Although supplementary plans are more congruous with insurance principles, they would raise costs for purchasers and would probably not provide full open-ended coverage to all potential clients. Insurance principles suggest that voluntary insurance plans that shift costs to the private sector would damage the publicly funded system and would be unable to cover costs for all services required. PMID:10497613

  3. Why not private health insurance? 1. Insurance made easy

    PubMed Central

    Deber, R; Gildiner, A; Baranek, P

    1999-01-01

    How realistic are proposals to expand the financing of Canadian health care through private insurance, either in a parallel stream or an expanded supplementary tier? Any successful business requires that revenues exceed expenditures. Under a voluntary health insurance plan those at highest risk would be the most likely to seek coverage; insurers working within a competitive market would have to limit their financial risk through such mechanisms as "risk selection" to avoid clients likely to incur high costs and/or imposing caps on the costs covered. It is unlikely that parallel private plans will have a market if a comprehensive public insurance system continues to exist and function well. Although supplementary plans are more congruous with insurance principles, they would raise costs for purchasers and would probably not provide full open-ended coverage to all potential clients. Insurance principles suggest that voluntary insurance plans that shift costs to the private sector would damage the publicly funded system and would be unable to cover costs for all services required. PMID:10497613

  4. Health insurance--a challenge in India.

    PubMed

    Presswala, R G

    2004-01-01

    In India, indemnity health insurance started about 3 decades ago. Mediclaim was the most popular product. Indian insurers and multinational companies have not been enthusiastic about starting health insurance in spite of the availability of a good market because health insurers have historically incurred losses. Losses have been caused by poor administration. Because it is a small portion of their total businesses, insurers have never tried sincerely to improve deficiencies or taken special interest. Hospital management and medical specialists have the spirit of entrepreneurship and are prepared to learn quickly and follow managed care principles, though they are not currently practiced in India. Actuarial data from the health insurance industry is sparse, but data from alternative sources will be helpful for starting managed healthcare. In my opinion, if properly administered, a "limited" managed care product with appropriate precautions and premium levels will be successful and profitable and will compete with present indemnity products in India. PMID:15104031

  5. Health insurance reform: labor versus health perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Walid; Awar, May

    2012-01-01

    The Ministry of Labor (MOL) has submitted to the Council of Ministers a social security reform plan. The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) considers that health financing should be dealt with as part of a more comprehensive health reform plan that falls under its prerogatives. While a virulent political discussion is taking place, major stakeholders' inputs are very limited and civil society is totally put away from the whole policy making process. The role of the media is restricted to reproducing political disputes, without meaningful substantive debate. This paper discusses health insurance reform from labor market as well as public health perspectives, and aims at launching a serious public debate on this crucial issue that touches the life of every citizen. PMID:22645894

  6. Competition between health maintenance organizations and nonintegrated health insurance companies in health insurance markets.

    PubMed

    Baranes, Edmond; Bardey, David

    2015-12-01

    This article examines a model of competition between two types of health insurer: Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) and nonintegrated insurers. HMOs vertically integrate health care providers and pay them at a competitive price, while nonintegrated health insurers work as indemnity plans and pay the health care providers freely chosen by policyholders at a wholesale price. Such difference is referred to as an input price effect which, at first glance, favors HMOs. Moreover, we assume that policyholders place a positive value on the provider diversity supplied by their health insurance plan and that this value increases with the probability of disease. Due to the restricted choice of health care providers in HMOs a risk segmentation occurs: policyholders who choose nonintegrated health insurers are characterized by higher risk, which also tends to favor HMOs. Our equilibrium analysis reveals that the equilibrium allocation only depends on the number of HMOs in the case of exclusivity contracts between HMOs and providers. Surprisingly, our model shows that the interplay between risk segmentation and input price effects may generate ambiguous results. More precisely, we reveal that vertical integration in health insurance markets may decrease health insurers' premiums. PMID:26608954

  7. Determinants of Health Insurance Coverage among People Aged 45 and over in China: Who Buys Public, Private and Multiple Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yinzi; Hou, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Donglan

    2016-01-01

    Background China is reforming and restructuring its health insurance system to achieve the goal of universal coverage. This study aims to understand the determinants of public, private and multiple insurance coverage among people of retirement-age in China. Methods We used data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey 2011 and 2013, a nationally representative survey of Chinese people aged 45 and over. Multinomial logit regression was performed to identify the determinants of public, private and multiple health insurance coverage. We also conducted logit regression to examine the association between public insurance coverage and demand for private insurance. Results In 2013, 94.5% of this population had at least one type of public insurance, and 12.2% purchased private insurance. In general, we found that rural residents were less likely to be uninsured (Relative Risk Ratio (RRR) = 0.40, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.34–0.47) and were less likely to buy private insurance (RRR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.16–0.31). But rural-to-urban migrants were more likely to be uninsured (RRR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.24–1.57). Public health insurance coverage may crowd out private insurance market (Odds Ratio = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.48–0.63), particularly among enrollees of Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance. There exists a huge socioeconomic disparity in both public and private insurance coverage. Conclusion The migrants, the poor and the vulnerable remained in the edge of the system. The growing private insurance market did not provide sufficient financial protection and did not cover the people with the greatest need. To achieve universal coverage and reduce socioeconomic disparity, China should integrate the urban and rural public insurance schemes across regions and remove the barriers for the middle-income and low-income to access private insurance. PMID:27564320

  8. NATIONAL EMPLOYER HEALTH INSURANCE SURVEY (NEHIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Employer Health Insurance Survey (NEHIS) was developed to produce estimates on employer-sponsored health insurance data in the United States. The NEHIS was the first Federal survey to represent all employers in the United States by State and obtain information on all...

  9. 41 CFR 60-741.25 - Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans. (a) An insurer, hospital, or medical service company, health maintenance organization, or any agent or entity that administers benefit plans, or... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health insurance,...

  10. Tax subsidies for private health insurance.

    PubMed

    Williams, Claudia; Burman, Len; Uccello, Cori; Wheaton, Laura; Kobes, Deborah; Khitatrakun, Surachai; Goodell, Sarah

    2003-05-01

    The exclusion from income and payroll taxes for employer-paid health insurance premiums amounted to more than $240 billion in 2010. As policy-makers search for ways to pay for health care reform and contain health care costs, this exclusion is coming under scrutiny, despite the fact that employee-sponsored insurance (ESI) is an integral part of the health insurance system. This update of a 2003 synthesis looks at the tax subsidy for private health insurance. Key findings include: The current tax subsidy benefits higher-income workers the most. The tax exclusion is worth more to those in higher tax brackets, higher-income workers are three times more likely to work for firms who offer ESI than lower-income workers, and they are more likely to purchase ESI when offered because they can afford it. Families earning $10,000 to $20,000 annually spend more than 25 percent of their income on health insurance but the value of their tax subsidy is only $1,500. By contrast, earners over $200,000 spend less than 5 percent on health insurance but their benefit is worth $4,500. Workers who cannot afford ESI or are ineligible, including the self-employed and many part-time workers, do not receive this subsidy when they purchase private, non-group coverage. PMID:22052181

  11. Manufacturing firms' decisions regarding retiree health insurance.

    PubMed

    Born, Patricia H; Zawacki, Alice M

    2006-01-01

    The trend for employers to discontinue offering retiree health insurance has profound implications for a large and growing share of the U.S. older population. The authors explore factors related to the firm's decision to offer and contribute to retiree health insurance using data from manufacturing firms. Their findings indicate that while firm characteristics, such as size and age, affect the probability that a firm offers retiree health insurance, employer contributions to this benefit are significantly related to the firm's financial performance and the alternative insurance options available in the market. The article concludes with a brief discussion of policy-related measures with potentially important implications for the future of retiree health benefits. PMID:16792390

  12. 42 CFR 457.348 - Determinations of Children's Health Insurance Program eligibility by other insurance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Determinations of Children's Health Insurance Program eligibility by other insurance affordability programs. 457.348 Section 457.348 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS...

  13. 41 CFR 60-250.25 - Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health insurance, life... SEPARATED VETERANS, AND OTHER PROTECTED VETERANS Discrimination Prohibited § 60-250.25 Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans. (a) An insurer, hospital, or medical service company,...

  14. 41 CFR 60-300.25 - Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health insurance, life... VETERANS, AND ARMED FORCES SERVICE MEDAL VETERANS Discrimination Prohibited § 60-300.25 Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans. (a) An insurer, hospital, or medical service company,...

  15. Smart Choice Health Insurance©: A New, Interdisciplinary Program to Enhance Health Insurance Literacy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Virginia; Russell, Mia; Ginter, Amanda; Braun, Bonnie; Little, Lynn; Pippidis, Maria; McCoy, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Smart Choice Health Insurance© is a consumer education program based on the definition and emerging measurement of health insurance literacy and a review of literature and appropriate theoretical frameworks. An interdisciplinary team of financial and health educators was formed to develop and pilot the program, with the goal of reducing confusion and increasing confidence in the consumer's ability to make a smart health insurance decision. Educators in seven states, certified to teach the program, conducted workshops for 994 consumers. Results show statistically significant evidence of increased health insurance literacy, confidence, and capacity to make a smart choice health insurance choice. Discussion centers on the impact the program had on specific groups, next steps to reach a larger audience, and implications for educators, consumers, and policymakers nationwide. PMID:26721502

  16. Type of health insurance and the quality of primary care experience.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the association between type of health insurance coverage and quality of primary care as measured by its distinguishing attributes--first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. METHODS: The household component of the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey was used for this study. The analysis primarily focused on subjects aged younger than 65 years who identified a usual source of care. Logistic regressions were used to examine the independent effects of insurance status on primary care attributes while individual sociodemographic characteristics were controlled for. RESULTS: The experience of primary care varies according to insurance status. The insured are able to obtain better primary care than the uninsured, and the privately insured are able to obtain better primary care than the publicly insured. Those insured through fee-for-service coverage experience better longitudinal care and less of a barrier to access than those insured through health maintenance organizations (HMOs). CONCLUSIONS: While expanding insurance coverage is important for establishing access to care, efforts are needed to enhance the quality of primary health care, particularly for the publicly insured. Policymakers should closely monitor the quality of primary care provided by HMOs. PMID:11111255

  17. 77 FR 16453 - Student Health Insurance Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... proposed rule (76 FR 7767) regarding section 1560(c) entitled ``Student Health Insurance Coverage.'' In the... Departments), published interim final rules (IFR) with request for comments (76 FR 46621) amending the Interim... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  18. Can Health Insurance Reduce School Absenteeism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Ryan; Gunton, Bradley; Kalbacher, Dylan; Seltzer, Jed; Wesolowski, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    Enacted in 1997, the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) represented the largest expansion of U.S. public health care coverage since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid 32 years earlier. Although the program has recently been reauthorized, there remains a considerable lack of thorough and well-designed evaluations of the program. In…

  19. Student Health Insurance: Problems and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Student health insurance experiences the same inflationary trends as employee benefits, but is rarely viewed as a significant direct cost to an institution, nor is the bill as high as the costs associated with employee health plans. Several long-term solutions and strategies that could help colleges to contain the ever-escalating cost of providing…

  20. Many Hispanics, Poor Still Without Health Insurance: Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160507.html Many Hispanics, Poor Still Without Health Insurance: Report Majority live in states that haven't ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite an overall rise in health insurance coverage among all Americans, Hispanics, low-income earners ...

  1. 45 CFR 147.102 - Fair health insurance premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fair health insurance premiums. 147.102 Section 147.102 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE REFORM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETS §...

  2. 45 CFR 147.145 - Student health insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Student health insurance coverage. 147.145 Section 147.145 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE REFORM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETS §...

  3. 45 CFR 147.102 - Fair health insurance premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fair health insurance premiums. 147.102 Section 147.102 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE REFORM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETS §...

  4. 45 CFR 147.145 - Student health insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Student health insurance coverage. 147.145 Section 147.145 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE REFORM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETS §...

  5. 45 CFR 147.145 - Student health insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Student health insurance coverage. 147.145 Section 147.145 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE REFORM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKETS §...

  6. [Community financing for health care in Africa: mutual health insurance].

    PubMed

    Richard, V

    2005-01-01

    Health care in sub-Saharan Africa is increasingly financed by direct payments from the population. Mutual health insurance plans are developing to ensure better risk sharing. However mutual health insurance cannot fully resolve all equity issues. The low resources available for contribution and the limited availability of care services especially in the public sector cannot guarantee the quality of care necessary for the development of mutual health insurance. National governments must not forget their responsibility especially for defining and ensuring basic services that must be accessible to all. Will mutual health insurance plans be a stepping-stone to universal health care coverage and can these plans be successfully implemented in the context of an informal economy? PMID:15903084

  7. The effects of health shocks on employment and health insurance: the role of employer-provided health insurance.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Cathy J; Neumark, David; Motika, Meryl

    2012-12-01

    Employment-contingent health insurance (ECHI) has been criticized for tying insurance to continued employment. Our research sheds light on two central issues regarding employment-contingent health insurance: whether such insurance "locks" people who experience a health shock into remaining at work; and whether it puts people at risk for insurance loss upon the onset of illness, because health shocks pose challenges to continued employment. We study how men's dependence on their own employer for health insurance affects labor supply responses and health insurance coverage following a health shock. We use the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) surveys from 1996 through 2008 to observe employment and health insurance status at interviews 2 years apart, and whether a health shock occurred in the intervening period between the interviews. All employed married men with health insurance either through their own employer or their spouse's employer, interviewed in at least two consecutive HRS waves with non-missing data on employment, insurance, health, demographic, and other variables, and under age 64 at the second interview are included in the study sample. We then limited the sample to men who were initially healthy. Our analytical sample consisted of 1,582 men of whom 1,379 had ECHI at the first interview, while 203 were covered by their spouse's employer. Hospitalization affected 209 men with ECHI and 36 men with spouse insurance. A new disease diagnosis was reported by 103 men with ECHI and 22 men with other insurance. There were 171 men with ECHI and 25 men with spouse employer insurance who had a self-reported health decline. Labor supply response differences associated with ECHI-with men with health shocks and ECHI more likely to continue working-appear to be driven by specific types of health shocks associated with future higher health care costs but not with immediate increases in morbidity that limit continued employment. Men with ECHI who have a self

  8. Health Care for the Wongs: Health Insurance, Choosing a Doctor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thypin, Marilyn; Glasner, Lynne

    A short fictional work for limited English speakers presents a young family's experience in learning about the value of health insurance and the importance of having a physician when medical care is needed. Information is related regarding insurance acquired through one's place of employment and the availability of medical assistance, through…

  9. Operationalizing universal health coverage in Nigeria through social health insurance.

    PubMed

    Okpani, Arnold Ikedichi; Abimbola, Seye

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria faces challenges that delay progress toward the attainment of the national government's declared goal of universal health coverage (UHC). One such challenge is system-wide inequities resulting from lack of financial protection for the health care needs of the vast majority of Nigerians. Only a small proportion of Nigerians have prepaid health care. In this paper, we draw on existing evidence to suggest steps toward reforming health care financing in Nigeria to achieve UHC through social health insurance. This article sets out to demonstrate that a viable path to UHC through expanding social health insurance exists in Nigeria. We argue that encouraging the states which are semi-autonomous federating units to setup and manage their own insurance schemes presents a unique opportunity for rapidly scaling up prepaid coverage for Nigerians. We show that Nigeria's federal structure which prescribes a sharing of responsibilities for health care among the three tiers of government presents serious challenges for significantly extending social insurance to uncovered groups. We recommend that rather than allowing this governance structure to impair progress toward UHC, it should be leveraged to accelerate the process by supporting the states to establish and manage their own insurance funds while encouraging integration with the National Health Insurance Scheme. PMID:26778879

  10. Operationalizing universal health coverage in Nigeria through social health insurance

    PubMed Central

    Okpani, Arnold Ikedichi; Abimbola, Seye

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria faces challenges that delay progress toward the attainment of the national government's declared goal of universal health coverage (UHC). One such challenge is system-wide inequities resulting from lack of financial protection for the health care needs of the vast majority of Nigerians. Only a small proportion of Nigerians have prepaid health care. In this paper, we draw on existing evidence to suggest steps toward reforming health care financing in Nigeria to achieve UHC through social health insurance. This article sets out to demonstrate that a viable path to UHC through expanding social health insurance exists in Nigeria. We argue that encouraging the states which are semi-autonomous federating units to setup and manage their own insurance schemes presents a unique opportunity for rapidly scaling up prepaid coverage for Nigerians. We show that Nigeria's federal structure which prescribes a sharing of responsibilities for health care among the three tiers of government presents serious challenges for significantly extending social insurance to uncovered groups. We recommend that rather than allowing this governance structure to impair progress toward UHC, it should be leveraged to accelerate the process by supporting the states to establish and manage their own insurance funds while encouraging integration with the National Health Insurance Scheme. PMID:26778879

  11. Risk Selection under Public Health Insurance with Opt-Out.

    PubMed

    Panthöfer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies risk selection between public and private health insurance when some, but not all, individuals can opt out of otherwise mandatory public insurance. Using a theoretical model, I show that public insurance is adversely selected when insurers and insureds are symmetrically informed about health-related risks, and that there can be adverse or advantageous selection when insureds are privately informed. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, I find that (i) public insurance is, on balance, adversely selected under the German public health insurance with opt out scheme, (ii) individuals advantageously select public insurance based on risk aversion and residential location, and (iii) there is suggestive evidence of asymmetric information in the market for private health insurance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27237082

  12. Health insurance and the obesity externality.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Jay; Sood, Neeraj

    2007-01-01

    If rational individuals pay the full costs of their decisions about food intake and exercise, economists, policy makers, and public health officials should treat the obesity epidemic as a matter of indifference. In this paper, we show that, as long as insurance premiums are not risk rated for obesity, health insurance coverage systematically shields those covered from the full costs of physical inactivity and overeating. Since the obese consume significantly more medical resources than the non-obese, but pay the same health insurance premiums, they impose a negative externality on normal weight individuals in their insurance pool. To estimate the size of this externality, we develop a model of weight loss and health insurance under two regimes--(1) underwriting on weight is allowed and (2) underwriting on weight is not allowed. We show that under regime (1), there is no obesity externality. Under regime (2), where there is an obesity externality, all plan participants face inefficient incentives to undertake unpleasant dieting and exercise. These reduced incentives lead to inefficient increases in bodyweight, and reduced social welfare. Using data on medical expenditures and bodyweight from the National Health and Interview Survey and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, we estimate that, in a health plan with a coinsurance rate of 17.5%, the obesity externality imposes a welfare cost of about $150 per capita. Our results also indicate that the welfare loss can be reduced by technological change that lowers the pecuniary and non-pecuniary costs of losing weight, and also by increasing the coinsurance rate. PMID:19548556

  13. Welfare Reform and Health Insurance of Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Neeraj; Kaestner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) on the health insurance coverage of foreign- and U.S.-born families headed by low-educated women. Data Source Secondary data from the March series of the Current Population Surveys for 1994–2001. Study Design Multivariate regression methods and a pre- and post-test with comparison group research design (difference-in-differences) are used to estimate the effect of welfare reform on the health insurance coverage of low-educated, foreign- and U.S.-born unmarried women and their children. Heterogenous responses by states to create substitute Temporary Aid to Needy Families or Medicaid programs for newly arrived immigrants are used to investigate whether the estimated effect of PRWORA on newly arrived immigrants is related to the actual provisions of the law, or the result of fears engendered by the law. Principal Findings PRWORA increased the proportion of uninsured among low-educated, foreign-born, unmarried women by 9.9–10.7 percentage points. In contrast, the effect of PRWORA on the health insurance coverage of similar U.S.-born women is negligible. PRWORA also increased the proportion of uninsured among foreign-born children living with low-educated, single mothers by 13.5 percentage points. Again, the policy had little effect on the health insurance coverage of the children of U.S.-born, low-educated single mothers. There is some evidence that the fear and uncertainty engendered by the law had an effect on immigrant health insurance coverage. Conclusions This research demonstrates that PRWORA adversely affected the health insurance of low-educated, unmarried, immigrant women and their children. In the case of unmarried women, it may be partly because the jobs that they obtained in response to PRWORA were less likely to provide health insurance. The research also suggests that PRWORA may have engendered fear among immigrants and dampened their

  14. Many Unfamiliar with Health Insurance Lingo, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157734.html Many Unfamiliar With Health Insurance Lingo, Study Says Texas survey found words like ' ... of adults in Texas don't understand basic health insurance terms, a new report finds. Poor, uninsured and ...

