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Sample records for los angeles urban

  1. Urban America: Policy Choices for Los Angeles and the Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, James B., Ed.; And Others

    This volume presents 13 essays on urban problems in the United States, particularly in Los Angeles (California) following the 1992 riots, and policy options for the future. Part 1 addresses policies of the past three decades; Part 2 looks at children, youth, and families; Part 3 discusses crime and criminal justice; and Part 4 examines public…

  2. Research on Urban Community College Transfer and Retention: The Los Angeles TRUCCS Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, Bill

    This is a report on the Los Angeles Transfer and Retention of Urban Community College Students (TRUCCS) Project, which tracks approximately 5,000 community college students from nine campuses of the Los Angeles Community College District in order to gather information on retention and persistence. The project also investigates urban community…

  3. The Urban Los Angeles American Indian Experience: Perspectives from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledesma, Rita

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the findings from two studies conducted in the Los Angeles urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) community. The research investigated the relationship between the American Indian and Alaska Native cultural values and the social problems that challenge the urban Native community in the greater Los Angeles and Orange…

  4. Transpiration of urban forests in the Los Angeles metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Pataki, Diane E; McCarthy, Heather R; Litvak, Elizaveta; Pincetl, Stephanie

    2011-04-01

    Despite its importance for urban planning, landscape management, and water management, there are very few in situ estimates of urban-forest transpiration. Because urban forests contain an unusual and diverse mix of species from many regions worldwide, we hypothesized that species composition would be a more important driver of spatial variability in urban-forest transpiration than meteorological variables in the Los Angeles (California, USA) region. We used constant-heat sap-flow sensors to monitor urban tree water use for 15 species at six locations throughout the Los Angeles metropolitan area. For many of these species no previous data on sap flux, water use, or water relations were available in the literature. To scale sap-flux measurements to whole trees we conducted a literature survey of radial trends in sap flux across multiple species and found consistent relationships for angiosperms vs. gymnosperms. We applied this relationship to our measurements and estimated whole-tree and plot-level transpiration at our sites. The results supported very large species differences in transpiration, with estimates ranging from 3.2 +/- 2.3 kg x tree(-1) x d(-1) in unirrigated Pinus canariensis (Canary Island pine) to 176.9 +/- 75.2 kg x tree(-1) x d(-1) in Platanus hybrida (London planetree) in the month of August. Other species with high daily transpiration rates included Ficus microcarpa (laurel fig), Gleditsia triacanthos (honeylocust), and Platanus racemosa (California sycamore). Despite irrigation and relatively large tree size, Brachychiton populneas (kurrajong), B. discolor (lacebark), Sequoia sempervirens (redwood), and Eucalyptus grandis (grand Eucalyptus) showed relatively low rates of transpiration, with values < 45 kg x tree(-1) x d(-1). When scaled to the plot level, transpiration rates were as high as 2 mm/d for sites that contained both species with high transpiration rates and high densities of planted trees. Because plot-level transpiration is highly

  5. The Los Angeles Community Colleges: Pathways to Urban Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujimoto, Jack

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) serves as a beacon for "majority minorities" who seek a better life through the pursuit of educational opportunities in a large metropolitan setting. Discusses challenges facing LACCD, which is trying to cope with changing social and economic needs. Contains 10 references. (VWC)

  6. Climate Change, Pacific Ocean and Land Use Influences on Los Angeles' Urban Heat Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamelin, B.; Hsu, F.; LaDochy, S.; Ramirez, P. C.; Ye, H.; Sequera, P.; Gonzalez, J.; McDonald, K.; Patzert, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Los Angeles urban heat island (UHI) is a complex entity that is changing in time, space and intensity. The major influences on its characteristics appear to be population, landuse, and Pacific Ocean variability. Since 1950, the city of Los Angeles has nearly tripled in population from 1,333,300 to 3,792,621 in 2010. The downtown skyline has also changed as more high-rises replace lower density buildings and parking lots. Downtown average temperatures have increased rapidly, rising over 3oC in the last century. Tmin values have increased faster than Tmax similar to other UHI cities. However the Los Angeles UHI is unique among most cities, with its complex terrain and dominant land/sea breeze circulations. Also, the city is part of a regional megalopolis, where the surrounding rural areas are distant and ill-defined, in contrast to most UHIs. Our study looks at the diurnal and seasonal patterns in the urban thermal regime and how they have changed over recent decades. Temporal changes in land use, particularly vegetation, coastal sea surface temperatures, Pacific climatic indices such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and coastal upwelling all seem to contribute to the changes in city temperatures. The PDO especially correlates well with Los Angeles temperatures. The spatial changes in an UHI are described combining surface met data and aircraft remote sensing, using the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) sensors at spatial resolutions of 30 and 50 m, respectively. In our study recent sea breeze enhancement will be investigated in its influence on coastal cooling. Implications of the role of the intensifying UHI in the increases in Los Angeles heat waves will also be discussed.

  7. Perceived and actual environmental benefits of the Los Angeles urban forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pataki, D. E.; McCarthy, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    There has been a widespread movement to plant more trees and increase canopy cover in cities throughout the United States, in order to enhance ecosystem services provided by urban forests. The city of Los Angeles has been engaged in a widespread tree planting program with the goal of increasing tree cover, particularly in low income neighborhoods. However, the Los Angeles urban forest is almost entirely non-native, located predominately in former semi-arid shrublands and grasslands. We used multiple approaches to evaluate environmental costs and benefits of urban trees in Los Angeles, both as they are perceived by local residents, as well as actual physical impacts of urban tree processes on the environment. We conducted an internet survey of attitudes and preferences for specific tree functional types, ecosystem services, and potential costs. We also directly measured urban forest structure and function including species and functional biodiversity, transpiration, basal area increments, hydraulic architecture, and leaf gas exchange. We translated these processes into categories of ecosystem services and costs such as water use, latent heat fluxes, water use efficiency, growth rates, sensitivity to drought stress, and aesthetic traits (flowering, fruiting, etc.). We found that provision of shade by urban trees is highly valued by local residents, and in fact, the urban forest has a significant impact on surface temperatures. Aesthetics benefits are also commonly cited as desirable traits. Although aesthetic and other cultural ecosystem services are difficult to quantify, we found spatial patterns in aesthetic traits influenced by neighborhood socioeconomic variables. Local residents seemed less concerned about the water use of irrigated urban trees, but we found significant rates of transpiration in urban trees and forest plots depending on species that may be important in the local hydrologic budget, which is increasingly constrained by water shortages. There was

  8. Spatial patterns and source attribution of urban methane in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Francesca M.; Kort, Eric A.; Bush, Susan E.; Ehleringer, James R.; Lai, Chun-Ta; Blake, Donald R.; Randerson, James T.

    2016-03-01

    Urban areas are increasingly recognized as a globally important source of methane to the atmosphere; however, the location of methane sources and relative contributions of source sectors are not well known. Recent atmospheric measurements in Los Angeles, California, USA, show that more than a third of the city's methane emissions are unaccounted for in inventories and suggest that fugitive fossil emissions are the unknown source. We made on-road measurements to quantify fine-scale structure of methane and a suite of complementary trace gases across the Los Angeles Basin in June 2013. Enhanced methane levels were observed across the basin but were unevenly distributed in space. We identified 213 methane hot spots from unknown emission sources. We made direct measurements of ethane to methane (C2H6/CH4) ratios of known methane emission sources in the region, including cattle, geologic seeps, landfills, and compressed natural gas fueling stations, and used these ratios to determine the contribution of biogenic and fossil methane sources to unknown hot spots and to local urban background air. We found that 75% of hot spots were of fossil origin, 20% were biogenic, and 5% of indeterminate source. In regionally integrated air, we observed a wider range of C2H6/CH4 values than observed previously. Fossil fuel sources accounted for 58-65% of methane emissions, with the range depending on the assumed C2H6/CH4 ratio of source end-members and model structure. These surveys demonstrated the prevalence of fugitive methane emissions across the Los Angeles urban landscape and suggested that uninventoried methane sources were widely distributed and primarily of fossil origin.

  9. Expanding Urban Metabolism: Coupling Methodologies and Integrating Social Factors, a Pilot for Los Angeles County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincetl, S.

    2011-12-01

    Urban metabolism is a powerful method for describing resource flows into cities and the waste streams produced as a result of resource use. To date these flows have rarely been geospatially correlated to reveal who uses what type of energy where and the concomitant waste streams. Thus there is little ability to understand energy use in urban areas. Additionally, the social and ecological footprint of the flows have not been drawn and explained. We are developing an expanded and integrated urban metabolism analysis for Los Angeles County, attempting to integrate socio-demographic and geospatial grounding of resource flows and sinks, as well as life cycle, cradle to grave information. This presentation will focus on the reasons for this approach and methodological innovations and challenges.

  10. A plot scale evapotranspiration model for urban landscapes in Los Angeles, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, E.; Pataki, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Southern California is experiencing the worst drought on record and facing more dramatic decreases in water supply due to regional climate change trends. In Los Angeles, evapotranspiration (ET) from irrigated landscapes is likely to be a major contributor to the urban water budget. However, data on water use by irrigated urban plants is very scarce and ET patterns from urban vegetation are not well quantified. Methods currently used for estimating water use by urban lawns are mainly based on Penman-Monteith model, which depends on a set of empirical coefficients that are hard to define, as well as a simplified crop coefficient approach that has low accuracy. Previously, we performed continuous in-situ measurements of transpiration from 126 urban trees in the Los Angeles area using sapflux sensors and ET from 8 turfgrass lawns using portable chambers. Here, we synthesize the results of those measurements as well as literature data and construct biologically meaningful equations for assessment of ET from urban landscapes. The resulting empirical model is reasonably accurate yet relatively simple for managers to apply with basic weather and tree inventory data. It explains 72% of tree transpiration variability and 79% of turfgrass ET variability. The parameters of the model currently include vulnerability of branches to cavitation for trees, turfgrass area and percent tree canopy cover for lawns, and incoming solar radiation, vapor pressure deficit of the air and soil water content for defining environmental conditions. To give an illustration, the model estimate of the highest ET from a vegetated area in Los Angeles during a typical summer day is 5 - 8 mm/d (high transpiring street trees with turfgrass groundcover or unshaded turfgrass) and the lowest ET is 0.6 - 0.8 mm/d (low-transpiring trees without groundcover). The next step is to substitute vulnerability to cavitation, the only model parameter that requires laboratory equipment, with parameters that can be more

  11. Predicting tree water use and drought tolerance from leaf traits in the Los Angeles urban ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, G. P.; Scoffoni, C.; Sack, L.

    2013-12-01

    Urban green space provides a suite of valuable ecosystem services. In semiarid systems, like Los Angeles, trees rely primarily on irrigation water for transpiration. Managers may need to reduce irrigation associated with urban trees given climate change, urban expansion, and the steady decrease in available freshwater. While leaf and whole plant water relations have been extensively studied, we are only now gaining a detailed understanding of diverse leaf anatomical designs, and their use for predicting physiology and water use at landscape scale. For 50 diverse urban species, we quantified leaf anatomical and physiological traits important to tree drought tolerance and water use efficiency including turgor loss point, vein architecture, cellular anatomy, leaf mass per unit area, and petiole and leaf dimensions. We hypothesized detailed relationships to develop models relating leaf functional traits to tree water relations. These models provide key insights regarding the role of anatomical designs in leaf stress tolerance and water use efficiency. Additionally we predicted how traits measured at the leaf level would scale with existing data for individuals at the whole plant level. We tested our predictions by determining correlations between leaf level anatomical traits and drought tolerance. Additionally, we determined correlations between functional traits, physiology and water use, and the climate of origin for the urban species. Leaf level measurements will be valuable for rapid estimation of more difficult to measure whole plant water relations traits important at the landscape scale. The Los Angeles urban ecosystem can serve as a model for other semiarid system and provide more informed system wide water conservation strategies.

  12. Development of urban water consumption models for the City of Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mini, C.; Hogue, T. S.; Pincetl, S.

    2011-12-01

    Population growth and rapid urbanization coupled with uncertain climate change are causing new challenges for meeting urban water needs. In arid and semi-arid regions, increasing drought periods and decreasing precipitation have led to water supply shortages and cities are struggling with trade-offs between the water needs of growing urban populations and the well-being of urban ecosystems. The goal of the current research is to build models that can represent urban water use patterns in semi-arid cities by identifying the determinants that control both total and outdoor residential water use over the Los Angeles urban domain. The initial database contains monthly water use records aggregated to the zip code level collected from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) from 2000 to 2010. Residential water use was normalized per capita and was correlated with socio-demographic, economic, climatic and vegetation characteristics across the City for the 2000-2010 period. Results show that ethnicity, per capita income, and the average number of persons per household are linearly related to total water use per capita. Inter-annual differences in precipitation and implementation of conservation measures affect water use levels across the City. The high variability in water use patterns across the City also appears strongly influenced by income and education levels. The temporal analysis of vegetation indices in the studied neighborhoods shows little correlation between precipitation patterns and vegetation greenness. Urban vegetation appears well-watered, presenting the same greenness activity over the study period despite an overall decrease in water use across the City. We hypothesize that over-watering is occurring and that outdoor water use represents a significant part of the residential water budget in various regions of the City. A multiple regression model has been developed that integrates these fundamental controlling factors to simulate residential

  13. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Los Angeles Unified School District. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each district that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 Trial Urban District Assessment in reading receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. This report presents the results for Los Angeles Unified School District's student achievement in reading. In…

  14. Conceptions of evolution among urban middle school students in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Michael A.

    To uncover student ideas regarding evolution, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 eighth grade students at a Los Angeles urban public charter school. This study was designed to learn about student understandings regarding speciation, the mechanisms and purposes of trait development, and differences in how students explain human versus non-human examples. Hybridization and adaption to the environment emerged as major themes for non-human speciation. Other than a basic recognition that trait development is related to genetics and some understanding of mutation, students' understanding of genetic diversity and natural selection was limited, and they thought traits mainly developed because species must purposely adapt to their environment. When explaining evolutionary processes in humans, students did not discuss hybridization or predator-prey interactions, and they thought that humans could consciously affect their trait development. Overall, these students appear to represent transitional reasoning, incorporating common misconceptions with ideas from initial instruction.

  15. Evaluating the Impact of Conservation Measures on Urban Water Fluxes in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manago, K. F.; Hogue, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    California is experiencing one of the most severe droughts on record. In response, the State Water Resources Control Board adopted emergency regulations in May, implementing a mandatory 25% statewide reduction in potable urban water use. Prior to this, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power had implemented mandatory restrictions and a pricing increase in 2009 and 2010, respectively to encourage reduced consumption. Understanding where conservation measures are having the greatest impact and how it is affecting water fluxes throughout the basin is critical, especially when considering the push for increased reliance on local water resources. Los Angeles is selected as the study area due to its high degree of urbanization, while the Ballona Creek watershed is used for runoff analysis due to the lack of dams and wastewater treatment plants altering flow in the channel. Utilizing a combination of runoff gages, groundwater monitoring well data, consumption data, and hydrologic models, we aim to evaluate how hydrologic processes have been influenced by water conservation measures. The work focuses on how changes in outdoor water use have influenced discharge patterns and groundwater recharge since most of the water conservation efforts have been focused on decreasing landscape irrigation. Previous work has shown that outdoor irrigation rates have decreased after the implementation of conservation measures, causing a decrease in vegetation greenness across the city. Runoff has also significantly decreased, especially dry season discharge. Further work is also being conducted to evaluate changes to evapotranspiration, using a combination of NLDAS model results and CIMIS reference ET data, as well as groundwater and recharge, utilizing a Bayesian Hierarchical model to fill missing groundwater monitoring well data. Results provide improved understanding of response to, and impacts of, conservation measures which ultimately allow for better water resources management

  16. Creating an Urban Oasis of Learning. Los Angeles City College Strategic Plan, 2002-2008.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Mary; Seymour, Dan

    This report details the Los Angeles City College's (California) strategic plan for the years 2002 to 2008. The report, the product of a process of commissioning a "Vision Team" and holding "Town Meetings," resulted in eight institution-wide priorities: (1) to foster a culture of academic excellence; (2) to maintain and enhance a safe campus…

  17. Serving Los Angeles: Urban Community Colleges and Educational Success among Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Cepeda, Rita

    2004-01-01

    This article reports the special efforts of the largest community college district in the country to assist its largest ethnic group to succeed. The Los Angeles Community College District consists of nine campuses; the Latino student population ranges from 22-75 percent of the total number of students. In this article, using questionnaire data…

  18. Partitioning Native and Imported Source Contributions and their Uncertainties for Urban Runoff in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Hogue, T. S.; Stein, E. D.; Barco, J.

    2011-12-01

    Water conservation efforts strive to reduce dependency on imported water. A critical first step in these efforts is evaluating the range of hydrologic inputs and outputs of highly complex urban watersheds. The Ballona Creek Watershed is an ideal location to demonstrate application of a water budget analysis to quantify native and non-native inputs and outputs as well as associated uncertainties. The Ballona Creek Watershed is located within Los Angeles County, the second most populous metropolitan region in the United States. This extensively developed watershed relies heavily on imported water to meet the demands of its 1.2 million residents. Rapid development has led to an increase in impervious land cover, reducing natural infiltration and directing pollutant-loaded urban runoff to the concrete-lined channels which drain to the Santa Monica Bay. Results of the long-term water budget analysis show that the annual runoff ratio exhibits a distinct rising trend through the study period (1938 to 2010) which is indicative of rapid development; however, trends in the last decade have deviated from this pattern, often yielding annual runoff ratios greater than 1. At the monthly time scale, average dry season runoff exceeds precipitation during the June to August period for all decades between the 1940s to 2000s, with the exception of a few anomalous summer storm events. Most of this additional water is attributed to imported water and irrigation excess resulting in dry season runoff and artificial groundwater recharge. However, contributing native water sources also exist. Perennial natural springs were identified through field investigation in the foothills and along faults in the watershed. Summer season flow rates from sampled springs range from 2 to 200 m3/day. Historical evapotranspiration rates are also being investigated using traditional models and a remote-sensing algorithm. Information obtained from this study is being used to inform managers and decision

  19. Drivers of Variability in Water Use of Native and Non-native Urban Trees in the Greater Los Angeles Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, H. R.; Pataki, D. E.

    2007-12-01

    A number of cities, including Los Angeles, have started programs aimed at increasing urban tree cover, due to growing recognition that urban trees can mitigate urban heat island effects, storm water runoff, atmospheric CO2 emissions and pollution, and energy expenditures. There is considerable interest in trying to quantify the magnitude of these tree-induced benefits, yet water use and water relations of urban trees have rarely been studied. Urban trees are exposed and presumably adapted to a different set of growing conditions than natural trees, including growth-enhancing environmental alterations such as irrigation and fertilization, but also detrimental conditions like increased ozone and restricted rooting area. In order to study the factors which control whole tree water use of common species in the Los Angeles Basin urban forest, four sites in Los Angeles and Orange County have been instrumented with sap flow and meteorological sensors. These sites allow comparisons of the water use of the same species under different environmental conditions: urban vs. non- urban, coastal vs. inland climates, and comparisons of native vs. non-native species. We found that over a similar vapor pressure deficit (daytime average 0.5-3.5 kPa; VPD) range, California native sycamores in the inland urban site exhibited far higher (up to 3 times) rates of daily sap flow (g cm-2 d-1) than sycamores in an inland non-urban (natural riparian, non-irrigated) site. However daily sap flow rates of sycamores at an urban coastal site, where VPD is generally lower (daytime average <1.2 kPa), were much lower than in the inland urban site even at the same VPD. In contrast, Canary Island pines showed lower daily sap flow rates over the same VPD range at an inland, urbanized site in comparison to a coastal, irrigated urban site. These differing behaviors in contrasting environments could result from differences in a number of allometric or hydraulic properties. In order to determine what drives

  20. The City and the World of Work: A Critical Examination of Life in Los Angeles and Urban America in the Mid-Sixties. Proceedings of the Annual Research Conference (9th, Los Angeles, March 14-15, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Inst. of Industrial Relations.

    Conference papers examining recent trends affecting the development of urban life in America are presented. "How People Look at Cities Where They Live and Work," by Anselm L. Strauss, presents sample work and life styles and their effects on perceptions of cities. "Los Angeles as a Changing Community," by Fred E. Chase, discusses problems and…

  1. Hydrocarbon emissions from twelve urban shade trees of the Los Angeles, California, Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corchnoy, Stephanie B.; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    The large-scale planting of shade trees in urban areas to counteract heat-island effects and to minimize energy use is currently being discussed. Among the costs to be considered in a cost/benefit analysis of such a program is the potential for additional reactive organic compounds in the atmosphere due to emissions from these trees. In this program, 15 species of potential shade trees for the Los Angeles Air Basin were studied and emission rates were determined for 11 of these trees, with one further tree (Crape myrtle) exhibiting no detectable emissions. The emission rates normalized to dry leaf weight and corrected to 30°C were (in μg g -1 h -1), ranked from lowest to highest emission rate: Crape myrtle, none detected; Camphor, 0.03; Aleppo pine, 0.15; Deodar cedar, 0.29; Italian Stone pine, 0.42; Monterey pine, 0.90; Brazilian pepper, 1.3; Canary Island pine, 1.7; Ginkgo, 3.0; California pepper, 3.7; Liquidambar, 37; Carrotwood, 49. In addition to the emission rates per unit biomass, the biomass per tree must be factored into any assessment of the relative merits of the various trees, since some trees have higher biomass constants than others. The present data shows that there are large differences in emission rates among different tree species and this should be factored into decision-making as to which shade trees to plant. Based solely on the presently determined emission rates, the Crape myrtle and Camphor tree are good choices for large-scale planting, while the Carrotwood tree and Liquidambar are poor choices due to their high isoprene emission rates.

  2. Fault zone regulation, seismic hazard, and social vulnerability in Los Angeles, California: Hazard or urban amenity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toké, Nathan A.; Boone, Christopher G.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón

    2014-09-01

    Public perception and regulation of environmental hazards are important factors in the development and configuration of cities. Throughout California, probabilistic seismic hazard mapping and geologic investigations of active faults have spatially quantified earthquake hazard. In Los Angeles, these analyses have informed earthquake engineering, public awareness, the insurance industry, and the government regulation of developments near faults. Understanding the impact of natural hazards regulation on the social and built geography of cities is vital for informing future science and policy directions. We constructed a relative social vulnerability index classification for Los Angeles to examine the social condition within regions of significant seismic hazard, including areas regulated as Alquist-Priolo (AP) Act earthquake fault zones. Despite hazard disclosures, social vulnerability is lowest within AP regulatory zones and vulnerability increases with distance from them. Because the AP Act requires building setbacks from active faults, newer developments in these zones are bisected by parks. Parcel-level analysis demonstrates that homes adjacent to these fault zone parks are the most valuable in their neighborhoods. At a broad scale, a Landsat-based normalized difference vegetation index shows that greenness near AP zones is greater than the rest of the metropolitan area. In the parks-poor city of Los Angeles, fault zone regulation has contributed to the construction of park space within areas of earthquake hazard, thus transforming zones of natural hazard into amenities, attracting populations of relatively high social status, and demonstrating that the distribution of social vulnerability is sometimes more strongly tied to amenities than hazards.

  3. Urban legacies and soil management affect the concentration and speciation of trace metals in Los Angeles community garden soils.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Lorraine Weller; Jenerette, G Darrel; Bain, Daniel J

    2015-02-01

    Heavy metals in urban soils can compromise human health, especially in urban gardens, where gardeners may ingest contaminated dust or crops. To identify patterns of urban garden metal contamination, we measured concentrations and bioavailability of Pb, As, and Cd in soils associated with twelve community gardens in Los Angeles County, CA. This included sequential extractions to partition metals among exchangeable, reducible, organic, or residual fractions. Proximity to road increased all metal concentrations, suggesting vehicle emissions sources. Reducible Pb increased with neighborhood age, suggesting leaded paint as a likely pollutant source. Exchangeable Cd and As both increased with road proximity. Only cultivated soils showed an increase in exchangeable As with road proximity, potentially due to reducing humic acid interactions while Cd bioavailability was mitigated by organic matter. Understanding the geochemical phases and metal bioavailability allows incorporation of contamination patterns into urban planning. PMID:25437835

  4. Welfare Reform in Los Angeles: Implementation, Effects, and Experiences of Poor Families and Neighborhoods. The Project on Devolution and Urban Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polit, Denise F.; Nelson, Laura; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Seith, David

    2005-01-01

    This report concludes the main portion of MDRC's Project on Devolution and Urban Change, an eight-year effort to chart the course of welfare reform in four big urban counties: Los Angeles, Cuyahoga (Cleveland), Miami-Dade, and Philadelphia. The goal of the study was to find out whether federal welfare reform would lead to meaningful changes in…

  5. Hydrologic and Land Surface Modeling of the Semi-Arid Urban Environment: Ballona Creek, Los Angeles, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, B.; Hogue, T. S.; Maxwell, R. M.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this work is to assess and improve the water and energy budgets produced by a coupled hydrologic-land surface model (LSM), ParFlow.CLM (PF.CLM), when applied to an urban semiarid environment, Ballona Creek watershed in Los Angeles, CA, and to compare these results to remotely sensed data. To accomplish this, we have worked with various traditional LSMs within the Land Information System (LIS) framework. These models include the Noah 3.2 LSM and the Community Land Model (CLM) 2. The domain is a 22-km by 22-km square fully encompassing Ballona Creek watershed run at a 1-km spatial resolution for the traditional LSMs and 30-m resolution for PF.CLM at an hourly timestep. To improve modeling of the watershed and represent urban processes, representations of urban irrigation and the storm-drainage network were included in PF.CLM modeling. Comparison datasets of relevant variables were acquired at similar resolutions and timescales and statistically compared to modeling results. These datasets consist of: (1) prior modeling work conducted at a 30-m resolution with the irrigated and non-irrigated Noah Urban Canopy Model (Noah-UCM), in a subset domain of the Ballona Creek watershed near downtown Los Angeles; (2) a historic watershed study of Ballona Creek watershed; and (3) remote sensing products (land surface temperature) obtained from various MODIS and Landsat sensors. The effects of introducing urban processes into land surface and fully distributed, high-resolution hydrologic modeling is assessed and understood.

  6. Estimating Urban-Induced Groundwater Recharge Through Coupled Hydrologic Modeling in Ballona Creek Watershed, Los Angeles, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, B.; Hogue, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    The current research focuses on the modeling and prediction of urban-induced groundwater recharge in highly developed, semi-arid regions. The groundwater component of the hydrologic cycle goes through significant changes during urbanization and has historically been understudied. The changes brought on by urbanization not only include physical alterations (increased surface imperviousness, channelized flow, increased sub-surface infrastructure etc.) but also changes to the water cycle due to human interactions (increased use of imported water, variable landscape irrigation, industrial water use, etc.). We undertake our initial analysis in Ballona Creek watershed, which contains highly urbanized and diverse portions of the cities of Santa Monica and Los Angeles, California along with more natural land surfaces in the northern portions of the watershed in the Santa Monica Mountains. The primary focus of this research is the development of a fully distributed and coupled surface-groundwater model of the Ballona Creek watershed. We use the three-dimensional finite-difference surface and groundwater flow model, ParFlow, fully-coupled to a land surface model, CLM, at a 30-meter by 30-meter resolution forced by observed meteorological data from 2000 to 2010. Previous work in Ballona includes a detailed historical water budget analysis from the early 1900s to the present. This extensive in situ data set will be used to estimate model parameters as well as provide upper and lower boundaries for groundwater recharge values across the system. Preliminary results focus on annual and seasonal (wet/dry periods) surface and groundwater fluxes, including the influence of natural spring flow and dry weather runoff in the watershed. Los Angeles and the surrounding metropolitan area rely on some of the most extensive and oldest centralized water redistribution projects in the United States where water is transported hundreds of kilometers to support agricultural and urban activities

  7. Climatic influences on the spatial distribution of ecosystem services and costs in the Los Angeles urban forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, H. R.; Pataki, D. E.; Weller, L. T.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial distribution of urban ecosystem services (e.g. shading, flowering or provision of food) and costs (such as irrigation) is dependent in part on the biogeography of the species and plant communities of interest. In natural ecosystems, the distribution of plant species and functional types is in large part limited by climatic conditions and the ability of plants to disperse. However, in urban ecosystems many species are planted, and their distribution may depend largely on social factors such as income and neighborhood age. The importance of climatic gradients in these settings is unknown. In order to understand the factors that affect the distribution of urban trees with different functional traits and ecosystem services, urban forest inventories were conducted on >350 plots within the city of Los Angeles. Los Angeles is a city with extreme socioeconomic diversity and a complex history of urban development patterns, as well as a sharp climatic gradient largely influenced by proximity to the coast. Thus, the plots covered a range of neighborhood ages, household incomes, and climates. We found that more moderate climate zones (generally closer to the coast) had a higher proportion of evergreen species and flowering species than warmer, more inland areas. In general, we have found that many of these flowering species have relatively low water use efficiency. In contrast, the distribution of fruiting trees seemed largely related to land use history in this area: the proportion of fruiting trees was highest in areas formerly used for citrus production. There was also a slight trend towards a higher proportion of high water using species in inland areas. This pattern could result in significant water costs, as the combination of intrinsically high water use and high atmospheric demand will compound urban forest water loss in inland areas. Although environmental drivers can be difficult to disentangle from social drivers, our results thus far suggest that

  8. Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

  9. Strange Little Flies in the Big City: Exotic Flower-Breeding Drosophilidae (Diptera) in Urban Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, Lesley; McEvey, Shane; Hauser, Martin; Brown, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Urban landscapes are commonly considered too mundane and corrupted to be biotically interesting. Recent insect surveys employing 29 Malaise traps throughout Los Angeles, California, however, have uncovered breeding populations of two unexpected species of one of the most studied and familiar groups of organisms, Drosophila “fruit” flies. Unlike most introduced species of drosophilids, which breed in fresh or decaying fruits, these are specialized flower-breeders. A common species in the survey was Drosophila (Drosophila) gentica Wheeler and Takada, previously collected only once, in El Salvador. It belongs to the flavopilosa species group, all species of which have been known until now from central Chile, Argentina and Uruguay, to Veracruz, Mexico and the Caribbean, breeding in flowers of Cestrum (“jessamine”) and Sessea (Solanaceae). The Los Angeles populations are probably breeding in a native and/or introduced Cestrum; in addition, populations in San Luis Obispo County were visiting ornamental Cestrum. Drosophila gentica occurs as far north as San Francisco, where it was found breeding in Cestrum aurantiacum. D. gentica is redescribed and figured in detail for diagnostic and identification purposes. Specimens from Jamaica previously identified as D. gentica are a distinct species but are not formally described in lieu of complete male specimens. Rare in the Malaise traps was Drosophila (Sophophora) flavohirta Malloch, a common species in Australia on the blossoms of native Myrtaceae, found on introduced Eucalyptus in South Africa and both Eucalyptus and Syzygium in Madagascar; adults feed on myrtaceous pollen and nectar, larvae breed in the flowers. It is also redescribed in detail, including its unusual egg. This is the first New World report of this species; DNA sequences confirm it is a morphologically highly aberrant member of the D. melanogaster species group. This study reveals how intensive field sampling can uncover remarkable biodiversity in

  10. Strange little flies in the big city: exotic flower-breeding drosophilidae (Diptera) in urban Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, David; Ginsberg, Paul S; Thayer, Lesley; McEvey, Shane; Hauser, Martin; Turelli, Michael; Brown, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Urban landscapes are commonly considered too mundane and corrupted to be biotically interesting. Recent insect surveys employing 29 Malaise traps throughout Los Angeles, California, however, have uncovered breeding populations of two unexpected species of one of the most studied and familiar groups of organisms, Drosophila "fruit" flies. Unlike most introduced species of drosophilids, which breed in fresh or decaying fruits, these are specialized flower-breeders. A common species in the survey was Drosophila (Drosophila) gentica Wheeler and Takada, previously collected only once, in El Salvador. It belongs to the flavopilosa species group, all species of which have been known until now from central Chile, Argentina and Uruguay, to Veracruz, Mexico and the Caribbean, breeding in flowers of Cestrum ("jessamine") and Sessea (Solanaceae). The Los Angeles populations are probably breeding in a native and/or introduced Cestrum; in addition, populations in San Luis Obispo County were visiting ornamental Cestrum. Drosophila gentica occurs as far north as San Francisco, where it was found breeding in Cestrum aurantiacum. D. gentica is redescribed and figured in detail for diagnostic and identification purposes. Specimens from Jamaica previously identified as D. gentica are a distinct species but are not formally described in lieu of complete male specimens. Rare in the Malaise traps was Drosophila (Sophophora) flavohirta Malloch, a common species in Australia on the blossoms of native Myrtaceae, found on introduced Eucalyptus in South Africa and both Eucalyptus and Syzygium in Madagascar; adults feed on myrtaceous pollen and nectar, larvae breed in the flowers. It is also redescribed in detail, including its unusual egg. This is the first New World report of this species; DNA sequences confirm it is a morphologically highly aberrant member of the D. melanogaster species group. This study reveals how intensive field sampling can uncover remarkable biodiversity in even the

  11. Preventing the repetition: Or, what Los Angeles' experience in water management can teach Atlanta about urban water disputes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, David L.

    2009-04-01

    Southern California's water history is an epic story with larger-than-life characters and ambitions and abundant hubris. Students of water policy might reasonably ask: Does this story, while unique to greater Los Angeles, hold lessons for other metropolises experiencing water conflict caused by explosive growth? We examine this question by considering similarities between the challenges facing Atlanta, Georgia, one of the nation's fastest growing cities in the 21st century, with those of Los Angeles. We focus on junctures where important decisions regarding water were made and how these decisions continue to challenge both cities' futures. Atlanta's financial, cultural, and environmental imprint on its surrounding region share remarkable similarities with Los Angeles' influence trajectory: it is the largest city in the southeast, a principal transportation and business hub, and it is embroiled in water conflict with nearby communities and adjoining states.

  12. Los Angeles and Its Mistress Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Wesley

    1973-01-01

    Los Angeles city has acute air pollution problems because of lack of an adequate mass transit system and the type of local industries. Air pollution in Los Angeles has affected agricultural production, vegetation, and public health in nearby areas. (PS)

  13. The Impact of Science Graduate Students in Urban Science Classrooms: The SFOS Program at Cal State Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebey, S.; Mayo, D.; Strauss, J.

    2005-12-01

    The SFOS program at Cal State Los Angeles places science graduate students in minority serving high schools and middle schools in the Los Angeles region. Graduate fellows pursue Master's degrees in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics while working with partner teachers to provide science demonstrations and activities that are based on California science content standards. Fellows in the classroom are not apprentice teachers, but rather, their role is science communication. Now in its third year, we discuss the impacts of the SFOS program on graduate fellows, teachers, and high school curricula. We thank the National Science Foundation for funding through the GK-12 program.

  14. The Impact of Science Graduate Students in Urban Science Classrooms: The SFOS Program at Cal State Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebey, Susan; Mayo, D.

    2006-12-01

    The SFOS program at Cal State Los Angeles places science graduate students in minority serving high schools and middle schools in the Los Angeles region. Graduate fellows pursue Master's degrees in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics while working with partner teachers to provide science demonstrations and activities that are based on California science content standards. Fellows in the classroom are not apprentice teachers, but rather, their role is science communication. Now in its fourth year, we discuss the impacts of the SFOS program on graduate fellows, teachers, and high school curricula.

  15. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL WEST ELEVATION FROM PARKING LOT ACROSS SPRING STREET, FACING EAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TENTH FLOOR SOUTH WING CAFETERIA FOOD LINE, FACING NORTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FOURTEENTH FLOOR Y-CORRIDOR, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FOURTEENTH FLOOR Y-CORRIDOR, FACING SOUTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FOURTEENTH FLOOR Y-CORRIDOR NEAR ROOM 1403, FACING SOUTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR Y-CORRIDOR SOUTH SIDE OF ELEVATOR LOBBY, FACING WEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR Y-CORRIDOR SOUTH SIDE OF ELEVATOR LOBBY, FACING NORTHEAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR Y-CORRIDOR NORTH SIDE OF ELEVATOR LOBBY, FACING EAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE WING SHOWING PARTITIONS, WINDOWS AND RADIATOR, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. John Ash, ALA., Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, ALA., Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE WING SHOWING PARTITIONS, WINDOWS AND RADIATOR, FACING SOUTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL TENTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE WING SHOWING RADIATOR AND WINDOW, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL WEST ENTRANCE COURTYARD SHOWING FLOORING, COLUMNS AND BRONZE DOORS, FACING EAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL WEST ENTRANCE COURTYARD SHOWING BRONZE DOORS AND HANDRAILS, FACING EAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL WEST ENTRANCE COURTYARD SHOWING BRONZE DOORS, LIGHT FIXTURES AND GRILLS, FACING EAST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL WEST ENTRANCE COURTYARD SOUTH ARCADE SHOWING FLOORING AND WALL MOSAICS, FACING WEST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL WEST ENTRANCE COURTYARD NORTHWEST CORNER SHOWING DAMAGED STONE, FACING NORTHWEST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FOURTEENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE WING SHOWING TYPICAL DOOR HARDWARE, FACING SOUTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINTH FLOOR NORTH CORRIDOR STAIR NUMBER NINE DOOR HARDWARE, FACING WEST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR SHOWING ROTUNDA COLUMN CAPITALS AND LIGHT FIXTURES, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS SHOWING COLUMN, ARCADE AND SPECTATOR SEATING, FACING SOUTHWEST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS SHOWING PODIUM AND SEATING, FACING SOUTH. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL THIRD FLOOR CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS SHOWING COLUMN, ARCADE AND SPECTATOR SEATING, FACING SOUTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE AREA, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA SHOWING DEMOLITION OF WEST WALL, FACING WEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE AREA SHOWING STRUCTURAL PIERS AND FLORESCENT LIGHTS, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FOURTEENTH FLOOR, SERVICE AREA DOOR NEAR ELEVATOR LOBBY, FACING SOUTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR NORTH OFFICE AREA, FACING NORTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA SHOWING BEAM AND COLUMN CONNECTION NEAR SOUTHEAST CORNER, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE AREA SHOWING RADIATOR AND WINDOWS, FACING EAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Ash, AIA, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SEVENTH FLOOR SOUTH OFFICE AREA SHOWING WOOD AND GLASS PARTITIONS, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA SHOWING DEMOLITION OF SOUTH WALL, FACING SOUTH - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA SHOWING BEAM AND COLUMN CONNECTION NEAR NORTHWEST CORNER, FACING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL NINETEENTH FLOOR MAIN OFFICE AREA, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR WEST OFFICE AREA THAT WAS ORIGINAL ART COMMISSION ROOMS, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR BREAK ROOM OFF OF ORIGINAL ART COMMISSION ROOMS, FACING SOUTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR BREAK ROOM OFF OF ORIGINAL ART COMMISSION ROOMS, FACING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL FIFTH FLOOR WEST OFFICE AREA THAT WAS ORIGINAL ART COMMISSION ROOMS, FACING NORTHWEST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL WEST ENTRANCE COURTYARD NORTH ARCADE SHOWING TILE WORK, FACING NORTH. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Monica Griesbach, Photographer August 1997. DETAIL OF LOS ANGELES CITY HALL SECOND FLOOR SHOWING SOUTH LOBBY TILE WORK, FACING NORTHWEST. - Los Angeles City Hall, 200 North Spring Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Palace Revolt in Los Angeles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Antonio Villaraigosa, the mayor of Los Angeles, comes alive when recalling his start in local politics--as a labor organizer agitating for reform inside decrepit and overcrowded schools. In his quest to turn around the schools, the mayor has united working-class Latino parents, civil rights leaders, and big-money Democrats to challenge union…

  16. Risks and benefits of gardening in urban soil; heavy metals and nutrient content in Los Angeles Community Gardens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, L. W.; Jenerette, D.; Bain, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The availability of soil nutrients and heavy metals in urban community gardens can influence health of crops and participants. Interactions between garden history, management, and soils are understudied in cities. In July 2011, we collected soil samples from 45 plots at 6 Los Angeles community gardens. For comparison, 3 samples were collected from uncultivated garden soils and 3 more from outside soils. Samples were then tested for major nutrients- Nitrogen(N), Potassium (K), and Phosphorous (P)- and organic matter (SOM). We also measured concentrations of 29 metals in 3 gardens using Inductively Coupled Plasma- Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. Potassium and phosphorus exceeded optimum levels in all plots, with some over twice the maximum recommended levels. Over-fertilized soils may contribute to local watershed pollution and crop micronutrient deficiencies. Low soil SOM was observed in gardens in impoverished neighborhoods, possibly due to low quality amendments. Our metals analysis showed dangerous levels of lead (Pb)-- up to 1700 ppm in outside soils and 150 ppm in garden soils-- near older gardens, indicating lead deposition legacies. California lead safety standards indicate that children should not play near soils with Pb above 200 ppm, indicating need for long term monitoring of lead contaminated gardens. Arsenic (As) levels exceeded federal risk levels (0.3 ppm) and average CA background levels (2 ppm) in all areas, with some gardens exceeding 10 ppm. Heavy metal legacies in gardens may pose risks to participants with prolonged exposure and remediation of soils may be necessary.

