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Sample records for loop materials corrosion

  1. Corrosion-erosion test of SS316L grain boundary engineering material (GBEM) in lead bismuth flowing loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Kenji; Hamaguchi, Dai; Tezuka, Masao; Miyagi, Masanori; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the lifetime of structural materials utilized in a spallation neutron source, corrosion tests in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) have been done at JAEA. Austenitic steels are preferable as the structural material for ADS. However, previous studies have revealed that austenitic steel SS316 shows severe corrosion-erosion in LBE because of LBE penetration through grain boundaries and separation of grains. So it was considered that GBE (grain-boundary engineered) materials may be effective to improve the corrosion resistance of austenitic steels in LBE. In this study, the results of corrosion tests on austenitic steel SS316L-BM (base metal) and SS316L-GBEM (grain-boundary-engineered material) under flowing LBE conditions will be reported. The corrosion test was performed using the JAEA lead-bismuth material corrosion loop (JLBL-1). The experimental conditions were as follows: The high and low temperature parts of the loop were 450 °C and 350 °C, respectively. The flow velocity at the test specimens was about 0.7 m/s. The oxygen concentration in LBE was not controlled and was estimated to have been very low. After the 3600 h of operation, macroscopic, SEM, and SIM observations and EDX analysis were carried out. The results showed that the corrosion depth and LBE penetration through the grain boundaries of the 316SS-GBEM were smaller than those of the 316SS-BM.

  2. Molten Salt Heat Transport Loop: Materials Corrosion and Heat Transfer Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Mark Anderson; Dr. Michael Corradini; Dr. Todd Allen; Luke Olson; James Ambrosek; Daniel Ludwig

    2008-07-09

    An experimental system for corrosion testing of candidate materials in molten FLiNaK salt at 850 degree C has been designed and constructed. While molten FLiNaK salt was the focus of this study, the system can be utilized for evaluation of materials in other molten salts that may be of interest in the future. Using this system, the corrosion performance of a number of code-certified alloys of interest to NGNP as well as the efficacy of Ni-electroplating have been investigated. The mechanisums underlying corrosion processes have been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the materials after the corrosion tests, as well as by the post-corrosion analysis of the salts using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques.

  3. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  4. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  5. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  6. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  7. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest; Clarity, J.

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  8. Analysis of CREVONA sodium loop material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Vaidehi; Ganesan, V.; Borgstedt, H. U.

    2003-02-01

    Stainless steel specimens equivalent to AISI type 304 taken from the CREVONA sodium loop (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany), which was operated for more than 80 000 h, were analysed for microstructures and changes in chemical composition of depleted layers using SEM/EDAX. SEM micrographs were obtained in the cross-section of the specimens to reveal the thickness of the corroded layer. EDX analysis confirms depletion of Ni and Cr in the corroded layer. The leaching rates of chromium and nickel are obtained from the depleted layer width. These results are compared with the degraded layer and corrosion resistant node formation in sodium-exposed AISI type 316 SS specimens. The corroded layer widths of the specimens taken from the CREVONA loop determined using known models for life prediction like those proposed by Thorley and Tyzack are found to be much less than the actual layer widths observed experimentally after sodium exposure. The materials were exposed to flowing sodium for about 10 years.

  9. Visualizing Nanoscale Distribution of Corrosion Cells by Open-Loop Electric Potential Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Honbo, Kyoko; Ogata, Shoichiro; Kitagawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Sugimoto, Itto; Shima, Shohei; Fukunaga, Akira; Takatoh, Chikako; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-02-23

    Corrosion is a traditional problem but still one of the most serious problems in industry. To reduce the huge economic loss caused by corrosion, tremendous effort has been made to understand, predict and prevent it. Corrosion phenomena are generally explained by the formation of corrosion cells at a metal-electrolyte interface. However, experimental verification of their nanoscale distribution has been a major challenge owing to the lack of a method able to visualize the local potential distribution in an electrolytic solution. In this study, we have investigated the nanoscale corrosion behavior of Cu fine wires and a duplex stainless steel by in situ imaging of local corrosion cells by open-loop electric potential microscopy (OL-EPM). For both materials, potential images obtained by OL-EPM show nanoscale contrasts, where areas of higher and lower potential correspond to anodic areas (i.e., corrosion sites) and cathodic areas, respectively. This imaging capability allows us to investigate the real-time transition of local corrosion sites even when surface structures show little change. This is particularly useful for investigating reactions under surface oxide layers or highly corrosion-resistant materials as demonstrated here. The proposed technique should be applicable to the study of other redox reactions on a battery electrode or a catalytic material. The results presented here open up such future applications of OL-EPM in nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:26811989

  10. A kinetic model for corrosion and precipitation in non-isothermal LBE flow loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, By Xiaoyi; Li, Ning; Mineev, Mark

    2001-08-01

    A kinetic model was developed to estimate the corrosion/precipitation rate in a non-isothermal liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) flow loop. The model was based on solving the mass transport equation with the assumptions that convective transport dominates in the longitudinal flow direction and diffusion dominates in the transverse direction. The species concentration at wall is assumed to be determined either by the solubility of species in LBE in the absence of oxygen or by the reduction reaction of the protective oxide film when active oxygen control is applied. Analyses show that the corrosion/precipitation rate depends on the flow velocity, the species diffusion rate, the oxygen concentration in LBE, as well as the temperature distribution along a loop. Active oxygen control can significantly reduce the corrosion/precipitation of the structural materials. It is shown that the highest corrosion/precipitation does not necessarily locate at places with the highest/lowest temperature. For a material testing loop being constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the highest corrosion occurs at the end of the heater zone, while the highest precipitation occurs in the return flow in the recuperator.

  11. Vacuum Ampoule Isolates Corrosive Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Debnam, W. J.; Taylor, R.

    1983-01-01

    Quartz vacuum ampoule confines corrosive sample wafer between two quartz plugs inserted in quartz tube. One quartz plug is window for measuring sample thermodynamic properties while laser pulse entering other quartz plug heats sample to molten state. Confinement of sample in vacuum prevents contamination of measurement system by hot corrosive vapors and any interference by preferential evaporation of melt.

  12. Corrosion resistant materials in MCFC environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeaud, A.; Yuh, C. Y.; Singh, P.

    A 24-month effort in the development of a corrosion resistant hardware material for molten carbonate fuel cell (MFC) application is described. The objective was to identify an inexpensive alloy for MCFC current collector/bipolar plate application. For this, 310S was selected as the base alloy composition and La, Ce and Si were added to improve corrosion resistance. Eight candidate alloys, including 310S and 316L, were screened in MCFC anode and cathode atmospheres. The techniques used include isothermal corrosion, acoustic emission, thermal cycling corrosion, thermogravimetric analyses, electrical surface resistance, and dual atmosphere corrosion testing. Oxide scales formed were analyzed by standard metallographic techniques. The results indicate that COLT-25+ and Crutemp-25 alloys (both containing 25Cr-25Ni and balance Fe) have the best corrosion resistance in the MCFC environment. Rare earth additives, La and Ce, do not appear to improve isothermal or thermal cycling resistance. Silicon addition appears to improve thermal cycling but not isothermal corrosion resistance. High Mn content (approx. 18%) appears detrimental based on this limited investigation. Currently used 316L has the least corrosion resistance of all the alloys tested. Pressurized tests have shown that high pressure (10 atm) reduces corrosion rate in the anode atmosphere whereas it only slightly affects corrosion rate in the cathode atmosphere.

  13. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  14. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, M.S.

    1984-08-30

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating high-level radioactive waste material in a repository is claimed. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between juxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  15. Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, Donald G.; Davis, Mary S.

    1990-01-01

    A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating radioactive waste material in a repository. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between judxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

  16. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    SciTech Connect

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  17. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  18. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  19. Corrosion of electronic materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Comizzoli, R B; Frankenthal, R P; Milner, P C; Sinclair, J D

    1986-10-17

    Electronic materials and devices corrode in the same ways as automobiles, bridges, and pipelines, but their typically small dimensions make them orders of magnitude more susceptible to corrosion failure. As elsewhere, the corrosion involves interactions with the environment. Under control, these interactions can be put to use, as in the formation of protective and functional oxide films for superconducting devices. Otherwise, they cause damage, as in the electrolytic dissolution of conductors, even gold, in the presence of humidity and ionic contamination from atmospheric particles and gases. Preventing corrosion entails identifying the damaging interactions and excluding species that allow them to occur. PMID:17834532

  20. Mapping climate conditions with materials corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The world's first comprehensive materials corrosion mapping system can predict the effects that climatic conditions have on the life cycle of products ranging from automobiles to bridges, according to Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and the Australian Industrial Galvanizers Corporation. Both jointly announced the system on 14 November.The mapping system, which incorporates conditions such as moisture, salinity pollution, and prevailing winds, can predict the corrosion of materials in any part of Australia, they said. Ivan Cole of CSIRO Materials Engineering said the mapping system even takes into account durability factors impacting on greenhouse gas contributions and soil conditions, making it a unique tool for Australian industry.

  1. Electrochemical noise measurements of sustained microbially influenced pitting corrosion in a laboratory flow loop system.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y. J.

    1999-01-13

    Because of the chaotic nature of the corrosion process and the complexity of the electrochemical noise signals that are generated, there is no generally accepted method of measuring and interpreting these signals that allows the consistent detection and identification of sustained localized pitting (SLP) as compared to general corrosion. We have reexamined electrochemical noise analysis (ENA) of localized corrosion using different hardware, signal collection, and signal processing designs than those used in conventional ENA techniques. The new data acquisition system was designed to identify and monitor the progress of SLP by analyzing the power spectral density (PSD) of the trend of the corrosion current noise level (CNL) and potential noise level (PNL). Each CNL and PNL data point was calculated from the root-mean- square value of the ac components of current and potential fluctuation signals, which were measured simultaneously during a short time period. The PSD analysis results consistently demonstrated that the trends of PNL and CNL contain information that can be used to differentiate between SLP and general corrosion mechanisms. The degree of linear slope in the low-frequency portion of the PSD analysis was correlated with the SLP process. Laboratory metal coupons as well as commercial corrosion probes were tested to ensure the reproducibility and consistency of the results. The on-line monitoring capability of this new ENA method was evaluated in a bench-scale flow-loop system, which simulated microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) activity. The conditions in the test flow-loop system were controlled by the addition of microbes and different substrates to favor accelerated corrosion. The ENA results demonstrated that this in-situ corrosion monitoring system could effectively identify SLP corrosion associated with MIC, compared to a more uniform general corrosion mechanism. A reduction in SLP activity could be clearly detected by the ENA monitoring system

  2. Corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in a mercury thermal convection loop

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1999-04-01

    Two thermal convection loops fabricated from 316L stainless steel containing mercury (Hg) and Hg with 1000 wppm gallium (Ga), respectively, were operated continuously for about 5000 h. In each case, the maximum loop temperature was constant at about 305 degrees C and the minimum temperature was constant at about 242 degrees C. Coupons in the hot leg of the Hg-loop developed a posous surface layer substantially depleted of nickel and chromium, which resulted in a transformation to ferrite. The coupon exposed at the top of the hot leg in the Hg-loop experienced the maximum degradation, exhibiting a surface layer extending an average of 9-10 mu m after almost 5000 h. Analysis of the corrosion rate data as a function of temperature (position) in the Hg-loop suggests wetting by the mer cury occurred only above about 255 degrees C and that the rate limiting step in the corrosion process above 255 degrees C is solute diffusion through the saturated liquid boundary layer adjacent to the corroding surface. The latter factor suggests that the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in a mercury loop may be velocity dependent. No wetting and no corrosion were observed on the coupons and wall specimens removed from the Hg/Ga loop after 5000 h of operation.

  3. Hot corrosion of ceramic engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Smialek, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of commercially available SiC and Si3N4 materials were exposed to 1000 C in a high velocity, pressurized burner rig as a simulation of a turbine engine environment. Sodium impurities added to the burner flame resulted in molten Na2SO4 deposition, attack of the SiC and Si4N4 and formation of substantial Na2O-x(SiO2) corrosion product. Room temperature strength of the materials decreased. This was a result of the formation of corrosion pits in SiC, and grain boundary dissolution and pitting in Si3N4. Corrosion regimes for such Si-based ceramics have been predicted using thermodynamics and verified in rig tests of SiO2 coupons. Protective mullite coatings are being investigated as a solution to the corrosion problem for SiC and Si3N4. Limited corrosion occurred to cordierite (Mg2Al4Si5O18) but some cracking of the substrate occurred.

  4. Corrosion of barrier materials in seawater environments

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.H.; Soo, P.

    1995-07-01

    A brief review has been carried out on the performance of barrier materials for low-level radioactive wastes in seawater environments. The environments include those for shallower coastal waters as well as the deep ocean (down to 3800 m). The review is mainly focused on metallic materials since they are the most common for seawater service and they have the largest data base. Information from the literature is usually pertinent to shallower coastal locations, but there is a valuable source of corrosion data obtained from several studies of metallic specimens exposed to ocean-bed conditions. In addition, the corrosion of carbon steel barriers has been evaluated for actual waste containers that were retrieved from previously-used disposal sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Of the metallic materials studied, carbon steel showed the least corrosion resistance. Failure by non-uniform attack in a typical waste container could occur in as little as 25 y in some ocean environments ` Penetration by local attack, such as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance was also observed for more expensive materials such as low-alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium alloys, zirconium alloys, copper alloys, nickel alloys, aluminum alloys, and lead alloys.

  5. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  6. Mass Transfer of Corrosion Products in the Nonisothermal Sodium Loop of a Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varseev, E. V.; Alekseev, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    The mass transfer of the products of corrosion of the steel surface of the sodium loop of a fast nuclear power reactor was investigated for the purpose of optimization of its parameters. The problem of deposition of the corrosion products on the surface of the heat-exchange unit of the indicated loop was considered. Experimental data on the rate of accumulation of deposits in the channel of this unit and results of the dispersion analysis of the suspensions contained in the sodium coolant are presented.

  7. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-05-16

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and

  8. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D K

    2003-04-22

    The "Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program" is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100°F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles' Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

  9. Materials corrosion and protection from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald F.

    Materials erode under environmental stresses such as high temperature, high pressure, and mechanical shock/stress, but erosion is often exacerbated by chemical corrosion. In this dissertation, periodic density functional theory (DFT) is employed to simulate interfacial adhesion, absorption kinetics, bulk diffusion, and other material phenomena (e.g., hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and shock-induced phase changes) with the intention of understanding corrosion and subsequent failure processes and guiding the design of new protective coatings. This work examines corrosion and/or protection of materials ( i.e., Fe, Ni, W) with important applications: structural steel, gun tubes, high-pressure oil recovery vessels, jet engine turbine blades, and fusion reactor walls. We use DFT to model the pressure-induced, bcc-to-hcp phase transformation in Fe, in which a new low energy pathway is predicted exhibiting nonadiabatic behavior coupling magnetic and structural changes. Protection of steel is addressed in two aspects: interfacial adhesion of protective coatings and assessment of corrosion resistance provided by a surface alloy. First, the current chrome-coated steel system is examined where extremely strong adhesion is predicted at the Cr/Fe interface originating in strong spin correlations. A ceramic coating, SiC, is considered as a possible replacement for Cr. Strong adhesion is predicted, especially for C-Fe interfacial bonds. To assess corrosion resistance, we model ingress of two common corrosive elements, H and C, into two Fe alloys, FeAl and Fe3Si. Adsorption and absorption thermodynamics and kinetics, as well as bulk dissolution and diffusion are calculated in order to determine whether these two alloys can inhibit uptake of H and C. Relative to pure Fe, dissolved H and C are less stable in the alloys, as the dissolution enthalpy is predicted to be more endothermic. Overall, the energy barriers and rate constants for adsorbed H/C diffusing into Fe3Si subsurface layers

  10. Corrosion of muffler materials in automotive exhaust gas condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Ujiro, Takumi; Kitazawa, Makoto; Togashi, Fusao . Iron and Steel Research Lab.)

    1994-12-01

    The corrosion of automotive mufflers collected in North America was investigated. Aluminum (Al)-plated steels corroded severely in the substrate under the Al plating. Type 409 (UNS S40900) stainless steels sustained a large number of pits. The effects of ions in the condensate and activated carbon on the corrosion resistance of muffler materials were studied with a newly developed condensate corrosion test.

  11. PH and Electrochemical Responsive Materials for Corrosion Smart Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a costly issue for military operations and civil industries. While most corrosion initiates from localized corrosion form, such as pitting, failure directly caused by localized corrosion is the most dangerous kind, because it is difficult to anticipate and prevent, occurs very suddenly and can be catastrophic. One way of preventing these failures is with a coating that can detect and heal localized corrosion. pH and other electrochemical changes are often associated with localized corrosion, so it is expected that materials that are pH or otherwise electrochemical responsive can be used to detect and control corrosion. This paper will review various pH and electrochemical responsive materials and their potential applications in corrosion smart coatings. Current research results in this field will also be reported.

  12. T-111 Rankine system corrosion test loop, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, R. W.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of a program whose objective was to determine the performance of refractory metal alloys in a two loop Rankine test system. The test system consisted of a circulating lithium circuit heated to 1230 C maximum transferring heat to a boiling potassium circuit with a 1170 C superheated vapor temperature. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected refractory alloys to perform from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  13. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge.

  14. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K; Joseph Murphy, J

    2008-07-18

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding that was induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species used in the construction of the packaging, followed by polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. Fiberboard material, also used in the construction of the packaging induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV sealant, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water. In light of these corrosion mechanisms, the lead shielding was sheathed in a stainless steel liner to mitigate against corrosion.

  15. Materials characterization center workshop on corrosion of engineered barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.; Zima, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    A workshop on corrosion test procedures for materials to be used as barriers in nuclear waste repositories was conducted August 19 and 20, 1980, at the Battelle Seattle Research Center. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in preparing test procedures to be approved by the Materials Review Board. The workshop identified test procedures that address failure modes of uniform corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion, and hydrogen effects that can cause delayed failures. The principal areas that will require further consideration beyond current engineering practices involve the analyses of pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion, especially with respect to quantitative predictions of the lifetime of barriers. Special techniques involving accelerated corrosion testing for uniform attack will require development.

  16. Heavy Liquid Metal Corrosion of Structural Materials in Advanced Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, M.; Woloshun, K.; Rubio, F.; Maloy, S. A.; Hosemann, P.

    2013-08-01

    Interest in advanced nuclear concepts using liquid metal coolant has increased in the past few years. Liquid metal coolants have been proposed for the next generation of small-sized nuclear reactors, which offer exceptional safety and reliability, sustainability, nonproliferation, and economic competitiveness. Heavy liquid metal coolants are investigated for advanced fast reactors that operate at high temperatures, reaching high efficiencies. Lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolants are also proposed as coolants and targets of accelerator driven systems. High temperature, corrosive environment, high fast neutron flux, high fluence, and radiation damage, among other physical phenomena, challenge the integrity of materials in these advanced systems. Excellent compatibility with the liquid coolant is recognized as a key factor in the selection of structural materials for advanced concepts. In this article, we review materials requirements for heavy metal cooled systems with emphasis on lead and LBE materials corrosion properties. We describe experimental corrosion tests currently ongoing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Development of Lead Alloy Technical Applications (DELTA) loop. DELTA is a facility designed to study the long-term corrosive effects of LBE on structural materials under relevant conditions of chemistry, flow, and temperature. The research studies will provide data of corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms in selected steel exposed to high velocity (above 2 m/s) in flowing LBE at 500°C. Fundamental research studies will help support conceptual design efforts and further the development of heavy liquid metals technology.

  17. Corrosion Testing of Brazed Space Station IATCS Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohlman, Matthew J.; Varisik, Jerry; Steele, John W.; Golden, Johnny L.; Boyce, William E.; Pedley, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Increased nickel concentrations in the IATCS coolant prompted a study of the corrosion rates of nickel-brazed heat exchangers in the system. The testing has shown that corrosion is occurring in a silicon-rich intermetallic phase in the braze filler of coldplates and heat exchangers as the result of a decrease in the coolant pH brought about by cabin carbon dioxide permeation through polymeric flexhoses. Similar corrosion is occurring in the EMU de-ionized water loop. Certain heat exchangers and coldplates have more silicon-rich phase because of their manufacturing method, and those units produce more nickel corrosion product. Silver biocide additions did not induce pitting corrosion at silver precipitate sites.

  18. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  19. IMPACT OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLUTION ON VESSEL CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.; Clifton, B.

    2012-10-01

    Different nuclear materials require different processing conditions. In order to maximize the dissolver vessel lifetime, corrosion testing was conducted for a range of chemistries and temperature used in fuel dissolution. Compositional ranges of elements regularly in the dissolver were evaluated for corrosion of 304L, the material of construction. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni.

  20. CORROSION OF LEAD SHIELDING IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K; Kerry Dunn, K

    2007-11-16

    Inspection of United States-Department of Energy (US-DOE) model 9975 nuclear materials shipping package revealed corrosion of the lead shielding induced by off-gas constituents from organic components in the package. Experiments were performed to determine the corrosion rate of lead when exposed to off-gas or degradation products of these organic materials. The results showed that the room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) sealant was the most corrosive organic species followed by the polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) glue. The fiberboard material induced corrosion to a much lesser extent than the PVAc glue and RTV, and only in the presence of condensed water. The results indicated faster corrosion at temperatures higher than ambient and with condensed water as expected. A corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/year measured for coupons exposed to the most aggressive conditions was recommended as a conservative estimate for use in package performance calculations.

  1. Method of preparing corrosion resistant composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    Method of manufacture of ceramic materials which require stability in severely-corrosive environment having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These surfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  2. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  3. CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-12-17

    This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

  4. Corrosion assessment of refractory materials for high temperature waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.C.; Congdon, J.W.; Kielpinski, A.L.

    1995-11-01

    A variety of vitrification technologies are being evaluated to immobilize radioactive and hazardous wastes following years of nuclear materials production throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The compositions and physical forms of these wastes are diverse ranging from inorganic sludges to organic liquids to heterogeneous debris. Melt and off-gas products can be very corrosive at the high temperatures required to melt many of these waste streams. Ensuring material durability is required to develop viable treatment processes. Corrosion testing of materials in some of the anticipated severe environments is an important aspect of the materials identification and selection process. Corrosion coupon tests on typical materials used in Joule heated melters were completed using glass compositions with high salt contents. The presence of chloride in the melts caused the most severe attack. In the metal alloys, oxidation was the predominant corrosion mechanism, while in the tested refractory material enhanced dissolution of the refractory into the glass was observed. Corrosion testing of numerous different refractory materials was performed in a plasma vitrification system using a surrogate heterogeneous debris waste. Extensive corrosion was observed in all tested materials.