  15. Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160304.html Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival 2 studies ... certain cancers in America could depend on your health insurance status. Despite improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment, ...

  16. Consumer preferences in social health insurance.

    PubMed

    Kerssens, Jan J; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2005-03-01

    Allowing consumers greater choice of health plans is believed to be the key to high quality and low costs in social health insurance. This study investigates consumer preferences (361 persons, response rate 43%) for hypothetical health plans which differed in 12 characteristics (premium, deductibles, no-claim discount, extension of insurance and financial services, red tape involved, medical help-desk, choice of family physicians and hospitals, dental benefits, physical therapy benefits, benefits for prescription drugs and homeopathy). In 90% the health plan with the most attractive characteristics was preferred, indicating a predominantly rational kind of choice. The most decisive characteristics for preference were: complete dental benefits, followed by zero deductibles, and free choice of hospitals. PMID:15452743

  17. Does Retiree Health Insurance Encourage Early Retirement?*

    PubMed Central

    Nyce, Steven; Schieber, Sylvester J.; Shoven, John B.; Slavov, Sita Nataraj; Wise, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The strong link between health insurance and employment in the United States may cause workers to delay retirement until they become eligible for Medicare at age 65. However, some employers extend health insurance benefits to their retirees, and individuals who are eligible for such retiree health benefits need not wait until age 65 to retire with group health coverage. We investigate the impact of retiree health insurance on early retirement using employee-level data from 54 diverse firms that are clients of Towers Watson, a leading benefits consulting firm. We find that retiree health coverage has its strongest effects at ages 62 through 64. Coverage that includes an employer contribution is associated with a 6.3 percentage point (36.2 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 62, a 7.7 percentage point (48.8 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 63, and a 5.5 percentage point (38.0 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 64. Conditional on working at age 57, such coverage reduces the expected retirement age by almost three months and reduces the total number of person-years worked between ages 58 and 64 by 5.6 percent. PMID:24039312

  18. Does Retiree Health Insurance Encourage Early Retirement?

    PubMed

    Nyce, Steven; Schieber, Sylvester J; Shoven, John B; Slavov, Sita Nataraj; Wise, David A

    2013-08-01

    The strong link between health insurance and employment in the United States may cause workers to delay retirement until they become eligible for Medicare at age 65. However, some employers extend health insurance benefits to their retirees, and individuals who are eligible for such retiree health benefits need not wait until age 65 to retire with group health coverage. We investigate the impact of retiree health insurance on early retirement using employee-level data from 54 diverse firms that are clients of Towers Watson, a leading benefits consulting firm. We find that retiree health coverage has its strongest effects at ages 62 through 64. Coverage that includes an employer contribution is associated with a 6.3 percentage point (36.2 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 62, a 7.7 percentage point (48.8 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 63, and a 5.5 percentage point (38.0 percent) increase in the probability of turnover at age 64. Conditional on working at age 57, such coverage reduces the expected retirement age by almost three months and reduces the total number of person-years worked between ages 58 and 64 by 5.6 percent. PMID:24039312

  19. America's Children: Health Insurance and Access to Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Margaret, Ed.; Coye, Molly Joel, Ed.

    The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Children, Health Insurance, and Access to Care was assembled to address questions about health insurance for children, evaluating the strengths and limitations of insurance as a means of improving children's health from a variety of approaches and policies. Meeting between March 1997 and January 1998,…

  20. Why Employed Latinos Lack Health Insurance: A Study in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Howard P.; O'Keefe, Suzanne; DiCamillo, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This article assesses the relative importance of several factors believed to reduce the likelihood of health insurance coverage among working Latinos in California, including cost, immigration history, availability of insurance, beliefs about insurance, and beliefs about health and health care. According to a survey of 1,000 randomly selected…

  1. Americans' health insurance coverage, 1980-91

    PubMed Central

    Levit, Katharine R.; Olin, Gary L.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1992-01-01

    The authors of this article have used Current Population Surveys to summarize public and private health insurance trends in the United States over the last 12 years. Key findings include the declining percentage of the non-elderly population with employer-sponsored coverage and increasing numbers of low- and middle-income uninsured. That is, in a period of fast-rising health care costs, the poor and the near-poor in working families have been losing coverage for health care and facing increasing risks of inadequate care and financial loss. These data highlight health care access and financing problems now facing the Nation. PMID:10124438

  2. [French national health insurance. The current situation].

    PubMed

    Huguier, Michel; Lagrave, Michel; Marcelli, Aline; Rossignol, Claude; Tillement, Jean-Paul

    2010-06-01

    An audit of the French national health insurance system would be justified by economic considerations alone, but this would risk overlooking the notions of solidarity and freedom to which the French are rightly attached. European comparisons suggest, however, that our system could be made more efficient without undermining public health. The national health insurance system allows each member of the population to receive high-quality medical care. Practitioners have near-total freedom of prescription and practice. Medical care contributes to the ongoing increase in life expectancy, which is currently 73 years and second only to Japan. Healthcare is also a source of a million jobs. Macro-economic spending controls have failed, owing to medical progress and population aging, and also to medical consumerism favored by an unprecedented range of examinations and treatments, the increasing reimbursement of medical care, and the extension of direct payment by the insurer. Many ineffective measures have been implemented, such as tarification according to activity, and hospital certification. Health spending is also increased unnecessarily by bureaucratisation of healthcare spending and the transfer of professionals to posts for which they are not qualified. Some controversial medical prescriptions are not adequately controlled by the health service. Many reforms are based on over-optimistic economic predictions that fail to take related overheads into account. Lobbying by special interests groups undermines reform and the public interest. Too many independent administrative bodies have been created, and many are less efficient than the public structures they replaced. In sum, the French national health insurance system has become less and less efficient over the years. PMID:21513139

  3. The Disabled: Their Health Care and Health Insurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Michele

    This paper examines issues concerning access to health care for persons with disabilities, specifically the health status of the disabled, utilization and cost of services, and a comparison of health insurance coverage of persons with and without disabilities. Three age groups (children, working-age adults, and the elderly) are considered. Data…

  4. Short-run effects of job loss on health conditions, health insurance, and health care utilization.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jessamyn; Stevens, Ann Huff

    2015-09-01

    Job loss in the United States is associated with reductions in income and long-term increases in mortality rates. This paper examines the short-run changes in health, health care access, and health care utilization after job loss that lead to these long-term effects. Using a sample with more than 10,000 individual job losses and longitudinal data on a wide variety of health-related outcomes, we show that job loss results in worse self-reported health, activity limitations, and worse mental health, but is not associated with statistically significant increases in a variety of specific chronic conditions. Among the full sample of workers, we see reductions in insurance coverage, but little evidence of reductions in health care utilization after job loss. Among the subset of displaced workers with chronic conditions and those for whom the lost job was their primary source of insurance we do see reductions in doctor's visits and prescription drug usage. PMID:26250651

  5. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Programs § 403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health...

  6. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Programs § 403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health...

  7. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Programs § 403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health...

  8. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Programs § 403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health...

  9. 42 CFR 403.220 - Supplemental Health Insurance Panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. 403.220 Section 403.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Programs § 403.220 Supplemental Health Insurance Panel. (a) Membership. The Supplemental Health...

  10. Health Insurance Rate Review Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2011-01-25

    01/25/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (text of measure as introduced: CR S206) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Life and Health Insurance Industry Investments in Fast Food

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Danny; Woolhandler, Steffie; Himmelstein, David U.; Boyd, J. Wesley

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on health and life insurers' financial investments has highlighted the tension between profit maximization and the public good. We ascertained health and life insurance firms' holdings in the fast food industry, an industry that is increasingly understood to negatively impact public health. Insurers own $1.88 billion of stock in the 5 leading fast food companies. We argue that insurers ought to be held to a higher standard of corporate responsibility, and we offer potential solutions. PMID:20395572

  12. Life and health insurance industry investments in fast food.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Arun V; McCormick, Danny; Woolhandler, Steffie; Himmelstein, David U; Boyd, J Wesley

    2010-06-01

    Previous research on health and life insurers' financial investments has highlighted the tension between profit maximization and the public good. We ascertained health and life insurance firms' holdings in the fast food industry, an industry that is increasingly understood to negatively impact public health. Insurers own $1.88 billion of stock in the 5 leading fast food companies. We argue that insurers ought to be held to a higher standard of corporate responsibility, and we offer potential solutions. PMID:20395572

  13. Health risk and access to employer-provided health insurance.

    PubMed

    Buchmueller, T C

    1995-01-01

    The attractiveness of a job offering health benefits increases with a worker's expected medical expenditures. At the same time, employers have an incentive to screen out high-risk workers. Evidence from the 1984 Survey of Income and Program Participation indicates that employer screening dominates high-risk workers' desire to select jobs that offer insurance. Workers who describe their health as fair or poor, report difficulty with physical tasks, or have a work-related disability are less likely to receive employer-provided health insurance than healthy workers. Part of this effect is explained by the negative impact of poor health on earnings and labor supply. PMID:7713620

  14. Health promotion financing with Mongolia's social health insurance.

    PubMed

    Bayarsaikhan, Dorjsuren; Nakamura, Keiko

    2015-03-01

    Health promotion is receiving more attention in Mongolia. A survey is undertaken to examine health promotion in terms of health-related information, education, counseling, screening, preventive and medical checkups. Almost all (97.5%) of the subjects feel that access to reliable and systematically organized health-related information is important. About 60% of the subjects expressed that the amount of currently available information is inadequate. There are several factors that limit the implementation of public health programs. These include inadequate focus on promoting health at individual level, lack of funds, and limited incentives to promote health. This article examined social health insurance as an option to address these issues. Three hypothetical benefits package options expanded to health promotion were developed and simulated by a computerized tool. The simulations show that all 3 options are financially sustainable at the existing level of contribution if Mongolia will gain near universal health insurance coverage and improve revenue collection practices. PMID:25834269

  15. ADDHEALTH - NATIONAL LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF ADOLESCENT HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study provides a comprehensive view of the health and health behaviors of adolescents and the antecedents - personal, interpersonal, familial, and environmental of these outcomes. The study features a longitudinal, multi-level design with independent measurement at the indiv...

  16. Health financing and insurance reform in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Kress, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The government of Morocco approved two reforms in 2005 to expand health insurance coverage. The first is a payroll-based mandatory health insurance plan for public- and formal private-sector employees to extend coverage from the current 16 percent of the population to 30 percent. The second creates a publicly financed fund to cover services for the poor. Both reforms aim to improve access to high-quality care and reduce disparities in access and financing between income groups and between rural and urban dwellers. In this paper we analyze these reforms: the pre-reform debate, benefits covered, financing, administration, and oversight. We also examine prospects and future challenges for implementing the reforms. PMID:17630444

  17. Health Insurance Claim Review Using Information Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Sik; Speedie, Stuart M.; Yoon, Hojung; Lee, Jiseon

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this paper is to describe the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA)'s payment request (PARE) system that plays the role of the gateway for all health insurance claims submitted to HIRA, and the claim review support (CRS) system that supports the work of claim review experts in South Korea. Methods This study describes the two systems' information technology (IT) infrastructures, their roles, and quantitative analysis of their work performance. It also reports the impact of these systems on claims processing by analyzing the health insurance claim data submitted to HIRA from April 1 to June 30, 2011. Results The PARE system returned to healthcare providers 2.7% of all inpatient claims (97,930) and 0.1% of all outpatient claims (317,007) as un-reviewable claims. The return rate was the highest for the hospital group as 0.49% and the lowest rate was found in clinic group. The CRS system's detection rate of the claims with multiple errors in inpatient and outpatient areas was 23.1% and 2.9%, respectively. The highest rate of error detection occurred at guideline check-up stages in both inpatient and outpatient groups. Conclusions The study found that HIRA's two IT systems had a critical role in reducing heavy administrative workloads through automatic data processing. Although the return rate of the problematic claims to providers and the error detection rate by two systems was low, the actual count of the returned claims was large. The role of IT will become increasingly important in reducing the workload of health insurance claims review. PMID:23115745

  18. Health insurance exchanges bring potential opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M Orry; Eggbeer, Bill

    2012-11-01

    The introduction of the state health insurance exchanges, as provided for in the Affordable Care Act, has many strategic implications for healthcare providers: Unprecedented transparency; The "Walmart Effect", with patients playing a greater role as healthcare consumers; A rise in narrow networks spurred by low prices and narrow geographies; The potential end of the cross subsidy of Medicare and Medicaid by commercial plans; The possible end of not-for-profit status for hospitals PMID:23173361

  19. Health insurance: an eye on American welfare.

    PubMed

    Draper, J

    1980-02-15

    One of the great myths about the United States is that it does not have a welfare state. The myth is largely founded on the fact that America is one of the few remaining western nations with no national health insurance scheme to protect its citizens against the crippling costs of medical and hospital care. However, that does not mean that the United States does not have an extensive welfare system, writes John Draper. PMID:10245813

  20. Health Insurance as a Two-Part Pricing Contract *

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawalla, Darius; Sood, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Monopolies appear throughout health care. We show that health insurance operates like a conventional two-part pricing contract that allows monopolists to extract profits without inefficiently constraining quantity. When insurers are free to offer a range of insurance contracts to different consumer types, health insurance markets perfectly eliminate deadweight losses from upstream health care monopolies. Frictions limiting the sorting of different consumer types into different insurance contracts restore some of these upstream monopoly losses, which manifest as higher rates of uninsurance, rather than as restrictions in quantity utilized by insured consumers. Empirical analysis of pharmaceutical patent expiration supports the prediction that heavily insured markets experience little or no efficiency loss under monopoly, while less insured markets exhibit behavior more consistent with the standard theory of monopoly. PMID:23997354

  1. 77 FR 72721 - Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40, 46, and 602 RIN 1545-BK59 Fees on Health Insurance Policies and... issuers of certain health insurance policies and plan sponsors of certain self-insured health plans to...-3970 (regarding health insurance policies). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Paperwork Reduction Act...

  2. Worker decisions to purchase health insurance.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, L J; Nichols, L M; Banthin, J S

    2001-01-01

    Studying worker health insurance choices is usually limited by the absence of price data for workers who decline their employer's offer. This paper uses a new Medical Expenditure Panel Survey file which links household and employer survey respondents, supplying data for both employer insurance takers and declines. We test for whether out-of-pocket or total premium better explains worker behavior, estimate price elasticities with observed prices and with imputed prices, and test for worker sorting among jobs with and without health insurance. We find that out-of-pocket price dominates, that there is some upward bias from estimating elasticities with imputed premiums rather than observed premiums, and that workers do sort among jobs but this does not affect elasticity estimates appreciably. Like earlier studies with less representative worker samples, we find worker price elasticity of demand to be quite low. This suggests that any premium subsidies must be large to elicit much change in worker take-up behavior. PMID:14625931

  3. Health insurance and outcomes: comprehensive assessment of health system outputs.

    PubMed

    Perkins, N A

    1991-01-01

    Outcomes analysis in health care has historically meant the examination of clinical results of inpatient hospitalization. In response to climbing health care and health insurance costs, the organization of health care providers, the location of service delivery and reimbursement mechanisms have changed. As the health care industry changes, so too must the definition of outcomes. This article presents a conceptual framework for the analysis of health outcomes as health industry outputs, with an emphasis on the ways in which such outputs are being assessed and improved. PMID:10116955

  4. [Competition among health insurance funds: the position of the PKV].