  17. Determination of site amplification in the Los Angeles urban area from inversion of strong-motion records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harmsen, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    The amplification of strong ground motion at sites in the greater Los Angeles, California, region is determined using the generalized-inverse method of Andrews (1986). Site-amplification estimates are determined at 281 strong-motion sites that provided horizontal-component accelerograms from the 1971 San Fernando, 1987 Whittier Narrows, 1991 Sierra Madre, or 1994 Northridge mainshocks. The estimates are determined relative to the spectral level recorded at a single reference site. In a second inversion, a source-site interaction term is added to Andrews's (1986) model to quantify the effect selected mainshock records have on site-amplification estimates. The source-site interaction term is applied to the San Fernando Valley sites' records of the Northridge earthquake and to three Los Angeles basin sites' records of the Whittier Narrows mainshock. Site-amplification spectra are averaged within two frequency bands: the intermediate-frequency band (IFB) from 0.5 to 1.5 Hz and the high-frequency band (HFB) from 2 to 6 Hz. Results are displayed on maps of surficial geology. Average spectral levels are correlated with average shear-wave velocity in the uppermost 30 m, a geotechnical parameter used by the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) to characterize site amplification. Statistically significant correlation is found in both frequency bands. Average spectral amplification levels for NEHRP class B, C, and D sites in the LA urban area are determined. These averages display an expected increase in spectral amplification with category, with a more pronounced variation in the IFB than in the HFB. Considerable overlap in the one-standard-deviation range of the C and D site levels is found in both IFB and HFB, suggesting that site-specific spectral amplification is influenced by more than just near-surface shear-wave velocity. Average site-amplification levels are compared with those obtained from Northridge aftershock records at 28 collocated sites and

  18. Confronting the Nation's Urban Crisis: From Watts (1965) to South Central Los Angeles (1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, George E.; And Others

    What has been learned about making cities better since civil disturbances first arose in American cities is summarized, and guidelines are offered for constructing an urban agenda for improvement. In some respects the country has made real progress since the Watts riots, but in other areas, conditions are unambiguously worse, with increasing…

  19. Los Angeles megacity: a high-resolution land-atmosphere modelling system for urban CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sha; Lauvaux, Thomas; Newman, Sally; Rao, Preeti; Ahmadov, Ravan; Deng, Aijun; Díaz-Isaac, Liza I.; Duren, Riley M.; Fischer, Marc L.; Gerbig, Christoph; Gurney, Kevin R.; Huang, Jianhua; Jeong, Seongeun; Li, Zhijin; Miller, Charles E.; O'Keeffe, Darragh; Patarasuk, Risa; Sander, Stanley P.; Song, Yang; Wong, Kam W.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-07-01

    Megacities are major sources of anthropogenic fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emissions. The spatial extents of these large urban systems cover areas of 10 000 km2 or more with complex topography and changing landscapes. We present a high-resolution land-atmosphere modelling system for urban CO2 emissions over the Los Angeles (LA) megacity area. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Chem model was coupled to a very high-resolution FFCO2 emission product, Hestia-LA, to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations across the LA megacity at spatial resolutions as fine as ˜ 1 km. We evaluated multiple WRF configurations, selecting one that minimized errors in wind speed, wind direction, and boundary layer height as evaluated by its performance against meteorological data collected during the CalNex-LA campaign (May-June 2010). Our results show no significant difference between moderate-resolution (4 km) and high-resolution (1.3 km) simulations when evaluated against surface meteorological data, but the high-resolution configurations better resolved planetary boundary layer heights and vertical gradients in the horizontal mean winds. We coupled our WRF configuration with the Vulcan 2.2 (10 km resolution) and Hestia-LA (1.3 km resolution) fossil fuel CO2 emission products to evaluate the impact of the spatial resolution of the CO2 emission products and the meteorological transport model on the representation of spatiotemporal variability in simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We find that high spatial resolution in the fossil fuel CO2 emissions is more important than in the atmospheric model to capture CO2 concentration variability across the LA megacity. Finally, we present a novel approach that employs simultaneous correlations of the simulated atmospheric CO2 fields to qualitatively evaluate the greenhouse gas measurement network over the LA megacity. Spatial correlations in the atmospheric CO2 fields reflect the coverage of individual measurement sites when a

  20. Los Angeles from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER image was acquired on July 23, 2001 and covers an area of 64 x 72 km. The data were processed to create a simulated natural color image. From its start as a sleepy Spanish pueblo in 1781, LA and its metropolitan area has grown to become an ethnically diverse, semitropical megalopolis, laying claim as the principal center of the western US and the nation's second largest urban area. The city's economy is based on international trade, aerospace, agriculture, tourism, and filmmaking. LA provides a glimpse of the typically cosmopolitan and global city of the future.

    The image is located at 34.1 degrees north latitude and 118.2 degrees west longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution

  1. Molecular Characterization of Organosulfates in Organic Aerosols from Shanghai and Los Angeles Urban Areas by Nanospray-Desorption Electrospray Ionization High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Shikang; Lu, Xiaohui; Levac, Nicole; Bateman, Adam P.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Bones, David L.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Yang, Xin

    2014-09-16

    Aerosol samples collected in the urban areas of Shanghai and Los Angeles were analyzed by nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS) with high mass resolution (m/Δm=100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrile/water and acetonitrile/toluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar compounds, respectively. A diverse mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons, organosulfates, organonitrates, and organics with reduced nitrogen were detected in the Los Angeles sample. Majority of the organics in the Shanghai sample were detected as organosulfates. The dominant organosulfates in the two samples have distinctly different molecular characteristics. Specifically, organosulfates in the Los Angeles sample were dominated by isoprene- or monoterpene-derived products, while organosulfates of yet unknown origin in the Shanghai sample had distinctive characteristics of long aliphatic carbon chains and low degree of oxidation and unsaturation. The use of acetonitrile/toluene solvent facilitated identification of this type of organosulfates, suggesting they could be missed in previous studies relying on sample extraction using common polar solvents. The high molecular weight and low degree of unsaturation and oxidization of the organosulfates detected in the Shanghai sample suggest that they may act as surfactants, and plausibly affect the surface tension and hygroscopicity of the atmospheric particulate matter. We propose that direct esterification of carbonyl or hydroxyl compounds by sulfates or sulfuric acid in liquid phase could be the formation pathway of these special organosulfates. Finally, long-chain alkanes from vehicle emissions might be their precursors.

  2. 40. PLEASANT VALLEY RESERVOIR DAM LOOKING NORTHWEST Los Angeles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. PLEASANT VALLEY RESERVOIR DAM LOOKING NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. Trouble Brewing in Los Angeles. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The city of Los Angeles will face enormous budgetary pressures from the growing deficits in public pensions, both at a state and local level. In this policy brief, the author estimates that Los Angeles faces a total $152.6 billion liability for pensions that are underfunded--including $49.1 billion for the city pension systems, $2.4 billion for…

  4. Estimating the diminution of shear-wave amplitude with distance: Application to the Los Angeles, California, urban area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harmsen, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    The rate of decay with distance of shear-wave amplitude, computed from 20-sec S-wave spectra, is determined from TERRAscope records of small earthquakes in the greater Los Angeles area. Piecewise log-linear interpolation functions and traditional diminution functions are used to fit spectral decay to a maximum distance of 150 km. Simultaneously, isotropic source and receiver terms are determined. Separate branches of the spectral decay function are found for two categories of source depth: greater than 10 km and less than 10 km. In the hypocentral distance range of 20 to 150 km and in the frequency range of 0.5 to 8.0 Hz, an important result of the investigation is that the horizontal-component decay rate associated with deeper-crustal sources is generally greater than that associated with shallower sources and is greater than that which is estimated using more traditional models of spectral decay with distance. The same behavior generally holds for vertical-component spectra. The variation in apparent attenuation rate with source depth should affect seismic-hazard estimates associated with the rupture of blind thrust faults in the Los Angeles basin and vicinity. The results of the inversions suggest that interpolation function representations of spectral decay are sensitive to perturbations of S-wave amplitude due to crustal reflectors, such as post-critical S-wave arrivals from mid-crustal to deep-crustal velocity interfaces.

  5. Impact of remotely sensed albedo and vegetation fraction on simulation of urban climate in WRF-urban canopy model: A case study of the urban heat island in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahmani, P.; Ban-Weiss, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    Modeling the climate of urban areas is of interest for studying urban heat islands (UHIs). Reliable assessment of the primary causes of UHIs and the efficacy of various heat mitigation strategies requires accurate prediction of urban temperatures and realistic representation of land surface physical characteristics in models. In this study, we expand the capabilities of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model by implementing high-resolution, real-time satellite observations of green vegetation fraction (GVF) and albedo. Satellite-based GVF and albedo replace constant values that are assumed for urban pixels in the default version of WRF. Simulations of urban meteorology in Los Angeles using the improved model show marked improvements relative to the default model. The largest improvements are for nocturnal air temperatures, with a reduction in root-mean-square deviation between simulations and observations from 3.8 to 1.9°C. Utilizing the improved model, we quantify relationships between surface and 2 m air temperatures versus urban fraction, GVF, albedo, distance from the ocean, and elevation. Distance from the ocean is found to be the main contributor to variations in temperatures around Los Angeles. After conditionally sampling pixels to minimize the influence of distance from the ocean and elevation, we find that variations in GVF and urban fraction are responsible for up to 58 and 27% of the variance in temperatures. The satellite-supported meteorological modeling framework reported here can be used for studying UHIs in other cities and can serve as a foundation for testing the efficacy of various heat mitigation strategies.

  6. Outreach and education in urban Los Angeles Schools: integration of research into middle and high school science curriculum through the NSF GK-12 SEE-LA program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. C.; Hogue, T. S.; Moldwin, M. B.; Nonacs, P.

    2012-12-01

    A National Science Foundation Graduate Teaching Fellows in K- 12 Education program at UCLA (SEE-LA; http://measure.igpp.ucla.edu/GK12-SEE-LA/ ) partners UCLA faculty and graduate students (fellows) with urban middle and high school science teachers and their students to foster programs of science and engineering exploration that bring the environment of Los Angeles into the classroom. UCLA science and engineering graduate fellows serve as scientists-in-residence at four partner schools to integrate inquiry-based science lessons, facilitate advancements in science content teaching, and ultimately, to improve their own science communication skills. As part of their fellowship, graduate students are required to develop three "major" lessons, including one based on their PhD research at UCLA. During the first four years of the project, the SEE-LA fellows have developed a range of research-based activities, including lessons on sustainable fisheries, ecosystems and remote sensing, earthquakes, urban water quality including invertebrate observations, and post-fire soil chemistry, among others. This presentation will provide an overview of the SEE-LA GK-12 program and development of research lessons that also address California State Science Standards. We also discuss potential sustainability of GK-12 type outreach and education programs. The SEE-LA program has provided development of graduate student communication and teaching skills while also contributing significantly to the integration of science education into K-12 curriculum in Los Angeles schools.

  7. Opportunity in our Ignorance: Urban Biodiversity Study Reveals 30 New Species and One New Nearctic Record for Megaselia (Diptera: Phoridae) in Los Angeles (California, USA).

    PubMed

    Hartop, Emily A; Brown, Brian V; Disney, R Henry L

    2015-01-01

    An urban biodiversity study sampling primarily from private backyards in Los Angeles, California (USA), reveals the presence of fifty-six species of Megaselia within the first few months of sampling. Thirty of these are described as new to science: M. armstrongorum, M. bradyi, M. brejchaorum, M. carthayensis, M. ciancii, M. creasoni, M. defibaughorum, M. donahuei, M. francoae, M. fujiokai, M. hardingorum, M. heini, M. hentschkeae, M. hoffmanorum, M. hoggorum, M. hoguei, M. isaacmajorum, M. kelleri, M. lombardorum, M. marquezi, M. mikejohnsoni, M. oxboroughae, M. pisanoi, M. renwickorum, M. rodriguezorum, M. sacatelensis, M. seaverorum, M. sidneyae, M. steptoeae, and M. wiegmanae. M. largifrontalis is newly reported from the Nearctic Region. The implications these findings have for future taxonomic work in Megaselia, particularly in urban areas, are discussed. PMID:25947525

  8. Application of earth resources technology satellite data to urban and regional planning: Test site, County of Los Angeles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raje, S.; Mcknight, J.; Willoughby, G.; Economy, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The County of Los Angeles photointerpreted ERTS film products to define problems of interest, coordinated ground truth over the complex test site including interfaces with secondary users as well as participated in on-line analyses of the GE multispectral information extraction systems. Interactive machine analyses were carried out, developing techniques and procedures as well as evaluating the outputs for community and regional planning. Extensive aircraft underflight coverage was provided that was valuable both in inputs preparation and outputs evaluation of the machine-aided analyses. One of the nonstandard ERTS images led to the discovery of a major new fault lineament on the northern slope of the Santa Monica Mountains.

  9. Molecular characterization of organosulfates in organic aerosols from Shanghai and Los Angeles urban areas by nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shikang; Lu, Xiaohui; Levac, Nicole; Bateman, Adam P; Nguyen, Tran B; Bones, David L; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Yang, Xin

    2014-09-16

    Fine aerosol particles in the urban areas of Shanghai and Los Angeles were collected on days that were characterized by their stagnant air and high organic aerosol concentrations. They were analyzed by nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with high mass resolution (m/Δm = 100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrile and water and acetonitrile and toluene were used to extract and ionize polar and nonpolar compounds, respectively. A diverse mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons, organosulfates, organonitrates, and organics with reduced nitrogen were detected in the Los Angeles sample. A majority of the organics in the Shanghai sample were detected as organosulfates. The dominant organosulfates that were detected at two locations have distinctly different molecular characteristics. Specifically, the organosulfates in the Los Angeles sample were dominated by biogenic products, while the organosulfates of a yet unknown origin found in the Shanghai sample had distinctive characteristics of long aliphatic carbon chains and low degrees of oxidation and unsaturation. The use of the acetonitrile and toluene solvent facilitated the observation of this type of organosulfates, which suggests that they could have been missed in previous studies that relied on sample extraction using common polar solvents. The high molecular weight and low degree of unsaturation and oxidization of the uncommon organosulfates suggest that they may act as surfactants and plausibly affect the surface tension and hygroscopicity of atmospheric particles. We propose that direct esterification of carbonyl or hydroxyl compounds by sulfates or sulfuric acid in the liquid phase could be the formation pathway of these special organosulfates. Long-chain alkanes from vehicle emissions might be their precursors. PMID:25184338

  10. Drop Out Patterns in the East Los Angeles Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waktola, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    This study attempted to analyze the drop out problem from spatial perspectives within the context of East Los Angeles Community College, California. Selected urban land-use types, which positively and negatively influence the propensity to drop out or persist-in colleges, were selected and captured during a global positioning system (GPS)-based…

  11. Shuttle Endeavour Flyover of Los Angeles Landmarks

    NASA Video Gallery

    Space shuttle Endeavour atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft flew over many Los Angeles area landmarks on its final ferry flight Sept. 21, 2012, including the Coliseum, the Hollywood Sign, Griffith...

  12. Urban solar photovoltaics potential: An inventory and modelling study applied to the San Fernando Valley region of Los Angeles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelici, G. L.; Bryant, N. A.; Freta, R. K.; Friedman, S. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures for analyzing the potential of solar photovoltaic collectors to meet energy requirements in a metropolitan region are described and a modeling effort is applied to the San Fernando Valley region of Los Angeles. The procedure involves a series of steps designed to produce maps and tabulations revealing the amount of rooftop area available for establishing solar collectors and the proportion of energy requirement that could be potentially supplied by solar photovoltaics within each of the 533 mainline feeder service areas in the study area. For the sixty five square mile study area, the results showed that, with half the available flat and south facing roofs used and assuming the availability of energy storage, 52.7 percent of the actual kWh energy requirements could have been met in 1978 using photovoltaic collectors. Hourly, daily, weekly, and monthly fluctuations in potential supply and actual loads and recommendations of avenues for further research are discussed. Some further potential applications of the modeling technique are suggested.

  13. The Effects of Los Angeles Universal Preschool on Quality Preschool Teacher Retention in Los Angeles County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Stevens, Holly Anne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of Los Angeles Universal Preschool (LAUP) programs has a positive effect on the retention of quality preschool teachers in Los Angeles County. In prior work, preschool teacher retention is associated with wages, program structure, program process, professional development, and…

  14. Review of the Organizational Structure and Operations of the Los Angeles Unified School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Los Angeles Unified School District is the second largest public school system in the United States, and one of the largest organizations of any kind in the country. As with urban school systems across the country, the Los Angeles school district is under enormous pressure to improve. The district is under public scrutiny and is the subject of…

  15. WRF-UCM Modeling of Urban Land-Atmosphere Interactions with a Focus on Landscape Irrigation in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahmani, P.; Hogue, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Urbanization is a demographic trend worldwide. Urban irrigation can exceed natural precipitation and is an important component of the water cycle in water stressed cities. 14-30% of municipal water consumption in California is used for irrigation. Understanding and quantifying the potential influence of urban anthropogenic soil moisture contribution on local and regional hydrological cycle is an imperative step toward sustainable and better-managed water resources in water scarce regions. In the current study we address the impact and feedback of urban irrigation by integrating a developed irrigation scheme within the coupled framework of the WRF-UCM (Urban Canopy Model) over the Los Angeles metropolitan area at 1 km spatial resolution. We focus on the impacts of irrigation on the urban water cycle and atmospheric feedback during the summer period. Our results demonstrate a significant sensitivity of WRF-UCM simulated surface turbulent fluxes to the incorporation of irrigation. Introducing anthropogenic moisture, the vegetated pixels show increased latent heat fluxes and decreased sensible and ground heat fluxes confirming irrigation induced shift in the energy partitioning toward elevated latent heat fluxes. The evaluation of the model performance against ground-based reference evapotranspiration (ET) observations indicates that WRF-UCM, after adding irrigation, performs reasonably during the course of the simulation, tracking day to day variability of ET. In the absence of irrigation, simulated ET values are significantly underestimated. This is due to fact that soil moisture is the only source of water in the absence of significant precipitation. In the course of model spin up, the moisture sorted in the soil layers is consumed, resulting in considerable decreases in the latent heat fluxes. Evaluating the model outputs against MODIS based land surface temperature illustrates that this ET reduction leads to reduced cooling effects of urban vegetation

  16. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 & 209 - Type A Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Hawthorn Avenue, Laurel Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & 211 - Type B Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Laurel Street, Flores Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. REACTIVE HYDROCARBON CONTROL COSTS FOR LOS ANGELES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the results of a study to determine the costs associated with controlling reactive organic emissions in the Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region. An inventory of organic emissions from 26 categories of stationary and mobile sources was develop...

  19. African American Art: A Los Angeles Legacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Harriet

    This curriculum unit focuses on the importance of Los Angeles (California) as a center for African American art and shows how African American artists have developed their own styles and how critics and collectors have encouraged them. The unit consists of four lessons, each of which can stand alone or be used in conjunction with the others. It…

  20. Educational and Demographic Profile: Los Angeles County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Los Angeles County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  1. Minorities in Suburbs: The Los Angeles Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinovitz, Francine F.; Siembieda, William J.

    This book focuses on black suburbanization in the Los Angeles area, and questions whether the national increase in black suburbanization should be viewed with optimism or pessimism. The study addresses three questions: (1) Does the presence of substantial black populations in suburban areas represent suburbanization as it is normally thought of,…

  2. Los Angeles Settles ACLU Suit on Layoffs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A settlement crafted last week seeking to curb the use of seniority as a factor in teacher layoffs in the Los Angeles school system could become one of the nation's most far-reaching overhauls of the "last hired, first fired" policies common in school districts. If approved by a judge, the settlement would shield up to 45 low-performing schools in…

  3. Latina Adolescent Childbearing in East Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Pamela I.

    This book is about teenage pregnancy among Latina teenagers in East Los Angeles (California). It focuses on teenage pregnancy and motherhood among economically disadvantaged Latinas aged 17 and under. The young mothers in this study were participants in a series of intervention efforts to prevent repeat pregnancy at a family planning clinic. This…

  4. Fostering K-12 Inquiry-based Lesson Development on Regional Water Resource Issues in Los Angeles Urban Schools through the NSF UCLA SEE-LA GK-12 program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, T. S.; Burke, M. P.; Thulsirag, V.; Daniel, J.; Moldwin, M.; Nonacs, P.

    2010-12-01

    A National Science Foundation Graduate Teaching Fellows in K- 12 Education program at UCLA (SEE-LA; http://measure.igpp.ucla.edu/GK12-SEE-LA/ ) partners UCLA faculty and graduate students (fellows) with urban middle and high school science teachers and their students to foster programs of science and engineering exploration that bring the environment of Los Angeles into the classroom. UCLA graduate fellows serve as scientists-in-residence at four partner schools to integrate inquiry-based science lessons, facilitate advancements in science content teaching, and ultimately, to improve their own science communication skills. As part of their fellowship, graduate students are required to develop inquiry-based lessons in their partner classroom. During the first two years of the project, the SEE-LA fellows have developed a range of inquiry-based activities, from invertebrate observations in an urban stream system, to water and home energy consumption surveys, to a school biodiversity investigation, to a school-wide alternative energy fair, to engineering the cleanup of environmental disasters, such as the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Several of the current fellows have dissertation research in water resource related fields and are specifically integrating lessons specific to their research into their partner classrooms, including urban stream water quality, post-fire watershed behavior, beach water quality assessment and E. coli source tracking. This presentation will provide an overview of goals of the SEE-LA GK-12 program, development of inquiry-based water resource lessons and resulting engagement in the partner classrooms. University and local pre-college school partnerships provide an excellent opportunity to support the development of graduate student communication and teaching skills while also contributing significantly to the integration of science education into K-12 curriculum.

  5. Methane Hotspots in the Los Angeles Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Bush, S.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Lai, C.; Kort, E. A.; Blake, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne observations show that Los Angeles (LA) is a large source of methane to the atmosphere, yet the sources of excess methane from the urban area are poorly constrained. We used a mobile laboratory, a Ford Transit van equipped with cavity ring down spectrometers (Picarro, Inc.), to measure greenhouse gases (CH4, CO2, and CO) mole fractions in LA. On-road surveys across the LA Basin were conducted seasonally to determine patterns of CH4 enrichment in space and over time, with a focus on quantifying methane leaks from known sources. We found fugitive leaks and elevated CH4 concentrations throughout the LA Basin. Some were associated with known sources, such as landfills, wastewater treatment, and oil and gas infrastructure, while others had an unknown origin. Urban CH4 enrichment varied over the course of the year, largely due to seasonal changes in meteorological conditions. Nevertheless, our mobile surveys revealed CH4 hotspots (>200 ppb elevated with respect to background levels) that persisted among seasons. High CH4 concentrations were most easily predicted by proximity to methane sources, particularly near the coast, while elevated CH4 levels were more evenly dispersed in inland areas. CH4 hotspots had a disproportionate impact on excess methane relative to the area they accounted for, typically providing more than a quarter of excess methane measured on a transect. These data improve estimates of the relative roles of specific leaks and emission sectors to LA's excess methane. Depending on the cost of reducing these CH4 leaks, a focus on CH4 emissions may prove an effective way to reduce LA's greenhouse gas emissions in the near term.

  6. Was all that Los Angeles River flood control concrete necessary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzert, W. C.; Regalado, S. S.; LaDochy, S.; Ramirez, P. C.; Willis, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    In 1938, heavy rains over the Los Angeles Basin resulted in widespread and costly flooding of the Los Angeles River floodplain. In response to the resultant damage, 51 miles of the River was concreted from the San Fernando Valley to the Pacific Ocean. Today proposals to modify the river to capture more water and to restore it to a more natural state have been approved. Through comparison of rainfall data, we test whether channelization can adequately handle the extreme flooding events occurring since 1938. Between February 27th to March 3rd 1938, two major storms resulted in 14.1 inches of rain in Pasadena, CA leading to the flooding of the Los Angeles River, 115 fatalities, the destruction of 5,601 buildings, and to $627 million (2011 dollars) in damages. Downtown Los Angeles averages 15 inches of precipitation a year, while the San Gabriel Mountains, where most of the Los Angeles River watershed rainfall is collected, typically receive more than 40 inches of rain annually. Eight record storms, each with rainfall totals over 11 inches, since the 1938 flood could have created devastating deluges were it not for channelization. Presently, at full stage the channelized Los Angeles River can accommodate a discharge of 129,000 cfs. During the 1938 flood event the discharge peaked at 68,000 cfs above Arroyo Seco and 79,000 cfs below Firestone Blvd. A similar storm event today would have led to increased discharge due to urbanization. Since 1938, the greatest discharge recorded at the same stations was 52,200 and 74,400 cfs during the February 16th 1980 storm. Although damage was substantial during this storm, river channelization prevented fatalities and much damage. To date, the channelization of the Los Angeles River has been successful in flood control. However, our research shows that southern California precipitation is becoming more intense which may result in increased flooding. Any future modifications to the river must be prepared to handle the extreme flooding

  7. Wolf Fire West of Los Angeles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph taken from the International Space Station on June 7, 2002, shows the Copper Fire burning in the hills outside Los Angeles. Astronauts use a variety of lenses and look angles as their orbits pass over wildfires to document the long-distance movements of smoke from the fires as well as details of the burning areas. This image clearly illustrates the difficult, rugged terrain that firefighters must face when fighting these wildland fires.

  8. Los Angeles Urban Mathematics/Science/Technology Collaborative Five-Year Site Report. Program Report 91-5 LA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Norman L.; And Others

    The Urban Mathematics Collaborative (UMC) project has the goal of contributing to the improvement of mathematics education in the inner-city schools by identifying models to enhance the professional lives of teachers and encouraging the entry of high school mathematics teachers into a larger mathematics community including mathematicians from…

  9. Application of Earth Resources Technology Satellite data to urban development and regional planning: Test site, County of Los Angeles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raje, S. (Principal Investigator); Economy, R.; Mcknight, J. S.; Garofalo, P.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Signigicant results have been obtained from the analyses of ERTS-1 imagery from five cycles over Test Site SR 124 by classical photointerpretation and by an interactive hybrid multispectral information extraction system (GEMS). Photointerpretation has produced over 25 overlays at 1:1,000,000 scale depicting regional relations and urban structure in terms of several hundred linear and areal features. A possible new fault lineament has been discovered on the northern slope of the Santa Monica mountains. GEMS analysis of the ERTS-1 products has provided new or improved information in the following planning data categories: urban vegetation; land cover segregation; manmade and natural impact monitoring; urban design; land suitability. ERTS-1 data analysis has allowed planners to establish trends that directly impact planning policies. For example, detectable grading and new construction sites quantitatively indicated the extent, direction, and rate of urban expansion which enable planners to forecast demand and growth patterns on a regional scale. This new source of information will not only assist current methods to be more efficient, but permits entirely new planning methodologies to be employed.

  10. Interactive analysis and evaluation of ERTS data for regional planning and urban development: A Los Angeles Basin case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raje, S.; Economy, R.; Willoughby, G.; Mcknight, J.

    1974-01-01

    The progression endemic to the ERTS Data Use Experiment SR 124 in data quality, analysis sophistication and applications responsiveness is reviewed. The roles of the variety of ERTS products, including the supporting underflight aircraft imagery at various scales, are discussed in the context of this investigation. The versatility of interpretation techniques and outputs developed and implemented via the General Electric Multispectral Information Extraction Systems is described and exemplified by both system-expository and applications-explanatory products. The wide-ranging and in-depth applications studied in the course of this experiment can be characterized as community-oriented and agency-directed. In the former, generic category, which is primarily data-contextual, problems analyzed dealt with agricultural systems, surface water bodies, snow cover, brush fire burns, forestry, grass growth, parks - golf courses - cemeteries, dust storms, grading sites, geological features and coastal water structure. The ERTS MSS band selectivity and measurements thresholds were of primary interest here. The agency-directed application areas have been user-evaluational in nature. Beginning with overall urbanized regional analysis of land cover density-development intensity, residential areas were analyzed for ascertaining if housing types could be aggregated with any degree of reliability.

  11. Space Radar Image of Los Angeles, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of Los Angeles, California, taken on October 2, 1994. Visible in the image are Long Beach Harbor at the bottom right (south corner of the image), Los Angeles International Airport at the bottom center, with Santa Monica just to the left of it and the Hollywood Hills to the left of Santa Monica. Also visible in the image are the freeway systems of Los Angeles, which appear as dark lines. The San Gabriel Mountains (center top) and the communities of San Fernando Valley, Simi Valley and Palmdale can be seen on the left-hand side. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 24th orbit. The image is centered at 34 degrees north latitude, 118 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 100 kilometers by 52 kilometers (62 miles by 32 miles). This single-frequency SIR-C image was obtained by the L-band (24 cm) radar channel, horizontally transmitted and received. Portions of the Pacific Ocean visible in this image appear very dark as do freeways and other flat surfaces such as the airport runways. Mountains in the image are dark grey, with brighter patches on the mountain slopes, which face in the direction of the radar illumination (from the top of the image). Suburban areas, with the low-density housing and tree-lined streets that are typical of Los Angeles, appear as lighter grey. Areas with high-rise buildings, such as downtown Los Angeles, appear in very bright white, showing a higher density of housing and streets which run parallel to the radar flight track. Scientists hope to use radar image data from SIR-C/X-SAR to map fire scars in areas prone to brush fires, such as Los Angeles. In this image, the Altadena fire area is visible in the top center of the image as a patch of mountainous terrain which is slightly darker than the nearby mountains. Using all the radar frequency and polarization images provided by SIR

  12. Implementing municipal tree planting: Los Angeles million-tree initiative.

    PubMed

    Pincetl, Stephanie

    2010-02-01

    Urban forests are increasingly being seen as an important infrastructure that can help cities remediate their environmental impacts. This work reports on the first steps in implementing a million tree program in Los Angeles and the ways such a biogenic-living-infrastructure has been approached. Numbers of studies have been done to quantify the benefits of urban forests, but little has been written on the process of implementing urban tree planting programs. The investigative methods were primarily qualitative, involving interviews, attending meetings and conducting literature reviews. Results indicate that multiple nonprofit and city agency programs are involved in planting and maintaining trees and this has required coordination among groups that here-to-fore were unaccustomed to having to collaborate. The main finding that emerge from this research is that the implementation of such a program in Los Angeles is more complicated than it may seem due to several interacting factors: the need to rely on multiple public and private organizations to put trees into the ground and to maintain them; coordination of these multiple efforts must be centralized, but requires a great deal of time and effort and maybe resisted by some of the partners; funding for planting and long term maintenance must be pieced together from multiple sources; acceptance of trees by residents varies by neighborhood as does tree canopy cover; appropriate nursery supply can be limited; the location of the program within the city administration is determined by who initiates the program. PMID:20016982

  13. Implementing Municipal Tree Planting: Los Angeles Million-Tree Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincetl, Stephanie

    2010-02-01

    Urban forests are increasingly being seen as an important infrastructure that can help cities remediate their environmental impacts. This work reports on the first steps in implementing a million tree program in Los Angeles and the ways such a biogenic—living—infrastructure has been approached. Numbers of studies have been done to quantify the benefits of urban forests, but little has been written on the process of implementing urban tree planting programs. The investigative methods were primarily qualitative, involving interviews, attending meetings and conducting literature reviews. Results indicate that multiple nonprofit and city agency programs are involved in planting and maintaining trees and this has required coordination among groups that here-to-fore were unaccustomed to having to collaborate. The main finding that emerge from this research is that the implementation of such a program in Los Angeles is more complicated than it may seem due to several interacting factors: the need to rely on multiple public and private organizations to put trees into the ground and to maintain them; coordination of these multiple efforts must be centralized, but requires a great deal of time and effort and maybe resisted by some of the partners; funding for planting and long term maintenance must be pieced together from multiple sources; acceptance of trees by residents varies by neighborhood as does tree canopy cover; appropriate nursery supply can be limited; the location of the program within the city administration is determined by who initiates the program.

  14. Glyoxal contribution to aerosols over Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies have indicated that glyoxal (chemical formula OCHCHO), an atmospheric oxidation product of isoprene and aromatic compounds, may contribute to secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere, which can block sunlight and affect atmospheric chemistry. Some aerosols are primary aerosols, emitted directly into the atmosphere, while others are secondary, formed through chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Washenfelder et al. describe in situ glyoxal measurements from Pasadena, Calif., near Los Angeles, made during summer 2010. They used three different methods to calculate the contribution of glyoxal to secondary atmospheric aerosol and found that it is responsible for 0-0.2 microgram per cubic meter, or 0-4%, of the secondary organic aerosol mass. The researchers also compared their results to those of a previous study that calculated the glyoxal contribution to aerosol for Mexico City. Mexico City had higher levels of organic aerosol mass from glyoxal. They suggest that the lower contribution of glyoxal to aerosol concentrations for Los Angeles may be due to differences in the composition or water content of the aerosols above the two cities. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, doi:10.1029/2011JD016314, 2011)

  15. Perspective View, SRTM / Landsat, Los Angeles, Calif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Los Angeles, Calif., is one of the world's largest metropolitan areas with a population of about 15 million people. The urban areas mostly cover the coastal plains and lie within the inland valleys. The intervening and adjacent mountains are generally too rugged for much urban development. This in large part because the mountains are 'young', meaning they are still building (and eroding) in this seismically active (earthquake prone) region.

    Earthquake faults commonly lie between the mountains and the lowlands. The San Andreas fault, the largest fault in California, likewise divides the very rugged San Gabriel Mountains from the low-relief Mojave Desert, thus forming a straight topographic boundary between the top center and lower right corner of the image. We present two versions of this perspective image from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM): one with and one without a graphic overlay that maps faults that have been active in Late Quaternary times (white lines). The fault database was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey.

    For the annotated version of this image, please select Figure 1, below: [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Large image: 2 mB jpeg)

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on May 4, 2001, about seven weeks before the summer solstice, so natural terrain shading is not particularly strong. It is also not especially apparent given a view direction (northwest) nearly parallel to the sun illumination (shadows generally fall on the backsides of mountains). Consequently, topographic shading derived from the SRTM elevation model was added to the Landsat image, with a false sun illumination from the left (southwest). This synthetic shading enhances the appearance of the topography.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and substantially helps in analyzing the large and

  16. How Diverse Schools Affect Student Mobility: Charter, Magnet, and Newly Built Institutions in Los Angeles. Los Angeles School Infrastructure Project. Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dauter, Luke; Fuller, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Everyone knows that student achievement often suffers when children and families move, leaving behind their school and neighborhood, yet, in urban districts like Los Angeles, mobility is now encouraged by the development of mixed-markets of diverse schools, including charter, pilot, and magnet schools in. Over 60 new school facilities were opened…

  17. 91. FAIRMONT RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST/NORTHWEST Los Angeles Aqueduct, From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. FAIRMONT RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST/NORTHWEST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Los Angeles Community Colleges Information Digest [1998-99].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Dexter; Prather, George

    This digest presents information about the Los Angeles Community Colleges and their students using tables, charts, and narrative text that emphasize trends and changes during the past twenty years. Statistical highlights include: (1) in 1998, Los Angeles Community College enrollment declined by 45 students overall (East and Valley had the highest…

  19. Los Angeles Tries Luring Back Dropouts via Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports that education leaders in Los Angeles, faced with unrelenting pressure to raise anemic high school graduation rates, are turning to YouTube, MySpace, text messaging, and the radio waves to reach students at risk of dropping out of school and lure back thousands who have already left. The Los Angeles Unified School…

  20. Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund: Los Angeles Program Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Los Angeles, CA.

    The Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund was created in response to the high school dropout problem in Los Angeles. The Fund enables the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Los Angeles to build upon the successful relationship it has developed in the Hispanic community and maximizes the effectiveness of existing student support programs by directing needy…

  1. The Politics of School Desegregation in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart-Nibbrig, Nand E.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the influences that city and State politics have on school desegregation in Los Angeles. Asserts that the Los Angeles desegregation plan reflects the influence and power of the city's westside by providing an escape from its provisions of mandatory busing while meeting the school district's desegregation guidelines. (Author/GC)

  2. 78 FR 68135 - Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles County, California AGENCY... Environmental Impact Statement will be prepared for a proposed highway project in Los Angeles County, California... place of the hearing. The Draft Environmental Impact Statement will be available for public and...

  3. Roberto Gutierrez and the Art of Mapping Latino Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orozco, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Chicano artist Roberto Gutierrez is one of the most important artists to come out of the East Los Angeles artistic boom of the early 1970s. Gutierrez's life and the significance of his work to the evolving Chicano artistic narrative about Latino life and aesthetics in Los Angeles are discussed.

  4. Los Angeles Trade-Technical College Assessment Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Trade-Technical Coll., CA.

    This assessment report concerns the Los Angeles Trade-Technical College and the information, which is reported to the Los Angeles Community College District. The data was gathered through interviews conducted by an outside company. The report summarizes what interviewers learned about Trade-Tech's past and present and offers recommendations to…

  5. Glitches in Los Angeles Payroll System Spark Furor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Thousands of Los Angeles teachers have not been paid properly for months because of errors in a corporate-style payroll system that was introduced in January as part of a sweeping, $95 million computer modernization. The Los Angeles Unified School District acknowledges that the payroll system's rollout was rushed and tainted by numerous…

  6. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal waters produced from large oil fields are currently the most important geothermal resources in Los Angeles County. Otherwise, the County does not appear to have any large, near-surface geothermal resources. The oil fields produce thermal water because of both the moderate depths of production and normal to above-normal geothermal gradients. Gradients are about 3.0-3.5/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Ventura Basin and range from that up to about 5.5-6.0/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Los Angeles Basin. The hottest fields in the County are west of the Newport-Inglewood Structural Zone. The Los Angeles Basin has substantially more potential for uses of heat from oil fields than does the Ventura Basin because of its large fields and dense urban development. Produced fluid temperatures there range from ambient air to boiling, but most are in the 100-150/sup 0/F range. Daily water production ranges from only a few barrels at some fields to over a million barrels at Wilmington Oil Field; nearly all fields produce less than 50,000 barrels/day. Water salinity generally ranges from about 15,000-35,000 mg/liter NaCl. Fields with the most promise as sources of heat for outside applications are Wilmington, Torrance, Venice Beach, and Lawndale. The centralized treatment facilities are the most favorable sites for extraction of heat within the oil fields. Because of the poor water quality heat exchangers will likely be required rather than direct circulation of the field water to users. The best sites for applications are commercial-industrial areas and possibly institutional structures occupied by large numbers of people.

  7. Los Angeles, California, Radar Image, Wrapped Color as Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic radar image shows the relationships of the dense urban development of Los Angeles and the natural contours of the land. The image includes the Pacific Ocean on the left, the flat Los Angeles Basin across the center, and the steep ranges of the Santa Monica and Verdugo mountains along the top. The two dark strips near the coast at lower left are the runways of Los Angeles International Airport. Downtown Los Angeles is the bright yellow and pink area at lower center. Pasadena, including the Rose Bowl, are seen half way down the right edge of the image. The communities of Glendale and Burbank, including the Burbank Airport, are seen at the center of the top edge of the image. Hazards from earthquakes, floods and fires are intimately related to the topography in this area. Topographic data and other remote sensing images provide valuable information for assessing and mitigating the natural hazards for cities such as Leangles.

    This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between

  8. Smog chamber simulation of Los Angeles pollutant transport

    SciTech Connect

    Glasson, W.A.

    1981-06-01

    A smog chamber study simulated pollutant transport from Los Angeles to downwind areas by irradiating a typical Los Angeles hydrocarbon/nitrogen oxides mixture for extended periods of time. Smog chamber experiments were extended to 22 hr to obtain an integrated light intensity equal to that which occurs in this city. Results show that downwind oxidant levels are only slightly affected by large changes in emissions of nitrogen oxides. However, it is clear that reduced emissions will lead to an increase in oxidant in downtown Los Angeles. (6 graphs, 9 references, 1 table)

  9. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF NITRATE AEROSOLS IN THE LOS ANGELES AIR BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric aerosol was sampled with a low pressure impactor at a coastal, an urban, and an agricultural site in the Los Angeles air basin. The material collected on each stage was analyzed for nitrate by direct vaporization into a chemiluminescent analyzer, sensitive at nano...

  10. Comparing Outcomes for Los Angeles County's HUD-Assisted and Unassisted CalWORKS Leavers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Nandita; Hendra, Richard

    The impact of supplemental assistance from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on CalWORKs leavers was examined in a study of CalWORKs recipients in Los Angeles County, California, who stopped receiving welfare benefits in the third quarter of 1998. Two groups received federal housing assistance at the time of exit from…

  11. Final Ferry Takes SCA-Endeavour Over Los Angeles

    NASA Video Gallery

    Space shuttle Endeavour atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft overflew many landmarks in Los Angeles to conclude its final ferry flight into history on Sept. 21, 2012. Among highlights in this video...

  12. Home Tutorials vs. the Public Schools in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Roy A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Examines the Home Tutorial Program in the San Fernando Valley of California in the areas of organization, parent attitudes, learning environment, achievement, and socialization. Compare the home program with the Los Angeles Unified School District. (IRT)

  13. Epidemiology of pancreas cancer in Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, T.M.; Paganini-Hill, A.

    1981-03-15

    The characteristics of the 3614 Los Angeles County residents in whom cancer of the exocrine pancreas was diagnosed during the period 1972-1977 were compared with those of all county residents and patients in whom any cancer was diagnosed during the same period. Seventy-nine percent of the diagnoses had been pathologically verified. This disease still preferentially afflicts the old, the black, and men, although the differences in risk with factors other than age are modest. The disease is not evenly distributed by social class, or over time, although it is not clear that the observed differences reflect etiology. The distributions with respect to important categories of occupation and industry, religion, marital status, geography of residence, and birthplace were rather uniform. Although there is no obvious explanation for any of several unexpected minor inequities in the pattern of incidence, there is no compelling evidence to support any specific environmental cause. There is substantial evidence which is inconsistent with those environmental hypotheses that have been proposed previously.

  14. Los Angeles: The most differentiated basaltic martian meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Warren, Paul H.; Greenwood, James P.; Verish, Robert S.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Hervig, Richard L.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.

    2000-11-01

    Los Angeles is a new martian meteorite that expands the compositional range of basaltic shergottites. Compared to Shergotty, Zagami, QUE94201, and EET79001-B, Los Angeles is more differentiated, with higher concentrations of incompatible elements (e.g., La) and a higher abundance of late-stage phases such as phosphates and K-rich feldspathic glass. The pyroxene crystallization trend starts at compositions more ferroan than in other martian basalts. Trace elements indicate a greater similarity to Shergotty and Zagami than to QUE94201 or EET79001-B, but the Mg/Fe ratio is low even compared to postulated parent melts of Shergotty and Zagami. Pyroxene in Los Angeles has 0.7 4-μm-thick exsolution lamellae, ˜10 times thicker than those in Shergotty and Zagami. Opaque oxide compositions suggest a low equilibration temperature at an oxygen fugacity near the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer. Los Angeles cooled more slowly than Shergotty and Zagami. Slow cooling, coupled with the ferroan bulk composition, produced abundant fine-grained intergrowths of fayalite, hedenbergite, and silica, by the breakdown of pyroxferroite. Shock effects in Los Angeles include maskelynitized plagioclase, pyroxene with mosaic extinction, and rare fault zones. One such fault ruptured a previously decomposed zone of pyroxferroite. Although highly differentiated, the bulk composition of Los Angeles is not close to the low-Ca/Si composition of the globally wind-stirred soil of Mars.

  15. Comparison of ozone exposure characteristics in forested regions near Mexico City and Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Paul R.; de Lourdes de Bauer, María; Quevedo Nolasco, Abel; Hernández Tejeda, Tomás

    This comparison of forest exposure to ozone in the vicinity of México City and Los Angeles provides preliminary evidence of the seasonal differences in ozone concentrations. Summer concentrations near México City are not as high as those near Los Angeles because most of the precipitation and associated cloudiness occurs near México City during the months of June through September. Winter concentrations remain nearly as high as summer concentrations at México City, because in winter skies are clearer and incident sunlight remains high. Latitudinal influences on solar zenith angle and the higher altitude of the México City region both contribute to a higher actinic flux than in the Los Angeles region. The primary difference in forest exposure is that there is very little respite from adverse ozone concentrations during the entire year in the México City region. Also, the rainy summer season would likely diminish water stress and result in greater ozone uptake at the Desierto de los Leones compared to dry summer conditions in California. The closer proximity of the Desierto de los Leones monitoring site to the urban area also contributes to high winter exposures. There is some respite from exposure during the winter in the San Bernardino mountain region; however, summer concentrations are higher than near México City. The greater transport distance from the Los Angeles source region also contributes to lower winter exposures.