  5. Prediction of Corrosion of Advanced Materials and Fabricated Components

    SciTech Connect

    A. Anderko; G. Engelhardt; M.M. Lencka; M.A. Jakab; G. Tormoen; N. Sridhar

    2007-09-29

    The goal of this project is to provide materials engineers, chemical engineers and plant operators with a software tool that will enable them to predict localized corrosion of process equipment including fabricated components as well as base alloys. For design and revamp purposes, the software predicts the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and assists the user in selecting the optimum alloy for a given environment. For the operation of existing plants, the software enables the users to predict the remaining life of equipment and help in scheduling maintenance activities. This project combined fundamental understanding of mechanisms of corrosion with focused experimental results to predict the corrosion of advanced, base or fabricated, alloys in real-world environments encountered in the chemical industry. At the heart of this approach is the development of models that predict the fundamental parameters that control the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environmental conditions and alloy composition. The fundamental parameters that dictate the occurrence of localized corrosion are the corrosion and repassivation potentials. The program team, OLI Systems and Southwest Research Institute, has developed theoretical models for these parameters. These theoretical models have been applied to predict the occurrence of localized corrosion of base materials and heat-treated components in a variety of environments containing aggressive and non-aggressive species. As a result of this project, a comprehensive model has been established and extensively verified for predicting the occurrence of localized corrosion as a function of environment chemistry and temperature by calculating the corrosion and repassivation potentials.To support and calibrate the model, an experimental database has been developed to elucidate (1) the effects of various inhibiting species as well as aggressive species on localized corrosion of nickel

  6. A Novel Emulsion Flow Loop for Investigating the Corrosion of X65 Steel in Emulsions with H2S/CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Rihan; Zafar, Muhammad Nauman; Al-Hadhrami, Luai

    2016-06-01

    Corrosion resistance (R P) of X65 steel was investigated in an oil-in-water emulsion containing H2S and CO2 at several oil concentrations and different flow regions using a novel emulsion flow loop. One working electrode was mounted in the flow developing region while the other one was mounted in a region where the flow is fully developed. The experimental results show that the addition of CO2 to an H2S containing emulsion decreases the corrosion rate. The R P in the flow developing region is less than that in the fully developed region and it increases with increasing oil concentration. This flow loop is a promising tool for investigating the R P of engineering materials in a simulated environment similar to that encountered in the petroleum industry.

  7. A Novel Emulsion Flow Loop for Investigating the Corrosion of X65 Steel in Emulsions with H2S/CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Rihan; Zafar, Muhammad Nauman; Al-Hadhrami, Luai

    2016-07-01

    Corrosion resistance ( R P) of X65 steel was investigated in an oil-in-water emulsion containing H2S and CO2 at several oil concentrations and different flow regions using a novel emulsion flow loop. One working electrode was mounted in the flow developing region while the other one was mounted in a region where the flow is fully developed. The experimental results show that the addition of CO2 to an H2S containing emulsion decreases the corrosion rate. The R P in the flow developing region is less than that in the fully developed region and it increases with increasing oil concentration. This flow loop is a promising tool for investigating the R P of engineering materials in a simulated environment similar to that encountered in the petroleum industry.

  8. Corrosion properties of second-generation conductive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groshart, E.

    1984-01-01

    Since the introduction of silver-filled epoxy adhesives and silver-filled nitrocellulose lacquer as RFI control materials, a number of new materials have been introduced. The resin carriers have been changed in an effort to make the materials more usable or more EPA acceptable and the fillers have been varied in an effort to make the materials less costly. The corrosion-related properties of second-generation materials were assessed, including adhesives, caulks, and greases. Aluminum 2024 was used as the only substrate material. Ten days of salt fog was used as the corrosive environment. If a noble material such as silver, nickel, or carbon is sandwiched with aluminum an increase in dc resistance results given enough time. If this is unsatisfactory electrically it should either not be used or have all corrosive environments excluded.

  9. Corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jin Cheol; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man; Park, Se-Ho

    2015-03-01

    This experiment has examined the corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials. There were slight changes of weight after the occurring of corrosion based on time and H2SO4 concentration, but in general, the weight increased. It is assumed that this happens due to the basalt fiber precipitate. Prior to the corrosion, friction-wear behavior showed irregular patterns compared to metallic materials, and when it was compared with the behavior after the corrosion, the coefficient of friction was 2 to 3 times greater. The coefficient of friction of all test specimen ranged from 0.1 to 0.2. Such a result has proven that the basalt fiber, similar to the resin rubber, shows regular patterns regardless of time and H2SO4 concentration because of the space made between resins and reinforced materials.

  10. Corrosion of candidate materials in Lake Rotokawa geothermal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion rates were determined for CDA 613, CDA 715, A-36 carbon steel, 1020 carbon steel, and Alloy 825 flat coupons which were exposed to geothermal spring water at Paraiki site number 9 near Lake Rotokawa, New Zealand. Qualitative observations of the corrosion performance of Type 304L stainless steel and CDA 102 exposed to the same environment were noted. CDA 715, Alloy 825, 1020 carbon steel, and other alloys are being considered for the materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste containers for the United States civilian radioactive waste disposal program. Alloys CDA 613 and CDA 102 were tested to provide copper-based materials for corrosion performance comparison purposes. A36 was tested to provide a carbon steel baseline material for comparison purposes, and alloy 304L stainless steel was tested to provide an austenitic stainless steel baseline material for comparison purposes. In an effort to gather corrosion data from an environment that is rooted in natural sources of water and rock, samples of some of the proposed container materials were exposed to a geothermal spring environment. At the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, currently under consideration for high-level nuclear waste disposal, transient groundwater may come in contact with waste containers over the course of a 10,000-year disposal period. The geothermal springs environment, while extremely more aggressive than the anticipated general environment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, could have similarities to the environment that arises at selected local sites on a container as a result of crevice corrosion, pitting corrosion, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), or the concentration of the ionic species due to repetitive evaporation or boiling of the groundwater near the containers. The corrosion rates were based on weight loss data obtained after six weeks exposure in a 90{degrees}C, low-pH spring with relatively high concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Cl{sup -}.

  11. Corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials for coal gasification applications

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1980-05-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented on the corrosion and mechanical behavior of materials at elevated temperatures in coal-gasification environments. The gas atmosphere in coal-conversion processes are, in general, complex mixtures which contain sulfur-bearing components (H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, and COS) as well as oxidants (CO/sub 2//CO and H/sub 2/O/H/sub 2/). The information developed over the last five years clearly shows sulfidation to be the major mode of material degradation in these environments. The corrosion behavior of structural materials in complex gas environments is examined to evaluate the interrelationships between gas chemistry, alloy chemistry, temperature, and pressure. Thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature corrosion processes that pertain to coal conversion are discussed, and kinetic data are used to compare the behavior of different commercial materials of interest. The influence of complex gas environments on the mechanical properties such as tensile, stress-rupture, and impact on selected alloys is presented. The data have been analyzed, wherever possible, to examine the role of environment on the property variation. The results from ongoing programs on char effects on corrosion and on alloy protection via coatings, cladding, and weld overlay are presented. Areas of additional research with particular emphasis on the development of a better understanding of corrosion processes in complex environments and on alloy design for improved corrosion resistance are discussed. 54 references, 65 figures, 24 tables.

  12. Corrosion testing of steel X 18 CrMoVNb 12 1 (1.4914) in A Pb$z.sbnd;17Li pumped loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgstedt, H. U.; Drechsler, G.; Frees, G.; Perić, Z.

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion behaviour of the martensitic steel DIN 1.4914 in flowing liquid Pb17Li has been tested in a test series of 3700 h duration. The specimens have been exposed to the melt of 550°C flowing with a velocity of 0.3 m/ s ( Rc ~ 21 × 10 3). The loss of material can be expressed by the equation r( mm) = -0.0288 + 4.604 × 10 -5t( h). The anual loss of material is R = 0.37 ( mm/ yr). The liquid alloy does not generate internal corrosion effects in this steel, the unequal dissolution layer is small compared to the thickness of the removed layer. The dissolution and precipitation of these amounts of material components causes problems in loop operation. The martensitic steel has, however, a better compatibility with the eutectic Pb17Li than austenitic steels.

  13. Corrosion behavior of materials exposed to hypersaline geothermal brine

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.

    1980-11-20

    The corrosion rate and corrosion attack characteristics were determined for thirteen commercially available materials exposed in a geothermal production well for three months. The materials included carbon steels, Cr-Mo alloy steels, martensitic and ferritic stainless steels, high-nickel alloys, and titanium. The environment at the 1800 ft (600 m) depth of exposure was a single phase high salinity brine. The prevailing temperature was 260{sup 0}C and the prevailing pressure was 630 psi (4.0 MPa) during the exposure period. Results indicated that the carbon steels suffered intense generalized and localized corrosion. Addition of Cr and Mo to steels imparted significant improvement in the corrosion performance in this aggressive environment. Of the stainless steels tested, the most resistant were those containing a few percent molybdenum.

  14. Glass corrosion in the presence of iron-bearing materials and potential corrosion suppressors

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Joelle T.; Neill, Lindsay; Weaver, Jamie L.; Parruzot, Benjamin; Musa, Christopher; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Gin, Stephane; Wall, Nathalie

    2015-07-16

    A complete understanding of radioactive waste glass interactions with near-field materials is essential for appropriate nuclear waste repository performance assessment. In many geologic repository designs, Fe is present in both the natural environment and in the containers that will hold the waste glasses. In this paper we discuss investigations into the alteration of International Simple Glass (ISG) in the presence of Fe0 foil and hematite (Fe2O3). ISG alteration is more pronounced in the presence of Fe0 than with hematite. Additionally, minimal glass corrosion is observed for distances equal to 5 mm between Fe materials and ISG, but substantial glass corrosion is observed for systems exhibiting full contact between Fe0 material and ISG. Diatomaceous earth appears to be a better corrosion suppressant than silica when present with iron and ISG.

  15. Localized corrosion of container materials under potentiodynamic and potentiostatic controls

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.K.; Fleming, D.L.; Gordon, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarization experiments were performed on ten candidate waste package container materials to evaluate their pitting tendency at ambient and elevated temperatures in aqueous environments relevant to the potential underground nuclear waste repository. Results indicate that of all the materials tested, Alloys G-30, C-4 and C-22, and Ti Gr-12 exhibited the maximum corrosion resistance, showing no pitting or observable dissolution in any environment tested. These experimental results will be used in identifying a group of potential container materials having the desired corrosion resistance.

  16. Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.K.; Fleming, D.L.; Lum, B.Y.

    1999-07-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner- and outer-container materials of current nuclear waste package design was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 516 carbon steel (UNS K01800), and high-performance UNS N08825, UNS N06985, UNS N06030, UNS N06455, UNS N06625, UNS N06022, and UNS R53400. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel UNS N08825 and N06985 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in UNS N06030 and N06455. UNS N06625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base UNS N06022 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. UNS R53400 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed a significant amount of precipitated particles, especially at higher temperatures.

  17. Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D L; Lum, B Y; Roy, A K

    1998-10-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner and outer container materials of currently-designed nuclear waste package was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 5 16 carbon steel and high-performance alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4, 625. C-22, and Ti Gr-12. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel alloys 825 and G-3 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in alloys G-30 and C-4. Alloy 625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion, crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only a slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base alloy C-22 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. Ti Gr-12 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed significant amount of precipitated particles during and after testing especially at higher temperatures.

  18. Corrosion of candidate container materials in air-steam mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lutton, J.M.; Dewees, D.A.; Robinson, C.G.; Brehm, W.F.; Anantatmula, R.P.

    1987-11-01

    The environment during the operating period of a high-level nuclear waste repository in basalt is expected to be air saturated with steam. Liquid groundwater is not expected to be in contact with the container surface during that time. The report presents corrosion findings from tests conducted for one to twenty-five months in an air-steam environment. Tests were carried out with bare metal specimens exposed to an air atmosphere containing 12% moisture in chambers maintained at temperatures between 150/degree/C and 300/degree/C. Cast carbon steel exhibited total penetrations less than 0.002 mm for exposures up to 25 months. A ferritic alloy steel, Fe9Cr1Mo, showed corrosion results very similar to cast carbon steel. Unalloyed copper materials showed essentially linear corrosion rates, with total penetrations between 0.002 mm at 150/degree/C and 0.14 mm at 300/degree/C in 25 months. Cupronickel 90-10 exhibited total penetrations between 0.001 mm at 150/degree/C and 0.05 mm at 300/degree/C in 25 months. There was a tendency for the corrosion rate to increase with time for cupronickel at 250/degree/C and 300/degree/C possibly because of a mid-test change in the corrosion mechanism. Limited testing of specimens surrounded with bentonite/basalt packing material indicated that the presence of packing has no strong effect on the corrosion of iron-base materials; however, copper-base and cupronickel materials corroded at higher rates in the presence of packing, with a possible shift towards the lower bare specimen corrosion rates with increasing time. 8 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Materials studies for preventing corrosion in condensing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T. )

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the fundamental interfacial requirements for low-cost, organic and inorganic materials resistive to corrosion in condensing furnace exhausts. This research effort is being focused to provide information regarding corrosion resistance, heat transfer, material cost, fabrication method and cost, and product reliability since all are important in the final design and production of a heat exchanger. Results to date indicate that organic and inorganic-type polymer coating systems applied to low cost metals such as mild steel and aluminum provide good corrosion protection. The thermal stability of these polymers plus the identification of the interfacial requirements needed to utilize them with reactive filler materials should also make their use as bulk composites feasible.

  20. Corrosion testing of urea-formaldehyde foam insulating material

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, R.; Graviano, A.; Sheppard, K.

    1980-09-01

    Two tests of the corrosiveness of urea-formaldehyde (UF) foam insulating materials were compared. One test, the Timm test, had test coupons foamed in place. In the second, the Canadian test, blocks of foam already set were placed in contact with test coupons. The Timm test uses 10 gage thick coupons, while the Canadian test specifies 3 mil thick ones. Two samples of UF foam were tested by the Timm and the Canadian tests. The electrical-resistance probes showed that the corrosion rate against steel was initially quite high, of the order of 12 to 20 mpy (mils per year). After about 20 days, the rate was almost zero. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates of steel coupons were of the order to 0.5 to 2 mpy when averaged over the 28 or 56 day test period. The greater corrosion rate of the thick coupons in the Canadian test as well as poor reproducibility of the corrosion rates was attributed primarily to variations in the contact areas between the sample and the UF foam. The corrosion rates of galvanized steel coupons in the Canadian test in several cases exceeded the failure value. In the Timm test, the corrosion rates averaged over the whole test period were quite low. The corrosion rates of copper and aluminum in both tests were quite low. On the basis of the results of this study the following recommendations for a corrosion-test procedure for UF foam were made: two corrosion tests should be conducted, one for foam while curing and one after it has stabilized; the Timm test for corrosiveness while curing should be used, but for only 1 to 2 days; the test for corrosiveness after stabilizing should be of the accelerated type such as the Canadian one. To insure a constant-contact area, thicker coupons should be used; and the coupons for both tests should have a controlled part of the area not in contact with the foam to simulate field conditions.

  1. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  2. Status of coal ash corrosion resistant materials test program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.K.; Meisenhelter, D.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1999-07-01

    In November of 1998, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) began development of a system to permit testing of several advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam conditions of 1100 F and higher in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B and W, and First Energy's Ohio Edison jointly fund the project. CONSOL Energy Company is also participating as an advisor. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. The coal-ash corrosion resistant materials test program will provide full scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater and reheater tube materials. These newer materials may be capable of operating at higher steam temperatures while resisting external/fire-side corrosion. For high sulfur coal applications, this is a key issue for advanced cycle pulverized coal-fired plants. Fireside corrosion is also a critical issue for many existing plants. Previous testing of high temperature materials in the United States has been based primarily on using laboratory test coupons. The test coupons did not operate at conditions representative of a high sulfur coal-fired boiler. Testing outside of the United States has been with low sulfur coal or natural gas firing and has not addressed corrosion issues. This test program takes place in an actual operating boiler and is expected to confirm the performance of these materials with high sulfur coal. The system consists of three identical sections, each containing multiple pieces of twelve different materials. They are cooled by reheater steam, and are located just above the furnace exit in Ohio Edison's Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. After one year of operation, the first section will be removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation. The second and third sections will operate for three and

  3. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for Fuel Cladding in Canadian SCWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yimin; Guzonas, David

    2016-02-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative next generation reactor that offers many promising features, but the high-temperature high-pressure coolant introduces unique challenges to the long-term safe and reliable operation of in-core components, in particular the fuel cladding. To achieve high thermal efficiency, the Canadian SCWR concept has a coolant core outlet temperature of 625°C at 25 MPa with a peak cladding temperature as high as 800°C. International and Canadian research programs on corrosion issues in supercritical water have been conducted to support the SCWR concept. This paper provides a brief review of corrosion in supercritical water and summarizes the Canadian corrosion assessment work on potential fuel cladding materials. Five alloys, SS 347H, SS310S, Alloy 800H, Alloy 625 and Alloy 214, have been shown to have sufficient corrosion resistance to be used as the fuel cladding. Additional work, including tests in an in-reactor loop, is needed to confirm that these alloys would work as the fuel cladding in the Canadian SCWR.

  4. Corrosion of materials in chemical heat pump working fluids

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; Wolf, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    A series of laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of type A106B and 2.25Cr-1Mo steels, types 304 and 304L stainless steel, and the nickel-base alloy Monel 400 in chemical heat pump environments based on aqueous nitrate salt mixtures. Autoclave screening tests were initially performed to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties of the materials at temperatures of 170, 210, and 250/degree/C, respectively. In 2-week tests, one of two heats of A106B exhibited cracking tendencies, but all of the other materials showed no evidence of SCC or significant general corrosion. The cracking tendency of the susceptible steel was associated with an abnormal carbide morphology. A series of 250/degree/C capsule tests, conducted for times of up to 6 months, similarly indicated that neither SCC nor general corrosion was a problem area for these material-environment combinations. General corrosion rates were <0.1 mil/year (mpy). The two materials that performed best, type A106B mild steel and type 304L stainless steel, were tested while being dynamically strained in an 80% nitrate salt/20% water mixture at 250/degree/C. These materials survived the tests with no indication of SCC or other significant corrosion effects. Based on this relatively short-term laboratory test program, type 304L stainless steel and A106B carbon steel can be recommended as candidate classes of structural materials for the nitrate-carrying piping of the chemical heat pump. It is noted that stringent microstructural control may be required in the case of type A106B piping. 2 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Corrosion in Supercritical carbon Dioxide: Materials, Environmental Purity, Surface Treatments, and Flow Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2013-12-10

    separately to high purity CO{sub 2}. Task 3: Evaluation of surface treatments on the corrosion performance of alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2}: Surface treatments can be very beneficial in improving corrosion resistance. Shot peening and yttrium and aluminum surface treatments will be investigated. Shot peening refines the surface grain sizes and promotes protective Cr-oxide layer formation. Both yttrium and aluminum form highly stable oxide layers (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which can get incorporated in the growing Fe-oxide layer to form an impervious complex oxide to enhance corrosion resistance. Task 4: Study of flow-assisted corrosion of select alloys in supercritical CO{sub 2} under a selected set of test conditions: To study the effects of flow-assisted corrosion, tests will be conducted in a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow loop. An existing facility used for supercritical water flow studies at the proposing university will be modified for use in this task. The system is capable of flow velocities up to 10 m/s and can operate at temperatures and pressures of up to 650°C and 20 MPa, respectively. All above tasks will be performed in conjunction with detailed materials characterization and analysis using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) techniques, and weight change measurements. Inlet and outlet gas compositions will be monitored using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS).

  6. Investigation of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in bolting materials on light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments performed at BNL have shown that the concentration of boric acid to a moist paste at approximately the boiling point of water can produce corrosion rates of the order of several tenths of an inch per year on bolting and piping materials, which values are consistent with service experience. Other failure evaluation experience has shown that primary coolant/lubricant interaction may lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator manway studs. An investigation was also performed on eleven lubricants and their effects on A193 B7 and A540 B24 bolting materials. H/sub 2/S generation by the lubricants, coefficient of friction results and transgranular SCC of the bolting materials in steam are discussed. 13 refs.

  7. Reinforced concrete structural corrosion monitoring using Hi-Bi photonic crystal fibres in a fiber loop structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, M.; McCague, C.; Fabian, M.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Mergo, P.; Lopez-Amo, M.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Sun, T.

    2014-05-01

    A novel sensing approach has been developed for in-situ corrosion monitoring of steel in reinforced concrete structures, using a fibre loop interferometer sensor system based on a Hi-Bi photonic crystal fibre (PCF). To do so an accurate fibre alignment procedure has been implemented in order to improve the performance of the sensor system embedded into the concrete structure when it is subjected to an accelerated corrosion test. The positive results obtained have confirmed the effectiveness of such a sensor system for applications in structural health monitoring.

  8. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-12-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  9. Corrosion behavior of materials for MHD steam bottoming plant

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Swift, W.M.

    1989-04-01

    Test data have been developed for the corrosion of several commercial ASME-coded alloys and their weldments by exposing internally cooled ring specimens to simulated MHD environments. The specimens, coated with a K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-rich deposit, were exposed for times up to 2000 h at metal temperatures of 762,593, and 567/degree/C to simulate intermediate-temperature air heater (ITAH), transition region and secondary superheater (SSH) conditions, respectively. This report discusses the observed corrosion scale morphologies of various exposed specimens. Data on scale thickness, depth of intergranular penetration, and metal recession are presented and the results are used to assess the corrosion behavior of various materials for application in the MHD steam bottoming plant. 9 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  11. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-06-01

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  12. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak

    2006-08-28

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Park, J.Y.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.

    1990-11-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs.

  14. High temperature corrosion of separator materials for MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Kazumi; Kojima, Toshikatsu

    1996-12-31

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is one of promising high efficiency power generation devices with low emission. Molten carbonate used for its electrolyte plays an important role in MCFC. It separates between anode and cathode gas environment and provides ionic conductivity on MCFC operation. Stainless steel is conventionally used as separator/current collector materials in MCFC cathode environment. As corrosion of the components of MCFC caused by the electrolyte proceeds with the electrolyte consumption, the corrosion in the MCFC is related to its performance and life. To understand and inhibit the corrosion in the MCFC is important to realize MCFC power generation system. We have studied the effect of alkaline earth carbonate addition into carbonate on corrosion of type 316L stainless steel. In this paper, we describe the effect of the temperature on corrosion behavior of type 316L stainless steel with carbonate mixture, (Li{sub 0.62}K{sub 0.38}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, under the cathode environment in out-of-cell test.