    PubMed

    Leienbach, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Competition between private health insurers (PKV) and statutory health insurance funds (GKV) in Germany is far from being perfect, but the advantages resulting from the duality between PKV and GKV for the insured outweigh its disadvantages. Germany is the only country in the world where two systems compete for the best health insurance services and offer actual alternatives. They represent two different ways of funding leading into one common healthcare system. The dual structure stabilizes and enhances the medical infrastructure for all insured individuals alike. The rules of competition however can only take effect if the particularities of the two system are maintained and not mixed up. PMID:20120193

  5. Immigrants’ Access to Health Insurance: No Equality without Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Dzúrová, Dagmar; Winkler, Petr; Drbohlav, Dušan

    2014-01-01

    The Czech government has identified commercial health insurance as one of the major problems for migrants’ access to health care. Non-EU immigrants are eligible for public health insurance only if they have employee status or permanent residency. The present study examined migrants’ access to the public health insurance system in Czechia. A cross-sectional survey of 909 immigrants from Ukraine and Vietnam was conducted in March and May 2013, and binary logistic regression was applied in data analysis. Among immigrants entitled to Czech public health insurance due to permanent residency/asylum, 30% were out of the public health insurance system, and of those entitled by their employment status, 50% were out of the system. Migrants with a poor knowledge of the Czech language are more likely to remain excluded from the system of public health insurance. Instead, they either remain in the commercial health insurance system or they simultaneously pay for both commercial and public health insurance, which is highly disadvantageous. Since there are no reasonable grounds to stay outside the public health insurance, it is concluded that it is lack of awareness that keeps eligible immigrants from entering the system. It is suggested that no equal access to health care exists without sufficient awareness about health care system. PMID:25026082

  6. Evidence of Adverse Selection in Iranian Supplementary Health Insurance Market

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Gh; Izadi, Z

    2012-01-01

    Background: Existence or non-existence of adverse selection in insurance market is one of the important cases that have always been considered by insurers. Adverse selection is one of the consequences of asymmetric information. Theory of adverse selection states that high-risk individuals demand the insurance service more than low risk individuals do. Methods: The presence of adverse selection in Iran’s supplementary health insurance market is tested in this paper. The study group consists of 420 practitioner individuals aged 20 to 59. We estimate two logistic regression models in order to determine the effect of individual’s characteristics on decision to purchase health insurance coverage and loss occurrence. Using the correlation between claim occurrence and decision to purchase health insurance, the adverse selection problem in Iranian supplementary health insurance market is examined. Results: Individuals with higher level of education and income level purchase less supplementary health insurance and make fewer claims than others make and there is positive correlation between claim occurrence and decision to purchase supplementary health insurance. Conclusion: Our findings prove the evidence of the presence of adverse selection in Iranian supplementary health insurance market. PMID:23113209

  7. Health insurance tax credits, the earned income tax credit, and health insurance coverage of single mothers.

    PubMed

    Cebi, Merve; Woodbury, Stephen A

    2014-05-01

    The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 enacted a refundable tax credit for low-income working families who purchased health insurance coverage for their children. This health insurance tax credit (HITC) existed during tax years 1991, 1992, and 1993, and was then rescinded. A difference-in-differences estimator applied to Current Population Survey data suggests that adoption of the HITC, along with accompanying increases in the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), was associated with a relative increase of about 4.7 percentage points in the private health insurance coverage of working single mothers with high school or less education. Also, a difference-in-difference-in-differences estimator, which attempts to net out the possible influence of the EITC increases but which requires strong assumptions, suggests that the HITC was responsible for about three-quarters (3.6 percentage points) of the total increase. The latter estimate implies a price elasticity of health insurance take-up of -0.42. PMID:23813687

  8. 77 FR 41048 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ..., 2012 (77 FR 30377). The final regulations relate to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BJ82 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit; Correction...

  9. Divorce and Women's Risk of Health Insurance Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health…

  10. Health insurance and the demand for medical care: Instrumental variable estimates using health insurer claims data.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Abe

    2016-07-01

    This paper takes a different approach to estimating demand for medical care that uses the negotiated prices between insurers and providers as an instrument. The instrument is viewed as a textbook "cost shifting" instrument that impacts plan offerings, but is unobserved by consumers. The paper finds a price elasticity of demand of around -0.20, matching the elasticity found in the RAND Health Insurance Experiment. The paper also studies within-market variation in demand for prescription drugs and other medical care services and obtains comparable price elasticity estimates. PMID:27107371

  11. Insurer Market Structure and Variation in Commercial Health Care Spending

    PubMed Central

    McKellar, Michael R; Naimer, Sivia; Landrum, Mary B; Gibson, Teresa B; Chandra, Amitabh; Chernew, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between insurance market structure and health care prices, utilization, and spending. Data Sources Claims for 37.6 million privately insured employees and their dependents from the Truven Health Market Scan Database in 2009. Measures of insurer market structure derived from Health Leaders Inter study data. Methods Regression models are used to estimate the association between insurance market concentration and health care spending, utilization, and price, adjusting for differences in patient characteristics and other market-level traits. Results Insurance market concentration is inversely related to prices and spending, but positively related to utilization. Our results imply that, after adjusting for input price differences, a market with two equal size insurers is associated with 3.9 percent lower medical care spending per capita (p = .002) and 5.0 percent lower prices for health care services relative to one with three equal size insurers (p < .001). Conclusion Greater fragmentation in the insurance market might lead to higher prices and higher spending for care, suggesting some of the gains from insurer competition may be absorbed by higher prices for health care. Greater attention to prices and utilization in the provider market may need to accompany procompetitive insurance market strategies. PMID:24303879

  12. Development of the Health Insurance Literacy Measure (HILM): conceptualizing and measuring consumer ability to choose and use private health insurance.

    PubMed

    Paez, Kathryn A; Mallery, Coretta J; Noel, HarmoniJoie; Pugliese, Christopher; McSorley, Veronica E; Lucado, Jennifer L; Ganachari, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Understanding health insurance is central to affording and accessing health care in the United States. Efforts to support consumers in making wise purchasing decisions and using health insurance to their advantage would benefit from the development of a valid and reliable measure to assess health insurance literacy. This article reports on the development of the Health Insurance Literacy Measure (HILM), a self-assessment measure of consumers' ability to select and use private health insurance. The authors developed a conceptual model of health insurance literacy based on formative research and stakeholder guidance. Survey items were drafted using the conceptual model as a guide then tested in two rounds of cognitive interviews. After a field test with 828 respondents, exploratory factor analysis revealed two HILM scales, choosing health insurance and using health insurance, each of which is divided into a confidence subscale and likelihood of behavior subscale. Correlations between the HILM scales and an objective measure of health insurance knowledge and skills were positive and statistically significant which supports the validity of the measure. PMID:25315595

  13. Development of the Health Insurance Literacy Measure (HILM): Conceptualizing and Measuring Consumer Ability to Choose and Use Private Health Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Paez, Kathryn A.; Mallery, Coretta J.; Noel, HarmoniJoie; Pugliese, Christopher; McSorley, Veronica E.; Lucado, Jennifer L.; Ganachari, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Understanding health insurance is central to affording and accessing health care in the United States. Efforts to support consumers in making wise purchasing decisions and using health insurance to their advantage would benefit from the development of a valid and reliable measure to assess health insurance literacy. This article reports on the development of the Health Insurance Literacy Measure (HILM), a self-assessment measure of consumers' ability to select and use private health insurance. The authors developed a conceptual model of health insurance literacy based on formative research and stakeholder guidance. Survey items were drafted using the conceptual model as a guide then tested in two rounds of cognitive interviews. After a field test with 828 respondents, exploratory factor analysis revealed two HILM scales, choosing health insurance and using health insurance, each of which is divided into a confidence subscale and likelihood of behavior subscale. Correlations between the HILM scales and an objective measure of health insurance knowledge and skills were positive and statistically significant which supports the validity of the measure. PMID:25315595

  14. [Right to health. Perspective of the statutory health insurance].

    PubMed

    Müller, R D

    2007-09-01

    This essay is concerned with the topic 'right to health' from the perspective of a health insurance company. Following an outline of the legal foundation, aspects regarding benefit restrictions within the context of the contemporary political health discourse are discussed. The AOK's viewpoints and demands regarding patient sovereignty are represented under the rubrics of: information and transparency, consumer protection and self-help groups, quality of health care, treatment error management, doctor contract codification, error reduction management and expanding avenues for participation. The section "Health insurance companies fortify patient rights" exemplifies the efforts and activities of the AOK Berlin. These include the Disease Management Program Breast Cancer, a patient survey regarding home nursing care, and AOK Berlin's contributions to "A Healthy City" - a project based on the initiative of the WHO's Ottawa Charta. Furthermore, "prevention" and "setting" proposals, treatment error management, and complaint management are presented. In conclusion, the goals of deploying patient sovereignty, taking into consideration essential limitations of health insurance benefits, are redeveloped and linked with the demands for further development of patient rights. PMID:17828473

  15. Does Health Insurance Continuity Among Low-income Adults Impact Their Children’s Insurance Coverage?

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Melissa; Carlson, Matthew J.; Wright, Bill J.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Parent’s insurance coverage is associated with children’s insurance status, but little is known about whether a parent’s coverage continuity affects a child’s coverage. This study assesses the association between an adult’s insurance continuity and the coverage status of their children. We used data from a subgroup of participants in the Oregon Health Care Survey, a three-wave, 30-month prospective cohort study (n = 559). We examined the relationship between the length of time an adult had health insurance coverage and whether or not all children in the same household were insured at the end of the study. We used a series of univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to identify significant associations and the rho correlation coefficient to assess collinearity. A dose response relationship was observed between continuity of adult coverage and the odds that all children in the household were insured. Among adults with continuous coverage, 91.4% reported that all children were insured at the end of the study period, compared to 83.7% of adults insured for 19–27 months, 74.3% of adults insured for 10–18 months, and 70.8% of adults insured for fewer than 9 months. This stepwise pattern persisted in logistic regression models: adults with the fewest months of coverage, as compared to those continuously insured, reported the highest odds of having uninsured children (adjusted odds ratio 7.26, 95% confidence interval 2.75, 19.17). Parental health insurance continuity is integral to maintaining children’s insurance coverage. Policies to promote continuous coverage for adults will indirectly benefit children. PMID:22359243

  16. Putting Health Back Into Health Insurance Choice.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Pavel; Baker, Tom

    2014-08-01

    What are the barriers to voluntary take-up of high-deductible plans? We address this question using a large-scale employer survey conducted after an open-enrollment period in which a new high-deductible plan was first introduced. Only 3% of the employees chose this plan, despite the respondents' recognition of its financial advantages. Employees who believed that the high-deductible plan provided access to top physicians in the area were three times more likely to choose it than employees who did not share this belief. A framed field experiment using a similar choice menu showed that displaying additional financial information did not increase high-deductible plan take-up. However, when plans were presented as identical except for the deductible, respondents were highly likely to choose the high-deductible plan, especially in a two-way choice. These results suggest that informing plan choosers about high-deductible plans' health access provisions may affect choice more strongly than focusing on their financial advantages. PMID:24811934

  17. The impact of health insurance on health services utilization and health outcomes in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Guindon, G Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, a number of low- and middle-income country governments have introduced health insurance schemes. Yet not a great deal is known about the impact of such policy shifts. Vietnam's recent health insurance experience including a health insurance scheme for the poor in 2003 and a compulsory scheme that provides health insurance to all children under six years of age combined with Vietnam's commitment to universal coverage calls for research that examines the impact of health insurance. Taking advantage of Vietnam's unique policy environment, data from the 2002, 2004 and 2006 waves of the Vietnam Household Living Standard Survey and single-difference and difference-in-differences approaches are used to assess whether access to health insurance--for the poor, for children and for students--impacts on health services utilization and health outcomes in Vietnam. For the poor and for students, results suggest health insurance increased the use of inpatient services but not of outpatient services or health outcomes. For young children, results suggest health insurance increased the use of outpatient services (including the use of preventive health services such as vaccination and check-up) but not of inpatient services. PMID:24661805

  18. Private health insurance and regional Australia.

    PubMed

    Lokuge, Buddhima; Denniss, Richard; Faunce, Thomas A

    2005-03-21

    Since 1996, an increasing proportion of federal government expenditure has been directed into Australia's healthcare system via private health insurance (PHI) subsidies, in preference to Medicare and the direct funding of public health services. A central rationale for this policy shift is to increase the use of private hospital services and thereby reduce pressure on public inpatient facilities. However, the impact of this reform process on regional Australia has not been addressed. An analysis of previously unpublished Australian Bureau of Statistics data shows that regional Australians have substantially lower levels of private health fund membership. As a result, regional areas appear to be receiving substantially less federal government health funding, compared with cities, than if these funds were allocated on a per-capita basis. We postulate that the lower level of membership in regional areas is mainly due to the limited availability of private inpatient facilities, making PHI less attractive to rural Australians. We conclude that PHI as a vehicle for mainstream federal health financing has potential structural failures that disadvantage regional Australians. PMID:15777145

  19. Managed competition and consumer price sensitivity in social health insurance.

    PubMed

    Schut, Frederik T; Hassink, Wolter H J

    2002-11-01

    This paper examines whether the introduction of managed competition in Dutch social health insurance has resulted in effective price competition among insurance funds. We find evidence of limited price competition, which may be caused by low consumer price sensitivity. Using aggregate panel data from all insurance funds over the period 1996-1998, estimated premium elasticities of market share are -0.3 for compulsory coverage and -0.8 for supplementary coverage. These elasticities are much smaller than in managed competition settings in US group insurance. This may be explained by differences in switching experience and higher search costs associated with individual insurance. PMID:12475123

  20. 77 FR 30377 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ..., a notice of proposed rulemaking (REG-131491-10) was published in the Federal Register (76 FR 50931... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 602 RIN 1545-BJ82 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY... regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection...

  1. Health Insurance for Children. The Future for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Richard E., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This issue of "The Future of Children" focuses on efforts to provide publicly funded health insurance to low-income children in the United States through Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The articles summarize current knowledge and research about which children are uninsured and why, discuss ways to improve…

  2. 77 FR 41048 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... Register on Wednesday, May 23, 2012 (77 FR 30377). The final regulations relate to the health insurance... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 602 RIN 1545-BJ82 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit... FR Doc. 2012-12421, are corrected as follows: 1. On page 30377, column 2, in the preamble, under...

  3. [Health insurance in the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Starodubov, V I; Semenov, V Iu

    1997-01-01

    The need to reform health care in Russia became evident in the late 1980s when due to socioeconomic crisis, the government could not cover the expenses connected with this field and put the up-to-date expensive technologies into life. The introduction of the compulsory health insurance system (CHIS) is aimed at: 1) obtaining an additional financial source for health care by making the goal-oriented stable rates of deductions from the wage fund; 2) protecting the Russian Federation citizens' rights to have free medical aid of the guaranteed scope; 3) enhancing the quality of medial care delivered to the population by introducing a mechanism of movement of funds paid for a patient; 4) paying for medical care in relation to the volume and quality of the work done by simultaneously controlling the stipulated use of funds. Three-year experience of CHIS in Russia has indicated that there is a real mechanism of reformation and government regulation of health care under the conditions of transition to the market, with the interests of the general population and medical personnel in mind. Obvious legal, organizational, technological, and psychological problems and disadvantages have been found at all management levels, which are an obstacle in the way of the reforms and which whip up social tension and call for prompt decisions. PMID:9213488

  4. 42 CFR 457.348 - Determinations of Children's Health Insurance Program eligibility by other insurance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE... insurance affordability program. (b) Provision of CHIP for individuals found eligible for CHIP by another insurance affordability program. If a State accepts final determinations of CHIP eligibility made by...

  5. 42 CFR 457.348 - Determinations of Children's Health Insurance Program eligibility by other insurance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE... insurance affordability program. (b) Provision of CHIP for individuals found eligible for CHIP by another insurance affordability program. If a State accepts final determinations of CHIP eligibility made by...

  6. Health insurance trends are contributing to growing health care inequality.

    PubMed

    Book, Eric L

    2005-01-01

    A health plan chief medical officer comments on several trends underscoring the conclusion reached by Robert Hurley and colleagues that disparities in health care are widening. Growing use of new technology is driving up premiums, increasing the ranks of the uninsured and underinsured. Cost shifting by hospitals because of inadequate public program reimbursements drives premiums even higher. Although disparities in health care can never be eliminated, access to essential services can-and must-be made universal. That goal can be accomplished if insurance coverage is mandated and responsibility for its cost is spread broadly. PMID:16332912

  7. Preference diversity and the breadth of employee health insurance options.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, J R; Chernew, M E; Hirth, R A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of worker heterogeneity, firm size, and establishment size on the breadth of employer health insurance offerings. DATA SOURCES: The data were drawn from the 1993 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Employer Health Insurance Survey of 22,000 business establishments selected randomly from ten states. STUDY DESIGN: The analysis was cross-sectional, using ordered probit models to relate the breadth of plan offerings to firm characteristics. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Firms with more diverse workforces offered a more diverse set of health insurance options. Firm and establishment size independently influenced the breadth of plan offerings. CONCLUSIONS: Employers are responsive to worker heterogeneity when determining the breadth of their health insurance offerings. However, diseconomies of scale in the purchase and administration of health insurance appear to limit the extent to which small employers can accommodate diverse worker preferences. PMID:11666110

  8. Health insurance in India: need for managed care expertise.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Thomas K

    2011-02-01

    Health insurers in India currently face many challenges, including poor consumer awareness, strict regulations, and inefficient business practices. They operate under a combination of stifling administrative costs and high medical expense ratios which have ensured that insurers operate under steep losses. External factors (eg, onerous regulations, lack of standards, high claims payouts) and internal factors (eg, high administrative costs, dependence on indemnity models that cover inpatient treatment costs only) have forced the health insurance industry into a regressive spiral. To overcome these challenges, health insurers need to innovate in their product offerings and tighten their existing processes and cost structures. But as a long-term strategy, it is imperative that health insurers deploy managed care concepts, which will go a long way toward addressing the systemic issues in the current operational models of health plans. PMID:21473657

  9. Health insurance and ex ante moral hazard: evidence from Medicare.

    PubMed

    Dave, Dhaval; Kaestner, Robert

    2009-12-01

    Basic economic theory suggests that health insurance coverage may cause a reduction in prevention activities, but empirical studies have yet to provide much evidence to support this prediction. However, in other insurance contexts that involve adverse health events, evidence of ex ante moral hazard is more consistent. In this paper, we extend the analysis of the effect of health insurance on health behaviors by allowing for the possibility that health insurance has a direct (ex ante moral hazard) and indirect effect on health behaviors. The indirect effect works through changes in health promotion information and the probability of illness that may be a byproduct of insurance-induced greater contact with medical professionals. We identify these two effects and in doing so identify the pure ex ante moral hazard effect. This study exploits the plausibly exogenous variation in health insurance as a result of obtaining Medicare coverage at age 65. We find evidence that obtaining health insurance reduces prevention and increases unhealthy behaviors among elderly men. We also find evidence that physician counseling is successful in changing health behaviors. PMID:19277859

  10. 76 FR 5861 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ..., and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements, Application Fees..., Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements, Application Fees... Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); an application fee imposed on institutional providers...

