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Sample records for los usuarios internet

  1. Using the Internet in Middle Schools: A Model for Success. A Collaborative Effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Los Alamos Middle School (LAMS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addessio, Barbara K.; And Others

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed a model for school networking using Los Alamos Middle School as a testbed. The project was a collaborative effort between the school and the laboratory. The school secured administrative funding for hardware and software; and LANL provided the network architecture, installation, consulting, and…

  2. Internet Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Frank X.

    1999-01-01

    States that children need proper guidance and boundaries to reap the benefits of the Internet. Focuses on two issues: how parents can protect their children from the Internet's potential dangers and how they can help their children use the Internet to get work done. Includes suggestions for teachers to help parents meet these challenges. (VWC)

  3. Internet Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehr, William H.; Pupillo, Lorenzo Maria

    The Internet is now widely regarded as essential infrastructure for our global economy and society. It is in our homes and businesses. We use it to communicate and socialize, for research, and as a platform for E-commerce. In the late 1990s, much was predicted about what the Internet has become at present; but now, we have actual experience living with the Internet as a critical component of our everyday lives. Although the Internet has already had profound effects, there is much we have yet to realize. The present volume represents a third installment in a collaborative effort to highlight the all-encompassing, multidisciplinary implications of the Internet for public policy. The first installment was conceived in 1998, when we initiated plans to organize an international conference among academic, industry, and government officials to discuss the growing policy agenda posed by the Internet. The conference was hosted by the European Commission in Brussels in 1999 and brought together a diverse mix of perspectives on what the pressing policy issues would be confronting the Internet. All of the concerns identified remain with us today, including how to address the Digital Divide, how to modify intellectual property laws to accommodate the new realities of the Internet, what to do about Internet governance and name-space management, and how to evolve broadcast and telecommunications regulatory frameworks for a converged world.

  4. Exploring potential use of internet, E-mail, and instant text messaging to promote breast health and mammogram use among immigrant Hispanic women in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Dang, Catherine M; Estrada, Sylvia; Bresee, Catherine; Phillips, Edward H

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is now the leading cause of death in Hispanic women (HW). Internet, e-mail, and instant text messaging may be cost-effective in educating HW about breast health and in reducing breast cancer mortality. We surveyed 905 HW women attending a free health fair about their technology use, acculturation, insurance status, mammography use, and breast cancer knowledge. Data were analyzed by t test or χ(2) tests. Mean age was 51.9 ± 14.2 years (range, 18 to 88 years). Ninety-two per cent were foreign-born. Most had completed some high school (39%) or elementary (38%) education. Most (62%) were uninsured. The majority spoke (67%) and read (66%) only Spanish. Only 60 per cent of HW older than 40 years had a recent mammogram. HW older than 40 years who had not had a recent mammogram were younger (mean 54.9 ± 10.8 vs 58 ± 10.4 years) and less likely to have health insurance (25 vs 44%; P < 0.001). Most HW never use the Internet (58%) or e-mail (64%). However, 70 per cent have mobile phones (66% older than 40 years), and 65 per cent use text messaging daily (58% older than 40 years, P = 0.001). In fact, 45 per cent wish to receive a mammogram reminder by text. Text messaging may be an inexpensive way to promote breast health and screening mammography use among uninsured HW. PMID:24160786

  5. Internet Censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyotsna; Kapil; Aayush

    2012-09-01

    Censorship on Internet has always wet its hands in the water of controversies, It is said to go in with synonym of "FILTERING THE NET" i.e. Either done to protect minors or for nationís privacy, some take it as snatching their freedom over internet and some take it as an appropriate step to protect minor, It has its supporters as well as opponents.Google has reported a whooping number of requests from Governments of U.K, China, Poland, Spain, and Canada to remove videos and search links that led to harassment, sensitive issues or suspicious people. This paper deals with the cons of censorship on internet and to make people aware of the fact that Internet is not a single body owned by an org. but an open sky of information shared equally by all. Research done has found out many unseen aspects of different people's view point.

  6. [Internet addiction].

    PubMed

    Korkeila, Jyrki

    2012-01-01

    Internet addiction is defined as uncontrolled and harmful use of Internet, which manifests in three forms: gaming, various sexual activities and excessive use of emails, chats or SMS messaging. Several studies have found that abuse of alcohol and other substances, depression and other health problems are associated with Internet addiction. In boys and men depression may be more a consequence of the addiction than a cause for it. ADHD seems to be a significant background factor for developing the condition. Because it is almost impossible to lead a life without Internet and computers nowadays, it is unrealistic to aim towards full abstinence. Treatment has generally followed the guidelines adapted for pathological gambling. PMID:22612024

  7. A Case Study: To Internet or Not To Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Jared; Boynton, Doug

    1997-01-01

    Interactive multimedia training can be delivered via CD-ROM, hard drive, local area networks (LAN), wide area networks (WAN), Intranet, Internet and hybrid systems. This article presents a case study of how two companies (Los Angeles Times and Allen Communication) evaluated alternative delivery systems, chose one, and implemented multimedia…

  8. Measuring the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molyneux, Robert E.; Williams, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the literature that measures characteristics of the Internet. Discusses: conclusions about the Internet measurement literature; definition of the Internet from a technical standpoint; history of Internet measurement; nature of the Internet data environment; Internet technical characteristics; information measurement and the Internet;…

  9. Internet bullying.

    PubMed

    Donnerstein, Ed

    2012-06-01

    There is substantial literature on the impact of the mass media on children's and adolescents' health and development. The question of what role new technology plays in the media's influence is now a subject of both review and discussion, particularly regarding health risks and intervention. This article takes a brief look at online usage and the theoretical mechanisms that might make Internet access more problematic in terms of risks, compared with more traditional media such as television and film. One of these risks, known today as cyberbullying or Internet harassment, is scrutinized in detail. PMID:22643169

  10. Internet Sexualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  11. Internet 101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noguchi, Kay

    The Internet, a worldwide network of computer networks, is a noncommercial service with acceptable use restricted to the advancement of education and research. Although it has been in existence for quite a while, it is still new to most elementary and secondary educators in the Pacific region and elsewhere. This report is an introduction to the…

  12. Internet India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahl, Ronald H.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews a number of Internet sites containing information on every aspect of life in Modern India. The various sites provide information on such diverse topics as the Indian film industry, politics, the booming Indian computer industry, changing status of women, and financial and political issues. (MJP)

  13. [Internet addiction].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Susumu

    2015-09-01

    Internet technologies have made a rapid progress, bringing convenience to daily life. On the other hand, internet use disorder and internet addiction (IA) have become reportedly serious health and social problems. In 2013, internet gaming disorder criteria have been proposed in the section of Conditions for Further Study of DSM-5. Existing epidemiological studies by questionnaire methods have reported that the prevalence of IA ranges between 2.8% and 9.9% among youths in Japan. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), sleeping disorders, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and phobic anxiety disorder are extremely common comorbid mental disorders with IA. Some psychotherapies (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing) and medical treatments (e.g., antidepressant drugs, methylphenidate) for comorbid mental disorders as well as rehabilitation (e.g., treatment camp) are effective for IA remission. However, some serious cases of IA may be difficult to treat, and prevention is very important. In future, the prevention, rehabilitations and treatments for IA will be more required in Japan. PMID:26394521

  14. The internet

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shahi, R; Sadler, M; Rees, G; Bateman, D

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of email and the world wide web (WWW), by the public, academics, and clinicians—as well as the increasing availability of high quality information on the WWW—make a working knowledge of the internet important. Although this article aims to enhance readers' existing use of the internet and medical resources on the WWW, it is also intelligible to someone unfamiliar with the internet. A web browser is one of the central pieces of software in modern computing: it is a window on the WWW, file transfer protocol sites, networked newsgroups, and your own computer's files. Effective use of the internet for professional purposes requires an understanding of the best strategies to search the WWW and the mechanisms for ensuring secure data transfer, as well as a compendium of online resources including journals, textbooks, medical portals, and sites providing high quality patient information. This article summarises these resources, available to incorporate into your web browser as downloadable "Favorites" or "Bookmarks" from www.jnnp.com, where there are also freely accessible hypertext links to the recommended sites. PMID:12438460

  15. The internet.

    PubMed

    Al-Shahi, R; Sadler, M; Rees, G; Bateman, D

    2002-12-01

    The growing use of email and the world wide web (WWW), by the public, academics, and clinicians-as well as the increasing availability of high quality information on the WWW-make a working knowledge of the internet important. Although this article aims to enhance readers' existing use of the internet and medical resources on the WWW, it is also intelligible to someone unfamiliar with the internet. A web browser is one of the central pieces of software in modern computing: it is a window on the WWW, file transfer protocol sites, networked newsgroups, and your own computer's files. Effective use of the internet for professional purposes requires an understanding of the best strategies to search the WWW and the mechanisms for ensuring secure data transfer, as well as a compendium of online resources including journals, textbooks, medical portals, and sites providing high quality patient information. This article summarises these resources, available to incorporate into your web browser as downloadable "Favorites" or "Bookmarks" from www.jnnp.com, where there are also freely accessible hypertext links to the recommended sites. PMID:12438460