  16. 77 FR 25743 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    .... Teeter, Ph.D., Curator of Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549...., Curator of Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549, telephone (310)...

  17. PM 10 and ozone control strategy to improve visibility in the los angeles basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Robert J.; Welsing, Peter R.; Rozzi, Carlo

    The greater Los Angeles metropolitan area is in violation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) ambient standards for both ozone and PM 10. Accompanying these violations are hazy summer conditions, with current annual median visibility in the inland portions of Los Angeles running about 13 km, and visibilities decreasing to about 3 km on the 90th percentile days (worst days). The USEPA has given the local air pollution control agency until 2010 to bring the area into compliance with these standards. Because of continued population growth, accompanying light industry, dependence on private motor vehicles, and adverse natural meteorological conditions, emission reductions costing billions of dollars will be needed between now and 2010. The combination of emission reductions which will result in the fastest ozone and PM 10 cleanup at the lowest cost are presented. Substantial emission reductions in NO x, reactive hydrocarbons, SO x, ammonia, soot and fugitive dust will result in visibility improvements in the Los Angeles area. However, enactment of this comprehensive control strategy will only improve the annual median visibility to about 20 km and the 90th percentile days to 6.5 km. Significant changes in fine mass will result in relatively small changes in perceived visibility since the human eye is unable to differentiate visual range changes even as large as 40% in an urban landscape typical of Los Angeles.

  18. Evolving Groundwater Rights and Management in Metropolitan Los Angeles: Implications for Water Supply and Stormwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porse, E.; Pincetl, S.; Glickfeld, M.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater supports many aspects of human life. In cities, groundwater can provide a cost-effective source of water for drinking and industrial uses, while groundwater basins provide storage. The role of groundwater in a city's water supply tends to change over time. In the Los Angeles metropolitan area, groundwater is critical. Over decades, users in the region's many basins allocated annual pumping rights to groundwater among users through adjudications. These rights were determined through collective processes over decades, which contributed to the complex array of public and private organizations involved in water management. The rights also continue to evolve. We analyzed changes in the distribution of groundwater rights over time for adjudicated basins in Southern Los Angeles County. Results indicate that groundwater rights are increasingly: 1) controlled or regulated by public institutions and municipalities, and 2) consolidated among larger users. Yet, both the percentage of total supplies provided by groundwater, as well as the distribution of groundwater rights, varies widely among cities and communities throughout Los Angeles. As metropolitan Los Angeles faces reduced water imports and emphasizes local water reliance, access to pumping rights and storage capacity in groundwater basins will become even more vital. We discuss implications of our results for future urban water management.

  19. Fragmented Flows: Water Supply in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Pincetl, Stephanie; Porse, Erik; Cheng, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    In the Los Angeles metropolitan region, nearly 100 public and private entities are formally involved in the management and distribution of potable water-a legacy rooted in fragmented urban growth in the area and late 19th century convictions about local control of services. Yet, while policy debates focus on new forms of infrastructure, restructured pricing mechanisms, and other technical fixes, the complex institutional architecture of the present system has received little attention. In this paper, we trace the development of this system, describe its interconnections and disjunctures, and demonstrate the invisibility of water infrastructure in LA in multiple ways-through mapping, statistical analysis, and historical texts. Perverse blessings of past water abundance led to a complex, but less than resilient, system with users accustomed to cheap, easily accessible water. We describe the lack of transparency and accountability in the current system, as well as its shortcomings in building needed new infrastructure and instituting new water rate structures. Adapting to increasing water scarcity and likely droughts must include addressing the architecture of water management. PMID:27174451

  20. Fragmented Flows: Water Supply in Los Angeles County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincetl, Stephanie; Porse, Erik; Cheng, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    In the Los Angeles metropolitan region, nearly 100 public and private entities are formally involved in the management and distribution of potable water—a legacy rooted in fragmented urban growth in the area and late 19th century convictions about local control of services. Yet, while policy debates focus on new forms of infrastructure, restructured pricing mechanisms, and other technical fixes, the complex institutional architecture of the present system has received little attention. In this paper, we trace the development of this system, describe its interconnections and disjunctures, and demonstrate the invisibility of water infrastructure in LA in multiple ways—through mapping, statistical analysis, and historical texts. Perverse blessings of past water abundance led to a complex, but less than resilient, system with users accustomed to cheap, easily accessible water. We describe the lack of transparency and accountability in the current system, as well as its shortcomings in building needed new infrastructure and instituting new water rate structures. Adapting to increasing water scarcity and likely droughts must include addressing the architecture of water management.

  1. The Los Angeles Experience in Monitoring Desegregation: Progress and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Nicelma J.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a case analysis of the role of the Los Angeles (California) School Monitoring Committee in the implementation of school desegregation. Demonstrates how citizen monitoring advisory committees work in desegregated settings and discusses the challenges, problems, and opportunities they are likely to face. (Author/MK)

  2. The Los Angeles Experience in Monitoring Desegregation: Progress and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Nicelma J.

    This paper presents a case analysis of the role of the Los Angeles School Monitoring Committee in the implementation of school desegregation. The analysis provides information about how citizens' monitoring committees (CMCs) work in the desegregated setting, along with the challenges, problems and opportunities they are likely to face. The paper…

  3. The California State University, Los Angeles Biomedical Sciences Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Carlos G.; Brown, Costello L.

    The Biomedical Sciences Program at California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA), is described. The federally funded program was designed to help economically disadvantaged students to pursue careers in biomedical sciences. The program provided academic support in mathematics, science, and English; study skills development; experiences in…

  4. Housing in Los Angeles: Affordable Housing for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Blue Ribbon Committee for Affordable Housing, CA.

    A 1988 mayoral committee assessed the seriousness of Los Angeles (California) housing problems and found that the city's housing efforts were sufficient in the 1960s, when the Federal Government took primary responsibility for housing and the average wage was adequate to support the cost of the average house or apartment. However, the following…

  5. Los Angeles City College, Presidential Inauguration, October 22, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Mary

    On October 22, 1998, Los Angeles City College's 70th anniversary, Dr. Mary Spangler was inaugurated as the 12th president of the college. In this, her message to faculty, staff, and family attending the event, Spangler revisits the college's past, citing historical highlights from each decade. She also focuses on the present state of the college,…

  6. Life Science Learning Center, Los Angeles Valley College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Edward

    A description is provided of Los Angeles Valley College's Life Science Learning Center (LSLC), which provides: (1) a resource center addressed to the individualized learning needs of students served by the Biology Department; (2) a learning environment enabling students to proceed in self-paced, activity-centered, concept-oriented experiences in…

  7. Working Smart: The Los Angeles Workplace Literacy Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Adult and Occupational Education.

    The Working Smart workplace literacy project was sponsored by a public school district and several profit and nonprofit companies and conducted for the hotel and food industry in the Los Angeles area. Literacy instruction was merged with job requirements of the customer service job classifications. Videodisc courseware was developed, as were…

  8. Los Angeles School Board Race Shatters Spending Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2013-01-01

    The price tag to win a seat in this week's primary election for the Los Angeles school board climbed to unprecedented levels, as a massive influx of outside cash has turned a local campaign into a national showdown pitting the long-standing influence of teachers' unions against the expanding imprint of deep-pocketed education activists. The high…

  9. Spring 1987 Student Survey: Summary. Los Angeles Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrath, Nancy; Fong Lai, Kit

    Since 1974, student surveys have been conducted in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) to gather information on student goals, plans, academic preparation, characteristics, financial aid, and evaluations of college services. In spring 1987, a random sample of 15% of the current enrollment at each college in the LACCD were surveyed…

  10. FINE PORE DIFFUSER FOULING: THE LOS ANGELES STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes five fine pore diffuser evaluations conducted at three different wastewater treatment plants located in the greater Los Angeles area. he overall goal of the study was to evaluate the performance of fine pore diffusers using selected cleaning methods for exte...

  11. Turning Neighbors into Friends: The Los Angeles Camp Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenya, Judith

    2002-01-01

    A camp for Los Angeles (California) children traumatized by war, community violence, and hatred gives them time to heal and feel safe. The camp's theme of reconciliation and nonviolence is expressed by an all-volunteer staff through community, teamwork, and cooperation. Nature's diversity is used to show how diverse groups can interact, thrive,…

  12. 40. Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, Los Angeles, California, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, Los Angeles, California, dated July 1937. (Microfiched drawings located at the Denver Service Center, #113/41906-set of 2) IMPROVEMENTS IN SEWAGE TREATMENT AND FILTER CHAMBER. - Water Reclamation Plant, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  13. Annual Information Digest. Los Angeles Community Colleges, 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Dexter

    This databook provides information on the nine colleges in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD), California, for the 1989-90 academic year. Tables and graphs present data on community characteristics and attendance patterns, student and enrollment characteristics, instructional programs, student academic performance and articulation,…

  14. FINE PORE DIFFUSER FOULING: THE LOS ANGELES STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes five fine pore diffuser evaluations conducted at three different wastewater treatment plants located in the greater Los Angeles area. The overall goal of the study was to evaluate the performance of fine pore diffusers using selected cleaning methods for ex...

  15. Los Angeles Community Colleges Fall 2000 Student Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prather, George; Kelly, Dexter

    This report gives a historical overview of the Los Angeles Community Colleges District Student Survey and provides details about the current survey results. The student survey was started in fall 1976 in order to provide a picture of students by identifying their goals, levels of college preparation, extra curricular interests, transportation…

  16. The Los Angeles Community College District Crisis, 1981-1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Lowell Janes

    This document describes a crisis in enrollment, funding, and governance that occurred in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) between 1981 and 1987. Following introductory materials, chapter 1 reviews the history of the LACCD and the effect of funding reductions caused by 1978's Proposition 13. The next two chapters review the…

  17. SOFT FLOOR COVERING IN THE LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CUNLIFF, DONALD D.

    A STUDY REGARDING THE INSTALLATION OF CARPET IN SCHOOLS IS DISCUSSED. THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO HAVE A CONSULTANT REVIEW UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE DISTRICT BUILDING AND GROUNDS SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR OF THE LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICTS, THE SOFT FLOOR COVERING INSTALLATIONS AT ARAGON AVENUE AND TWENTY-FOURTH STREET SCHOOLS. SECTIONS…

  18. Arts in Focus: Los Angeles Countywide Arts Education Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This report baseline study information about the state of arts education in Los Angeles County, California, the most populous county in the United States. Students in the districts covered in this survey represent 27% of all students enrolled in California public schools (K-12) and 3.4% of all students enrolled in U.S. public schools. The survey's…

  19. Los Angeles Community College District Annual Report, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Community Coll. District, CA.

    This 1993 annual report provides information on student demographics, college programs, and educational finances in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD), which, with more than 117,000 students, is the largest community college district in the nation. The report begins with a statement from Donald Phelps, the outgoing chancellor of…

  20. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE LOS ANGELES CATALYST STUDY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research was initiated to perform statistical analyses of the data from the Los Angeles Catalyst Study. The objective is to determine the effects of the introduction of the catalytic converter upon the atmospheric concentration levels of a number of air pollutants. This repo...

  1. Art Captures the Impact of the Los Angeles Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Shirley; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on area of crisis-art expressions. Offers selection of drawings done by children and adults after the Los Angeles riots that followed the court decision concerning the police handling of the Rodney King case. Brief commentaries on the drawings are included by the therapists who worked with the clients. (NB)

  2. State of the District [Los Angeles Community College District].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltai, Leslie

    Accomplishments made by the Los Angeles Community College District during its fifth year of independent operation are noted, and 10 projects to receive attention during the coming year are listed. The accomplishments are: (1) increasing and diversifying enrollment, (2) stabilizing and improving the college environment, (3) developing fiscal…

  3. 33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach... the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long Beach, the pilot stations for the Port of Long Beach and...

  4. 33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach... the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long Beach, the pilot stations for the Port of Long Beach and...

  5. 40 CFR 81.17 - Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.17 Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region consists of the following territorial area (including the territorial... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Metropolitan Los Angeles Air...

  6. 40 CFR 81.17 - Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.17 Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region consists of the following territorial area (including the territorial... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metropolitan Los Angeles Air...

  7. Characterizing Air Toxics from Oil Field Operations in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Brown, S. G.; DeWinter, J. L.; Bai, S.; O'Brien, T.; Vaughn, D.; Peltier, R.; Soltis, J.; Field, R. A.; Murphy, S. M.; Roberts, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Inglewood Oil Field in urban Los Angeles has been in operation for more than 70 years. Neighborhoods surrounding the oil field are concerned with the potential emissions of air toxics from oil field operations. The Baldwin Hills Air Quality Study focused on (1) quantifying air toxics concentrations originating from the Inglewood Oil Field operations, including drilling and well workovers, and (2) assessing the health risk of both acute and chronic exposure to air toxics emitted from oil field operations. Key pollutants identified for characterization included diesel particulate matter (DPM), cadmium, benzene, nickel, formaldehyde, mercury, manganese, acrolein, arsenic, and lead. The field study began in November 2012 and ended in November 2013. Four types of instruments were used to characterize oil field operations: (1) Aethalometers to measure black carbon (BC; as a proxy for DPM); (2) X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) for metals; (3) Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS) for volatile organic compounds; and (4) meteorological sensors to help assess the wind patterns, temperature, and humidity that influence pollutant concentrations. Overall concentrations of most of the species measured in the study were quite low for an urban area. We determined that there were statistically significant increases in concentrations of DPM associated with oil field operations when winds were from the west-southwest. BC concentrations increased by 0.036 to 0.056 μg/m3, on average, when winds originated from the west-southwest, compared to annual mean BC concentrations of approximately 0.67 μg/m3. West-southwest winds occurred 53% of the time during the study. No other pollutants showed strong statistical evidence of chronic or acute risk from oil field operations.

  8. Hate Crime in Los Angeles County 1990. A Report to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Bunny Nightwalker

    A report on 1990 hate crimes in Los Angeles County (California) found 275 racially motivated hate crimes, 150 religiously motivated hate crimes, and 125 sexual orientation hate crimes. The data were collected primarily from law enforcement and community agencies. Of the racially motivated crimes, most were aimed at Blacks, followed by Asians. Jews…

  9. Analysis of urban residential environments using color infrared aerial photography: An examination of socioeconomic variables and physical characteristics of selected areas in the Los Angeles basin, with addendum: An application of the concepts of the Los Angeles residential environment study to the Ontario-Upland region of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullens, R. H., Jr.; Senger, L. W.

    1969-01-01

    Aerial photographs taken with color infrared film were used to differentiate various types of residential areas in the Los Angeles basin, using characteristics of the physical environment which vary from one type of residential area to another. Residential areas of varying quality were classified based on these characteristics. Features of the physical environment, identifiable on CIR aerial photography were examined to determine which of these are the best indicators of quality of residential areas or social areas, as determined by the socioeconomic characteristics of the inhabitants of the selected areas. Association between several physical features and the socioeconomic variables was found to exist.

  10. Methane and Ethane Measurements from a New TCCON Station in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunch, D.; Roehl, C. M.; Blavier, J. L.; Allen, N.; Treffers, R.; Toon, G. C.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2012-12-01

    The Los Angeles urban region emits large amounts of methane (~0.44Tg/year) into the atmosphere. It is currently unclear exactly how much of this is biogenic (landfills, cattle), and how much is from natural gas (natural seeps or fugitive emissions from the natural gas infrastructure). Since natural gas contains ethane, whereas biogenic emissions contain none, simultaneous measurements of ethane and methane offer the possibility of separating the biogenic versus natural gas emissions of methane. We investigate this using total column measurements from a new Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) remote sensing station in the Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena, which began measurements in July 2012. These measurements will be put into the context of historical remote sensing and in situ measurements described by Wennberg et al., 2012 (doi:10.1021/es301138y).

  11. The American Indian Family in Los Angeles: A Comparison of Premigration Experience, Postmigration Residence and Employment Mobility, and Coping Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weibel, Joan

    Urban adaptation patterns of male and female American Indians were investigated via comparison of premigration statistics (48 Navajo and 40 Oklahoma families) with postmigration statistics on a sample of 23 Navajo and 21 Oklahoma families now living in Los Angeles. The premigration variables were residence patterns; population density;…

  12. Modeling the formamtion and aging of secondary organic aerosols in Los Angeles during CalNex 2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four different literature parameterizations for the formation and evolution of urban secondary organic aerosol (SOA) frequently used in 3-D models are evaluated using a 0-D box model representing the Los Angeles metropolitan region during the California Research at the Nexus of A...

  13. Lidar observation of elevated pollution layers over Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Wakimoto, R.M.; McElroy, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    Elevated pollution layers are observed over Los Angeles with an aircraft equipped with a downward-looking lidar. For the first time, detailed ancillary upper-air kinematic and thermodynamic data were collected simultaneously to aid in the interpretation of these elevated layers. It is concluded that upper-level winds within the inversion, orographic effects, and thermally induced changes in the depth of the mixed layer control the evolution of these layers.

  14. Sustainable Hydrogen Fueling Station, California State University, Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Blekhman, David

    2013-01-25

    The College of Engineering, Computer Science, & Technology at California State University, Los Angeles as part of its alternative and renewable energy leadership efforts has built a sustainable hydrogen station to teach and demonstrate the production and application of hydrogen as the next generation of fully renewable fuel for transportation. The requested funding was applied toward the acquisition of the core hydrogen station equipment: electrolyzer, compressors and hydrogen storage.

  15. The CalNex Los Angeles Experiment: Overview and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, J.; de Gouw, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Surratt, J.; Seinfeld, J.; CalNex-LA Team

    2010-12-01

    Air quality has considerably improved in the Los Angeles Basin over the past decades. These improvements were driven by some of the most advanced regulations on air pollution in the world. Nevertheless elevated ozone and particulate matter levels in Los Angeles and its surrounding areas persist. In addition recent regulations on greenhouse gases adopted by the State of California pose new challenges on air pollution mitigation in the LA Basin. With its rigorous air pollution mitigation policies Los Angeles offers a glimpse into the future of many other large urban areas which are following many of the strategies adopted in the LA Basin. Motivated by the desire to better understand the processes controlling air quality and greenhouse gas emissions in Southern California the CalNex experiment was performed in Spring 2010. Here we give an overview of the main surface measurement site in the Los Angeles Basin, which was set up on the campus of the California Institute of Technology on the east side of the South Coast Air Basin. The field site was motivated by the desire to better understand the daytime and nighttime chemistry that controls the formation of ozone and particulate matter. Many aspects of this chemistry, for example the removal of trace gases at night, the role of reactive halogens and the formation of secondary organic aerosol remain poorly understood. To address these, and other questions related to urban atmospheric chemistry, a comprehensive set of surface measurements were performed from May 15 - June 15, 2010. Over 30 research groups from a variety of national and international universities and research institutes performed measurements of meteorological parameters, a large number of trace gas-phase species, and detailed physical and chemical properties of aerosol. Here we present an overview of these measurements and discuss the general conditions encountered during the experiment. We will show early highlights from the CalNex-LA field experiment.

  16. First look analyses of five cycles of ERTS-1 imagery over County of Los Angeles: Assessment of data utility for urban development and regional planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raje, S.; Economy, R.; Mcknight, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Significant results have been obtained from the analyses of ERTS-1 imagery from five cycles over Test Site SR 124 by classical photointerpretation and by an interactive hybrid multispectral information extraction system (GEMS). The synopticity, periodicity and multispectrality of ERTS coverage, available for the first time to LA County planners, have opened up both a new dimensionality in data and offer new capability in preparation of planning inputs. Photointerpretation of ERTS images has produced over 25 overlays at 1:1,000,000 scale depicting regional relations and urban structure in terms of several hundred linear and areal features. To mention only one such result, a possible new fault lineament has been discovered on the northern slope of the Santa Monica mountains in the scene 1144-18015, composited of MSS bands 4, 5, 6,. GEMS analysis of the ERTS products has provided new or improved information in the following planning data categories: urban vegetation; land cover segregation; man-made and natural impact monitoring; urban design; and suitability. ERTS data analysis has allowed planners to establish trends that directly impact planning policies. This new source of information will not only assist current methods to be more efficient, but permits entirely new planning methodologies to be employed.

  17. Using Research to Improve College Readiness: A Research Partnership between the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Los Angeles Education Research Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Meredith; Yamashiro, Kyo; Farrukh, Adina; Lim, Cynthia; Hayes, Katherine; Wagner, Nicole; White, Jeffrey; Chen, Hansheng

    2015-01-01

    The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) serves a large majority of socioeconomically disadvantaged students who are struggling academically and are underprepared for high school graduation and college. This article describes the partnership between LAUSD and the Los Angeles Education Research Institute, and how this collaboration endeavors…

  18. Water Use in Los Angeles, California: Consumption Patterns, Ecosystem Response and Impact on Regional Water Budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    The City of Los Angeles relies heavily on external water sources, primarily the Eastern Sierra, Northern California and the Colorado River, and approximately 90% of the City's water supply is snowpack dependent. In recent years, water conservation measures have been implemented in response to regional drought, which include a tiered pricing structure and watering restrictions. As a result of implemented conservation policies, Los Angeles reported the lowest water consumption per capita per day in 2011 among cities over 1 million people in the U.S. This presentation will highlight our ongoing work to better understand the coupling between humans, ecosystems and water across the City of Los Angeles, especially during the recent drought period. Our work is unique in that we integrate social, ecological, and hydrologic data, including ten years of residential water consumption data for the entire city of Los Angeles, extensive groundwater well data, socio-economic information and remote sensing to evaluate relationships as well as spatial and temporal patterns. Developed statistical models demonstrated that Single-Family Residential (SFR) water use across the City is primarily driven by household income, landscape greenness, water rates and water volume allocation,, with higher consumption rates in the northern, warmer and more affluent parts, and lower consumption rates in the less affluent neighborhoods near Downtown. Landscape use also varies greatly across the city, averaging 50% of total SFR. Our evaluation of conservation efforts shows that the combination of mandatory watering restrictions and price increase led to a water reduction of 23%, while voluntary restrictions led to only a 6% reduction in water use. Relationships of water use to ecosystems (greenness) and groundwater variability were also evaluated and will be highlighted. Our ultimate goal is to improve predictions of human-water interactions in order to drive policy change and guide future demand

  19. Interseismic Strain Accumulation Across Metropolitan Los Angeles: Puente Hills Thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus, D.; Liu, Z.; Heflin, M. B.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.; Lundgren, P.; Drake, V. G.; Rodriguez, I. I.

    2012-12-01

    Twelve years of observation of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) are tightly constraining the distribution of shortening across metropolitan Los Angeles, providing information on strain accumulation across blind thrust faults. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) and water well records are allowing the effects of water and oil management to be distinguished. The Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault is at a 25° angle to Pacific-North America plate motion. GPS shows that NNE-SSW shortening due to this big restraining bend is fastest not immediately south of the San Andreas fault across the San Gabriel mountains, but rather 50 km south of the fault in northern metropolitan Los Angeles. The GPS results we quote next are for a NNE profile through downtown Los Angeles. Just 2 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up across the San Gabriel mountains, 40 km wide (0.05 micro strain/yr); 4 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up between the Sierra Madre fault, at the southern front of the San Gabriel mountains, and South Central Los Angeles, also 40 km wide (0.10 micro strain/yr). We find shortening to be more evenly distributed across metropolitan Los Angeles than we found before [Argus et al. 2005], though within the 95% confidence limits. An elastic models of interseismic strain accumulation is fit to the GPS observations using the Back Slip model of Savage [1983]. Rheology differences between crystalline basement and sedimentary basin rocks are incorporated using the EDGRN/EDCMP algorithm of Wang et al. [2003]. We attempt to place the Back Slip model into the context of the Elastic Subducting Plate Model of Kanda and Simons [2010]. We find, along the NNE profile through downtown, that: (1) The deep Sierra Madre Thrust cannot be slipping faster than 2 mm/yr, and (2) The Puente Hills Thrust and nearby thrust faults (such as the upper Elysian Park Thrust) are slipping at 9 ±2 mm/yr beneath a locking depth of 12 ±5 km (95% confidence limits

  20. New heads for Freud's hydra: psychoanalysis in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Hale, N G

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the transplantation of psychoanalysis from Europe to Los Angeles and the similarities and differences in followers, cultural attitudes, institutional organization, and patient symptoms. Psychoanalysis in both places attracted psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, artists, writers, and movie people, all committed to "modernism" and cultural change. But special American conditions created greater institutional rigidity, medicalization, and a more diffuse patient symptomatology centered on the maternal relationship. Such conditions also fostered bitter disputes over modifications of psychoanalytic theory and practice which have only recently become less acute as the status of psychoanalysis has declined in America. PMID:11343295

  1. Oxidant and precursor trends in the metropolitan Los Angeles region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trijonis, J.; Peng, T.; Mcrae, G.; Lees, L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes recent historical trends in oxidant and precursors in the Los Angeles region. Control strategies and basinwide emission trends for nitrogen oxides and reactive hydrocarbons are documented year by year from 1965 to 1974. Trends in the geographic distribution of emissions are illustrated by computing net percentage emission changes over the decade for individual counties. The changes in emissions are compared with changes in ambient precursor concentrations and oxidant concentrations. We find that many of the changes in monitored air quality can be explained by trends in both total emissions and the spatial distribution of emissions.

  2. Air pollution and daily hospital admissions in metropolitan Los Angeles.

    PubMed Central

    Linn, W S; Szlachcic, Y; Gong, H; Kinney, P L; Berhane, K T

    2000-01-01

    We used daily time-series analysis to evaluate associations between ambient carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter [less than and equal to] 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)), or ozone concentrations, and hospital admissions for cardiopulmonary illnesses in metropolitan Los Angeles during 1992-1995. We performed Poisson regressions for the entire patient population and for subgroups defined by season, region, or personal characteristics, allowing for effects of temporal variation, weather, and autocorrelation. CO showed the most consistently significant (p<0.05) relationships to cardiovascular admissions. A wintertime 25th-75th percentile increase in CO (1.1-2.2 ppm) predicted an increase of 4% in cardiovascular admissions. NO(2), and, to a lesser extent, PM(10) tracked CO and showed similar associations with cardiovascular disease, but O(3) was negatively or nonsignificantly associated. No significant demographic differences were found, although increased cardiovascular effects were suggested in diabetics, in whites and blacks (relative to Hispanics and Asians), and in persons older than 65 years of age. Pulmonary disease admissions associated more with NO(2) and PM(10) than with CO. Pulmonary effects were generally smaller than cardiovascular effects and were more sensitive to the choice of model. We conclude that in Los Angeles, atmospheric stagnation with high primary (CO/NO(2)/PM(10)) pollution, most common in autumn/winter, increases the risk of hospitalization for cardiopulmonary illness. Summer photochemical pollution (high O(3)) apparently presents less risk. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10811569

  3. Masculinity and HIV Risk among Homeless Men in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David P; Brown, Ryan A; Golinelli, Daniela; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Tucker, Joan S; Wertheimer, Samuel R

    2013-01-01

    HIV continues to be a serious public health problem for men who have sex with women (MSW), especially homeless MSW. Although consideration of gender has improved HIV prevention interventions, most of the research and intervention development has targeted how women's HIV risk is affected by gender roles. The effect of gender roles on MSW has received relatively little attention. Previous studies have shown mixed results when investigating the association between internalization of masculine gender roles and HIV risk. These studies use a variety of scales that measure individual internalization of different aspects of masculinity. However, this ignores the dynamic and culturally constructed nature of gender roles. The current study uses cultural consensus analysis (CCA) to test for the existence of culturally agreed upon masculinity and gender role beliefs among homeless MSW in Los Angeles, as well as the relationship between these beliefs and HIV-related behaviors and attitudes. Interviews included 30 qualitative and 305 structured interviews with homeless MSW in Los Angeles's Skid Row area. Analysis identified culturally relevant aspects of masculinity not represented by existing masculinity scales, primarily related to barriers to relationships with women. Behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge related to HIV were significantly associated with men's level of agreement with the group about masculinity. The findings are discussed in light of implications for MSW HIV intervention development. PMID:23730216

  4. Isotopic constraints on sources of methane in Los Angeles, California, USA (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Tyler, S. C.; Christensen, L.; Xu, X.; Pataki, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and an important contributor to global warming. Recent studies have suggested that methane emissions in large cities are underestimated with several models even indicating that substantial emissions attributed to cities are in part from regional and/or encroaching agricultural sources rather than from urban fossil fuel sources. We have found that stable isotopes (13-C and D) and radiocarbon (C-14) are excellent tracers of various sources of methane in Los Angeles, California. Measurements of the d13C and dD of methane from discrete sources show excellent separation between urban sources, such as vehicle emissions, power plants, oil refineries, landfills, and sewage treatment plants and agricultural sources like cows, biogas, and cattle feedlots. In addition, radiocarbon is an excellent tracer of modern versus fossil fuel contributions to methane emissions in the region. Preliminary measurements of background air in Los Angeles indicate that the major source of excess methane is vehicle emissions with most additional CH4 likely contributed from among other fossil fuel sources such as oil refining or power plants. We are currently confirming these results with broader field campaigns and additional measurements, including continuous measurements of atmospheric methane concentration using tunable laser spectroscopy. The combination of high-resolution tunable laser concentration measurements and precise isotope measurements using mass spectrometry is a very promising and powerful tool for methane source monitoring.

  5. The Economic Impact of Public K-12 Education in the Los Angeles Region: A Preliminary Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picus, Lawrence O.; Bryan, Jimmy L.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the economic implications to Los Angeles (California) of K-12 public education funding from educational agencies. It reveals the relative size of the K-12 public education sector in the United States and summarizes the role of education in the Los Angeles area in terms of human capital, enhancements in industrial productivity, and…

  6. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long...) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude 33°44′22.8″...

  7. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long...) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude 33°44′22.8″...

  8. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long...) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude 33°44′22.8″...

  9. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long...) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude 33°44′22.8″...

  10. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach... HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long...) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude 33°44′22.8″...

  11. 40 CFR 52.229 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 52.223 is retained. (ii) Rule 1115, Automotive Coatings, adopted on March 16, 1984 by the...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. 52.229 Section 52.229... oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. (a) (b) The following rules...

  12. 40 CFR 52.229 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 52.223 is retained. (ii) Rule 1115, Automotive Coatings, adopted on March 16, 1984 by the...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. 52.229 Section 52.229... oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. (a) (b) The following rules...

  13. 40 CFR 52.229 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 52.223 is retained. (ii) Rule 1115, Automotive Coatings, adopted on March 16, 1984 by the...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. 52.229 Section 52.229... oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. (a) (b) The following rules...

  14. 40 CFR 52.229 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 52.223 is retained. (ii) Rule 1115, Automotive Coatings, adopted on March 16, 1984 by the...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. 52.229 Section 52.229... oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. (a) (b) The following rules...

  15. 40 CFR 52.229 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 52.223 is retained. (ii) Rule 1115, Automotive Coatings, adopted on March 16, 1984 by the...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. 52.229 Section 52.229... oxidants (hydrocarbons), Metropolitan Los Angeles Intrastate Region. (a) (b) The following rules...

  16. "USA Today": Comparative Analysis with Two National and Two Los Angeles Daily Newspapers. Research Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Steve; And Others

    Sections of the newspaper "USA Today" were compared with corresponding sections of four major newspapers--the "New York Times," the "Wall Street Journal," the "Los Angeles Herald Examiner," and the "Los Angeles Times"--to determine what editorial components made "USA Today" different and whether the paper would succeed. Judgment criteria included…

  17. 40 CFR 81.17 - Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.17 Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  18. 40 CFR 81.17 - Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.17 Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  19. 40 CFR 81.17 - Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.17 Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  20. 75 FR 65512 - Raleigh Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, CA; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, California (the subject firm). The Notice of determination was issued on January 14, 2010 and published in the Federal Register on February 16, 2010 (75 FR... Employment and Training Administration Raleigh Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, CA; Notice...

  1. 33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a line...

  2. 33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a line...

  3. 33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a line...

  4. 33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a line...

  5. 33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a line...

  6. Confronting Homophobia at School: High School Students and the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knotts, Greg; Gregorio, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    This study discusses student responses to curriculum taught by the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles to choral students in local high schools. The Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles's A-LIVE Music Project brings live music and standards-driven curriculum to high school youth with the express purpose of teaching content in innovative ways and…

  7. To Kill a Child's Spirit: The Tragedy of School Segregation in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caughey, John; Caughey, LaRee

    The contents of this case study, on the perpetuation of segregation in the American city and a participant's narrative of Los Angeles' 10-year debate and struggle, 70-day trial and court order which was promptly bottled up by appeal, are organized in 13 parts as follows: (1) "The Segregating of the Los Angeles Schools"; (2) "Attempts to Persuade…

  8. Evaluation of the Life Skills Training Program, Los Angeles County, California: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Mark E.; Zinn, Andrew; Zielewski, Erica H.; Bess, Roseana J.; Malm, Karin E.; Stagner, Matthew; Pergamit, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This report presents findings from a rigorous evaluation of the Life Skills Training Program (LST) in Los Angeles County. LST provides 30 hours of life skills training over five weeks to foster youths ages 16 and older. The classes are held on community college campuses throughout Los Angeles County. The program is staffed by workers tasked with…

  9. El Proyecto Sismico "LARSE" - Trabajando Hacia un Futuro con Mas Seguridad para Los Angeles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henyey, Thomas L.; Fuis, Gary S.; Benthien, Mark L.; Burdette, Thomas R.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Clayton, Robert W.; Criley, Edward E.; Davis, Paul M.; Hendley, James W., II; Kohler, Monica D.; Lutter, William J.; McRaney, John K.; Murphy, Janice M.; Okaya, David A.; Ryberg, Trond; Simila, Gerald W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1999-01-01

    La region de Los Angeles contiene una red de fallas activas, incluyendo muchas fallas por empuje que son profundas y no rompen la superficie de la tierra. Estas fallas ocultas incluyen la falla anteriormente desconocida que fue responsable por la devastacion que ocurrio durante el terremoto de Northridge en enero de 1994, el terremoto mas costoso en la historia de los Estados Unidos. El Experimento Sismico en la Region de Los Angeles (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, LARSE), esta localizando los peligros ocultos de los terremotos debajo de la region de Los Angeles para mejorar la construccion de las estructuras que pueden apoyar terremotos que son inevitables en el futuro, y que ayudaran a los cientificos determinar donde occurira el sacudimento mas fuerte y poderoso.

  10. 77 FR 11571 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Fowler Museum at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549, telephone (310) 825-1864... Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549, telephone (310) 825- 1864,...

  11. 76 FR 43721 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Fowler Museum at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1549, telephone (310) 825- 1864... contact Wendy G. Teeter, PhD, Curator of Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles,...

  12. The Fossil Fueled Metropolis: Los Angeles and the Emergence of Oil-Based Energy in North America, 1865--1930

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Jason Arthur

    Beginning with coal in the nineteenth century, the mass production and intensive consumption of fossil fuel energy fundamentally changed patterns of urban and industrial development in North America. Focusing on the metropolitan development of Los Angeles, this dissertation examines how the emergence of oil-based capitalism in the first three decades of the twentieth century was sustained and made increasingly resilient through the production of urban and industrial space. In a region where coal was scarce, the development of oil-based energy was predicated on long-term investments into conversion technologies, storage systems and distribution networks that facilitated the efficient and economical flow of liquefied fossil fuel. In this dissertation, I argue that the historical and geographical significance of the Southern California petroleum industry is derived from how its distinctive market expansion in the first three decades of the twentieth century helped establish the dominance of oil-based energy as the primary fuel for transportation in capitalist society. In North America, the origins of oil-based capitalism can be traced to the turn of the twentieth century when California was the largest oil-producing economy in the United States and Los Angeles was the fastest growing metropolitan region. This dissertation traces how Los Angeles became the first city in North America where oil became a formative element of urban and industrial development: not only as fuel for transportation, but also in the infrastructures, landscapes and networks that sustain a critical dependence on oil-based energy. With a distinctive metropolitan geography, decentralized and automobile-dependent, Los Angeles became the first oil-based city in North America and thus provides an ideal case study for examining the regional dynamics of energy transition, establishment and dependence. Interwoven with the production of urban and industrial space, oil remains the primary fuel that

  13. Flies from L.A., The Sequel: A further twelve new species of Megaselia (Diptera: Phoridae) from the BioSCAN Project in Los Angeles (California, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brian V.; Disney, R. Henry L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Presented are continued results from the BioSCAN Project, an urban biodiversity study sampling primarily from private backyards in Los Angeles, California (USA). Presented are continued results from the BioSCAN Project, an urban biodiversity study sampling primarily from private backyards in Los Angeles, California (USA). New information Twelve new species of Megaselia (Diptera: Phoridae) are described: M. baileyae, M. friedrichae, M. gonzalezorum, M. joanneae, M. losangelensis, M. phyllissunae, M. pongsaiae, M. shatesae, M. stoakesi, M. studentorum, M. voluntariorum, M. wongae. PMID:27226746

  14. Risk factors for meningiomas in men in Los Angeles County

    SciTech Connect

    Preston-Martin, S.; Yu, M.C.; Henderson, B.E.; Roberts, C.

    1983-05-01

    A case-control study among men in Los Angeles County was conducted to investigate further the causes of intracranial meningiomas. Meningioma patients and a neighbor of each one were interviewed about past experiences that might be associated with tumor development. Analysis of information from the 105 matched pairs showed an association with meningioma occurrence for various factors relating to head trauma and head X-rays: 1) ever boxed as a sport (odds ratio (OR) . 2.0, P . 0.03), 2) had a serious head injury (OR . 1.9, P . 0.01), and 3) had X-ray treatment to the head before 20 years of age and/or had five or more full mouth dental X-ray series before 1945 (OR . 3.5, P . 0.02). Of the 105 subjects, 72 (69%) had a history of exposure to at least one of these factors.

  15. Public health impact of the 1992 Los Angeles civil unrest.

    PubMed

    Evans, C A

    1993-01-01

    The Los Angeles civil unrest in April 1992 stunned the nation. The days of violence resulted in 53 deaths, 2,325 reported injuries, more than 600 buildings completely destroyed by fire, and approximately $735 million in total damages. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the activities of the Public Health Programs and Services Branch of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services during and after the civil unrest and to illustrate the types of public health issues and problems that may result from large-scale civil disturbance. Public health agencies and jurisdictions should consider these issues in their disaster planning. Public Health Programs and Services Branch activities were directly affected by the violence and destruction. Women, Infants and Children Program vouchering sites and 20 drug program and alcohol recovery sites were damaged or burned and 15 county health centers closed during the unrest. At least 38 private medical and dental offices and 45 pharmacies were destroyed or damaged. County health authorities offered facilities to house relocated private care providers and filled prescriptions for medications where needed. The environmental health impact required the inspection of 2,827 burned and damaged sites for hazardous waste including asbestos; at 9 percent of the inspected sites, waste required special disposal. More than 1,000 food facilities suffered damage and required inspection before reopening. In the 3 months following the unrest, a 20-percent increase in disposal capacity was authorized at four county landfills to accommodate the disposal of debris. Violence was a public health issue of particular concern. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sent a team to study the violence from an epidemiologic perspective. The Federal agency also provided funding for televised children's talk shows dealing with reactions to the violence. PMID:8497562

  16. Immigrant incorporation in the garment industry of Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Light, I; Bernard, R B; Kim, R

    1999-01-01

    This study expands immigrant social network theory and examined employment patterns in the garment industry in Los Angeles, California, among Latino workers employed by Asian immigrant entrepreneurs. The study determined that a large percentage of immigrant employees found their jobs through the immigrant economy. Entrepreneurship increased the supply of local jobs and expanded the economy at destination at no expense to natives. Immigrant entrepreneurs bought firms from nonimmigrant owners or started new ones with an immigrant labor supply. Massey's index is flawed due to its exclusion of the role of entrepreneurs. Migration networks facilitate entrepreneurship, but some ethnic groups have fewer entrepreneurs, such as Mexicans and Central Americans. A 1993 Los Angeles survey identified 3642 garment factories in its county. Mean employment was 27.1 persons. The garment industry was the 4th largest industry in the area in 1996, with 98,700 employees. It represented 6% of all wage and salary employees in the City and 5.5% of the immigrant labor force in the County in 1990. 93% of garment workers in 1990 were immigrants. It is estimated that 51% of garment factory owners were Asians; most employees were Latinos. Census figures on sewing machine operators indicated 47.3% of owners were Whites and 42.45 were Asians. 53.3% of employees were other ethnic groups, 14.5% were Asians, and 32.2% were Whites. It is estimated that 47.2% of total employment was due to the immigration economy. 71.5% of the total employment in the garment industry was in the immigrant sector. PMID:12294981

  17. Climate Change and Adaptation Planning on the Los Angeles Aqueduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. B.; Bales, R. C.; Costa-Cabral, M. C.; Chen, L.; Maurer, E. P.; Miller, N. L.; Mills, W. B.

    2009-12-01

    This study provides an assessment of the potential impacts of climate change on the Eastern Sierra Nevada snowpack and snowmelt timing, using a combination of empirical (i.e., data-based) models, and computer simulation models forced by GCM-projected 21st century climatology (IPCC 2007 AR4 projections). Precipitation from the Eastern Sierra Nevada is one of the main water sources for Los Angeles' more than 4 million people - a source whose future availability is critical to the city's growing population and large economy. Precipitation in the region falls mostly in winter and is stored in the large natural reservoir that is the snowpack. Meltwater from the Eastern Sierra is delivered to the city by the 340-mile long Los Angeles Aqueducts. The analysis is focused on the nature of the impact to the LAA water supplies over the 21st century due to potential climate change, including volume of precipitation, the mix of snowfall and rainfall, shifts in the timing of runoff, interannual variability and multi-year droughts. These impacts further affect the adequacy of seasonal and annual carryover water storage, and potentially water treatment. Most of the snow in the 10,000 km^2 Mono-Owens basins that feed the LAA occurs in a relatively narrow, 10-20 km wide, high-elevation band on the steep slopes of 20 smaller basins whose streams drain into the Owens River and thence LAA. Extending over 240 km in the north-south direction, these basins present special challenges for estimating snowpack amounts and downscaling climate-model data. In addition, there are few meteorological stations and snow measurements in the snow-producing parts of the basins to drive physically based hydrologic modeling.