  15. In vitro crevice corrosion behavior of implant materials.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Jones, D W; Milne, E L

    1985-05-01

    The crevice corrosion susceptibility of cold-worked Type 316LVM stainless steel, cast Co-Cr-Mo, wrought Co-Cr-W-Ni, non-nitrided and nitrided Ti-6Al-4V ELI, and c.p. Ti, Grades 1 and 4, was studied in vitro by means of a crevice cell. Occlusion was created by interfacing a disc specimen and a Teflon bar. Specimens were mechanically prepared through 2-4 micron Al2O3 and passivated in 30% HNO3, followed by steam sterilization. Tests were performed in a deaerated Ringer's solution, maintained at pH = 7 and 37 degrees C. Anodic polarization was conducted potentiostatically at pre-selected levels, and resultant currents were monitored: stainless steel, 50 and 100 mV (S.C.E.), 450 min; non-stainless materials, 600 mV, 1000 min. Results for the stainless steel demonstrated that a HNO3 passivation treatment reduced its crevice corrosion susceptibility. For the non-stainless steel materials, no crevice corrosion susceptibility was observed, although a dulling and discoloration of c.p. Ti was evident. Recognizing that 600 mV is in excess of the O2 reduction potential in vivo, it was concluded that, in the absence of fretting, implants of these non-stainless steel materials would not experience significant corrosion loss under crevice conditions. PMID:3858307

  16. Summary of the WIPP materials interface interactions test: Metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Molecke, M.A.

    1992-12-31

    Several series of in situ, high-level and transuranic waste form-leaching and waste form-engineered barrier materials interactions tests were conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the USA. This multi-national effort, the WIPP Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), involves the underground testing of about 2000 (nonradioactive) waste form, metal, and geologic samples in the bedded salt at the WIPP. This test program started on July 22, 1986 and has achieved its projected five-year lifetime. All in situ samples have been retrieved and sent to multiple laboratories for posttest analyses. Most of the analyses on metal samples have been completed and the results are summarized in this paper. The tested metal alloys proposed for waste canister or overpack use included titanium alloys (grade-2 and grade-12), Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, austenitic stainless steels (304L, 316, and NS 24/AISI 309), carbon steels (Belgian C and ASTM A216/WCA), copper, and lead. After five-years of test exposure immersed in WIPP brine A and/or salt at about 90{degree}C, the corrosion-resistant materials (Ti; Inconel, Hastelloy) exhibited very little corrosion. The austenitic stainless steels suffered pitting, crevice corrosion, and some evidence of stress corrosion cracking. The carbon steels, copper, and lead exhibited both extensive general and localized attack. Details of the test, analyses, and results obtained will be discussed.

  17. Summary of the WIPP materials interface interactions test: Metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Molecke, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Several series of in situ, high-level and transuranic waste form-leaching and waste form-engineered barrier materials interactions tests were conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico, in the USA. This multi-national effort, the WIPP Materials Interface Interactions Tests (MIIT), involves the underground testing of about 2000 (nonradioactive) waste form, metal, and geologic samples in the bedded salt at the WIPP. This test program started on July 22, 1986 and has achieved its projected five-year lifetime. All in situ samples have been retrieved and sent to multiple laboratories for posttest analyses. Most of the analyses on metal samples have been completed and the results are summarized in this paper. The tested metal alloys proposed for waste canister or overpack use included titanium alloys (grade-2 and grade-12), Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, austenitic stainless steels (304L, 316, and NS 24/AISI 309), carbon steels (Belgian C and ASTM A216/WCA), copper, and lead. After five-years of test exposure immersed in WIPP brine A and/or salt at about 90[degree]C, the corrosion-resistant materials (Ti; Inconel, Hastelloy) exhibited very little corrosion. The austenitic stainless steels suffered pitting, crevice corrosion, and some evidence of stress corrosion cracking. The carbon steels, copper, and lead exhibited both extensive general and localized attack. Details of the test, analyses, and results obtained will be discussed.

  18. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

    1983-03-01

    Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

  19. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What coating material may I use for external...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  20. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Judithann Ruth

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed, wherein the composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures thereof. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  1. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, J.R.

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C{sub 8}{single_bond}C{sub 15} alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  2. Corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel and anti-corrosion materials in a high acidified chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z. H.; Ge, H. H.; Lin, W. W.; Zong, Y. W.; Liu, S. J.; Shi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of a type 316L (UNS S31603) stainless steel (SS) expansion joint in a simulated leaching solution of sediment on blast furnace gas pipeline in a power plant is investigated by using dynamic potential polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM) and Scan Kelvin Probe (SKP). Severe general corrosion accompanied by pitting corrosion occurs on the type 316L SS surface in this solution. As the immersion period increases, the charge transfer resistance Rct decreases, the dissolution rate accelerates, the surface roughness increases and the surface potential difference enhances significantly. Then eight corrosion-resistant materials are tested, the corrosion rates of type 254SMo SS, type 2507 SS and TA2 are relatively minor in the solution. The corrosion resistance properties of TA2 is most excellent, indicating it would be the superior material choice for blast furnace gas pipeline.

  3. Corrosion performance of ceramic materials in slagging environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1996-10-01

    Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that use coal as feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces that can operate at temperatures much higher than in current coal-fired power plants. Combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments requires advanced ceramics. Objectives of this program are to evaluate the (a) chemistry of gaseous and condensed products arising during coal combustion, (b) corrosion behavior of candidate materials in air, slag, and salt environments, and (c)residual mechanical properties of the materials after corrosion. Temperatures in the range of 1000-1400 C for ceramics and 600-1000 C for metallic alloys are emphasized. Coal/ash chemistries developed on the basis of thermodynamic/kinetic calculations, together with slags from actual combustors, are used. Materials being evaluated include monolithic Si carbides from several sources: Si nitride, Si carbide in alumina composites, Si carbide fibers in a Si carbide-matrix composite, and some advanced Ni-base alloys. This paper presents results from an ongoing program on corrosion performance of candidate ceramic materials exposed to air, salt, and slag environments and their effect on flexural strength and energy absorbed during fracture of these materials. 10 figs, 4 tabs, 8 refs.

  4. Effect of Mercury Velocity on Corrosion of Type 316L Stainless Steel in a Thermal Convection Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, SJ

    2001-03-23

    Two 316L thermal convection loops (TCLs) containing several types of 316L specimens circulated mercury continuously for 2000 h at a maximum temperature of 300 C. Each TCL was fitted with a venturi-shaped reduced section near the top of the hot leg for the purpose of locally increasing the Hg velocity. Results suggest that an increase in velocity from about 1.2 m/min (bulk flow) to about 5 mmin (reduced section) had no significant impact on compatibility of 316L with Hg. In addition, various surface treatments such as gold-plating, chemical etching, polishing, and steam cleaning resulted in little or no influence on compatibility of 316L with Hg when compared to nominal mill-annealed/surface-ground material. A sensitizing heat treatment also had little/no effect on compatibility of 316L with Hg for the bulk specimen, although intergranular attack was observed around the specimen holes in each case. It was determined that carburization of the hole area had occurred as a result of the specimen fabrication process potentially rendering the specimens susceptible to corrosion by Hg at these locations. To avoid sensitization-related compatibility issues for SNS components, selection of low carbon grades of stainless steel and control of the fabrication process is recommended.

  5. The aqueous corrosion behavior of technetium - Alloy and composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.; Kolman, D.; Taylor, C.; Goff, G.; Cisneros, M.; Mausolf, E.; Poineau, F.; Koury, D.; Czerwinski, K.

    2013-07-01

    Metal waste forms are under study as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products. The alloying of Tc is desirable to reduce the melting point of the Tc-containing metal waste form and potentially improve its corrosion resistance. Technetium-nickel composites were made by mixing the two metal powders and pressing the mixture to make a pellet. The as-pressed composite materials were compared to sintered composites and alloys of identical composition in electrochemical corrosion tests. As-pressed samples were not robust enough for fine polishing and only a limited number of corrosion tests were performed. Alloys and composites with 10 wt% Tc appear to be more corrosion resistant at open circuit than the individual components based on linear polarization resistance and polarization data. The addition of 10 wt% Tc to Ni appears beneficial at open circuit, but detrimental upon anodic polarization. Qualitatively, the polarizations of 10 wt% Tc alloys and composites appear like crude addition of Tc plus Ni. The 1 wt% Tc alloys behave like pure Ni, but some effect of Tc is seen upon polarization. Cathodic polarization of Tc by Ni appears feasible based on open circuit potential measurements, however, zero resistance ammetry and solution measurements are necessary to confirm cathodic protection.

  6. Experiments and models of general corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of materials in nuclear reactor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, William Gordon

    Corrosion and material degradation issues are of concern to all industries. However, the nuclear power industry must conform to more stringent construction, fabrication and operational guidelines due to the perceived additional risk of operating with radioactive components. Thus corrosion and material integrity are of considerable concern for the operators of nuclear power plants and the bodies that govern their operations. In order to keep corrosion low and maintain adequate material integrity, knowledge of the processes that govern the material's breakdown and failure in a given environment are essential. The work presented here details the current understanding of the general corrosion of stainless steel and carbon steel in nuclear reactor primary heat transport systems (PHTS) and examines the mechanisms and possible mitigation techniques for flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) in CANDU outlet feeder pipes. Mechanistic models have been developed based on first principles and a 'solution-pores' mechanism of metal corrosion. The models predict corrosion rates and material transport in the PHTS of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and the influence of electrochemistry on the corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of carbon steel in the CANDU outlet feeders. In-situ probes, based on an electrical resistance technique, were developed to measure the real-time corrosion rate of reactor materials in high-temperature water. The probes were used to evaluate the effects of coolant pH and flow on FAC of carbon steel as well as demonstrate of the use of titanium dioxide as a coolant additive to mitigated FAC in CANDU outlet feeder pipes.

  7. Metallic materials corrosion in the CRNL radwaste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tapping, R.L.; McVey, E.G.; Disney, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion coupon evaluation and in-service materials performance for the CRNL waste incinerator has been carried out since 1980. Data are presented to show that types 309, 310 and 446 stainless steel, Alloy 625 and Alloy 333 all perform well in short-term tests in the afterburner environment (850-1000/sup 0/C) but are subject to sigma-phase embrittlement and grain boundary carbide precipitation following long-term exposures. Several alloys performed satisfactorily in the primary chamber (500/sup 0/C), and the material of construction, type 310 stainless steel, continues to provide good service.

  8. Materials and corrosion characterization using the confocal resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Tigges, C.P.; Sorensen, N.R.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1997-05-01

    Improved characterization and process control is important to many Sandia and DOE programs related to manufacturing. Many processes/structures are currently under-characterized including thin film growth, corrosion and semiconductor structures, such as implant profiles. A sensitive tool is required that is able to provide lateral and vertical imaging of the electromagnetic properties of a sample. The confocal resonator is able to characterize the surface and near-surface impedance of materials. This device may be applied to a broad range of applications including in situ evaluation of thin film processes, physical defect detection/characterization, the characterization of semiconductor devices and corrosion studies. In all of these cases, the technology should work as a real-time process diagnostic or as a feedback mechanism regarding the quality of a manufacturing process. This report summarizes the development and exploration of several diagnostic applications.

  9. Corrosion-Resistant Container for Molten-Material Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore G.; McNaul, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In a carbothermal process, gaseous methane is passed over molten regolith, which is heated past its melting point to a temperature in excess of 1,625 C. At this temperature, materials in contact with the molten regolith (or regolith simulant) corrode and lose their structural properties. As a result, fabricating a crucible to hold the molten material and providing a method of contact heating have been problematic. Alternative containment approaches use a large crucible and limit the heat zone of the material being processed, which is inefficient because of volume and mass constraints. Alternative heating approaches use non-contact heating, such as by laser or concentrated solar energy, which can be inefficient in transferring heat and thus require higher power heat sources to accomplish processing. The innovation is a combination of materials, with a substrate material having high structural strength and stiffness and high-temperature capability, and a coating material with a high corrosion resistance and high-temperature capability. The material developed is a molybdenum substrate with an iridium coating. Creating the containment crucible or heater jacket using this material combination requires only that the molybdenum, which is easily processed by conventional methods such as milling, electric discharge machining, or forming and brazing, be fabricated into an appropriate shape, and that the iridium coating be applied to any surfaces that may come in contact with the corrosive molten material. In one engineering application, the molybdenum was fashioned into a container for a heat pipe. Since only the end of the heat pipe is used to heat the regolith, the container has a narrowing end with a nipple in which the heat pipe is snugly fit, and the external area of this nipple, which contacts the regolith to transfer heat into it, is coated with iridium. At the time of this reporting, no single material has been found that can perform the functions of this combination

  10. Materials corrosion and mitigation strategies for APT, end of FY `97 report: Inconel 718 in-beam corrosion rates from the `97 A6 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Pile, D.L.; Butt, D.P.

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes the results from the 1997 irradiation of the corrosion insert at the LANSCE A6 Target Station. It addresses the corrosion measurements made on the in-beam Inconel 718 probe only. To simulate the environment that materials may be exposed to in a spallation neutron target/blanket cooling loops, samples were irradiated by the proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). EIS measurements have demonstrated that the polarization resistance of IN718 decreases from approximately 3 x 10{sup 5} ohms prior to irradiation to approximately 1,000 ohms during irradiation at a proton beam current of 400 {micro}A. From the polarization resistance measurements, corrosion rate as a function of beam current was calculated for several different scenarios of beam/sample interaction. As the beam spot was small relative to the size of the IN718 corrosion probe (2{sigma} = 3 cm vs. 1.3 cm diam. x 15.9 cm length respectively), The first method for calculating corrosion rate used beam profile as a criterion for the area of highest damage. The beam spot intensity profile at LANSCE has been characterized and found to be a Gaussian distribution rotated about a central axis. From this relationship, and R{sub p} as a function of beam current, corrosion rate as a function of radial distance from the center of the beam was calculated for each beam current. Physical evidence from change in thickness measurements made on tungsten rods irradiated at 1 mA during the FY 96 irradiation period suggest that this Gaussian damage profile is an accurate depiction of beam/sample interaction. From this method the corrosion rate of IN718 during irradiation at a beam current of 1.0 mA is calculated to be approximately 0.002 inches per yr (2 mpy). The second method assumed that the predominant contributor to the corrosion current comes from an area defined by 2{sigma}. Further, the method assumed that the corrosion rate was uniform over this area

  11. Improved fracture toughness corrosion-resistant bearing material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Nahm, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    A development program was performed to establish whether a corrosion-resistant bearing material, such as a 14Cr steel, could be modified to allow carburization, thereby providing the excellent fracture toughness characteristics feasible with this process. The alloy selected for investigation was AMS 5749. Several modifications were made including the addition of a small amount of nickel for austenite stabilization. While some promising results were achieved, the primary objective of an acceptable combination of case hardness and microstructure was not attained. Because the high chromium content presents a serious problem in achieving a viable carburizing cycle, a number of experimental steels having lower chromium contents (8 to 12%) were produced in laboratory quantities and evaluated. The results were basically the same as those initially obtained with the modified AMS 5749. Corrosion tests were performed on AMS 5749, AISI M50, and 52100 bearing steels as well as some of the lower chromium steels. These tests showed that a reduced chromium level (10 to 12%) provided essentially the same corrosion protection as the 14Cr steels.

  12. General corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical evaluation of nuclear waste package structural barrier materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Nelson, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying the general corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmentally enhanced crack propagation of five candidate materials in high-temperature aqueous environments simulating those expected in basalt and tuff repositories. The materials include three cast ferrous materials (ductile cast iron and two low-alloy Cr-Mo cast steels) and two titanium alloys, titanium Grade 2 (commercial purity) and Grade 12 (a Ti-Ni-Mo alloy). The general corrosion results are being obtained by autoclave exposure of specimens to slowly replenished simulated ground water flowing upward through a bed of the appropriate crushed rock (basalt or tuff), which is maintained at the desired test temperature (usually 250/sup 0/C). In addition, tests are being performed in deionized water. Metal penetration rates of iron-base alloys are being derived by stripping off the corrosion product film and weighing the specimen after the appropriate exposure time. The corrosion of titanium alloy specimens is being determined by weight gain methods. The irradiation-corrosion studies are similar to the general corrosion tests, except that the specimen-bearing autoclaves are held in a /sup 60/Co gamma radiation field at dose rates up to 2 x 10/sup 6/ rad/h. For evaluating the resistance of the candidate materials to environmentally enhanced crack propagation, three methods are being used: U-bend and fracture toughness specimens exposed in autoclaves; slow strain rate studies in repository-relevant environments to 300/sup 0/C; and fatigue crack growth rate studies at ambient pressure and 90/sup 0/C. The preliminary data suggest a 1-in. corrosion allowance for iron-base barrier elements intended for 1000-yr service in basalt or tuff repositories. No evidence has yet been found that titanium Grade 2 or Grade 12 is susceptible to environmentally induced crack propagation or, by extension, to stress corrosion cracking.

  13. Materials corrosion in molten lithium fluoride-sodium fluoride-potassium fluoride eutectic salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Luke Christopher

    Static corrosion studies were undertaken to determine the compatibility of several candidate high temperature materials for a heat transfer loop in a molten alkali fluoride eutectic salt, LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol % (commonly referred to as FLiNaK), as well as a molten chloride near eutectic salt, KCl-MgCl2: 68-32 mol %. Several high temperature alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, Nb-1Zr, a nearly pure Ni alloy Ni-201, and a C/SiSiC ceramic were exposed to molten FLiNaK at 850°C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion occurred predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the Cr bearing alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries. Corrosion was noted to occur from selective attack of the Si phase in the C/SiSiC ceramic. Alloy weight-loss/area due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys' weight-loss/area was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present in the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. The corrosion mechanisms for the chloride based salt were found to be similar to those observed in FLiNaK, but the chemical attack was found to be less aggressive. Sulfamate Ni electroplating and Mo plasma spraying of Fe-Ni-Cr alloy coupons was investigated to mitigate Cr dissolution. A chemical vapor deposited pyrolytic carbon and SiC coating was also investigated to protect the C/SiSiC composites. Results indicate that Ni-plating has the potential to provide protection against alloy corrosion in molten fluoride salts. Furthermore, the presence of a chromium-oxide interlayer at the interface of the Ni-plating and alloy substrate can further improve the efficacy of the Ni-plating. The pyrolytic carbon and SiC coating on the C/SiSiC composites

  14. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Ambrosek, James W.; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark H.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Gray, Joshua; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion inmore » graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.« less

  15. Impact of corrosion test container material in molten fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Luke C.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael J.; Ambrosek, James W.; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark H.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Gray, Joshua; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-10-15

    The effects of crucible material choice on alloy corrosion rates in immersion tests in molten LiF–NaF–KF (46.5–11.5-42 mol. %) salt held at 850 °C for 500 hrs are described. Four crucible materials were studied. Molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in graphite, Ni, Incoloy-800H, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PyBN) crucibles all led to weight-loss in the Incoloy-800H coupons. Alloy weight loss was ~30 times higher in the graphite and Ni crucibles in comparison to the Incoloy-800H and PyBN crucibles. It is hypothesized galvanic coupling between the alloy coupons and crucible materials contributed to the higher corrosion rates. Alloy salt immersion in graphite and Ni crucibles had similar weight-loss hypothesized to occur due to the rate limiting out diffusion of Cr in the alloys to the surface where it reacts with and dissolves into the molten salt, followed by the reduction of Cr from solution at the molten salt and graphite/Ni interfaces. As a result, both the graphite and the Ni crucibles provided sinks for the Cr, in the formation of a Ni–Cr alloy in the case of the Ni crucible, and Cr carbide in the case of the graphite crucible.

  16. Friction and Surface Damage of Several Corrosion-resistant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Marshall B; Johnson, Robert L

    1952-01-01

    Friction and surface damage of several materials that are resistant to corrosion due to liquid metals was studied in air. The values of kinetic friction coefficient at low sliding velocities and photomicrographs of surface damage were obtained. Appreciable surface damage was evident for all materials tested. The friction coefficients for the combinations of steel, stainless steel, and monel sliding against steel, stainless steel, nickel, Iconel, and Nichrome ranged from 0.55 for the monel-Inconel combination to 0.97 for the stainless-steel-nickel combination; for steel, stainless steel, monel, and tungsten carbide against zirconium, the friction coefficient was approximately 0.47. Lower coefficients of friction (0.20 to 0.60) and negligible surface failure at light loads were obtained with tungsten carbide when used in combination with various plate materials.

  17. Evolution kinetics of interstitial loops in irradiated materials: a phase-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Li, Yulan; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial loops are one of the principal evolving defects in irradiated materials. The evolution of interstitial loops, including spatial and size distributions, affects both vacancy and interstitial accumulations in the matrix, hence, void formation and volumetric swelling. In this work, a phase-field model to simulate the growth kinetics of interstitial loops in irradiated materials during aging is developed. The diffusion of vacancies and interstitials and the elastic interaction between interstitial loops and point defects are accounted in the model. The effects of interstitial concentration, chemical potential, and elastic interaction on the growth kinetics and stability of interstitial loops are investigated in two and three dimensions. It is found that the elastic interaction enhances the growth kinetics of interstitial loops. The elastic interaction also affects the stability of a small interstitial loop adjacent to a larger loop. The model predicts linear growth rates for interstitial loops that is in agreement with the previous theoretical predictions and experimental observations.

  18. Corrosion test on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curtis, P.G.

    1996-01-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials in order to assist in selecting materials for package design and to help in designing longer-term corrosion tests. The corrosion solution was buffered near pH4, was in contact with air, and contained chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron absorber elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron absorber elements were studied.

  19. Fireside corrosion of superheater materials in chlorine containing flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, T.

    2001-10-01

    Corrosion resistance of three types of candidate materials for superheater sections under simulated waste incineration conditions was evaluated. A 9Cr1Mo steel, an AISI 310SS, and the Ni-based alloy Sanicro 28 were tested on a laboratory and on a pilot scale with different flue gas compositions (up to 2500 mg/Nm3 of HCl and 1500 mg/Nm3 of fly ash). Laboratory tests were carried out in a furnace up to 200 h. Metal and gas temperature were kept constant at 500 °C. Pilot scale tests were carried out by using a 0.3 × 0.3 m cross-sectional combustor, with flue gas velocity of 5 m/s. Air-cooled probes, designed to operate at a metal temperature of 500 °C and facing gas temperatures as high as 600 °C, were used for 200 h as maximum test time. Qualitative correspondence was found between results obtained by the two sets of experimental tests, but quantitative values were not comparable. Metallographic evaluations, metal loss measurements, and weight loss analysis evidenced as the most suitable alloy Sanicro28. Maximum metal loss observed was 240, 182, and 107 µm, respectively, for 9Cr1Mo, AISI310SS, and Sanicro 28 under the most aggressive conditions. Intergranular corrosion attack was evidenced for AISI310SS, limiting the choice of materials to 9Cr1Mo and Sanicro 28, depending upon the lifetime expected at the design stage.