  16. Internet-Based Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    Google the question, "How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?," and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting…

  17. The Internet and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smigielski, Alan

    1997-01-01

    This issue of "Art to Zoo" examines the "mysteries" surrounding the Internet and offers simple "pointers" on how to access the Smithsonian's teaching materials. Many of the materials are available online. Articles include: (1) "What is the Internet?"; (2) "Connecting to the Internet"; (3) "Internet Shopping List"; (4) "Internet Terms"; (5) "A…

  18. Internet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose, Rajan Mathew

    The World Wide Web and the Internet are rapidly expanding spaces, of great economic and social significance, which offer an opportunity to study many phenomena, often previously inaccessible, on an unprecedented scale and resolution with relative ease. These phenomena are measurable on the scale of tens of millions of users and hundreds of millions of pages. By virtue of nearly complete electronic mediation, it is possible in principle to observe the time and ``spatial'' evolution of nearly all choices and interactions. This cyber-space therefore provides a view into a number of traditional research questions (from many academic disciplines) and creates its own new phenomena accessible for study. Despite its largely self-organized and dynamic nature, a number of robust quantitative regularities are found in the aggregate statistics of interesting and useful quantities. These regularities can be understood with the help of models that draw on ideas from statistical physics as well as other fields such as economics, psychology and decision theory. This thesis develops models that can account for regularities found in the statistics of Internet congestion and user surfing patterns and discusses some practical consequences. practical consequences.

  19. Next Generation Internet Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desJardins, R.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with next generation Internet are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Internet architecture; 2) NASA's advanced networking; 3) Internet capability, capacity and applications; and 4) Systems engineering.

  20. Internet Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Rafael; Argyle, R. W.

    Amateur astronomers can carry out scientific research in many different ways. Some activities require expensive telescopes, cameras, and often access to dark skies. But those who live in highly polluted areas, or do not have access to very specialized equipment, still have many possibilities; amongst which is using the online resources available from the internet. In this chapter we explore Aladin, Simbad, and VizieR, three resources created and maintained by the Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). Although these applications are intended for professional astronomers, they are also freely available for amateurs. They allow us to find and measure old neglected difficult pairs, discover new double stars, and in general have a better understanding of those tiny pairs of points of light that we love to observe, photograph and measure.

  1. Poultry Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheok, Adrian David

    Poultry are one of the most badly treated animals in the modern world. It has been shown that they have high levels of both cognition and feelings, and as a result there has been a recent trend of promoting poultry welfare. There is also a tradition of keeping poultry as pets in some parts of the world. However, in modern cities and societies, it is often difficult to maintain contact with pets, particularly for office workers. We propose and describe a novel cybernetics system to use mobile and Internet technology to improve human-pet interaction. It can also be used for people who are allergic to touching animals and thus cannot stroke them directly. This interaction encompasses both visualization and tactile sensation of real objects.

  2. Responsible Internet Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truett, Carol; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Provides advice for making school Internet-use guidelines. Outlines responsible proactive use of the Internet for educators and librarians, discusses strengths and weaknesses of Internet blocking software and rating systems, and describes acceptable-use policies (AUP). Lists resources for creating your own AUP, Internet filtering software, and…

  3. Evaluating Internet Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    The following four papers focus on the topic of evaluating Internet information services: "Some Evaluation Criteria To Assess Internet Information Services" (Carmel Galvin); "The Teacher Librarian's Role as Evaluator of Internet Information Services" (Pru Mitchell); "How Students Evaluate Internet Information Services" (Ross Todd); and "Internet…

  4. Internet Addiction among Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargin, Nurten

    2012-01-01

    Each innovation brings along many risks. One of the risks related with the Internet use is Internet addiction. The aim of this study is to examine Internet addiction in adolescence in terms of gender, Internet access at home and grades. The research design used was survey method. The study population consisted of second stage students attending…

  5. Internet-Based Communication

    PubMed Central

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2015-01-01

    Google the question, “How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?,” and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting our preference for writing over speaking. I propose that our preference for communicating through Internet-based text derives from a fundamental feature of writing: In contrast to speech, which is most often synchronous, text is most often asynchronous. PMID:26330702

  6. Internet and Internet Use: Teacher Trainees' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinoglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the development and issues of internet and internet use. The study has a descriptive survey design and 185 randomly selected teacher trainees at Marmara University, Ataturk Education Faculty in the 2001-2002 academic year constitute the sample. Data were collected via a questionnaire prepared by the researcher…

  7. The Internet in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubarth, Michael, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This special theme issue of "Internet World" contains 10 articles on the role of the Internet in education. The articles are: "Internet Cum Laude" (Eric C. Richardson)--technological developments in college and university services; "Campus Connections" (Michael A. Arnzen)--guidelines for taking full advantage of on-campus access; "Major Links"…

  8. Internet Addiction and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between university students' internet addiction and psychopathology in Turkey. The study was based on data drawn from a national survey of university students in Turkey. 174 university students completed the SCL-90-R scale and Addicted Internet Users Inventory. Results show that students who use internet six…

  9. The Internet Scout Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calcari, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Internet Scout Project which provides Internet users, particularly those in higher education, with current, selective, and well-annotated pointers to information about resources, network tools, and Internet news items. Offered through regular e-mail updates, titles include The Scout Report, The Scout Report Signpost, Net-Happenings,…

  10. Internet-Savvy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2003-01-01

    Describes national study of the attitudes and behaviors of middle and high school students who use the Internet. Finds that Internet-savvy students use the Internet as a virtual book and reference library, a tutor and study shortcut, a study group, a guidance counselor, and a locker, backpack, and notebook. Offers several explanations about the…

  11. Basic Internet Software Toolkit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Once schools are connected to the Internet, the next step is getting network workstations configured for Internet access. This article describes a basic toolkit comprising software currently available on the Internet for free or modest cost. Lists URLs for Web browser, Telnet, FTP, file decompression, portable document format (PDF) reader,…

  12. The Next Generation Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    1999-01-01

    Internet II will take three to five years to develop, will be 1,000 times faster than Internet I, and will cost at least $500 million. Key developers are universities, several federal agencies, and leading computer and telecommunications firms. Internet II will support face-to-face communications technology to facilitate "real-time" networking.…

  13. Advertising on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jugenheimer, Donald W.

    1996-01-01

    States that although many advertisers have intentions of utilizing the Internet for advertising, which can provide specific audience targeting and buyer/seller interactivity, few have been successful. Explains advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet for advertising purposes. Cites special problems with Internet advertising and successes…

  14. Adolescentes que no habrían fumado pueden ser atraídos por los cigarrillos electrónicos

    Cancer.gov

    Artículo del blog Temas y relatos sobre un estudio reciente que sugiere que los adolescentes están usando cigarrillos electrónicos no solo como sustituto de cigarrillos convencionales sino cigarrillos electrónicos están atrayendo nuevos usuarios de tabaco

  15. Navigating the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Powsner, S M; Roderer, N K

    1994-01-01

    Navigating any complex set of information resources requires tools for both browsing and searching. A number of tools are available today for using Internet resources, and more are being developed. This article reviews existing navigational tools, including two developed at the Yale University School of Medicine, and points out their strengths and weaknesses. A major shortcoming of the present Internet navigation methods is the lack of controlled descriptions of the available resources. As a result, navigating the Internet is very difficult. PMID:7841913

  16. Characteristics of Internet Gamblers among a Sample of Students at a Large, Public University in Southwestern United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shead, N. Will; Derevensky, Jeffrey L.; Fong, Timothy W.; Gupta, Rina

    2012-01-01

    There is a current lack of descriptive information on college students who gamble on the Internet. With the increasing popularity of Internet gambling, this study aimed to better understand the profile of Internet gamblers among a sample of college students. Of 909 students at the University of California-Los Angeles who completed an online…

  17. Pincharse sin infectarse: estrategias para prevenir la infección por el VIH y el VHC entre usuarios de drogas inyectables

    PubMed Central

    MATEU-GELABERT, P.; FRIEDMAN, S.; SANDOVAL, M.