  11. 75 FR 48815 - Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid Eligibility... Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid Eligibility Quality... Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). DATES: Effective Date: These regulations are effective...

  12. 76 FR 78741 - Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency Reports and Reporting of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... 42 CFR Parts 402 and 403 Medicare, Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency..., Children's Health Insurance Programs; Transparency Reports and Reporting of Physician Ownership or... medical supplies covered by Medicare, Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to...

  13. The Role of Public Health Insurance in Reducing Child Poverty.

    PubMed

    Wherry, Laura R; Kenney, Genevieve M; Sommers, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 30 years, there have been major expansions in public health insurance for low-income children in the United States through Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and other state-based efforts. In addition, many low-income parents have gained Medicaid coverage since 2014 under the Affordable Care Act. Most of the research to date on health insurance coverage among low-income populations has focused on its effect on health care utilization and health outcomes, with much less attention to the financial protection it offers families. We review a growing body of evidence that public health insurance provides important financial benefits to low-income families. Expansions in public health insurance for low-income children and adults are associated with reduced out of pocket medical spending, increased financial stability, and improved material well-being for families. We also review the potential poverty-reducing effects of public health insurance coverage. When out of pocket medical expenses are taken into account in defining the poverty rate, Medicaid plays a significant role in decreasing poverty for many children and families. In addition, public health insurance programs connect families to other social supports such as food assistance programs that also help reduce poverty. We conclude by reviewing emerging evidence that access to public health insurance in childhood has long-term effects for health and economic outcomes in adulthood. Exposure to Medicaid and CHIP during childhood has been linked to decreased mortality and fewer chronic health conditions, better educational attainment, and less reliance on government support later in life. In sum, the nation's public health insurance programs have many important short- and long-term poverty-reducing benefits for low-income families with children. PMID:27044710

  14. Progressive segmented health insurance: Colombian health reform and access to health services.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Fernando; Amaya, Liliana; Venegas, Stella

    2007-01-01

    Equal access for poor populations to health services is a comprehensive objective for any health reform. The Colombian health reform addressed this issue through a segmented progressive social health insurance approach. The strategy was to assure universal coverage expanding the population covered through payroll linked insurance, and implementing a subsidized insurance program for the poorest populations, those not affiliated through formal employment. A prospective study was performed to follow-up health service utilization and out-of-pocket expenses using a cohort design. It was representative of four Colombian cities (Cendex Health Services Use and Expenditure Study, 2001). A four part econometric model was applied. The model related medical service utilization and medication with different socioeconomic, geographic, and risk associated variables. Results showed that subsidized health insurance improves health service utilization and reduces the financial burden for the poorest, as compared to those non-insured. Other social health insurance schemes preserved high utilization with variable out-of-pocket expenditures. Family and age conditions have significant effect on medical service utilization. Geographic variables play a significant role in hospital inpatient service utilization. Both, geographic and income variables also have significant impact on out-of-pocket expenses. Projected utilization rates and a simulation favor a dual policy for two-stage income segmented insurance to progress towards the universal insurance goal. PMID:16929487

  15. Small firms' demand for health insurance: the decision to offer insurance.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Jack; Reschovsky, James D

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the decisions by small business establishments (< 100 workers) to offer health insurance. We estimate a theoretically derived model of establishments' demand for insurance using nationally representative data from the 1997 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Employer Health Insurance Survey and other sources. Findings show that offer decisions reflect worker demand, labor market conditions, and establishments' costs of providing coverage. Premiums have a moderate effect on offer decisions (elasticity = -.54), though very small establishments and those employing low-wage workers are more responsive. This suggests that premium subsidies to employers would be an inefficient means of increasing insurance coverage. Greater availability of public insurance and safety net care has a small negative effect on offer decisions. PMID:12371567

  16. Main Determinants of Supplementary Health Insurance Demand: (Case of Iran)

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Soraya Nouraei; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Mahdavi, Ghadir; Ghaderi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the majority of developing countries, the volume of medical insurance services, provided by social insurance organizations is inadequate. Thus, supplementary medical insurance is proposed as a means to address inadequacy of medical insurance. Accordingly, in this article, we attempted to provide the context for expansion of this important branch of insurance through identification of essential factors affecting demand for supplementary medical insurance. Method: In this study, two methods were used to identify essential factors affecting choice of supplementary medical insurance including Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and Bayesian logit. To this end, Excel® software was used to refine data and R® software for estimation. The present study was conducted during 2012, covering all provinces in Iran. Sample size included 18,541 urban households, selected by Statistical Center of Iran using 3-stage cluster sampling approach. In this study, all data required were collected from the Statistical Center of Iran. Results: In 2012, an overall 8.04% of the Iranian population benefited from supplementary medical insurance. Demand for supplementary insurance is a concave function of age of the household head, and peaks in middle-age when savings and income are highest. The present study results showed greater likelihood of demand for supplementary medical insurance in households with better economic status, higher educated heads, female heads, and smaller households with greater expected medical expenses, and household income is the most important factor affecting demand for supplementary medical insurance. Conclusion: Since demand for supplementary medical insurance is hugely influenced by households’ economic status, policy-makers in the health sector should devise measures to improve households’ economic or financial access to supplementary insurance services, by identifying households in the lower economic deciles, and increasing their

  17. Future prospects of voluntary health insurance in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Supakankunti, S

    2000-03-01

    Voluntary health insurance schemes in Thailand are still under development and have yet to seriously address the questions of equity and efficiency, while private health insurance is limited to people who can afford the premium. One form of insurance, commonly known as the health insurance card scheme, was first introduced as the Health Card Program in 1983. This program is based on risk sharing of health expenditures, with no cost sharing, in a voluntary health insurance prepayment scheme. With the uncertain performance of the Thai economy, program sustainability and the efficient use of resources are major concerns. The Health Card Program needs enough enrollees to ensure a sufficient pool of risks. This study looks at health card purchase and utilization patterns, using data from Khon Kaen Province, and finds that employment, education levels and the presence of illness are significant factors influencing card purchase. The last factor is related to the problem of adverse selection of the program; families with symptoms of sickness are more likely to buy cards, resulting in greater use of health services. The results also show an improvement in accessibility to health care and a high level of satisfaction among card holders, both key objectives of the program. It is suggested that changes in the health card system could enable it to evolve into a community-based compulsory health insurance scheme for rural areas. PMID:10731239

  18. Benefit distribution of social health insurance: evidence from china's urban resident basic medical insurance.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jay; Tian, Sen; Zhou, Qin; Han, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Equity is one of the essential objectives of the social health insurance. This article evaluates the benefit distribution of the China's Urban Residents' Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI), covering 300 million urban populations. Using the URBMI Household Survey data fielded between 2007 and 2011, we estimate the benefit distribution by the two-part model, and find that the URBMI beneficiaries from lower income groups benefited less than that of higher income groups. In other words, government subsidy that was supposed to promote the universal coverage of health care flew more to the rich. Our study provides new evidence on China's health insurance system reform, and it bears meaningful policy implication for other developing countries facing similar challenges on the way to universal coverage of health insurance. PMID:26936094

  19. Insurance Coverage & Whither Thou Goest for Health Information in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Saulsberry, Loren; Price, Mary; Hsu, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective Examine use of the Internet (eHealth) and mobile health (mHealth) technologies by privately insured, publicly insured (Medicare/Medicaid), or uninsured U.S. adults in 2012. Data Source Pew Charitable Trust telephone interviews of a nationally representative, random sample of 3,014 adult U.S. residents, age 18+. Methods Estimate health information seeking behavior overall and by segment (i.e., insurance type), then, adjust estimates for individual traits, clinical need, and technology access using logistic regression. Results Most respondents prefer offline to online (Internet) health information sources; over half across all segments use the Internet. More respondents communicate with providers offline compared with online. Most self-reported Internet users use online tools for health information, with privately insured respondents more likely to use new technologies. Unadjusted use rates differ across segments. Medicaid beneficiaries are more likely than the privately insured to share health information online, and Medicare beneficiaries are more likely than the privately insured to text with health professionals. After adjustment, these differences were minimal (e.g., Medicare beneficiaries had odds similar to the privately insured of online physician consultations), or the direction of the association reversed (e.g., Medicaid beneficiaries had greater odds than the privately insured of online physician consultations versus lower odds before adjustment). Discussion Few adults report eHealth or mHealth use in 2012. Use levels appear unevenly distributed across insurance types, which could be mostly attributed to differences in individual traits and/or need. As out-of-pocket costs of medical care increases, consumers may increasingly turn to these generally free electronic health tools. PMID:25383242

  20. [The pharmaceutical cost of elderly people in private health insurance].

    PubMed

    Wild, F

    2009-12-01

    In this paper the author analyses the prescription of pharmaceuticals for elderly private insured persons. Data from eight firms form the basis of the survey. The main focus lies in the analysis of the expenditure per capita and the distribution of the pharmaceuticals costs. It will illustrate that costs for elderly private insured persons will have a great impact on the expenditure for the private health insurance companies in the coming years. PMID:20052826

  1. 77 FR 22691 - Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 46 RIN 1545-BK59 Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self... Protection and Affordable Care Act on issuers of certain health insurance policies and plan sponsors of..., Rebecca L. Baxter at (202) 622-3970 (regarding health insurance policies) or R. Lisa Mojiri-Azad at...

  2. Making health insurance cost-sharing clear to consumers: challenges in implementing health reform's insurance disclosure requirements.

    PubMed

    Quincy, Lynn

    2011-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act calls for a new health insurance disclosure form, called the Summary of Benefits and Coverage, which uses a fixed layout and standard terms and definitions to allow consumers to compare health insurance plans and understand terms of coverage. This brief reports on findings from a Consumers Union study that examined consumers' initial reactions to the form. Testing revealed that consumers were able to use the forms to make hypothetical choices among health plans. However, the study also found deep-seated confusion and lack of confidence with respect to health plan cost-sharing. These findings have significant implications for any venue providing comparative displays of health insurance information, like the future state exchanges, and for policies that rely on the ability of consumers to make informed health insurance purchasing decisions, such as "consumer-driven health care" policies. PMID:21348328

  3. Survey of social health insurance structure in selected countries; providing framework for basic health insurance in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Effat; Raissi, Ahmad Reza; Barooni, Mohsen; Ferdoosi, Massoud; Nuhi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Health system reforms are the most strategic issue that has been seriously considered in healthcare systems in order to reduce costs and increase efficiency and effectiveness. The costs of health system finance in our country, lack of universal coverage in health insurance, and related issues necessitate reforms in our health system financing. The aim of this research was to prepare a structure of framework for social health insurance in Iran and conducting a comparative study in selected countries with social health insurance. Materials and Methods: This comparative descriptive study was conducted in three phases. The first phase of the study examined the structure of health social insurance in four countries – Germany, South Korea, Egypt, and Australia. The second phase was to develop an initial model, which was designed to determine the shared and distinguishing points of the investigated structures, for health insurance in Iran. The third phase was to validate the final research model. The developed model by the Delphi method was given to 20 professionals in financing of the health system, health economics and management of healthcare services. Their comments were collected in two stages and its validity was confirmed. Findings: The study of the structure of health insurance in the selected countries shows that health social insurance in different countries have different structures. Based on the findings of the present study, the current situation of the health system, and the conducted surveys, the following framework is suitable for the health social insurance system in Iran. The Health Social Insurance Organization has a unique service by having five funds of governmental employees, companies and NGOs, self-insured, villagers, and others, which serves as a nongovernmental organization under the supervision of public law and by decision- and policy-making of the Health Insurance Supreme Council. Membership in this organization

  4. Utilization of health insurance data in an environmental epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jongsik; Cho, Seongkyung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In South Korea, health insurance data are used as material for the health insurance of national whole subject. In general, health insurance data could be useful for estimating prevalence or incidence rate that is representative of the actual value in a population. The purpose of this study was to apply the concept of episode of care (EoC) in the utilization of health insurance data in the field of environmental epidemiology and to propose an improved methodology through an uncertainty assessment of disease course and outcome. Methods In this study, we introduced the concept of EoC as a methodology to utilize health insurance data in the field of environmental epidemiology. The characterization analysis of the course and outcome of applying the EoC concept to health insurance data was performed through an uncertainty assessment. Results The EoC concept in this study was applied to heat stroke (International Classification of Disease, 10th revision, code T67). In the comparison of results between before and after applying the EoC concept, we observed a reduction in the deviation of daily claims after applying the EoC concept. After that, we categorized context, model, and input uncertainty and characterized these uncertainties in three dimensions by using uncertainty typology. Conclusions This study is the first to show the process of constructing episode data for environmental epidemiological studies by using health insurance data. Our results will help in obtaining representative results for the processing of health insurance data in environmental epidemiological research. Furthermore, these results could be used in the processing of health insurance data in the future. PMID:26796891

  5. Using Clinical Decision Support Software in Health Insurance Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, R.; Kumlander, Deniss

    This paper proposes the idea to use Clinical Decision Support software in Health Insurance Company as a tool to reduce the expenses related to Medication Errors. As a prove that this class of software will help insurance companies reducing the expenses, the research was conducted in eight hospitals in United Arab Emirates to analyze the amount of preventable common Medication Errors in drug prescription.

  6. Health insurance and use of alternative medicine in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    van Gameren, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives I analyze the effect of coverage by health insurance on the use of alternative medicine such as folk healers and homeopaths, in particular if it complements or substitutes conventional services. Methods Panel data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) is used to estimate bivariate probit models in order to explain the use of alternative medicine while allowing the determinant of interest, access to health insurance, to be an endogenous factor. Results The findings indicate that households with insurance coverage less often use alternative medicine, and that the effect is much stronger among poor than among rich households. Conclusions Poor households substitute away from traditional medicine towards conventional medicine. PMID:20546965

  7. MORAL HAZARD IN HEALTH INSURANCE: DO DYNAMIC INCENTIVES MATTER?

    PubMed Central

    Aron-Dine, Aviva; Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy; Cullen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Using data from employer-provided health insurance and Medicare Part D, we investigate whether healthcare utilization responds to the dynamic incentives created by the nonlinear nature of health insurance contracts. We exploit the fact that, because annual coverage usually resets every January, individuals who join a plan later in the year face the same initial (“spot”) price of healthcare but a higher expected end-of-year (“future”) price. We find a statistically significant response of initial utilization to the future price, rejecting the null that individuals respond only to the spot price. We discuss implications for analysis of moral hazard in health insurance. PMID:26769985

  8. Health Insurance Information-Seeking Behaviors Among the Uninsured.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Karishma S; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Perkins, Hannah; Politi, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    As a result of the Affordable Care Act, millions of previously uninsured individuals are facing the daunting task of selecting health insurance. In order to better understand how to reach the uninsured and support their health insurance decision making, this study examined where the uninsured collect information about health insurance and the extent to which they trust those sources and media. We analyzed secondary data on health insurance information-seeking behaviors collected from a survey of 343 uninsured individuals. The Internet, mail, and television were among the most frequently used media, though all 3 had low trust scores. Participants sought information from health care providers and interpersonal sources less frequently but trusted it more than they trusted the media. Age, gender, race, and education were predictors of use and trust of different media and sources of health insurance information. Findings suggest that strategies that pair health care professionals, lay health advisors, or community liaisons with the ubiquity of the Internet may be a strong approach for delivering quality health insurance information to the uninsured. Tailoring messages might also be effective at reaching specific subgroups of the uninsured. PMID:26444848

  9. Supplemental health insurance: did Croatia miss an opportunity?

    PubMed

    Langenbrunner, John C

    2002-08-01

    Croatia continues to face a health-funding crisis. A recent supplemental health insurance law increases revenues through first increasing co-payments, then raising the payroll tax to cover those co-payments. This public finance "slight-of-hand" will not solve the system's structural issues and may worsen system performance both in terms of efficiency and equity. Should Croatia have considered private supplemental insurance as an alternative? There is a new single private supplemental health insurance market now evolving over the EU countries and into Eastern Europe. Croatians could take advantage of lowered costs due to larger risk pooling and the lower administrative overhead of mature insurance organizations. Private supplemental insurance, when designed well, can address several objectives, including a) increased revenues into the health sector; b) removal of the public burden of coverage of selected services for certain population groups; and c) encourage new management and organizational innovations into the sector. Private and multiple company insurance markets are thought to be superior in terms of consumer responsiveness; choice of benefits; adoption of new, more expensive technology; and use of private sector providers. Private sector insurers may also encourage "spillover" effects encouraging reforms with public sector insurance performance. There is already an emerging private insurance market in Croatia, but can it be expanded and properly regulated? The private insurance companies might capture as much as 30-70% of the market for certain services, such as high cost procedures, preferred providers, and hotel amenities. But the Government will need to strengthen the regulatory framework for private insurance and assure that there is adequate regulatory capacity. PMID:12187517

  10. SCHIP Directors' Perception of Schools Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.; Rickard, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Health insurance coverage increases access to health care. There has been an erosion of employer-based health insurance and a concomitant rise in children covered by public health insurance programs, yet more than 8 million children are still without health insurance coverage. Methods: This study was a national survey to assess the…