  18. On the Sources of Methane to the Los Angeles Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, Paul O.; Mui, Wilton; Fischer, Marc L.; Wunch, Debra; Kort, Eric A.; Blake, Donald R.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Jeong, Seongeun

    2012-01-01

    We use historical and new atmospheric trace gas observations to refine the estimated source of methane (CH4) emitted into California's South Coast Air Basin (the larger Los Angeles metropolitan region). Referenced to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) CO emissions inventory, total CH4 emissions are 0.44 +/- 0.15 Tg each year. To investigate the possible contribution of fossil fuel emissions, we use ambient air observations of methane (CH4), ethane (C2H6), and carbon monoxide (CO), together with measured C2H6 to CH4 enhancement ratios in the Los Angeles natural gas supply. The observed atmospheric C2H6 to CH4 ratio during the ARCTAS (2008) and CalNex (2010) aircraft campaigns is similar to the ratio of these gases in the natural gas supplied to the basin during both these campaigns. Thus, at the upper limit (assuming that the only major source of atmospheric C2H6 is fugitive emissions from the natural gas infrastructure) these data are consistent with the attribution of most (0.39 +/- 0.15 Tg yr-1) of the excess CH4 in the basin to uncombusted losses from the natural gas system (approximately 2.5-6% of natural gas delivered to basin customers). However, there are other sources of C2H6 in the region. In particular, emissions of C2H6 (and CH4) from natural gas seeps as well as those associated with petroleum production, both of which are poorly known, will reduce the inferred contribution of the natural gas infrastructure to the total CH4 emissions, potentially significantly. This study highlights both the value and challenges associated with the use of ethane as a tracer for fugitive emissions from the natural gas production and distribution system.

  19. Public health impact of the 1992 Los Angeles civil unrest.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C A

    1993-01-01

    The Los Angeles civil unrest in April 1992 stunned the nation. The days of violence resulted in 53 deaths, 2,325 reported injuries, more than 600 buildings completely destroyed by fire, and approximately $735 million in total damages. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the activities of the Public Health Programs and Services Branch of the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services during and after the civil unrest and to illustrate the types of public health issues and problems that may result from large-scale civil disturbance. Public health agencies and jurisdictions should consider these issues in their disaster planning. Public Health Programs and Services Branch activities were directly affected by the violence and destruction. Women, Infants and Children Program vouchering sites and 20 drug program and alcohol recovery sites were damaged or burned and 15 county health centers closed during the unrest. At least 38 private medical and dental offices and 45 pharmacies were destroyed or damaged. County health authorities offered facilities to house relocated private care providers and filled prescriptions for medications where needed. The environmental health impact required the inspection of 2,827 burned and damaged sites for hazardous waste including asbestos; at 9 percent of the inspected sites, waste required special disposal. More than 1,000 food facilities suffered damage and required inspection before reopening. In the 3 months following the unrest, a 20-percent increase in disposal capacity was authorized at four county landfills to accommodate the disposal of debris. Violence was a public health issue of particular concern.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8497562

  20. Investigating high concentrations of three greenhouse gases in the Los Angeles Basin and San Bernardino Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirpes, R.; Blake, D. R.; Marrero, J.

    2013-12-01

    Following the Montreal Protocol of 1987 calling for the phase-out of CFCs and other ozone depleting substances, HCFCs and HFCs were introduced as alternatives despite still being greenhouse gases with high global warming potentials. In this study, whole air samples were collected during four research flights over Southern California aboard the NASA DC-8 Airborne Science Laboratory as part of the NASA Student Airborne Science Program. These samples were then analyzed by gas chromatography using a suite of detectors for many compounds, including HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and HFC-152a. HCFC-22 is primarily used as a refrigerant, while HFC-134a and HFC-152a are also used as aerosol propellants and foam blowing agents. High concentrations of these three compounds were observed for samples taken at low altitudes over urban areas around Los Angeles and San Bernardino. Exceptionally high concentrations were seen for all three compounds in samples taken near the Ontario and San Bernardino airports. Concentrations of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and HFC-152a were enhanced above background levels near other airports sampled in the Los Angeles Basin and San Bernardino Valley. It is clear that concentrations of these three gases are higher in the San Bernardino Valley than in the Los Angeles Basin, and locations with exceptionally high concentrations were investigated to identify potential point sources. Concentrations of these three compounds were also compared to data from past SARP missions and data collected at Trinidad Head, California since 2005 as part of the AGAGE network. Comparison of the average values for each of these campaigns reveal that the background concentrations of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and HFC-152a are all increasing with a strong linear trend in Southern California.

  1. Isotopic measurements of atmospheric methane in Los Angeles, California, USA: Influence of “fugitive” fossil fuel emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Tyler, Stanley C.; Pataki, Diane E.; Xu, Xiaomei; Christensen, Lance E.

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that CH4 emissions in Los Angeles and other large cities may be underestimated. We utilized stable isotopes (13C and D) and radiocarbon (14C) to investigate sources of CH4 in Los Angeles, California. First, we made measurements of δ13C and δD of various CH4 sources in urban areas. Fossil fuel CH4 sources (oil refineries, power plants, traffic, and oil drilling fields) had δ13C values between -45 and -30‰ and dD values between -275 and -100‰, whereas biological CH4 (cows, biofuels, landfills, sewage treatment plants, and cattle feedlots) had δ13C values between -65 and -45‰ and δD values between -350 and -275‰. We made high-altitude observations of CH4 concentration using continuous tunable laser spectroscopy measurements combined with isotope analyses (13C, 14C, and D) of discrete samples to constrain urban CH4 sources. Our data indicate that the dominant source of CH4 in Los Angeles has a δ13C value of approximately -41.5‰ and a δD value between -229 and -208‰. Δ14C of CH4 in urban air samples ranged from +262 to +344‰ (127.1 to 134.9 pMC), depleted with respect to average global background CH4. We conclude that the major source of CH4 in Los Angeles is leakage of fossil fuels, such as from geologic formations, natural gas pipelines, oil refining, and/or power plants. More research is needed to constrain fluxes of CH4 from natural gas distribution and refining, as this flux may increase with greater reliance on natural gas and biogas for energy needs.

  2. Masculinity and HIV Risk among Homeless Men in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, David P.; Brown, Ryan A.; Golinelli, Daniela; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.; Wertheimer, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    HIV continues to be a serious public health problem for men who have sex with women (MSW), especially homeless MSW. Although consideration of gender has improved HIV prevention interventions, most of the research and intervention development has targeted how women’s HIV risk is affected by gender roles. The effect of gender roles on MSW has received relatively little attention. Previous studies have shown mixed results when investigating the association between internalization of masculine gender roles and HIV risk. These studies use a variety of scales that measure individual internalization of different aspects of masculinity. However, this ignores the dynamic and culturally constructed nature of gender roles. The current study uses cultural consensus analysis (CCA) to test for the existence of culturally agreed upon masculinity and gender role beliefs among homeless MSW in Los Angeles, as well as the relationship between these beliefs and HIV-related behaviors and attitudes. Interviews included 30 qualitative and 305 structured interviews with homeless MSW in Los Angeles’s Skid Row area. Analysis identified culturally relevant aspects of masculinity not represented by existing masculinity scales, primarily related to barriers to relationships with women. Behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge related to HIV were significantly associated with men’s level of agreement with the group about masculinity. The findings are discussed in light of implications for MSW HIV intervention development. PMID:23730216

  3. Los Angeles and Its Influence on Professional and Popular Astronomy - A Hollywood Love Story, by Lewis Chilton, Past President, Optical Shop Director and Historian, Los Angeles Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilton, Lew

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show through visualizations how the Los Angeles, California milieu of the early 20th century benefited the advancement of astronomy and captured the public consciousness through popular press accounts of these advancements and of the scientists who made them. The thesis of this presentation purports that a symbiosis developed between astronomers of Los Angeles-area scientific and educational institutions and a local community of interested laypersons, and was the catalyst that sparked future generations to enter the fields of astronomy, the allied sciences, education and technology. This presentation attempts to highlight the importance of continued public outreach by the professional astronomical community, for the ultimate benefit to itself, in Los Angeles and beyond.

  4. Are Schools Prepared for Emergencies?: A Baseline Assessment of Emergency Preparedness at School Sites in Three Los Angeles County School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kano, Megumi; Ramirez, Marizen; Ybarra, William J.; Frias, Gus; Bourque, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    A survey of emergency preparedness was conducted in three public school districts in urban areas of Los Angeles County. Eighty-three school sites were surveyed using self-administered questionnaires. Although designated respondents generally felt that their schools were well prepared, the survey also revealed the need for improvements in written…

  5. "Weak-Center" Gentrification and the Contradictions of Containment: deconcentrating poverty in downtown Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Reese, Ellen; DeVerteuil, Geoffrey; Thach, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    This case study of recent efforts to deconcentrate poverty within the Skid Row area of Los Angeles examines processes of "weak-center" gentrification as it applies to a "service dependent ghetto," thus filling two key gaps in prior scholarship. We document the collaboration between the government, business and development interests, and certain non-profit agencies in this process and identify two key mechanisms of poverty deconcentration: housing/service displacement and the criminalization of low income residents. Following Harvey, we argue that these efforts are driven by pressures to find a "spatial fix" for capital accumulation through Downtown redevelopment. This process has been hotly contested, however, illustrating the strength of counter-pressures to gentrification/poverty deconcentration within "weak-center" urban areas. PMID:20827846

  6. REGIONAL MANAGEMENT OF AUTOMOTIVE EMISSIONS: THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ALTERNATIVE POLICIES FOR LOS ANGELES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study has two objectives: first, to develop procedures to evaluate policies for controlling automobile emissions; and second, to use these procedures to evaluate specific pollution control strategies for Los Angeles. The first objective is achieved by developing a relatively...

  7. Strategic Plan for Sustainable Energy Management and Environmental Stewardship for Los Angeles Unified School District

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.; Beattie, D.; Thomas, K.; Davis, K.; Sim, M.; Jhaveri, A.

    2007-11-01

    This Strategic Plan for Sustainable Energy Management and Environmental Stewardship states goals, measures progress toward goals and how actions are monitored to achieve continuous improvement for the Los Angeles Unified School District.

  8. Los Angeles Finds Recycling Success with Multi-Lingual Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Roland

    1995-01-01

    Describes a program established in Los Angeles to introduce curbside recycling and automated trash collection to multilingual residents. Discusses a grass-roots community-based outreach strategy designed to change attitudes toward waste. (LZ)

  9. 76 FR 48176 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Fowler Museum at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... address below by September 7, 2011. ADDRESSES: Wendy G. Teeter, Ph.D., Curator of Archaeology, Fowler... G. Teeter, Ph.D., Curator of Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA...

  10. Transitioning from a Sanitary City to a Sustainable City: Drivers and Dynamics in the City of Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S.; Pincetl, S.

    2011-12-01

    With more than half of the world's population living in cities the decisions made in urban areas are critical for the sustainability of water resources. In the past, cities have been designed to efficiently use, clean, and dispose of water. This model is being challenged due to its effects on ecosystems and communities and its inability to adapt to changing circumstances. The aim of our research is to describe the mechanisms behind Los Angeles's transition from a monolithic water importing city to a city committed to local water resource development, conservation and regional collaboration. The paper argues this transition is the result of a "double exposure" of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), the major water supplier for the city. The first exposure is the increasing vulnerability and unreliability of its water imports due to environmental regulation and litigation. The second exposure is the increasing political integration and interdependence of LADWP with local government and interest groups due to institutional changes and rising environmental awareness in the city. These exposures and their effects are traced from the late 1970s to the present using interviews, government documents, and media accounts. The transition in Los Angeles is well underway but limited revenue and complex governance arrangements are barriers to greater change. The results from the Los Angeles case may provide insights for these cities and provide testable propositions for research on this topic in other places and sectors. Overall, we conclude that internal and external exposures can drive transitions in urban development, improving our understanding of when and how cities adopt more sustainable forms.

  11. Chemical measurements in the Los Angeles atmosphere. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, S.; Brewer, R.L.; Kaplan, I.R.; Wong, W.W.

    1980-07-01

    An exploratory study was made of the Battelle Megavolume Sampler. This device collects gram quantities of aerosol particles from air at high flow rates, by impaction and electrostatic precipitation, in three ranges of particle size, namely 0-1.7 ..mu..m, 1.7-3.5 ..mu..m, and >3.5 ..mu..m. The usefulness of various sample treatments and analyses were examined. Samples were taken at the foothill location northeast of Los Angeles, where intense photochemical smog is often encountered. Samples were extracted into organic or aqueous solvents for chromatographic and spectroscopic treatments. Individual components were identified in the following classes: alkanes, fatty acids, dicarboxylic acids, carbonyl compounds, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, inorganic anions, and metals. Elemental analyses for C, H, and N, /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios, electron spin resonance, and /sup 14/C radio-activities were also run. The sampler was simple to operate and gave suitable samples, but quantitative recovery of material from the sampler was difficult. The distribution of certain homologous series of organic compounds, the high electron spin densities, and the finding from /sup 14/C activities that only about 50% of the noncarbonate aerosol was fossil, all indicated that a substantial part of the aerosol was biogenic.

  12. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  13. Puente Hills blind-thrust system, Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, J.H.; Plesch, A.; Dolan, J.F.; Pratt, T.L.; Fiore, P.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the three-dimensional geometry and Quaternary slip history of the Puente Hills blind-thrust system (PHT) using seismic reflection profiles, petroleum well data, and precisely located seismicity. The PHT generated the 1987 Whittier Narrows (moment magnitude [Mw] 6.0) earthquake and extends for more than 40 km along strike beneath the northern Los Angeles basin. The PHT comprises three, north-dipping ramp segments that are overlain by contractional fault-related folds. Based on an analysis of these folds, we produce Quaternary slip profiles along each ramp segment. The fault geometry and slip patterns indicate that segments of the PHT are related by soft-linkage boundaries, where the fault ramps are en echelon and displacements are gradually transferred from one segment to the next. Average Quaternary slip rates on the ramp segments range from 0.44 to 1.7 mm/yr, with preferred rates between 0.62 and 1.28 mm/yr. Using empirical relations among rupture area, magnitude, and coseismic displacement, we estimate the magnitude and frequency of single (Mw 6.5-6.6) and multisegment (Mw 7.1) rupture scenarios for the PHT.

  14. Shortening and Thickening of Metropolitan Los Angeles Measured and Inferred Using Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, D.; Heflin, M.; Donnellan, A.; Webb, F.; Dong, D.; Hurst, K.; Jefferson, D.; Lyzenga, G.; Watkins, M.; Zumberge, J.

    1999-01-01

    Geodetic measurements using the Global Positioning System and other techniques show north-south shortening near Los Angeles to be fastest across the northern part of the metropolitan area, where an ESE-striking, 5- to 40-km-wide belt lying to the south of San Gabriel Mountains and to the north of downtown and West Los Angeles is shortening at 5 mm/yr.

  15. Geological, hydrological, and biological issues related to the proposed development of a park at the confluence of the Los Angeles River and the Arroyo Seco, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Michael; Trenham, Peter C.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Reichard, Eric G.; Tinsley, John C., III; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Meyer, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    A new park is being considered for the confluence of the Los Angeles River and the Arroyo Seco in Los Angeles County, California. Components of the park development may include creation of a temporary lake on the Los Angeles River, removal of channel lining along part of the Arroyo Seco, restoration of native plants, creation of walking paths, and building of facilities such as a boat ramp and a visitor center. This report, prepared in cooperation with the Mountains Recreation and Conservancy Authority, delineates the geological, hydrological, and biological issues that may have an impact on the park development or result from development at the confluence, and identifies a set a tasks to help address these science issues. Geologic issues of concern relate to surface faulting, earthquake ground motions, liquefaction, landsliding, and induced seismicity. Hydrologic issues of concern relate to the hydraulics and water quality of both surface water and ground water. Biological issues of concern include colonization-extinction dynamics, wildlife corridors, wildlife reintroduction, non-native species, ecotoxicology, and restoration of local habitat and ecology. Potential tasks include (1) basic data collection and follow-up monitoring, and (2) statistical and probabilistic analyses and simulation modeling of the seismic, hydraulic, and ecological processes that may have the greatest impact on the park. The science issues and associated tasks delineated for the proposed confluence park will also have transfer value for river restoration in other urban settings.

  16. Anaglyph, Metro Los Angeles, Calif.: Malibu to Mount Baldy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount San Antonio (more commonly known as Mount Baldy) crowns the San Gabriel Mountains northeast of Los Angeles in this computer-generated east-northeast anaglyph perspective viewed from above the Malibu coastline. On the right, the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica are in the foreground. Further away are downtown Los Angeles and then the San Gabriel Valley, which lies adjacent to the mountain front. The San Fernando Valley appears in the left foreground, separated from the ocean by the Santa Monica Mountains. At 3,068 meters (10,064 feet) Mount Baldy rises above the tree line, exposing bright white rocks that are not snow capped in this early autumn scene.

    This anaglyph perspective (stereoscopic 3-D) view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and a Landsat 7 satellite image. Topographic expression is exaggerated one and one-half times. Two perspectives (from slightly differing geographic positions) were created, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a near horizontal view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, S.D.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR)that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour

  17. Speciation of arsenic in ambient aerosols collected in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Rabano, E S; Castillo, N T; Torre, K J; Solomon, P A

    1989-01-01

    First-time measurements of the potentially toxic inorganic species of arsenic (arsenite and arsenate) have been obtained in fine (less than 2.5 microns AD) and coarse (greater than 2.5 microns AD) atmospheric particles in the Los Angeles area. A recently developed method that includes procedures for sample collection, preparation, and analysis was used in this study. Size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected with a high-volume dichotomous virtual impactor that employed polytetrafluoroethylene filters. Results were obtained for the recovery of arsenic standards added to unexposed and collected filters. Data from this study, indicated that the recently developed speciation method can be used to determine concentrations of As(III) and As(V) in atmospheric particulate matter samples. Size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected in the city of Industry during January and February 1987. In most samples, As(III) and As(V) were above the detection limit (approximately 1 ng m-3 of either species) in both aerosol size fractions. A greater portion (about 75 percent) of the two species were observed in the fine particles. The As(III)/As(V) ratio for both particle sizes was close to 1 (i.e., an equal mixture of both species). Comparison of total suspended particulate arsenic measured by the speciation method to that measured by a routine California Air Resources Board-approved procedure showed good agreement (r = 0.94), indicating both methods were approximately equivalent for the collection and analysis of aerosol arsenic. PMID:2709077

  18. Energy recovery from biosolids: The City of Los Angeles experience

    SciTech Connect

    Haug, R.T.; Moore, G.L.; Harrison, D.S.

    1995-11-01

    The City of Los Angeles` Hyperion Treatment Plant serves an area of 1,500 sq km (600 sq mi) with a contributory population of nearly 4 million. The plant currently produces more than 250 dry tonnes per day (dtpd) of digested, dewatered biosolids and is being expanded and upgraded to provide pure oxygen, full secondary treatment by 1998. The modern Hyperion Plant began operating in 1951. Since that time, Hyperion has provided anaerobic digestion for its biosolids and has used the produced biogas for power generation. In the 1980`s the City completed a major expansion of its power generation and biosolids handling facilities at Hyperion. These facilities became known as the Hyperion Energy Recovery System (HERS) and their objective is to maximize the recovery of energy from the renewable biosolids. Today, these facilities are operational and continue to be modified to optimize performance and expanded to meet the increased loadings from full secondary treatment. Biogas produced by the anaerobic digestion process is compressed, scrubbed to remove H{sub 2}S, and used to power a gas turbine, combined cycle cogeneration system. Emergency flares are provided in the event of a power plant outage. A portion of the biosolids are transported offsite for beneficial reuse, such as composting and direct land application. The remaining solids are centrifugally dewatered and dried by indirect rotary dryers to produce about 50 dtpd of dried biofuel. Biofuel produced from the drying processes is fired in a fluidized bed gasification and staged combustion process (FBC) designed to recover energy and reduce air emissions. Superheated steam is produced in a waste heat boiler and converted to electrical power is a condensing steam turbine. Bioash from the FBC`s is contracted for off-site reuse, primarily as a fluxing agent in copper smelting and as a source of silica, aluminum, iron and calcium for manufacture of portland cement.

  19. Ambient Air Pollution and Autism in Los Angeles County, California

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Tracy Ann; Wilhelm, Michelle; Olsen, Jørn; Cockburn, Myles

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of autistic disorder (AD), a serious developmental condition, has risen dramatically over the past two decades, but high-quality population-based research addressing etiology is limited. Objectives: We studied the influence of exposures to traffic-related air pollution during pregnancy on the development of autism using data from air monitoring stations and a land use regression (LUR) model to estimate exposures. Methods: Children of mothers who gave birth in Los Angeles, California, who were diagnosed with a primary AD diagnosis at 3–5 years of age during 1998–2009 were identified through the California Department of Developmental Services and linked to 1995–2006 California birth certificates. For 7,603 children with autism and 10 controls per case matched by sex, birth year, and minimum gestational age, birth addresses were mapped and linked to the nearest air monitoring station and a LUR model. We used conditional logistic regression, adjusting for maternal and perinatal characteristics including indicators of SES. Results: Per interquartile range (IQR) increase, we estimated a 12–15% relative increase in odds of autism for ozone [odds ratio (OR) = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.19; per 11.54-ppb increase] and particulate matter ≤ 2.5 µm (OR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.24; per 4.68-μg/m3 increase) when mutually adjusting for both pollutants. Furthermore, we estimated 3–9% relative increases in odds per IQR increase for LUR-based nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide exposure estimates. LUR-based associations were strongest for children of mothers with less than a high school education. Conclusion: Measured and estimated exposures from ambient pollutant monitors and LUR model suggest associations between autism and prenatal air pollution exposure, mostly related to traffic sources. PMID:23249813

  20. Diurnal trends in coarse particulate matter composition in the Los Angeles Basin.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kalam; Daher, Nancy; Shafer, Martin M; Ning, Zhi; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the diurnal profile of the concentration and composition of ambient coarse particles, three sampling sites were set up in the Los Angeles Basin to collect coarse particulate matter (CPM) in four different time periods of the day (morning, midday, afternoon and overnight) in summer and winter. The samples were analyzed for total and water-soluble elements, inorganic ions and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). In summer, highest concentrations of CPM gravimetric mass, mineral and road dust, and WSOC were observed in midday and afternoon, when the prevailing onshore wind was stronger. In general, atmospheric dilution was lower in winter, contributing to the accumulation of air pollutants during stagnation conditions. Turbulences induced by traffic become a significant particle re-suspension mechanism, particularly during winter night time, when mixing height was lowest. This is evident by the high levels of CPM mass, mineral and road dust in winter overnight at the near-freeway sites located in urban Los Angeles, and to a lesser extent in Riverside. WSOC levels were higher in summer, with a similar diurnal profile with mineral and road dust, indicating that they either share common sources, or that WSOC may be adsorbed or absorbed onto the surfaces of these dust particles. In general, the contribution of inorganic ions to CPM mass was greater in the overnight sampling period at all sampling sites, suggesting that the prevailing meteorological conditions (lower temperature and higher relative humidity) favor the formation of these ions in the coarse mode. Nitrate, the most abundant CPM-bound inorganic species in this basin, is found to be predominantly formed by reactions with sea salt particles in summer. When the sea salt concentrations were low, the reaction with mineral dust particles and the condensation of ammonium nitrate on CPM surfaces also contributes to the formation of nitrate in the coarse mode. PMID:22025084

  1. ShakeOut and its Effects in Los Angeles and Oxnard Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, R.; Ramírez-Guzmán, L.; López, J.; Urbanic, J.; Bielak, J.; O'Hallaron, D.

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of earthquakes have given a deeper understanding of wave propagation and site effects in urban regions. In this work we study the impact of a potential major earthquake on the San Andreas Fault with significant seismic hazard in the Greater Los Angeles Basin. We present results for the ShakeOut simulation---a rupture beginning near Salton Sea, California, heading 270 km northwest along the fault, that produces a Mw 7.8 earthquake in a geographical region which includes all major populated areas of Southern California and northern Mexico, in a 600 km by 300 km by 80 km volume, for a maximum frequency of 1.0 Hz and a minimum shear wave velocity of 200 m/s. For the material model, we use a discretized version of SCEC's CVM4 velocity model, called CVM-Etree. The simulation was performed at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center using Hercules, a finite element octree-based, parallel software developed by the Quake Group at Carnegie Mellon University. Hercules implements a highly efficient end-to-end algorithm for solving the wave field in highly heterogeneous media due to kinematic faulting. We verify our results by comparing synthetic seismograms computed with a parallel finite difference code by Robert Graves (URS) for a similar scenario earthquake, for a maximum frequency of 0.5 Hz and minimum shear wave velocity of 500 m/s. We focus our analysis of the results of the 1.0 Hz ShakeOut simulation on the Los Angeles Basin area, and the Santa Clara River Valley and Oxnard Plain. We examine the site effects present in these two areas and their proneness to capture and amplify seismic waves due to their geological features. Results show a direct correlation between the amplification levels and the local soil and basin profiles.

  2. Water Quality Assessment of the Los Angeles River Watershed, California, USA in Wet and Dry Weather Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaie Boroon, M. H.; Von L Coo, C.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify sources of potential pollutants and characterize urban water quality along the Los Angeles River from its head to the mouth during dry and wet weather periods. Los Angeles (LA) River flows through heavily populated urbanized area in the Los Angeles downtown. The LA River is an effluent-dominated water body during the dry season. The three waste water treatment plants (WWTP) including the Tillman, Burbank, and Glendale discharge the majority of the volume flowing in the LA River during the dry and wet period. The concentration values (ppm) for anions in the dry season ranging 5.5-16,027 (Cl), 0-1.0 (F), 0-21(NO3), 0-1.6 (PO4), and 13.3-2,312 (SO4); whereas the values (ppm) for anions in the wet season ranging 3.4-5,860 (Cl), 0-0.66 (F), 0-17 (NO3), 0-0.67 (PO4), 7.9- 745 (SO4). Dry season concentrations values for trace metals were obtained with values (ppb) ranging 0.9-10 (Ni), 0.8-62 (Zn), 1-4 (As), 0-1 (Pb) and 0-3 (Se). As for wet season trace metals (ppb) ranging 0.001-0.008 (Ni), 0.000001-0.038 (Zn), 0.0016-0.016 (As), 0.00099-0.0058 (Pb), 0.000001-0.0093 (Se). Higher concentrations values during the dry period in the LA River watershed may be attributed to the three WWTPs discharge (75% of the volume of water flowing in the LA River). In water-limited areas such as the Los Angeles basin, urban runoff is a water resource that could enhance restricted water supplies and to enhance localized renewable groundwater resources, thus an assessment of this precious water resource is important for local city and regulatory organizations. In water-limited areas such as the LA basin, urban runoff is a water resource that could enhance restricted water supplies and groundwater resources, thus an assessment of this precious water resource is important for local regulatory organizations.

  3. West Nile Virus Emergence and Persistence in Los Angeles, California, 2003–2008

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jennifer L.; Kluh, Susanne; Madon, Minoo B.; Reisen, William K.

    2010-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) invaded Los Angeles in September 2003, and during the subsequent five-year period followed a pattern of amplification, subsidence, and resurgence. Enzootic transmission was tracked by abundance and infection incidence in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus and Cx. tarsalis and by seroprevalence in peridomestic passerine birds, infection in dead birds, and seroconversions in sentinel chickens. Culex p. quinquefasciatus served as the primary vector of WNV, with gravid traps serving as the best sampling method and the most consistent indicator of viral activity. Spatial scan statistics applied to mosquito infection and positive dead bird data delimited three major clusters of WNV transmission, with introduction occurring in the Los Angeles Basin, and amplification and dispersal events carrying transmission to the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys. Los Angeles experienced major epidemics in 2004 and 2008, providing a unique opportunity to investigate specific patterns of enzootic amplification preceding epidemics. PMID:20682890

  4. Organic and elemental carbon size distributions of Los Angeles aerosols measured during SCAQS. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.

    1989-12-01

    The report summarizes measurements of size-resolved residual organic carbon (ROC) and elemental carbon (EC) made by U. of Minnesota during the Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS). Measurements were made with MOUDI impactors. Impactors were located at Claremont and Rubidoux during summer SCAQS sampling, and at Long Beach and Los Angeles during the fall. It was found that the average mass mean diameter of ROC ranged from 0.43 micrometer at Los Angeles to 0.62 micrometer at Rubidoux. Mass mean diameters of EC were systematically smaller than for ROC. The ROC/EC ratio varied with site, season and particle size. Average ROC/EC ratios were 2.66 (Claremont), 2.12 (Rubidoux), 1.51 (Long Beach) and 1.26 (Los Angeles).

  5. Using Research to Improve College Readiness: A Research Partnership Between the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Los Angeles Education Research Institute

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Meredith; Yamashiro, Kyo; Farrukh, Adina; Lim, Cynthia; Hayes, Katherine; Wagner, Nicole; White, Jeffrey; Chen, Hansheng

    2015-01-01

    The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) serves a large majority of socioeconomically disadvantaged students who are struggling academically and are underprepared for high school graduation and college. This article describes the partnership between LAUSD and the Los Angeles Education Research Institute, and how this collaboration endeavors to produce accessible and high-quality research to inform pressing problems of practice. The article also presents findings from an ongoing partnership research project analyzing a district policy focused on improving college readiness by aligning high school graduation and college-eligibility requirements. In a cohort that went through high school before the policy became mandatory for all students, less than 1/5 of all students (and 30% of graduates) met the college eligibility criteria. Our findings indicate that academic and behavioral indicators from 8th and 9th grade can help identify for possible intervention students who are not on track to meet these new graduation requirements. PMID:26709340

  6. Statistical and Biophysical Models for Predicting Total and Outdoor Water Use in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mini, C.; Hogue, T. S.; Pincetl, S.

    2012-04-01

    Modeling water demand is a complex exercise in the choice of the functional form, techniques and variables to integrate in the model. The goal of the current research is to identify the determinants that control total and outdoor residential water use in semi-arid cities and to utilize that information in the development of statistical and biophysical models that can forecast spatial and temporal urban water use. The City of Los Angeles is unique in its highly diverse socio-demographic, economic and cultural characteristics across neighborhoods, which introduces significant challenges in modeling water use. Increasing climate variability also contributes to uncertainties in water use predictions in urban areas. Monthly individual water use records were acquired from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) for the 2000 to 2010 period. Study predictors of residential water use include socio-demographic, economic, climate and landscaping variables at the zip code level collected from US Census database. Climate variables are estimated from ground-based observations and calculated at the centroid of each zip code by inverse-distance weighting method. Remotely-sensed products of vegetation biomass and landscape land cover are also utilized. Two linear regression models were developed based on the panel data and variables described: a pooled-OLS regression model and a linear mixed effects model. Both models show income per capita and the percentage of landscape areas in each zip code as being statistically significant predictors. The pooled-OLS model tends to over-estimate higher water use zip codes and both models provide similar RMSE values.Outdoor water use was estimated at the census tract level as the residual between total water use and indoor use. This residual is being compared with the output from a biophysical model including tree and grass cover areas, climate variables and estimates of evapotranspiration at very high spatial resolution. A

  7. New Acid Stimulation Treatment to Sustain Production - Los Angeles Downtown Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Richard C.

    2003-03-10

    Hydrochloric acid stimulation was successfully used on several wells in the Los Angeles Downtown Field, in the past. The decline rates after stimulation were relatively high and generally within six months to a year, production rates have returned to their prestimulation rates. The wells in Los Angeles Downtown Field have strong scale producing tendencies and many wells are treated for scale control. Four wells were carefully selected that are representative of wells that had a tendency to form calcium carbonate scale and had shown substantial decline over the last few years.

  8. Landsat - SRTM Shaded Relief Comparison, Los Angeles and Vicinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs), such as those produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), allow user-controlled visualization of the Earth's landforms that is not possible using satellite imagery alone. This three-view comparison shows Los Angeles, Calif., and vicinity, with a Landsat image (only) on the left, a shaded relief rendering of the SRTM DEM on the right, and a merge of the two data sets in the middle. Note that topographic expression in the Landsat image alone is very subtle due to the fairly high sun angle (63 degrees above the horizon) during the satellite overflight in late morning of a mid-Spring day (May 4, 2001). In contrast, computer generated topographic shading of the DEM provides a pure and bold image of topographic expression with a user specified illumination direction. The middle image shows how combining the Landsat and DEM shaded relief can result in a topographically enhanced satellite image in which the information content of both data sets is merged into a single view.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and helps in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA

  9. The 2007 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby Study: A Multilevel, Population-Based Study of Maternal and Infant Health in Los Angeles County

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shin M.; Wakeel, Fathima; Herman, Dena; Higgins, Chandra; Shi, Lu; Chow, Jessica; Sun, Stacy; Lu, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. In order to comprehensively examine the risks and resources associated with racial-ethnic disparities in adverse obstetric outcomes, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health and the University of California, Los Angeles, joined efforts to design and implement the 2007 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby (LAMB) study. This paper aims to present the conceptual frameworks underlying the study's development, highlight the successful collaboration between a research institution and local health department, describe the distinguishing characteristics of its methodology, and discuss the study's implications for research, programs, and policies. Methods. The LAMB study utilized a multilevel, multistage cluster design with a mixed-mode methodology for data collection. Two samples were ultimately produced: the multilevel sample (n = 4,518) and the augmented final sample (n = 6,264). Results. The LAMB study allowed us to collect multilevel data on the risks and resources associated with racial-ethnic disparities in adverse obstetric outcomes. Both samples were more likely to be Hispanic, aged 20–34 years, completed at least 12 years of schooling, and spoke English. Conclusions. The LAMB study represents the successful collaboration between an academic institution and local health department and is a theoretically based research database and surveillance system that informs effective programmatic and policy interventions to improve outcomes among LAC's varied demographic groups. PMID:25580305

  10. 33 CFR 167.503 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. 167.503 Section 167.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. (a) A separation zone is established bounded...

  11. 33 CFR 167.503 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. 167.503 Section 167.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. (a) A separation zone is established bounded...

  12. 33 CFR 167.503 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. 167.503 Section 167.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. (a) A separation zone is established bounded...

  13. 33 CFR 167.503 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. 167.503 Section 167.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. (a) A separation zone is established bounded...

  14. 33 CFR 167.500 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. 167.500 Section 167.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters....500 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. The Traffic Separation Scheme in the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach consists of three parts: a Precautionary...

  15. 33 CFR 167.500 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. 167.500 Section 167.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters....500 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. The Traffic Separation Scheme in the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach consists of three parts: a Precautionary...

  16. 33 CFR 167.500 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. 167.500 Section 167.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters....500 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. The Traffic Separation Scheme in the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach consists of three parts: a Precautionary...

  17. 33 CFR 167.500 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. 167.500 Section 167.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters....500 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. The Traffic Separation Scheme in the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach consists of three parts: a Precautionary...

  18. 33 CFR 167.500 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. 167.500 Section 167.500 Navigation and Navigable Waters....500 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General. The Traffic Separation Scheme in the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach consists of three parts: a Precautionary...

  19. 33 CFR 167.503 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. 167.503 Section 167.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach TSS: Southern approach. (a) A separation zone is established bounded...

  20. Academic Performance of L.A.C.C. Transfers to California State College at Los Angeles, 1967-68.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Ben K.

    Grade reports for the 848 students who had transfered from Los Angeles City College to California State College at Los Angeles during the academic year 1967-68 are analyzed and presented in tabular form. Tables include: (1) academic performance of transfers in their first quarter, (2) distribution of majors, (3) academic performance according to…

  1. An Analysis of the Use and Validity of Test-Based Teacher Evaluations Reported by the "Los Angeles Times": 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durso, Catherine S.

    2012-01-01

    In May of 2011, the "Los Angeles Times" published, for the second time, results of statistical studies examining the variation in teacher and school performance in the Los Angeles Unified School District, based on the California Standards Tests for math and English Language Arts (ELA). The studies use data from the seven academic years ending in…

  2. The effectiveness of recent water restriction policies on single-family water use in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mini, C.; Hogue, T. S.; Pincetl, S.

    2013-12-01

    Residential water consumption represents the largest urban water consumer category and is projected to have significant increase over the next 20 years in Los Angeles, California. Successive severe droughts have occurred in Los Angeles over the past 30 years leading to the implementation of emergency water conservation measures that include limiting the time and frequency of urban irrigation as well as applying shortage year water rates. Reliance on imported water sources dramatically increased during the past drought periods, which questions the reliability of future water supply. The objectives of the current study include quantifying the impact of past water restrictions on single-family residential water use in single-family areas in Los Angeles. Three phases of water restrictions were implemented during the 2007-2010 drought period to reduce water consumption: voluntary restrictions during fiscal year 2007-2008, mandatory outdoor use restrictions in fiscal year 2008-2009, and more stringent mandatory restrictions limiting the frequency of irrigation coupled with a water rate increase in fiscal year 2009-2010. Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) monthly individual water use records from 2000 to 2010 were aggregated at the block level in the San Fernando Valley. The effectiveness of the three water restrictions phases was analyzed through a linear regression model developed over 2000-2007 with single-family water use as the dependent variable, climate, and economic variables as the predictors at the block level. Predicted water use during the 2007-2010 period was estimated using results from the statistical model and compared with actual water use to calculate the amount of water savings due to the restrictions. The comparison of the impact of water restrictions on single-family water use reveals that the more stringent mandatory water restrictions provided a higher and statistically significant decrease in water use. Single-family water

  3. Gas phase C{sub 2}-C{sub 10} organic acids concentrations in the Los Angeles atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, C.G.; Fraser, M.P.; Cass, G.R.

    1999-02-15

    The atmospheric concentrations of gas-phase C{sub 2}--C{sub 10} monocarboxylic and benzoic acids are reported in samples collected during a severe Los Angeles area photochemical smog episode. Average urban concentrations are 10--50 {times} greater than concentrations observed at a remote background location, indicating an anthropogenic origin for these compounds. Average urban concentrations during the episode were 16.1 {micro}g m{sup {minus}3} (6.6 ppb) for acetic acid and 1.67 {micro}g m{sup {minus}3} (0.55 ppb) for propionic acid, with progressively lesser amounts as the carbon chain length of the acids is increased. Spatial and diurnal variations in atmospheric organic acids concentrations point to the importance of both direct emissions from primary sources and formation by photochemical reaction of precursor compounds.

  4. Water Quality Improvement Policies: Lessons Learned from the Implementation of Proposition O in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mi-Hyun; Stenstrom, Michael; Pincetl, Stephanie

    2009-03-01

    This article evaluates the implementation of Proposition O, a stormwater cleanup measure, in Los Angeles, California. The measure was intended to create new funding to help the city comply with the Total Maximum Daily Load requirements under the federal Clean Water Act. Funding water quality objectives through a bond measure was necessary because the city had insufficient revenues to deploy new projects in its budget. The bond initiative required a supermajority vote (two-thirds of the voters), hence the public had to be convinced that such funding both was necessary and would be effective. The bond act language included project solicitation from the public, as well as multiple benefit objectives. Accordingly, nonprofit organizations mobilized to present projects that included creating new parks, using schoolyards for flood control and groundwater recharge, and replacing parking lots with permeable surfaces, among others. Yet few, if any, of these projects were retained for funding, as the city itself also had a list of priorities and higher technical expertise in justifying them as delivering water quality improvements. Our case study of the implementation of Proposition O points to the potentially different priorities for the renovation of urban infrastructure that are held by nonprofit organizations and city agencies and the importance of structuring public processes clearly so that there are no misimpressions about funding and implementation responsibilities that can lead to disillusionment with government, especially under conditions of fiscal constraints.

  5. Geographic variation in rates of selected surgical procedures within Los Angeles County.

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, D M; Valdez, R B; Shapiro, M F; Brook, R H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We explore the contribution of income and ethnicity to geographic variation in utilization of surgical procedures. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. We assessed the use of eight procedures from 1986 through 1988 among residents of Los Angeles County using data from the California Discharge Dataset, the 1980 census, and other secondary sources. Procedures chosen for evaluation were coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), coronary artery angioplasty, permanent pacemaker insertion, mastectomy, simple hysterectomy, transurethral prostate resection (TURP), carotid endarterectomy, and appendectomy. STUDY DESIGN. The amount of inter-zip code variation for each procedure was first measured using various estimates including the analysis of variance coefficient of variation (CVA). Population-weighted multivariate regression analysis was used to model variation in age- and gender-adjusted rates of procedure use among 236 residential zip codes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Highest-variation procedures were coronary artery angioplasty (CVA = .392) and carotid endarterectomy (CVA = .374). The procedures with the lowest degree of variation were cardiac pacemaker implantation (CVA = .194) and hysterectomy (CVA = .195). Variation was significantly related to income (carotid endarterectomy) and either African American or Latino zip code ethnicity for all procedures except pacemaker implantation. For all procedures except appendectomy, the direction of the effect was toward fewer procedures with lower income. However, the effect of African American or Latino population ethnicity varied. CONCLUSIONS. In this large urban area both population ethnicity and socioeconomic status are significantly associated with the geographic utilization of selected surgical procedures. PMID:7721583

  6. Immigration and the Low-Cost Housing Shortage: The Los Angeles Area's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, John

    Rising housing costs, increased homelessness, and the debate over illegal immigrants residing in publically assisted housing have renewed media and public interest in immigration's contribution to the Los Angeles, California area's problems of scarce low-cost housing, homelessness, and housing code violations. Recent data suggest that immigrants…

  7. Project Support Evaluation. Los Angeles Unified School District, Report #3 - Final Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simun, Patricia Bates; And Others

    Project Support, a 3-year project funded by the federal government, was designed as a demonstration of the impact of a comprehensive school-based drug and gang prevention program for high-risk students in six elementary schools in Los Angeles (California). In addition to providing some programs for entire grade levels, the program planned to…

  8. Intergroup Conflict in Los Angeles County Schools. Report on a Survey of Hate Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations, CA.

    This report discusses the findings of a survey on school hate crime which was distributed to all schools in Los Angeles County (California). The survey was designed to assess the level of inter-ethnic conflict and hate crime on kindergarten through twelfth-grade campuses. Chapter 1 discusses the background of the problem, including information…

  9. Minority Ethnic Television in Toronto and Los Angeles: Two North American Approaches to Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoloff, David L.

    Toronto (Ontario, Canada) and Los Angeles (California) are two cities that provide television programs for specific ethnic groups. During a sample week, 13 percent of the total broadcast time of stations serving Greater Toronto was devoted to programs for ethnic groups. In another sample week, minority ethnic broadcasts took up 17 percent of the…

  10. Lau Year-End Report, 1979-1980. Los Angeles Unified School District. Publication No. 379.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisbender, Leo; And Others

    This second annual year-end report summarizes the efforts of administrators, teachers, and students in the Los Angeles Unified School District on behalf of children whose primary language is not English. It documents the district's response to the January 1974 Supreme Court decision in Lau v. Nichols. The response is embodied in programs for…

  11. West Los Angeles College Student Follow-Up Study Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Robert

    A follow-up study was conducted among new students at West Los Angeles College (WLAC) to identify student characteristics, educational goals, and objectives; and to relate these characteristics to student attrition. Subjects for the study were 483 first-time freshmen enrolled at WLAC in Fall 1977. This initial sample was surveyed again one year…

  12. Catholic Education for Mexican Americans in Los Angeles: A Brief Historical Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Eduardo F.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the historical development of Catholic schools for Mexican Americans in Los Angeles, California. It provides a brief overview of events spanning the 1700s to the 1970s, with particular attention placed on examining the administration of Cardinal James Francis Aloysius McIntyre from 1948-1969. While his predecessor, Archbishop…

  13. Korean-Americans in Los Angeles: Their Concerns and Language Maintenance. Technical Report 01-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kenneth Kong-On; And Others

    A preliminary study was conducted by the National Center for Bilingual Education on the Korean community living in the United States. The study focused on Korean Americans residing within the Los Angeles Long Beach area of southern California, one of the largest Korean communities in the United States. This report includes: (1) a history of the…

  14. Los Angeles Free Clinic [and]"Adolescent Health Care Programs That Work."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainwater, Mary; De Caprio, Chris

    The first paper describes The Los Angeles Free Clinic and its services, which are specifically designed to respond to the needs of low-income and homeless youth within the community. The paper describes a free-of-charge, free-of-judgment comprehensive response system that exists because of collaboration with other health facilities such as…

  15. 77 FR 43656 - BNSF Railway Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Los Angeles County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board BNSF Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Los Angeles County, CA BNSF Railway Company (BNSF) has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR pt. 1152 subpart...