    2011-01-01

    Resumen Objetivo Desde principios de los noventa, en la ciudad de Nueva York se han implementado con éxito programas para reducir la incidencia del virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH) y, en menor medida, del virus de la hepatitis C (VHC). A pesar de ello, aproximadamente el 70% de los usuario de drogas inyectables (UDI) están infectados por el VHC. Queremos investigar cómo el 30% restante se las ha arreglado para no infectarse. El Staying safe (nombre original del estudio) explora los comportamientos y mecanismos que ayudan a evitar la infección por el VHC y el VIH a largo plazo. Material y métodos Hemos utilizado el concepto de «desviación positiva» aplicado en otros campos de salud pública. Estudiamos las estrategias, prácticas y tácticas de prevención de aquellos UDI que, viviendo en contextos de alta prevalencia, se mantienen sin infectar por VIH y el VHC, a pesar de haberse inyectado heroína durante años. Los resultados preliminares presentados en este artículo incluyen el análisis de las entrevistas realizadas a 25 UDI (17 doble negativos, 3 doble positivos y 5 con infección por el VHC y sin infección por el VIH). Se usaron entrevistas semiestructuradas que exploraban con detalle la historia de vida de los sujetos, incluyendo su consumo de drogas, redes sociales, contacto con instituciones, relaciones sexuales y estrategias de protección y vigilancia. Resultados La intencionalidad es importante para no infectarse, especialmente durante períodos de involución (períodos donde hay un deterioro económico y/o social que llevan al que se inyecta a situaciones de mayor riesgo). Presentamos tres dimensiones independientes de intencionalidad que conllevan comportamientos que pueden ayudar a prevenir la infección: a) evitar «el mono» (síntomas de abstención) asegurando el acceso a la droga; b) «llevarlo bien» para no convertirse en un junkie y así evitar la «muerte social» y la falta de acceso a los recursos, y c) seguir sin

  18. Creating Pupils' Internet Magazine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bognar, Branko; Šimic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an action research, which aimed to improve pupils' literary creativity and enable them to use computers connected to the internet. The study was conducted in a small district village school in Croatia. Creating a pupils' internet magazine appeared to be an excellent way for achieving the educational aims of almost all…

  19. Understanding the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana

    The Internet is an international network linking hundreds of smaller computer networks in North America, Europe, and Asia. Using the Internet, computer users can connect to a variety of computers with little effort or expense. The potential for use by college faculty is enormous. The largest problem faced by most users is understanding what such…

  20. Banking on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Internet Research, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Electronic ground was broken in 1995 with the development of the completely Internet-based bank Security First Network Bank. This article discusses the need for developing online services, outlines the reasons for the formation of an Internet-based bank and argues that to remain competitive financial services providers must provide easier customer…

  1. Addiction to internet replies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ook

    2009-01-01

    This research introduces a new addictive behavior in cyberspace, which is called Internet Reply Addiction. This phenomenon was found and empirically investigated in Korea where addictive behavior on Internet reply is common. This research suggests that the cause of this kind of addiction can be inferred from the Confucian cultural tradition that oppresses free expressions of individuals in real life settings. PMID:19592737

  2. Internet and forensic science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamakura, Reddy P.

    1997-02-01

    The Internet is a very powerful and inexpensive tool that was created for the free distribution of knowledge and information. The Internet is a learning tool, a research tool, a virtual library without borders and membership requirements, a journal with instant publication, a help desk, and a newspaper/journal with current information. Very soon, when live audio and video transmission is perfected, the Internet also will be a live classroom and everyday conference. Forensic scientists, laboratories and colleges should make use of information already available on the Internet. They also should actively participate and contribute. Very few forensic scientists and laboratories have made their presence felt by setting up their home pages/web pages. But, there is tremendous growth during the past year. Immense benefits from Internet to forensic community are discussed along with the author's personal experience. Creating on-line searchable data bases in all specialties of forensic science is an urgent need. Leading forensic journals should take a lead and create on-line searchable indexes with abstracts. On line electronic publishing, collaborative research/paper publishing or editing is easy, fast, economical and convenient through the use of the Internet. Creation of Internet repositories of unpublished papers is an idea worth looking into. Internet also can be used to give training, re-training or advanced training to students/forensic scientists.

  3. job.search@internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Claudia.

    1995-01-01

    Presents job-hunting options and career opportunities available by searching the Internet, as well as tips for consulting others in a field of interest through a listserv or usenet news group. A collection of Internet addresses providing access to information on job search strategies or job availability is provided. (JPS)

  4. Internet Basics. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    The Internet is a worldwide network of computer networks. In the United States, the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNet) serves as the Internet "backbone" (a very high speed network that connects key regions across the country). The NSFNet will likely evolve into the National Research and Education Network (NREN) as defined in the High…

  5. Regulating the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Byron

    2007-01-01

    The Internet's breakthrough to primetime usage beginning in the mid-1990s evolved in an era of openness. Unfettered access seemed key to Internet development. An important foundation for the 1996 Telecommunications Act was the theory that the telecom industry would work best if it were free of government regulation, a guiding principle that has…

  6. Lessons on Using Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemme, Bobbi; Donovan, Terri

    Intended for beginning Internet users and adult basic education instructors, this manual presents a very basic, instructional approach to exploring the Internet, with explicit instructions on what to do, places to go, and interesting things to try. An introduction on getting started is followed by sections on electronic mail, including using the…

  7. Internet Relay Chat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Carol

    2000-01-01

    Describes Internet Relay Chats (IRCs), electronic conversations over the Internet that allow multiple users to write messages, and their applications to educational settings such as teacher collaboration and conversations between classes. Explains hardware and software requirements, IRC organization into nets and channels, and benefits and…

  8. Making the Internet Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Don E.

    1995-01-01

    Provides information on commercial connections to the Internet via gateways as opposed to direct connection or through a modem. Hardware and software requirements are described; and commercial online services offering an Internet gateway are discussed, including America Online, CompuServe, Delphi, GEnie, and Prodigy. (LRW)

  9. Interlinguistics and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fettes, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Argues that the Internet offers new opportunities for the development, use, and study of planned languages. Notes that while most Web pages on "constructed" languages are the work of individual hobbyists, a few projects have small communities of users. The paper concludes that the use of Esperanto on the Internet reflects increased socialization…

  10. Internet Addiction and Antisocial Internet Behavior of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hing Keung

    2011-01-01

    Internet addiction and the moral implication of antisocial Internet behavior will be investigated in this paper. More and more people use the Internet in their daily life. Unfortunately the percentage of people who use the internet excessively also increases. The concept of Internet addiction or pathological use of Internet is discussed in detail, and the characteristics of Internet addicts are also delineated. The social (especially the antisocial) use of Internet is discussed. It is argued that the behavior of Internet use is similar to daily life social behavior. In other words, Internet behavior is a kind of social behavior. Kohlberg's theory of moral development is employed to delineate the moral reasoning of the antisocial Internet behavior. The following behaviors are regarded as antisocial Internet behavior: (1) the use of Internet to carry out illegal activities such as selling faked products or offensive pornographic materials, (2) the use of Internet to bully others (i.e., cyberbullying) such as distributing libelous statements against a certain person, (3) the use of Internet to cheat others, and (4) the use of Internet to do illegal gambling. The characteristics of the moral stages that are associated with these antisocial Internet behaviors are investigated in detail. PMID:22125466

  11. Introducing the Internet.

    PubMed

    Pallen, M

    1995-11-25

    The benefits to medical practitioners of using the Internet are growing rapidly as the Internet becomes easier to use and ever more biomedical resources become available on line. The Internet is the largest computer network in the world; it is also a virtual community, larger than many nation states, with its own rules of behaviour or "netiquette." There are several types of Internet connection and various ways of acquiring a connection. Once connected, you can obtain, free of charge, programs that allow easy use of the Internet's resources and help on how to use these resources; you can access many of these resources through the hypertext references in the on line version of this series (go to http:@www.bmj.com/bmj/ to reach the electronic version). You can then explore the various methods for accessing, manipulating, or disseminating data on the Internet, such as electronic mail, telnet, file transfer protocol, and the world wide web. Results from a search of the world wide web for information on the rare condition of Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis illustrate the breadth of medical information available on the Internet. PMID:8520280

  12. Introducing the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Pallen, M.

    1995-01-01

    The benefits to medical practitioners of using the Internet are growing rapidly as the Internet becomes easier to use and ever more biomedical resources become available on line. The Internet is the largest computer network in the world; it is also a virtual community, larger than many nation states, with its own rules of behaviour or "netiquette." There are several types of Internet connection and various ways of acquiring a connection. Once connected, you can obtain, free of charge, programs that allow easy use of the Internet's resources and help on how to use these resources; you can access many of these resources through the hypertext references in the on line version of this series (go to http:@www.bmj.com/bmj/ to reach the electronic version). You can then explore the various methods for accessing, manipulating, or disseminating data on the Internet, such as electronic mail, telnet, file transfer protocol, and the world wide web. Results from a search of the world wide web for information on the rare condition of Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis illustrate the breadth of medical information available on the Internet. Images p1424-a PMID:8520280

  13. Internet Cum Laude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Eric C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the Internet's role in colleges and universities. Topics include network development, accessing the library's online catalog; attracting students, electronic student handbooks, coursework information, and program listings, teleconferencing, distance education, independent study and online degrees, electronic field trips, journalism…

  14. Medicine and the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Akatsu, H; Kuffner, J

    1998-01-01

    Practicing physicians are frequently overwhelmed by the amount of new medical information. The internet is increasingly becoming an important vehicle for accessing that information with a variety of online resources for medical professionals. In its current state, however, the internet abounds with misleading information, making it difficult to sort out what is both meaningful and accurate from among the thousands of electronic documents. In this article, we list medical web sites that we have found to be useful, accurate, and easy to navigate. We also give an overview of the internet and World Wide Web to provide a starting point for novice users, and we briefly discuss how internet policy relates to medical practice. PMID:9830368