  11. Rural Enrollment in Health Insurance Marketplaces.

    PubMed

    Barker, Abigail R; McBride, Timothy D; Kemper, Leah M; Mueller, Keith J

    2015-07-01

    Our previous analysis of 2015 Health Insurance Marketplace (HIM) data on plan availability and premiums in comparison to 2014 showed only modest premium increases in many rural areas and increased firm participation in most areas. To determine whether HIM enrollment also shows a positive trend, we analyzed county-level HIM enrollment data for 2015 by geographic categories, population density, premium, and firm participation, comparing enrollment outcomes in rural places to those in urban places. Key Findings. (1) In the Northeast, Midwest, and West census regions, estimated enrollment rates in rural (micropolitan and noncore) counties were similar to estimated rates in urban counties, while in the South, rural rates lagged behind urban rates. (2) Estimated enrollment rates at the rating area level increased as the population density of the rating area increased. (3) Various measures of rurality and geography indicate that HIMs performed well in many rural areas; however, this analysis suggests that in some rural areas, enrollment outcomes may have been weak due to factors such as the geographic scope of the rating areas, plan availability in these rating areas, or potentially fewer resources devoted to outreach and enrollment efforts. (4) In general, county-level, enrollment-weighted average premiums differed more by census region than by metropolitan, micropolitan, and noncore status. (5) Low enrollment rates at the rating area level were associated with a lower numbers of firms participating in HIMs. When three or more firms participated, enrollment rates were close to or above average. PMID:26793819

  12. Impact of Health Insurance Expansions on Nonelderly Adults With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bruen, Brian K.; Lantz, Paula M.; Mendez, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death in the United States. The treatment and control of hypertension is inadequate, especially among patients without health insurance coverage. The Affordable Care Act offered an opportunity to improve hypertension management by increasing the number of people covered by insurance. This study predicts the long-term effects of improved hypertension treatment rates due to insurance expansions on the prevalence and mortality rates of CVD of nonelderly Americans with hypertension. Methods We developed a state-transition model to simulate the lifetime health events of the population aged 25 to 64 years. We modeled the effects of insurance coverage expansions on the basis of published findings on the relationship between insurance coverage, use of antihypertensive medications, and CVD-related events and deaths. Results The model projected that currently anticipated health insurance expansions would lead to a 5.1% increase in treatment rate among hypertensive patients. Such an increase in treatment rate is estimated to lead to 111,000 fewer new coronary heart disease events, 63,000 fewer stroke events, and 95,000 fewer CVD-related deaths by 2050. The estimated benefits were slightly greater for men than for women and were greater among nonwhite populations. Conclusion Federal and state efforts to expand insurance coverage among nonelderly adults could yield significant health benefits in terms of CVD prevalence and mortality rates and narrow the racial/ethnic disparities in health outcomes for patients with hypertension. PMID:26133648

  13. What Can Massachusetts Teach Us about National Health Insurance Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Kenneth A., Ed.; Joyce, Theodore J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is the most significant health policy legislation since Medicare in 1965. The need to address rising health care costs and the lack of health insurance coverage is widely accepted. Health care spending is approaching 17 percent of gross domestic product and yet 45 million Americans remain…

  14. 76 FR 46677 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Coverage of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Center for Consumer Information & Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services... with respect to group health plans and health insurance coverage offered in connection with a group.... The temporary regulations provide guidance to employers, group health plans, and health...

  15. [Persons insured with the German statutory sickness funds or privately insured: differences in health and health behaviour].

    PubMed

    Kriwy, P; Mielck, A

    2006-05-01

    This paper deals with differences in health and health behaviour between those who are insured in the German Statutory Sickness Funds (GKV) and those who are privately insured (PKV). This topic has been largely ignored in German Public Health research. The analyses are based on data from a large survey in Germany conducted in 1998 and including 6822 adults. The multivariate analyses have been performed with OLS and logistic regression, separately for men and women and controlling for age, educational level, income and region. The most important result is that PKV-insured men have fewer diseases and feel more healthy than GKV-insured men. For women, though, no significant association could be found between health and type of health insurance. The interpretation of these results is mainly based on the "selection hypothesis", stating that healthier persons are more likely to be insured in the PKV than in the GKV. This would imply that the "causation hypothesis" (stating that being privately insured has a positive effect on health) is less important. Taking into account the current discussion on the balance between GKV and PKV, it is believed that future research should focus more on these topics. PMID:16773548

  16. 75 FR 43109 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Internal Claims and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are issuing substantially similar interim final regulations with respect to group health plans and health insurance coverage offered in... health insurance issuers providing group health insurance coverage. The text of those...

  17. Consolidating the social health insurance schemes in China: towards an equitable and efficient health system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyue; Fang, Hai; Liu, Xiaoyun; Yuan, Beibei; Xu, Jin

    2015-10-10

    Fragmentation in social health insurance schemes is an important factor for inequitable access to health care and financial protection for people covered by different health insurance schemes in China. To fulfil its commitment of universal health coverage by 2020, the Chinese Government needs to prioritise addressing this issue. After analysing the situation of fragmentation, this Review summarises efforts to consolidate health insurance schemes both in China and internationally. Rural migrants, elderly people, and those with non-communicable diseases in China will greatly benefit from consolidation of the existing health insurance schemes with extended funding pools, thereby narrowing the disparities among health insurance schemes in fund level and benefit package. Political commitments, institutional innovations, and a feasible implementation plan are the major elements needed for success in consolidation. Achievement of universal health coverage in China needs systemic strategies including consolidation of the social health insurance schemes. PMID:26466052

  18. Wisconsin Blues' conversion: the privatization of a health insurer.

    PubMed

    Fetter, Bruce

    2007-12-01

    Wisconsin Blue Cross was chartered in 1939 as a "charitable and benevolent corporation" to cover hospitalization costs at a time when most Americans did not have health insurance. In order to promote the protection that insurance afforded, the Wisconsin legislature exempted the company from most state and local taxes. During World War II, the federal government created tax deductions for both employers and employees, which created new demand for health insurance. The company extended its coverage to physicians' services and, as Blue Cross Blue Shield United of Wisconsin (BCBSUW), became the state's largest health insurer. In 1965, when Medicare and Medicaid further extended health coverage to the elderly, disabled, and indigent, the company took on the additional activity of administering those benefits on behalf of the government. The surge in demand for health care led to inflation in health costs in the 1970s. Many in the insurance industry and government felt this inflation could be controlled through the extension of market competition among insurers. They therefore proposed abandoning their tax exemptions in exchange for the right to operate as for-profit corporations. As a condition of this transformation, the state government required that BCBSUW create charitable foundations to benefit medical education and public health. After privatization, however, the for-profit successors of BCBSUW failed to control both medical costs and company administrative expenses. A substantial share of the profits went to their executives. PMID:18237069

  19. Health insurance and subjective health status: data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure survey.

    PubMed Central

    Franks, P; Clancy, C M; Gold, M R; Nutting, P A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The relationship between health insurance and subjective health status was investigated. It was hypothesized that persons without health insurance would have lower levels of subjective health status than those with health insurance and that this relationship would hold for both poor and nonpoor persons. METHODS. Data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey were analyzed to examine the relationship between health insurance and self-reported health status. The analysis controlled for sociodemographic and attitudinal variables and medical conditions. RESULTS. Persons without health insurance had significantly lower levels of subjective health status than did persons with insurance. This adverse effect persisted after adjustments were made for the effects of age, sex, race, income, attitude toward the value of medical care and health insurance, and medical conditions. The detrimental effect of lacking health insurance on subjective health status was present for persons at all income levels and was greater than the effect on subjective health status found for 2 of the 11 reported medical conditions. CONCLUSIONS. Lacking health insurance is associated with clinically significant lower levels of subjective health status in both poor and non-poor persons. PMID:8363006

  20. Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP): accomplishments, challenges, and policy recommendations.

    PubMed

    Racine, Andrew D; Long, Thomas F; Helm, Mark E; Hudak, Mark; Racine, Andrew D; Shenkin, Budd N; Snider, Iris Grace; White, Patience Haydock; Droge, Molly; Harbaugh, Norman

    2014-03-01

    Sixteen years ago, the 105th Congress, responding to the needs of 10 million children in the United States who lacked health insurance, created the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) as part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Enacted as Title XXI of the Social Security Act, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP; or SCHIP as it has been known at some points) provided states with federal assistance to create programs specifically designed for children from families with incomes that exceeded Medicaid thresholds but that were insufficient to enable them to afford private health insurance. Congress provided $40 billion in block grants over 10 years for states to expand their existing Medicaid programs to cover the intended populations, to erect new stand-alone SCHIP programs for these children, or to effect some combination of both options. Congress reauthorized CHIP once in 2009 under the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act and extended its life further within provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The purpose of this statement is to review the features of CHIP as it has evolved over the 16 years of its existence; to summarize what is known about the effects that the program has had on coverage, access, health status, and disparities among participants; to identify challenges that remain with respect to insuring this group of vulnerable children, including the impact that provisions of the new Affordable Care Act will have on the issue of health insurance coverage for near-poor children after 2015; and to offer recommendations on how to expand and strengthen the national commitment to provide health insurance to all children regardless of means. PMID:24470647

  1. Preferences and choices for care and health insurance.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Bernard; Van Dommelen, Paula; Stam, Piet; Laske-Aldershof, Trea; Buchmueller, Tom; Schut, Frederik T

    2008-06-01

    Legislation that came into effect in 2006 has dramatically altered the health insurance system in the Netherlands, placing greater emphasis on consumer choice and competition among insurers. The potential for such competition depends largely on consumer preferences for price and quality of service by insurers and quality of affiliated providers. This study provides initial evidence on the preferences of Dutch consumers and how they view trade-offs between various aspects of health insurance product design. A key feature of the analysis is that we compare the responses of high and low risk individuals, where risk is defined by the presence of a costly chronic condition. This contrast is critically important for understanding incentives facing insurers and for identifying potential unanticipated consequences of market competition. The results from our conjoint analysis suggest that not only high risk but also low risk individuals are willing to pay substantially more for insurance products that can be shown to provide better health outcomes. This suggests that insurance products that are more expensive and provide better quality of care may also attract low risk individuals. Therefore, development and dissemination of good, reliable and understandable health plan performance indicators may effectively reduce the problem of adverse selection. PMID:18400349

  2. Employer-sponsored health insurance and the gender wage gap.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Benjamin; Schwab, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    During prime working years, women have higher expected healthcare expenses than men. However, employees' insurance rates are not gender-rated in the employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI) market. Thus, women may experience lower wages in equilibrium from employers who offer health insurance to their employees. We show that female employees suffer a larger wage gap relative to men when they hold ESI: our results suggest this accounts for roughly 10% of the overall gender wage gap. For a full-time worker, this pay gap due to ESI is on the order of the expected difference in healthcare expenses between women and men. PMID:26614691

  3. Insurance Accounts: The Cultural Logics of Health Care Financing.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    The financial exuberance that eventually culminated in the recent world economic crisis also ushered in dramatic shifts in how health care is financed, administered, and imagined. Drawing on research conducted in the mid-2000s at a health insurance company in Puerto Rico, this article shows how health care has been financialized in many ways that include: (1) privatizing public services; (2) engineering new insurance products like high deductible plans and health savings accounts; (3) applying financial techniques to premium payments to yield maximum profitability; (4) a managerial focus on shareholder value; and (5) prioritizing mergers and financial speculation. The article argues that financial techniques obfuscate how much health care costs, foster widespread gaming of reimbursement systems that drives up prices, and "unpool" risk by devolving financial and moral responsibility for health care onto individual consumers.[insurance, health reform, managed care, financialization, Medicare]. PMID:25331937

  4. 76 FR 9233 - Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Allotment Methodology and States' Fiscal Years 2009...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), as amended by the Children's Health Insurance Program.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background A. The Children's Health Insurance Program Title XXI of the Social... Commonwealths and Territories to initiate and expand health insurance coverage to uninsured, low-income...

  5. School Superintendents' Perceptions of Schools Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Megan L.; Price, James H.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Dake, Joseph A.; Fink, Brian N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Superintendents' perceptions regarding the effect of health insurance status on academics, the role schools should play in the process of obtaining health insurance, and the benefits/barriers to assisting students in enrolling in health insurance were surveyed. Superintendents' basic knowledge of health insurance, the link between…

  6. Choice of health insurance by families of the mentally ill.

    PubMed

    Deb, P; Wilcox-Gök, V; Holmes, A; Rubin, J

    1996-01-01

    This paper investigates whether choice of health insurance is influenced by the perceived mental and physical health of family members among a sample of policy-holders with private health insurance. A multinomial probit model of the choice among major medical coverage only, traditional full coverage, and coverage through a health maintenance organization is estimated. Results indicate that the presence of at least one family member who rates his or her general health as poor does not affect the policy-holder's choice of health insurance. However, the presence of at least one family member considered at risk of mental illness does in some instances affect the policy-holder's choice of health insurance: We observe significant effects for policy-holders who are female, black, have some college education, work for a large firm, and live in an urban area. These findings suggest that adverse selection may arise when individuals are able to choose between health insurance policies with different degrees of coverage for mental health care and that such effects are far more pronounced for those people who consider themselves at risk for mental illness than physical illness. PMID:8653192

  7. Supporting health insurance expansion: do electronic health records have valid insurance verification and enrollment data?

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Miguel; Hoopes, Megan; Bailey, Steffani R; Gold, Rachel; O’Malley, Jean; Angier, Heather; Nelson, Christine; Cottrell, Erika; Devoe, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Objective To validate electronic health record (EHR) insurance information for low-income pediatric patients at Oregon community health centers (CHCs), compared to reimbursement data and Medicaid coverage data. Materials and Methods Subjects Children visiting any of 96 CHCs (N = 69 189) from 2011 to 2012. Analysis The authors measured correspondence (whether or not the visit was covered by Medicaid) between EHR coverage data and (i) reimbursement data and (ii) coverage data from Medicaid. Results Compared to reimbursement data and Medicaid coverage data, EHR coverage data had high agreement (87% and 95%, respectively), sensitivity (0.97 and 0.96), positive predictive value (0.88 and 0.98), but lower kappa statistics (0.32 and 0.49), specificity (0.27 and 0.60), and negative predictive value (0.66 and 0.45). These varied among clinics. Discussion/Conclusions EHR coverage data for children had a high overall correspondence with Medicaid data and reimbursement data, suggesting that in some systems EHR data could be utilized to promote insurance stability in their patients. Future work should attempt to replicate these analyses in other settings. PMID:25888586

  8. Strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Liying; Yuan, Beibei; Huang, Fei; Lu, Ying; Garner, Paul; Meng, Qingyue

    2014-01-01

    Background Health insurance has the potential to improve access to health care and protect people from the financial risks of diseases. However, health insurance coverage is often low, particularly for people most in need of protection, including children and other vulnerable populations. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), part of The Cochrane Library. www.thecochranelibrary.com (searched 2 November 2012), PubMed (searched 1 November 2012), EMBASE (searched 6 July 2012), Global Health (searched 6 July 2012), IBSS (searched 6 July 2012), WHO Library Database (WHOLIS) (searched 1 November 2012), IDEAS (searched 1 November 2012), ISI-Proceedings (searched 1 November 2012),OpenGrey (changed from OpenSIGLE) (searched 1 November 2012), African Index Medicus (searched 1 November 2012), BLDS (searched 1 November 2012), Econlit (searched 1 November 2012), ELDIS (searched 1 November 2012), ERIC (searched 1 November 2012), HERDIN NeON Database (searched 1 November 2012), IndMED (searched 1 November 2012), JSTOR (searched 1 November 2012), LILACS(searched 1 November 2012), NTIS (searched 1 November 2012), PAIS (searched 6 July 2012), Popline (searched 1 November 2012), ProQuest Dissertation &Theses Database (searched 1 November 2012), PsycINFO (searched 6 July 2012), SSRN (searched 1 November 2012), Thai Index Medicus (searched 1 November 2012), World Bank (searched 2 November 2012), WanFang (searched 3 November 2012), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CHKD-CNKI) (searched 2 November 2012). In addition, we searched the reference lists of included studies and carried out a citation search for the included studies via Web of Science to find other potentially relevant studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised controlled trials (NRCTs), controlled before-after (CBA

  9. Spillover effects of supplementary on basic health insurance: evidence from The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Roos, Anne-Fleur; Schut, Frederik T

    2012-02-01

    Like many other countries, the Netherlands has a health insurance system that combines mandatory basic insurance with voluntary supplementary insurance. Both types of insurance are founded on different principles. Since basic and supplementary insurance are sold by the same health insurers, both markets may interact. This paper examines to what extent basic and supplementary insurance are linked to each other and whether these links generate spillover effects of supplementary on basic insurance. Our analysis is based on an investigation into supplementary health insurance contracts, underwriting procedures and annual surveys among 1,700-2,100 respondents over the period 2006-2009. We find that health insurers increasingly use a variety of strategies to enforce a joint purchase of basic and supplementary health insurance. Despite incentives for health insurers to use supplementary insurance as a tool for risk selection in basic insurance, we find limited evidence of supplementary insurance being used this way. Only a minority of health insurers uses health questionnaires when people apply for supplementary coverage. Nevertheless, we find that an increasing proportion of high-risk individuals believe that insurers would not be willing to offer them another supplementary insurance contract. We discuss several strategies to prevent or to counteract the observed negative spillover effects of supplementary insurance. PMID:20862510

  10. 75 FR 24470 - Health Care Reform Insurance Web Portal Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 159 RIN 0991-AB63 Health Care Reform Insurance Web... that may be available to them in their State. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)...