  16. Master Plan for the Drew Postgraduate Medical School, Los Angeles, Calif.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    With the assistance of a consortium of subcontractors and with additional support provided by the Commonwealth Fund, the contractor has produced a Master Plan for the Drew Postgraduate Medical School in Los Angeles. The Bureau on developing a scope of work defined its interest in this contract as a demonstration of the planning process by which an…

  17. ORIGINS OF AEROSOL SULFUR SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE LOS ANGELES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low pressure impactor measurements show two distinct types of fine particle sulfur size distributions in Los Angeles. These types have mass median diameters of 0.54 + or - 0.07 micrometers and 0.20 + or - 0.02 micrometers, respectively. Factors which may account for the two distr...

  18. The Impact of Proposition 13 on Public Employee Relations: The Case of Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swimmer, Gene

    1982-01-01

    The impact of Proposition 13 and subsequent state bailout legislation on public employee relations in the City and County of Los Angeles (California) has been a new collective bargaining environment. The 1979 negotiations, where a countywide strike was narrowly averted, illustrate the hardening of management attitudes and union militancy. (MLF)

  19. Remedial/Developmental Education and the Cost of Community College Transfer: A Los Angeles County Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melguizo, Tatiana; Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Cypers, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This study calculates and explores the total costs of a community college education prior to transfer to a four-year college. Included are all courses both at and below the college level by 411 students who attended one of the nine community colleges in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) and who successfully transferred to a…

  20. Teacher Hiring, Transfer and Evaluation in Los Angeles Unified School District. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Teacher Project, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In the spring and summer of 2008, The New Teacher Project (TNTP) partnered with Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) to investigate the impact of the school district's policies and practices on the ability of schools to build and maintain strong instructional teams. TNTP's analysis included the following components: (1) Analysis of teacher…

  1. Lessons from the Los Angeles River: An Environmental Education Success Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Betsy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the work of Friends of the Los Angeles River (FoLAR) in local environmental education. Discusses the creation of educational programs that celebrate and study the river and explain the importance of the river, its tributaries, and watershed. (Author/MM)

  2. Retention Patterns in the Los Angeles Unified School District, 1983-84. Publication No. 456.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joubert, Lionel; Weisbender, Leo

    This report provides information on the number and percentage of students retained in grade during the 1983-84 school term in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Data were analyzed from reports filed by all principals and from the LAUSD Racial and Ethnic Survey, Fall 1983. Children's centers, adult schools, occupational centers, and…

  3. The Eighth Annual Air Pollution Medical Research Conference, Los Angeles, March 2-4, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archives of Environmental Health, 1967

    1967-01-01

    Papers read before the Eighth Annual American Medical Association Air Pollution Medical Research Conference, Los Angeles, California, March 2-4, 1966, are presented in this document. Topics deal with basic approaches to the study of the effects of inhaled irritants on the lung; environmental parameters in relation to host responses; biological…

  4. Project Support Evaluation, Los Angeles Unified School District. Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovacek, Simeon P.; And Others

    This report describes the first operating year of Project Support, a 3-year gang/drug prevention program aimed at elementary students in six inner city schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District. The project involves the implementation of nine strategies described in the research literature as being effective in drug/gang prevention. These…

  5. Los Angeles Unified School District Esea Title I Components--Evaluation Reports. Division of Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA. Research and Development Section.

    This volume contains evaluation reports for 1967-68 secondary-school activities in the Los Angeles Unified School District, funded under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Included are all activities which continued through the school year or extended into the 1968 summer session. Some 32 activities were carried out in…

  6. 1984-85 State of the District Address. Los Angeles Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltai, Leslie

    In this address by the Chancellor of the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD), an overview is provided of major accomplishments, influences, changes, and directions of the District. Following introductory comments, the paper highlights some of the recent accomplishments of LACCD colleges, including the Test Construction and Evaluation…

  7. The demographic outlook for Los Angeles, 1980-2000: prospects and policies.

    PubMed

    Thomlinson, R

    1983-01-01

    Five projections of the population of Los Angeles County, California, to the year 2000 are analyzed. Consideration is given to components of growth, the immigration of minorities, transportation and commuting, and the prospect of the development of a Californian megalopolis. PMID:12266466

  8. The Rise in Methamphetamine Use among American Indians in Los Angeles County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spear, Suzanne; Crevecoeur, Desiree A.; Rawson, Richard A.; Clark, Rose

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary review of substance abuse treatment admission data from 2001-2005 was conducted to explore the use of methamphetamine among American Indians in treatment programs funded by Los Angeles County. Comparisons were made between primary methamphetamine users and users whose primary drug was a substance other than methamphetamine. In that…

  9. East Los Angeles College Student and Staff Transportation Survey. Research Report 80-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Steven Mark

    In response to the 1979 gasoline shortage, East Los Angeles College (ELAC) conducted a survey of faculty and staff to determine the primary means of transportation to ELAC, the number of miles which students and faculty commuted, the accessibility of bus lines to student and staff homes, the number of transfers made by those riding the bus to…

  10. Desegregating the Los Angeles Unified School District: Second Simulation Series. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Rabinovitz and Szanton, Inc., Los Angeles, CA.

    This document reports the results of computer simulations of each of 19 variations on 4 prototypical desegregation plans applied to the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Each prototype represents one of the following categories of proposals offered during the litigation of the desegregation issue in the California courts: (1) an…

  11. DYNAMOMETER TESTING OF ON-ROAD VEHICLES FROM THE LOS ANGELES IN-USE EMISSIONS STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    One part of the CARB/EPA coordinated In-Use Automobile Emissions field study of 1991 carried out in the Los Angeles area was to examine the operation and emissions characteristics of vehicles emitting high quantities of Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Hydrocarbon (HC) vehicles. n-use, c...

  12. Nature's Classroom. A Guide for the Los Angeles County Outdoor School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korporaal, Arie R., Ed.

    Promoting understandings in outdoor science and conservation is the primary goal of the Los Angeles County Outdoor School as presented in this guide to its five-day resident program for elementary school pupils. The purpose of various program components is briefly described, including hikes, cabin living, campfires, conservation projects, crafts,…

  13. 40 CFR 52.263 - Priority treatment for buses and carpools-Los Angeles Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... preferential treatment on arterial surface streets from Vermont Avenue to the Los Angeles central business... preferential treatment to LA/CBD. (3) Wilshire Corridor—surface street preferential bus treatment from vicinity... preferential treatment in CBD on surface streets to connect Wilshire and San Bernardino corridors. (d) On...

  14. Disabled Students in Vocational Education Programs: Los Angeles Community Colleges, 1981-1982--Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzkamper, Charlot

    This report reviews efforts by the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) to meet the needs of handicapped students in its vocational education programs. The report begins with a summary of district statistics and California and federal legislation regarding access for the disabled in vocational programs. Part II focuses on the students…

  15. Nutritional Status of Mexican American Preschool Children in East Los Angeles and San Diego.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jane S.; And Others

    Results of a 1968 pilot study of the nutritional status of Mexican American preschool children in East Los Angeles and San Diego are reported in this document. Questionnaire data collected from mothers of preschool children are presented in terms of a description of families, prenatal care, clinical examinations, dietary intakes, and biochemical…

  16. 76 FR 28453 - Cesar Chavez Special Resource Study-Alameda, Fresno, Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Monterey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... National Park Service Cesar Chavez Special Resource Study--Alameda, Fresno, Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles.... ACTION: Notice of Scoping for Cesar Chavez Special Resource Study. SUMMARY: In accordance with provisions.... 110-229-May 2008), the NPS is conducting a special resource study of the sites in the State of...

  17. The Work Experience of Undocumented Mexican Women Migrants in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Rita J.; DeLey, Margo

    1984-01-01

    Undocumented Mexican women workers in Los Angeles were interviewed about their work experience in the United States. Most of them work in factories, not in domestic service. Most earn a salary above minimum wage but below that earned by documented women, and 80 percent believe their treatment at work equals that of other workers. (KH)

  18. Early Grade Retention and Student Success: Evidence from Los Angeles. Technical Appendices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Jill S.; Lipscomb, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This report uses administrative data provided by the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) on kindergarten to third-grade students. The records begin with kindergartners in 2001, first-graders in 2002, second-graders in 2003, and third-graders in 2004 and include all LAUSD students in grades K-3 for 2004 to 2008. Altogether, the raw data…

  19. Passing the Test: Ecological Regression Analysis in the Los Angeles County Case and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Allan J.

    1991-01-01

    Statistical analysis of racially polarized voting prepared for the Garza v County of Los Angeles (California) (1990) voting rights case is reviewed to demonstrate that ecological regression is a flexible, robust technique that illuminates the reality of ethnic voting, and superior to the neighborhood model supported by the defendants. (SLD)

  20. Breastfeeding Practices of Japanese Mothers in the South Bay Area of Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hongo, Hiroko

    A study investigated the attitudes of Japanese breastfeeding mothers in the South Bay area in Los Angeles. The sample consisted of 20 Japanese mothers over the age of 18 who were born in Japan, who recently came to the United States, and whose youngest child has been breastfed for at least 6 months. Subjects were interviewed in their native…

  1. CARBON MONOXIDE COMMUTER EXPOSURE DATA BASE: A 5-DAY STUDY IN LOS ANGELES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent concern about carbon monoxide exposure to the commuter population prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to conduct a five-day field project to assess the CO exposure to Los Angeles commuters. The purpose of this report is to document the field project and to pr...

  2. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act. RAND Quarterly Report, October 2008. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Terry; Turner, Susan; Ridgeway, Greg

    2009-01-01

    This document is the second quarterly progress report for the evaluation of Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) programs for the Los Angeles County Probation Department. The report covers the period from July 1, 2008, through September 30, 2008. The intent of the report is to provide Probation and the community-based organizations (CBOs)…

  3. Acculturation and Reported Intimate Partner Violence Among Latinas in Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Lorena; Hurwitz, Eric L.; Kraus, Jess F.

    2005-01-01

    This study sought to understand the relationship between acculturation and reporting intimate partner violence (IPV) among Latinas. A cross-sectional interviewer-administered survey was conducted at public health care clinics throughout Los Angeles County. Logistic regression was used to estimate the effect of acculturation on reporting IPV. An…

  4. 75 FR 58466 - Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties, CA; Notice of Intent

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... projected traffic demand attributed to large-scale growth and increasing population in the Antelope, Victor and Apple Valley areas of Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. This growth has resulted in... and approximately 125th St. East. From 125th St. East, the route would curve south until it joins...

  5. The Development of a Questionnaire for an Organizational Development Program at Los Angeles Southwest College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Ollie B.; Andrews, James

    An Organizational Development (OD) questionnaire was designed at Los Angeles Southwest College to enhance planned change in that educational organization. The questionnaire measures attitudes in seven organizational development concept areas: (1) institutional climate indices--opportunity for advancement, general institutional conditions, concern…

  6. An Expression of Black Identity: The Use of Gospel Music in a Los Angeles Catholic Church.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djedje, Jacqueline

    1983-01-01

    Gives a brief history of Black Catholics in the United States. Presents the history of one Catholic church in Los Angeles that began to use gospel music at Mass, and shows how this church met the needs of the Black community by enhancing the liturgy with traditional Black culture and values. (ML)

  7. University of California at Los Angeles: Translating Alumni Loyalty into Donations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strout, Erin

    2006-01-01

    When the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) ended a $3-billion campaign in December, the effort was known as a success not only because of its large goal, but also because of the high participation by alumni. Three out of every 10 alumni made a donation, accounting for 22 percent of the total take. Now the institution faces the…

  8. Los Angeles OneSource System Youth Participant Customer Satisfaction Survey, 2010-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heisley, Deborah D.; Moore, Richard W.; Patch, Robin N.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, Los Angeles OneSource Centers offer low-income youth ages 14-21 services aimed at improving educational achievement, enhancing job skills, and preparing for college. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the youths' satisfaction with services received at 14 OneSource Centers throughout…

  9. "City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles," by Mike Davis [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Mike Davis's book presents a history and current sociology of Los Angeles from a socialist perspective, arguing that inequalities in the distribution of power and wealth underlie the area's serious, growing problems: ethnic fear and discrimination, social disinvestment and withdrawal by the "haves," and an epidemic of youth violence. (SV)

  10. See Us as We Are: Clara Chu--University of California at Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This article highlights the influence of Clara Chu, associate professor in the University of California at Los Angeles's (UCLA) Department of Information Studies. Her influence extends far beyond her campus. She works with many organizations to advance multiculturalism in librarianship. As a prolific researcher, writer, and speaker, Chu has given…

  11. Methodology for Obtaining a Representative Sample of Homeless Persons: The Los Angeles Skid Row Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnam, M. Audrey; Koegel, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Drawing a probability sample of homeless adults in Los Angeles' Skid Row resulted in a sampling design meeting statistical criteria. The design uses data from meal centers, bed counts, and outdoor congregations; and allows unbiased estimates of prevalence of mental disorders and assessment of service needs of the homeless. (TJH)

  12. What Is an Egalitarian Family: Reflections from a Los Angeles Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Carol Chapnick

    The degree to which spouses actually share household tasks and income production is compared to their ideological commitment to sex role equity. Data were obtained from long-term intensive fieldwork with 19 Los Angeles nurses and their 18 families and from the researcher's doctoral dissertation. All data on family performance patterns indicate a…

  13. POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS FROM CONSUMPTION OF FISH CAUGHT IN POLLUTED COASTAL WATERS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was carried out in the Los Angeles metropolitan coastal area during 1980 to assess fishing activity and consumption rates of fish by sport fishermen at local sites which were pollution impacted. Among the 1059 anglers interviewed, 49% of them fish at least one time each ...

  14. 33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Specific regulations pertaining to vessels operating in these areas are contained in 33 CFR 165.1109(d). .../Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section 167.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary area consists of the...

  15. 33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Specific regulations pertaining to vessels operating in these areas are contained in 33 CFR 165.1109(d). .../Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section 167.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary area consists of the...

  16. 33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Specific regulations pertaining to vessels operating in these areas are contained in 33 CFR 165.1109(d). .../Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section 167.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary area consists of the...

  17. 33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Specific regulations pertaining to vessels operating in these areas are contained in 33 CFR 165.1109(d). .../Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section 167.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary area consists of the...

  18. 33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Specific regulations pertaining to vessels operating in these areas are contained in 33 CFR 165.1109(d). .../Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section 167.501 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary area consists of the...

  19. Tiene Arte Valor Afuera Del Barrio: The Murals of East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holscher, Louis M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the themes of the murals and explores the possible uses that the murals in Los Angeles have for the outsider, the non-Chicano, for those who have only a little understanding or awareness of the Chicano community. (Author/AM)

  20. Retention Patterns in the Los Angeles Unified School District. June 1989. Publication No. 557.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isonio, Steven

    This annual report shows the number and percentage of students retained in grade at the conclusion of the 1988-89 school year in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Statistical data were gathered from a principal's report, a student survey, and earlier reports. The following findings are presented: (1) in June of 1989, 30,413 students…

  1. To Develop an Administrative Manual for the Cooperative Education Program at Los Angeles Valley College [California].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomen, Lynn D.

    This document is Part I of the Handbook on Cooperative Education at Los Angeles Valley College (California). It was designed to standardize the procedures and policies that have proven appropriate for this college. For comparative purposes, the author studied the administration of cooperative education programs at four other California community…

  2. Transiency and Stability in the Los Angeles Unified School District, 1988-89. Publication No. 542.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Deborah F.; Weisbender, Leo

    This annual report shows student transiency and stability rates for the 1988-89 school year in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Transiency refers to the number of students who enter and leave a school during the year, expressed as a percentage. Stability refers to the number of students who remained in a school all year, expressed…

  3. Transiency and Stability in the Los Angeles Unified School District, 1996-97. Publication No. 710.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Probst, Lynette

    A report on transiency and stability in the Los Angeles Unified School District (California) has been published for almost 3 decades. "Transiency" refers to the number of students who enter and leave during the school year, and is expressed as a percentage (rate) of the starting enrollment. "Stability" refers to the student population that has…

  4. Transiency and Stability in the Los Angeles Unified School District, 1989-90. Publication No. 556.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Deborah F.

    This annual report shows student transiency and stability rates for the 1989-90 school year in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Transiency refers to the number of students who enter and leave a school during the year, expressed as a percentage. Stability refers to the number of students who remained in a school all year, expressed…

  5. Transiency and Stability in the Los Angeles Unified School District 1997-98. Publication No. 714.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Probst, Lynette

    A report on transience and stability has been published by the Los Angeles Unified School District (California) for almost 3 decades. "Transiency" refers to the number of students who enter and leave during the school year, and is expressed as a percentage (rate). Stability refers to the student population that has remained in the school all year,…

  6. Transiency and Stability in the Los Angeles Unified School District, 1987-88. Publication No. 526.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Daniel W.; Weisbender, Leo

    This document comprises a report on transiency and stability for the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) for 1987-88. Transiency refers to the number of students who enter and leave during the school year expressed as a percentage rate. Stability refers to the student population that has remained in the school all year expressed as a…

  7. What Teacher Characteristics Affect Student Achievement? Findings from Los Angeles Public Schools. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giglio, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Teacher effectiveness is typically measured by traditional teacher qualification standards, such as experience, education, and scores on licensure examinations. RAND researchers found no evidence that these standards have a substantial effect on student achievement in Los Angeles public elementary, middle, and high schools. Alternative measures of…

  8. Sesame Street. A Survey of Two Cities: Viewing Patterns in Inner City Los Angeles and Chicago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filep, Robert; And Others

    This survey was conducted: (1) to develop a survey instrument for the collection of viewer interviews with the guidance and involvement of personnel recruited from inner city communities; (2) to ascertain if Sesame Street was being received by a significant number of inner city households in the low-income, minority, communities of Los Angeles and…

  9. Communication between African Americans and Korean Americans: Before and after the Los Angeles Riots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Ella

    1993-01-01

    Follows up a 1989 study of communication patterns between Korean-American merchants and African-American patrons in South Central Los Angeles (California), and expands the study to include a wider population of 58 African Americans and 21 Korean Americans. Effects of the 1992 riots on attitudes are discussed. (SLD)

  10. Sports and Politics: Los Angeles Times' Coverage of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salwen, Michael B.; Garrison, Bruce

    To investigate whether political assertions were interjected into American sports coverage of the 1984 Olympic games and which direction those assertions took, a study examined the Los Angeles Times' coverage of the games in its award-winning special supplement sections. The "Times" included these special supplements in its papers from July 22,…

  11. 76 FR 53115 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 202; Los Angeles, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... inviting public comment has been given in the Federal Register (75 FR 47536-47537, 08/06/2010) and the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 202; Los Angeles, CA Pursuant to its...

  12. 76 FR 86 - Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 202, Los Angeles, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ..., filed 12/11/2009); Whereas, notice inviting public comment has been given in the Federal Register (74 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion/Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 202, Los Angeles, CA Pursuant...

  13. Evaluation of Los Angeles County Head Start Program, 1969-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economic and Youth Opportunities Agency of Greater Los Angeles, CA.

    In October 1969 and again six months later, in April 1970, the Bettye Caldwell Preschool Inventory was administered to Head Start children in Los Angeles County. In all, 704 pre- and post-tests were obtained. The purpose of the testing was to assess one of the goals of the Head Start Program: to enrich the experience of preschool children and to…

  14. 76 FR 70051 - Establishment of Class D and Amendment of Class E Airspace; Los Angeles, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend controlled airspace at Los Angeles, CA (76 FR...) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2....

  15. 76 FR 14103 - The Jewelry Stream; Los Angeles, CA, Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration The Jewelry Stream; Los Angeles, CA, Notice of Negative Determination... in the Federal Register (75 FR 71455). Workers of The Jewelry Stream are engaged in employment...). Conclusion After reconsideration, I affirm the original notice of negative determination of eligibility...

  16. Missing the Mark: Intelligence Testing in Los Angeles Public Schools, 1922-32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raftery, Judith R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes how Intelligence Quotient (I.Q.) testing came to be used in the Los Angeles, California public schools. Argues that the test generated more confusion and frustration among teachers and administrators than previously believed. Concludes that, despite pressure to use I.Q. scores exclusively for student classification, individual teachers…

  17. Los Angeles and San Diego Margin High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry and Backscatter Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gardner, James V.; Mayer, Larry A.; Hughes-Clarke, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Summary -- The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the University of New Hampshire and the University of New Brunswick mapped the nearshore regions off Los Angeles and San Diego, California using multibeam echosounders. Multibeam bathymetry and co-registered, corrected acoustic backscatter were collected in water depths ranging from about 3 to 900 m offshore Los Angeles and in water depths ranging from about 17 to 1230 m offshore San Diego. Continuous, 16-m spatial resolution, GIS ready format data of the entire Los Angeles Margin and San Diego Margin are available online as separate USGS Open-File Reports. For ongoing research, the USGS has processed sub-regions within these datasets at finer resolutions. The resolution of each sub-region was determined by the density of soundings within the region. This Open-File Report contains the finer resolution multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data that the USGS, Western Region, Coastal and Marine Geology Team has processed into GIS ready formats as of April 2004. The data are available in ArcInfo GRID and XYZ formats. See the Los Angeles or San Diego maps for the sub-region locations. These datasets in their present form were not originally intended for publication. The bathymetry and backscatter have data-collection and processing artifacts. These data are being made public to fulfill a Freedom of Information Act request. Care must be taken not to confuse artifacts with real seafloor morphology and acoustic backscatter.

  18. To Develop a Curriculum Manual for the Cooperative Education Program at Los Angeles Valley College [California].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomen, Lynn D.

    This document is Part II of the Handbook on Cooperative Education at Los Angeles Valley College (California). It was designed to enable instructor/coordinators to conduct classes more effectively and efficiently. Outlines are provided of the new and revised curriculum offerings that have been suggested by students, the Cooperative Education…

  19. East Los Angeles College Former Students Survey. Research Report 80-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Steven Mark

    A telephone survey of 1,080 students enrolled in East Los Angeles College (ELAC) during the Fall 1977 semester, but not subsequently enrolled in the Spring 1978 semester, was conducted to determine the students' current activities and to ascertain their characteristics and opinions concerning ELAC. The former students, representing 10% of the Fall…

  20. Revisiting "Rodriguez v. Los Angeles Unified School District": A Case of Intra-District Inequities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinosa, Ruben W.

    2010-01-01

    The educational community and the courts continue to struggle with the challenges of intra-district resource inequality revealed by the California Supreme Court landmark case "Rodriguez v. Los Angeles Unified School District" (1992). Intra-district school resource inequality is one of the remaining bastions of major inequalities in the United…

  1. A Contextual Overview of the Modified Consent Decree in the Los Angeles Unified School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weintraub, Frederick J.; Myers, Robert M.; Hehir, Thomas; Jaque-Anton, Donnalyn

    2008-01-01

    Since 1996, the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), located in Southern California, has been under a federal court consent decree requiring compliance with laws pertaining to the delivery of special education services and the elimination of architectural barriers in schools. In 2003, the consent decree was modified, creating…

  2. The Effectiveness of Independent Living Training Programs in Los Angeles County for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Nancy E.

    The effectiveness of independent living programs for developmentally disabled persons in Los Angeles County was examined using a sample of 33 clients (ages 18-50) who exited such programs between June 1984 and June 1986. All but one were mentally retarded; seven also had either cerebral palsy or epilepsy. Survey forms for each client were…

  3. Extraction and Analysis of PAHs in Surface Soils Near Freeways in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannino, I.

    2004-12-01

    Large urban areas such as Los Angeles are characterized by high levels of motor vehicle traffic. A by-product of this traffic is the emission of a group of compounds known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are a global-scale persistent environmental hazard, many of which are considered to be carcinogenic. This study investigated the prevalence of 16 PAHs in surface soils near major Los Angeles highways. The first phase of the study was the development of a methodology for efficiently extracting PAHs from soil. Preliminary findings suggested that the most efficient extraction method using an accelerated solvent extractor employed a mixture of acetone and hexane and a static extraction time of 5 minutes (completed in 2 cycles). Extraction efficiency was measured by spiking clean sand with a known amount of a PAH standard and extracting and analyzing the sand. The addition of an extra static cycle produced a significant increase in extraction efficiency. For example, utilization of 2 static cycles recovered 99.6% of the spiked phenanthrene compared to a 44% efficiency for the 1 cycle run. Preliminary results from a field sampling campaign indicated that significant concentrations of PAHs are deposited onto and accumulate in surface soils. Specifically, we found 12.13 μ g/kg of anthracene, 15.82 μ g/kg of benzo(a)pyrene, 23.42 μ g/kg of phenanthrene, and 23.43 μ g/kg of pyrene in surface soils, including soils from a public park. These results indicate that background levels of PAHs in soils may pose a significant health risk to humans. For example, the California preliminary remediation goal for benzo(a)pyrene in residential soils is 62 μ g/kg, slightly greater than our reported background values. A more detailed field sampling campaign will be pursued to elucidate the role of different environmental variables (i.e., time of day, sun intensity, traffic congestion, etc.), on the accumulation of PAHs in soils.

  4. Quantifying sources of methane using light alkanes in the Los Angeles basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Brioude, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Andrews, A. E.; Atlas, E.; Blake, D.; Daube, B. C.; Gouw, J. A.; Dlugokencky, E.; Frost, G. J.; Gentner, D. R.; Gilman, J. B.; Goldstein, A. H.; Harley, R. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Kofler, J.; Kuster, W. C.; Lang, P. M.; Novelli, P. C.; Santoni, G. W.; Trainer, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Parrish, D. D.

    2013-05-01

    Methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and C2-C5 alkanes were measured throughout the Los Angeles (L.A.) basin in May and June 2010. We use these data to show that the emission ratios of CH4/CO and CH4/CO2 in the L.A. basin are larger than expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories, consistent with previously published work. We use experimentally determined CH4/CO and CH4/CO2 emission ratios in combination with annual State of California CO and CO2 inventories to derive a yearly emission rate of CH4 to the L.A. basin. We further use the airborne measurements to directly derive CH4 emission rates from dairy operations in Chino, and from the two largest landfills in the L.A. basin, and show these sources are accurately represented in the California Air Resources Board greenhouse gas inventory for CH4. We then use measurements of C2-C5 alkanes to quantify the relative contribution of other CH4 sources in the L.A. basin, with results differing from those of previous studies. The atmospheric data are consistent with the majority of CH4 emissions in the region coming from fugitive losses from natural gas in pipelines and urban distribution systems and/or geologic seeps, as well as landfills and dairies. The local oil and gas industry also provides a significant source of CH4 in the area. The addition of CH4 emissions from natural gas pipelines and urban distribution systems and/or geologic seeps and from the local oil and gas industry is sufficient to account for the differences between the top-down and bottom-up CH4 inventories identified in previously published work.

  5. Modeling diurnal land temperature cycles over Los Angeles using downscaled GOES imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Qihao; Fu, Peng

    2014-11-01

    Land surface temperature is a key parameter for monitoring urban heat islands, assessing heat related risks, and estimating building energy consumption. These environmental issues are characterized by high temporal variability. A possible solution from the remote sensing perspective is to utilize geostationary satellites images, for instance, images from Geostationary Operational Environmental System (GOES) and Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). These satellite systems, however, with coarse spatial but high temporal resolution (sub-hourly imagery at 3-10 km resolution), often limit their usage to meteorological forecasting and global climate modeling. Therefore, how to develop efficient and effective methods to disaggregate these coarse resolution images to a proper scale suitable for regional and local studies need be explored. In this study, we propose a least square support vector machine (LSSVM) method to achieve the goal of downscaling of GOES image data to half-hourly 1-km LSTs by fusing it with MODIS data products and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation data. The result of downscaling suggests that the proposed method successfully disaggregated GOES images to half-hourly 1-km LSTs with accuracy of approximately 2.5 K when validated against with MODIS LSTs at the same over-passing time. The synthetic LST datasets were further explored for monitoring of surface urban heat island (UHI) in the Los Angeles region by extracting key diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) parameters. It is found that the datasets and DTC derived parameters were more suitable for monitoring of daytime- other than nighttime-UHI. With the downscaled GOES 1-km LSTs, the diurnal temperature variations can well be characterized. An accuracy of about 2.5 K was achieved in terms of the fitted results at both 1 km and 5 km resolutions.

  6. First-generation site-response maps for the Los Angeles region based on earthquake ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.; Carver, D.; Cranswick, E.; Meremonte, M.; Michael, J.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-motion records from aftershocks of the 1994 Northridge earthquake and mainshock records from the 1971 San Fernando, 1987 Whittier Narrows, 1991 Sierra Madre, and 1994 Northridge earthquakes are used to estimate site response relative to a rock site for the urban Los Angeles area. Site response is estimated at 232 mainshock and 201 aftershock sites relative to a low-amplitude site in the Santa Monica Mountains. Average amplification values are calculated for the frequency bands: 1 to 3, 3 to 5, and 5 to 7 Hz. These bands are chosen based on limitations in aftershock recording equipment at lower frequencies and reduced significance to the building inventory at higher frequencies. Site amplification factors determined at the instrumented locations are grouped by the surficial geology and contoured to produce a continuous spatial estimation of amplification. The maps in this article represent the first attempt to produce estimates of site amplification based on observations of ground motion for such a large areal extent of the Los Angeles region. These maps are expected to evolve as more data become available and more analysis is done.

  7. Seeking solace in West Hollywood: sexual orientation-based hate crimes in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Stotzer, Rebecca L

    2010-01-01

    Many thriving "gay communities" across the United States report high levels of sexual orientation-based hate crimes every year, raising questions about the level of safety in these gay communities and neighborhoods. This study examines hate crime data from 2002-2006 in Los Angeles County and the relationship those hate crimes have to West Hollywood, the best known gay community of Los Angeles County. Results suggest that although West Hollywood does consistently report high numbers of hate crimes, this does not reflect a greatly increased risk to any one lesbian, gay, or bisexual person. Results suggest that we need to consider other variables as predictors (such as poverty, business density, and population density) in determining safe versus unsafe space, rather than just the percentage of lesbians, gay, and bisexuals in a population. PMID:20818526

  8. Remote Sensing of Spatial Distributions of Greenhouse Gases in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Dejian; Sander, Stanley P.; Pongetti, Thomas J.; Cheung, Ross; Stutz, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    The Los Angeles air basin is a significant anthropogenic source of greenhouse gasses and pollutants including CO2, CH4, N2O, and CO, contributing significantly to regional and global climate change. Recent legislation in California, the California Global Warning Solutions Act (AB32), established a statewide cap for greenhouse gas emissions for 2020 based on 1990 emissions. Verifying the effectiveness of regional greenhouse gas emissions controls requires high-precision, regional-scale measurement methods combined with models that capture the principal anthropogenic and biogenic sources and sinks. We present a novel approach for monitoring the spatial distribution of greenhouse gases in the Los Angeles basin using high resolution remote sensing spectroscopy. We participated in the CalNex 2010 campaign to provide greenhouse gas distributions for comparison between top-down and bottom-up emission estimates.

  9. Residential hierarchy in Los Angeles: an examination of ethnic and documentation status differences.

    PubMed

    Cort, David A; Lin, Ken-Hou; Stevenson, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    Longitudinal event history data from two waves of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey are used to explore racial, ethnic, and documentation status differences in access to desirable neighborhoods. We first find that contrary to recent findings, undocumented Latinos do not replace blacks at the bottom of the locational attainment hierarchy. Whites continue to end up in neighborhoods that are less poor and whiter than minority groups, while all minorities, including undocumented Latinos, end up in neighborhoods that are of similar quality. Second, the effects of socioeconomic status for undocumented Latinos are either similar to or weaker than disadvantaged blacks. These findings suggest that living in less desirable neighborhoods is a fate disproportionately borne by non-white Los Angeles residents and that in some limited ways, the penalty attached to being undocumented Latino might actually be greater than the penalty attached to being black. PMID:24576634

  10. Losses from the Northridge earthquake: disruption to high-technology industries in the Los Angeles Basin.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Villa, L; Walrod, W

    1999-03-01

    This study explores the relationship between industrial location geography, metropolitan patterns and earthquake disasters. Production losses from the 1994 Northridge earthquake to the Los Angeles Basin's most important high-technology industrial sector are evaluated in the context of that area's polycentric metropolitan form. Locations for each one of the Los Angeles Basin's 1,126 advanced electronics manufacturing establishments were identified and mapped, providing an indication of the patterns and clusters of the industry. An extensive survey of those establishments gathered information on disruptions from the Northridge earthquake. Production losses were then estimated, based on the sampled plants' lost workdays and the earthquake's distance-decay effects. A conservative estimate of total production losses to establishments in seven four-digit SIC advanced electronics industrial groups placed their value at US$220.4 million. Based on this estimate of losses, it is concluded that the Northridge earthquake's economic losses were much higher than initially anticipated. PMID:10204286

  11. Tick-borne Relapsing Fever and Borrelia hermsii, Los Angeles County, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Webster, Larry S.; Marques, Adriana R.; Spano, Robyn; Rood, Michael; Burns, Joe; Hu, Renjie

    2009-01-01

    The primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in western North America is Borrelia hermsii, a rodent-associated spirochete transmitted by the fast-feeding soft tick Ornithodoros hermsi. We describe a patient who had an illness consistent with relapsing fever after exposure in the mountains near Los Angeles, California, USA. The patient’s convalescent-phase serum was seropositive for B. hermsii but negative for several other vector-borne bacterial pathogens. Investigations at the exposure site showed the presence of O. hermsi ticks infected with B. hermsii and the presence of rodents that were seropositive for the spirochete. We determined that this tick-borne disease is endemic to the San Gabriel Mountains near the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area. PMID:19624916

  12. Designing an Innovative Data Architecture for the Los Angeles Data Resource (LADR)

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sukrit; Jenders, Robert A.; Delta, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    The Los Angeles Data Resource (LADR) is a joint project of major Los Angeles health care provider organizations that help clinical investigators to explore the size of potential research study cohorts using operational clinical data across all participating institutions. The Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (CDU) LADR team sought to develop an innovative data architecture that would aggregate de-identified clinical data from safety-net providers in the community into CDU LADR node which in turn would be federated with the other nodes of LADR for a shared view in a way that was never available before. This led to a self-service system to assess patients matching study criteria at each medical center and to search patients by demographics, ICD-9 codes, lab results and medications. PMID:26262354

  13. Long-range transport of ozone from the Los Angeles Basin: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J.; Banta, R. M.; Hardesty, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    Airborne lidar measurements of ozone above the Los Angeles Basin on 17 July 2009 show orographic lifting of ozone from the surface to the free troposphere by the San Gabriel Mountains. Mixing ratios in excess of 100 parts-per-billion-by-volume (ppbv) were measured ˜4 km above mean sea level (ASL). These observations are in excellent agreement with published model studies, confirming that topographic venting by the so called “mountain chimney effect” is a potentially important pathway for removal of pollutants from the Los Angeles Basin. The lofting of ozone and other pollutants into the free troposphere also greatly increases the potential for long-range transport from the Basin, and trajectory calculations suggest that some of this ozone may have been transported ˜1000 km to eastern Utah and western Colorado.

  14. The 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauksson, E.; Jones, L.M.; Davis, T.L.; Hutton, L.K.; Brady, A.G.; Reasenberg, P.A.; Michael, A.J.; Yerkes, R.F.; Williams, Pat; Reagor, G.; Stover, C.W.; Bent, A.L.; Shakal, A.K.; Etheredge, E.; Porcella, R.L.; Bufe, C.G.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Cranswick, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Whittier Narrows earthquake sequence (local magnitude, ML=5.9), which caused over $358-million damage, indicates that assessments of earthquake hazards in the Los Angeles metropolitan area may be underestimated. The sequence ruptured a previously unidentified thrust fault that may be part of a large system of thrust faults that extends across the entire east-west length of the northern margin of the Los Angeles basin. Peak horizontal accelerations from the main shock, which were measured at ground level and in structures, were as high as 0.6g (where g is the acceleration of gravity at sea level) within 50 kilometers of the epicenter. The distribution of the modified Mercalli intensity VII reflects a broad north-south elongated zone of damage that is approximately centered on the main shock epicenter.

  15. Designing an Innovative Data Architecture for the Los Angeles Data Resource (LADR).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sukrit; Jenders, Robert A; Delta, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The Los Angeles Data Resource (LADR) is a joint project of major Los Angeles health care provider organizations. The LADR helps clinical investigators to explore the size of potential research study cohorts using operational clinical data across all participating institutions. The Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (CDU) LADR team sought to develop an innovative data architecture that would aggregate de-identified clinical data from safety-net providers in the community into CDU LADR node. This in turn would be federated with the other nodes of LADR for a shared view in a way that was never available before. This led to a self-service system to assess patients matching study criteria at each medical center and to search patients by demographics, ICD-9 codes, lab results and medications. PMID:26262354

  16. ERTS-1 applied for structural and morphological investigtions case studies. 1: Los Angeles, California. 2: Coastal plain, New Jersey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, E. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Two major earth's resources management problems, the application of ERTS-1 imagery for geomorphotectonics, and subsequently seismic-risk, earthquake, and mineral exploration applications are discussed. Case studies are presented for Los Angeles, California, and New Jersey coastal plain.

  17. Predicting traffic-related air pollution in Los Angeles using a distance decay regression selection strategy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jason G.; Jerrett, Michael; Beckerman, Bernardo; Wilhelm, Michelle; Ghosh, Jo Kay; Ritz, Beate

    2013-01-01

    Land use regression (LUR) has emerged as an effective means of estimating exposure to air pollution in epidemiological studies. We created the first LUR models of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) for the complex megalopolis of Los Angeles (LA), California. Two-hundred and one sampling sites (the largest sampling design to date for LUR estimation) for two seasons were selected using a location-allocation algorithm that maximized the potential variability in measured pollutant concentrations and represented populations in the health study. Traffic volumes, truck routes and road networks, land use data, satellite-derived vegetation greenness and soil brightness, and truck route slope gradients were used for predicting NOx concentrations. A novel model selection strategy known as “ADDRESS” (A Distance Decay REgression Selection Strategy) was used to select optimized buffer distances for potential predictor variables and maximize model performance. Final regression models explained 81%, 86% and 85% of the variance in measured NO, NO2 and NOx concentrations, respectively. Cross-validation analyses suggested a prediction accuracy of 87–91%. Remote sensing-derived variables were significantly correlated with NOx concentrations, suggesting these data are useful surrogates for modeling traffic-related pollution when certain land use data are unavailable. Our study also demonstrated that reactive pollutants such as NO and NO2 could have high spatial extents of influence (e.g., > 5000 m from expressway) and high background concentrations in certain geographic areas. This paper represents the first attempt to model traffic-related air pollutants at a fine scale within such a complex and large urban region. PMID:19540476

  18. Predicting traffic-related air pollution in Los Angeles using a distance decay regression selection strategy.

    PubMed

    Su, Jason G; Jerrett, Michael; Beckerman, Bernardo; Wilhelm, Michelle; Ghosh, Jo Kay; Ritz, Beate

    2009-08-01

    Land use regression (LUR) has emerged as an effective means of estimating exposure to air pollution in epidemiological studies. We created the first LUR models of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOX) for the complex megalopolis of Los Angeles (LA), California. Two-hundred and one sampling sites (the largest sampling design to date for LUR estimation) for two seasons were selected using a location-allocation algorithm that maximized the potential variability in measured pollutant concentrations and represented populations in the health study. Traffic volumes, truck routes and road networks, land use data, satellite-derived vegetation greenness and soil brightness, and truck route slope gradients were used for predicting NOX concentrations. A novel model selection strategy known as "ADDRESS" (A Distance Decay REgression Selection Strategy) was used to select optimized buffer distances for potential predictor variables and maximize model performance. Final regression models explained 81%, 86% and 85% of the variance in measured NO, NO2 and NOX concentrations, respectively. Cross-validation analyses suggested a prediction accuracy of 87-91%. Remote sensing-derived variables were significantly correlated with NOX concentrations, suggesting these data are useful surrogates for modeling traffic-related pollution when certain land use data are unavailable. Our study also demonstrated that reactive pollutants such as NO and NO2 could have high spatial extents of influence (e.g., > 5000 m from expressway) and high background concentrations in certain geographic areas. This paper represents the first attempt to model traffic-related air pollutants at a fine scale within such a complex and large urban region. PMID:19540476

  19. Use of mammography screening among older Samoan women in Los Angeles county: a diffusion network approach.

    PubMed

    Levy-Storms, Lené; Wallace, Steven P

    2003-09-01

    Minority migrant populations, such as older Samoan women, are likely to underuse preventive health services, including mammography screening. The purpose of this paper is to explore how informal (lay peers from churches) and formal (health care providers) health communication networks influence mammography screening use among older Samoan women. To do so, we apply diffusion of innovation theory and network analysis to understand how interpersonal networks may affect mammography use in this urban-dwelling, migrant population. The data come from a survey of 260 Samoan women, aged 50 years or older, who attended 39 randomly sampled Samoan churches in Los Angeles County (USA) between 1996 and 1997. Retrospective data, based over a 20-year period from this sample's year of first use of mammography screening, suggest that interpersonal networks may have accounted for the dramatic increase in the rate of adoption within the past 5 years of the survey. Using this information, we categorized women into mutually exclusive stages of mammography use and regressed these stages of mammography use on formal (had a provider referral) and informal (level of connectedness with peers in churches) health communication networks. The results indicated that being well-connected within women's informal, church-based health communication networks increased the likelihood of being in the decision (planned to have) and implementation and confirmation (had a recent mammogram) stages, but having a provider referral for a mammogram (formal networks) only increased the likelihood of being in the latter stages compared to women in the knowledge and persuasion stages. Formal and informal health communication networks influence recent use of mammography screening, but informal networks, in and of themselves, are also influential on future intention to use mammography screening. PMID:12878100

  20. Public health at the 1984 Summer Olympics: the Los Angeles County experience.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, B P; Mascola, L; Fannin, S L

    1988-01-01

    During the 1984 Summer Olympic Games, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services used its active disease surveillance system to monitor disease occurrence and other health concerns. Reports were collected by telephone three times a week from 198 participating facilities including hospitals, prepaid health plans, private physicians, and Olympic sites. Background data were obtained two months preceding the Olympic events. Less illness was recorded during the Olympics than during the same period for the three preceding years. PMID:3285705

  1. Neighborhood Food Environment, Diet, and Obesity Among Los Angeles County Adults, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lightstone, Amy S.; Basurto-Davila, Ricardo; Morales, Douglas M.; Sturm, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to examine whether an association exists between the number and type of food outlets in a neighborhood and dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) among adults in Los Angeles County. We also assessed whether this association depends on the geographic size of the food environment. Methods We analyzed data from the 2011 Los Angeles County Health Survey. We created buffers (from 0.25 to 3.0 miles in radius) centered in respondents’ residential addresses and counted the number of food outlets by type in each buffer. Dependent variables were weekly intake of fruits and vegetables, sugar-sweetened beverages, and fast food; BMI; and being overweight (BMI ≥25.0 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2). Explanatory variables were the number of outlets classified as fast-food outlets, convenience stores, small food stores, grocery stores, and supermarkets. Regressions were estimated for all sets of explanatory variables and buffer size combinations (150 total effects). Results Only 2 of 150 effects were significant after being adjusted for multiple comparisons. The number of fast-food restaurants in nonwalkable areas (in a 3.0-mile radius) was positively associated with fast-food consumption, and the number of convenience stores in a walkable distance (in a 0.25-mile radius) was negatively associated with obesity. Discussion Little evidence was found for associations between proximity of respondents’ homes to food outlets and dietary intake or BMI among adults in Los Angeles County. A possible explanation for the null finding is that shopping patterns are weakly related to neighborhoods in Los Angeles County because of motorized transportation. PMID:26334715

  2. Public Perceptions of Tsunamis and the NOAA TsunamiReady Program in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, A.