  20. Corrosion resistance of steel materials in LiCl-KCl melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Li, Bing; Shen, Miao; Li, Shi-yan; Yu, Jian-guo

    2012-10-01

    The corrosion behaviors of 304SS, 316LSS, and Q235A in LiCl-KCl melts were investigated at 450°C by Tafel curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). 316LSS shows the best corrosion resistance behaviors among the three materials, including the most positive corrosion potential and the smallest corrosion current from the Tafel curves and the largest electron transfer resistance from the Nyquist plots. The results are in good agreement with the weight losses in the static corrosion experiments for 45 h. This may be attributed to the better corrosion resistance of Mo and Ni existing as alloy elements in 316LSS, which exhibit the lower corrosion current densities and more positive corrosion potentials than 316LSS in the same melts.

  1. Application of High Temperature Corrosion-Resistant Materials and Coatings Under Severe Corrosive Environment in Waste-to-Energy Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Yuuzou

    2007-06-01

    Corrosion-resistant materials (CRMs) and coatings are key technologies to increase power generation efficiency and reduce maintenance in waste-to-energy (WTE) plants. Corrosion environment became severe as steam temperatures have increased. The steam condition of more than 400 °C/3.9 MPa became possible in WTE boilers by using highly durable corrosion-resistant coatings, such as thermal spray of Al/80Ni20Cr alloy, HVOF-sprayed NiCrSiB alloy, Alloy 625 weld overlay for waterwall tubes and also superheater tubes. Also, the use of 310S type stainless steels and high Cr-high Mo-Ni base and high Si-Cr-Ni-Fe alloys have progressed because of a better understanding of corrosion mechanisms. Furthermore, high durability coatings using cermet and ceramic materials were applied to high temperature superheaters. This paper describes the major developments and the application of CRMs and coating technologies in the last 30 years in WTE plants, the corrosion mechanisms of alloys, the deterioration mechanisms of spray coating layers, and future subjects for the development of corrosion-resistant materials and coatings.

  2. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Study of High-Alloy Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    A corrosion study involving high-alloy materials and concentrated hydrofluoric acid (HF) was conducted in support of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Conversion Project (CP). The purpose of the test was to obtain a greater understanding of the corrosion rates of materials of construction currently used in the CP vs those of proposed replacement parts. Results of the study will help formulate a change-out schedule for CP parts. The CP will convert slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U from a gas (UF{sub 6}) sorbed on sodium fluoride pellets to a more stable oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). One by-product of the conversion is the formation of concentrated HF. Six moles of highly corrosive HF are produced for each mole of UF{sub 6} converted. This acid is particularly corrosive to most metals, elastomers, and silica-containing materials. A common impurity found in {sup 233}U is {sup 232}U. This impurity isotope has several daughters that make the handling of the {sup 233}U difficult. Traps of {sup 233}U may have radiation fields of up to 400 R at contact, a situation that makes the process of changing valves or working on the CP more challenging. It is also for this reason that a comprehensive part change-out schedule must be established. Laboratory experiments involving the repeated transfer of HF through 1/2-in. metal tubing and valves have proven difficult due to the corrosivity of the HF upon contact with all wetted parts. Each batch of HF is approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt% HF and is transferred most often as a vapor under vacuum and at temperatures of up to 250 C. Materials used in the HF side of the CP include Hastelloy C-276 and Monel 400 tubing, Haynes 230 and alloy C-276 vessels, and alloy 400 valve bodies with Inconel (alloy 600) bellows. The chemical compositions of the metals discussed in this report are displayed in Table 1. Of particular concern are the almost 30 vendor-supplied UG valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. These valves have been

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.Y.; Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1992-06-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS). Type 316L SS, Incoloy 825, phosphorus-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks. and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC)- A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) and fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests was performed at 93{degree}C and 1 atm of pressure in simulated J-13 well water. This water is representative, prior to the widespread availability of unsaturated-zone water, of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. Slow-strain-rate tests were conducted on 6.35-mm-diameter cylindrical specimens at strain rates of 10-{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice and noncrevice conditions. All tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strain of 1--4%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed some crack initiation in virtually all the materials, as well as weldments made from these materials. A stress- or strain-ratio cracking index ranks these materials, in order of increasing resistance to SCC, as follows: Type 304 SS < Type 316L SS < Incoloy 825 < Cu-30%Ni < Cu and Cu-7%Al. Fracture-mechanics CGR tests were conducted on 25.4-mm-thick compact tension specimens of Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS) and Incoloy 825. Crack-growth rates were measured under various load conditions: load ratios M of 0.5--1.0, frequencies of 10{sup {minus}3}-1 Hz, rise nines of 1--1000s, and peak stress intensities of 25--40 MPa{center_dot}m {sup l/2}.

  4. Evaluation of shuttle solid rocket booster case materials. Corrosion and stress corrosion susceptibility of several high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pionke, L. J.; Garland, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Candidate alloys for the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) case were tested under simulated service conditions to define subcritical flaw growth behavior under both sustained and cyclic loading conditions. The materials evaluated were D6AC and 18 Ni maraging steel, both heat treated to a nominal yield strength of 1380 MN/sq m (200 ksi). The sustained load tests were conducted by exposing precracked, stressed specimens of both alloys to alternate immersion in synthetic sea water. It was found that the corrosion and stress corrosion resistance of the 18 Ni maraging steel were superior to that of the D6AC steel under these test conditions. It was also found that austenitizing temperature had little influence on the threshold stress intensity of the D6AC. The cyclic tests were conducted by subjecting precracked surface-flawed specimens of both alloys to repeated load/thermal/environmental profiles which were selected to simulate the SRB missions. It was found that linear removal operations that involve heating to 589 K (600 F) cause a decrease in cyclic life of D6AC steel relative to those tests conducted with no thermal cycling.

  5. Corrosion test plan to guide canister material selection and design for a tuff repository

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.; van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ballou, L.B.

    1983-11-01

    Corrosion rates and the mode of corrosion attack form a most important basis for selection of canister materials and design of a nuclear waste package. Type 304L stainless steel was selected as the reference material for canister fabrication because of its generally excellent corrosion resistance in water, steam and air. However, 304L may be susceptible to localized and stress-assisted forms of corrosion under certain conditions. Alternative alloys are also investigated; these alloys were chosen because of their improved resistance to these forms of corrosion. The fabrication and welding processes, as well as the glass pouring operation for defense and commercial high-level wastes, may influence the susceptibility of the canister to localized and stress forms of corrosion. 12 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  6. 49 CFR 173.154 - Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group Assignments... Packing Group II and III are excepted from labeling requirements, unless the material also meets the... following combination packagings are authorized: (1) For corrosive materials in Packing Group II,...

  7. High-temperature oxidation and corrosion of materials program

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, D.P.

    1980-03-01

    Research progress is reported in the behavior of metals and alloys in gas mixtures at high temperature, corrosion mechanisms in complex environments of low oxidizing potential, hot corrosion of nickel-base alloys at intermediate temperatures, corrosion of solid sulfate deposits, adherence of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide films, oxidation behavior of a two-phase alloy Fe-44% Cu, and formation of subscales of varying composition. (FS)

  8. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  9. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  10. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  11. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  12. Corrosion issues in joining lightweight materials: A review of the latest achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemor, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    Multimaterials assemblies and, in particular, assemblies made of lightweight components are of utmost relevance in many technical applications. These assemblies include multimetal, metal-polymer, metal-adhesive, and metal-composites combinations, among others. Presently, the transportation sector is looking for lighter materials that allow for reducing fuel consumption and the environmental footprint. Aluminum and magnesium alloys, as well as composites and polymers, are considered strategic for such purposes, and their joining in metal-metal or hybrid assemblies has been explored to develop lightweight components. These multimaterial assemblies are often exposed to aggressive environments in which moisture and aggressive species are present. Under these conditions corrosion phenomena are a major source of material failures. Depending on the nature of the metals and nonmetals and of the joining process, the mechanism and extent of corrosion can vary significantly. Thus, it is essential to understand the impact of corrosion in joined materials and to know which counter-measures can be adopted to mitigate corrosion events in the system of concern. This chapter aims at reviewing the latest results of studies focused in corrosion issues in the joining of lightweight materials. It describes the most common corrosion phenomena observed in joined materials, and it emphasizes corrosion issues in assemblies that combine different metals and that combine metals with nonmetals. Moreover, it overviews the state-of-the-art in corrosion protection strategies that can be applied and, finally, it overlooks the future trends.

  13. Materials corrosion and mitigation strategies for APT: End of year report, FY `96

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1996-10-30

    The authors major accomplishment in FY96 was the design and fabrication of the corrosion probes to be used ``In Beam`` during the FY97 irradiation period to begin on February 1, 1997. Never before have corrosion rate measurements been made on-line in such a high radiation environment. To measure corrosion rate as a function of beam time, it is necessary to electrical isolate the corrosion electrode to be examined form the plumbing system. Conventionally, this is accomplished with glass seals. Here irradiation of the glass may cause it to become conductive, rendering the seal useless. To overcome this problem, the corrosion probes to be used in-beam at the spallation neutron cooling water loop at the LANSCE A6 target station were fabricated with ceramic inserts which act as electrical feed-throughs. The corrosion sample is joined to the ceramic by means of a compression seal. The corrosion samples are closed end cylinders, 0.5 inches diameter x 6.25 inch length, that are constructed from Stainless Steel 304L, Stainless Steel 316L, Inconel 718, Tungsten, HT-9, and Tantalum. Because of their specialized nature, InTa Corporation, of Santa Clara, CA was contracted to manufacture these problems. As of November 1, 1996 delivery of these probes has begun and the authors anticipate having all of the probes in hand by Nov. 25.

  14. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating... § 195.557 must— (a) Be designed to mitigate corrosion of the buried or submerged pipeline; (b)...

  15. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating... § 195.557 must— (a) Be designed to mitigate corrosion of the buried or submerged pipeline; (b)...

  16. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating... § 195.557 must— (a) Be designed to mitigate corrosion of the buried or submerged pipeline; (b)...

  17. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating... § 195.557 must— (a) Be designed to mitigate corrosion of the buried or submerged pipeline; (b)...

  18. Effect of deposits on corrosion of materials exposed in the Coal-Fired Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-05-01

    Candidate heat exchanger materials tested in the Low Mass Flow train at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at Tullahoma, TN. were analyzed to evaluate their corrosion performance. Tube specimens obtained at each foot of the 14-ft-long Unbend tubes were analyzed for corrosion-scale morphologies, scale thicknesses, and internal penetration depths. Results developed on 1500- and 2000- h exposed specimens were correlated with exposure temperature. In addition, deposit materials collected at several locations in the CFFF were analyzed in detail to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the deposits and their influence on corrosion performance of tube materials.

  19. Assessing microbiologically induced corrosion of waste package materials in the Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J. M., LLNL

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of bacterial activities to corrosion of nuclear waste package materials must be determined to predict the adequacy of containment for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. The program to evaluate potential microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of candidate waste container materials includes characterization of bacteria in the post-construction YM environment, determination of their required growth conditions and growth rates, quantitative assessment of the biochemical contribution to metal corrosion, and evaluation of overall MIC rates on candidate waste package materials.

  20. Corrosion-resistant tube materials for extended life of openings in recovery boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, L.D.; Danielson, M.J.; Harper, S.L. . Research and Development Div.); Barna, J.L. . Fossil Power Div.)

    1993-08-01

    The corrosive conditions causing rapid corrosion of Type 304L stainless steel in tube openings have been duplicated in the laboratory. Alternate materials also have been tested, and some show improved corrosion resistance over Type 304L. Alloy 825 and Alloy 625 composite tubing and Alloy 600 and Alloy 625 weld overlay materials all show promise as a replacement for Type 304L in tube openings. All recovery boilers designed or operated at 8.375 MPa (1,200 psi) and above should consider using these replacement materials for tube openings.

  1. Corrosion of copper-based materials in gamma-irradiated air/water vapor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.

    1992-04-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the atmospheric corrosion of copper-based materials in an irradiated air/water vapor system. The three materials investigated were oxygen-free copper (CDA-102), 7% aluminum-bronze (CDA-613), and 70-30 cupronickel (CDA-715). To support the corrosion studies, a number of irradiation studies were performed to characterize the gas phase radiation chemistry of the system. Both copper oxide and nitrate phases were identified as corrosion products depending on the dose rate, humidity and temperature. Uniform corrosion rates increased with temperature, humidity, and dose rate. A clear tie between the radiolytic products generated in the gas phase and the corrosion observed was established.

  2. Corrosion of copper-based materials in gamma-irradiated air/water vapor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the atmospheric corrosion of copper-based materials in an irradiated air/water vapor system. The three materials investigated were oxygen-free copper (CDA-102), 7% aluminum-bronze (CDA-613), and 70-30 cupronickel (CDA-715). To support the corrosion studies, a number of irradiation studies were performed to characterize the gas phase radiation chemistry of the system. Both copper oxide and nitrate phases were identified as corrosion products depending on the dose rate, humidity and temperature. Uniform corrosion rates increased with temperature, humidity, and dose rate. A clear tie between the radiolytic products generated in the gas phase and the corrosion observed was established.

  3. HIGH-TEMPEPATURE OXIDATION AND CORROSION OF MATERIALS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, D.P.

    1980-03-01

    The objective of this program is to gain an understanding of the corrosion chemistry and materials behavior in high temperature environments. Of particular interest are the mechanisms of attack in environments containing more than one reactive species, for example sulfur and oxygen. Sulfur is a critical impurity in almost all energy sources and leads to accelerated, and often unacceptable rates of metal degradation. In addition, the competitive formation of potentially more than one phase as a reaction product is an important fundamental problem, and can only be truly understood if the underlying thermodynamic and transport properties of the systems, and their interrelation, are identified. Sulfur can appear in a number of forms. In entirely gaseous environments it can appear as H{sub Z}S when the oxidizing potential of the atmosphere is low, such as might exist in energy conversion systems, or as SO{sub 2}/SO{sub 3} at higher oxygen potentials, such as those produced by fuel combustion. It may also appear in sulfatic deposits, either as a solid, such as CaSO{sub 4} in fluidized bed combustion systems, as inorganic and organic sulfur compounds in coal char, or as a liquid alkali-metal sulfate in coal-ash, or turbine-blade deposits. This last year has been spent primarily in establishing the typical behavioral patterns of common materials in these types of environments, and identifying the common mechanisms. In addition, development of definitive models of alloy reactions with single oxidants has continued. The individual projects are described.

  4. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... atmosphere, except pipelines under paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Coating material must be suitable...

  5. Water-induced corrosion of materials used for semiconductor passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Osenbach, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    The authors show for the first time that both chemical corrosion and electrochemical corrosion of silicon-based films does occur, and that this corrosion leads to device failure. Chemical corrosion is the dominate failure mechanism when devices are aged between 500 and 1,500 h. Typically, a small number of failures are found as a result of chemical corrosion. However, if the devices are improperly packaged, then this mechanism can be responsible for most if not all failures. The mechanism is characterized by an activation energy between 0.6 and 1.0 eV depending on the passivation stoichiometry. Electrochemical corrosion dominates long term failure and is strongly dependent upon the resistivity of the passivation. They found that the median lifetime could vary by two orders of magnitude depending on the film resistivity. Because of this large variation in median lifetimes, it is important to characterize the resistivity of the passivation films used for given technologies, remembering, of course, that the resistivity is strongly dependent on film stoichiometry, applied field, and local geometry.

  6. Corrosion-resistant iridium-platinum anode material for high polarization application in corrosive acids

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.

    1993-09-08

    The present invention relates to highly corrosion resistant components for use in an electrochemical cell. Specifically, these components are resistant to corrosion under very extreme conditions such as exposure to aqua regia in the presence of a constant current density of 100mA/m{sup 2}. The components are comprised of an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy comprises 15-20% iridium. In another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy is deposited on the surface of an electrochemical cell component by magnetron sputtering. The present invention also relates to a method for conducting an electrochemical reaction in the presence of highly corrosive acids under a high degree of polarization wherein the electrochemical cell comprises a component, preferably the anode, containing an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium.

  7. Corrosion inhibitor evaluation for materials used in closed cooling water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moccari, A.A.

    1999-09-01

    Electrochemical tests were conducted to evaluate the inhibition effects of a commercial sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2})/sodium tolyltriazole (nitrite/TTA)-based corrosion inhibitor added to deionized water at 50 C. General and pitting corrosion of materials commonly used in closed cooling water systems were examined. Tests also were performed in deionized water to which Cl{sup {minus}} had been added. At the tested concentrations, nitrite/TTA was found to be an effective corrosion inhibitor for all of the materials tested in plain deionized water and Cl{sup {minus}}-containing water.

  8. Effect of environmental variables on localized corrosion of high-performance container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.K.; Fleming, D.L.; Lum, B.Y.

    1997-01-01

    Electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) experiments were performed on several candidate high-performance waste package container materials to evaluate their susceptibility to localized corrosion in aqueous environments relevant to the potential underground high-level nuclear waste repository. This paper presents the results of this study showing the effects of chloride ion (Cl) concentrations, pH, temperature, and electrochemical potential scan rate on the pitting corrosion behavior of these materials.

  9. Atmospheric corrosion of batten and enclosure materials for flat-plate solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    As part of the Solar Reliability and Materials Program at Argonne National Laboratory, the atmospheric-corrosion-monitoring project is to assess the materials used for battens and enclosures for flat-plate solar collectors. Sensors at nine test sites have provided atmospheric data. Other data have been obtained by analyzing corrosion samples that were exposed for varying periods of time. This interim report summarizes the results of the first test period.

  10. Localized corrosion in materials for geothermal power. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Troiano, A.R.; Hehemann, R.F.

    1982-04-01

    The influence of 16 different geothermally related environments on a number of potentially useful steels was examined for both general and localized corrosion and at ambient and 150/sup 0/C. Variation in chloride concentration of 1 to 20% generally demonstrated only minor aggressiveness in acidified solutions. In general, the presence of H/sub 2/S raised the corrosion rate. However, very low concentrations (10 ppM) indicated higher rates than in saturated brines. This is rationalized on the basis of the inability to develop a semi-protective film at the low H/sub 2/S concentration. The corrosion rate for the Cr-Mo steel was unexpectedly high at ambient, but improved substantially at 150/sup 0/C. The Ni-Cu-Nb steel consistently demonstrated excellent resistance in all environments, except the 10 ppM H/sub 2/S at ambient. At 150/sup 0/C there were no exceptions to its superior performance. Maximum pit depth studies, analyzed statistically, indicated that the Ni-Cu-Nb alloy was the most resistant to localized attack. A clean (low inclusions) Mn-C and a clean vacuum melted steel ranked well. A comparison of two almost identical Mn-C steels one clean and one dirty clearly indicated the deleterious influence of inclusions on the tendency for localized corrosion. The profiling of a protected section of a creviced or pitted sample helped to delineate the nebulous line of demarcation between general and localized corrosion in these low alloy steels.

  11. Galvanic corrosion study of container materials using zero resistance ammeter

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A. K., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Galvanic corrosion behavior of A 516 steel separately coupled to six different corrosion-resistant alloys was investigated in an acidic brine (pHa2.70) at 30{degree}C 60{degree}C and 80{degree}C using zero resistance ammeter technique. The corrosion-resistant alloys include Alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4 and C-22; and Ti Grade-12, which were coupled to A 516 steel at an anode-to- cathode area ratio of one. The galvanic current and galvanic potential were measured as a function of time at all three temperatures. Optical microscopic examination was also performed on all tested specimens to evaluate the extent of surface degradation due to galvanic coupling. The overall results are presented in this paper.

  12. 49 CFR 173.154 - Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials). 173.154 Section 173.154 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS...

  13. 49 CFR 173.154 - Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions for Class 8 (corrosive materials). 173.154 Section 173.154 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS...

  14. Corrosion tests of canister and overpack materials in simulated basalt groundwater. [Hastelloy G and C-276

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results indicate that the environment expected in a repository in basalt is not highly corrosive to the materials tested. Comparisons of weight change data between two simulated basalt groundwater compositions indicate that variations in oxygen fugacity had a minor effect on corrosion of nickel, titanium, and zirconium alloys. The corrosion of cupronickel alloy, however, was drastically reduced when a lower oxygen fugacity was maintained. Effectiveness of a hydrogen/argon sparge to maintain a low oxygen fugacity in a simulated groundwater was demonstrated. 5 tables.

  15. Irradiation corrosion of waste package container materials in air/steam environment

    SciTech Connect

    Anantatmula, R.P.; Colburn, R.P.

    1991-11-01

    A set of corrosion tests of the candidate waste container materials for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) was conducted in a moist air environment simulating the repository preclosure condition. The tests were performed over a four-month period with air, saturated with moisture at 50{degree}C, passing through test chambers holding specimens at 150{degree}C and 250{degree}C. The test materials included A27 cast carbon steel, A387 ferritic steel, oxygen-free copper and cupronickel 90-10. Each material was tested both with and without basalt/bentonite packing material adjacent to the specimens. For each combination of material, temperature and packing condition, tests were conducted at 10,000 R/hr and 100 R/hr radiation levels. All four materials tested at 250{degree}C showed corrosion rates as much as an order of magnitude higher in the high radiation field when compared with similar tests without irradiation. Typically, the corrosion rates were lower at the lower dose rates, but were significantly higher at 100 R/hr compared to the case without radiation. At 150{degree}C only pure copper showed enhanced corrosion due to gamma radiation. The presence of packing material adjacent to the specimens had no consistent effect on corrosion rate at either temperature.

  16. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Curits, P.C.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90{degrees}C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel-, and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron- absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. the stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on it chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high- chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. the results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  17. Scoping corrosion tests on candidate waste package basket materials for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Curtis, P.G.; Summers, T.S.E.