  15. Saving the internet.

    PubMed

    Zittrain, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    The Internet goose has laid countless golden eggs, along with a growing number of rotten ones. But it's the rotten ones that now tempt commercial, governmental, and consumer interests to threaten the Internet's uniquely creative power. The expediently selected, almost accidentally generative properties of the Internet - its technical openness, ease of access and mastery, and adaptability - have combined, especially when coupled with those of the PC, to produce an unsurpassed environment for innovative experiment. Those same properties, however, also make the Internet hospitable to various forms of wickedness: hacking, porn, spam, fraud, theft, predation, and attacks on the network itself. As these undesirable phenomena proliferate, business, government, and many users find common cause for locking down Internet and PC architecture in the interests of security and order. PC and Internet security vulnerabilities are a legitimate menace. However, the most likely reactions - if they are not forestalled - will be at least as unfortunate as the security problems themselves. Consider the growing profusion of "tethered appliances" - devices whose functions cannot readily be altered by their owners (think TiVo). Such appliances take Internet innovations and wrap them up in a neat, easy-to-use package, which is good - but only if the Internet and PC can remain sufficiently in the center of the digital ecosystem to produce the next round of innovations and to generate competition. People buy these devices for their convenience or functionality and may appreciate the fact that they are safer to use (they limit the damage users can do through ignorance or carelessness). But the risk is that users, by migrating to such appliances, will unwittingly trade away the future benefits of generativity - a loss that will go unappreciated even as innovation tapers off. PMID:17580647

  16. Acne and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A; Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-04-01

    The Internet provides both education and miseducation for acne patients. Although some sites provide disease background information and objective treatment guidance, support networks, and research findings, others may seem to be objective on the surface, but are in reality run by untrained, self-proclaimed experts or are promotional in nature. Providers must be aware of the potential benefits and pitfalls the Internet provides for those suffering with acne. PMID:27015772

  17. Strategy and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Porter, M E

    2001-03-01

    Many of the pioneers of Internet business, both dot-coms and established companies, have competed in ways that violate nearly every precept of good strategy. Rather than focus on profits, they have chased customers indiscriminately through discounting, channel incentives, and advertising. Rather than concentrate on delivering value that earns an attractive price from customers, they have pursued indirect revenues such as advertising and click-through fees. Rather than make trade-offs, they have rushed to offer every conceivable product or service. It did not have to be this way--and it does not have to be in the future. When it comes to reinforcing a distinctive strategy, Michael Porter argues, the Internet provides a better technological platform than previous generations of IT. Gaining competitive advantage does not require a radically new approach to business; it requires building on the proven principles of effective strategy. Porter argues that, contrary to recent thought, the Internet is not disruptive to most existing industries and established companies. It rarely nullifies important sources of competitive advantage in an industry; it often makes them even more valuable. And as all companies embrace Internet technology, the Internet itself will be neutralized as a source of advantage. Robust competitive advantages will arise instead from traditional strengths such as unique products, proprietary content, and distinctive physical activities. Internet technology may be able to fortify those advantages, but it is unlikely to supplant them. Porter debunks such Internet myths as first-mover advantage, the power of virtual companies, and the multiplying rewards of network effects. He disentangles the distorted signals from the marketplace, explains why the Internet complements rather than cannibalizes existing ways of doing business, and outlines strategic imperatives for dot-coms and traditional companies. PMID:11246925

  18. Association between internet gambling and problematic internet use among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tsitsika, Artemis; Critselis, Elena; Janikian, Mari; Kormas, George; Kafetzis, Dimitrios A

    2011-09-01

    The study objectives were to evaluate the correlates and psychosocial implications of internet gambling among adolescents, as well as the association between internet gambling and problematic internet use. A cross-sectional study design was applied among a random sample (N = 484) of adolescents (71.2% boys; 28.8% girls; mean age ± standard deviation, SD = 14.88 ± 0.55 years). Self-completed questionnaires, including internet gambling practices, internet use characteristics, Young Internet Addiction Test, and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire were utilized. The prevalence of internet gambling was 15.1%. Internet gambling was associated with psychosocial maladjustment, including Abnormal Conduct Problems (gender adjusted odds ratio, AOR = 3.83; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 1.86-7.92) and Borderline Peer Problems (AOR = 2.04; 95% CI: 1.09-3.85). The likelihood of concomitant problematic internet use was significantly higher among internet gamblers (AOR = 1.81; 95% CI: 1.03-3.19). Multivariate regression analyses indicated that among all characteristics of internet use assessed, utilizing the internet for the purposes of gambling practices was independently associated with problematic internet use among adolescents (AOR = 3.43; 95% CI: 1.40-8.39). Thus, the study findings suggest that adolescents who participate in internet gambling practices are more likely to concomitantly present with problematic internet use. PMID:20953681

  19. Cue-induced craving for Internet among Internet addicts.

    PubMed

    Niu, Geng-Feng; Sun, Xiao-Jun; Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Kong, Fan-Chang; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Kui

    2016-11-01

    Intense craving is a core feature of addictive disorder, and cue-induced craving is believed to be a key factor in the maintenance and relapse of addictive behaviors. With the rapid development of the Internet, Internet addiction has become a widespread behavioral problem accompanied by many negative effects. This study used the cue-reactivity paradigm to examine cue-induced craving for the Internet among Internet addicts and non-addicts. Participants were exposed to Internet-related words, and asked to report their craving for the Internet. Results indicated that Internet-related words aroused cue-induced craving for the Internet among both Internet addicts and non-addicts; however, the craving was more intense among Internet addicts. These results suggest that craving may not be a unipolar, all or none state found only in addicts, but may also be present among non-addicts. They indicate that Internet-related words may be able to induce craving for the Internet, and that Internet addiction and other addictions may share similar underlying mechanisms. This finding has important implications for designing interventions for Internet addiction. PMID:27305097

  20. Internet Based Remote Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, James

    1999-01-01

    This is the Final Report for the Internet Based Remote Operations Contract, has performed payload operations research support tasks March 1999 through September 1999. These tasks support the GSD goal of developing a secure, inexpensive data, voice, and video mission communications capability between remote payload investigators and the NASA payload operations team in the International Space Station (ISS) era. AZTek has provided feedback from the NASA payload community by utilizing its extensive payload development and operations experience to test and evaluate remote payload operations systems. AZTek has focused on use of the "public Internet" and inexpensive, Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Internet-based tools that would most benefit "small" (e.g., $2 Million or less) payloads and small developers without permanent remote operations facilities. Such projects have limited budgets to support installation and development of high-speed dedicated communications links and high-end, custom ground support equipment and software. The primary conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) The trend of using Internet technology for "live" collaborative applications such as telescience will continue. The GSD-developed data and voice capabilities continued to work well over the "public" Internet during this period. 2. Transmitting multiple voice streams from a voice-conferencing server to a client PC to be mixed and played on the PC is feasible. 3. There are two classes of voice vendors in the market: - Large traditional phone equipment vendors pursuing integration of PSTN with Internet, and Small Internet startups.The key to selecting a vendor will be to find a company sufficiently large and established to provide a base voice-conferencing software product line for the next several years.

  1. Youth Stuck on Web!: The Internet for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Irene E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the procedures developed at the Los Angeles Public Library to offer age-appropriate and user-friendly electronic resources to children and teenagers via the Internet. Discusses filters and dedicated terminals; and describes appropriate Web sites and search engines for parents, children, and adolescents. (LRW)

  2. Teaching Internet Use to Adult Learners: The LANL Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sharon; Comstock, Dan

    The Research Library at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been teaching an Internet class to adult learners since May 1994. The weekly class combines lecture, personal anecdote, and teacher demonstration with hands-on practice using Gopher and the World Wide Web. The class, open to any Lab employee or associate, has provided 250 people…

  3. Internet Technology on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project has shown that Internet technology works in space missions through a demonstration using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. An Internet Protocol (IP) stack was installed on the orbiting UoSAT-12 spacecraft and tests were run to demonstrate Internet connectivity and measure performance. This also forms the basis for demonstrating subsequent scenarios. This approach provides capabilities heretofore either too expensive or simply not feasible such as reconfiguration on orbit. The OMNI project recognized the need to reduce the risk perceived by mission managers and did this with a multi-phase strategy. In the initial phase, the concepts were implemented in a prototype system that includes space similar components communicating over the TDRS (space network) and the terrestrial Internet. The demonstration system includes a simulated spacecraft with sample instruments. Over 25 demonstrations have been given to mission and project managers, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), contractor technologists and other decisions makers, This initial phase reached a high point with an OMNI demonstration given from a booth at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Inspection Day 99 exhibition. The proof to mission managers is provided during this second phase with year 2000 accomplishments: testing the use of Internet technologies onboard an actual spacecraft. This was done with a series of tests performed using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. This spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 6 months! On board software was modified to add an IP stack to support basic IP communications. Also added was support for ping, traceroute and network timing protocol (NTP) tests. These tests show that basic Internet functionality can be used onboard spacecraft. The performance of data was measured to show no degradation from current

  4. Internet resources for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Hariom; Jain, Shalini; Kapila, Suman; Prasad, Gbks

    2005-01-01

    Internet is transforming lives of many people in the world. Nowadays Internet has become one of the most common media to extract information of interest to researchers. The Internet is composed of a large number of smaller interconnected networks called Intranets. These Intranets connect thousands computers enabling them to share information with each other and to share various resources such as powerful super computers, software and databases of information. It has made it possible for people all over the world to effectively and inexpensively communicate with each other. The Internet has become world's biggest library where retrieval of scientific resources is only a mouse click away. The geometric growth in Internet usage is mainly due to the great success of "World Wide Web". Various useful databases on diabetes are already on 'the Net' and many more being added regularly. The present article is an attempt to provide a review of several sites that may be of great significance to the diabetes researchers before execution for new assignment/project. PMID:15681892

  5. Teaching internet use to adult learners: The LANL experience

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Comstock, D.