    2010-12-01

    After the devastating December 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, California and other coastal states began installing "Tsunami Warning Zone" and "Evacuation Route" signs at beaches and major access roads. The geography of the Los Angeles area may not be conducive to signage alone for communication of the tsunami risk and safety precautions. Over a year after installation, most people surveyed did not know about or recognize the tsunami signs. More alarming is that many did not believe a tsunami could occur in the area even though earthquake generated waves have reached nearby beaches as recently as September 2009! UPDATE: FEB. 2010. Fifty two percent of the 147 people surveyed did not believe they would survive a natural disaster in Los Angeles. Given the unique geography of Los Angeles, how can the city and county improve the mental health of its citizens before and after a natural disaster? This poster begins to address the issues of community self-efficacy and resiliency in the face of tsunamis. Of note for future research, the data from this survey showed that most people believed climate change would increase the occurrence of tsunamis. Also, the public understanding of water inundation was disturbingly low. As scientists, it is important to understand the big picture of our research - how it is ultimately communicated, understood, and used by the public.

  3. Impact of restaurant hygiene grade cards on foodborne-disease hospitalizations in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Simon, Paul A; Leslie, Phillip; Run, Grace; Jin, Ginger Zhe; Reporter, Roshan; Aguirre, Arturo; Fielding, Jonathan E

    2005-03-01

    Although health departments routinely inspect restaurants to assess compliance with established hygienic standards, few data are available on the effectiveness of these efforts in preventing foodborne disease. The study reported here assessed the impact on foodborne-disease hospitalizations in Los Angeles County of a restaurant hygiene grading system that utilized publicly posted grade cards. The grading systm was introduced in January 1998. Hospital discharge data on foodborne-disease hospitalizations were analyzed for Los Angeles County and, as a control, for the rest of California during the period 1993-2000. Ordinary least-squares regression analysis was done to measure the effect of the grading progam on these hospitalizations. After baseline temporal and geographic trends were adjusted for, the restaurant hygiene grading program was associated with a 13.1 percent decrease (p < .01) in the number of foodborne-disease hospitalizations in Los Angeles County in the year following implementation the program (1998). This decrease was sustained over the next two years (1999-2000). The results suggest that restaurant hygiene grading with public posting of results is an effective intervention for reducing the burden of foodborne disease. PMID:15794461

  4. UCLA's outreach program of science education in the Los Angeles schools.

    PubMed

    Palacio-Cayetano, J; Kanowith-Klein, S; Stevens, R

    1999-04-01

    The UCLA School of Medicine's Interactive Multi-media Exercises (IMMEX) Project began its outreach into pre-college education in the Los Angeles area in 1993. The project provides a model in which software and technology are effectively intertwined with teaching, learning, and assessment (of both students' and teachers' performances) in the classroom. The project has evolved into a special collaboration between the medical school and Los Angeles teachers. UCLA faculty and staff work with science teachers and administrators from elementary, middle, and high schools. The program benefits ethnically and racially diverse groups of students in schools ranging from the inner city to the suburbs. The project's primary goal is to use technology to increase students' achievement and interest in science, including medicine, and thus move more students into the medical school pipeline. Evaluations from outside project evaluators (West Ed) as well as from teachers and IMMEX staff show that the project has already had a significant effect on teachers' professional development, classroom practice, and students' achievement in the Los Angeles area. PMID:10219207

  5. Spatio-temporal Estimates of CO2 Emissions in the Los Angeles Basin from On-road and Airport Traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, P.; Song, Y.; Patarasuk, R.; Gurney, K. R.; Eldering, A.; O'Keeffe, D.; Miller, C. E.; Duren, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing the spatio-temporal distribution of fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emissions in urban landscapes is challenging. We use Hestia, an innovative "bottom up" approach for estimating FFCO2 emissions in the Los Angeles (LA) megacity and Southern California Air Basin (SCAB) which account for ~53% of the FFCO2 emissions in California. Hestia-LA, in coordination with "top down" atmospheric CO2 measurements, will provide baseline FFCO2 emissions, help monitor changes in emissions, and develop emissions mitigation policies. Hestia-LA characterizes FFCO2 emissions at the building/street spatial scale (10-100 m) and at hourly time steps in the basin by combining data on residential and commercial building emissions, industrial processes, electricity production, and different transportation sectors. We report here on the construction of the spatial and temporal structure in two key transportation sectors within the SCAB: on-road vehicle (46%) and aircraft (2%) emissions. We quantified on-road traffic emissions by merging traffic data from Southern California Association of Governments, California Freeway Performance Measurement System and modeled motor vehicle emissions from EPA's NMIM model. Preliminary analysis shows that (1) LA and Orange counties dominate the annual FFCO2 emissions from urban freeways and arterials, and (2) LA county has a wider peak traffic period during weekdays (2-6pm) than the other four counties (4-5pm). We characterized airport emissions by integrating information from Federal Aviation Administration, Los Angeles World Airports, and Airnav LLC for the temporal structure of aircraft arrivals and departures, and the National Emissions Inventory for total annual aircraft emissions. We categorized the 47 airports in LA basin based on the volume and type (commercial, general aviation and military) of aircraft traffic, and then assigned appropriate hour-of-day and day-of-week traffic volume-specific CO2 emission patterns to each airport. We found

  6. Seasonal and spatial variations of individual organic compounds of coarse particulate matter in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kalam; Olson, Michael R.; Shelton, Brandon; Schauer, James. J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2012-11-01

    To study the organic composition of ambient coarse particulate matter (CPM; 2.5-10 μm), coarse particles were collected one day a week from April 2008 to March 2009 at 10 sampling sites in the Los Angeles Basin. Samples were compiled into summer (June 2008 to September 2008) and winter (November 2008 to February 2009) composites, and were subsequently analyzed for individual organic constituents using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. n-alkanoic acids and medium molecular weight (MW) n-alkanes (C25 to C35) - the major constituents in the coarse size fraction - showed good associations with crustal materials. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and hopanes (both in low concentrations), as well as high MW n-alkanes (C37 and C38), were associated with traffic-related emissions. In the summer, when prevailing onshore winds were strong, the downwind/rural sites had higher concentrations of PAHs, n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids. An opposite trend was observed at the urban sites, where the levels of PAHs, n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids were higher in the winter, when the low wind speed limited long-range atmospheric transport. In general, the contribution of organic compounds to CPM mass was higher during wintertime, due to a reduction in the fraction of other CPM components (sea salt, secondary ions, etc.) and/or the increase in source strengths of organic compounds. The latter is consistent with the traffic-induced re-suspension of mineral and road dust, as previously observed in this basin. Overall, our results suggest that emissions from natural sources (soil and associated biota) constitute the majority of the organic content in coarse particles, with a more pronounced influence in the semi-rural/rural areas in Riverside/Lancaster compared with urban Los Angeles in the summer.

  7. Recent Immigrants to Los Angeles: Characteristics and Labor Market Impacts. Impacts of Immigration in California, Policy Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espenshade, Thomas J.; Goodis, Tracy Ann

    This paper summarizes the results of a study of the impact of immigration on California, particularly in Los Angeles County. Of the 1.7 million foreign-born persons in Los Angeles County in 1980, 950,000 (or 57 percent) came to the United States after 1970. Mexican immigrants comprise almost one-half of the total of recent arrivals. They tend to…

  8. Estimating methane emissions from dairies in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viatte, C.; Lauvaux, T.; Hedelius, J.; Parker, H. A.; Chen, J.; Jones, T.; Franklin, J.; Deng, A.; Gaudet, B.; Duren, R. M.; Verhulst, K. R.; Wunch, D.; Roehl, C. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Wofsy, S.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2015-12-01

    Inventory estimates of methane (CH4) emissions among the individual sources (mainly agriculture, energy production, and waste management) remain highly uncertain at regional and urban scales. Accurate atmospheric measurements can provide independent estimates to evaluate bottom-up inventories, especially in urban region, where many different CH4 sources are often confined in relatively small areas. Among these sources, livestock emissions, which are mainly originating from dairy cows, account for ~55% of the total CH4 emissions in California in 2013. This study aims to rigorously estimate the amount of CH4 emitted by the largest dairies in the Southern California region by combining measurements from four mobile ground-based spectrometers (EM27/SUN), in situ isotopic methane measurements from a CRDS analyzer (Picarro), and a high-resolution atmospheric transport model (the Weather Research and Forecasting model) in Large-Eddy Simulation mode. The remote sensing spectrometers measure the total column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of CH4 and CO2 (XCH4 and XCO2) in the near infrared region, providing information about total emissions of the dairies. Gradients measured by the four EM27 ranged from 0.2 to 22 ppb and from 0.7 to 3 ppm for XCH4 and XCO2, respectively. To assess the fluxes of the dairies, measurements of these gradients are used in conjunction with the local atmospheric dynamics simulated at 111 m resolution. Inverse modelling from WRF-LES is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the domain. A Bayesian inversion and a Monte-Carlo approach were used to provide the CH4 emissions over the dairy with their associated uncertainties. The isotopic δ13C sampled at different locations in the area ranges from -40 ‰ to -55 ‰, indicating a mixture of anthropogenic and biogenic sources.

  9. Ultrafine particles and associated pollutants on roadways and in community air of Los Angeles California, Beijing China, and the Los Angeles International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerdahl, Frederick Dane

    Particles smaller than 10 microm in diameter are harmful to health. However, the smallest of these particles, ultrafine particles (UFP), equal to or smaller than 100 nm, may be especially harmful. Most are emitted by combustion sources, with transportation sources being a dominant contributor. While these particles have recently been under intense research, little is known regarding UFP concentrations or its components where people live, work, and commute. This dissertation reports on investigations of UFP and other pollutants in transportation-dominated areas. Included are findings from on-road, near-road and community monitoring studies performed in two megacities: Los Angeles, California and Beijing, China. A common feature of these studies was the application of advanced technologies to gather time-resolved measurements. An important finding made in Los Angeles was that real-time pollutant measurements could be made on busy roadways. UFP size distribution measurements made on a freeway with heavy-duty truck traffic demonstrated that UFP were much higher than on other highways or in community air. Nitric oxide (NO) levels were also much higher in these truck-dominated microenvironments. High correlations were found between UFP, black carbon (BC), particle counts, (NO), and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Monitoring at Los Angeles International Airport demonstrated that aircraft are important sources of UFP. Elevated UFP counts were found 900 meters from a runway used for take offs, while smaller values were found 500 meters downwind of a runway used for landings. These measurements showed a persistence of UFP at the community boundary in excess of measurements from roadside studies. A peak UFP measurement of 4.8 million particles cm -3 was made approximately 75 meters from a jet aircraft waiting to takeoff. Measurements made in Beijing demonstrated that heavy-duty diesel truck activity severely impacts community air quality. Black carbon was a

  10. Source apportionment of ambient particle number concentrations in central Los Angeles using positive matrix factorization (PMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Hasheminassab, Sina; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model (version 5.0) was used to identify and quantify major sources contributing to particulate matter (PM) number concentrations, using PM number size distributions in the range of 13 nm to 10 µm combined with several auxiliary variables, including black carbon (BC), elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC), PM mass concentrations, gaseous pollutants, meteorological, and traffic counts data, collected for about 9 months between August 2014 and 2015 in central Los Angeles, CA. Several parameters, including particle number and volume size distribution profiles, profiles of auxiliary variables, contributions of different factors in different seasons to the total number concentrations, diurnal variations of each of the resolved factors in the cold and warm phases, weekday/weekend analysis for each of the resolved factors, and correlation between auxiliary variables and the relative contribution of each of the resolved factors, were used to identify PM sources. A six-factor solution was identified as the optimum for the aforementioned input data. The resolved factors comprised nucleation, traffic 1, traffic 2 (with a larger mode diameter than traffic 1 factor), urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust. Traffic sources (1 and 2) were the major contributor to PM number concentrations, collectively making up to above 60 % (60.8-68.4 %) of the total number concentrations during the study period. Their contribution was also significantly higher in the cold phase compared to the warm phase. Nucleation was another major factor significantly contributing to the total number concentrations (an overall contribution of 17 %, ranging from 11.7 to 24 %), with a larger contribution during the warm phase than in the cold phase. The other identified factors were urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust, with relative contributions of approximately 12 % (7.4-17.1), 2.1 % (1

  11. Emission ratios of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds in northern mid-latitude megacities: Observations versus emission inventories in Los Angeles and Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borbon, Agnes; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Grand, N.; Chevaillier, S.; Colomb, A.; Dolgorouky, C.; Gros, V.; Lopez, M.; Sarda-Esteve, R.; Holloway, J.; Stutz, J.; Petetin, H.; McKeen, S.; Beekmann, M.; Warneke, C.; Parrish, D. D.; Gouw, J. A.

    2013-02-01

    Ground-based and airborne volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements in Los Angeles, California, and Paris, France, during the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) and Megacities: Emissions, Urban, Regional and Global Atmospheric Pollution and Climate Effects, and Integrated Tools for Assessment and Mitigation (MEGAPOLI) campaigns, respectively, are used to examine the spatial variability of the composition of anthropogenic VOC urban emissions and to evaluate regional emission inventories. Two independent methods that take into account the effect of chemistry were used to determine the emission ratios of anthropogenic VOCs (including anthropogenic isoprene and oxygenated VOCs) over carbon monoxide (CO) and acetylene. Emission ratios from both methods agree within ±20%, showing the reliability of our approach. Emission ratios for alkenes, alkanes, and benzene are fairly similar between Los Angeles and Paris, whereas the emission ratios for C7-C9 aromatics in Paris are higher than in Los Angeles and other French and European Union urban areas by a factor of 2-3. The results suggest that the emissions of gasoline-powered vehicles still dominate the hydrocarbon distribution in northern mid-latitude urban areas, which disagrees with emission inventories. However, regional characteristics like the gasoline composition could affect the composition of hydrocarbon emissions. The observed emission ratios show large discrepancies by a factor of 2-4 (alkanes and oxygenated VOC) with the ones derived from four reference emission databases. A bias in CO emissions was also evident for both megacities. Nevertheless, the difference between measurements and inventory in terms of the overall OH reactivity is, in general, lower than 40%, and the potential to form secondary organic aerosols (SOA) agrees within 30% when considering volatile organic emissions as the main SOA precursors.

  12. Seasonal Variations in Fossil Fuel Emissions in the Los Angeles Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S.; Xu, X.; Kort, E. A.; Miller, C. E.; Sander, S.; Duren, R. M.; Eldering, A.; Yung, Y. L.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the effects of global warming resulting from increasing CO2 levels in the atmosphere requires understanding the sources and trends of emissions in urban regions, which contribute disproportionately relative to their spatial extent. We report the carbon isotopic composition of CO2 in air collected during mid-afternoon in two locations within the Los Angeles basin of California, Pasadena and Palos Verdes peninsula, for the past 3 (Palos Verdes) - 6.5 (Pasadena) years. Radiocarbon (Δ14C) is the gold standard for distinguishing between CO2 produced by terrestrial biosphere processes and fossil fuel combustion, since the latter contains virtually no 14C, whereas photosynthesis and respiration reflect the modern atmosphere. The stable isotopic composition of carbon in CO2 (δ13C) can be useful in distinguishing petroleum (higher δ13C) from natural gas (lower δ13C) combustion. We observe a significant inverse correlation between the fraction of CO2 from fossil sources at the receptor site of Pasadena, as determined by Δ14C, and the δ13C of the pollutant end member, determined from the Keeling plot intercept. This indicates that the fraction of CO2 emitted by natural gas combustion increases as the fraction of CO2 contributed locally by all fossil fuel burning increases. The proportion of CO2 emitted by fossil fuel combustion was never less than 80% during the study period, and it was occasionally above 100% when the biosphere was a local sink for CO2 during the second quarter of the year. In Palos Verdes, the proportion of fossil fuel combustion in the local emissions was much more varied, ranging from 25 to >100%. The local emissions are inversely correlated at the two sites, reflecting the importance of transport in controlling the signals detected. During the summer, air travels from the ocean over the Los Angles basin to Pasadena, whereas during the winter, wind directions are much more varied, with frequent events from the northeast bringing air of

  13. Earthquake hazards of active blind-thrust faults under the central Los Angeles basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John H.; Suppe, John

    1996-04-01

    We document several blind-thrust faults under the Los Angeles basin that, if active and seismogenic, are capable of generating large earthquakes (M = 6.3 to 7.3). Pliocene to Quaternary growth folds imaged in seismic reflection profiles record the existence, size, and slip rates of these blind faults. The growth structures have shapes characteristic of fault-bend folds above blind thrusts, as demonstrated by balanced kinematic models, geologic cross sections, and axial-surface maps. We interpret the Compton-Los Alamitos trend as a growth fold above the Compton ramp, which extends along strike from west Los Angeles to at least the Santa Ana River. The Compton thrust is part of a larger fault system, including a decollement and ramps beneath the Elysian Park and Palos Verdes trends. The Cienegas and Coyote Hills growth folds overlie additional blind thrusts in the Elysian Park trend that are not closely linked to the Compton ramp. Analysis of folded Pliocene to Quaternary strata yields slip rates of 1.4 ± 0.4 mm/yr on the Compton thrust and 1.7 ± 0.4 mm/yr on a ramp beneath the Elysian Park trend. Assuming that slip is released in large earthquakes, we estimate magnitudes of 6.3 to 6.8 for earthquakes on individual ramp segments based on geometric segment sizes derived from axial surface maps. Multiple-segment ruptures could yield larger earthquakes (M = 6.9 to 7.3). Relations among magnitude, coseismic displacement, and slip rate yield an average recurrence interval of 380 years for single-segment earthquakes and a range of 400 to 1300 years for multiple-segment events. If these newly documented blind thrust faults are active, they will contribute substantially to the seismic hazards in Los Angeles because of their locations directly beneath the metropolitan area.

  14. Reconciling Long-Term Trends in Air Quality with Bottom-up Emission Inventories for Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcdonald, B. C.; Kim, S. W.; Frost, G. J.; Harley, R.; Trainer, M.

    2014-12-01

    Significant long-term changes in air quality have been observed in the United States over several decades. However, reconciling ambient observations with bottom-up emission inventories has proved challenging. In this study, we perform WRF-Chem modeling in the Los Angeles basin for carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and ozone (O3) over a long time period (1987-2010). To improve reconciliation of emission inventories with atmospheric observations, we incorporate new high-resolution emissions maps of a major to dominant source of urban air pollution, motor vehicles. A fuel-based approach is used to estimate motor vehicle emissions utilizing annual fuel sales reports, traffic count data that capture spatial and temporal patterns of vehicle activity, and pollutant emission factors measured from roadway studies performed over the last twenty years. We also update emissions from stationary sources using Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) data when available, and use emission inventories developed by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and California Air Resources Board (ARB) for other important emission source categories. WRF-Chem modeling is performed in three years where field-intensive measurements were made: 1987 (SCAQS: Southern California Air Quality Study), 2002 (ITCT: Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation Study), and 2010 (CALNEX). We assess the ability of the improved bottom-up emissions inventory to predict long-term changes in ambient levels of CO, NOx, and O3, which are known to have occurred over this time period. We also assess changing spatial and temporal patterns of primary (CO and NOx) and secondary (O3) pollutant concentrations across the Los Angeles basin, which has important implications on human health.

  15. Risk Factors for Dog Relinquishment to a Los Angeles Municipal Animal Shelter

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Emily D.; Scotto, Jamie; Slater, Margaret; Weiss, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Low income has been reported to be a risk factor for dog relinquishment to shelters in the U.S. The majority of people with lower incomes, however, do not relinquish. Risk factors for relinquishment in a low socioeconomic region of Los Angeles were examined. Cost was associated with relinquishment, and most people were not aware of available assistance. Those who relinquished reported emotional attachment to the dog and higher perceived stress than a comparison group. The majority of reasons for relinquishment were likely solvable with assistance, highlighting an opportunity to provide community-specific alternatives to relinquishment. Abstract Dog relinquishment is a large component of shelter intake in the United States. Research has shown traits of the dog are associated with relinquishment as well as general characteristics of those relinquishing. Low income is often cited as a risk factor for relinquishment. The majority of people with lower incomes, however, do not relinquish. A group of people accessing a shelter in a low socioeconomic region of Los Angeles to relinquish their dogs was surveyed. This study examined risk factors for relinquishment, controlling for household income, compared to a group utilizing low cost spay/neuter services. A total of 76.9% of those relinquishing noted cost as a reason for relinquishment. Of participants in the relinquishment group, 80.7% reported not being aware of any services available to them. Most notable in the findings was that the odds of relinquishment were generally higher as the amount of perceived stress in the home in the past three months increased. The majority of people in both groups reported being emotionally attached to the dog. In this sample from a South Los Angeles community, the majority of reasons for relinquishment were likely solvable with assistance. These findings highlight an opportunity to assess community needs and provide community specific alternatives to relinquishment. PMID

  16. Crustal structure and tectonics from the Los Angeles basin to the Mojave Desert, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Godfrey, N.J.; Okaya, D.A.; Murphy, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    A seismic refraction and low-fold reflection survey, known as the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE), was conducted along a transect (line 1) extending from Seal Beach, California, to the Mojave Desert, crossing the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley basins and San Gabriel Mountains. The chief result of this survey is an interpreted cross section that addresses a number of questions regarding the crustal structure and tectonics of southern California that have been debated for decades and have important implications for earthquake hazard assessment. The results (or constraints) are as follows. (1) The maximum depth of the Los Angeles basin along line 1 is 8-9 km. (2) The deep structure of the Sierra Madre fault zone in the northern San Gabriel Valley is as follows. The Duarte branch of the Sierra Madre fault zone forms a buried, 2.5-km-high, moderately north dipping buttress between the sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the San Gabriel Valley and the igneous and metamorphic rocks of the San Gabriel Mountains. (For deeper structure, see following.) (3) There are active crustal de??collements in southern California. At middle-crustal depths, the Sierra Madre fault zone appears to sole into a master de??collement that terminates northward at the San Andreas fault and projects southward beneath the San Gabriel Valley to the Puente Hills blind thrust fault. (4) The dip and depth extent of the San Andreas fault along line 1 dips steeply (???83??) northward and extends to at least the Moho. (5) The subsurface lateral extent of the Pelona Schist in southern California is as follows. Along line 1, the Pelona Schist underlies much, if not all of the San Gabriel Mountains south of the San Andreas fault to middle-crustal depths. North of the San Andreas fault, it is apparently not present along the transect.

  17. USGS Research Helps the County of Los Angeles Address New Arsenic Standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nickles, James

    2008-01-01

    In January 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) enacted stringent standards on arsenic in drinking water. The new limitsraised concerns about wells in the Antelope Valley of northern Los Angeles County that had high levels of naturally occurring arsenic. To meet the new standard, Los Angeles County Waterworks District No. 40, part of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works, considered building arsenic-removal facilities at a cost of nearly $34 million. Instead, the District initiated a well-modification project that was based on the findings of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientific investigation. Using a well flowmeter and down-hole sampler - invented by USGS scientists ? the study team found that high-arsenic levels were concen-trated in the deepest portions of the wells, 600 feet or more below the land surface. Using this finding, the District implemented a well modification pilot project where the deep portions of five wells were sealed off permanently, while preserving the ability to pump high-quality water from the upper sections. Well screens in the upper sections were first cleaned using an innovative sonic technique to increase the yield of high-quality water. The deeper sections then were sealed using micro-fine cement technology. The District now pumps water that meets the new USEPA standard for arsenic from the affected wells. Arsenic concentrations are lower by an average of 84 percent, while well yield is lower by only 24 percent. The total cost of the modification project for the five wells was $608,580; a one-time net savings of 550 percent over construction of an arsenic-removal facility.

  18. Measurement of free radicals OH and HO2 in Los Angeles smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, L. A.; Hard, T. M.; O'Brien, R. J.

    1999-05-01

    Atmospheric free radicals hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl (OH and HO2, collectively HOx) are the catalysts that cause secondary or photochemical air pollution. Chemical mechanisms for oxidant and acid formation, on which expensive air pollution control strategies are based, must accurately predict these radical concentrations. We have used the fluorescence assay with gas expansion (FAGE) technique to carry out the first simultaneous, in situ measurements of these two radicals in highly polluted air during the Los Angeles Free Radical Experiment. A complete suite of ancillary measurements was also made, including speciated hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, aldehydes, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone along with meteorological parameters. Using this suite of measurements, we tested the ability of a lumped chemical mechanism to accurately predict radical concentrations in polluted air. Comparison of model predictions with measured radical concentrations revealed generally good agreement for OH early and late in the day, including the early evening hours, when OH persisted at low concentrations after dark. During midday, however, modeled [OH] was high by about 50%. Agreement for HO2 was quite good in the early morning hours, but model-calculated HO2 concentrations were significantly too high during midday. When we used our measured HO2 concentrations as model input, agreement between calculated and measured OH concentrations was improved. It seems likely that (1) the model's HOx sources are too large, (2) there are unaccounted HOx loss processes in Los Angeles air, and/or (3) the complex parameterization of RO2/HO2 radical chemistry in the reaction mechanism does not adequately describe the behavior of these radicals in the Los Angeles atmosphere.

  19. Estimating Top-down Emissions (2011-2014) of CH4 and CO2 From Los Angeles by an FTS Atop Mount Wilson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C.; Fu, D.; Pongetti, T. J.; Newman, S.; Kort, E. A.; Duren, R. M.; Hsu, Y.; Miller, C. E.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Megacities, such as Los Angeles, emit significant amount of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs). As the world's population in urban regions is expected to increase from over 50% now to 70% by 2050, monitoring the temporal trends of urban GHG emissions are necessary to verify regulation policy. Since megacities tend to have large spatially and temporally varying GHG emission characteristics, it is important to perform measurements which provide continuous spatio-temporal coverage of the domain. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to track major greenhouse gases, methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) using ground-based remote sensing technique from Mount Wilson. Since 2010, in Los Angeles, a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) has been deployed on Mount Wilson to measure CO2, CH4, carbon monoxide (CO), the combustion tracer, and other tracer gases using reflected sunlight in the near-infrared spectral regions. Combining the unique vista from Mount Wilson and high-precision measurements from the FTS, the slant column abundances of these trace gases above and within the urban dome of Los Angeles are acquired. Within the urban dome, continuous daytime temporal and spatial measurements are recorded for 28 reflection points which are strategically located across the basin. Here we analyze the path-averaged dry air mixing ratios XCH4, XCO2 and XCO acquired by the FTS during a three-year period from 2011 to 2014. Using tracer-to-tracer correlation analysis, we investigate the ratios of XCH4:XCO2, XCH4:XCO and XCO:XCO2 in excess of the background values. Significant spatio-temporal variability in all three ratios is observed across the Los Angeles megacity during this measurement period. We then derive the top-down estimates of basin total CH4 and CO2 emissions between 2011 and 2014 using the existing bottom-up emission database of CO2and CO, and compare our estimates to the emissions reported by the state government and previous studies. Copyright 2014. California

  20. Modelling Nitrogen Oxides in Los Angeles Using a Hybrid Dispersion/Land Use Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilton, Darren C.

    The goal of this dissertation is to develop models capable of predicting long term annual average NOx concentrations in urban areas. Predictions from simple meteorological dispersion models and seasonal proxies for NO2 oxidation were included as covariates in a land use regression (LUR) model for NOx in Los Angeles, CA. The NO x measurements were obtained from a comprehensive measurement campaign that is part of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Air Pollution Study (MESA Air). Simple land use regression models were initially developed using a suite of GIS-derived land use variables developed from various buffer sizes (R²=0.15). Caline3, a simple steady-state Gaussian line source model, was initially incorporated into the land-use regression framework. The addition of this spatio-temporally varying Caline3 covariate improved the simple LUR model predictions. The extent of improvement was much more pronounced for models based solely on the summer measurements (simple LUR: R²=0.45; Caline3/LUR: R²=0.70), than it was for models based on all seasons (R²=0.20). We then used a Lagrangian dispersion model to convert static land use covariates for population density, commercial/industrial area into spatially and temporally varying covariates. The inclusion of these covariates resulted in significant improvement in model prediction (R²=0.57). In addition to the dispersion model covariates described above, a two-week average value of daily peak-hour ozone was included as a surrogate of the oxidation of NO2 during the different sampling periods. This additional covariate further improved overall model performance for all models. The best model by 10-fold cross validation (R²=0.73) contained the Caline3 prediction, a static covariate for length of A3 roads within 50 meters, the Calpuff-adjusted covariates derived from both population density and industrial/commercial land area, and the ozone covariate. This model was tested against annual average NOx

  1. Love-styles among Latino community college students in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Leon, J J; Parra, F; Cheng, T; Flores, R E

    1995-10-01

    145 Latino community college students enrolled in Chicano Studies classes in Los Angeles, California were administered a love-attitudes scale. Analysis showed that the mean scores and endorsement patterns were similar to those in earlier research on white-Latino and white-non-Latino students in the United States. Significant gender differences were found. Latino men scored more Ludic and Agapic than women. Researchers might examine the love-styles and ethnic identity in and out of marriage among Latinos, whites, and Asians in southern California. PMID:8559877

  2. A model study of the impact of emission control strategies on Los Angeles air quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hameed, S.; Stewart, R. W.; Lebedeff, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    A generalized cell model is developed for the calculation of city-wide averages of photochemical smog components in Los Angeles. This model takes into account the effects of variations with time and within the city of the source strengths, the wind field, and the mixing depth. The effect of the influx of background pollution from outside the modeled volume is also included. Several control strategies for reducing automobile emissions are then introduced into the model, and their impact on predicted pollutant levels, particularly those of O3, are investigated.

  3. Associations Between Ethnic Labels and Substance Use Among Hispanic/Latino Adolescents in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Jennifer B; Thing, James; Soto, Daniel Wood; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Self-identification with ethnic-specific labels may indicate successful ethnic identity formation, which could protect against substance use. Alternatively, it might indicate affiliation with oppositional subcultures, a potential risk factor. This study examined longitudinal associations between ethnic labels and substance use among 1,575 Hispanic adolescents in Los Angeles. Adolescents who identified as Cholo or La Raza in 9th grade were at increased risk of past-month substance use in 11th grade. Associations were similar across gender and were not confounded by socioeconomic status, ethnic identity development, acculturation, or language use. Targeted prevention interventions for adolescents who identify with these subcultures may be warranted. PMID:24779500

  4. Use of Historical Radar Rainfall Estimates to Develop Design Storms in Los Angeles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, D. C.; Humphrey, J.; Moffitt, J.

    2007-12-01

    A database of 15-minute historical gage adjusted radar-rainfall estimates was used to evaluate the geometric properties of storms in the City of Los Angeles, CA. The database includes selected months containing significant rainfall during the period 1996-2007. For each time step, areas of contiguous rainfall were identified as individual storm cells. An idealized ellipse was fit to each storm cell and the properties of the ellipse (e.g., size, shape, orientation, velocity and other parameters) were recorded. To accurately account for the range of storm cell sizes, capture a large number of storm cells in a climatologically similar area, assess the variability of storm movement, and minimize the impact of edge effects (i.e., incomplete coverage of cells entering and leaving), a study area substantially larger than the City of Los Angeles was used. The study area extends from city center to 30 miles north to the crest of San Gabriel Mountains, 45 miles east to Ontario, 60 miles south to Santa Catalina Island, and 70 miles west to Oxnard, an area of about10,000 square miles. Radar data for this area over 30 months in the study yields many thousands of storm cells for analysis. Storms were separated into classes by origin, direction and speed of movement. Preliminary investigations considers three types: Arctic origin (west-northwest), Pacific origin (southwest) and Tropical origin (south or stationary). Radar data (for 1996-2007) and upper air maps (1948-2006) are used to identify the direction and speed of significant precipitation events. Typical duration and temporal patterns of Los Angeles historical storms were described by season and storm type. Time of maximum intensity loading variation were determined for a selection of historic storms Depth-Areal Reduction Factors (DARF) for cloudbursts were developedfrom the radar data. These data curves are fit to equations showing the relationships between DARF, area and central intensity. Separate DARF curves are

  5. Differentiating Tectonic and Anthropogenic Earthquakes in the Greater Los Angeles Basin, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Goebel, T.; Cochran, E. S.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 flurry of moderate earthquakes in the Los Angeles region raised the concern if some of this or past seismicity was of anthropogenic origin as opposed to being caused by ongoing transpressional tectonics. The Mw5.1 La Habra sequence is located near several major oil fields but the Mw4.4 Encino sequence was located away from oil fields, within the Santa Monica Mountains. The last century of seismicity in the Los Angeles area consists of numerous small and large earthquakes. Most of these earthquakes occur beneath the basin sediments and are associated with transpressional tectonics, related to the big bend in the San Andreas fault, but some could be associated with large oil fields. In particular, both the 1933 Mw6.4 Long Beach and the 1987 Mw5.9 Whittier Narrows earthquakes were spatially associated with two major oil fields, the Huntington Beach and Montebello fields. Numerous large oil fields have been in production for more than 125 years. The geographical locations of the oil fields follow major tectonic trends such as the Newport-Inglewood fault, the Whittier fault, and the thrust belt located at the north edge of the Los Angeles basin. More than 60 fields have oil wells and some of these have both disposal and fracking wells. Before fluid injection became common, Kovach (1974) documented six damaging events induced by fluid extraction from 1947 to 1961 in the Wilmington oil field. Since 1981 the waveform-relocated earthquake catalog for the Los Angeles basin is complete on the average above M2.0. We compare the spatial distribution of these events and the proximity of nearby active oil fields. We will also analyze the seismicity in the context of available monthly fluid extraction and injection volumes and search for temporal correlations. The La Habra sequence apparently correlates with temporal changes in extraction and injection volumes in the Santa Fe Springs oil field but not with activities in other oil fields within closer spatial proximity.

  6. Energy technologies evaluation for the EDD Los Angeles Building. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of potential energy efficiency measures (EEM`s) for the proposed EDD office building located at 5401 Crenshaw in Los Angeles, CA. The 26,748 ft{sup 2} single-story building is currently in the final design phase. Key building energy features include uninsulated exterior concrete block walls, R19 insulated roof, glazing on north and east orientations only, multiple air source rooftop packaged heat pumps, and electric resistance water heaters. For this project, DEG evaluated seven potential EEM`s from both performance and 30 year life cycle cost (LCC) perspectives.

  7. Offshore Stratigraphic Controls on Salt-Water Intrusion in Los Angeles Area Coastal Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. D.; Ponti, D. J.; Ehman, K. D.; Tinsley, J. C.; Reichard, E. G.

    2002-12-01

    Ground water is a major component of the water supply for the ~10 million residents of Los Angeles County. Ground water pumping, linked to population growth since the early 1900's, caused water levels to decline, reversed seaward hydraulic gradients in some coastal aquifers, and resulted in salt water intrusion. United States Geological Survey geologists and hydrologists are working cooperatively with local water agencies to (1) understand and model the process of salt-water intrusion in this siliciclastic, structurally complex basin, and (2) identify potential pathways for the salt-water intrusion. We collected over 2000 trackline-km of single- and multi-channel intermediate- and high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles (60 to 5000 Hz) from the Los Angeles/Long Beach Harbor complex and the adjacent San Pedro shelf to develop a 3-dimensional stratigraphic model of the coastal aquifer system. These data define stratal geometries, paleo-channels, and fault traces in the offshore that are potential pathways of salt-water intrusion. The offshore seismic-reflection profiles correlate with onshore geophysical and borehole data collected from four nearby drill sites that were cored continuously to depths ranging to 400 meters. These core holes provide detailed 1-dimensional reference sections that furnish stratigraphic, age, and facies control for the seismic-reflection profiles. The coastal aquifer system is described using sequence stratigraphic concepts as units deposited during eustatic sea level fluctuations during the Pleistocene to Recent. Seismic-reflection profiles identify sequence boundaries, and hence aquifer and aquitard units, by the truncation and onlap of reflectors. If and where the sequences crop out on the sea floor provides a potential pathway for intrusion. The youngest unit, the Gaspur aquifer, is intruded with salt water and consists of at least two flat-lying sequences, each marked by basal gravelly sands deposited by the ancestral Los Angeles

  8. Public opinion on nutrition-related policies to combat child obesity, Los Angeles County, 2011.

    PubMed

    Simon, Paul A; Chiang, Choiyuk; Lightstone, Amy S; Shih, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    We assessed public opinion on nutrition-related policies to address child obesity: a soda tax, restrictions on advertising unhealthy foods and beverages to children, and restrictions on siting fast food restaurants and convenience stores near schools. We analyzed data from 998 adults (aged ≥18 years) in the 2011 Los Angeles County Health Survey. Support was highest for advertising restrictions (74%), intermediate for a soda tax (60%), and lowest for siting restrictions on fast food restaurants and convenience stores (44% and 37%, respectively). Support for food and beverage advertising restrictions and soda taxation is promising for future policy efforts to address child obesity. PMID:24901796

  9. Factors predicting the capacity of Los Angeles city-region recreation programs to promote energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kim D; Dahmann, Nicholas; Wolch, Jennifer; Joassart-Marcelli, Pascale; Dunton, Genevieve; Rudulph, Diana; Newell, Joshua; Thayer, Jennifer; Jerrett, Michael

    2014-07-01

    An audit of recreation programs with moderate or higher levels of physical activity (PA) in Los Angeles area cities (N=82) was conducted using internet, telephone, and survey methods. Metabolic Equivalents (METs) were used to code programs׳ physical activity intensity. MET-hours per recreation program was associated with required age for enrollment, percent of residents >64 years of age, and fiscal capacity of cities. Capacity to promote energy expenditure may depend on targeted age groups, age of population, and municipal fiscal capacity. Cities with lower fiscal capacity might offer those higher MET-hour activities which require less specialized equipment and seek outside funding to offer higher MET programs. PMID:24755531

  10. A Gravity data along LARSE (Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment) Line II, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooley, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a detailed gravity study along part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE) transect across the San Fernando Basin and Transverse Ranges to help characterize the structure underlying this area. 249 gravity measurements were collected along the transect and to augment regional coverage near the profile. An isostatic gravity low of 50-60 mGal reflects the San Fernando-East Ventura basin. Another prominent isostatic gravity with an amplitude of 30 mGal marks the Antelope Valley basin. Gravity highs occur over the Santa Monica Mountains and the Transverse Ranges. The highest isostatic gravity values coincide with outcrops of Pelona schist.

  11. Scoring Los Angeles Landscapes: Environmental Education in an Urban Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Christopher L.; And Others

    This notebook serves as a guide for learning activities in environmental education. Twelve themes are treated in four groups: (1) sense of place includes history and landscape; (2) the natural environment covers air, water, energy, and landforms; (3) the built environment includes architecture, transportation, and housing; and (4) the social…

  12. Seven-Year Life Outcomes of Adolescent Offenders in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Morral, Andrew R.; Becker, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined important life outcomes for adolescent offenders to describe how they were faring in young adulthood. Methods. We assessed 449 adolescent offenders (aged 13–17 years) in Los Angeles, CA, whose cases had been adjudicated by the Los Angeles Superior Court and who had been referred to group homes between February 1999 and May 2000. We used the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs to interview respondents at baseline and at 3, 6, 12, 72, and 87 months after baseline. A total of 395 respondents (88%) were interviewed or confirmed as dead at the final interview. Results. At final interview, 12 respondents had died, 7 of them from gunshot wounds. Thirty-six percent of respondents reported recent hard drug use, and 27% reported 5 or more symptoms of substance dependence. Sixty-six percent reported committing an illegal activity within the previous year, 37% reported being arrested within the previous year, and 25% reported being in jail or prison every day for the previous 90 days. Fifty-eight percent had completed high school or obtained a GED, and 63% reported working at a job in the previous year. Conclusions. The high rates of negative life outcomes presented here suggest the need for more effective rehabilitation programs for juvenile offenders. PMID:19299674

  13. The Male-female Birth Ratio in California and the 1992 April Riots in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Grech, V

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Male live births slightly exceed female live births. This is usually expressed as M/F, the ratio of male to total live births. A multitude of external influences have been shown to reduce this ratio, including stress provoked through witnessing violent events; M/F dips occur three to four months later. The April 1992 Los Angeles riots constituted six days of extreme civil unrest in the city of Los Angeles. This study was carried out in order to ascertain whether M/F dipped in California following this event. Methods: Monthly male and female live births for California were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the state of California for 1992 and for January 1993. Results: This study analysed 649 073 live births; M/F was lowest in August 1992 (0.5085). This was significantly lower than for the period after (September 1992 to January 1993; p = 0.044). The ratio of male to total live births was higher in January to July 1992 than in August 1992 but this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Stress has been shown to reduce M/F through an excess of male fetal loss during gestation and/or from gender-biased conception favouring females. Only the former mechanism is supported by these findings. This is the first time that violent events at state level have been shown to have potentially influenced M/F. PMID:26457417

  14. Surveillance of listeriosis in Los Angeles County, 1985-1986. A first year's report.

    PubMed

    Mascola, L; Sorvillo, F; Neal, J; Iwakoshi, K; Weaver, R

    1989-07-01

    After a large food-borne outbreak of listeriosis in Los Angeles County, California, in 1985, the California State Department of Health Services instituted mandatory reporting of Listeria monocytogenes by clinical laboratories. From September 1, 1985, through August 31, 1986, 94 cases of listeriosis were reported in Los Angeles County for an annual crude incidence rate of 12 cases per million persons. Of the 94 cases, 37 (39%) were in neonates and/or their mothers and 57 (61%) were nonperinatal. The overall case fatality rate was 31%, with a perinatal case fatality of 16% (6 fetal and 23 nonperinatal); this compares with an epidemic perinatal case fatality rate of 32%. No significant differences were observed in age-adjusted, race-specific incidence rates among nonperinatal cases or race-specific incidence rates among perinatal cases. All but 2 of the nonperinatal patients had a known predisposing risk factor for the development of listeriosis, the most common of which was a prior history of steroid therapy. A clustering of cases was not identified. No common food sources were apparent. Patients presenting as perinatal cases were more likely to have ingested Mexican-style cheese, ice cream, and yogurt than those presenting as nonperinatal cases. Improved case ascertainment through mandatory reporting and laboratory-based surveillance will establish meaningful baseline levels of listeriosis. PMID:2742430

  15. Aeromagnetic Map with Geology of the Los Angeles 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangle, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Jachens, R.C.; Campbell, R.H.; Yerkes, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: An important objective of geologic mapping is to project surficial structures and stratigraphy into the subsurface. Geophysical data and analysis are useful tools for achieving this objective. This aeromagnetic anomaly map provides a three-dimensional perspective to the geologic mapping of the Los Angeles 30 by 60 minute quadrangle. Aeromagnetic maps show the distribution of magnetic rocks, primarily those containing magnetite (Blakely, 1995). In the Los Angeles quadrangle, the magnetic sources are Tertiary and Mesozoic igneous rocks and Precambrian crystalline rocks. Aeromagnetic anomalies mark abrupt spatial contrasts in magnetization that can be attributed to lithologic boundaries, perhaps caused by faulting of these rocks or by intrusive contacts. This aeromagnetic map overlain on geology, with information from wells and other geophysical data, provides constraints on the subsurface geology by allowing us to trace faults beneath surficial cover and estimate fault dip and offset. This map supersedes Langenheim and Jachens (1997) because of its digital form and the added value of overlaying the magnetic data on a geologic base. The geologic base for this map is from Yerkes and Campbell (2005); some of their subunits have been merged into one on this map.