    1998-03-01

    A scoping corrosion test was performed on candidate waste package basket materials. The corrosion medium was a pH-buffered solution of chemical species expected to be produced by radiolysis. The test was conducted at 90 C for 96 hours. Samples included aluminum-, copper-, stainless steel- and zirconium-based metallic materials and several ceramics, incorporating neutron-absorbing elements. Sample weight losses and solution chemical changes were measured. Both corrosion of the host materials and dissolution of the neutron-absorbing elements were studied. The ceramics and the zirconium-based materials underwent only minor corrosion. The stainless steel-based materials performed well except for a welded sample. The aluminum- and copper-based materials exhibited the highest corrosion rates. Boron dissolution depends on its chemical form. Boron oxide and many metal borides dissolve readily in acidic solutions while high-chromium borides and boron carbide, though thermodynamically unstable, exhibit little dissolution in short times. The results of solution chemical analyses were consistent with this. Gadolinium did not dissolve significantly from monazite, and hafnium showed little dissolution from a variety of host materials, in keeping with its low solubility.

  18. Corrosion behavior of copper-base materials in a gamma-irradiated environment; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yunker, W.H.

    1990-09-01

    Specimens of three copper-base materials were corrosion tested with gamma radiation exposure dose rates in the range of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 3} R/h to 4.9 {times} 10{sup 5} R/h. Materials used were pure copper, 7% aluminum bronze and 30% copper-nickel. Exposures were performed in moist air at 95{degree}C and 150{degree}C and liquid Well J-13 water at 95{degree}C, for periods of up to 16 months. Specimens were monitored for uniform weight loss, stress-induced corrosion and crevice corrosion. Specimen surfaces were examined visually at 10X magnification as well as by Auger Electron Spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and metallography. Corrosion was not severe in any of the cases. In general, the pure copper was corroded most uniformly while the copper-nickel was the least reproducibly corroded. 11 refs, 40 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ~3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  20. Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90{degrees}C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys.

  1. Results and recommendations from the reactor chemistry and corrosion tasks of the reactor materials program

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    Within the general context of extended service life, the Reactor Materials Program was initiated in 1984. This comprehensive program addressed material performance in SRS reactor tanks and the primary coolant or Process Water System (PWS) piping. Three of the eleven tasks concerned moderator quality and corrosion mitigation. Definition and control of the stainless steel aqueous environment is a key factor in corrosion mitigation. The Reactor Materials Program systematically investigated the SRS environment and its effect on crack initiation and propagation in stainless steel, with the objective of improving this environment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the contributions of Tasks 6, 7 and 10 of the Reactor Materials Program to the understanding and control of moderator quality and its relationship to mitigation of stress corrosion cracking.

  2. Potential Biogenic Corrosion of Alloy 22, A Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Materials, Under Simulated Repository Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.M.; Martin, S.I.; Rivera, A.J.; Bedrossian, P.J.; Lian, T.

    2000-01-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with assessing the suitability of a geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), NV. Microorganisms, both those endogenous to the repository site and those introduced as a result of construction and operational activities, may contribute to the corrosion of metal nuclear waste packaging and thereby decrease their useful lifetime as barrier materials. Evaluation of potential Microbiological Influenced Corrosion (MIC) on candidate waste package materials was undertaken reactor systems incorporating the primary elements of the repository: YM rock (either non-sterile or presterilized), material coupons, and a continual feed of simulated YM groundwater. Periodically, both aqueous reactor efflux and material coupons were analyzed for chemical and surfacial characterization. Alloy 22 coupons exposed for a year at room temperature in reactors containing non-sterile YM rock demonstrated accretion of chromium oxide and silaceous scales, with what appear to be underlying areas of corrosion.

  3. Corrosion susceptibility study of candidate pin materials for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovard, Francine S.; Cieslak, Wendy R.

    1987-09-01

    The corrosion susceptibilities of eight alternate battery pin material candidates for ALTC (Active Lithium/Thionyl Chloride) batteries in 1.5M LiAlCl4/SOCl2 electrolyte have been investigated using ampule exposure and electrochemical tests. The thermal expansion coefficients of these candidate materials are expected to match Sandia-developed Li-corrosion resistant glasses. The corrosion resistances of the candidate materials, which included three stainless steels (15-5 PH, 17-4 PH, and 446), three Fe-Ni glass sealing alloys (Kovar, Alloy 52, and Niromet 426), a Ni-based alloy (Hastelloy B-2) and a zirconium-based alloy (Zircaloy), were compared to the reference materials Ni and 316L SS. All of the candidate materials showed some evidence of corrosion and, therefore, did not perform as well as the reference materials. The Hastelloy B-2 and Zircaloy are clearly unacceptable materials for this application. Of the remaining alternate materials, the 446 SS and Alloy 52 are the most promising candidates.

  4. Laboratory corrosion tests for simulating fireside wastage of superheater materials in waste incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, N.; Kawahara, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Hosoda, T.

    1999-11-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were performed to clarify the effects of relative amounts of fused salts in tube deposits on corrosion rates of superheater materials in WTE plants. All test exposures were at 550 C and of 100 hour duration. The nine synthetic ashes used as corrodents consisted of mixtures of chlorides, sulfates and oxides. The test materials were alloy steel T22, stainless steels TP347H, TP310HCbN, and alloys HR11N and 625. The gas atmosphere consisted of 500 to 3000 ppm HCl-30ppm SO{sub 2}-10%O{sub 2}-10%CO{sub 2}-20%H{sub 2}O-bal.N{sub 2}. Generally, the relative amount of fused salts in non-fused ash constituents at 550 C increased with increasing the chlorine content of the ashes. The corrosion rate of T22 steel did not depend directly on ash chlorine content, but for ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rate depended on the calculated amount of fused salt at 500 C. The corrosion rates of TP347H steel and alloy 625 were maximum for ashes of 6--8 wt%Cl. For ashes of 7.7 wt.%Cl, the corrosion rates of T22 steel, stainless steels, and alloys increased with ashes having higher amounts of fused salts. Increased HCl content of the gas caused higher corrosion of the stainless steels and high-nickel alloys, but there was no clear corrosion-exacerbating effect with T22 steel.

  5. Materials studies for preventing corrosion in condensing environments. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the fundamental interfacial requirements for low-cost, organic and inorganic materials resistive to corrosion in condensing furnace exhausts. This research effort is being focused to provide information regarding corrosion resistance, heat transfer, material cost, fabrication method and cost, and product reliability since all are important in the final design and production of a heat exchanger. Results to date indicate that organic and inorganic-type polymer coating systems applied to low cost metals such as mild steel and aluminum provide good corrosion protection. The thermal stability of these polymers plus the identification of the interfacial requirements needed to utilize them with reactive filler materials should also make their use as bulk composites feasible.

  6. Microbial-induced corrosion in nuclear power plant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licina, George J.; Cubicciotti, Daniel

    1989-12-01

    The long construction times associated with nuclear plants and the large number of redundant or standby systems where water is allowed to remain stagnant for long periods of time produce conditions under which microbial-induced corrosion (MIC) can occur. Carbon and low-alloy steels, stainless steels and copper alloys are all susceptible to MIC in raw-water applications. Visual examination is particularly useful in performing preliminary assessments of MIC. If properly diagnosed, MIC can be effectively treated during plant construction, operation and temporary shutdowns.

  7. Corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing condition by using molten salt for spent nuclear oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Kato, T.; Hanada, K.; Koizumi, T.; Aose, S.

    2005-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of ceramic materials in pyrochemical reprocessing using molten salts was discussed through the thermodynamic calculation and corrosion test. The corrosion test was basically carried out in alkali molten salt under chlorine gas. In addition, the effects of oxygen, carbon and main fission product's chlorides on ceramics corrosion were evaluated in that condition. Most of ceramic oxides showed good chemical stability on chlorine, oxygen and uranyl chloride from thermodynamic calculation results. On the other hand, from corrosion test result, silicon nitride, mullite (Al6Si2O13) and cordierite (Mg2Al3(AlSi5O18)) have a good corrosion resistance which is corresponding to 0.1 mm/y or less. No cracks on the materials were observed and flexural strength did not drop remarkably after 480 h corrosion testing in molten salt under Cl2 O2 atmosphere.

  8. Corrosion response of nuclear reactor materials to mixtures of decontamination reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Speranzini, R.A.; Burchart, P.A.; Kanhai, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study of the corrosiveness of mixtures of citric acid, oxalic acid and EDTA to nuclear reactor materials was undertaken. Specimens of type 304 stainless steel (SS), type 410 SS,c carbon steel (CS) 1018 and A508, and heat treated alloy 600 were suspended in recirculating mixtures of two or more of citric acid, oxalic acid and EDTA at temperatures of 90{sup 0}C or 117{sup 0}C for 22 h. The results suggest that removal of oxalic acid from decontamination solutions should lower the corrosivity of the solutions to nuclear reactor materials, particularly 304 SS and 410 SS.

  9. Corrosion response of nuclear reactor materials to mixtures of decontamination reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Speranzini, R.A.; Burchart, P.A.; Kanhai, K.A.

    1989-02-01

    An experimental study of the corrosiveness of mixtures of citric acid, oxalic acid, and EDTA to nuclear reactor materials was undertaken. Specimens of type 304 stainless steel (SS), type 410 SS, carbon steel (CS) 1018 and A508, and heat-treated alloy 600 were suspended in recirculating mixtures of two or more combinations of citric acid, oxalic acid, and EDTA at temperatures of 90 C or 117 C for 22 hours. The results suggest that removal of oxalic acid from decontamination solutions should lower the corrosiveness of the solutions to nuclear reactor materials, particularly types 304 SS and 410 SS.

  10. Electrochemical evaluation of superheater materials in coal ash corrosion atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, K.; Ando, S.; Kawamoto, T.; Kihara, S.; Ohtomo, A.

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of AISI TYPE 347, TYPE 310, 17-14THCuMo steel and IN671 (50Cr-50Ni) in molten ternary eutectic of Li/sub 2/SO/sub 4//K/sub 2/SO/sub 4//Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, at 650/sup 0/C in air and under synthetic flue gas atmosphere: 14%CO/sub 2/, 4%O/sub 2/, two levels of SO/sub 2/ (0.25% and 1%), N/sub 2/ balance has been evaluated by potentiodynamic and free corrosion potential measurement. In air and 0.25%SO/sub 2/ containing synthetic flue gas atmosphere breakthrough potentials were observed in their potential curves. For the alloys examined the values of breakthrough potentials increased in the following order: IN671 > 310 > 347 > 17-14THCuMo. On the other hand in 1%SO/sub 2/ containing synthetic flue gas atmosphere breakthrough potentials were not observed but Tafel Type polarization response were observed. The i/SUB corr/ obtained from their polarization curves were increased in the following order: 310 < 347 < 17-14THCuMo.

  11. Role of synergy between wear and corrosion in degradation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzi, Marwan

    Tribocorrosion is a term used to describe the material degradation due to the combination of electrochemical and tribological processes. Due to a synergetic effect, the material loss can be larger than the sum of the losses due to wear and corrosion acting separately. In this thesis, the synergy of wear and corrosion was investigated for different types of material, namely the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, the SS316L stainless steel coated with a thin film of Diamond Like Carbon (DLC), and the SS301 stainless steel coated with a thin film of chromium silicon nitride (CrSiN). A tribocorrosion apparatus was designed and constructed to conduct wear experiments in corrosive media. Sliding ball-on-plate configuration was used in this design, where the contact between the ball and the specimen is totally immersed in the test electrolyte. The specimen was connected to a potentiostat to control its electrochemical parameters, namely the potential and the current. Electrochemical techniques were used to control the kinetics of corrosion reactions, and therefore it was possible to assess separately the role of corrosion and wear in the total degradation of material, and to evaluate the synergy between them. For Ti-6Al-4V, it was found that the corrosion and tribocorrosion depend strongly on the structure of the material. The alpha-equiaxed microstructure with fine dispersed beta-phase exhibited the best corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance was found to decrease when the basal plane was preferentially aligned parallel to the surface, which is attributed to a low resistance to charge transfer in the oxide films formed on this plane. On the other hand, when wear and corrosion were involved simultaneously, the oxide layer protecting the substrate against dissolution was mechanically destroyed leading to a high corrosion rate. It was found that the hardness was the most important factor determining the tribocorrosion behavior of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy; samples with high hardness

  12. Static corrosion of construction materials exposed to superphosphoric acid made from various sources of phosphate rock

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; McDonald, C.L.; McGill, K.E.

    1994-10-01

    Corrosion tests were performed with various construction materials, such as carbon steel, cast iron, stainless steels, nickel and nickel-based alloys, copper and its alloys, aluminum alloy, zirconium alloy, and tantalum, exposed to wet-process superphosphoric acids (approximately 70% P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) from all the suppliers in the United States and to a technical-grade (55% P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) acid made by the electric furnace process. The study was conducted in response to reports from pipe-reactor users of excessive corrosion by superphosphoric acids and electric furnace acid. Test temperatures were ambient (approximately 21{degrees}C or 70{degrees}F), 66{degrees}C (150{degrees}F), and 93{degrees}C (200{degrees}F). Test results showed that temperature was a significant factor in acid corrosivity. Electric furnace acid was more corrosive than the superphosphoric acids. Carbon steel, cast iron, and aluminum alloy were not resistant to either the superphosphoric acids or the electric furnace acid. Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and nickel-molybdenum (Ni-Mo) based alloys and tantalum exhibited adequate corrosion resistance in the superphosphoric acids and the electric furnace acid. Stainless steels performed well in all test acids at all test temperatures with some exceptions in the electric furnace acid at 93{degrees}C. Zirconium alloy, copper and its alloys, pure nickel, and Monel 400 provided adequate corrosion resistance to all test acids at ambient temperature only.

  13. In-pile irradiation research at NRI Rez for corrosion and material testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kysela, J.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental test facility enabling exposition of materials to radiation environment is described. The facility enables research on behavior of materials and water chemistry of PWRs and BWRs. High pressure water loop RVS-3 is operated in LVR-15 test research reactor. The loop was designed as a universal facility providing wide experimental possibilities. Loop is designed for 16.7 MPa pressure, 334 C temperature, 10 t/hour water flow rate and 1.10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1} neutron flux. Water chemistry used corresponds the PWRs with boric acid and pH control by potassium/lithium, hydrogen control by gas or ammonia. BWR loop is designed for investigation of structural materials and Water chemistry in conditions of boiling water power reactors.

  14. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot-gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, M.F.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of the 3M material to a combustion environment for as little as 25 hours at 800{degrees}C. The study of heat exchanger materials has focused on enhancing the corrosion resistance of DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} composite tubes by adding chromium to its surfaces by (1) heat treatments in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed, or (2) infiltrating surface porosity with molten chromium nitrate. Each process is followed by a surface homogenization at 1500{degrees}C. The powder bed method has been most successful, producing continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. As-received and Cr-modified DuPont Lanxide Dimox{trademark} samples will be reacted with commonly encountered coal-ash slags to determine the Cr effects on corrosion resistance.

  15. Boric acid corrosion of light water reactor pressure vessel head materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Chopra, O. K.; Natesan, K.; Shack, W. J.; Cullen, Jr.; W. H.; Energy Technology; USNRC

    2005-01-01

    This work presents experimental data on electrochemical potential and corrosion rates for the materials found in the reactor pressure vessel head and control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles in boric acid solutions of varying concentrations at temperatures of 95-316 C. Tests were conducted in (a) high-temperature, high-pressure aqueous solutions with a range of boric acid concentrations, (b) high-temperature (150-316 C)H-B-Osolutions at ambient pressure, in wet and dry conditions, and (c) low-temperature (95 C) saturated, aqueous, boric acid solutions. These correspond to the following situations: (a) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus plugged, (b) low leakage through the nozzle and nozzle/head annulus open, and (c) significant cooling due to high leakage and nozzle/head annulus open. The results showed significant corrosion only for the low-alloy steel and no corrosion for Alloy 600 or 308 stainless steel cladding. Also, corrosion rates were significant in saturated boric acid solutions, and no material loss was observed in H-B-O solution in the absence of moisture. The results are compared with the existing corrosion/wastage data in the literature.

  16. Evaluation by the Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation Test of Aged Ferritic Stainless Steel Intergranular Corrosion Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Braham, C.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental design method was used to determine the effect of factors that significantly affect the response of the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test in controlling the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of UNS S43000 (AISI 430) ferritic stainless steel. The test response is expressed in terms of the reactivation/activation current ratio ( I r / I a pct). Test results analysed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method show that the molarity of the H2SO4 electrolyte and the potential scanning rate have a more significant effect on the DL-EPR test response than the temperature and the depassivator agent concentration. On the basis of these results, a study was conducted in order to determine the optimal operating conditions of the test as a nondestructive technique for evaluating IGC resistance of ferritic stainless steel components. Three different heat treatments are considered in this study: solution annealing (nonsensitized), aging during 3 hours at 773 K (500 °C) (slightly sensitized), and aging during 2 hours at 873 K (600 °C) (highly sensitized). The aim is to find the operating conditions that simultaneously ensure the selectivity of the attack (intergranular and chromium depleted zone) and are able to detect the effect of low dechromization. It is found that a potential scanning rate of 2.5 mV/s in an electrolyte composed of H2SO4 3 M solution without depassivator, at a temperature around 293 K (20 °C), is the optimal operating condition for the DL-EPR test. Using this condition, it is possible to assess the degree of sensitization (DOS) to the IGC of products manufactured in ferritic stainless steels rapidly, reliably, and quantitatively. A time-temperature-start of sensitization (TTS) diagram for the UNS S43000 (France Inox, Villepinte, France) stainless steel was obtained with acceptable accuracy by this method when the IGC sensitization criterion was set to I r / I a > 1 pct. This diagram is in

  17. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  18. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  19. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Joseph; Choi, Jor-Shan; Saw, Cheng; Haslam, Jeffrey; Day, Dan; Hailey, Phillip; Lian, Tiangan; Rebak, Raul; Perepezko, John; Payer, Joe; Branagan, Daniel; Beardsley, Brad; D'Amato, Andy; Aprigliano, Lou

    2009-06-01

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition, materials synthesis, thermal stability, corrosion resistance, environmental cracking, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, radiation effects, and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as meltspun ribbons (MSRs), dropcast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of MSRs and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently, thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests; good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while the open-circuit corrosion potentials (OCPs) were simultaneously monitored; reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber and suitable for criticality-control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and Ni-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  20. Material Data Representation of Hysteresis Loops for Hastelloy X Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, Javed; Berke, Laszlo; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1993-01-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN) model proposed by Rumelhart, Hinton, and Williams is applied to develop a functional approximation of material data in the form of hysteresis loops from a nickel-base superalloy, Hastelloy X. Several different ANN configurations are used to model hysteresis loops at different cycles for this alloy. The ANN models were successful in reproducing the hysteresis loops used for its training. However, because of sharp bends at the two ends of hysteresis loops, a drift occurs at the corners of the loops where loading changes to unloading and vice versa (the sharp bends occurred when the stress-strain curves were reproduced by adding stress increments to the preceding values of the stresses). Therefore, it is possible only to reproduce half of the loading path. The generalization capability of the network was tested by using additional data for two other hysteresis loops at different cycles. The results were in good agreement. Also, the use of ANN led to a data compression ratio of approximately 22:1.

  1. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kupp, E.R.; Trubelja, K.E.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    Experimental corrosion studies of hot gas filter materials and heat exchanger materials in oxidizing combustion environments have been initiated. Filter materials from 3M Co. and DuPont Lanxide Composites Inc. are being tested over a range of temperatures, times and gas flows. It has been demonstrated that morphological and phase changes due to corrosive effects occur after exposure of these materials to a simulated coal combustion environment for relatively short periods of time (10-50 hours). Heat exchanger tubes from DuPont Lanxide Composite Inc. were cut and infiltrated with Cr by heating in a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder bed. This resulted in continuous Cr-rich layers with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 250 {mu}m. The Cr-free and the Cr-infiltrated specimens were reacted with the molten Illinois No. 6 slag for 2 and 20 h at 1260{degrees}C, and the reaction layers examined with SEM and EDX. In the Cr-free specimens, the segregation of Fe and the precipitation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were detected near the liquid/gas interface, but no evidence of corrosion was present. In the Cr-infiltrate specimens, corrosion was evident, since a rearrangement and segregation of the Cr-rich grains occurred toward the surface of the molten slag. In addition, evidence of the diffusion of major quantities of Fe was observed from the liquid slag into the Cr-rich layer formed by infiltration.

  2. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  3. Corrosion and its effect on mechanical properties of materials for advanced combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Freeman, M.; Mathur, M.

    1996-05-01

    Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that utilize coal as a feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces that can operate at temperatures much higher than those prevalent in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments necessitates development and application of advanced ceramic materials in these designs. The objectives of the present program are to evaluate (a) the chemistry of gaseous and condensed products that arise during combustion of coal; (b) the corrosion behavior of candidate materials in air, slag and salt environments for application in the combustion environments; and (c) the residual mechanical properties of the materials after corrosion. The program emphasizes temperatures in the range of 1000-1400{degrees}C for ceramic materials and 600-1000{degrees}C for metallic alloys. Coal/ash chemistries developed on the basis of thermodynamic/kinetic calculations, together with slags from actual combustors, are used in the program. The materials being evaluated include monolithic silicon carbide from several sources: silicon, nitride, silicon carbide in alumina composites, silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide- matrix composite, and some advanced nickel-base alloys. The paper presents results from an ongoing program on corrosion performance of candidate ceramic materials exposed to air, salt and slag environments and their affect on flexural strength and energy absorbed during fracture of these materials.

  4. High temperature corrosion of metallic materials in molten carbonate fuel cells environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, G.; Vegni, S.; Capobianco, P.; Golgovici, F.

    Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) are electrochemical devices that convert energy of a chemical reaction into electricity without any kind of combustion. So, MCFCs are promising for their high efficiency and their low environmental pollution. A limiting aspect for reaching the goal of 40,000 h of life-time is the corrosion of metallic parts of MCFC, especially for current collectors and separator plates. Generally, this corrosion leads to metal loss and to an important increase of the electrical resistance due to the formation of resistive oxides. One of the most critic components in a MCFC is the anodic side metallic components. More used choice for these components is actually a sheet of AISI310S cladded at both sides by a Ni layer. The analysis of the behaviour of this material after different steps of corrosion in a typical molten carbonate fuel cell environment could be important to understand some phenomena that cause the damage of the anodic current collector.