    1995-12-01

    The Research library at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been teaching an Internet class to adult learners since May 1994. The class is a team effort, combining lecture/demo with hands-on practice using Gopher and the World Wide Web. What started out as a small short-term project has become a weekly class available to any Lab employee or associate. More than 250 people have been taught to find basic reference materials and to navigate the Internet on the Gopher and World Wide Web. The class is one of the first classes offered by the Research Library to be filled every month, and one Laboratory group has recommended that their staff attend this class in preparation for more advanced Internet and HTML classes as part of their group training. The success of this class spurred development by the Research Library of more specific subject classes using Internet resources, specifically business and general science resources.

  6. The Internet for Librarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothkopf, U.

    Librarianship is currently undergoing major changes. New information sources, accessible via the "network of networks", the Internet, offer opportunities which were previously unknown, but which require continuous ongoing learning. The Internet seems to be organized badly or not at all. The poor appearance might lead to an underestimation of its value. In the following, an introduction to the main functions will be given in order to facilitate understanding and use of the Internet. E-Mail, FTP (File Transfer Protocol) and Telnet will be covered, as well as Mailing lists, Newsgroups and the tools Archie, Gopher, Veronica, WAIS (Wide Area Information Server) and the World Wide Web (WWW). Examples will be given to show possible applications for library services.

  7. Internet Performance to Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, L

    2003-10-01

    We report the first results ever for real-time Internet performance to Africa using the PingER methodology. Multiple monitoring hosts were used to enable comparisons with performance from different parts of the world. From these preliminary measurements, we have found that Internet packet losses to some African sites in recent months range from very poor to bad (> 12%), some getting better, others are holding steady or getting worse. This, together with the average monthly Round Trip Times, imply end-to-end maximum TCP throughputs that are order of magnitudes different between countries in the region. Africa is shown to be far from the Internet performance in industrialized nations due to the poor infrastructure in place today. These monitoring efforts can provide valuable information to analyze the relative rates of future improvement and today they help us to quantify the digital divide and can provide quantitative information to policy makers.

  8. Internet Access to Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Jackson, Chris; Price, Harold; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project at NASA's Goddard Space flight Center (GSFC), is demonstrating the use of standard Internet protocols for spacecraft communication systems. This year, demonstrations of Internet access to a flying spacecraft have been performed with the UoSAT-12 spacecraft owned and operated by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL). Previously, demonstrations were performed using a ground satellite simulator and NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These activities are part of NASA's Space Operations Management Office (SOMO) Technology Program, The work is focused on defining the communication architecture for future NASA missions to support both NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" concept and to enable new types of collaborative science. The use of standard Internet communication technology for spacecraft simplifies design, supports initial integration and test across an IP based network, and enables direct communication between scientists and instruments as well as between different spacecraft, The most recent demonstrations consisted of uploading an Internet Protocol (IP) software stack to the UoSAT- 12 spacecraft, simple modifications to the SSTL ground station, and a series of tests to measure performance of various Internet applications. The spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 3 months. The tests included basic network connectivity (PING), automated clock synchronization (NTP), and reliable file transfers (FTP). Future tests are planned to include additional protocols such as Mobile IP, e-mail, and virtual private networks (VPN) to enable automated, operational spacecraft communication networks. The work performed and results of the initial phase of tests are summarized in this paper. This work is funded and directed by NASA/GSFC with technical leadership by CSC in arrangement with SSTL, and Vytek Wireless.

  9. Cataloging Internet resources.

    PubMed

    Flannery, M R

    1995-04-01

    The number of resources available on the Internet continues to expand exponentially, but finding appropriate resources is still a fragmented, hit-or-miss operation. Traditional library expertise in bibliographic description and access should be applied to the management of this emerging body of material. In the process, catalogers will be able to assess the adequacy of current tools (e.g., cataloging codes, machine-readable cataloging formats, integrated library systems) for providing access to Internet resources and will contribute credibly to design or redesign of access tools. This paper outlines the major issues that must be considered in cataloging electronic resources. PMID:7599587

  10. Filtering the Internet: The Children's Internet Protection Act. Legal Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Martha M.

    2004-01-01

    Accompanying the explosive growth of the Internet have been concerns about protecting children from viewing pornographic and other harmful images through cyberspace. In the past few years, Congress has passed several acts to censor Internet sites available to children, but only the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) has received Supreme…

  11. Internet Abuse and Internet Addiction in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to overview the issues, concerns and challenges relating to internet abuse and internet addiction in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Using psychological literature, the paper outlines a number of important and inter-related areas including brief overviews of internet abuse, and the most extreme form of…

  12. Internet Resources on Aging: Parts of the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Joyce A.

    1996-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the Internet and a listing of various resources on aging that can be obtained through the Internet. Components of the Internet discussed are electronic-mail applications (listservs, USENET Newsgroups, Bulletin Board Systems, Freenets, and Commercial Services); File Transfer Protocol; Telnet/Remote Login; Gophers; Wide…

  13. Internet 2 and the Next Generation Internet: A Realistic Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Cecilia M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes new developments, such as Internet 2 and the Next Generation Internet (NGI) initiative, as well as other potential advances in high-performance applications that these new electronic resources will create. Relates these developments to the evolution of the Internet, and looks ahead to their likely impact beyond the higher education and…

  14. Internet Use for Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Services Utilization > Internet use for Health Information Internet use for Health Information Narrative Due in part to the growth in high-speed broadband, wireless networks, and mobile ...

  15. Teaching and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Problems involved in distance learning where teachers utilizing public chat sites and interactive software crosses the Internet students online are examined. The provisions of the TEACH Act that became law in 2002 and provides guidelines on the use of copyright-protected material are discussed.

  16. Collaborative Internet Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Joanne

    This paper describes pioneering in the area of telecommunications and the use of the Internet across the curriculum in Australian schools through the I*EARN (International Education and Resource Network). Topics discussed include: (1) changes to the traditional learning approach and school structure, including the role of the teacher and resource…

  17. Internet 2 Access Grid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 Initiative, which is based on collaboration among universities, businesses, and government, focuses on the Access Grid, a Computational Grid that includes interactive multimedia within high-speed networks to provide resources to enable remote collaboration among the research community. (Author/LRW)

  18. Commercialization of the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Allan H.

    1992-01-01

    Traces the growth of the Internet from its beginnings as the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency's ARPAnet. Discusses key issues facing network service providers including: acceptable use policies, liability exposure, the integration of research and production networks, the commercialization of the networks, and the need for global planning.…

  19. Reading the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Similar trends are occurring in schools. Lenhart, Simoin, and Graziano (2001) found that 94% of teens online use the Internet for school research projects, and according to the U.S. Department of Education (2004), "even students from low-income groups without access to technology at home seek and find it-using computers at schools, libraries, or…

  20. Internet Issues in Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of Internet access on library reference services based on 1994 interviews with almost two dozen university librarians. Highlights include library policy, overcrowded workstations and methods of controlling use, recreational use of terminals that interferes with more formal library use, restriction as a form of censorship, and…

  1. Internet Training Needs Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weglarz, Shirley

    The Office of Institutional Research at Johnson County Community College (JCCC), Kansas, conducted a survey to help determine the level of interest in Internet training courses. Surveys were mailed in November 1998 to 9,982 individuals selected from six lists representing the JCCC Business and Industry Division's current and potential clients. A…

  2. Cataloguing the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Daniel, Heather B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses problems and opportunities, presented by the information explosion and the growth of the Internet, for libraries to apply and augment traditional methods of cataloging. The first section provides an overview of how the process of cataloging evolved, including the development of the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR),…

  3. Modeling the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles Serrano, M.; Boguñá, M.; Díaz-Guilera, A.

    2006-03-01

    We model the Internet as a network of interconnected Autonomous Systems which self-organize under an absolute lack of centralized control. Our aim is to capture how the Internet evolves by reproducing the assembly that has led to its actual structure and, to this end, we propose a growing weighted network model driven by competition for resources and adaptation to maintain functionality in a demand and supply balance. On the demand side, we consider the environment, a pool of users which need to transfer information and ask for service. On the supply side, ASs compete to gain users, but to be able to provide service efficiently, they must adapt their bandwidth as a function of their size. Hence, the Internet is not modeled as an isolated system but the environment, in the form of a pool of users, is also a fundamental part which must be taken into account. ASs compete for users and big and small come up, so that not all ASs are identical. New connections between ASs are made or old ones are reinforced according to the adaptation needs. Thus, the evolution of the Internet can not be fully understood if just described as a technological isolated system. A socio-economic perspective must also be considered.