  11. Employer-provided health insurance and the incidence of job lock: a literature review and empirical test.

    PubMed

    Rashad, Inas; Sarpong, Eric

    2008-12-01

    The incidence of 'job lock' in the health insurance context has long been viewed as a potential problem with employer-provided health insurance, a concept that was instrumental in the passage of the United States Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, and later, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act in 1996. Several recent developments in healthcare in the USA include declining healthcare coverage and a noticeable shift in the burden of medical care costs to employees. If these developments cause employees with employer-provided health insurance to feel locked into their jobs, optimal job matches in the labor force may not take place. A summary of the seminal papers in the current literature on the topic of job lock is given, followed by an empirical exercise using single individuals from the National Health Interview Survey (1997-2003) and the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1989-2000). Econometric methods used include difference in differences, ordinary least squares and individual fixed effects models, in gauging the potential effect that employer-provided health insurance may have on job tenure and voluntary job departure. Our findings are consistent with recent assertions that there is some evidence of job lock. Individuals with employer-provided health insurance stay on the job 16% longer and are 60% less likely to voluntarily leave their jobs than those with insurance that is not provided by their employers. Productivity may not be optimal if incentives are altered owing to the existence of fringe benefits, such as health insurance. Further research in this area should determine whether legislation beyond the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act laws is needed. PMID:20528369

  12. The effects of Taiwan's National Health Insurance on access and health status of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Likwang; Yip, Winnie; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Lin, Hui-Sheng; Lee, Shyh-Dye; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2007-03-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to evaluate the impact of Taiwan's National Health Insurance program (NHI), established in 1995, on improving elderly access to care and health status. Further, we estimate the extent to which NHI reduces gaps in access and health across income groups. Using data from a longitudinal survey, we adopt a difference-in-difference methodology to estimate the causal effect of Taiwan's NHI. Our results show that Taiwan's NHI has significantly increased utilization of both outpatient and inpatient care among the elderly, and such effects were more salient for people in the low- or middle-income groups. Our findings also reveal that although Taiwan's NHI greatly increased the utilization of both outpatient and inpatient services, this increased utilization of health services did not reduce mortality or lead to better self-perceived general health status for Taiwanese elderly. Measures more sensitive than mortality and self-perceived general health may be necessary for discerning the health effects of NHI. Alternatively, the lack of NHI effects on health may reflect other quality and efficiency problems inherent in the system not yet addressed by NHI. PMID:16929478

  13. Premium variation in the individual health insurance market.

    PubMed

    Herring, B; Pauly, M V

    2001-03-01

    Recent proposals to decrease the number of uninsured in the U.S. indicate that the individual health insurance market's role may increase. Amid fears of possible risk-segmentation in individual insurance, there exists limited information of the functioning of such markets. This paper examines the relationship between expected medical expense and actual paid premiums for households with individual insurance in the 1996-1997 Community Tracking Study's Household Survey. We find that premiums vary less than proportionately with expected expense and vary only with certain risk characteristics. We also explore how the relationship between risk and premiums is affected by local regulations and market characteristics. We find that premiums vary significantly less strongly with risk for persons insured by HMOs and in markets dominated by managed care insurers. PMID:14626006

  14. Markets for individual health insurance: can we make them work with incentives to purchase insurance?

    PubMed

    Swartz, K

    2001-01-01

    Simple income-based incentives to purchase health insurance (tax credits or deductions, or subsidies) are unlikely to succeed in significantly reducing the number of uninsured because income is not a good predictor of the extent to which individuals use medical service. Proposals to provide incentives to low-income people so they will purchase individual health insurance need to address the inherent tension between the interests of low-risk and high-risk people who rely on individual coverage. If carriers are forced to cover all applicants and to community rate premiums, low-risk people will drop coverage or not apply for it because premiums will exceed their expected need for insurance. Concern for people who currently have access to individual coverage calls for careful examination of options to permit incentive programs to succeed with the individual insurance markets. In particular, attention should focus on using alternatives to simple income-based subsidies to spread the burden of high-risk people's costs broadly, rather than impose the costs on low-risk people who purchase individual coverage. This paper describes three such alternatives. One uses risk adjustments and two rely on reinsurance so that carriers are compensated for the higher costs of covering high-risk people who use incentives to buy insurance. One alternative also permits risk selection by insurance carriers. PMID:11529511

  15. State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services is issuing a final regulation that adopts, without change, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled ``State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP).'' This final rule implements a provision enacted by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 and reflects the transfer of the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to the Administration for Community Living (ACL) in HHS. Prior to the interim final rule, prior regulations were issued by CMS under the authority granted by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA), Section 4360. PMID:27295733

  16. Changes in Health Insurance for US Children and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Angier, Heather; DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Tillotson, Carrie; Wallace, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Recent policy changes have affected access to health insurance for families in the United States. Private health insurance premiums have increased, and state Medicaid programs have cut back coverage for adults. Concurrently, the Children’s Health Insurance Program has made public insurance available to more children. We aimed to better understand how child and parent health insurance coverage patterns may have changed as a result of these policies. METHODS We analyzed data from the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, comparing cohorts from 2003 and 2008. We assessed cross-sectional and full-year coverage patterns for child/parent pairs, stratified by income. We conducted chi-square tests to assess significant differences in coverage over time. RESULTS Middle-income child/parent pairs had the most significant changes in their coverage patterns. For example, those with full-year health insurance coverage significantly decreased from 85.4% in 2003 to 80.6% in 2008. There was also an increase in uninsured middle-income child/parent pairs for the full year (5.6% in 2003 to 8.3% in 2008) and an increase in pairs who had a gap in coverage (9.7% in 2003 to 13.0% in 2008). CONCLUSIONS The percentage of middle-income child/parent pairs who were lacking insurance, for part or all of the year, has risen, suggesting that these families may be caught between affording private coverage and being eligible for public coverage. Unless private coverage becomes more affordable, insurance instability among middle-income families may persist despite the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. PMID:23334964

  17. 75 FR 34571 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage Rules Relating to Status as a Grandfathered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 54 RIN 1545-BJ50 Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage Rules... respect to group health plans and health insurance coverage offered in connection with a group health plan... temporary regulations provide guidance to employers, group health plans, and health insurance...

  18. A health insurance tax credit for uninsured workers.

    PubMed

    Zelenak, L

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a new system of tax credits to help low-income workers pay for health insurance. The system would be designed to subsidize health insurance coverage for workers who are currently uninsured, or who pay high premiums for nongroup insurance. Anyone age 19 or older who is not covered by Medicaid, Medicare, or employer-sponsored health insurance would be eligible for a health insurance tax credit (HITC), administered through the Internal Revenue Service. The base amount of the proposed credit would be $2,000 per year for each covered individual, but this amount would be adjusted for the individual's age and sex, according to the effect of age and sex on the cost of insurance coverage. The base amount of the credit would be reduced by $150 for every $1,000 by which a person's income exceeded 200% of the federal poverty level, thus limiting HITC eligibility to lower-income workers. To encourage participation in the credit program, most of the credit would be available through an advance payment system, with final reconciliation after year's end. PMID:11529509

  19. Assessing barriers to health insurance and threats to equity in comparative perspective: The Health Insurance Access Database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Typologies traditionally used for international comparisons of health systems often conflate many system characteristics. To capture policy changes over time and by service in health systems regulation of public and private insurance, we propose a database containing explicit, standardized indicators of policy instruments. Methods The Health Insurance Access Database (HIAD) will collect policy information for ten OECD countries, over a range of eight health services, from 1990–2010. Policy indicators were selected through a comprehensive literature review which identified policy instruments most likely to constitute barriers to health insurance, thus potentially posing a threat to equity. As data collection is still underway, we present here the theoretical bases and methodology adopted, with a focus on the rationale underpinning the study instruments. Results These harmonized data will allow the capture of policy changes in health systems regulation of public and private insurance over time and by service. The standardization process will permit international comparisons of systems’ performance with regards to health insurance access and equity. Conclusion This research will inform and feed the current debate on the future of health care in developed countries and on the role of the private sector in these changes. PMID:22551599

  20. New Estimates of Gaps and Transitions in Health Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Short, Pamela Farley; Graefe, Deborah R.; Swartz, Katherine; Uberoi, Namrata

    2014-01-01

    Changes in individual or family circumstances cause many Americans to experience gaps and transitions in public and private health insurance. Using data from the 2004–2007 Survey of Income and Program Participation, this article updates earlier analyses of insurance gaps and transitions. Eighty-nine million people (one third of non-elderly Americans) were uninsured for at least one month during those four years. Approximately twenty-three million lost insurance more than once. The analyses call attention to the continuing instability and insecurity of health insurance, can inform implementation of national reforms, and establish a recent baseline that will be helpful in evaluating the reforms’ effects on coverage stability. PMID:22833452

  1. Designing and regulating health insurance exchanges: lessons from Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Keith M Marzilli; Starc, Amanda

    The Massachusetts health care reform provides preliminary evidence on the function of health insurance exchanges and individual insurance markets. This paper describes the type of products consumers choose and the dynamics of consumer choice. Evidence shows that choice architecture, including product standardization and the use of heuristics (rules of thumb), affects choice. In addition, while consumers often choose less generous plans in the exchange than in traditional employer-sponsored insurance, there is considerable heterogeneity in consumer demand, as well as some evidence of adverse selection. We examine the role of imperfect competition between insurers, and document the impact of pricing and product regulation on the level and distribution of premiums. Given our extensive choice data, we synthesize the evidence of the Massachusetts exchange to inform the design and regulation on other exchanges. PMID:23469676

  2. Tax subsidies for private health insurance - july 2009 update.

    PubMed

    Burman, Len; Khitatrakun, Surachai; Goodell, Sarah

    2009-07-01

    Tax subsides for employer-sponsored health insurance are the largest subsidy for private health insurance and support key mechanisms of the U.S. insurance system, but they overwhelmingly benefit high-wage employees. When employers purchase or provide insurance for their employees, their contributions to the premium are excluded from income and payroll taxes. This tax exclusion provided more than $100 billion in income and payroll tax subsidies in 2002. High-income workers benefit more from these subsidies than those with lower incomes because of their higher marginal tax rate. Applying the tax exclusion in their respective tax brackets means high-income families (those earning more than $200,000) receive a subsidy worth one-third of the premium, while the lowest income families receive a subsidy worth just 10 percent. Despite these issues, ESI is a successful mechanism in many ways, covering a significant majority of Americans and providing a good pooling mechanism. PMID:22052151

  3. 77 FR 66069 - Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) No-Health Period Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-01

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 9 RIN 2900-AO24 Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) No-Health Period Extension... Life Insurance (VGLI) to extend to 240 days the current 120-day ``no-health'' period during which... insurability is needed, known as the Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) ``no- health'' period, from 120...

  4. Considering health insurance: how do dialysis initiates with Medicaid coverage differ from persons without Medicaid coverage?

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, James B.; Rigler, Sally K.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Type of health insurance is an important mediator of medical outcomes in the United States. Medicaid, a jointly sponsored Federal/State programme, is designed to serve medically needy individuals. How these patients differ from non-Medicaid-enrolled incident dialysis patients and how these differences have changed over time have not been systematically examined. Methods. Using data from the United States Renal Data System, we identified individuals initiating dialysis from 1995 to 2004 and categorized their health insurance status. Longitudinal trends in demographic, risk behaviour, functional, comorbidity, laboratory and dialysis modality factors, as reported on the Medical Evidence Form (CMS-2728), were examined in all insurance groups. Polychotomous logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted generalized ratios (AGRs) for these factors by insurance status, with Medicaid as the referent insurance group. Results. Overall, males constitute a growing percentage of both Medicaid and non-Medicaid patients, but in contrast to other insurance groups, Medicaid has a higher proportion of females. Non-Caucasians also constitute a higher proportion of Medicaid patients than non-Medicaid patients. Body mass index increased in all groups over time, and all groups witnessed a significant decrease in initiation on peritoneal dialysis. Polychotomous regression showed generally lower AGRs for minorities, risk behaviours and functional status, and higher AGRs for males, employment and self-care dialysis, for non-Medicaid insurance relative to Medicaid. Conclusions. While many broad parallel trends are evident in both Medicaid and non-Medicaid incident dialysis patients, many important differences between these groups exist. These findings could have important implications for policy planners, providers and payers. PMID:19736241

  5. Can decision biases improve insurance outcomes? An experiment on status quo bias in health insurance choice.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Miriam; Felder, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure. PMID:23783222

  6. Can Decision Biases Improve Insurance Outcomes? An Experiment on Status Quo Bias in Health Insurance Choice

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Miriam; Felder, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure. PMID:23783222

  7. Necessary health care and basic needs: health insurance plans and essential benefits.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Johnson, Pamela Jo

    2013-12-01

    According to HealthCare.gov, by improving access to quality health for all Americans, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will reduce disparities in health insurance coverage. One way this will happen under the provisions of the ACA is by creating a new health insurance marketplace (a health insurance exchange) by 2014 in which "all people will have a choice for quality, affordable health insurance even if a job loss, job switch, move or illness occurs". This does not mean that everyone will have whatever insurance coverage he or she wants. The provisions of the ACA require that each of the four benefit categories of plans (known as bronze, silver, gold and platinum) provides no less than the benefits available in an "essential health benefits package". However, without a clear understanding of what criteria must be satisfied for health care to be essential, the ACA's requirement is much too vague and open to multiple, potentially conflicting interpretations. Indeed, without such understanding, in the rush to provide health insurance coverage to as many people as is economically feasible, we may replace one kind of disparity (lack of health insurance) with another kind of disparity (lack of adequate health insurance). Thus, this paper explores the concept of "essential benefits", arguing that the "essential health benefits package" in the ACA should be one that optimally satisfies the basic needs of the people covered. PMID:22068620

  8. Mental Health and Substance Abuse Insurance Parity for Federal Employees: How Did Health Plans Respond?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Colleen L.; Ridgely, M. Susan

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental concern with competitive health insurance markets is that they will not supply efficient levels of coverage for treatment of costly, chronic, and predictable illnesses, such as mental illness. Since the inception of employer-based health insurance, coverage for mental health services has been offered on a more limited basis than…

  9. Racial Disparities in Children's Health: A Longitudinal Analysis of Mothers Based on the Multiple Disadvantage Model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tyrone C; Lo, Celia C

    2016-08-01

    This secondary data analysis of 4373 mothers and their children investigated racial disparities in children's health and its associations with social structural factors, social relationships/support, health/mental health, substance use, and access to health/mental health services. The study drew on longitudinal records for mother-child pairs created from data in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Generalized estimating equations yielded results showing children's good health to be associated positively with mother's health (current health and health during pregnancy), across three ethnic groups. For African-American children, good health was associated with mothers' education level, receipt of informal child care, receipt of public health insurance, uninsured status, and absence of depression. For Hispanic children, health was positively associated with mothers' education level, receipt of substance-use treatment, and non-receipt of public assistance. Implications for policy and intervention are discussed. PMID:26754044

  10. Policy processes underpinning universal health insurance in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Bui T. T.; Frizen, Scott; Thi, Le M.; Duong, Doan T. T.; Duc, Duong M.

    2014-01-01

    Background In almost 30 years since economic reforms or ‘renovation’ (Doimoi) were launched, Vietnam has achieved remarkably good health results, in many cases matching those in much higher income countries. This study explores the contribution made by Universal Health Insurance (UHI) policies, focusing on the past 15 years. We conducted a mixed method study to describe and assess the policy process relating to health insurance, from agenda setting through implementation and evaluation. Design The qualitative research methods implemented in this study were 30 in-depth interviews, 4 focus group discussions, expert consultancy, and 420 secondary data review. The data were analyzed by NVivo 7.0. Results Health insurance in Vietnam was introduced in 1992 and has been elaborated over a 20-year time frame. These processes relate to moving from a contingent to a gradually expanded target population, expanding the scope of the benefit package, and reducing the financial contribution from the insured. The target groups expanded to include 66.8% of the population by 2012. We characterized the policy process relating to UHI as incremental with a learning-by-doing approach, with an emphasis on increasing coverage rather than ensuring a basic service package and financial protection. There was limited involvement of civil society organizations and users in all policy processes. Intertwined political economy factors influenced the policy processes. Conclusions Incremental policy processes, characterized by a learning-by-doing approach, is appropriate for countries attempting to introduce new health institutions, such as health insurance in Vietnam. Vietnam should continue to mobilize resources in sustainable and viable ways to support the target groups. The country should also adopt a multi-pronged approach to achieving universal access to health services, beyond health insurance. PMID:25262793

  11. 75 FR 70159 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage Rules Relating to Status as a Grandfathered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 54 RIN 1545-BJ50 Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage... provide guidance to employers, group health plans, and health insurance issuers providing group health... Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are issuing substantially...

  12. 75 FR 27141 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Providing Dependent Coverage of Children to Age...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 54 RIN 1545-BJ45 Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Providing... Labor and the Office of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health... health plans and health insurance coverage offered in connection with a group health plan under...

  13. 75 FR 41787 - Requirement for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers To Provide Coverage of Preventive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... group health plans and health insurance coverage offered in connection with a group health plan under... regulations provide guidance to employers, group health plans, and health insurance issuers providing group health insurance coverage. The text of those temporary regulations also serves as the text of...