  5. Electrochemical study on microbiology-related corrosion of metallic dental materials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chung; Oshida, Yoshiki; Gregory, Richard L; Andres, Carl J; Barco, Thomas M; Brown, David T

    2003-01-01

    Microbiology-related corrosion has been noted in industry for many years. It is widely recognized that microorganisms affect the corrosion of metal and alloys immersed in aqueous environments. Under similar conditions, the effect of bacteria in the oral environment on the corrosion of dental metallic materials remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the corrosion behavior of dental metallic materials in the presence of Streptococcus mutans and its growth byproducts. Samples were commercially pure titanium (CPT), Ti-6Al-4V (TAV), Ti-Ni (TN), Co-Cr-Mo alloy (CCM), 316L stainless steel (SSL), 17Cr-4Ni PH-type stainless steel (PH), and Ni-Cr alloy (NC). Using Gamry corrosion test system, surfaces were exposed to (1) sterilized Ringer's solution as a control for (2), (2) S. mutans mixed with sterilized Ringer's solution; (3) sterilized tryptic soy broth as a control for (4), and (4) byproducts of S. mutans mixed with sterilized tryptic soy broth. Corrosion parameters (EOCP, ECORR, ICORR, etc.) were corrected for all tested samples. Averaged values of these parameters were statistically analyzed by t-test to identify significant differences. It was concluded that (1) S. mutans reduced the EOCP of CPT, TAV, TN, and SSL, and the byproducts of S. mutans reduced the EOCP of TAV, TN, SSL, and PH. (2) S. mutans increased the ICORR of PH, and byproducts of S. mutans increased the ICORR of all the samples. (3) S. mutans reduced the ECORR of CPT, TAV and TN, and the byproducts of S. mutans reduced the ECORR of TN, SSL, PH, and NC. (4) S. mutans increased the IPASS of CPT, and the byproducts of S. mutans increased the IPASS of CPT, PH, and NC. PMID:12883177

  6. Silicon nitride: A ceramic material with outstanding resistance to thermal shock and corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, K. H.; Saure, F.

    1983-01-01

    The known physical, mechanical and chemical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride are summarized. This material deserves interest especially because of its unusually good resistance to thermal shock and corrosion at high temperatures. Two types are distinguished: reaction-sintered (porous) and hot-pressed (dense) Si3N4. Only the reaction-sintered material which is being produced today in large scale as crucibles, pipes, nozzles and tiles is considered.

  7. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection: Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Peter F.

    1982-10-08

    A consolidated reference of materials for downhole equipment used in geothermal energy exploitation is nearing completion. The reference is a summary of recent developments in the areas of tubular goods materials, highly alloyed metals, high temperature cements, high temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downwell pumps. A brief overview is presented in this paper.

  8. Workshop session on pros and cons for different target materials/corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Y.; Mansur, L.K.; Dai, Y.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Two of the originally planned workshop sessions, indicated by the titles on each side of the {open_quotes}/{close_quotes} in the above title were combined. The session was structured into four areas in which target material attributes were considered: nuclear properties; physical properties; compatibility; and liquid metal engineering/safety. Short presentations were either volunteered by participants or requested by the session organizers to help establish a background and stimulate discussion. G. Bauer, J. Takeda, T. Gabriel and S. Wender covered the first two areas; J. DiStefano, Y. Dai and Y. Orlov made presentations in the third area. O. Lielausis and R. Dressler spoke on the fourth area. L.K. Mansur served as moderator for the combined session. Although there was much discussion and some differences of opinion, the overall recommendations, considering all available factors, as distilled by this session`s organizers, are as follows. Choose Hg as the prime candidate target material to which most resources should be devoted. A strong alternate candidate is considered to exist in Pb-Bi eutectic. Other candidate materials such as Pb, Pb-Mg eutectic and Bi are weaker choices for various reasons, with Bi being the weakest.

  9. Study of materials to resist corrosion in condensing gas fired furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahtvee, T.; Khoo, S. W.; Schaus, O. O.

    1981-02-01

    Based on a thorough review of background information on the performance of materials in condensing gas fired furnace heat exchangers and in similar corrosive environments candidate materials were selected and tested on one of two identical test rigs built to provide the varying corrosive conditions encountered in an actual gas fired condensing system heat exchanger. The 32 different materials tested in a one month screening test included: mild, low alloy, galvanized, solder coated and CaCO3 dipped galvanized steel, porcelain, epoxy, teflon and nylon coated and alonized mild steel; austenitic, ferritic, low interstitial Ti stabilized ferritic, and high alloy stainless steels; aluminum alloy anodized and porcelain coated aluminum; copper and cupronickel alloys, solder coated copper; and titanium.

  10. Corrosion of structural materials by lead-based reactor coolants.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.; Leibowitz, L.; Maroni, V. A.; McDeavitt, S. M.; Raraz, A. G.

    2000-11-16

    Advanced nuclear reactor design has, in recent years, focused increasingly on the use of heavy-liquid-metal coolants, such as lead and lead-bismuth eutectic. Similarly, programs on accelerator-based transmutation systems have also considered the use of such coolants. Russian experience with heavy-metal coolants for nuclear reactors has lent credence to the validity of this approach. Of significant concern is the compatibility of structural materials with these coolants. We have used a thermal convection-based test method to allow exposure of candidate materials to molten lead and lead-bismuth flowing under a temperature gradient. The gradient was deemed essential in evaluating the behavior of the test materials in that should preferential dissolution of components of the test material occur we would expect dissolution in the hotter regions and deposition in the colder regions, thus promoting material transport. Results from the interactions of a Si-rich mild steel alloy, AISI S5, and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel, HT-9, with the molten lead-bismuth are presented.

  11. Corrosion behavior of Ni-based structural materials for electrolytic reduction in lithium molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Park, Sung Bin; Lee, Jong Hyeon; Hur, Jin Mok; Lee, Han Soo

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the corrosion behavior of new Ni-based structural materials was studied for electrolytic reduction after exposure to LiCl-Li 2O molten salt at 650 °C for 24-216 h under an oxidizing atmosphere. The new alloys with Ni, Cr, Al, Si, and Nb as the major components were melted at 1700 °C under an inert atmosphere. The melt was poured into a preheated metallic mold to prepare an as-cast alloy. The corrosion products and fine structures of the corroded specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscope (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion products of as cast and heat treated low Si/high Ti alloys were Cr 2O 3, NiCr 2O 4, Ni, NiO, and (Al,Nb,Ti)O 2; those of as cast and heat treated high Si/low Ti alloys were Cr 2O 3, NiCr 2O 4, Ni, and NiO. The corrosion layers of as cast and heat treated low Si/high Ti alloys were continuous and dense. However, those of as cast and heat treated high Si/low Ti alloys were discontinuous and cracked. Heat treated low Si/high Ti alloy showed the highest corrosion resistance among the examined alloys. The superior corrosion resistance of the heat treated low Si/high Ti alloy was attributed to the addition of an appropriate amount of Si, and the metallurgical evaluations were performed systematically.

  12. Coated silicon comprising material for protection against environmental corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Brian Thomas (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, an article is disclosed. The article comprises a gas turbine engine component substrate comprising a silicon material; and an environmental barrier coating overlying the substrate, wherein the environmental barrier coating comprises cerium oxide, and the cerium oxide reduces formation of silicate glass on the substrate upon exposure to corrodant sulfates.

  13. On the origin of dislocation loops in irradiated materials: A point of view from silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, Alain; Cherkashin, Nikolay

    2016-05-01

    Numerous dislocation loops are often observed in irradiated and nuclear materials, affecting many physical properties. The understanding of their origin and of their growth mechanism remains unclear rendering all modeling efforts elusive. In this paper, we remind the knowledge which has been gained during the last 20 years on the formation and growth of extrinsic dislocations loops in irradiated/implanted silicon. From the compilation of a large number of experimental results, a unified picture describing the thermal evolution of interstitial defects, from the di-interstitial stable at room temperature, to "magic-size" clusters then to rod-like defects and finally to large dislocation loops of two types has emerged. All these defects grow by Ostwald ripening, i.e. by interchanging the interstitial atoms they are composed of, and transform from one to the other driven by the resulting reduction of the defect formation energy. A model has been proposed and is now integrated into process simulators which quantitatively describes the thermal evolution of all these defects, based on pertinent formation energies. The influence of the proximity of free surfaces or other recombining interfaces can be integrated, allowing simulating the possible dissolution of defects. It is suggested that, beyond silicon, the same type of scenario may take place in many materials. Dislocation loops are just one, easily detectable among many, type of defects which forms during the growth of self-interstitials. They do not nucleate but result from the growth and transformation of smaller defects.

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Candidate Alloys for Supercritical Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, K.; Zillmer, A.; Licht, J.R.; Allen, T.R.; Anderson, M.H.; Tan, L.

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of metallic cladding and other core internal structures is critical to the success of the Generation IV Supercritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWR). The eventual materials selected will be chosen based on the combined corrosion, stress-corrosion, mechanical performance, and radiation stability properties. Among the materials being considered are austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels, and nickel-base alloys. This paper reports initial studies on the corrosion performance of the candidate alloys 316 austenitic stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Zircaloy-2, all exposed to supercritical water at 300-500 deg. C in a corrosion loop at the University of Wisconsin. Long-term corrosion performance of AISI 347, also a candidate austenitic steel, has also been examined by sectioning samples from a component that was exposed for a period of about 30 years in supercritical water at the Genoa 3 Supercritical Water fossil power plant located in Genoa, Wisconsin. (authors)

  15. Characterization of deposits and effect of deposits on corrosion of materials for MHD balance-of-plant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-12-01

    Candidate heat exchanger materials tested in the Low Mass Flow Train at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at Tullahoma, TN, were analyzed to evaluate their corrosion performances. Tube specimens obtained at each foot of the 14-ft-long U-bend tubes were analyzed for corrosion-scale morphologies, scale thicknesses, and internal penetration depths. Results developed on 1,500- and 2,000-h exposed specimens were correlated with exposure temperature. In addition, deposit materials collected at several locations in the CFFF were analyzed in detail to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the deposits and their influence on corrosion performance of tube materials.

  16. Assessment of Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion Potential in the International Space Station Internal Active Thermal Control System Heat Exchanger Materials: A 6-Momths Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Macuch, Patrick; McKrell, Thomas; VanDerSchijff, Ockert J.; Mitchell, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    The fluid in the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) of the International Space Station (ISS) is water based. The fluid in the ISS Laboratory Module and Node 1 initially contained a mix of water, phosphate (corrosion control), borate (pH buffer), and silver sulfate (Ag2SO4) (microbial control) at a pH of 9.5+/-0.5. Over time, the chemistry of the fluid changed. Fluid changes included a pH drop from 9.5 to 8.3 due to diffusion of carbon dioxide (CO2) through Teflon(reistered Trademark) (DuPont) hoses, increases in dissolved nickel (Ni) levels, deposition of silver (Ag) to metal surfaces, and precipitation of the phosphate (PO4) as nickel phosphate (NiPO4). The drop in pH and unavailability of a antimicrobial has provided an environment conducive to microbial growth. Microbial levels in the fluid have increased from >10 colony-forming units (CFUs)/100 ml to 10(exp 6) CFUs/100 ml. The heat exchangers in the IATCS loops are considered the weakest point in the loop because of the material thickness (=7 mil). It is made of a Ni-based braze filler/CRES 347. Results of a preliminary test performed at Hamilton Sundstrand indicated the possibility of pitting on this material at locations where Ag deposits were found. Later, tests have confirmed that chemical corrosion of the materials is a concern for this system. Accumulation of micro-organisms on surfaces (biofilm) can also result in material degradation and can amplify the damage caused by the chemical corrosion, known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). This paper will discuss the results of a 6-mo test performed to characterize and quantify the damage from microbial accumulation on the surface of the ISS/ATCS heat exchanger materials. The test was designed to quantify the damage to the materials under worst-case conditions with and without micro-organisms present at pH 8.3 and 9.5.

  17. Corrosion performance of materials for advanced combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Yanez-Herrero, M.; Fornasieri, C.

    1993-12-01

    Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that utilize coal as a feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces capable of operating at more elevated temperatures than those prevalent in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments necessitates development/application of advanced ceramic materials in these designs. This report characterizes the chemistry of coal-fired combustion environments over the wide temperature range that is of interest in these systems and discusses preliminary experimental results on several materials (alumina, Hexoloy, SiC/SiC, SiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, ZIRCONIA, INCONEL 677 and 617) with potential for application in these systems.

  18. Corrosion Processes of the CANDU Steam Generator Materials in the Presence of Silicon Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lucan, Dumitra; Fulger, Manuela; Velciu, Lucian; Lucan, Georgiana; Jinescu, Gheorghita

    2006-07-01

    The feedwater that enters the steam generators (SG) under normal operating conditions is extremely pure but, however, it contains low levels (generally in the {mu}g/l concentration range) of impurities such as iron, chloride, sulphate, silicate, etc. When water is converted into steam and exits the steam generator, the non-volatile impurities are left behind. As a result of their concentration, the bulk steam generator water is considerably higher than the one in the feedwater. Nevertheless, the concentrations of corrosive impurities are in general sufficiently low so that the bulk water is not significantly aggressive towards steam generator materials. The impurities and corrosion products existing in the steam generator concentrate in the porous deposits on the steam generator tubesheet. The chemical reactions that take place between the components of concentrated solutions generate an aggressive environment. The presence of this environment and of the tubesheet crevices lead to localized corrosion and thus the same tubes cannot ensure the heat transfer between the fluids of the primary and secondary circuits. Thus, it becomes necessary the understanding of the corrosion process that develops into SG secondary side. The purpose of this paper is the assessment of corrosion behavior of the tubes materials (Incoloy-800) at the normal secondary circuit parameters (temperature = 2600 deg C, pressure = 5.1 MPa). The testing environment was demineralized water containing silicon compounds, at a pH=9.5 regulated with morpholine and cyclohexyl-amine (all volatile treatment - AVT). The paper presents the results of metallographic examinations as well as the results of electrochemical measurements. (authors)

  19. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1988-11-04

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Engineered Materials Characterization Report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, Volume 3, Revision 1, Corrosion Data and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R D

    1998-04-01

    The Engineered Materials Characterization Report (EMCR) serves as a source of information on the properties of materials proposed as elements in the engineered barrier system (EBS) for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Volume 3 covered the corrosion data and modeling efforts. The present report is a revision to Volume 3 and updates information on the corrosion (and other degradation modes) behavior of candidate materials for the various components of the EBS. It also includes work on the performance modeling of these materials. Work is reported on metallic barriers, basket materials, packing/backfill/invert materials, and non-metallic materials.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

    1986-06-01

    Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented.

  2. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Korzan, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance.

  3. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  4. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  5. High-temperature corrosion of material based on silicon nitride and exposed to salts

    SciTech Connect

    Gogotski, Y.G.; Frantsevich, I.N.; Lavrenko, V.A.

    1985-05-01

    Materials based on silicon nitride or carbide have shown promise for use in manufacturing gas-turbine and diesel engine parts. This paper presents an investigation of the corrosion of a reaction-sintered material based on silicon nitride with the addition of 30% silicon carbide and 2% magnesium oxide, when exposed to melts of sodium chloride, sodium sulfide, or sea salt. The studies show that the material corrodes very little in sea salt or sodium chloride melts, but it is destroyed rapidly in a sodium sulfate melt.

  6. The stress corrosion resistance and the cryogenic temperature mechanical properties of annealed Nitronic 60 bar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion properties of annealed, straightened, and centerless ground Nitronic 60 stainless steel alloy bar material are presented. The mechanical properties of longitudinal specimens were evaluated at test temperatures from ambient to liquid hydrogen. The tensile test data indicated increasing strength with decreasing temperature to -196 C. Below liquid nitrogen temperature the smooth tensile and notched tensile strengths decreased slightly while the elongation and reduction of area decreased drastically. The Charpy V-notched impact energy decreased steadily with decreasing test temperature. Stress corrosion tests were performed on longitudinal tensile specimens and transverse C-ring specimens exposed to: alternate immersion in a 3.5% NaCl bath; humidity cabinet; and a 5% salt spray atmosphere. The longitudinal tensile specimens experienced no corrosive attack. Approximately 3/4 of the transverse C-rings exposed to alternate immersion and to salt spray experienced a pitting attack on the top and bottom ends. Additional stress corrosion tests were performed on transverse tensile specimens. No failures occurred in the 90% stressed specimens exposed for 90 days in the alternate immersion and salt spray environments

  7. Localized corrosion testing of CRA materials in elevated temperature sour gas environments

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, P.; Oldfield, J.W.; Al-Maslamani, M.

    1999-11-01

    An exposure test program has been undertaken to investigate the localized corrosion resistance of Alloys 28, 825, G3 and 625 in two simulated sour gas environments at 150 C. The chloride levels in these test environments, containing 30 psi (0.21 MPa) H{sub 2}S and 101 psi (0.70 MPa) CO{sub 2}, were 150 ppm and 30,000 ppm. The general corrosion rate of each material was found to be negligible in each test. Alloy 825 alone was susceptible to minor pitting and crevice initiation in the 150 ppm chloride environment. Increasing the chloride level to 30,000 ppm resulted in more severe crevice attack of Alloy 825 and crevice corrosion of Alloy 28. Alloys G3 and 625 were not susceptible to localized corrosion in either test environment. The exposure tests were supported by complementary electrochemical polarization curves in the low chloride environment. The curves did not exhibit clearly defined passive regions, which were masked by additional anodic current from the oxidation of H{sub 2}S.

  8. Control of molten salt corrosion of fusion structural materials by metallic beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, P.; Nishimura, H.; Terai, T.

    2009-04-01

    A series of tests have been performed between 2001 and 2006 at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research facility of the Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate chemical compatibility between the molten salt flibe (2LiF + BeF 2 in moles) and fusion structural materials once suitable fluoride potential control methods are established. The tests adopted metallic beryllium contact as main fluoride potential control, and the results have been published in recent years. A further step was to expose two specimens of low activation ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr-2W to static corrosion tests that include an active corrosion agent (hydrofluoric gas) in controlled conditions at 530 °C, and the results of the tests are presented in this paper. The results confirmed the expected correlation of the HF recovery with the concentration of metallic impurities dissolved in the salt because of specimen corrosion. The metals concentration dropped to levels close to the detectable limit when the beryllium rod was inserted and increased once the content of excess beryllium in the system had been consumed by HF reduction and specimen corrosion progressed. Metallographic analysis of the samples after 500 h exposure in reactive conditions showed evidence of the formation of unstable chromium oxide layers on the specimen's surface.

  9. Hot corrosion of ceramic-coating materials for industrial/utility gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Barkalow, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Furnace hot corrosion tests of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and other candidate ceramic coating materials were run under combinations of temperature, salt deposits, and gaseous environments know to cause severe hot corrosion of state-of-the-art metallic coatings for industrial/utility gas turbines. Specimens were free-standing ceramic coupons and ceramic-coated IN 792. X-ray fluorescence and diffraction data on free-standing YSZ coupons showed surface yttrium loss and cubic-to-monoclinic transformation as a result of exposure to liquid salt and SO/sub 3/. Greater destabilization was observed at the lower of two test temperatures (704 and 982/sup 0/C), and destabilization increased with increasing SO/sub 3/ pressure and V-containing salt deposits. The data suggest that hot corrosion of YSZ can occur by a type of acidic dissolution of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from the ZrO/sub 2/ solid solution. In spite of the greater surface destabilization at 704/sup 0/C, the bond coat and substrate of YSZ-coated IN 792 were not attacked at 704/sup 0/C but severely corroded at 982/sup 0/C. These results show that degradation of ceramic-coated metallic components can be more strongly influenced by the porosity of the microstructure and fluidity of the liquid salt than by the chemical stability of the ceramic coating material in the reactive environment. Other ceramic materials (SiO/sub 2/, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, ZrSiO/sub 2/, and mullite), concurrently exposed to the same conditions which produced significant destabilization of YSZ, showed no evidence of reaction at 704/sup 0/C but noticeable corrosion at 982/sup 0/C. Also, the high temperature corrosion was greater in air than in SO/sub 3/-containing gases. These trends suggest that hot corrosion of the silicon-containing ceramics was basic in nature, and such materials have potential for good resistance to chemical decomposition under the acidic conditions characteristics of industrial/utility gas turbines.

  10. Material transport via the emission of shear loops during void growth: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yi; Chen, Zengtao

    2016-06-01

    The growth of a nanovoid in single-crystal copper has been studied via molecular dynamics (MD) method. The objective is to build the correlation between material transport pattern and dislocation structures. MD results are examined by characterizing the material transport via the "relative displacement" of atoms, where the homogenous elastic deformation has been excluded. Through this novel approach, we are able to illustrate the feasibility of void growth induced by shear loops/curves. At a smaller scale, the formation and emission of shear loops/curves contribute to the local mass transport. At a larger scale, a new mechanism of void growth via frustum-like dislocation structure is revealed. A phenomenological description of void growth via frustum-like dislocation structure is also proposed.

  11. ACIDIC DEPOSITION AND THE CORROSION AND DETERIORATION OF MATERIALS IN THE ATMOSPHERE: A BIBLIOGRAPHY, 1880-1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bibliography contains more than 1300 article citations and abstracts on the effects of acidic deposition, air pollutants, and biological and meteorological factors on the corrosion and deterioration of materials in the atmosphere. The listing includes citations for the years ...

  12. Application of the thin electrolyte layer technique to corrosion testing of dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, Martin

    Proper simulation of the oral environment for the corrosion testing of dental materials is crucial for determining corrosion rates and mechanisms correctly. In this study, the thin electrolyte layer technique (TET) was characterized and employed to investigate the importance of the chemical composition of the testing environment on the outcome of electrochemical tests. The thickness of the electrolyte layer in TET is only 0.5 mm and contains only 20 muL of electrolyte. This arrangement simulates the physical characteristics of the oral environment and facilitates testing in human saliva. Oxygen availability for reduction on the sample surface was determined, using cathodic polarization of Pt in borate buffer, to be lower in TET than in traditional (bulk electrolyte) techniques. Appreciable differences were found during polarization experiments on 316 L SS in saline and artificial saliva. Oxygen content was found to play a significant role in the corrosivity of various species contained in artificial saliva. Potentiodynamic polarization employing human saliva in TET on 316L SS proved to be very different from tests performed in artificial saliva. This was believed to be due to the presence of organic species, specifically proteins, contained in human saliva. This was further confirmed by cyclic polarization and corrosion current measurements of four commercial nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloys with varying amounts of Be. For this phase of the experiment, artificial saliva (AS), AS with 1% albumin, AS with 1% of mucin and parotid human saliva were employed as electrolytes. The results obtained in the various electrolytes depended on the composition, microstructure, stability of passive film, and the presence of casting porosity of the alloys tested. Proteins had insignificant effect on alloys with highly stable passive films, whereas, corrosion rates increased substantially in those alloys with compromised passive film formation. Proteins, especially mucin, lowered the

  13. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  14. Corrosion and materials selection report update non-proprietary version. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, P.D.