  4. Glossary of Internet Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Microcomputers for Information Management, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Provides definitions for 71 terms related to the Internet, including Archie, bulletin board system, cyberspace, e-mail (electronic mail), file transfer protocol, gopher, hypertext, integrated services digital network, local area network, listserv, modem, packet switching, server, telnet, UNIX, WAIS (wide area information servers), and World Wide…

  5. Internet's critical path horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, S.; Solé, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    Internet is known to display a highly heterogeneous structure and complex fluctuations in its traffic dynamics. Congestion seems to be an inevitable result of user's behavior coupled to the network dynamics and it effects should be minimized by choosing appropriate routing strategies. But what are the requirements of routing depth in order to optimize the traffic flow? In this paper we analyse the behavior of Internet traffic with a topologically realistic spatial structure as described in a previous study [S.-H. Yook et al., Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99, 13382 (2002)]. The model involves self-regulation of packet generation and different levels of routing depth. It is shown that it reproduces the relevant key, statistical features of Internet's traffic. Moreover, we also report the existence of a critical path horizon defining a transition from low-efficient traffic to highly efficient flow. This transition is actually a direct consequence of the web's small world architecture exploited by the routing algorithm. Once routing tables reach the network diameter, the traffic experiences a sudden transition from a low-efficient to a highly-efficient behavior. It is conjectured that routing policies might have spontaneously reached such a compromise in a distributed manner. Internet would thus be operating close to such critical path horizon.

  6. The Global Internet Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Deborah Joy

    2009-01-01

    The global rise of Internet-based education is discussed in relation to models drawn from social studies and epidemiology. Experiential and data density models are highlighted, also the capacity for technological change, and phenomena observed in the spread of disease. The lesson of these illustrations is that even apparently permanent phenomena…

  7. Internet Technology Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes six "pathfinders" to locating information on Internet resources. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Texas at Austin in response to…

  8. Toward a Standardized Internet Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsiang; Tan, Zixiang

    This paper investigates measurement issues related to elements of the Internet and calls for a standardized measuring scheme to resolve the problem of the measurement. The dilemmas in measuring the elements of the Internet are identified, and previous studies are reviewed. Elements of the Internet are categorized into population, usage, protocol…

  9. Gaining Access to the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg R.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses Internet services and protocols (i.e., electronic mail, file transfer, and remote login) and provides instructions for retrieving guides and directories of the Internet. Services providing access to the Internet are described, including bulletin board systems, regional networks, nationwide connections, and library organizations; and a…

  10. Internet Resources for General Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Keith P.

    1999-01-01

    Describes Internet tools that can be incorporated into the general music class structure and are appropriate for upper elementary and middle school students: (1) electronic music dictionaries and encyclopedias; (2) Internet practice-and-drill web sites; and (3) virtual learning centers. Discusses the structure of Internet projects and the use of…

  11. Student Use of the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaney, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores Internet use among undergraduates, especially at one public research university where researchers have studied students' self-reported Internet use for several years. Analysis of data from a survey administered to 490 undergraduates in Fall 2000 and a survey of 593 undergraduates in Fall 2003 revealed that Internet use is…

  12. Internet in the Indian Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Sizigendi Subba

    This paper presents briefly the concept of the Internet and lists the Internet service providers in India (Education and Research Network from Department of Electronics, National Informatics Network from National Informatics Center, Gateway Internet Access Service from Videsh Sanchar Nigam Limited, and SOFTNET from Software Technology Parks India)…

  13. The Internet Serving Personal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Isabel

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the use of information technology, particularly the Internet, and the teacher's role. Describes the Macau-Portugal-Internet-Schools (MPIS) program that was developed to promote activities among schools via the Internet that would encourage a cultural exchange between Macau (Portuguese territory down the coast from Hong Kong scheduled to…

  14. Internet Accessibility in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haymond, Ruel

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the problems that prohibit expanded Internet access and possible solutions to these problems, particularly with respect to the country of Chile. The three main problems that block Internet usage in Latin America are high demand and poor infrastructure; high costs for Internet access; and high preliminary costs for computers, modems, and…

  15. Demystifying the Internet. Practitioner File.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education, Columbus, OH.

    This practitioner file is designed to provide information for adult, career, and vocational educators who have little or no experience using the Internet. Discussed first are the history of the Internet's development and its content and scope. Ways of obtaining an Internet connection are described. Next, annotated descriptions of eight sources of…

  16. The Internet as a Reference Tool: Accessing Scientific and Technical Information via the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosier, Mona L.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's Research Library has developed a World Wide Web (WWW) page to allow laboratory staff, as well as individuals from around the world, access to information via the Internet. While many Web pages offer information solely on the organization, the Los Alamos National Laboratory page provides links to reference materials…

  17. Internet addiction in young people.

    PubMed

    Ong, Say How; Tan, Yi Ren

    2014-07-01

    In our technology-savvy population, mental health professionals are seeing an increasing trend of excessive Internet use or Internet addiction. Researchers in China, Taiwan and Korea have done extensive research in the field of Internet addiction. Screening instruments are available to identify the presence of Internet addiction and its extent. Internet addiction is frequently associated with mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression, conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment modalities include individual and group therapies, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), family therapy and psychotropic medications. A significant proportion of Singapore adolescents engaging in excessive Internet use are also diagnosed to have concomitant Internet addiction. Despite the presence of a variety of treatment options, future research in this area is needed to address its growing trend and to minimise its negative psychological and social impact on the individuals and their families. PMID:25142474

  18. Internet and Advertisement.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-02-01

    The Internet has revolutionized the way knowledge is currently produced, stored and disseminated. A few finger clicks on a keyboard can save time and many hours of search in libraries or shopping in stores. Online trademarks with an (e-) prefix such as e-library, e-business, e-health etc., are increasingly part of our daily professional vocabularies. However, the Internet has also produced multiple negative side effects, ranging from an unhealthy dependency to a dehumanization of human relationships. Fraudulent, unethical and scam practices are also flourishing through for example misleading online advertising methods. Some social and professional networks gather users' profiles for selling and advertising purposes, sometimes by making it technically difficult to unsubscribe. Here, I discuss some of these unethical aspects and propose some potential solutions to reduce them. PMID:25842044

  19. Internet Business Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cogent Software, Inc. was formed in January 1995 by David Atkinson and Irene Woerner, both former employees of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Several other Cogent employees also worked at JPL. Atkinson headed JPL's Information Systems Technology section and Woerner lead the Advanced User Interfaces Group. Cogent's mission is to help companies organize and manage their online content by developing advanced software for the next generation of online directories and information catalogs. The company offers a complete range of Internet solutions, including Internet access, Web site design, local and wide-area networks, and custom software for online commerce applications. Cogent also offers DesignSphere Online, an electronic community for the communications arts industry. Customers range from small offices to manufacturers with thousands of employees, including Chemi-Con, one of the largest manufacturers of capacitors in the world.

  20. Internet minimal group paradigm.

    PubMed

    Amichai-Hamburger, Yair

    2005-04-01

    Over many years, social psychologists have sought to understand what causes individuals to form themselves into groups. Initially, it was believed that groups were formed when people bonded around a common goal. Later, it was found that, when individuals were divided into groups on a random basis, this in itself was sufficient for them to feel part of a group and show a preference for their own group over others. Since the environment in cyberspace is different from that of the offline world, for example, there is no physical proximity between participants; it may be assumed that it would be difficult to achieve feelings of affiliation among potential or actual group members. This pioneer study seeks to discover which components are requisite to the creation of a group identity among individuals surfing the Internet. For this experiment, 24 people were divided into two Internet chat groups according to their intuitive preference in a decision-making task. It was found that group members perceived their own group performance as superior on a cognitive task as compared with that of the other group. These results demonstrate that for surfers, the Internet experience is very real and even a trivial allocation of people to a group is likely to create a situation of ingroup favoritism. PMID:15938653

  1. Internet Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Wonshik; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Lin, Li-Chen; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2006-01-01