  16. Measles outbreak associated with an arriving refugee - Los Angeles County, California, August-September 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Measles is a highly communicable, acute viral illness with potential for severe complications, including death. Although endemic measles was eliminated in the United States in 2000 as a result of widespread vaccination, sporadic measles outbreaks still occur, largely associated with international travel from measles-endemic countries and pockets of unvaccinated persons. On August 26, 2011, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) was notified of suspected measles in a refugee from Burma who had arrived in Los Angeles, California, on August 24, after a flight from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Passengers on the flight included 31 other refugees who then traveled to seven other states, widening the measles investigation and response activities. In California alone, 50 staff members from LACDPH and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) interviewed and reinterviewed 298 contacts. Measles was diagnosed in three contacts of the index patient (patient A). The three contacts with measles were two passengers on the same flight as patient A and a customs worker; no secondary cases were identified. Delayed diagnosis of measles in patient A and delayed notification of health officials precluded use of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine as an outbreak intervention. This outbreak emphasizes the importance of maintaining a high level of vaccination coverage and continued high vigilance for measles in the United States, particularly among incoming international travelers; clinicians should immediately isolate persons with suspected measles and promptly report them to health authorities. PMID:22647743

  17. Tectonic contraction across Los Angeles after removal of groundwater pumping effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, G.W.; Thatcher, W.; Stein, R.S.; Hudnut, K.W.; Peltzer, G.

    2001-01-01

    After the 1987 Whittier Narrows and 1994 Northridge earthquakes revealed that blind thrust faults represent a significant threat to metropolitan Los Angeles, a network of 250 continuously recording global positioning system (GPS) stations was deployed to monitor displacements associated with deep slip on both blind and surface faults. Here we augment this GPS data with interferometric synthetic aperture radar imagery to take into account the deformation associated with groundwater pumping and strike-slip faulting. After removing these non-tectonic signals, we are left with 4.4 mm yr-1 of uniaxial contraction across the Los Angeles basin, oriented N 36??E (perpendicular to the major strike-slip faults in the area). This indicates that the contraction is primarily accommodated on thrust faults rather than on the northeast-trending strike-slip faults. We have found that widespread groundwater and oil pumping obscures and in some cases mimics the tectonic signals expected from the blind thrust faults. In the 40-km-long Santa Ana basin, groundwater withdrawal and re-injection produces 12 mm yr-1 of long-term subsidence, accompanied by an unprecedented seasonal oscillation of 55 mm in the vertical direction and 7 mm horizontally.

  18. Structure of the Los Angeles Basin from ambient noise and receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yiran; Clayton, Robert W.

    2016-06-01

    A velocity (Vs) and structure model is derived for the Los Angeles Basin, California based on ambient-noise surface-wave and receiver-function analysis, using data from a low-cost, short-duration, dense broadband survey (LASSIE) deployed across the basin. The shear wave velocities show lateral variations at the Compton-Los Alamitos and the Whittier Faults. The basement beneath the Puente Hills - San Gabriel Valley shows an unusually high velocity (˜4.0 km s-1) and indicates the presence of schist. The structure of the model shows that the basin is a maximum of 8 km deep along the profile, and that the Moho rises to a depth of 17 km under the basin. The basin has a stretch factor of 2.6 in the center grading to 1.3 at the edges and is in approximate isostatic equilibrium.

  19. Understanding the socio-demographic and climate impacts on total and landscape water use in the City of Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mini, C.; Hogue, T. S.; Pincetl, S.

    2010-12-01

    Urbanization has environmental impacts that modify ecosystem services associated with vegetation. Semi-arid urban forests also have costs related to irrigation that are difficult to evaluate. In the face of climate change and population growth, quantifying and predicting ecosystems costs and benefits are important and challenging. In urban areas, residential water consumption includes both domestic needs and landscaping irrigation, yet accurate partitioning of each of these uses is rare in most environments. The goal of the current research is to quantify outdoor landscape water use in order to have a better understanding of urban water footprints and the dynamics of water consumption patterns within semi-arid cities. Data is being collected from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) to evaluate household water use by ZIP code and by census tract. Neighborhoods were selected to represent city characteristics based on socio-demographic factors such as density, ethnicity, income level, education level and housing types. Initial studies are focusing on the correlation between residential water use and socio-demographic factors at the ZIP code level inside each neighborhood over the 2000-2010 period. Other variables predicting water use include climate variability and vegetation type. As expected, monthly water use patterns follow seasonal temperature and precipitation variability across the study neighborhoods. Results also show that education, ethnicity, per capita income, and the number of persons per household are linearly related to water use per capita and per area. A positive correlation is also observed between landscape area, vegetation indices and outdoor water use. A multiple regression model is developed that integrates these fundamental factors controlling indoor and outdoor water use across the region. Estimates of urban landscape water use will ultimately be compared to a remotely-sensed evapotranspiration model with high spatial (250 m

  20. Los Angeles Free-Net: an experiment in interactive telecommunication between lay members of the Los Angeles community and health care experts.

    PubMed

    Bluming, A; Mittelman, P S

    1996-04-01

    The Los Angeles Free-Net, an interactive community information resource, was established in part to help community members become more effective consumers of health care services. By providing timely, expert answers to anonymously asked medical questions at no charge, we hope to decrease unnecessary physician-patient encounters, encourage effective preventive-health measures, and improve the overall results of health care in our community. Although it is too early to assess health care benefits from this system, the following observations may help guide the development of similar systems around the nation: (1) A small annual registration fee generates both moral and financial public support. (2) Demographic information from registered users can help direct attempts at enfranchising all members of the community. (3) Toll-free access, free public-instruction sessions, moderated forums, extensive volunteer help, and encryption security are encouraged, while Internet censorship is difficult and counterproductive. (4) Access to Internet resources is important, but the strength of a community system lies primarily in the sharing of expertise and resources among members of the community. (5) A critical mass of available physicians to answer questions must be matched with a critical level of question input for this type of interactive medical information resource to function in a time-sensitive fashion. PMID:8826627

  1. 33 CFR 3.55-10 - Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-10 Section 3.55-10 Navigation and Navigable...-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach's...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1125 - Southern California Annual Firework Events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Firework Events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone. 165.1125 Section 165.1125... for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone. (a) General. Safety zones are established for... Cambria American Legion Post. Event Description Fireworks Display. Date July 4th. Location Shamel...

  3. 33 CFR 100.1104 - Southern California annual marine events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Table 1 of this section must submit an application each year as required by 33 CFR part 100, subpart A... events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port Zone. 100.1104 Section 100.1104 Navigation and... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.1104 Southern California annual marine events for the Los Angeles Long Beach...

  4. 33 CFR 3.55-10 - Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-10 Section 3.55-10 Navigation and Navigable...-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach's...

  5. 33 CFR 100.1104 - Southern California annual marine events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Table 1 of this section must submit an application each year as required by 33 CFR part 100, subpart A... events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port Zone. 100.1104 Section 100.1104 Navigation and... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.1104 Southern California annual marine events for the Los Angeles Long Beach...

  6. 33 CFR 3.55-10 - Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-10 Section 3.55-10 Navigation and Navigable...-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach's...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1125 - Southern California Annual Firework Events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Firework Events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone. 165.1125 Section 165.1125... for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone. (a) General. Safety zones are established for... Cambria American Legion Post. Event Description Fireworks Display. Date July 4th. Location Shamel...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1125 - Southern California Annual Firework Events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Firework Events for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone. 165.1125 Section 165.1125... for the Los Angeles Long Beach Captain of the Port zone. (a) General. Safety zones are established for... Cambria American Legion Post. Event Description Fireworks Display. Date July 4th. Location Shamel...

  9. 33 CFR 3.55-10 - Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-10 Section 3.55-10 Navigation and Navigable...-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach's...

  10. 33 CFR 3.55-10 - Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.55-10 Section 3.55-10 Navigation and Navigable...-Long Beach Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Los Angeles-Long Beach's...

  11. Limited Life Opportunities for Black and Latino Youth. Report on a Public Hearing by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations (Compton, California, April 26, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations, CA.

    The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations held a public hearing to examine the effects of poverty on the hundreds of thousands of low income Blacks and Latinos under the age of 18 residing in Los Angeles County (California). The Commission's findings, recommendations, and concerns are presented. The following findings are presented: (1)…

  12. Academic Performance of L.A.C.C. Transfers to California State University at Los Angeles, 1976-77. Research Study 77-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stine, Vance

    Academic performance of Los Angeles City College (LACC) transfers to California State University at Los Angeles (CSULA) in 1976-77 was assessed by examining first quarter grade reports of all 667 students. Of these, 552 or 83% completed some work, with 50% entering in fall, 17% in winter, 19% in spring, and 13% in summer. The grade point average…

  13. Integrating Remote Sensing Data in Noah-UCM Parameterization and Validation: A Case Study for the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahmani, P.; Hogue, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Regional meteorological models are increasingly being applied in urban areas. Accurate representation of urban surface physical characteristics in these models is critical for predictions of surface-atmosphere fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum, which in turn affect weather and climate forecasting capabilities. Yet, the specification of surface parameters largely relies on out-dated land-use maps and lookup tables. In this contribution, we use the Noah LSM (Land Surface Model)-SLUCM (Single Layer Urban Canopy Model) modeling framework to investigate the usefulness of remotely sensed data in the model parameterization and validation processes, the sensitivity of the model to the defined parameters, and the model's performance improvement when the new parameter sets are implemented. Fused Landsat ETM and MODIS data are used to generate high resolution (30 m) spatial maps of monthly GVF (Green Vegetation Fraction), ISA (Impervious Surface Area), LAI (Leaf Area Index), albedo, and emissivity over the Los Angeles metropolitan area, which are then directly implemented in the model simulations. Parameters derived from remote sensing platforms show significant temporal and spatial differences from traditional Noah LSM values. For example, GVF shows significantly less seasonal variability, reflecting the impact of heavy year round irrigation in the study domain, which is not accounted in the default parameters. Assimilating remotely sensed model parameters into Noah/SLUCM results in significant changes in the simulated energy and water fluxes over the study area. The results show a high sensitivity of model simulations to all investigated parameters except for emissivity. Finally, the model's performance is evaluated utilizing Landsat based land surface temperature and evapotranspiration measurements from CIMIS (California Irrigation Management Information System) stations. Results reveal that the surface energy and water budget estimation accuracies are

  14. Violence and Intimidation: Rising Bigotry toward Arabs and Muslims. Report on a Public Hearing by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations (Los Angeles, California, March 14, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Carole

    Responding to a rise in hate crimes directed toward persons of Arab descent and Muslims before and during the Gulf War, the Los Angeles County (California) Commission on Human Relations held a hearing. The commission heard presentations by representatives of the Arab and Muslim communities, law enforcement, schools, and social science, and…

  15. Quantifying sources of methane and light alkanes in the Los Angeles Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Thomas; Atlas, Elliot; Blake, Donald; Brioude, Jerome; Daube, Bruce; de Gouw, Joost; Frost, Gregory; Gentner, Drew; Gilman, Jessica; Goldstein, Allen; Harley, Robert; Holloway, John; Kuster, William; Santoni, Gregory; Trainer, Michael; Wofsy, Steven; Parrish, David

    2013-04-01

    We use ambient measurements to apportion the relative contributions of different source sectors to the methane (CH4) emissions budget of a U.S. megacity. This approach uses ambient measurements of methane and C2-C5 alkanes (ethane through pentanes) and includes source composition information to distinguish between methane emitted from landfills and feedlots, wastewater treatment plants, tailpipe emissions, leaks of dry natural gas in pipelines and/or local seeps, and leaks of locally produced (unprocessed) natural gas. Source composition information can be taken from existing tabulations or developed by direct sampling of emissions using a mobile platform. By including C2-C5 alkane information, a linear combination of these source signatures can be found to match the observed atmospheric enhancement ratios to determine relative emissions strengths. We apply this technique to apportion CH4 emissions in Los Angeles, CA (L.A.) using data from the CalNex field project in 2010. Our analysis of L.A. atmospheric data shows the two largest CH4 sources in the city are emissions of gas from pipelines and/or from geologic seeps (47%), and emissions from landfills (40%). Local oil and gas production is a relatively minor source of CH4, contributing 8% of total CH4 emissions in L.A. Absolute CH4 emissions rates are derived by multiplying the observed CH4/CO enhancement ratio by State of California inventory values for carbon monoxide (CO) emissions in Los Angeles. Apportioning this total suggests that emissions from the combined natural and anthropogenic gas sources account for the differences between top-down and bottom-up CH4 estimates previously published for Los Angeles. Further, total CH4 emission attributed in our analysis to local gas extraction represents 17% of local production. While a derived leak rate of 17% of local production may seem unrealistically high, it is qualitatively consistent with the 12% reported in a recent state inventory survey of the L.A. oil and

  16. Relationship between Los Angeles attrition test and Nordic abrasion test of volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutilová, Kateřina; Prikryl, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Various volcanic rocks contribute significantly to the production of crushed stone in the Czech Republic. When used for road surfacing, results of Los Angeles attrition test (LA value below 25 or 30 depending on the mode of use) together with polished stone value are required. In the recent study, we have focused on the search for possible correlation between results obtained by Los Angeles attrition test and Nordic abrasion test, a test widely employed in Scandinavia. For the experimental study, a set of volcanic rocks from 36 active quarries was used. The rocks under study represent range of volcanic rocks from ultrabasic to acid members, formed form Neoproterozoic to Tertiary. The most favourable results of Los Angeles attrition test (i.e. the lowest LA values) were obtained for basalts (range of values 9.4-19.4) and spilites (range of values 8.4-14.9) which are in fact Neoproterozoic to Late Palaeozoic basalts affected by low grade metamorphism. Nordic abrasion test exhibited much broader range of values (6.4 to 36.9) with average value at 15.2 for basalts, resulting in weak coefficient of determination (0.19). . On contrary, narrow range of values from Nordic abrasion test of spilites (7.2-15.9), very similar to the range of LA values, is reflect in higher coefficient of determination (0.56). On contrary, the least favourable properties (LA values 12.3-29.2, Nordic abrasion 16.8-43.3) have been observed for a group of basic to intermediate rocks classified in older literature as melaphyres and diabases (ranging from basalts to trachyndesites and/or trachybasalts) of Palaeozoic age. However, in this specific group of volcanic rocks, the highest coefficient of determination (0.89) between both tests has been achieved. For volcanic rocks exhibiting acid composition (rhyolites and quartz porphyry), coefficient of determination between LA values (15.1-19.3) and Nordic abrasion test (7.3-21.9) is weak (0.42). The weakest relationship between LA values (14

  17. Age and tectonic significance of volcanic rocks in the northern Los Angeles Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCulloh, Thane H.; Fleck, Robert J.; Denison, Rodger E.; Beyer, Larry A.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Volcanic rocks, mostly basalts and some andesites, are interbedded with middle Miocene strata and are overlain by younger rocks throughout the greater part of the Los Angeles Basin, California. Roughly correlative flows, previously dated radiometrically (or paleontologically) at about 16.4 to 10.7 Ma, crop out in five separate regions around the basin perimeter. Los Angeles Basin volcanic rocks have special meaning because they offer clues to tectonomagmatic events associated with onset of clockwise transrotation of the western Transverse Ranges region and to the timing and locus of the initial basin opening. Whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar dating of near-tholeiitic olivine basalts of the Topanga Formation (Hoots, 1931) from three sites in the easternmost Santa Monica Mountains, combined with 87Sr/86Sr dating of fossil carbonates from interstratified marine beds at nine sites, establish a new age of 17.4 Ma for these oldest known Topanga-age volcanics of the Los Angeles Basin. We also record three new 40Ar/39Ar ages (15.3 Ma) from andesitic flows of the lower Glendora Volcanics at the northeast edge of the basin, 70 km east of the Santa Monica Mountains. A whole-rock determination of 17.2±0.5 Ma for nearby altered olivine basalt in the unfossiliferous Glendora volcanic sequence is questionable because of a complex 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum suggestive of 39Ar recoil, but it may indicate an older volcanic unit in this eastern area. We hypothesize that the 17.4-Ma volcanics in the eastern Santa Monica Mountains are an early expression of deep crustal magmatism accompanying the earliest extensional tectonism associated with rifting. The extremely thick younger volcanic pile in the western and central parts of the range may suggest that this early igneous activity in the eastern area was premonitory. Paleomagnetic declination data are needed to determine the pre-transrotational orientation of the eastern Santa Monica Mountains volcanic sequence. The new age determinations do not

  18. CicLAvia: Evaluation of participation, physical activity and cost of an open streets event in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Deborah; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn P; Williamson, Stephanie; Paley, Aaron; Batteate, Christina

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity is beneficial for health, but there are limited opportunities in urban areas to safely access public streets for traffic-free cycling, skating or walking. Ciclovías are open streets programs that close major roads to motor vehicles so they can be exclusively used by bicyclists and pedestrians. We estimated participation in one Los Angeles Ciclovía event (CicLAvia) using intercept surveys and 14 surveillance cameras which were placed along the 6-mile route in April 2014. We also applied estimates of the distance and speed traveled from the use of GPS data acquired from subsequent CicLAvia events. CicLAvia attracted between 37,700 and 53,950 active participants generating 176,500 to 263,000 MET-hours of energy expenditure, at an estimated cost borne by tax dollars of $1.29 to $1.91 per MET-hour. Among participants, 37% had never previously participated in CicLAvia, but 40% of individuals said that if they were not at CicLAvia they would have been physically active elsewhere and 45% would have been sedentary. Given its large reach, it makes sense to increase the frequency of Ciclovías to occur more than a few times a year to promote population health. PMID:27317978

  19. An exploration of the gateway math and science course relationships in the Los Angeles Community College District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Donald G.

    This study evaluated selected demographic, pre-enrollment, and economic status variables in comparison to college-level performance factors of GPA and course completion ratios for gateway math and science courses. The Transfer and Retention of Urban Community College Students (TRUCCS) project team collected survey and enrollment data for this study in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD). The TRUCCS team surveyed over 5,000 students within the nine campus district beginning in the fall of 2000 and spring of 2001 with follow-up data for next several years. This study focused on the math and science courses; established background demographics; evaluated pre-enrollment high school self-reported grades; reviewed high school and college level math courses taken; investigated specific gateway courses of biology, chemistry and physics; and compared them to the overall GPAs and course completion ratios for 4,698 students. This involved the SPSS development of numerous statistical products including the data from frequency distributions, means, cross-tabulations, group statistics t-tests, independent samples t-tests, and one-way ANOVA. Findings revealed demographic and economic relationships of significance for students' performance factors of GPA and course completion ratios. Furthermore, findings revealed significant differences between the gender, age, ethnicity and economic employment relationships. Conclusions and implications for institutions of higher education were documented. Recommendations for dissemination, intervention programs, and future research were also discussed.

  20. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering in Mexico City: Comparison With Las Vegas, NV, and Los Angeles, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Campbell, D.; Fujita, E.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The primary site in Mexico City was an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP). Similar campaigns were held in Las Vegas, NV in January-February, 2003; and Los Angeles, CA at numerous sites during all seasons from 2003 through 2007. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions. The photoacoustic instrument (PAS) used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In Mexico City the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of Mexico City resulted in more direct solar radiation. Further insight on the meteorological connections and population dynamics will be discussed.

  1. Hate Crime in the 1980's: A Decade of Bigotry. A Report to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Bunny Nightwalker

    A report on hate-crimes in the 1980s in Los Angeles County (California) found that these acts had increased in number. Hate crimes are defined as criminal acts directed at an individual, institution, or business expressly because of race, ethnicity, religion, or sexual orientation. Over the period 1980 to 1989, religiously motivated hate crimes…

  2. The Relationship between Parenting, Acculturation, and Adolescent Academics in Mexican-Origin Immigrant Families in Los Angeles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Scott W.; Bamaca-Gomez, Mayra Y.

    2003-01-01

    A study examining Mexican-born parents' influence on their children's academic outcomes surveyed 273 Mexican American students attending three Los Angeles high schools. Girls reported higher academic motivation and educational aspirations than boys. Parent behaviors of helping, monitoring, and supporting positively affected academic motivation.…

  3. "Low Income"--Levels in the Jewish Population; The "Jewish Poor" in Los Angeles. A Summary of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massarik, Fred

    The concept "Jewish Poor" is defined simply as Jewish households (viz. households containing one or more persons defined as Jewish) whose total household cash income (1969, comparable to U.S. Census) was under 4000 dollars. The data were obtained from four sources: (1) analysis of "Jewish Poor" drawn from Los Angeles phase of National Jewish…

  4. Toxic School Sites in Los Angeles: Weaknesses in the Site Acquisition Process. Special Report of the Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Legislature, Sacramento. Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    A special report of the California Legislature's Joint Legislative Audit Committee addresses the school site acquisition process to attempt to discern how the system has allowed a minimum of nine Los Angeles public schools to be built on toxic lands. The report examines two such sites, the Jefferson Middle School (JMS) and the combined elementary…

  5. Preliminary Report Regarding State Allocation Board Funding of the Los Angeles Unified School District's Belmont Learning Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoudian, Maria; Carman, Georgann; Havan, Artineh; Heron, Frank

    A preliminary report of the California Legislature's Joint Legislative Audit Committee presents findings on the construction team selection process for the Los Angeles Unified School District's (LAUSD's) Belmont Learning Complex. Evidence reveals a seriously flawed process that directly conflicted with existing law and practice. The report…

  6. A Health Probe in College Students Living in Los Angeles and in Taiwan: Dietary Pattern, Physical Activity and Energy Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Li Hui; Yang, Hsin Ling; Chen, Yin Chang; Davis, Rebecca; Schwartz, Miriam E.; Tam, Chick F.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to examine differences of dietary pattern, physical activity and energy balance in 240 college students with 137 of them enrolled in California State University, Los Angeles (LA) and the other 93 enrolled in China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan (TW). A three-day dietary record and a 24-hour physical activity journal were…

  7. The Effectiveness of the Los Angeles County School-Based Probation Program: High School Administrators' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rickey

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The Los Angeles County Probation Department is currently receives millions of dollars through the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act to fund deputy probation officers (DPOs) on high school campuses who provide services to increase student attendance, decrease student behavioral infractions, and decrease student recidivism. The purpose…

  8. Network Correlates of Sexual Health Advice Seeking and Substance Use among Members of the Los Angeles House and Ball Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Ian W.; Schrager, Sheree M.; Wong, Carolyn F.; Dunlap, Shannon L.; Kipke, Michele D.

    2014-01-01

    House and Ball communities (HBCs), represent a prime context for human immunodeficiency virus prevention with African American young men who have sex with men and transgender persons. This study sought to understand the composition and function of social support and sexual networks of HBC members in Los Angeles, California (N = 263). Participants…

  9. Validation of the Risk and Resiliency Assessment Tool for Juveniles in the Los Angeles County Probation System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

    2005-01-01

    On June 2, 2000, the Los Angeles County Probation Department entered into a settlement agreement with the Black Probation Officers Association in response to a civil suit. As part of the settlement, the Department was required to allocate resources internally based on the administration of a risk and needs instrument to its juvenile probationers.…

  10. The Impact of Turnaround Reform on Student Outcomes: Evidence and Insights from the Los Angeles Unified School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunk, Katharine O.; Marsh, Julie A.; Hashim, Ayesha K.; Bush-Mecenas, Susan; Weinstein, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    We examine the Los Angeles Unified School District's Public School Choice Initiative (PSCI), which sought to turnaround the district's lowest-performing schools. We ask whether school turnaround impacted student outcomes, and what explains variations in outcomes across reform cohorts. We use a Comparative Interrupted Time Series approach using…

  11. 76 FR 14698 - Raleigh Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, CA; Notice of Negative Determination on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... the Federal Register on October 25, 2010 (75 FR 65512). The subject firm supplies sound stage... Employment and Training Administration Raleigh Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, CA; Notice of... Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration for the workers and former workers of Raleigh Film...

  12. Making Cultura Count inside and out of the Classroom: Public Art & Critical Pedagogy in South Central Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Luis-Genaro

    2012-01-01

    In this article, artist, educator, and activist Luis-Genaro Garcia describes the development and impact of the "May Day service learning project" on his advanced painting class in a high school in South Los Angeles. The project emerged from students' interests: their ideas, concerns for their community, socio-political consciousness, and…

  13. Understanding Child Care Demand and Supply Issues: New Lessons from Los Angeles. PACE Policy Brief. Early Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    With family demand for child care outpacing supply, California state and local policymakers want to learn how best to target resources on those neighborhoods most in need. Using the findings from two recent studies in Los Angeles County, this policy brief provides an overview of some of the options facing policymakers as they address issues of…

  14. TREE-RING INDICES AND ISOTOPE SIGNATURES OF PINUS PONDEROSA RELATED TO HISTORIC OZONE CHANGES OUTSIDE LOS ANGELES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone concentrations in the Los Angeles (LA) basin were at historic highs in the late 1970s. Since that time Clean Air regulations have helped lower ozone, but little is known of the long-term vegetation responses. Extensive research has used tree-ring indices together with the...

  15. 75 FR 52969 - Rim of the Valley Corridor Special Resource Study, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, CA; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Special Resource Study, the NPS will evaluate the national significance of the area's natural and cultural... National Park Service Rim of the Valley Corridor Special Resource Study, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties... protection and other considerations within the Rim of the Valley Corridor Special Resource Study area in...

  16. Body Image of Dancers in Los Angeles: The Cult of Slenderness and Media Influence among Dance Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiland, Teresa L.; Murray, Darrin S.; Edley, Paige P.

    2008-01-01

    Body image and self-esteem are examined through personal stories among Los Angeles college dancers who grew up in the Hollywood culture of the cult of slenderness. The study incorporates a body image survey, eating disorder screen, and an interview process capturing dancers' lived experiences with daily pressures. Dancers reveal their experiences…

  17. Portfolio District Reform Meets School Turnaround: Early Implementation Findings from the Los Angeles Public School Choice Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Julie A.; Strunk, Katharine O.; Bush, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the popularity of school "turnaround" and "portfolio district" management as solutions to low performance, there has been limited research on these strategies. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by exploring the strategic case of Los Angeles Unified School District's Public School Choice…

  18. The Los Angeles Community College District Student: Who, Where, Why, and How. Research Report 77-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiser, Irv

    A survey was administered to a representative sample of 8,500 students attending the nine colleges in the Los Angeles Community College District during fall 1977. The purposes of the survey were to determine the nature of students' educational goals, levels of college preparedness, extra-curricular interests, transportation patterns, student work…

  19. Knowledge, Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Nuclear "Weapons": A Survey of Registered Voters in Los Angeles County in 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kierulff, Stephen; Zippin, David

    This study examines the relationship between knowledge and attitudes with respect to nuclear issues, including the nuclear freeze proposal, MX missle, and Strategic Defense Initiative. Adults (N=750) drawn from a list of registered voters in Los Angeles County were sent a 53-item questionnaire. Of the respondents, 64 percent were male, 53 percent…

  20. 77 FR 44609 - Los Angeles Department of Water and Power v. PacifiCorp; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Los Angeles Department of Water and Power v. PacifiCorp; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on July 23, 2012, pursuant to section 206 of the Rules of Practice and Procedure of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

  1. The Los Angeles Jobs-First GAIN Evaluation. First-Year Findings on Participation Patterns and Impacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Stephen; Mitchell, Marisa; Navarro, David

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) with block grants to states, called Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Consistent with TANF's philosophy and goals, Los Angeles Jobs-First GAIN (Greater Avenues for Independence) emphasized job search…

  2. Strengthening Families and Communities to Prevent Child Abuse and Neglect: Lessons from the Los Angeles Prevention Initiative Demonstration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCroskey, Jacquelyn; Pecora, Peter J.; Franke, Todd; Christie, Christina A.; Lothridge, Jaymie

    2012-01-01

    The Prevention Initiative Demonstration Project, funded by the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), is a community-specific strategy delivered through eight regional networks designed to address the full spectrum of community-based prevention. This article summarizes a strong and meaningful pattern of improvements…

  3. Framing Peace as Violence: Television News Depictions of the 2007 Police Attack on Immigrant Rights Marchers in Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Ana, Otto; Lopez, Layza; Munguia, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    This study examines two successive days of U.S. television news coverage of the May 1, 2007, immigration rights rally in Los Angeles. As thousands of demonstrators appealed peacefully for comprehensive immigration policy reform, they were assailed by 450 police officers firing munitions and using truncheons. We evaluated fifty-one television news…

  4. Did the San Gabriel Mountains once floor the Los Angeles basin : Evidence from a Late Cenozoic magmatic event

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, G.B. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Nourse, J.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    A series of Late Cenozoic dikes intrude the crystalline basement complex of the San Gabriel Mountains. The dikes range in composition from basalt to rhyolite. Rocks of andesite composition are dominant. Cross-cutting relationships consistently show that the less abundant, high-silica units were emplaced during two or more initial pulses of magmatic activity. This was followed by at least four additional pulses of increasingly quartz-poor magma. The nature of the contacts between the dikes and their host suggest that the dikes were emplaced during progressive unroofing of the San Gabriel Mountains basement complex. In the northeastern corner of the Los Angeles basin, units within the Glendora Volcanics (Shelton, 1955) share many compositional and spatial characteristics with the dikes in the San Gabriel Mountains. The dikes may have served as mid-crustal conduits which fed the overlying Glendora Volcanics during widespread magmatism that accompanied the extensional opening of the Los Angeles basin sphenochasm (Luyendyk, 1991; Wright, 1991). The authors believe that the crystalline basement complex now exposed in the San Gabriel Mountains once floored portions of the Los Angeles basin prior to Miocene extension and magmatism. They feel that unroofing was accomplished by low-angle normal faulting during the opening of the Los Angeles basin.

  5. A Comparative Study of Student and Faculty Attitudes in the Los Angeles Community College Overseas (1975-76).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Alphonzo A.

    The purpose of this study was to develop a data base of expectations and perceptions held by students and faculty in the Far Eastern Division of Los Angeles Community College Overseas (LACC], which provides educational programs for military personnel in Korea. The study was further intended to replicate an earlier study of student/faculty…

  6. Los Angeles County Steps to Excellence Project: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Los Angeles County's Steps to Excellence Project prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs;…

  7. Trends in Los Angeles City College Day Course Enrollments, 1970-1974. Research Study No. 75-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Ben K.

    To identify discernible trends in day class enrollments, and thus assist in curriculum and course planning, detailed class enrollments for Los Angeles City College day classes were compiled over a five-year period. Over the period, total class enrollments decreased monotonically for the first four years, dropping in 1973 to about 90 percent of the…

  8. Science Courses Participated in and Completed by Students at Each of the Colleges in the Los Angeles Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Jack

    The transcripts of 8,873 students, representing 7% of the enrollments in the Los Angeles Community College District, were examined to determine course participation and completion rates in science. Six curricular areas were investigated: (1) agriculture; (2) biological sciences; (3) engineering; (4) mathematics and computer science; (5) physical…

  9. Immigration and the Challenge of Education: A Social Drama Analysis in South Central Los Angeles. Education, Politics and Public Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaramillo, Nathalia E.

    2012-01-01

    Part enthnograpy and part testimony, this book analyzes a school setting and community from the standpoint of a group of immigrant mothers (las madres) in South Central Los Angeles who were concerned about the education of their children and the violence in their communities. Written in both the first and third person, in Spanish and English, the…

  10. The 200-Day Calendar Initiative in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles: Three Schools' Decision to Break the Mold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatino, Anthony; Huchting, Karen; Dell'Olio, Franca

    2013-01-01

    This research study investigated the decision-making process utilized by three elementary schools in adopting the 200-day calendar initiative in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. The schools in the study represented three distinct sets of demographics focusing primarily on high, middle, and low socioeconomic characteristics, as reported by the…

  11. Assessment of undiscovered continuous oil and gas resources in the Monterey Formation, Los Angeles Basin Province, California, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Le, Phuong A.; Lillis, Paul G.; Marra, Kristen R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed technically recoverable mean resources of 13 million barrels of oil, 22 billion cubic feet of gas, and 1 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Monterey Formation of the Los Angeles Basin Province, California.

  12. Isostatic gravity map with simplified geology of the Los Angeles 30 x 60 minute quadrangle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooley, R.J.; Yerkes, R.F.; Langenheim, V.E.; Chuang, F.C.

    2003-01-01

    This isostatic residual gravity map is part of the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP) and is intended to promote further understanding of the geology in the Los Angeles 30 x 60 minute quadrangle, California, by serving as a basis for geophysical interpretations and by supporting both geological mapping and topical (especially earthquake) studies. Local spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field (after various corrections for elevation, terrain, and deep crustal structure explained below) reflect the lateral variation in density in the mid- to upper crust. Densities often can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in density commonly mark lithologic boundaries. The map shows contours of isostatic gravity overlain on a simplified geology including faults and rock types. The map is draped over shaded-relief topography to show landforms.

  13. Quantitative x-ray diffraction mineralogy of Los Angeles basin core samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; McIntyre, Brandie R.; Edwards, Brian D.; Lakota, Orion I.

    2006-01-01

    This report contains X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of mineralogy for 81 sediment samples from cores taken from three drill holes in the Los Angeles Basin in 2000-2001. We analyzed 26 samples from Pier F core, 29 from Pier C core, and 26 from the Webster core. These three sites provide an offshore-onshore record across the Southern California coastal zone. This report is designed to be a data repository; these data will be used in further studies, including geochemical modeling as part of the CABRILLO project. Summary tables quantify the major mineral groups, whereas detailed mineralogy is presented in three appendices. The rationale, methodology, and techniques are described in the following paper.

  14. Relative lateration across the Los Angeles basin using a satellite laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, E. C.; Cahill, T.; Dorman, J.

    1982-01-01

    In January of 1981 the Transportable Laser Ranging System (TLRS) developed for NASA by the University of Texas was used to conduct a four-day test of the relative lateration technique. The test evolved making repeated measurements of six lines over the Los Angeles basin varying in distance from 26 to 84 kilometers. Although the raw times-of-flight to the various targets changed typically by 5 parts in 10 to the 6th, their line ratios varied nearly an order of magnitude less. The test suggests that the TLRS or other pulsed laser ranging systems might be able to economically combine Lageos ranging and long baseline horizontal work to survey large areas for accumulating crustal strain.

  15. The design of a dynamic security system the XXIII Summer Olympics at Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The security requirements of the XXIII Summer Olympic Games at Los Angeles provided a challenge unparalleled in the history of the modern games. This paper discusses the dynamics involved and suggests that the principles used are applicable to many of today's security environments. The success of the Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) employed at each of the three Olympic villages and at the Piper Technical Center is a known fact. How it was accomplished is addressed in a straightforward, systematic way. The paper also recognizes the contributions made by the security community, law enforcement agencies, the government, military, the security industry and RandD organizations. It was a team effort that reflected the spirit of the games and the American ''can-do'' attitude.

  16. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  17. Risky Sexual Behaviors among a Sample of Gang-identified Youth in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Jackson-Bloom, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Gang youth are at an increased likelihood of participating in unsafe sexual behaviors and at an elevated risk of exposure to sexually transmitted infection (STIs), including HIV. This manuscript presents quantitative and qualitative data on sexual behaviors among a sample of predominately heterosexual, male gang youth aged 16 to 25 years interviewed in Los Angeles between 2006 and 2007 (n = 60). In particular, sexual identity, initiation and frequency of sex, and number of sexual partners; use of condoms, children, and other pregnancies; group sex; and STIs and sex with drug users. We argue that gang youth are a particular public health concern, due to their heightened risky sexual activity, and that behavioral interventions targeting gang youth need to include a component on reducing sexual risks and promoting safe sexual health. PMID:21949598

  18. Fault Interactions and Large Complex Earthquakes in the Los Angeles Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, G.; Aagaard, B.; Hudnut, K.

    2003-01-01

    Faults in complex tectonic environments interact in various ways, including triggered rupture of one fault by another, that may increase seismic hazard in the surrounding region. We model static and dynamic fault interactions between the strike-slip and thrust fault systems in southern California. We find that rupture of the Sierra Madre-Cucamonga thrust fault system is unlikely to trigger rupture of the San Andreas or San Jacinto strike-slip faults. However, a large northern San Jacinto fault earthquake could trigger a cascading rupture of the Sierra Madre-Cucamonga system, potentially causing a moment magnitude 7.5 to 7.8 earthquake on the edge of the Los Angeles metropolitan region.

  19. Earthquakes in the Los Angeles metropolitan region: A possible fractal distribution of rupture size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    Although there is debate on the maximum size of earthquake that is possible on any of several known fault systems in the greater Los Angeles metropolitan region, it is reasonable to assume that the distribution of earthquakes will follow a fractal distribution of rupture areas. For this assumption and an overall slip-rate for the region of approximately 1 centimeter per year, roughly one magnitude 7.4 to 7.5 event is expected to occur ever 245 to 325 years. A model in which the earthquake distribution is fractal predicts that additionally, there should be approximately six events in the range of magnitude 6.6 in this same span of time, a higher rate than has occurred in the historic record.

  20. Plant response to Los Angeles aqueduct construction in the Mojave desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathrop, Earl W.; Archbold, Edwin F.

    1980-03-01

    Construction of the 1913 Los Angeles aqueduct system had a different effect on vegetation productivity, diversity, and stability in the Mojave Desert than did construction of the 1970 aqueduct. Drastic disturbance was found to impede vegetation recovery, whereas slight disturbance sometimes enhanced vegetation. Comparisons of productivity, diversity, and stability measures for both aqueducts show apparent similarities of vegetation cover, biomass, and density. However, these similarities often vanish when one considers qualitative factors, such as proportion of long-lived species and typical cominants of undisturbed communities. Percentage composition of common long-lived perennials represents a good qualitative measure to supplement quantitative comparisons. Enhancement of vegetation along the right-of-way transects of the 1913 aqueduct shows considerable recovery, owing to the more than 65 years that have passed since construction.

  1. Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin megacity during spring, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.; Xu, X.; Haman, C. L.; Lefer, B.; Alvarez, S.; Rappenglueck, B.; Kort, E. A.; Andrews, A. E.; Peischl, J.; Gurney, K. R.; Miller, C. E.; Yung, Y. L.

    2012-02-01

    Attributing observed CO2 variations to human or natural cause is critical to deducing and tracking emissions from observations. We have used in situ CO2, CO, and planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) measurements recorded during the CalNex-LA (CARB et al., 2008) ground campaign of 15 May-15 June 2010, in Pasadena, CA, to deduce the diurnally varying anthropogenic component of observed CO2 in the megacity of Los Angeles (LA). This affordable and simple technique, validated by carbon isotope observations, is shown to robustly attribute observed CO2 variation to anthropogenic or biogenic origin. During CalNex-LA, local fossil fuel combustion contributed up to ~50 % of the observed CO2 enhancement overnight, and ~100 % during midday. This suggests midday column observations over LA, such as those made by satellites relying on reflected sunlight, can be used to track anthropogenic emissions.

  2. Factors affecting breastfeeding among women of Mexican origin or descent in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, S C; Engle, P L; Arnold, L; Haynes, K

    1987-04-01

    Data on breastfeeding intentions and behavior were collected in prenatal and postpartum interviews as part of a study on first birth among 518 women of Mexican origin or descent in two Los Angeles hospitals. The prenatal intentions of 82 per cent of the women to breastfeed were maintained postpartum in one hospital but dropped sharply in the other. A greater number of hours a day with the baby in the hospital and earlier initiation of breastfeeding were associated with the hospital where prenatal breastfeeding intentions were more likely to be carried out. The intention to work postpartum was associated both with the decision not to breastfeed at all and with shorter intended duration of breastfeeding. PMID:3826466

  3. A critical assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenberg, F.P.; Chang, H.-C.; Keeley, J.E.; Pompa, J.; Woods, J.; Xu, H.

    2007-01-01

    The Burning Index (BI) is commonly used as a predictor of wildfire activity. An examination of data on the BI and wildfires in Los Angeles County, California, from January 1976 to December 2000 reveals that although the BI is positively associated with wildfire occurrence, its predictive value is quite limited. Wind speed alone has a higher correlation with burn area than BI, for instance, and a simple alternative point process model using wind speed, relative humidity, precipitation and temperature well outperforms the BI in terms of predictive power. The BI is generally far too high in winter and too low in fall, and may exaggerate the impact of individual variables such as wind speed or temperature during times when other variables, such as precipitation or relative humidity, render the environment ill suited for wildfires. ?? IAWF 2007.