    1984-06-01

    The revised Baseline design (dated 22 October, 1982) used most of the available information with regard to the corrosion, erosion and materials of construction. This information was collected through various programs conducted at the major coal liquefaction pilot plants, e.g. SRC-1 and SRC-2, H-Coal and EDS, and at various research laboratories. The selection of materials of construction was also based on certain basic assumptions with regard to the plant life and life of each type of equipment. Other selection criteria included various process considerations and economics. In cases where no data on corrosion and erosion was available, past experience, licensors' knowhow and engineering judgement, were utilized in the selection process. Beyond the date of publication of the revised Baseline document, additional data from various pilot plants and lab programs has been made available. On account of continuous review being performed by DOE and their subcontractors and consultants, a number of comments were forwarded to ICRC. These comments and latest developmental programs suggested several improvements in the design. This report consists of the following major sections: A discussion on corrosion/erosion related research and pilot plant programs; the materials selection criterion, including plant and equipment life, and various process considerations, are discussed in detail; copies of the materials diagrams from the Revised Baseline are attached; ICRC response to unresolved materials-related comments is included in the Appendix A; areas of concern and data gaps, with regard to the materials of construction are identified; and recommended areas of future research and development programs are listed.

  15. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  16. Internal Corrosion and Deposition Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the science of corrosion control and control of scaling in drinking water systems. Topics covered include: types of corrosion; physical, microbial and chemical factors influencing corrosion; corrosion of specific materials; direct ...

  17. Studies of Corrosion Resistant Materials Being Considered for High-Level Nuclear Waste Containment in Yucca Mountain Relevant Environments

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.; Ilevbare, G.; Estill, J.; Rebak, R.

    2001-12-09

    Containment of spent nuclear fuel and vitrified forms of high level nuclear waste require use of materials that are highly corrosion resistant to all of the anticipated environmental scenarios that can occur in a geological repository. Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is proposed for the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container at the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. A range of water compositions that may contact the outer barrier is under consideration, and a testing program is underway to characterize the forms of corrosion and to quantify the corrosion rates. Results from the testing support models for long term prediction of the performance of the container. Results obtained to date indicate a very low general corrosion rate for Alloy 22 and very high resistance to all forms of localized and environmentally assisted cracking in environments tested to date.

  18. High-temperature oxidation and corrosion of structural materials in molten chlorides.

    SciTech Connect

    Indacochea, J. E.; Smith, J. L.; Litko, K. R.; Karell, E. J.; Raraz, A. G.; Chemical Engineering

    2001-02-01

    A molten salt-based process for treatment of spent oxide fuels is under development at the Argonne National Laboratory. A major part of the development effort involves identification of corrosion-resistant structural materials for the process vessels. Coupons of two stainless steels, tantalum, and two Inconel alloys were submitted to a corrosion test in an argon atmosphere with 10% oxygen. The coupons were partially immersed in molten lithium chloride salt containing small amounts of lithium metal, lithium oxide, and lithium nitride. Two sets of coupons were tested, the first at 750{sup o}C for 30 days and the second at 650{sup o}C for 6 days. Coupons of the first set corroded completely. In the second set of coupons, all corroded to some extent, but Inconel 600 showed the best performance overall. The salt-exposed region generally showed the greatest corrosion in the other coupons. One of the 316L SS coupons was welded and the weld area was severely attacked.

  19. Corrosion in the Oil and Gas Industry: An Increasing Challenge for Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Teresa E.

    2013-08-01

    Important reserves of oil and gas, which are left to be discovered and produced, are mainly concentrated in challenging locations and under severe conditions [i.e., high pressure (HP)/high temperature (HT)]. The HP/HT plus the presence of aggressive environments mean a highly demanding scenario for tubes used in producing oil and gas [oil country tubular goods (OCTG)]. Material property requirements include high mechanical properties at ambient and high temperatures (e.g., as high up to 200-250°C). Additionally, if H2S is present, resistance to sulfide stress cracking may be required, depending also on other environmental conditions. Even without H2S, contents of CO2, chlorides, and high temperatures and pressures can represent a risk of high corrosion rates. The improvement of some of the required properties of the materials (e.g., steels) can mean the impairment of other properties. Consequently, a careful balance is required and limits exist for the individual modification of the properties. The present article focuses on the two main environmental deterioration problems in the oil and gas business: (I) sulfide stress cracking and (II) CO2 corrosion. A description of the acting mechanisms and the effect of environmental and material factors are presented. Selection criteria and current material limitations are also discussed.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ferritic Materials for Fossil Power Generation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Siefert, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steels Grades 23, 24, 91, and 92 have been widely implemented in the fossil fired industry for over two decades. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these materials with respect to mainstay Cr-Mo steels (such as Grades 11, 12 and 22) has not been properly assessed, particularly in consideration of recent reported issues of SCC in CSEF steels. This report details the results of Jones test exposures of a wide range of materials (Grades 11, 22, 23, 24, and 92), material conditions (as-received, improper heat treatments, normalized, weldments) and environments (salt fog; tube cleaning environments including decreasing, scale removal, and passivation; and high temperature water) to compare the susceptibility to cracking of these steels. In the as-received (normalized and tempered) condition, none of these materials are susceptible to SCC in the environments examined. However, in the hardened condition, certain combinations of environment and alloy reveal substantial SCC susceptibility.

  1. Engineered materials characterization report, volume 3 - corrosion data and modeling update for viability assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R D

    1998-06-30

    This Engineered Materials Characterization Report (EMCR), Volume 3, discusses in considerable detail the work of the past 18 months on testing the candidate materials proposed for the waste-package (WP) container and on modeling the performance of those materials in the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository setting This report was prepared as an update of information and serves as one of the supporting documents to the Viability Assessment (VA) of the Yucca Mountain Project. Previous versions of the EMCR have provided a history and background of container-materials selection and evaluation (Volume I), a compilation of physical and mechanical properties for the WP design effort (Volume 2), and corrosion-test data and performance-modeling activities (Volume 3). Because the information in Volumes 1 and 2 is still largely current, those volumes are not being revised. As new information becomes available in the testing and modeling efforts, Volume 3 is periodically updated to include that information.

  2. Atmospheric corrosion of batten and enclosure materials for flat-plate solar collectors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.F.

    1983-04-01

    As part of the Solar Reliability and Materials Program at Argonne National Laboratory, the atmospheric corrosion of candidate batten and enclosure materials were tested on outdoor racks parallel to the tilted solar-collected panels at nine National Solar Data Network (NSDN) sites, loceated in mild marine, mild industrial, and rural environments. The candidate materials evaluated include galvanized steel (G-90), aluminized steel (Type 2), aluminum (6061), and white polyester painted steel. Data analyses predicted that all the first three materials will last more than 20 years in the nine sites tested. However, repainting of the painted steel is probably needed within five years in a mild marine environment and five to ten years in a mild industrial or rural environment.

  3. Preliminary corrosion studies of candidate materials for supercritical water oxidation reactor systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Orzalli, J.C.

    1994-05-01

    An experimental test facility has been designed and constructed for investigation of the corrosion behavior of candidate materials in a supercritical water oxidation environment. The high temperatures (500 deg C) and high pressures (300 atm) required in this process, made the experimental apparatus construction and control a complex engineering problem. The facility consists of two systems. The first is an exposure autoclave internal volume 850 ml, with associated monitoring and control systems for conducting long term exposure testing of test coupons and U-bends. The second is an electrochemical cell with a potentiostat and frequency response analyzer for conducting Electronic Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in the supercritical water environment. Exposure testing of three candidate materials; Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276 and 316 stainless steel was conducted at three temperature regimes corresponding to three locations in a SCWO waste treatment system. Preliminary results are presented in an environment of demineralized water as a control. Experimental results indicate evidence of a film on the materials characterized by slight weight gain. Light and confocal laser light microscopic evaluations revealed the presence of localized pitting corrosion on the Inconel 625.

  4. Stability and corrosion testing of a high temperature phase change material for CSP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Bell, Stuart; Tay, Steven; Will, Geoffrey; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the stability and corrosion testing results of a candidate high temperature phase change material (PCM) for potential use in concentrating solar power applications. The investigated PCM is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and Na2CO3 and both are low cost materials. This PCM has a melting temperature of 635 °C and a relatively high latent heat of fusion of 308.1 J/g. The testing was performed by means of an electric furnace subjected to 150 melt-freeze cycles between 600 °C and 650 °C. The results showed that this PCM candidate has no obvious decomposition up to 650 °C after 150 cycles and stainless steel 316 potentially can be used as the containment material under the minimized oxygen atmosphere.

  5. Study of materials to resist corrosion in condensing gas-fired furnaces. Final report Oct 79-Dec 81

    SciTech Connect

    Lahtvee, T.; Schaus, O.O.

    1982-02-01

    Based on a thorough review of background information on the performance of materials in condensing gas-fired heat exchangers and similar corrosive environments, candidate materials were examined on test equipment built to provide the varying corrosive conditions encountered in actual gas-fired condensing system heat exchangers. The 32 different materials tested in a one month screening test included: mild, low alloy, galvanized, solder coated steel, porcelain, epoxy, teflon and nylon coated and alonized mild steel; austenitic, ferritic, low interstitial Ti stabilized ferritic, and high alloy stainless steels; aluminum alloys, anodized and porcelain coated aluminum; copper and cupronickel alloys, solder coated copper; and titanium.

  6. Corrosion and environmental-mechanical characterization of iron-base nuclear waste package structural barrier materials. Annual report, FY 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.; Haberman, J.H.; Pitman, S.G.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Sigalla, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep underground repositories may require the development of waste packages that will keep the radioisotopes contained for up to 1000 y. A number of iron-base materials are being considered for the structural barrier members of waste packages. Their uniform and nonuniform (pitting and intergranular) corrosion behavior and their resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in aqueous environments relevant to salt media are under study at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of the work is to provide data for a materials degradation model that can ultimately be used to predict the effective lifetime of a waste package overpack in the actual repository environment. The corrosion behavior of the candidate materials was investigated in simulated intrusion brine (essentially NaCl) in flowing autoclave tests at 150/sup 0/C, and in combinations of intrusion/inclusion (high-Mg) brine environments in moist salt tests, also at 150/sup 0/C. Studies utilizing a /sup 60/Co irradiation facility were performed to determine the corrosion resistance of the candidate materials to products of brine radiolysis at dose rates of 2 x 10/sup 3/ and 1 x 10/sup 5/ rad/h and a temperature of 150/sup 0/C. These irradiation-corrosion tests were ''overtests,'' as the irradiation intensities employed were 10 to 1000 times as high as those expected at the surface of a thick-walled waste package. With the exception of the high general corrosion rates found in the tests using moist salt containing high-Mg brines, the ferrous materials exhibited a degree of corrosion resistance that indicates a potentially satisfactory application to waste package structural barrier members in a salt repository environment.

  7. Crack Initiation Life of Materials Under Combined Pitting Corrosion and Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriraman, M. R.; Pidaparti, R. M.

    2010-02-01

    Pitting corrosion triggered damage is responsible for the degradation of many metallic materials affecting structural integrity. As pitting and crack initiation processes govern the overall life of such structures and components, particularly at nominal cyclic stresses, there is a need to develop simple models to estimate crack initiation life of materials. This paper presents a simple deterministic model that considers the effect of cyclic stressing under pitting corrosion conditions. The developed model is validated on an aluminum alloy 2024-T3, and 12% Cr stainless steel used in aircraft and steam turbines, respectively. The predicted critical pit depth values are in fair agreement with the limited experimental data available in the literature. The model indicates that at high stresses, the crack initiation can occur very rapidly even from relatively small pits. The crack initiation life predictions when compared with the available experimental data, suggest a probable stress-level dependency with regard to the form and extent of the influence of cyclic stresses on pit growth and subsequent crack formation.

  8. Corrosion and corrosion prevention in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mom, A. J. A.; Kolkman, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions governing the corrosion behavior in gas turbines are surveyed. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, the presence of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and fuel quality are discussed. Electromechanical corrosion at relatively low temperature in compressors; oxidation; and hot corrosion (sulfidation) at high temperature in turbines are considered. Corrosion prevention by washing and rinsing, fueld additives, and corrosion resistant materials and coatings are reviewed.

  9. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  10. Evaluation of Corrosion of Aluminum Based Reactor Fuel Cladding Materials During Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.

    1999-10-21

    This report provides an evaluation of the corrosion behavior of aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium alloys at conditions relevant to dry storage. The details of the corrosion program are described and the results to date are discussed.

  11. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E.

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  12. Corrosion resistance and behavior of construction materials exposed to dilute sulfuric acid at elevated temperatures under static conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.

    1994-10-01

    Laboratory investigation has been undertaken to determine the electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of various construction materials in a simulated hydrolysis environment (5 wt % sulfuric acid) at temperatures ranging from 90 to 220C. Tests were performed in an autoclave-type electrochemical cell. The corrosion behavior of the test materials was determined using computer-controlled DC potentiodynamic polarization. Corrosion rates of the test materials were determined using AC impedance techniques. Among the stainless steels tested, only alloy N08026 (Carpenter 20Mo-6) performed satisfactory up to a temperature of 100C. The alloy passivated spontaneously in the environment and corroded at a rate of less than 2 mpy. None of the stainless steels tested could be used at 120{degrees}C or above. A number of nickel-based alloys tested had good corrosion resistance up to 100C, but their corrosion rate exceeded 2 mpy at higher temperatures. Zirconium alloys were satisfactory up to 180C. Only tantalum and a tantalum-niobium alloy were satisfactory up to 220C.

  13. Corrosion aspects of Ni-Cr-Fe based and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R. S.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews corrosion related issues of Ni-Cr-Fe based (in a general sense) and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials for nuclear power plants those have been dealt with for last more than four decades along with some updated information on corrosion research. The materials include austenitic stainless steels (SSs), Alloy 600, Monel 400, Alloy 800 and Alloy 690. Compatibility related issues of these alloys are briefly discussed along with the alloy chemistry and microstructure. For austenitic SSs, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in high temperature aqueous environments is discussed. For Alloy 600, intergranular cracking in high temperature water including hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking is highlighted along with the interactions of material in various environments. In case of Monel 400, intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion at ambient temperature and SCC behaviour at elevated temperature are briefly described. For Alloy 800, the discussion covers SCC behaviour, surface characterization and microstructural aspects of pitting, whereas hydrogen-related issues are also highlighted for Alloy 690.

  14. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  15. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  16. A compact square loop patch antenna on high dielectric ceramic-PTFE composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. Habib; Islam, M. T.

    2013-10-01

    Design and prototyping of a low profile, compact square loop microstrip line fed miniature patch antenna on 1.9 mm thick ceramic-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) high dielectric composite material substrate is presented in this paper. The measured -10 dB return loss bandwidths of the antenna are 300 MHz (0.75-1.05 GHz) and 800 MHz (2.4-3.2 GHz) with 3.4 dBi, 8.86 dBi and 7.42 dBi at 900 MHz, 2.5 GHz and 3.0 GHz, respectively. The measured symmetric and almost stable radiation pattern makes the proposed antenna suitable for RFID, GSM, ZIGBEE, WBAN, LR-WPAN etc. integrated mobile devices.

  17. Variable frequency pulsed phase-locked loop method for measuring material nonlinearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    1992-01-01

    The design of a pressure vessel with an isothermal volume to measure changes in the natural velocities of material continuously over a wide temperature range is reported. Highly sensitive pulsed phase-locked loop technology is used to measure the natural velocity of fatigued aluminum 2024-T4 as a function of pressure at different temperatures. Second derivative variations with respect to pressure and temperature are found to exhibit order-of-magnitude changes at a gauge pressure near 950 kPa at room temperature. This indicates a significant change in certain combinations of second-order and higher-order elastic constants at relatively low pressures. Fractional frequency change as a function of applied pressure for aluminum 2024-T4 with fatigue damage is illustrated.

  18. Yucca Mountain project canister material corrosion studies as applied to the electrometallurgical treatment metallic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, D.D.

    1996-11-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository. As part of the repository assessment activities, candidate materials are being tested for possible use as construction materials for waste package containers. A large portion of this testing effort is focused on determining the long range corrosion properties, in a Yucca Mountain environment, for those materials being considered. Along similar lines, Argonne National Laboratory is testing a metallic alloy waste form that also is scheduled for disposal in a geologic repository, like Yucca Mountain. Due to the fact that Argonne`s waste form will require performance testing for an environment similar to what Yucca Mountain canister materials will require, this report was constructed to focus on the types of tests that have been conducted on candidate Yucca Mountain canister materials along with some of the results from these tests. Additionally, this report will discuss testing of Argonne`s metal waste form in light of the Yucca Mountain activities.

  19. Materials Characterization Center state-of-the-art report on corrosion data pertaining to metallic barriers for nuclear-waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, M.D.

    1982-10-01

    A compilation of published corrosion data on metals that have been suggested as canisters and overpack materials is presented. The data were categorized according to the solutions used in testing and divided into two parts: high-ionic strength solutions (such as seawater and brine) and low-ionic-strength waters (such as basalt and tuff waters). This distinction was made primarily because of the general difference in aggressiveness of these solutions with respect to general corrosion. A considerable amount of data indicated that titanium alloys have acceptably low uniform corrosion rates in anticipated repository sites; the other possible corrosion failure modes for titanium alloys, such as stress corrosion cracking and delayed failure due to hydrogen, have not been sufficiently studied to make any similar conclusions about lifetime with respect to these particular degradation processes. Other data suggested that iron-base alloys are sufficiently resistant to corrosion in basalt and tuff waters, although the effects of radiation and radiation combined with elevated temperature have not been reported in enough detail to conclusively qualify iron-base alloys for any particular barrier thickness in regard to uniform corrosion rate. The effect of overpack size on corrosion rate has been given little attention. A review of long-term underground data indicated that temperature and accessibility to oxygen were too different for deep geologic repositories to make the underground corrosion data directly applicable. However, the characteristics of corrosion attack, statistical treatment of data, and kinetics of corrosion showed that corrosion proceeds in a systematic and predictable way.

  20. The analytical basis for the resonances and anti-resonances of loop antennas and meta-material ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, A. F.; White, T. P.; Maksymov, I. S.; Catchpole, K. R.

    2012-11-01

    Interest in the electromagnetic properties of loop structures has surged with the recent appearance of split-ring resonator meta-materials (SRRs) and nano-antennas. Understanding the resonances, anti-resonances, and harmonics of these loops is key to understanding their response to a wide range of excitation wavelengths. We present the classical analytical solution for the input impedance of a loop structure with circumference on the order of the wavelength, and we show how to identify these resonances from the function. We transform the classical solution into a new RLC formulation and show that each natural mode of the loop can be represented as a series resonant circuit, such that the full response function can be resolved by placing all of these circuits in parallel. We show how this formulation applies to SRRs.

  1. Corrosion of high-temperature materials in AFBC environments. Part 2: 4500-h tests

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, T.G.; DeVan, J.H.

    1981-08-01

    Candidate heat exchanger tube materials were tested for times to 4500 h in a small atmospheric-pressure fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) operated by the FluiDyne Engineering Corporation of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The materialso included alloy 800H; types 304, 310, and 316 stainless steel; and aluminized alloy 800H and type 310 stainless steel. These air-cooled tubes were exposed to the AFBC environment with wall temperatures ranging from 820 to 875/sup 0/C, a Ca/S molar ratio of 3.3 to 5.3, 2.5 to 3.5% excess O/sub 2/, and a fluidizing velocity of 0.7 m/s (2.3 fps). A set of low-temperature tubes was also included in the test for the final 3000-h period. These tubes were composites of 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel and type 304 stainless steel and were air-cooled to temperatures in the range 480 to 590/sup 0/C. Tubes were removed at intermediate times for metallographic examination. In general, the materials performed well. With one exception, metal wastage was at the lower limit of detection and intergranular corrosion was not severe. Most of the high-temperature samples, however, contained subsurface specks of metal sulfides, primarily of manganese, extending to depths of about 50 ..mu..m. The exception to the good performance noted above was a type 316 stainless steel high-temperature tube exposed for the final 3000-h portion of the 4500-h test. This tube suffered severe sulfidation-oxidation over most of its surface. The absence of such attack on eight other type 316 stainless steel tubes indicated that the position of the affected tube in the bed may have been a more significant corrosion factor than the steel composition per se.

  2. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2009-03-16

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  3. Aircraft Materials, Processes, Cleaning and Corrosion Control (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 1 (Power and Frame): 9073.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the beginning student with the basic concepts common to aircraft materials and processes, together with the requirements of proper cleaning and corrosion control as outlined by the Federal Aviation Agency. The aviation airframe and powerplant maintenance technician is…

  4. Oxidation/corrosion of metallic and ceramic materials in an aluminum remelt furnace. [For fluidized bed waste heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.; Jones, P.J.

    1985-12-01

    Both metallic alloys and ceramic materials are candidates for the distributor plate and other components of fluidized bed waste heat recovery (FBWHR) systems. Eleven Fe-, Ni-, and Co-base alloys were exposed to air at elevated temperatures in laboratory furnaces and to flue gases in an aluminum remelt furnace to assess their resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Four SiC ceramics and two oxide ceramics were also tested in the aluminum remelt furnace. Some alloys were coated with aluminum or SiO2 by commercial processes in an effort to enhance their oxidation and corrosion resistance.

  5. Silicon carbide as an oxidation-resistant high-temperature material. 1: Oxidation and heat corrosion behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, J.

    1981-01-01

    The oxidation and corrosion behavior of SiC (in the form of a SiC powder) and hot-pressed and reaction-bound material were studied. The excellent stability of SiC in an oxidizing atmosphere is due to the development of protective SiO2 coatings. Any changes in these protective layers (e.g., due to impurities, reaction with corrosive media, high porosity of SiC, etc.) lead in most cases to increased rates of oxidation and thus restrict the field of SiC application.

  6. Corrosion behavior and interfacial resistivity of bipolar plate materials under simulated molten carbonate fuel cell conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeler, A. C.; Kaun, T. D.; Bloom, I.; Lanagan, M.; Krumpelt, M.

    2000-03-01

    A material is needed for bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) that combines the low oxide resistivity of 316L stainless steel (SS) with the low corrosion rate of the type 310 SS. We tested a group of materials that included Nitronic 50 SS and a newly developed high-temperature nickel-rich alloy, having chromium contents ranging from 16 to 31 wt %. Our results indicate that chromium content is the primary determinant of oxide scale composition and resistivity. In the MCFC cathode compartment, all tested alloys formed a duplex structure with an inner Cr-rich layer and an outer Fe-rich one. The composition of the inner Cr-rich layer was determined by the chromium content of the base alloy and has a controlling effect on scale resistivity. Oxide scale resistivity was measured for three electrolyte compositions: Li/K, Li/Na, and newly developed (Li, Na, Ca, Ba) carbonates. Changes in the physical/mechanical properties (spallation/cracking) in the oxide scale of 316L SS provided an understanding of its resistivity fluctuations over time.