    Internet Cancer Support Groups (ICSGs) are an emerging form of support group on Internet specifically for cancer patients. Previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of ICSGs as a research setting or a data-collection method. Yet recent studies have also indicated that ICSGs tend to serve highly educated, high-income White males who tend to be at an early stage of cancer. In this article, a total of 317 general ICSGs and 229 ethnic-specific ICSGs searched through Google.com, Yahoo.com, http://Msn.com, AOL.com, and ACOR.org are analyzed from a feminist perspective. The written records of group discussions and written memos by the research staff members were also analyzed using content analysis. The idea categories that emerged about these groups include (a) authenticity issues; (b) ethnicity and gender issues; (c) intersubjectivity issues; and (d) potential ethical issues. The findings suggest that (a) researchers adopt multiple recruitment strategies through various Internet sites and/or real settings; (b) researchers raise their own awareness of the potential influences of the health-related resources provided by ICSGs and regularly update their knowledge related to the federal and state standards and/or policies related to ICSGs; and (c) researchers consider adopting a quota-sampling method. PMID:15681976

  2. Evolution and Structure of the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2007-09-01

    Preface; List of abbreviations; 1. A brief history of the Internet; 2. How the Internet works; 3. Measuring the global Internet; 4. The Internet's large-scale topology; 5. Modeling the Internet; 6. Internet robustness; 7. Virtual and social networks in the Internet; 8. Searching and walking on the Internet; 9. Epidemics in the Internet; 10. Beyond the Internet's skeleton: traffic and global performance; 11. Outlook; Appendix I: graph theory applied to topology analysis; Appendix II: interface resolution and router topology; Appendix III: numerical analysis of heavy-tailed distributions; Appendix IV: degree correlations; Appendix V: scale-free networks: scaling relations; Appendix VI: the SIR model of virus propagation; References; Index.

  3. Evolution and Structure of the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2004-02-01

    Preface; List of abbreviations; 1. A brief history of the Internet; 2. How the Internet works; 3. Measuring the global Internet; 4. The Internet's large-scale topology; 5. Modeling the Internet; 6. Internet robustness; 7. Virtual and social networks in the Internet; 8. Searching and walking on the Internet; 9. Epidemics in the Internet; 10. Beyond the Internet's skeleton: traffic and global performance; 11. Outlook; Appendix I: graph theory applied to topology analysis; Appendix II: interface resolution and router topology; Appendix III: numerical analysis of heavy-tailed distributions; Appendix IV: degree correlations; Appendix V: scale-free networks: scaling relations; Appendix VI: the SIR model of virus propagation; References; Index.

  4. Physiological anthropology and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Karelović, D; Ognjenović, M; Cekić-Arambasin, A; Tadin, I

    1998-12-01

    The Internet is the greatest computer network with many services like Web, FTP, Gopher, E-mail Discussion Groups, and Usenet Discussion Groups, that provides a rapid and the cheapest exchange of information. The benefits to anthropologists of using the Internet are growing rapidly, as the Internet becomes easier to use and ever more anthropological resources become available on line. Physiological anthropology is concerned with the evolution and biological features of human population and it's sources on the Internet are growing continuously. However, in that enormous number of data, is not easy to find a needed information. Currently, number of indexed physiological anthropology related sites on Web only is 233990 (October 98). This paper provides informations about Internet and needed hardware and software for using it. It also describes and lists the most important physiological anthropology addresses, together with physiological anthropology-related journals on the Internet, as well as the ways of searching them. PMID:9951133

  5. [Internet and medicine].

    PubMed

    De Fiore, L

    1995-10-01

    The World Wide Web creates world-circling medical information bridges connecting all the world. Web sites maintained by universities and institutes are prime sources for hard scientific data about medical research. These sites are more and more informative and usually readable. For some commentators the Web is the greatest advance in information transfer since the invention of the printing press. Some people believe that electronic medical publishing will fundamentally change the way that science gets done. However, an explicit policy is needed for the medical sites on the Internet because of its enormous capacity to transmit information. PMID:7501907

  6. Diabetes and the internet.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kenneth J

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines what the World Wide Web has to offer patients, families and professionals in relation to diabetes. The potential pitfalls and dangers are discussed, leading to a wider debate on how the Internet can be expected to impact upon diabetes and other health care provision in the near future, and how health care professionals' practices will have to change. Themes include: the World Wide Web (finding material, assessing authenticity, pitfalls for patients, personalized pages, chat rooms, security); e-mail consultation (benefits, risks, minimizing risk, what to tell patients, legal constraints, security); telemedicine (telemetry, surveillance, security); search engines (journals, etc.); looking ahead (digital television, web-based medical records). PMID:11979038

  7. Anomaly detection for internet surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Henri; Raaijmakers, Stephan; Halma, Arvid; Wedemeijer, Harry

    2012-06-01

    Many threats in the real world can be related to activity of persons on the internet. Internet surveillance aims to predict and prevent attacks and to assist in finding suspects based on information from the web. However, the amount of data on the internet rapidly increases and it is time consuming to monitor many websites. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically monitor trends and find anomalies on the internet. The system was tested on Twitter data. The results showed that it can successfully recognize abnormal changes in activity or emotion.

  8. Library resources on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Nancy L.

    1995-07-01

    Library resources are prevalent on the Internet. Library catalogs, electronic books, electronic periodicals, periodical indexes, reference sources, and U.S. Government documents are available by telnet, Gopher, World Wide Web, and FTP. Comparatively few copyrighted library resources are available freely on the Internet. Internet implementations of library resources can add useful features, such as full-text searching. There are discussion lists, Gophers, and World Wide Web pages to help users keep up with new resources and changes to existing ones. The future will bring more library resources, more types of library resources, and more integrated implementations of such resources to the Internet.

  9. The Internet Guide for New Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dern, Daniel P.

    This guide will help the new user get started on the Internet. It explains what the Internet is, how to use it, and how to think like an Internet user. Part 1, "Ramping Up, Getting Started," covers the basics of getting access to the Internet and general information about it. It includes a review of the history and technology of the Internet, some…

  10. An Exploration of Flow during Internet Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rettie, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Uses focus groups to facilitate identification and discussion of respondents' Internet experience. Explores respondents' awareness and experience of flow-identified in research as a key characteristic of Internet consumer behavior. Finds half the respondents recognized Internet flow experience and Internet flow seems to prolong Internet and Web…

  11. Serving the Internet Public: The Internet Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Electronic Library, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Internet Public Library (IPL) which was developed at the School of Information and Library Studies at the University of Michigan to be a library for Internet users. Highlights include mission statement and goals, funding, staffing with volunteers, future possibilities, IPL services, and statement of principles. (LRW)

  12. Quality of internet access: barrier behind internet use statistics.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Harvey; Biscope, Sherry; Poland, Blake

    2003-09-01

    The rapid growth of the Internet is increasingly international with young people being the early adopters in most countries. However, the quality of Internet access looms as a major barrier hidden behind Internet use statistics. The goal of this study was to provide an in-depth evaluation of young people's perspectives on using the Internet to obtain health information and resources (e-health). Using an inductive qualitative research design, 27 focus groups were conducted in Ontario, Canada. The 210 young participants were selected to reflect diversity in age, sex, geographic location, cultural identity and risk. A major finding was how the quality of Internet access influenced young people's ability to obtain health information and resources. Quality of Internet access was affected by four key factors: 1. Privacy, 2. Gate-keeping, 3. Timeliness and 4. Functionality. Privacy was particularly relevant to these young people in getting access to sensitive health information (e.g. sexual activities). Variations in access quality also impacted participation in mutual support, fostering social networks and getting specific health questions answered. These results serve as a warning about using Internet penetration statistics alone as a measure of access. Concerted attention is needed on improving the quality of Internet access for achieving the potential of e-health. This is imperative for addressing the digital divide affecting populations both within countries and globally between countries. PMID:12850112

  13. [Excessive Internet use and Internet addiction: emerging public health issues.].

    PubMed

    Coniglio, Maria Anna; Muni, Viviana; Giammanco, Giuseppe; Pignato, Sarina

    2007-01-01

    A survey was performed among students of various faculties at the University of Catania (Italy) to examine the health effects of excessive Internet use and behaviour patterns of Internet dependency. Three hundred students were recruited through a non probabilistic quota sampling method and were asked to complete a questionnaire aimed at identifying attitudes and behaviours regarding Internet use, and the psychological and physical consequences of excessive use of the Internet. The most relevant findings that emerged from student responses regard: emotional dependency on the Internet (5% of students believe that Internet facilitates social relationships, 4% experiences euphoric feelings or excitement while on-line, 1% consider the Internet as a way of escaping from real life), the excessive amount of time spent on-line (8%) and the inability to end an on-line session(8%), lying to family members to conceal the nature of involvement with the Internet (3%), giving up sports (2%) or meals (1%), the negative impact on school grades (3%), lack of sleep (4%), and physical health problems such as backache (2%), arm or wrist pain (2%), vision disturbances (6%). PMID:18216888

  14. Internet Insights: How Academics Are Using the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bane, Adele F.; Milheim, William D.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the Internet, highlighting its academic roots, and describes a survey conducted to determine how and why academics use the Internet. Information gathered, presented in seven tables, shows frequency of use; types of resources accessed; levels of computer experience; use of nagivational aids; and reaction to the survey.…

  15. Astronomy. Internet site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimenko, Anatoly Vasilievich

    The Internet site covers a wide area of actual astronomical topics, including 1) Astronomical News 2) Didactics of Astronomy 3) Space Research (Cosmonautics) 4) That's interesting 5) A Handbook of an astronomer 6) The Solar system 7) A Photogalery 8) Works of Schoolars 9) History of Astronomy The most important of them is the section concerning Space Research (Cosmonautics). This section covers a wide range of topics, beginning with very complete Illustrated History of Soviet Space research , the building of Soviet Rockets, a complete list of Cosmonauts with biographies, a list of all the flies. The author of the site concerns much ineterest to recent and extraordinary astronomiucal phenomena, such as Hazardous asteroids, Comets, Solar and Moon Eclipses, Meteorites, as well as to correct from the scientifical point of view interpretation of the extraordinary astronomical phenomena. The section concerning the Solar system is richly illustrated and give detailed explanations to Solar System evolution and actual state, explains many phenomena in the Solar system. THe Internet site is designed for schoolars as well as to amateur and professional astronomers.