  4. Role of a psychiatric pharmacist in a Los Angeles "Skid-Row" safety-net clinic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Indriani; Dopheide, Julie Ann; Gregerson, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Limited access to a psychiatrist prompted a collaborative practice agreement between a psychiatric pharmacist, a psychiatric pharmacy resident, and primary care physicians at the Center for Community Health, a safety-net clinic providing comprehensive care to the homeless in Skid Row, Los Angeles, CA, USA. From July 2009 to February 2010, 36 (75%) of the 48 patients referred to the psychiatric pharmacy resident met the criteria for the chart review. Twenty-six (54%) were seen for regular follow-up care over 7 months. Most referrals were for depression, bipolar disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The types of drug therapy problems, pharmacist interventions, and clinical mental health outcomes are discussed. PMID:21512832

  5. Community characteristics and violence against homeless women in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Heslin, Kevin C; Robinson, Paul Langham; Baker, Richard S; Gelberg, Lillian

    2007-02-01

    Research on violence against homeless women has focused mainly on individual rather than community-level risk factors. Using an ecological conceptual framework, we estimated the independent association of community characteristics with sexual and physical assault in a probability sample of 974 homeless women. Participants were interviewed at 66 assistance programs in Los Angeles County, California in 1997. Individual responses were linked to community-level data from land use files and the U.S. Census by the facility ZIP codes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that women using service providers in closer proximity to Skid Row had higher odds of physical assault (OR=1.48; 95% CI=1.03, 2.14). A number of individual characteristics were also associated with violent victimization. To reduce violence against homeless women, ensuring the safety of locations for shelters and other assistance programs should be a planning priority for local housing authorities. PMID:17337808

  6. Methane emissions from the 2015 Aliso Canyon blowout in Los Angeles, CA.

    PubMed

    Conley, S; Franco, G; Faloona, I; Blake, D R; Peischl, J; Ryerson, T B

    2016-03-18

    Single-point failures of natural gas infrastructure can hamper methane emission control strategies designed to mitigate climate change. The 23 October 2015 blowout of a well connected to the Aliso Canyon underground storage facility in California resulted in a massive release of natural gas. Analysis of methane and ethane data from dozens of plume transects, collected during 13 research-aircraft flights between 7 November 2015 and 13 February 2016, shows atmospheric leak rates of up to 60 metric tons of methane and 4.5 metric tons of ethane per hour. At its peak, this blowout effectively doubled the methane emission rate of the entire Los Angeles basin and, in total, released 97,100 metric tons of methane to the atmosphere. PMID:26917596

  7. Fault interactions and large complex earthquakes in the Los Angeles area.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Greg; Aagaard, Brad; Hudnut, Ken

    2003-12-12

    Faults in complex tectonic environments interact in various ways, including triggered rupture of one fault by another, that may increase seismic hazard in the surrounding region. We model static and dynamic fault interactions between the strike-slip and thrust fault systems in southern California. We find that rupture of the Sierra Madre-Cucamonga thrust fault system is unlikely to trigger rupture of the San Andreas or San Jacinto strike-slip faults. However, a large northern San Jacinto fault earthquake could trigger a cascading rupture of the Sierra Madre-Cucamonga system, potentially causing a moment magnitude 7.5 to 7.8 earthquake on the edge of the Los Angeles metropolitan region. PMID:14671298

  8. Air pollution and morbidity: a further analysis of the Los Angeles student nurses data

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Hasselblad, V.; Pitcher, H.

    1988-02-01

    Hammer et al. analyzed daily diary reports of headache, eye irritation, cough, and chest discomfort in a study of Los Angeles student nurses, and found a statistically significant association between these symptoms and daily maximum one-hour oxidant concentrations at a nearby air quality monitor. Our analysis examines the student nurse data for the possible significance of other pollutants. We used new model specifications designed to account for the probabilistic nature of the outcome variables, and to allow for complications arising from the time series aspects of the data. We replicated the finding of a significant relationship between oxidants and coughing and eye irritation, and also found that; carbon monoxide was significantly related to headache symptoms; nitrogen dioxide was significantly related to eye irritation; and sulfur dioxide was significantly related to chest discomfort.

  9. Club Drug Use in Los Angeles among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Kipke, Michele D.; Weiss, George; Ramirez, Marizen; Dorey, Fred; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Iverson, Ellen; Ford, Wesley

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about young men who have sex with men's use of club drugs and the risk factors associated with such use. A structured survey was administered in 2005 to 496 young men who were 18-22 years old (40% were 18-19 years old); self-identified as with a same-sex sexuality (83%), bisexual (16%), and/or had had sex with a man (97%); Caucasian (35%), African American (24%), and Latino of Mexican descent (40%). Subjects were recruited from gay-identified venues in Los Angeles, California using a venue-based probability sampling design. Descriptive statistics revealed a high prevalence of drug and club drug use. Regression analyses revealed risk factors associated with recent club drug use, including place of residence, religiosity, disclosure of sexuality to family, frequency of attendance at bars/clubs, and involvement in sexual exchange and the street economy. Limitations and implications of this research are discussed. PMID:17934992

  10. Unequal Protection: Secondhand Smoke Threatens Health of Tenants in Multi-Unit Housing in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying-Ying; Rahman, Tamanna; Hanaya, Daniel; Lam, Vanessa; Gomez, Marlene; Toy, Peggy; Wallace, Steven P

    2016-03-01

    Secondhand smoke is dangerous to a person's health at any level of exposure. Yet policies that prevent smoking are not in place for a majority of market-rate multi-unit housing complexes, according to a new survey of nearly 1,000 apartment dwellers in the city of Los Angeles. Approximately 37 percent of respondents reported that secondhand smoke had drifted into their apartments in the past year. Households with members of vulnerable populations, such as children or individuals with chronic conditions, are more likely to report smoke drifting from adjacent units. Four out of five respondents--including more than half of those who self-reported currently smoking--supported a smoke-free policy in common areas and/or individual units. PMID:27197310

  11. HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL EDUCATION AT CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LOS ANGELES

    SciTech Connect

    Blekhman, David

    2011-09-30

    California State University, Los Angeles, has partnered with the Department of Energy in addressing the workforce preparation and public education needs of the fuel cell industry and the US economy through a comprehensive set of curriculum development and training activities: * Developing and offering several courses in fuel cell technologies, hydrogen and alternative fuels production, alternative and renewable energy technologies as means of zero emissions hydrogen economy, and sustainable environment. * Establishing a zero emissions PEM fuel cell and hydrogen laboratory supporting curriculum and graduate students teaching and research experiences. * Providing engaging capstone projects for multi-disciplinary teams of senior undergraduate students. * Fostering partnerships with automotive OEMs and energy providers. * Organizing and participating in synergistic projects and activities that grow the program and assure its sustainability.

  12. Case-control study of intracranial meningiomas in women in Los Angeles County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Preston-Martin, S.; Paganini-Hill, A.; Henderson, B.E.; Pike, M.C.; Wood, C.

    1980-07-01

    A case-control study was conducted among women in Los Angeles County to investigate possible causes of intracranial meningiomas. Questionnaires sought information from patients and from a neighbor of each one on characteristics and past experiences that might be associated with the development of this disease. Information was obtained on 188 matched patient-neighbor pairs. Three primary factors appeared to be associated with meningioma occurrence: 1) a history of head trauma (odds ratio = 2.0, p = 0.01), 2) consumption of certain cured meats (odds ratio = 2.8, p = less than 0.01), and 3) exposure to medical and dental diagnostic X-rays to the head. For diagnostic X-rays, the strongest association was with early exposure (less than 20 yr old) to full-mouth dental X-ray series (odds ratio = 4.0, p less than 0.01).

  13. Shallow seismic imaging of folds above the Puente Hills blind-thrust fault, Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, T.L.; Shaw, J.H.; Dolan, J.F.; Christofferson, S.A.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.; Plesch, A.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles image discrete folds in the shallow subsurface (<600 m) above two segments of the Puente Hills blind-thrust fault system, Los Angeles basin, California. The profiles demonstrate late Quaternary activity at the fault tip, precisely locate the axial surfaces of folds within the upper 100 m, and constrain the geometry and kinematics of recent folding. The Santa Fe Springs segment of the Puente Hills fault zone shows an upward-narrowing kink band with an active anticlinal axial surface, consistent with fault-bend folding above an active thrust ramp. The Coyote Hills segment shows an active synclinal axial surface that coincides with the base of a 9-m-high scarp, consistent with tip-line folding or the presence of a backthrust. The seismic profiles pinpoint targets for future geologic work to constrain slip rates and ages of past events on this important fault system.

  14. HIV transmission in the adult film industry--Los Angeles, California, 2004.

    PubMed

    2005-09-23

    In April 2004, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LACDHS) received reports of work-related exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the heterosexual segment of the adult film industry in California. This report summarizes an investigation by LACDHS into four work-related HIV-transmission cases among adult film industry workers. The investigation was initiated April 20, 2004, and joined by the California Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) on April 21, 2004, and by CDC on May 18, 2004. This investigation identified important and remediable gaps in the prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the adult film industry. PMID:16177683

  15. A Condom Distribution Program in the Los Angeles Men's Central Jail: Sheriff Deputies' Attitudes and Opinions.

    PubMed

    McCuller, William J; Harawa, Nina T

    2014-06-16

    The K6G unit of Los Angeles Men's Central Jail is comprised of males who have sex with males (MSM), whether gay, bisexual, or transgender. Within this unit, condoms are distributed to inmates, one condom per week. The current study was conducted to better understand the experiences and opinions of jail staff as they pertain to the condom distribution program's effectiveness and impact on jail safety and management. A total of 10 staff interviews were conducted with the unit's line staff (n = 8) and administrative personnel (n = 2). Findings suggest that despite the contradictory "mixed message" that jail staff felt the program sent, it causes few operational or safety concerns and is perceived to be beneficial to public health. PMID:24934837

  16. A Condom Distribution Program in the Los Angeles Men's Central Jail: Sheriff Deputy's Attitudes and Opinions

    PubMed Central

    McCuller, William J.; Harawa, Nina T.

    2014-01-01

    The K6G unit of Los Angeles Men's Central Jail (MCJ) is comprised of males who have sex with males (MSM), whether gay, bisexual or transgender. Within this unit, condoms are distributed to inmates, one condom per week. The current study was conducted to better understand the experiences and opinions of jail staff as it pertains to the condom distribution program's effectiveness and impact on jail safety and management. A total of 10 staff interviews were conducted with the unit's line staff (n=8) and administrative personnel (n=2). Findings suggest that despite the contradictory “mixed message” that jail staff felt the program sent, it causes few operational or safety concerns and is perceived to be beneficial to public health. PMID:24934837

  17. Club drug use in los angeles among young men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kipke, Michele D; Weiss, George; Ramirez, Marizen; Dorey, Fred; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Iverson, Ellen; Ford, Wesley

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about young men who have sex with men's use of club drugs and the risk factors associated with such use. A structured survey was administered in 2005 to 496 young men who were 18-22 years old (40% were 18-19 years old); self-identified as with a same-sex sexuality (83%), bisexual (16%), and/or had had sex with a man (97%); Caucasian (35%), African American (24%), and Latino of Mexican descent (40%). Subjects were recruited from gay-identified venues in Los Angeles, California, using a venue-based probability sampling design. Descriptive statistics revealed a high prevalence of drug and club drug use. Regression analyses revealed risk factors associated with recent club drug use, including place of residence, religiosity, disclosure of sexuality to family, frequency of attendance at bars/clubs, and involvement in sexual exchange and street economy. Limitations and implications of this research are discussed. PMID:17934992

  18. Correlates of Perceived Risk of Developing Cancer among African-Americans in South Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Lucas-Wright, Anna; Bazargan, Mohsen; Jones, Loretta; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.; Vargas, Roberto; Sarkissyan, Marianna; Smith, James; Yazdanshenas, Hamed; Maxwell, Annette E.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are differences in cancer-risk perception among racial/ethnic groups that may affect health risk behaviors. Methods Using a community partnered-participatory research approach, we conducted a survey on cancer screening, risk behaviors, and related knowledge/attitudes within 11 churches in South Los Angeles with predominantly African-American parishioners. This analysis examines correlates of perceived risk of developing cancer among 755African American adults. Results Almost 15% of participants indicated higher perceived risk for cancer compared to the average man/woman of the same age, 38% indicated same risk, whereas 48% perceived lower risk. Sixty-nine individuals (9%) reported a cancer history and 63% reported at least one blood relative with cancer. Controlling for demographic characteristics and healthcare access, participants who reported higher risk of cancer had higher level of cancer-related knowledge; were current and ex-smokers; had poorer health status; had a blood relative with cancer; had a cancer history; and had discussed their risk of cancer with their doctor. The bivariate association between high perceived cancer risk and lack of exercise and obesity disappeared after adjusting for demographic characteristics and perceived health status. Conclusions Our data suggest that a substantial proportion of African Americans in South Los Angeles may underestimate their cancer risk. Additionally, lack of exercise and obesity are not recognized as independent cancer risk factors as much as smoking and personal and family history of cancer. Next steps will be to inform participating churches about our findings and explore their interest in taking steps to reduce health risk behaviors among their parishioners. PMID:24026303

  19. Variation and Trends in Lower Extremity Amputation Rates in Los Angeles County Hospitals 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Jindeel, Ayad; Gessert, Charles; Johnson, Brian P

    2016-09-01

    Lower extremity amputation (LEA) is a preventable complication of diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. Hospital-related factors associated with higher LEA are low hospital LEA revascularization volume, rural setting, and nonteaching status. In this study, we describe LEA rates in health care systems and hospitals in Los Angeles County from 2000 to 2010. Data on hospital discharges in Los Angeles County from 2000 to 2010 were obtained from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. LEA rates were adjusted for clinical and demographic variables including age, sex, race, source of health care payment, diabetes, and peripheral vascular disease. Adjusted LEA rates over the study period were analyzed by category of hospital (municipal, nonprofit/non-Kaiser, Kaiser, and private), and for changes in rates in each hospital over the study period. Over the 11-year study period the LEA rates increased for municipal hospitals, while decreasing for the other 3 categories of hospitals. Among the 84 hospitals included in the final analysis, 41 hospitals had higher than average relative risk for LEA in 2007-2010. Among these hospitals 12 had higher than average decline in LEA rate between 2000-2003 and 2007-2010. The other 29 hospitals had not lowered the LEA rate as much as the whole County over the study period. After adjusting for demographic and clinical variables, the relative risk for LEA among hospitals varied by 7.5-fold. Significant variability was found both within each of the 4 types of hospitals, and between the 4 types. Hospitals also varied in the degree that they lowered their LEA rates. This study demonstrated that health care systems and hospitals are associated with significant disparity in LEA rates among socioeconomic groups and geographical regions. PMID:27335119

  20. Disparities in detection and treatment history among mothers with major depression in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz; Griffin, Beth Ann; Daugherty, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study's goal was to determine disparities in detection and treatment histories among a group of racial and ethnically diverse mothers with major depression. Methods Our sample included 276 racially and ethnically diverse mothers who participated in the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A.FANS) and who were classified with major depression based on the Comprehensive International Diagnostic Interview -Short Form (CIDI-SF). We used logistic regression to assess the association between demographic factors and previous detection with major depression, mental health specialty use, and the use of a primary care physician among these women. The demographic factors examined included race and ethnicity, immigration status, marital status, education, income, body mass index (BMI), maternal age, number of children, children's ages, history of emotional problems, and history of diabetes. Results Results indicated that 69 percent of mothers had not been previously detected with major depression nor had they sought mental health treatment in the 12 months prior to the interview. The odds of having been previously detected with major depression were significantly higher among white and single mothers, as well as among mothers with higher BMIs and those with a history of emotional problems. Non-immigrant mothers without emotional problems had higher odds of having seen a mental health specialist in the 12 months prior to the interview compared to immigrant mothers without emotional problems; no differences in mental health treatment were found between non-immigrant and immigrant mothers with emotional problems. Finally, African-American mothers and those with a history of diabetes had significantly higher odds of seeing a primary care physician compared to Hispanic mothers and those with no history of diabetes, respectively. Conclusion Our analyses of a population of depressed mothers living in Los Angeles highlight the need for detection and treatment

  1. Characterization of organic, metal and trace element PM2.5 species and derivation of freeway-based emission rates in Los Angeles, CA.

    PubMed

    Liacos, James W; Kam, Winnie; Delfino, Ralph J; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2012-10-01

    On-road particulate matter (PM) was collected during a sampling campaign in March-April of 2011 on two major Los Angeles freeways, I-710 and Route 110. I-710 is a major route for heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) traveling to and from the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, while Route 110 has a much lower HDV fraction -3.9% versus 11.4%. Two sets of samples were collected for each roadway, each set representing approximately 50°h of on-road sampling. Concurrent sampling at a fixed site at the University of Southern California's (USC) downtown Los Angeles campus provided estimates of urban background levels. Chemical analysis was performed for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes and steranes, and metals and trace elements. Freeway-based emission rates (ERs) - mass per kilometer of freeway per hour - were calculated using mass concentrations, fuel characteristics, and traffic flow rates. These ERs are presented such that freeways could be treated as a line source of emissions for use in predictive models of population exposure for nearby communities. This data could also be used to assess the exposure of commuters to traffic-related PM2.5 emissions. ERs are compared to data from a previous fixed-site roadside study of I-710 as well as to reconstructed values from a tunnel study. ERs were generally lower (or comparable) on the gasoline-vehicle dominated freeway (Route 110) than the freeway with more diesel trucks (I-710), with EC and pyrene being notably lower on Route 110, findings consistent with the Route 110's lower HDV fraction. We found EC emission rates decreased over time suggesting that efforts to reduce diesel emissions from HDVs at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach have been successful. While ERs for most of the organic species were within the range of values reported by previous studies, the present study found much higher ERs for metals and trace elements. This suggests that the sampling methods

  2. Using Arc/Info GIS to help implement the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) stormwater permit for Los Angeles County

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, D.A.; Pace, P.J.; Woods, J.A.; DePoto, W.

    1997-06-01

    One of Los Angeles County Department of Public Works` many responsibilities is to manage non-point pollution that enters the storm drain network within Los Angeles County. The management of this non-point source pollution is mandated by the NPDES guidelines under the Federal Clean Water Act. These guidelines require the County to monitor the drainage network and the storm water and urban runoff flowing through it. The County covers over 3,117 square miles, with the NPDES Permit covering over 3,100 square miles and over 2500 miles of storm drains. A proposed solution to monitor and manage this vast geographic area is centered upon an Arc/Info GIS. Some of the many concerns which need to be addressed include the administration and evaluation of Best Management Practices (BMP`s), storm drain inspection for illegal connections and illicit discharges, and pollutant load assessment and modeling. The storm drain network and other coverages will be related to external data bases currently used for facility management and planning. This system would be used for query purposes to perform spatial modeling and {open_quotes}what if{close_quotes} scenarios needed to create maps and reports required by the permit and to evaluate various BMP implementation strategies.

  3. Spectral-element Simulations of Earthquakes In The Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.; Stidham, C.; Suess, P.; Shaw, J.

    We use a spectral-element method (SEM) to simulate ground motion in the Los Ange- les Basin. The method is implemented on a massively parallel computer based upon a message-passing algorithm. The SEM includes effects due to topography and uses perfectly-matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary conditions. The SEM has been successfully benchmarked against a discrete wavenumber method for laterally homo- geneous models. We simulate several recent small earthquakes in the basin that can be treated as point sources. This allows us to assess the quality of the 3-D basin model. Our Los Angeles basin velocity and density model was constructed using sonic log and stacking velocity information provided by oil industry sources. The density model is based upon a new database of approximately 300 oil industry density logs from across the basin. We have developed an empirical relation between sonic velocity and density by comparing data from approximately 30 wells in which we have both sonic and density logs. For the remaining wells, we have derived relationships between depth and density. Previous work has typically used density values which were predicted by the velocity values; use of our measured density values should provide more accurate ground shaking predictions, and comparison to previous results will provide a useful assessment of the importance of density models in such simulations.

  4. Increases in the climate change adaption effectiveness and availability of vegetation across a coastal to desert climate gradient in metropolitan Los Angeles, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Tayyebi, Amin; Jenerette, G Darrel

    2016-04-01

    Urbanization has increased heat in the urban environment, with many consequences for human health and well-being. Managing climate change in part through increasing vegetation is desired by many cities to mitigate current and future heat related issues. However, little information is available on what influences the current effectiveness and availability of vegetation for local cooling. In this study, we identified the variation in the interacting relationships among vegetation (normalized difference vegetation index), socioeconomic status (neighborhood income), elevation and land surface temperature (LST) to identify how vegetation based surface cooling services change throughout the pronounced coastal to desert climate gradient of the Los Angeles, CA metropolitan region, a megacity of >18 million residents. A key challenge for understanding variation in vegetation as a climate change adaptation tool spanning neighborhood to megacity scales is developing new "big data" analytical tools. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to quantify the interacting relationships among socio-economic status data obtained from government census data, elevation and new LST and vegetation data obtained from an airborne imaging campaign conducted in 2013 for the urban and suburban areas across a series of fifteen climate zones. Vegetation systematically increased in cooling effectiveness from 6.06 to 31.77 degrees with increasing distance from the coast. Vegetation and neighborhood income were positively correlated throughout all climate zones with a peak in the relationship occurring near 25km from the coast. Because of the interaction between these two relationships, we also found that higher income neighborhoods were cooler and that this effect peaked at about 30km from the coast. These results show the availability and effectiveness of vegetation on the local climate varies tremendously throughout the Los Angeles, CA metropolitan area. Further, using the more inland climate

  5. Mapping CH4 : CO2 ratios in Los Angeles with CLARS-FTS from Mount Wilson, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. W.; Fu, D.; Pongetti, T. J.; Newman, S.; Kort, E. A.; Duren, R.; Hsu, Y.-K.; Miller, C. E.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Los Angeles megacity, which is home to more than 40% of the population in California, is the second largest megacity in the United States and an intense source of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs). Quantifying GHG emissions from the megacity and monitoring their spatiotemporal trends are essential to be able to understand the effectiveness of emission control policies. Here we measure carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) across the Los Angeles megacity using a novel approach - ground-based remote sensing from a mountaintop site. A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) with agile pointing optics, located on Mount Wilson at 1.67 km above sea level, measures reflected near-infrared sunlight from 29 different surface targets on Mount Wilson and in the Los Angeles megacity to retrieve the slant column abundances of CO2, CH4 and other trace gases above and below Mount Wilson. This technique provides persistent space- and time-resolved observations of path-averaged dry-air GHG concentrations, XGHG, in the Los Angeles megacity and simulates observations from a geostationary satellite. In this study, we combined high-sensitivity measurements from the FTS and the panorama from Mount Wilson to characterize anthropogenic CH4 emissions in the megacity using tracer-tracer correlations. During the period between September 2011 and October 2013, the observed XCH4 : XCO2 excess ratio, assigned to anthropogenic activities, varied from 5.4 to 7.3 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1, with an average of 6.4 ± 0.5 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 compared to the value of 4.6 ± 0.9 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 expected from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) bottom-up emission inventory. Persistent elevated XCH4 : XCO2 excess ratios were observed in Pasadena and in the eastern Los Angeles megacity. Using the FTS observations on Mount Wilson and the bottom-up CO2 emission inventory, we derived a top-down CH4 emission of 0.39 ± 0.06 Tg CH4 year-1 in the Los Angeles megacity. This is 18-61% larger than the

  6. Mapping CH4 : CO2 ratios in Los Angeles with CLARS-FTS from Mount Wilson, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. W.; Fu, D.; Pongetti, T. J.; Newman, S.; Kort, E. A.; Duren, R.; Hsu, Y.-K.; Miller, C. E.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.

    2014-06-01

    The Los Angeles megacity, which is home to more than 40% of the population in California, is the second largest megacity in the United States and an intense source of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs). Quantifying GHG emissions from the megacity and monitoring their spatiotemporal trends are essential to be able to understand the effectiveness of emission control policies. Here we measure carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) across the Los Angeles megacity using a novel approach - ground-based remote sensing from a mountaintop site. A Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) with agile pointing optics, located on Mount Wilson at 1.67 km above sea level, measures reflected near infrared sunlight from 29 different surface targets on Mount Wilson and in the Los Angeles megacity to retrieve the slant column abundances of CO2, CH4 and other trace gases above and below Mount Wilson. This technique provides persistent space and time resolved observations of path-averaged dry-air GHG concentrations, XGHG, in the Los Angeles megacity and simulates observations from a geostationary satellite. In this study, we combined high sensitivity measurements from the FTS and the panorama from Mount Wilson to characterize anthropogenic CH4 emissions in the megacity using tracer : tracer correlations. During the period between September 2011 and October 2013, the observed XCH4 : XCO2 excess ratio, assigned to anthropogenic activities, varied from 5.4 to 7.3 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1, with an average of 6.4 ± 0.5 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 compared to the value of 4.6 ± 0.9 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 expected from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) bottom-up emission inventory. Persistent elevated XCH4 : XCO2 excess ratios were observed in Pasadena and in the eastern Los Angeles megacity. Using the FTS observations on Mount Wilson and the bottom-up CO2 emission inventory, we derived a top-down CH4 emission of 0.39± 0.06 Tg CH4 year-1 in the Los Angeles megacity. This is 18-6% larger than the

  7. Does Preconception Health Differ by Nativity?: Findings from the Los Angeles Mommy and Baby (LAMB) Study

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shin M.; Wakeel, Fathima; Nazinyan, Yeghishe; Sun, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare certain preconception health (PCH) behaviors and conditions among US-born (USB) and foreign-born (FB) mothers in Los Angeles County (LAC), regardless of race/ethnicity, and to determine if any identified differences vary among Asian/Pacific Islanders (API’s) and Hispanics. Methods Data are from the 2012 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby (LAMB) study (n=6,252). PCH behaviors included tobacco use, multivitamin use, unintended pregnancy, and contraception use. PCH conditions comprised being overweight/obese, diabetes, asthma, hypertension, gum disease, and anemia. The relationship between nativity and each PCH behavior/ condition was assessed using multivariable logistic regression models. Results USB women were more likely than FB women to smoke (AOR=2.12, 95% CI=1.49–3.00), be overweight/obese (AOR=1.57, 95% CI=1.30–1.90), and have asthma (AOR=2.04, 95% CI=1.35–3.09) prior to pregnancy. They were less likely than FB women to use contraception before pregnancy (AOR=0.59, 95% CI=0.49–0.72). USB Hispanics and API’s were more likely than their FB counterparts to be overweight/obese (AOR=1.57, 95% CI=1.23–2.01 and AOR=2.37, 95% CI=1.58–3.56, respectively) and less likely to use contraception (AOR=0.58, 95% CI=0.45–0.74 and AOR= 0.46, 95% CI=0.30–0.71, respectively). USB Hispanic mothers were more likely than their FB counterparts to smoke (AOR=2.47, 95% CI=1.46–4.17), not take multivitamins (AOR=1.30, 95% CI=1.02–1.66), and have asthma (AOR=2.35, 95% CI=1.32–4.21) before pregnancy. Conclusions US nativity is linked to negative PCH among LAC women, with many of these associations persisting among Hispanics and API’s. As PCH profoundly impacts maternal and child health across the lifecourse, culturally-appropriate interventions that maintain positive behaviors among FB reproductive-aged women and encourage positive behaviors among USB women should be pursued. PMID:26728899

  8. Near-surface location, geometry, and velocities of the Santa Monica Fault Zone, Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Gandhok, G.; Goldman, M.R.; Okaya, D.; Rymer, M.J.; Bawden, G.W.

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction imaging, combined with existing borehole, earthquake, and paleoseismic trenching data, suggest that the Santa Monica fault zone in Los Angeles consists of multiple strands from several kilometers depth to the near surface. We interpret our seismic data as showing two shallow-depth low-angle fault strands and multiple near-vertical (???85??) faults in the upper 100 m. One of the low-angle faults dips northward at about 28?? and approaches the surface at the base of a topographic scarp on the grounds of the Wadsworth VA Hospital (WVAH). The other principal low-angle fault dips northward at about 20?? and projects toward the surface about 200 m south of the topographic scarp, near the northernmost areas of the Los Angeles Basin that experienced strong shaking during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The 20?? north-dipping low-angle fault is also apparent on a previously published seismic-reflection image by Pratt et al. (1998) and appears to extend northward to at least Wilshire Boulevard, where the fault may be about 450 m below the surface. Slip rates determined at the WVAH site could be significantly underestimated if it is assumed that slip occurs only on a single strand of the Santa Monica fault or if it is assumed that the near-surface faults dip at angles greater than 20-28??. At the WVAH, tomographic velocity modeling shows a significant decrease in velocity across near-surface strands of the Santa Monica fault. P-wave velocities range from about 500 m/sec at the surface to about 4500 m/sec within the upper 50 m on the north side of the fault zone at WVAH, but maximum measured velocities on the south side of the low-angle fault zone at WVAH are about 3500 m/sec. These refraction velocities compare favorably with velocities measured in nearby boreholes by Gibbs et al. (2000). This study illustrates the utility of com- bined seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction methods, which allow more accurate

  9. Does Preconception Health Differ by Nativity?: Findings from the Los Angeles Mommy and Baby (LAMB) Study.

    PubMed

    Chao, Shin M; Wakeel, Fathima; Nazinyan, Yeghishe; Sun, Stacy

    2016-04-01

    Objectives To compare certain preconception health (PCH) behaviors and conditions among US-born (USB) and foreign-born (FB) mothers in Los Angeles County (LAC), regardless of race/ethnicity, and to determine if any identified differences vary among Asian/Pacific Islanders (API's) and Hispanics. Methods Data are from the 2012 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby study (n = 6252). PCH behaviors included tobacco use, multivitamin use, unintended pregnancy, and contraception use. PCH conditions comprised being overweight/obese, diabetes, asthma, hypertension, gum disease, and anemia. The relationship between nativity and each PCH behavior/condition was assessed using multivariable logistic regression models. Results USB women were more likely than FB women to smoke (AOR 2.12, 95 % CI 1.49-3.00), be overweight/obese (AOR 1.57, 95 % CI 1.30-1.90), and have asthma (AOR 2.04, 95 % CI 1.35-3.09) prior to pregnancy. They were less likely than FB women to use contraception before pregnancy (AOR 0.59, 95 % CI 0.49-0.72). USB Hispanics and API's were more likely than their FB counterparts to be overweight/obese (AOR 1.57, 95 % CI 1.23-2.01 and AOR 2.37, 95 % CI 1.58-3.56, respectively) and less likely to use contraception (AOR 0.58, 95 % CI 0.45-0.74 and AOR 0.46, 95 % CI 0.30-0.71, respectively). USB Hispanic mothers were more likely than their FB counterparts to smoke (AOR 2.47, 95 % CI 1.46-4.17), not take multivitamins (AOR 1.30, 95 % CI 1.02-1.66), and have asthma (AOR 2.35, 95 % CI 1.32-4.21) before pregnancy. Conclusions US nativity is linked to negative PCH among LAC women, with many of these associations persisting among Hispanics and API's. As PCH profoundly impacts maternal and child health across the lifecourse, culturally-appropriate interventions that maintain positive behaviors among FB reproductive-aged women and encourage positive behaviors among USB women should be pursued. PMID:26728899

  10. Modeling spatial effects of PM(2.5) on term low birth weight in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Coker, Eric; Ghosh, Jokay; Jerrett, Michael; Gomez-Rubio, Virgilio; Beckerman, Bernardo; Cockburn, Myles; Liverani, Silvia; Su, Jason; Li, Arthur; Kile, Molly L; Ritz, Beate; Molitor, John

    2015-10-01

    Air pollution epidemiological studies suggest that elevated exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with higher prevalence of term low birth weight (TLBW). Previous studies have generally assumed the exposure-response of PM2.5 on TLBW to be the same throughout a large geographical area. Health effects related to PM2.5 exposures, however, may not be uniformly distributed spatially, creating a need for studies that explicitly investigate the spatial distribution of the exposure-response relationship between individual-level exposure to PM2.5 and TLBW. Here, we examine the overall and spatially varying exposure-response relationship between PM2.5 and TLBW throughout urban Los Angeles (LA) County, California. We estimated PM2.5 from a combination of land use regression (LUR), aerosol optical depth from remote sensing, and atmospheric modeling techniques. Exposures were assigned to LA County individual pregnancies identified from electronic birth certificates between the years 1995-2006 (N=1,359,284) provided by the California Department of Public Health. We used a single pollutant multivariate logistic regression model, with multilevel spatially structured and unstructured random effects set in a Bayesian framework to estimate global and spatially varying pollutant effects on TLBW at the census tract level. Overall, increased PM2.5 level was associated with higher prevalence of TLBW county-wide. The spatial random effects model, however, demonstrated that the exposure-response for PM2.5 and TLBW was not uniform across urban LA County. Rather, the magnitude and certainty of the exposure-response estimates for PM2.5 on log odds of TLBW were greatest in the urban core of Central and Southern LA County census tracts. These results suggest that the effects may be spatially patterned, and that simply estimating global pollutant effects obscures disparities suggested by spatial patterns of effects. Studies that incorporate spatial multilevel modeling with

  11. On the origin of water-soluble organic tracer compounds in fine aerosols in two cities: the case of Los Angeles and Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Alier, M; Osto, M Dall; Lin, Y-H; Surratt, J D; Tauler, R; Grimalt, J O; van Drooge, B L

    2014-10-01

    Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs), represented by anhydro-saccharides, dicarboxylic acids, and polyols, were analyzed by gas chromatography interfaced to mass spectrometry in extracts from 103 PM1 and 22 PM2.5 filter samples collected in an urban background and road site in Barcelona (Spain) and an urban background site in Los Angeles (USA), respectively, during 1-month intensive sampling campaigns in 2010. Both locations have similar Mediterranean climates, with relatively high solar radiation and frequent anti-cyclonic conditions, and are influenced by a complex mixture of emission sources. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares analyses were applied on the database in order to resolve differences and similarities in WSOC compositions in the studied sites. Five consistent clusters for the analyzed compounds were obtained, representing primary regional biomass burning organic carbon, three secondary organic components (aged SOC, isoprene SOC, and α-pinene SOC), and a less clear component, called urban oxygenated organic carbon. This last component is probably influenced by in situ urban activities, such as food cooking and traffic emissions and oxidation processes. PMID:24385187

  12. Micrometeorological simulations to predict the impacts of heat mitigation strategies on pedestrian thermal comfort in a Los Angeles neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Mohammad; Sailor, David; Ban-Weiss, George A.

    2016-02-01

    The urban heat island impacts the thermal comfort of pedestrians in cities. In this paper, the effects of four heat mitigation strategies on micrometeorology and the thermal comfort of pedestrians were simulated for a neighborhood in eastern Los Angeles County. The strategies investigated include solar reflective ‘cool roofs’, vegetative ‘green roofs’, solar reflective ‘cool pavements’, and increased street-level trees. A series of micrometeorological simulations for an extreme heat day were carried out assuming widespread adoption of each mitigation strategy. Comparing each simulation to the control simulation assuming current land cover for the neighborhood showed that additional street-trees and cool pavements reduced 1.5 m air temperature, while cool and green roofs mostly provided cooling at heights above pedestrian level. However, cool pavements increased reflected sunlight from the ground to pedestrians at a set of unshaded receptor locations. This reflected radiation intensified the mean radiant temperature and consequently increased physiological equivalent temperature (PET) by 2.2 °C during the day, reducing the thermal comfort of pedestrians. At another set of receptor locations that were on average 5 m from roadways and underneath preexisting tree cover, cool pavements caused significant reductions in surface air temperatures and small changes in mean radiant temperature during the day, leading to decreases in PET of 1.1 °C, and consequent improvements in thermal comfort. For improving thermal comfort of pedestrians during the afternoon in unshaded locations, adding street trees was found to be the most effective strategy. However, afternoon thermal comfort improvements in already shaded locations adjacent to streets were most significant for cool pavements. Green and cool roofs showed the lowest impact on the thermal comfort of pedestrians since they modify the energy balance at roof level, above the height of pedestrians.

  13. Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, R.

    1993-02-01

    This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  14. Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, R.

    1993-02-01

    This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  15. Air quality impacts of a CicLAvia event in Downtown Los Angeles, CA.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shi; Batteate, Christina; Cole, Brian; Froines, John; Zhu, Yifang

    2016-01-01

    CicLAvia in Los Angeles, CA is the open streets program that closes streets to motorized vehicles and invites people to walk, run, play or ride their bicycles on these streets, allowing them to experience the city in a new way and get exercise at the same time. Since the events reduce the motorized traffic flow, which is a significant source of air pollution, on the streets, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the CicLAvia events can reduce the concentrations of traffic-emitted air pollutants during the road closure. This study is the first experiment to test this hypothesis. The on-road and community-wide ultrafine particle (UFP) and PM2.5 were measured on the Event-Sunday (October 5th, 2014) and the Pre- and Post- Sundays (September 28(th) and October 12(th), 2014). Data analysis results showed the on-road UFP and PM2.5 reduction was 21% and 49%, respectively, and the community-wide PM2.5 reduction was 12%. PMID:26493865

  16. Nature and chlorine reactivity of organic constituents from reclaimed water in groundwater, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Barber, L.B.; Schroeder, R.A.; Anders, R.; Davisson, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    The nature and chlorine reactivity of organic constituents in reclaimed water (tertiary-treated municipal wastewater) before, during, and after recharge into groundwater at the Montebello Forebay in Los Angeles County, CA, was the focus of this study. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in reclaimed water from this site is primarily a mixture of aromatic sulfonates from anionic surfactant degradation, N-acetyl amino sugars and proteins from bacterial activity, and natural fulvic acid, whereas DOM from native groundwaters in the aquifer to which reclaimed water was recharged consists of natural fulvic acids. The hydrophilic neutral N-acetyl amino sugars that constitute 40% of the DOM in reclaimed water are removed during the first 3 m of vertical infiltration in the recharge basin. Groundwater age dating with 3H and 3He isotopes, and determinations of organic and inorganic C isotopes, enabled clear differentiation of recent recharged water from older native groundwater. Phenol structures in natural fulvic acids in DOM isolated from groundwater produced significant trihalomethanes (THM) and total organic halogen (TOX) yields upon chlorination, and these structures also were responsible for the enhanced SUVA and specific fluorescence characteristics relative to DOM in reclaimed water. Aromatic sulfonates and fulvic acids in reclaimed water DOM produced minimal THM and TOX yields.

  17. Loss estimates for a Puente Hills blind-thrust earthquake in Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, E.H.; Seligson, H.A.; Gupta, N.; Gupta, V.; Jordan, T.H.; Campbell, K.W.

    2005-01-01

    Based on OpenSHA and HAZUS-MH, we present loss estimates for an earthquake rupture on the recently identified Puente Hills blind-thrust fault beneath Los Angeles. Given a range of possible magnitudes and ground motion models, and presuming a full fault rupture, we estimate the total economic loss to be between $82 and $252 billion. This range is not only considerably higher than a previous estimate of $69 billion, but also implies the event would be the costliest disaster in U.S. history. The analysis has also provided the following predictions: 3,000-18,000 fatalities, 142,000-735,000 displaced households, 42,000-211,000 in need of short-term public shelter, and 30,000-99,000 tons of debris generated. Finally, we show that the choice of ground motion model can be more influential than the earthquake magnitude, and that reducing this epistemic uncertainty (e.g., via model improvement and/or rejection) could reduce the uncertainty of the loss estimates by up to a factor of two. We note that a full Puente Hills fault rupture is a rare event (once every ???3,000 years), and that other seismic sources pose significant risk as well. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  18. Protocols for Late Maxillary Protraction in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Stephen L-K

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols used at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) to protract the maxilla during early adolescence. It is a modification of techniques introduced by Eric Liou with his Alternate Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Constriction (ALT-RAMEC) technique. The main differences between the CHLA protocol and previous maxillary protraction protocols are the age the protraction is attempted, the sutural loosening by alternating weekly expansion with constriction and the use of Class III elastics to support and redirect the protraction by nightly facemask wear. The CHLA protocol entirely depends on patient compliance and must be carefully taught and monitored. In a cooperative patient, the technique can correct a Class III malocclusion that previously would have been treated with LeFort 1 maxillary advancement surgery. Thus, it is not appropriate for patients requiring 2 jaw surgeries to correct mandibular prognathism, occlusal cants or facial asymmetry. The maxillary protraction appears to work by a combination of skeletal advancement, dental compensation and rotation of the occlusal planes. Microscrew/microimplant/temporary anchorage devices have been used with these maxillary protraction protocols to assist in expanding the maxilla, increasing skeletal anchorage during protraction, limiting dental compensations and reducing skeletal relapse. PMID:21765629

  19. A century of oilfield operations and earthquakes in the greater Los Angeles Basin, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauksson, Egill; Goebel, Thomas; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Cochran, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the seismicity in the Los Angeles Basin (LA Basin) occurs at depth below the sediments and is caused by transpressional tectonics related to the big bend in the San Andreas fault. However, some of the seismicity could be associated with fluid extraction or injection in oil fields that have been in production for almost a century and cover ∼ 17% of the basin. In a recent study, first the influence of industry operations was evaluated by analyzing seismicity characteristics, including normalized seismicity rates, focal depths, and b-values, but no significant difference was found in seismicity characteristics inside and outside the oil fields. In addition, to identify possible temporal correlations, the seismicity and available monthly fluid extraction and injection volumes since 1977 were analyzed. Second, the production and deformation history of the Wilmington oil field were used to evaluate whether other oil fields are likely to experience similar surface deformation in the future. Third, the maximum earthquake magnitudes of events within the perimeters of the oil fields were analyzed to see whether they correlate with total net injected volumes, as suggested by previous studies. Similarly, maximum magnitudes were examined to see whether they exhibit an increase with net extraction volume. Overall, no obvious previously unidentified induced earthquakes were found, and the management of balanced production and injection of fluids appears to reduce the risk of induced-earthquake activity in the oil fields.

  20. Asbestos diseases and pulmonary symptoms and signs in shipyard workers and their families in Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.; Thornton, J.C.

    1986-11-01

    Families of 338 male and 81 female shipyard workers (SYW), including 280 wives, 144 daughters, and 81 sons, were examined for diseases resulting from asbestos. The workers were initially exposed to asbestos at least 20 years prior to the study date. Radiographic signs of asbestosis (using standard criteria international Labor Office 1980) were found in 64% of 288 male SYW and 21% of 71 female SYW. After excluding those with any occupational exposure to asbestos, asbestosis prevalence was 11% in wives, 8% in sons, and 2% in daughters. Asbestos disease prevalence in workers and in wives increased with the number of years from initial exposure. Male SYW who had smoked had airway obstruction without volume loss. Nonsmokers had normal pulmonary functions. In SYW households prevalences of respiratory diseases, wheezing on physical examination, and symptoms of asthma and chronic bronchitis, exceeded those in the comparison (Michigan) population, even for the younger daughters and sons. These differences, and airway obstruction and distribution defects reported earlier were not explained by cigarette smoking or by asbestos exposure. Instead, they are tentatively ascribed to long-term exposure to ambient air pollution in Los Angeles.