  7. Corrosion behavior and interfacial resistivity of bipolar plate materials under molten carbonate fuel cell cathode conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeler, A.C.; Kaun, T.D.; Bloom, I.; Lanagan, M.; Krumpelt, M.

    2000-03-01

    A material is needed for bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) that combines the low oxide resistivity of 316L stainless steel (SS) with the low corrosion rate of the type 310 SS. The authors tested a group of materials that included Nitronic 50 SS and a newly developed high-temperature nickel-rich alloy, having chromium contents ranging from 16 to 31 wt %. Their results indicate that chromium content is the primary determinant of oxide scale composition and resistivity. In the MCFC cathode compartment, all tested alloys formed a duplex structure with an inner Cr-rich layer and an outer Fe-rich one. The composition of the inner Cr-rich layer was determined by the chromium content of the base alloy and has a controlling effect on scale resistivity. Oxide scale resistivity was measured for three electrolyte compositions: Li/K, Li/Na, and newly developed (Li, Na, Ca, Ba) carbonates. Changes in the physical/mechanical properties (spallation/cracking) in the oxide scale of 316L SS provided an understanding of its resistivity fluctuations over time.

  8. Specific corrosion product on interior surface of a bronze wine vessel with loop-handle and its growth mechanism, Shang Dynasty, China

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yang; Bao Zhirong; Wu Taotao; Jiang, Junchun; Chen Guantao; Pan Chunxu

    2012-06-15

    In this paper, a kind of specific stalactitic product was found on the interior surface of a covered bronze wine vessel with loop-handle (Chinese name is you), which was fabricated in Shang Dynasty (1700 B.C.-1100 B.C.) and now is collected in Xiaogan Museum, Hubei province of China. The microstructures of the product were characterized systematically by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and Raman microscopy. The experimental results revealed that the product belonged to a kind of malachite with high purity and high crystallinity. The growth of the product was considered to be a possible reason that the vessel was overly airtight within a museum display cabinet besides a lid of the vessel, which made the excess of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} gas concentrations inside the vessel during long-term storage. This corrosion product is very harmful to bronze cultural relics, because of a large amount of copper consumption from the matrix which will reduce its life. The growth mechanism of the specific stalactitic product and the suggestions for preservation of the similar bronze relics in museum were proposed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stalactitic product was the high purity and good crystallinity malachite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its growth was related to the excess of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} gas concentrations in museum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is harmful to the bronzes, because copper will be consumed from the matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The suggestions for preservation of the similar bronzes in museum were proposed.

  9. Erosion/corrosion of turbine airfoil materials in the high-velocity effluent of a pressurized fluidized coal combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellars, G. R.; Rowe, A. P.; Lowell, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Four candidate turbine airfoil superalloys were exposed to the effluent of a pressurized fluidized bed with a solids loading of 2 to 4 g/scm for up to 100 hours at two gas velocities, 150 and 270 m/sec, and two temperatures, 730 deg and 795 C. Under these conditions, both erosion and corrosion occurred. The damaged specimens were examined by cross-section measurements, scanning electron and light microscopy, and X-ray analysis to evaluate the effects of temperature, velocity, particle loading, and alloy material. Results indicate that for a given solids loading the extent of erosion is primarily dependent on gas velocity. Corrosion occurred only at the higher temperature. There was little difference in the erosion/corrosion damage to the four alloys tested under these severe conditions.

  10. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  11. Chemical and material studies to understand the source of corrosion in the Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor (GSTR) tank liner

    SciTech Connect

    Rusling, D.H.; Millard, H.T. Jr.; Heifer, P.G.; Perryman, R.E.; Smith, W.L.

    1988-07-01

    Corrosion damage to the aluminum tank liner of the GSTR reactor was discovered and samples of various materials were collected for chemical and mineralogical analyses. The following scenario for the corrosion was suggested: 1. Cyclical temperature changes caused the tank liner to change size repeatedly. It extruded tar as it expanded and created voids as it contracted. 2. Hydrostatic pressure forced ground water through openings in the concrete into voids near the bottom of the tank, and overflow introduced tank water at the top of the tank. 3. The expansion-contraction cycle moved the water around the complex, interconnecting systems of voids and, in some locations, caused the tar-to-aluminum bond to fail. 4. Chemical interactions of the water with the tar and concrete supplied the elements capable of corroding the aluminum (e.g., Zn, Cu). 5. The corrosive solution has reacted with the aluminum over the lifetime of the reactor to produce the present corrosion damage. 6. As corrosion pits became holes, reactor tank water entered the voids.

  12. Increased corrosion resistance of stent materials by converting current surface film of polycrystalline oxide into amorphous oxide.

    PubMed

    Shih, C C; Lin, S J; Chung, K H; Chen, Y L; Su, Y Y

    2000-11-01

    Current efforts of new stent technology have been aimed largely at the improvement of intravascular stent biocompatibility. Among the chemical characteristics of metallic stents, surface oxide corrosion properties are paramount. Using our unique technique, the currently marketed 316 L stainless steel and nitinol stent wires covered with polycrystalline oxide were chemically etched and then passivated to form amorphous oxide. Excellent metallic-stent corrosion resistance with an amorphous oxide surface was demonstrated in our previous in vitro study. For in vivo validation, we compared the corrosion behavior of different oxide surfaces on various forms of test wires in the abdominal aorta of mongrel dogs using open-circuit potential and cyclic anodic polarization measurements. After conduction, the retrieved test wires were observed under scanning electron microscope. No passivity breakdown was found for wires covered with amorphous oxide, while wires with polycrystalline oxide showed breakdown at potentials between +0.2 to + 0.6 V. It has been proven that severe pitting or crevice corrosion occurred on the surface of polycrystalline oxide, while the surface of amorphous oxide was free of degradations in our experiment. We have demonstrated that this amorphous oxide coating on metallic material provides better corrosion resistance, not only in vitro but also in vivo, and it is superior not only in strength safety but also in medical device biocompatibility. PMID:10951371

  13. Materials corrosion in molten LiF-NaF-KF eutectic salt under different reduction-oxidation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, R. S.; Cheng, W. J.; Anderson, M. H.; Sridharan, K.; Wang, C. J.; Allen, T. R.

    2012-07-01

    Molten fluoride salts such as FLiNaK (LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol %) have been proposed for use as secondary reactor coolants, media for transfer of high temperature process heat from nuclear reactors to chemical plants, and for concentrated solar power thermal energy storage. In molten fluoride salts, passive oxide films are chemically unstable, and corrosion is driven largely by the thermodynamically driven dissolution of alloying elements into the molten salt environment. Two alloys, Hastelloy{sup R} N and 316L stainless steel were exposed to molten FLiNaK salt in a 316L stainless steel crucible under argon cover gas for 1000 hours at 850 deg. C. Graphite was present in some of the crucibles with the goal of studying corrosion behavior of relevant reactor material combinations. In addition, a technique to reduce alloy corrosion through modification of the reduction-oxidation state was tested by the inclusion of zirconium to the system. Corrosion of 316L stainless steel was noted to occur primarily through surface depletion of chromium, an effect that was enhanced by the presence of graphite. Hastelloy{sup R} N experienced weight gain through electrochemical plating of corrosion products derived from the 316L stainless steel crucible. In the presence of zirconium, both alloys gained weight through plating of zirconium and as a result formed intermetallic layers. (authors)

  14. Pitting, crevice and galvanic corrosion of REX stainless-steel/CoCr orthopedic implant material.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Blatter, A; Meyer, J M

    2002-08-01

    The corrosion behavior of surgical implant CoCr alloy and REX 734 steel has been investigated. The pitting or crevice corrosion potentials have been determined to reach values as high as 500 mV vs. SCE for CoCr and 450 mV vs. SCE for REX 734. The galvanic corrosion behavior of CoCr/REX 734 couples has been evaluated with various electrochemical techniques. The measurement of the corrosion current of the galvanic couple as well as its prediction by applying mixed potential theories on measured potentiodynamic polarization curves revealed low galvanic currents in the range of nanoamperes. PMID:12099292

  15. MaTrace: tracing the fate of materials over time and across products in open-loop recycling.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichiro; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2014-07-01

    Even for metals, open-loop recycling is more common than closed-loop recycling due, among other factors, to the degradation of quality in the end-of-life (EoL) phase. Open-loop recycling is subject to loss of functionality of original materials, dissipation in forms that are difficult to recover, and recovered metals might need dilution with primary metals to meet quality requirements. Sustainable management of metal resources calls for the minimization of these losses. Imperative to this is quantitative tracking of the fate of materials across different stages, products, and losses. A new input-output analysis (IO) based model of dynamic material flow analysis (MFA) is presented that can trace the fate of materials over time and across products in open-loop recycling taking explicit consideration of losses and the quality of scrap into account. Application to car steel recovered from EoL vehicles (ELV) showed that after 50 years around 80% of the steel is used in products, mostly buildings and civil engineering (infrastructure), with the rest mostly resided in unrecovered obsolete infrastructure and refinery losses. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of changes in product lifespan, and the quality of scrap. PMID:24872019

  16. Preparations and properties of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This short review describes various types of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials. It is concerned with synthetic additives classified according to their functional groups; silicone compounds, carboxylic acids and dibasic acids, esters, Diels-Alder adducts, various polymers, nitrogen compounds, phosphoric esters, phosphonic acids, and others. Testing methods for water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials are described for a practical application in a laboratory. PMID:18075217

  17. Novel methods and self-reinforced composite materials for assessment and prevention of mechanically assisted corrosion in modular implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Eric S.

    Novel methods for assessing the electrochemical and micromechanical performance of modular tapers were evaluated, and self-reinforced composite materials were developed for their potential to prevent the onset of mechanically assisted corrosion in modular taper devices. A study of the seating and taper locking mechanics of modular taper samples was conducted, and the effect on taper engagement strength of seating load, loading rate, taper moisture, and taper design/material combination was studied. The load-displacement behavior was captured during seating, and the subsequent pull off load was correlated to seating displacement, seating energy, and seating load. The primary factor affecting taper engagement strength was seating load, and loading rate and design/material factors did not have a significant impact on the quality of the taper engagement. Next, the effect of variation of 7 different design, material, and surgical factors on the fretting corrosion and micromechanical behavior during incremental cyclic fretting corrosion testing was examined using a design of experiments matrix. Seating load and head offset length were the most influential factors affecting fretting corrosion, with low seating loads and high head offsets giving rise to increased currents during sequentially incremented cyclic loads. Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) fibers were produced, and the effects of varying draw down ratio, molecular weight, and post-spinning treatment on the structural and mechanical properties of the fibers were studied. Highly drawn fibers showed the highest increase in molecular orientation and mechanical properties. PEEK fibers were then utilized in the design and fabrication of self-reinforced composite PEEK (SRC-PEEK) thin film composites, and self-reinforced composite ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (SRC-PE) produced from Spectra fiber was also introduced. Pin on disk studies were employed to understand the potential of both of these SRC materials to

  18. Corrosion of high-density kinetic-energy penetrator materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zabielski, C.V.; Levy, M.

    1992-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of DU-3/4% Ti and DU-2% Mo alloys was assessed by electrochemical polarization techniques and exposure to both 5% salt fog at 35 deg C and a 95% relative humidity at 45 deg C. The efficacy of an ion vapor deposited aluminum coating in mitigating the corrosion of these alloys was also assessed.

  19. The initiation of material corrosion in semicritical and supercritical aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Boukis, N.; Kritzer, P.; Schacht, M.; Dinjus, E.

    1999-11-01

    In recent years, a lot of work has been performed to interpret corrosion during the process of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO). For a better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms, the initiation processes of corrosion have to be known. The corrosion resistance of two alumina ceramics and sapphire in hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions was investigated at T = 240 C -- 500 C and p = 27 MPa. For the alumina ceramics, intergranular corrosion and dissolution of the grains were identified as corrosion mechanisms. The corrosion experiments with the nickel-base alloy 625 (UNS N06625) and its main constituents nickel, chromium, and molybdenum were performed in oxygenated HCl solutions at T = 350 C and p = 24 MPa. Nickel and molybdenum showed severe weight loss after only 5 h of reaction. The attack on chromium started with grain boundary etching and proceeded via the formation of thick, spalling oxide layers on the surface. Initial corrosion phenomena observed on alloy 625 were intergranular attack and pit formation. At longer reaction times, a complete surface attack was observed.

  20. Study of materials to resist corrosion in condensing gas fired furnaces. Annual report Oct 79-Oct 80

    SciTech Connect

    Lahtvee, T.; Khoo, S.W.; Schaus, O.O.

    1981-02-01

    Based on a thorough review of background information on the performance of materials in condensing gas-fired furnace heat exchangers and in similar corrosive environments, candidate materials were selected and tested on one of two identical test rigs built to provide the varying corrosive conditions encountered in an actual gas-fired condensing system heat exchanger. The 32 different materials tested in a one month screening test included: mild, low alloy, galvanized, solder coated and CaCO3 dipped galvanized steel, porcelain, epoxy, teflon and nylon coated and alonized mild steel; austenitic, ferritic, low interstitial Ti stabilized ferritic, and high alloy stainless steels; aluminum alloy anodized and porcelain coated aluminum; copper and cupronickel alloys, solder coated copper; and titanium.

  1. Corrosion investigations on zircaloy-4 and titanium dissolver materials for MOX fuel dissolution in concentrated nitric acid containing fluoride ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraj, J.; Krishnaveni, P.; Krishna, D. Nanda Gopala; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2016-05-01

    Aqueous reprocessing of plutonium-rich mixed oxide fuels require fluoride as a dissolution catalyst in boiling nitric acid for an effective dissolution of the spent fuel. High corrosion rates were obtained for the candidate dissolver materials zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) and commercial pure titanium (CP-Ti grade 2) in boiling 11.5 M HNO3 + 0.05 M NaF. Complexing the fluoride ions either with Al(NO3)3 or ZrO(NO3)2 aided in decreasing the corrosion rates of Zr-4 and CP-Ti. From the obtained corrosion rates it is concluded that CP-Ti is a better dissolver material than Zr-4 for extended service life in boiling 11.5 M HNO3 + 0.05 M NaF, when complexed with 0.15 M ZrO(NO3)2. XPS analysis confirmed the presence of TiO2 and absence of fluoride on the surface of CP-Ti samples, indicating that effective complexation had occurred in solution leading to passivation of the metal and imparting high corrosion resistance.

  2. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was

  3. Experience with IN 939 as a hot corrosion resistant turbine vane material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.; Bauer, R.; Grunling, H.W.; Staubli, M.

    1984-06-01

    For stationary gas turbine vanes IN 939 was evaluated very thoroughly in Europe as a promising hot corrosion resistant nickel base alloy. This paper shows examples of properties and behavior of IN 939 from literature and from actual application in stationary gas turbines. After long-term operation in stationary gas turbines vanes are analysed to show the type of oxide scale formation, the hot corrosion attack and phase stability. The alloy IN 939 exhibited excellent hot corrosion resistance under severe environmental conditions comparable to that of commercial hot corrosion protective coatings. Phases are described developed after casting and during heat treatment and sensitivity towards ..gamma..-phase formation is briefly discussed. Creep and fatique data of IN 939 are compared with IN 738 LC as well as the hot corrosion behavior.

  4. Comparisons of a Constrained Least Squares Model versus Human-in-the-Loop for Spectral Unmixing to Determine Material Type of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, Kira J.; Rapp, Jason; Bedard, Donald; Seitzer, Patrick; Cardona, Tommaso; Cowardin, Heather; Barker, Ed; Lederer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Constrained Linear Least Squares model is generally more accurate than the "human-in-the-loop". However, "human-in-the-loop" can remove materials that make no sense. The speed of the model in determining a "first cut" at the material ID makes it a viable option for spectral unmixing of debris objects.

  5. Investigations on the corrosion resistance of metallic bipolar plates (BPP) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) - understanding the effects of material, coating and manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dur, Ender

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) systems are promising technology for contributing to meet the deficiency of world`s clean and sustainable energy requirements in the near future. Metallic bipolar plate (BPP) as one of the most significant components of PEMFC device accounts for the largest part of the fuel cell`s stack. Corrosion for metallic bipolar plates is a critical issue, which influences the performance and durability of PEMFC. Corrosion causes adverse impacts on the PEMFC`s performance jeopardizing commercialization. This research is aimed at determining the corrosion resistance of metallic BPPs, particularly stainless steels, used in PEMFC from different aspects. Material selection, coating selection, manufacturing process development and cost considerations need to be addressed in terms of the corrosion behavior to justify the use of stainless steels as a BPP material in PEMFC and to make them commercially feasible in industrial applications. In this study, Ti, Ni, SS304, SS316L, and SS 430 blanks, and BPPs comprised of SS304 and SS316L were examined in terms of the corrosion behavior. SS316L plates were coated to investigate the effect of coatings on the corrosion resistance performance. Stamping and hydroforming as manufacturing processes, and three different coatings (TiN, CrN, ZrN) applied via the Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) method in three different thicknesses were selected to observe the effects of manufacturing processes, coating types and coating thicknesses on the corrosion resistance of BPP, respectively. Uncoated-coated blank and formed BPP were subjected to two different corrosion tests: potentiostatic and potentiodynamic. Some of the substantial results: 1- Manufacturing processes have an adverse impact on the corrosion resistance. 2- Hydroformed plates have slightly higher corrosion resistance than stamped samples. 3- BPPs with higher channel size showed better corrosion resistance. 4- Since none of the uncoated samples

  6. A Review of 25 Years of Corrosion Studies on HLW Container Materials at the CEA

    SciTech Connect

    Helie, Max

    2007-07-01

    The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA, French Atomic Energy Commission) has been involved in researches on nuclear waste management for more than 25 years. One of the key issues is the prediction of the long term behavior and aging of the High Level Waste (HLW) containers in order to develop concepts that will ensure the confinement of the activity over extremely long periods of time. Preliminary studies were carried out on two concepts, one of a thin 'corrosion resistant' container made of titanium or nickel base alloy, and the other on a thick 'corrosion allowance' container made or carbon steel. The results of these experiments showed that the 'corrosion resistant' concept led to a high uncertainty on the development and propagation rate of localized forms of corrosion, and the concept of geological disposal in an argillaceous host formation of thick waste containers made of carbon steel was chosen as the reference for further studies. This eventually led to the voting of a law relative to nuclear waste management on June 28 2006, which endorses the geological disposal of corrosion allowance containers as the reference solution, while stating than an effort must be kept on the research on actinides transmutation to reduce the time during which a geological disposal facility has to be proven capable to ensure the confinement of the radioactive waste. Studies are still in progress to better assess the corrosion mechanisms relevant to this situation in order to provide reliable models for the long term prediction of the containers corrosion behavior. (author)

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    SciTech Connect

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  8. Effects of Under Bump Metallurgy (UBM) Materials on the Corrosion of Electroless Nickel Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jin; Kim, Kyoungdoc

    2015-07-01

    The "black pad" phenomenon, which refers to the blackening of electroless-plated nickel-phosphorus [Ni(P)] films during the immersion Au process, is reproduced using pure chemicals and its fundamental mechanisms are investigated. In the present analysis, under bump metallurgy (UBM) materials have profound effects on the black pad susceptibility, and the presence of abnormally large nodules (ALNs) is essential to the black pad occurrence. The Ni(P) films over Cu, Ag, and Au substrates all exhibit ALNs and are susceptible to black pads, while those over Ni and Co substrates do not have ALNs and therefore are not susceptible to black pad. In the former cases, submicron scale nodular variations of the surface curvature lead to variations in the P concentration in the Ni(P) films, which induces sufficiently large potential differences to drive galvanic corrosion when exposed to the electrolyte, which is a gold cyanide solution in this study. The UBM effect is ascribed to differences in the Ni(P) film growth mode, where the transition from a layer-by-layer growth mode to an island growth mode is easier over Cu, Ag, and Au UBMs.

  9. Corrosion studies on construction materials for flue-gas-desulfurization systems. [Effects of Ph, chloride content, and alloy composition

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.

    1982-08-01

    Several Mo- and Cr-bearing alloys of interest to flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have been examined for corrosion in simulated FGD environments at 85/sup 0/C. To evaluate the importance of hydrogen and chloride ion concentrations, Type 316L stainless steel was exposed for varying times at different pH levels (0.5 to 3.0) and chloride content (0.03 to 5.0 wt% Cl/sup -/). To determine the effects of pH and composition in acid solution that contains a fixed amount of chloride (approx. 0.34 wt% Cl/sup -/), a number of alloys were used in which the composition parameter (defined as the sum of Cr and Mo) varied from 19.5 to 33.5 wt%. In all cases, the general corrosion or dissolution as determined from weight loss measurements (mg mm/sup -2/) varied linearly with time. The corrosion rate (mg mm/sup -2/ h/sup -1/) for the alloys decreased with an increase in pH in a consistent manner regardless of the alloy crystal structure. The composition effects on corrosion rate were most significant at pH = 0.5. The dependence of corrosion rate on pH, chloride ion concentration, and alloy composition is discussed in a quantitative manner. The relationships developed from the kinetic data provide useful guidance in the selection of appropriate alloys for more comprehensive studies under more realistic FGD testing environments that include environmental and stress cycling. Also, the materials evaluation approach adopted in the present study enables predictions of the life of components subjected to different environments and is relevant to alloy development work in progress elsewhere. In addition, testing and evaluation procedures have been developed for two alternative materials, namely, a fiber-reinforced plastic (Atlac 4010-A from ICI Americas, Inc.) and an epoxy coating on mild steel (Markote 300 System from Martek Engineering, Inc.); preliminary results are presented.

  10. Corrosion processes of austenitic stainless steels and copper-based materials in gamma-irradiated aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    The US Department of Energy is evaluating a site located at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, as a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The rock at the proposed repository horizon (above the water table) is densely welded, devitrified tuff, and the fluid environment in the repository is expected to be primarily air-steam. A more severe environment would be present in the unlikely case of intrusion of vadose groundwater into the repository site. For this repository location, austenitic stainless steels and copper-based materials are under consideration for waste container fabrication. This study focuses on the effects of gamma irradiation on the electrochemical mechanisms of corrosion for the prospective waste container materials. The radiolytic production of such species as hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid are shown to exert an influence on corrosion mechanisms and kinetics.