  14. Update: Health Insurance and Utilization of Care among Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Probst, Janice C.; Moore, Charity G.; Baxley, Elizabeth G.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Adolescence is critical for the development of adult health habits. Disparities between rural and urban adolescents and between minority and white youth can have life-long consequences. Purpose: To compare health insurance coverage and ambulatory care contacts between rural minority adolescents and white and urban adolescents. Methods:…

  15. Private health insurance: an international overview and considerations for Canada.

    PubMed

    Dhalla, Irfan

    2007-01-01

    Since the passage of the Canada Health Act in 1984 and its prohibition of extra-billing, there has been an extremely limited role for private health insurance in Canada as a mechanism to pay for medically necessary physician or hospital services. In the aftermath of the landmark Supreme Court decision Chaoulli v. Québec, this may change. PMID:18274001

  16. Adverse Selection in Health Insurance Markets: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Adverse selection as it relates to health care policy will be a key economic issue in many upcoming elections. In this article, the author lays out a 30-minute classroom experiment designed for students to experience the kind of elevated prices and market collapse that can result from adverse selection in health insurance markets. The students…

  17. Management implications of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

    PubMed

    Prince, L H; Carroll-Barefield, A

    2000-09-01

    Health care professionals are faced with ever-changing rules and regulations and technological advances. Add to this the 1996 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the health care manager's list of challenges continues to expand. This article presents an overview of HIPAA requirements and tools for use by health care managers in ensuring their facility is in compliance with the latest rulings. PMID:11183652

  18. Effects of Health Information Technology on Malpractice Insurance Premiums

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The widespread adoption of health information technology (IT) will help contain health care costs by decreasing inefficiencies in healthcare delivery. Theoretically, health IT could lower hospitals' malpractice insurance premiums (MIPs) and improve the quality of care by reducing the number and size of malpractice. This study examines the relationship between health IT investment and MIP using California hospital data from 2006 to 2007. Methods To examine the effect of hospital IT on malpractice insurance expense, a generalized estimating equation (GEE) was employed. Results It was found that health IT investment was not negatively associated with MIP. Health IT was reported to reduce medical error and improve efficiency. Thus, it may reduce malpractice claims from patients, which will reduce malpractice insurance expenses for hospitals. However, health IT adoption could lead to increases in MIPs. For example, we expect increases in MIPs of about 1.2% and 1.5%, respectively, when health IT and labor increase by 10%. Conclusions This study examined the effect of health IT investment on MIPs controlling other hospital and market, and volume characteristics. Against our expectation, we found that health IT investment was not negatively associated with MIP. There may be some possible reasons that the real effect of health IT on MIPs was not observed; barriers including communication problems among health ITs, shorter sample period, lower IT investment, and lack of a quality of care measure as a moderating variable. PMID:25995964

  19. Experiences and Lessons from Urban Health Insurance Reform in China.

    PubMed

    Xin, Haichang

    2016-08-01

    Health care systems often face competing goals and priorities, which make reforms challenging. This study analyzed factors influencing the success of a health care system based on urban health insurance reform evolution in China, and offers recommendations for improvement. Findings based on health insurance reform strategies and mechanisms that did or did not work can effectively inform improvement of health insurance system design and practice, and overall health care system performance, including equity, efficiency, effectiveness, cost, finance, access, and coverage, both in China and other countries. This study is the first to use historical comparison to examine the success and failure of China's health care system over time before and after the economic reform in the 1980s. This study is also among the first to analyze the determinants of Chinese health system effectiveness by relating its performance to both technical reasons within the health system and underlying nontechnical characteristics outside the health system, including socioeconomics, politics, culture, values, and beliefs. In conclusion, a health insurance system is successful when it fits its social environment, economic framework, and cultural context, which translates to congruent health care policies, strategies, organization, and delivery. No health system can survive without its deeply rooted socioeconomic environment and cultural context. That is why one society should be cautious not to radically switch from a successful model to an entirely different one over time. There is no perfect health system model suitable for every population-only appropriate ones for specific nations and specific populations at the right place and right time. (Population Health Management 2016;19:291-297). PMID:26565614

  20. Reinsurance of health insurance for the informal sector.

    PubMed Central

    Dror, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    Deficient financing of health services in low-income countries and the absence of universal insurance coverage leaves most of the informal sector in medical indigence, because people cannot assume the financial consequences of illness. The role of communities in solving this problem has been recognized, and many initiatives are under way. However, community financing is rarely structured as health insurance. Communities that pool risks (or offer insurance) have been described as micro-insurance units. The sources of their financial instability and the options for stabilization are explained. Field data from Uganda and the Philippines, as well as simulated situations, are used to examine the arguments. The article focuses on risk transfer from micro-insurance units to reinsurance. The main insight of the study is that when the financial results of micro-insurance units can be estimated, they can enter reinsurance treaties and be stabilized from the first year. The second insight is that the reinsurance pool may require several years of operation before reaching cost neutrality. PMID:11477971

  1. Community health insurance schemes & patient satisfaction - evidence from India

    PubMed Central

    Devadasan, N.; Criel, Bart; Damme, Wim Van; Lefevre, Pierre; Manoharan, S.; der Stuyft, Patrick Van

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Quality of care is an important determinant for utilizing health services. In India, the quality of care in most health services is poor. The government recognizes this and has been working on both supply and demand aspects. In particular, it is promoting community health insurance (CHI) schemes, so that patients can access quality services. This observational study was undertaken to measure the level of satisfaction among insured and uninsured patients in two CHI schemes in India. Methods: Patient satisfaction was measured, which is an outcome of good quality care. Two CHI schemes, Action for Community Organisation, Rehabilitation and Development (ACCORD) and Kadamalai Kalanjiam Vattara Sangam (KKVS), were chosen. Randomly selected, insured and uninsured households were interviewed. The household where a patient was admitted to a hospital was interviewed in depth about the health seeking behaviour, the cost of treatment and the satisfaction levels. Results: It was found that at both ACCORD and KKVS, there was no significant difference in the levels of satisfaction between the insured and uninsured patients. The main reasons for satisfaction were the availability of doctors and medicines and the recovery by the patient. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that insured hospitalized patients did not have significantly higher levels of satisfaction compared to uninsured hospitalized patients. If CHI schemes want to improve the quality of care for their clients, so that they adhere to the scheme, the scheme managers need to negotiate actively for better quality of care with empanelled providers. PMID:21321418

  2. Determining health insurance coverage of technology: problems and options.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, B; Derzon, R A

    1981-10-01

    By deciding which medical procedures are eligible for reimbursement, health insurance programs possess the potential to affect significantly technology use and health care spending. Traditionally, insurers have adopted a passive stance and made relatively few negative coverage determinations. However, resistance to rapidly rising costs has created a powerful inducement for third-party payors to become more prudent purchasers of health care services. Consequently, both Medicare and Blue Cross--Blue Shield are considering the implementation of changes that may ultimately result in more restrictive coverage decisions. This article examines the coverage process of Medicare and Blue Cross--Blue Shield and the policy changes that both programs are considering. In addition, it discusses the strengths and drawbacks of four coverage policy options: restricting insurance coverage of unproven procedures, introducing cost-effectiveness criteria, educating physicians and educating consumers. PMID:6796788

  3. The RAND Health Insurance Experiment, Three Decades Later*

    PubMed Central

    Aron-Dine, Aviva; Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy

    2013-01-01

    We re-present and re-examine the analysis from the famous RAND Health Insurance Experiment from the 1970s on the impact of consumer cost sharing in health insurance on medical spending. We begin by summarizing the experiment and its core findings in a manner that would be standard in the current age. We then examine potential threats to the validity of a causal interpretation of the experimental treatment effects stemming from different study participation and differential reporting of outcomes across treatment arms. Finally, we re-consider the famous RAND estimate that the elasticity of medical spending with respect to its out-of-pocket price is −0.2, emphasizing the challenges associated with summarizing the experimental treatment effects from non-linear health insurance contracts using a single price elasticity. PMID:24610973

  4. Employer-provided health insurance and hospital mergers.

    PubMed

    Garmon, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of employer-provided health insurance on hospital competition and hospital mergers. Under employer-provided health insurance, employer executives act as agents for their employees in selecting health insurance options for their firm. The paper investigates whether a merger of hospitals favored by executives will result in a larger price increase than a merger of competing hospitals elsewhere. This is found to be the case even when the executive has the same opportunity cost of travel as her employees and even when the executive is the sole owner of the firm, retaining all profits. This is consistent with the Federal Trade Commission's findings in its challenge of Evanston Northwestern Healthcare's acquisition of Highland Park Hospital. Implications of the model are further tested with executive location data and hospital data from Florida and Texas. PMID:23347566

  5. Health Insurance Coverage and Use of Family Planning Services among Current and Former Foster Youth: Implications of the Health Care Reform Law

    PubMed Central

    Dworsky, Amy; Ahrens, Kym; Courtney, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This research uses data from a longitudinal study to examine how two provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act could affect health insurance coverage among young women who have aged out of foster care. It also explores how allowing young people to remain in foster care until age twenty-one affects their health insurance coverage, use of family planning services, and information about birth control. We find that young women are more likely to have health insurance if they remain in foster care until their twenty-first birthday and that having health insurance is associated with an increase in the likelihood of receiving family planning services. Our results also suggest that many young women who would otherwise lack health insurance after aging out of foster care will be eligible for Medicaid under the health care reform law. Because having health insurance is associated with use of family planning services, this increase in Medicaid eligibility may result in fewer unintended pregnancies among this high-risk population. PMID:23262773

  6. Health insurance coverage and use of family planning services among current and former foster youth: implications of the health care reform law.

    PubMed

    Dworsky, Amy; Ahrens, Kym; Courtney, Mark

    2013-04-01

    This research uses data from a longitudinal study to examine how two provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act could affect health insurance coverage among young women who have aged out of foster care. It also explores how allowing young people to remain in foster care until age twenty-one affects their health insurance coverage, use of family planning services, and information about birth control. We find that young women are more likely to have health insurance if they remain in foster care until their twenty-first birthday and that having health insurance is associated with an increase in the likelihood of receiving family planning services. Our results also suggest that many young women who would otherwise lack health insurance after aging out of foster care will be eligible for Medicaid under the health care reform law. Because having health insurance is associated with use of family planning services, this increase in Medicaid eligibility may result in fewer unintended pregnancies among this high-risk population. PMID:23262773

  7. Universal Health Insurance in India: Ensuring Equity, Efficiency, and Quality

    PubMed Central

    Prinja, Shankar; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Indian health system is characterized by a vast public health infrastructure which lies underutilized, and a largely unregulated private market which caters to greater need for curative treatment. High out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditures poses barrier to access for healthcare. Among those who get hospitalized, nearly 25% are pushed below poverty line by catastrophic impact of OOP healthcare expenditure. Moreover, healthcare costs are spiraling due to epidemiologic, demographic, and social transition. Hence, the need for risk pooling is imperative. The present article applies economic theories to various possibilities for providing risk pooling mechanism with the objective of ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality care. Asymmetry of information leads to failure of actuarially administered private health insurance (PHI). Large proportion of informal sector labor in India's workforce prevents major upscaling of social health insurance (SHI). Community health insurance schemes are difficult to replicate on a large scale. We strongly recommend institutionalization of tax-funded Universal Health Insurance Scheme (UHIS), with complementary role of PHI. The contextual factors for development of UHIS are favorable. SHI schemes should be merged with UHIS. Benefit package of this scheme should include preventive and in-patient curative care to begin with, and gradually include out-patient care. State-specific priorities should be incorporated in benefit package. Application of such an insurance system besides being essential to the goals of an effective health system provides opportunity to regulate private market, negotiate costs, and plan health services efficiently. Purchaser-provider split provides an opportunity to strengthen public sector by allowing providers to compete. PMID:23112438

  8. Universal health insurance in India: ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality.

    PubMed

    Prinja, Shankar; Kaur, Manmeet; Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    Indian health system is characterized by a vast public health infrastructure which lies underutilized, and a largely unregulated private market which caters to greater need for curative treatment. High out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditures poses barrier to access for healthcare. Among those who get hospitalized, nearly 25% are pushed below poverty line by catastrophic impact of OOP healthcare expenditure. Moreover, healthcare costs are spiraling due to epidemiologic, demographic, and social transition. Hence, the need for risk pooling is imperative. The present article applies economic theories to various possibilities for providing risk pooling mechanism with the objective of ensuring equity, efficiency, and quality care. Asymmetry of information leads to failure of actuarially administered private health insurance (PHI). Large proportion of informal sector labor in India's workforce prevents major upscaling of social health insurance (SHI). Community health insurance schemes are difficult to replicate on a large scale. We strongly recommend institutionalization of tax-funded Universal Health Insurance Scheme (UHIS), with complementary role of PHI. The contextual factors for development of UHIS are favorable. SHI schemes should be merged with UHIS. Benefit package of this scheme should include preventive and in-patient curative care to begin with, and gradually include out-patient care. State-specific priorities should be incorporated in benefit package. Application of such an insurance system besides being essential to the goals of an effective health system provides opportunity to regulate private market, negotiate costs, and plan health services efficiently. Purchaser-provider split provides an opportunity to strengthen public sector by allowing providers to compete. PMID:23112438

  9. Setting a standard of affordability for health insurance coverage.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Linda J; Holahan, John; Hadley, Jack; Nordahl, Katharine

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Massachusetts passed landmark legislation designed to expand health insurance coverage. This legislation includes a requirement that all adults enroll in a health insurance plan. This mandate takes effect only if an "affordable" plan is available. The definition of affordability for individuals and families of different incomes or circumstances is a critical decision in implementation and is relevant to any state or federal reform requiring individual premium or cost-sharing contributions, or both. This analysis was done to assist the policy design process in Massachusetts and delineates an empirically based approach to setting affordability standards. PMID:17548341

  10. 75 FR 34537 - Interim Final Rules for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage Relating to Status as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Health Insurance Coverage Relating to Status as a Grandfathered Health Plan Under the Patient Protection...-AB68 Interim Final Rules for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage Relating to Status as a... Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight, Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION:...

  11. 75 FR 37242 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Under the Patient Protection and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 54 RIN 1545-BJ57 Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance... temporary regulations provide guidance to employers, group health plans, and health insurance issuers providing group health insurance coverage. The text of those temporary regulations also serves as the...

  12. Choosing your health insurance package: a method for measuring the public's preferences for changes in the national health insurance plan.

    PubMed

    Victoor, Aafke; Hansen, Johan; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; van den Berg, Bernard; van den Hout, Wilbert B; de Jong, Judith D

    2014-08-01

    With rising healthcare expenditure and limited budgets available, countries are having to make choices about the content of health insurance plans. The views of the general population can help determine such priorities. In this article, we investigate whether preferences of the general population regarding the content of health insurance plans could be measured with the help of a stated preference method: the Basket Method (BM). In this method, people use an online tool to include or exclude healthcare interventions from their hypothetical insurance package; this then affects their monthly premium. The study was conducted in the Netherlands. In total, 1007 members of two panels managed by the NIVEL filled out an online questionnaire that included the BM. The suitability of the BM was tested with the help of five criteria, e.g. the BM's ability to distinguish between healthcare interventions. Our results suggest that the BM is suitable for measuring preferences of the general population regarding the content of the health insurance plan, as it performs well on most criteria. Policy makers can use these preferences when deciding the content of the health insurance plan. Its contents will then be more aligned to the population's needs and preferences. PMID:24875333

  13. 78 FR 6275 - Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... 457 Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 155 RIN 0938-AR04 Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance... Federal Register entitled ``Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2013-00659 of January 22, 2013 (78 FR 4594), there was...

  14. Health insurance reform: modifications to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) electronic transaction standards. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    2008-08-22

    This rule proposes to adopt updated versions of the standards for electronic transactions originally adopted in the regulations entitled, "Health Insurance Reform: Standards for Electronic Transactions," published in the Federal Register on August 17, 2000, which implemented some of the requirements of the Administrative Simplification subtitle of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). These standards were modified in our rule entitled, "Health Insurance Reform: Modifications to Electronic Data Transaction Standards and Code Sets," published in the Federal Register on February 20, 2003. This rule also proposes the adoption of a transaction standard for Medicaid Pharmacy Subrogation. In addition, this rule proposes to adopt two standards for billing retail pharmacy supplies and professional services, and to clarify who the "senders" and "receivers" are in the descriptions of certain transactions. PMID:18958949

  15. Expanding insurance coverage through tax credits, consumer choice, and market enhancements: the American Medical Association proposal for health insurance reform.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Donald J; Emmons, David W; Wozniak, Gregory D

    2004-05-12

    Recent reports showing an increase in the number of uninsured individuals in the United States have given heightened attention to increasing health insurance coverage. The American Medical Association (AMA) has proposed a system of tax credits for the purchase of individually owned health insurance and enhancements to individual and group health insurance markets as a means of expanding coverage. Individually owned insurance would enable people to maintain coverage without disruption to existing patient-physician relationships, regardless of changes in employers or in work status. The AMA's plan would empower individuals to choose their health plan and give patients and their physicians more control over health care choices. Employers could continue to offer employment-based coverage, but employees would not be limited to the health plans offered by their employer. With a tax credit large enough to make coverage affordable and the ability to choose their own coverage, consumers would dramatically transform the individual and group health insurance markets. Health insurers would respond to the demands of individual consumers and be more cautious about increasing premiums. Insurers would also tailor benefit packages and develop new forms of coverage to better match the preferences of individuals and families. The AMA supports the development of new health insurance markets through legislative and regulatory changes to foster a wider array of high-quality, affordable plans. PMID:15138246

  16. How does retiree health insurance influence public sector employee saving?

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert L; Mitchell, Olivia S

    2014-12-01

    Economic theory predicts that employer-provided retiree health insurance (RHI) benefits have a crowd-out effect on household wealth accumulation, not dissimilar to the effects reported elsewhere for employer pensions, Social Security, and Medicare. Nevertheless, we are unaware of any similar research on the impacts of retiree health insurance per se. Accordingly, the present paper utilizes a unique data file on respondents to the Health and Retirement Study, to explore how employer-provided retiree health insurance may influence net household wealth among public sector employees, where retiree healthcare benefits are still quite prevalent. Key findings include the following: Most full-time public sector employees anticipate having employer-provided health insurance coverage in retirement, unlike most private sector workers.Public sector employees covered by RHI had substantially less wealth than similar private sector employees without RHI. In our data, Federal workers had about $82,000 (18%) less net wealth than private sector employees lacking RHI; state/local workers with RHI accumulated about $69,000 (or 15%) less net wealth than their uninsured private sector counterparts.After controlling on socioeconomic status and differences in pension coverage, net household wealth for Federal employees was $116,000 less than workers without RHI and the result is statistically significant; the state/local difference was not. PMID:25479891

  17. A Welfare Measure of "Offset Effects" in Health Insurance.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Jacob; McGuire, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Changing health insurance coverage for one service may affect use of other insured services. When improving coverage for one service reduces use of another, the savings are referred to as "offset effects." For example, costs of better coverage for prescription drugs may be partly "offset" by reductions in hospital costs. Offset effects have welfare implications but it has not been clear how to value these impacts in design of health insurance. We show that plan-paid - rather than total -- spending is the right welfare measure of the offset effect, and go on to develop a "sufficient statistic" for evaluating the welfare effects of change in coverage in the presence of multiple goods. We derive a simple rule for when a coverage improvement increases welfare due to offset effects. PMID:22544983

  18. Biased selection within the social health insurance market in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castano, Ramon; Zambrano, Andres

    2006-12-01

    Reducing the impact of insurance market failures with regulations such as community-rated premiums, standardized benefit packages and open enrolment, yield limited effect because they create room for selection bias. The Colombian social health insurance system started a market approach in 1993 expecting to improve performance of preexisting monopolistic insurance funds by exposing them to competition by new entrants. This paper tests the hypothesis that market failures would lead to biased selection favoring new entrants. Two household surveys are analyzed using Self-Reported Health Status and the presence of chronic conditions as prospective indicators of individual risk. Biased selection is found to take place, leading to adverse selection among incumbents, and favorable selection among new entrants. This pattern is absent in 1997 but is evident in 2003. Given that the two incumbents analyzed are public organizations, the fiscal implications of the findings in terms of government bailouts, are analyzed. PMID:16516333

  19. The Longitudinal Guttman Simplex: Applications to Health Behavior Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Linda M.; Dent, Clyde W.

    Because health behavior is often concerned with dynamic constructs, a longitudinal approach to measurement is needed. The Longitudinal Guttman Simplex (LGS) is a measurement model developed especially for dynamic constructs exhibiting cumulative, unitary development measured longitudinally. Data from the Television Smoking Prevention Project, a…

  20. 75 FR 63480 - Medicaid Program: Implementation of Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Medicaid Program: Implementation of Section 614 of the Children's Health Insurance... Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA), Public Law 111-3. Section 614... Security Act and for child health assistance expenditures under the Children's Health Insurance...

  1. How and why the health insurance system will collapse.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Humphrey

    2002-01-01

    The advocates of defined-contribution health plans extol the virtues of consumer-driven health care, consumer choice, and empowered consumers as solutions to the problems--particularly the rapidly growing costs--of employer-sponsored health benefits. This paper argues that the widespread use of defined-contribution plans, with more consumer choice and more knowledgeable consumers, will lead to the erosion of the social contract on which health insurance must be based, with healthier employees subsidizing the care of older and sicker ones, and a death spiral of adverse selection. If unchecked by government intervention, these trends will lead to the collapse of employer-sponsored health insurance. PMID:12442855

  2. Defined-contribution health insurance products: development and prospects.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Jon B; Parente, Stephen T; Taylor, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    Defined-contribution health insurance products have received considerable recent attention, stimulated by double-digit increases in health plan premiums and employers' desire to get their employees more involved in health care purchasing decisions. Existing products typically feature a consumer health spending account, a major medical or other insurance policy, and the use of the Internet to support consumer decision making. They vary in their use of provider networks, provider payment approaches, the specific design of spending accounts, marketing strategies, and infrastructure investment. The companies producing these products are now at a critical juncture. They could grow rapidly over the next few years, be acquired by existing health plans, or fail if they do not deliver on their promises. PMID:11900095

  3. 77 FR 47573 - Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 46 RIN 1545-BK59 Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self... Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on issuers of certain health insurance policies and plan... Federal Register on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 (77 FR 22691) announced that a public hearing was...

  4. 76 FR 7767 - Student Health Insurance Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... protections) (75 FR 37188 (June 28, 2010)), and section 2713 (regarding preventive health services) (75 FR..., 2010, implemented rules for preventive health services (75 FR 41726). Concerns have been raised as to... health care professional (75 FR 37188). Concerns have been expressed by stakeholders...

  5. National health insurance policy in Nepal: challenges for implementation.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shiva Raj; Khanal, Pratik; Karki, Deepak Kumar; Kallestrup, Per; Enemark, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    The health system in Nepal is characterized by a wide network of health facilities and community workers and volunteers. Nepal's Interim Constitution of 2007 addresses health as a fundamental right, stating that every citizen has the right to basic health services free of cost. But the reality is a far cry. Only 61.8% of the Nepalese households have access to health facilities within 30 min, with significant urban (85.9%) and rural (59%) discrepancy. Addressing barriers to health services needs urgent interventions at the population level. Recently (February 2015), the Government of Nepal formed a Social Health Security Development Committee as a legal framework to start implementing a social health security scheme (SHS) after the National Health Insurance Policy came out in 2013. The program has aimed to increase the access of health services to the poor and the marginalized, and people in hard to reach areas of the country, though challenges remain with financing. Several aspects should be considered in design, learning from earlier community-based health insurance schemes that suffered from low enrollment and retention of members as well as from a pro-rich bias. Mechanisms should be built for monitoring unfair pricing and unaffordable copayments, and an overall benefit package be crafted to include coverage of major health services including non-communicable diseases. Regulations should include such issues as accreditation mechanisms for private providers. Health system strengthening should move along with the roll-out of SHS. Improving the efficiency of hospital, motivating the health workers, and using appropriate technology can improve the quality of health services. Also, as currently a constitution drafting is being finalized, careful planning and deliberation is necessary about what insurance structure may suit the proposed future federal structure in Nepal. PMID:26300556

  6. National health insurance policy in Nepal: challenges for implementation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shiva Raj; Khanal, Pratik; Karki, Deepak Kumar; Kallestrup, Per; Enemark, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    The health system in Nepal is characterized by a wide network of health facilities and community workers and volunteers. Nepal's Interim Constitution of 2007 addresses health as a fundamental right, stating that every citizen has the right to basic health services free of cost. But the reality is a far cry. Only 61.8% of the Nepalese households have access to health facilities within 30 min, with significant urban (85.9%) and rural (59%) discrepancy. Addressing barriers to health services needs urgent interventions at the population level. Recently (February 2015), the Government of Nepal formed a Social Health Security Development Committee as a legal framework to start implementing a social health security scheme (SHS) after the National Health Insurance Policy came out in 2013. The program has aimed to increase the access of health services to the poor and the marginalized, and people in hard to reach areas of the country, though challenges remain with financing. Several aspects should be considered in design, learning from earlier community-based health insurance schemes that suffered from low enrollment and retention of members as well as from a pro-rich bias. Mechanisms should be built for monitoring unfair pricing and unaffordable copayments, and an overall benefit package be crafted to include coverage of major health services including non-communicable diseases. Regulations should include such issues as accreditation mechanisms for private providers. Health system strengthening should move along with the roll-out of SHS. Improving the efficiency of hospital, motivating the health workers, and using appropriate technology can improve the quality of health services. Also, as currently a constitution drafting is being finalized, careful planning and deliberation is necessary about what insurance structure may suit the proposed future federal structure in Nepal. PMID:26300556

  7. Determinants of health insurance ownership among South African women

    PubMed Central

    Kirigia, Joses M; Sambo, Luis G; Nganda, Benjamin; Mwabu, Germano M; Chatora, Rufaro; Mwase, Takondwa

    2005-01-01

    Background Studies conducted in developed countries using economic models show that individual- and household- level variables are important determinants of health insurance ownership. There is however a dearth of such studies in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between health insurance ownership and the demographic, economic and educational characteristics of South African women. Methods The analysis was based on data from a cross-sectional national household sample derived from the South African Health Inequalities Survey (SANHIS). The study subjects consisted of 3,489 women, aged between 16 and 64 years. It was a non-interventional, qualitative response econometric study. The outcome measure was the probability of a respondent's ownership of a health insurance policy. Results The χ2 test for goodness of fit indicated satisfactory prediction of the estimated logit model. The coefficients of the covariates for area of residence, income, education, environment rating, age, smoking and marital status were positive, and all statistically significant at p ≤ 0.05. Women who had standard 10 education and above (secondary), high incomes and lived in affluent provinces and permanent accommodations, had a higher likelihood of being insured. Conclusion Poverty reduction programmes aimed at increasing women's incomes in poor provinces; improving living environment (e.g. potable water supplies, sanitation, electricity and housing) for women in urban informal settlements; enhancing women's access to education; reducing unemployment among women; and increasing effective coverage of family planning services, will empower South African women to reach a higher standard of living and in doing so increase their economic access to health insurance policies and the associated health services. PMID:15733326

  8. Is employer-based health insurance a barrier to entrepreneurship?

    PubMed

    Fairlie, Robert W; Kapur, Kanika; Gates, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The focus on employer-provided health insurance in the United States may restrict business creation. We address the limited research on the topic of "entrepreneurship lock" by using recent panel data from matched Current Population Surveys. We use difference-in-difference models to estimate the interaction between having a spouse with employer-based health insurance and potential demand for health care. We find evidence of a larger negative effect of health insurance demand on business creation for those without spousal coverage than for those with spousal coverage. We also take a new approach in the literature to examine the question of whether employer-based health insurance discourages business creation by exploiting the discontinuity created at age 65 through the qualification for Medicare. Using a novel procedure of identifying age in months from matched monthly CPS data, we compare the probability of business ownership among male workers in the months just before turning age 65 and in the months just after turning age 65. We find that business ownership rates increase from just under age 65 to just over age 65, whereas we find no change in business ownership rates from just before to just after for other ages 55-75. We also do not find evidence from the previous literature and additional estimates that other confounding factors such as retirement, partial retirement, social security and pension eligibility are responsible for the increase in business ownership in the month individuals turn 65. Our estimates provide some evidence that "entrepreneurship lock" exists, which raises concerns that the bundling of health insurance and employment may create an inefficient level of business creation. PMID:20952079

  9. Risk equalisation and voluntary health insurance: The South Africa experience.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Heather; Grobler, Pieter

    2010-11-01

    South Africa intends implementing major reforms in the financing of healthcare. Free market reforms in private health insurance in the late 1980s have been reversed by the new democratic government since 1994 with the re-introduction of open enrolment, community rating and minimum benefits. A system of national health insurance with income cross-subsidies, risk-adjusted payments and mandatory membership has been envisaged in policy papers since 1994. Subsequent work has seen the design of a Risk Equalisation Fund intended to operate between competing private health insurance funds. The paper outlines the South African health system and describes the risk equalisation formula that has been developed. The risk factors are age, gender, maternity events, numbers with certain chronic diseases and numbers with multiple chronic diseases. The Risk Equalisation Fund has been operating in shadow mode since 2005 with data being collected but no money changing hands. The South African experience of risk equalisation is of wider interest as it demonstrates an attempt to introduce more solidarity into a small but highly competitive private insurance market. The measures taken to combat over-reporting of chronic disease should be useful for countries or funders considering adding chronic disease to their risk equalisation formulae. PMID:20619476

  10. 78 FR 7264 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ...-131491-10) was published in the Federal Register (76 FR 50931). On May 23, 2012, final regulations (TD 9590) were published in the Federal Register (77 FR 30377). The final regulations reserved a rule (Sec... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BL49 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY:...

  11. 78 FR 17612 - Health Insurance Providers Fee; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ..., 2013 (78 FR 14034). The proposed regulations provide guidance on the annual fee imposed on covered...-118315-12), that was the subject of FR Doc. 2013-04836, is corrected as follows: Sec. 57.1 On page 14042... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 57 RIN 1545-BL20 Health Insurance Providers Fee; Correction...

  12. 77 FR 41270 - Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 602 RIN 1545-BJ82 Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit Correction In rule document 2012-12421 appearing on pages 30377-30400 in the issue of Wednesday, May 23,...

  13. A Self-Insured Health Program: From Crisis to Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffes, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Moberly Area Community College faced a crisis in healthcare coverage that eventually lead to enhanced benefits, greater control, plan stability, and increased flexibility through a self-insured program. Presented here is how Moberly Area Community College overcame the health care coverage crisis and how other institutions can benefit from the…

  14. Choosing a Medigap Policy: A Guide to Health Insurance for People with Medicare

    MedlinePlus

    ... SERVICES 2015 Choosing a Medigap Policy: AGuide to Health Insurance for People with Medicare This official government guide ... 2015 Choosing a Medigap Policy: A Guide to Health Insurance for People with Medicare” isn’t a legal ...

  15. 78 FR 72089 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... or Medicaid program or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); revalidating their Medicare... enrollment issues. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In the February 2, 2011 Federal Register (76 FR... Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements, Application Fees, Temporary...

  16. 76 FR 67743 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... Medicare or Medicaid programs or Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); revalidating their Medicare... enrollment issues. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In the February 2, 2011 Federal Register (76 FR... Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements, Application Fees, Temporary...

  17. Consumer choice in Dutch health insurance after reform.

    PubMed

    Maarse, Hans; Meulen, Ruud Ter

    2006-03-01

    This article investigates the scope and effects of enhanced consumer choice in health insurance that is presented as a cornerstone of the new health insurance legislation in the Netherlands that will come into effect in 2006. The choice for choice marks the current libertarian trend in Dutch health care policymaking. One of our conclusions is that the scope of enhanced choice should not be overstated due to many legal and non-legal restrictions to it. The consumer choice advocates have great expectations of the impact of enhanced choice. A critical analysis of its impact demonstrates that these expectations may not become true and that enhanced consumer choice should not be perceived as the 'magic bullet' for many problems in health care. PMID:17137018

  18. The Massachusetts Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector: structure and functions.

    PubMed

    Lischko, Amy M; Bachman, Sara S; Vangeli, Alyssa

    2009-05-01

    The Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector Authority is the centerpiece of Massachusetts' ambitious health care reforms, which were implemented beginning in 2006. The Connector is an independent quasi-governmental agency created by the Massachusetts legislature to facilitate the purchase of affordable, high-quality health insurance by small businesses and individuals without access to employer-sponsored coverage. This issue brief describes the structure and functions of the Connector, providing a primer to policymakers interested in exploring similar reforms at the state and national level. The authors describe how the Connector works to promote administrative ease, eliminate paperwork, offer portability of coverage, and provide some standardization and choice of plans. National policymakers looking to achieve similar policy goals may find some of the structural components and functions of the Connector to be transferable to a national health reform model, say the authors. PMID:19492496

  19. State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    This rule implements a provision enacted by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 and reflects the transfer of the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to the Administration for Community Living (ACL) in HHS. The previous regulations were issued by CMS under the authority granted by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA `90), Section 4360. PMID:26859899

  20. Effects of Health Insurance Among Patients on Hepatitis C Treatment Along the Texas-Mexico Border.

    PubMed

    Romero, Roberta; Campbell, Lisa; Song, Huaxin; Zuckerman, Marc J; Alozie, Ogechika

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is steadily increasing across the world. Increasing morbidity and mortality rates associated with HCV are influencing research on treatment outcomes. The purpose of this project was to examine the effect of health insurance status and office visit compliance on sustained virologic response (SVR) in adult patients living along the Texas-Mexico border treated for HCV and who received dual or triple medication therapy between January 2010 and August 2013. The objective of this project was to determine whether there is an association between health insurance status, and/or office visit compliance, and SVR. We conducted a longitudinal retrospective chart review pilot study of patients who underwent treatment with dual and triple therapy in a border community in Texas. Results revealed that lack of insurance did not affect SVR in the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso-based clinic setting due to enrollment into a managed healthcare program. Providing a financial benefit may improve treatment compliance of HCV-infected individuals, reduce overall cost, and improve the patient's quality of life. PMID:27467060

  1. Voluntary private health insurance among the over fifties in Europe◊

    PubMed Central

    Paccagnella, Omar; Rebba, Vincenzo; Weber, Guglielmo

    2012-01-01

    Using data from SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe), we investigate the determinants of voluntary private health insurance (VPHI) among the over fifties in eleven European countries, and their effects on health care spending. Firstly, we find that the main determinants of VPHI are different in each country, reflecting differences in the underlying health care systems, but in most countries education levels and cognitive abilities have a strong positive effect on holding a VPHI policy. We also analyse the effect of holding a voluntary additional health insurance policy on out-of-pocket (OOP) health care spending. We adopt a simultaneous-equations approach to control for self-selection into VPHI policy holding and find that only in the Netherlands VPHI policyholders have lower OOP spending than the rest of the population while in some countries (Italy, Spain, Denmark and Austria) they spend significantly more. This could be due to increased utilisation but also to cost-sharing measures adopted by the insurers in order both to counter the effects of moral hazard and to keep adverse selection under control. PMID:22315160

  2. Employer health insurance and local labor market conditions.

    PubMed

    Marquis, M S; Long, S H

    2001-01-01

    Theory suggests that an employer's decisions about the amount of health insurance included in the compensation package may be influenced by the practices of other employers in the market. We test the role of local market conditions on decisions of small employers to offer insurance and their dollar contribution to premiums using data from two large national surveys of employers. These employers are more likely to offer insurance and to make greater contributions in communities with tighter labor markets, less concentrated labor purchasers, greater union penetration, and a greater share of workers in big business and a small share in regulated industries. However, our data do not support the notion that marginal tax rates affect employers' offer decision or contributions. PMID:14625929

  3. 78 FR 52719 - Tax Credit for Employee Health Insurance Expenses of Small Employers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BL55 Tax Credit for Employee Health Insurance Expenses of... certain small employers that offer health insurance coverage to their employees under section 45R of the... ``Affordable Care Act''). I. Section 45R Section 45R(a) provides for a health insurance tax credit in the...

  4. 77 FR 43290 - Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Final Allotments to States, the District of Columbia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services RIN 0938-AR45 Children's Health Insurance... Columbia, and the U.S. Territories and Commonwealths to initiate and expand health insurance coverage to uninsured, low-income children under the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). The fiscal...

  5. 76 FR 46684 - Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Disallowance of Claims for FFP and Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...-AQ32 Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Disallowance of Claims for FFP and Technical... within that time period; make conforming changes to the Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program... the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to jointly fund State efforts to initiate and...

  6. 78 FR 45208 - Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Final Allotments to States, the District of Columbia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services RIN 0938-AR79 Children's Health Insurance... Columbia, and the U.S. Territories and Commonwealths to initiate and expand health insurance coverage to uninsured, low-income children under the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). The fiscal...

  7. 78 FR 54996 - Information Reporting by Applicable Large Employers on Health Insurance Coverage Offered Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... on Health Insurance Coverage Offered Under Employer-Sponsored Plans AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... credit to help individuals and families afford health insurance coverage purchased through an Affordable... health insurance coverage offered by an employer to the employee that is (1) a governmental plan,...

  8. 77 FR 28788 - Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Under the Patient Protection and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 158 Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Under the... Federal Register on December 1, 2010, entitled ``Health Insurance Issuers Implementing Medical Loss Ratio... published in the Federal Register on December 30, 2010, entitled ``Health Insurance Issuers...

  9. 76 FR 11782 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Renewal, Expansion, and Renaming of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... signed the charter establishing the APME on January 21, 1999 (64 FR 7899, February 17, 1999). II... with or who are eligible for Medicare, Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP... Insurance Assistance Programs (SHIPs), health insurance plans, aging, Web health education,...

  10. 75 FR 6673 - Expert Meeting on Measurement Criteria for Children's Health Insurance Program; Reauthorization...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Children's Health Insurance Program; Reauthorization Act Pediatric Quality Measures AGENCY: Agency for... (PQMP) under Section 1139A(b) of the Social Security Act as enacted in the Children's Health Insurance... INFORMATION: I. Purpose In early 2009, CHIPRA (Pub. L. 111-3) reauthorized the Child Health Insurance...