  16. Accessing the Internet Via Satellite.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Lisa M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the use of satellite technology as an option for public schools to access the Internet. Examines costs and available technology. Presents two examples of school-satellite usage, including its use by the Navajo Nation to provide Internet access for its students who are spread out across 26,000 square miles. (GR)

  17. Parent's Guide to the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Paulette

    This booklet provides parents with basic information about how to use the computer to find information and communicate with others. It describes what is needed to get started on the Internet and points to some of the many resources available online for parents and children. The book discusses: a brief definition of the Internet, including what the…

  18. Internet use among Turkish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tahiroglu, Aysegul Yolga; Celik, Gonca G; Uzel, Mehtap; Ozcan, Neslihan; Avci, Ayse

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate Internet use habits and problematic Internet use (PIU) in Turkish adolescents. Participants were 3,975 undergraduate students, 7.6% of whom used the Internet for more than 12 hours weekly. The Online Cognition Scale (OCS) was used. The most common purpose for using the Internet was playing games, followed by general information search. Female users mostly preferred searching for general information; male users preferred playing games (p < 0.001, gamma = 995.205). The most preferred type of game was violent games. While preference for strategy and fantasy role-play (FRP) games increased with age, preference for other games decreased (p < 0.0001, gamma = 283.767). Participants who used the Internet mostly for general information searches and school-related searches had lower OCS scores (p < 0.0001). The highest OCS scores were related to violent games, followed by FRP, strategy, and sports and motor racing games. Computers and the Internet are useful, important inventions, but like other inventions, if used improperly, they may be harmful. Risk of harm raises concerns about who should use the Internet and computers, and where, when, and why the Internet and computers should be used. PMID:18785800

  19. Extending the Internet 2 Domain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 community, formed from partnerships involving universities, businesses, and the government, focuses on the K-20 Initiative that extends Internet 2 developments to other nonmember environments, including elementary and secondary schools, community colleges, universities, libraries, and museums. Discusses networking and…

  20. Human Resources and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Suzanne; Joseph, Deborah

    Concerned about falling behind the technology curve, organizations are using the Internet or intranets to provide and communicate information to their employees and create more efficient workplaces. The Internet is not just a "network of computer networks," but a medium conveying a vast, diverse amount of information. This publication is an…

  1. Ethical Considerations for Internet Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attridge, William C.

    With the advent of new technologies, the possibility for providing quality, Internet-based, therapeutic counseling services becomes more attainable and realistic every year. Since the National Board for Certified Counselors announced the adoption of voluntary standards for the practice of Internet-based counseling, a new dimension has been added…

  2. Perceptions of Internet Information Credibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Miriam J.; Flanagin, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    Seeks to assess people's perceptions of the credibility of various categories of Internet information. Finds that respondents considered Internet information to be as credible as that obtained from television, radio, and magazines, but not as credible as newspaper information. Explores the social relevance of the findings and discusses them in…

  3. The ARPANET and DARPA Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Dennis G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the development and growth of the ARPANET, a wide-area packet switching network initiated by the U.S. Department of Defense in 1969. Evolution of the ARPANET into the DARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency) Internet in the 1970s and current uses of the internet are discussed. (16 references) (MES)

  4. Rocket Science for the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Rainfinity, a company resulting from the commercialization of Reliable Array of Independent Nodes (RAIN), produces the product, Rainwall. Rainwall runs a cluster of computer workstations, creating a distributed Internet gateway. When Rainwall detects a failure in software or hardware, traffic is shifted to a healthy gateway without interruptions to Internet service. It more evenly distributes workload across servers, providing less down time.

  5. Teacher's Guide to the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaylock, Jenny L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is designed for teachers of students in grades Pre-K through 12 and will introduce them to the numerous curriculum resources on the Internet. More often today supplements to course curriculum can be found on any text book company web site. Even more important is the amount of curriculum resources available for free on the Internet.…

  6. Internet Adoption: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Junzhao

    2011-01-01

    The Internet has brought significant changes to the retail industry because it revolutionizes how information is transmitted and accessed. The main objective of this research is to enhance our understanding of people's adoption of the Internet and its implications for retail competition. This dissertation consists of two essays. The first essay…

  7. Internet Information: The Whole Truth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Susan; Tranter, Joanne

    2000-01-01

    Discusses information literacy skills as a way to handle information overload. Explores the critical Internet viewing of 1,693 students in grades 7-9 who responded to a survey. Discusses the results on students' beliefs about information accuracy, their information evaluation strategies, and the importance of Internet information validity.…

  8. The Internet in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meloni, Christine

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the many reasons to use the Internet in English-as-a-Second-Language classrooms, including increased student motivation, authentic language use, global awareness, and environmental friendliness (decreased use of paper). Examines two popular features of the Internet (electronic mail and the World Wide Web), presenting projects that can…

  9. Can the Internet Be Saved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischman, Josh

    2007-01-01

    The Internet has great difficulty coping with the sharp increase in mobile devices like cellphones and laptops, and handling bandwidth-hungry traffic such as video, now demanded by an increasing number of users. According to Ellen W. Zegura, chairwoman of computer sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Internet is like a big…

  10. Internet Skill Rubrics for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the need for formal training in Internet use for K-12 educators and presents rubrics to help staff-development designers measure the following competencies: Internet basics; e-mail/electronic mailing lists; World Wide Web; search tools; newsgroups, gophers, telnet; obtaining, decompressing, using files; real-time/push technologies;…

  11. Internet Staff Development: A Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1998-01-01

    Provides a synopsis of classes developed by the Winona (Minnesota) Middle School media center to provide staff with current Internet skills. Includes navigation techniques using browsers; e-mail; search engines; selecting and evaluating Web sites; Internet ethics and Netiquette; critical evaluation of Web sources; graphics; interactive video…

  12. Keeping Up with the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dealy, Jacqueline

    1994-01-01

    Offers instructions and resources for Internet novices wanting to access Internet services. Instructions are offered for connecting to 13 education listservs, 9 electronic journals and newsletters, 3 education databases, 7 Telnet gopher sites, Veronica and Archie search tools, and File Transfer Protocol (FTP). (Contains 16 references.) (SLW)

  13. The Internet: Trends and Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Byron

    1996-01-01

    Examines current trends and directions in information technology and telecommunications. Discusses legislation; mergers and acquisitions; Internet service providers; fiscal control in libraries and the pooling of electronic information access through consortiums; demand for more bandwidth; technology selection; Internet usage patterns; the…

  14. Radiology uses of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Krug, H; Cheng, D

    1995-01-01

    The Internet promises to be an essential resource for radiology administrators. In addition to offering remarkable access to colleagues all over the world, the Internet offers specialized information resources for radiology, many of which are described in this article. The Internet is many networks that communicate with each other and whose general purpose is to share information. Although there are several consortium organizations that support and regulate it, no single body or organization "owns" the Internet. Many employees and students at large teaching centers already have access to the Internet through their institution's connection. Individuals and small institutions can contract with independent service providers for Internet access. Internet functions covered in this article include: e-mail, listservs, newsgroups, file transfer protocols, Gopher, and the World Wide Web. The rapid pace of information exchange is making the world of radiology smaller and more intimate. Communication and knowledge are becoming so accessible that individuals are privy to the most minute happenings in the industry. Sharing information on the Internet will benefit not only individual users and the industry, but also patients. PMID:10161227

  15. 77 FR 74661 - Open Internet Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Open Internet Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice... Internet at http://www.fcc.gov/events/open-internet-advisory-committee . Federal Communications...

  16. 78 FR 16852 - Open Internet Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... COMMISSION Open Internet Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission announces the next meeting date, time, and agenda of the Open Internet Advisory... Open Internet rules, and to provide any recommendations it deems appropriate to the...

  17. The complexity of internet sexuality.

    PubMed

    Daneback, Kristian; Ross, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown men and women of all ages and sexual orientations to use the Internet for sexual purposes. For example, the Internet is used to access pornography, to find sex-related information, to purchase sexual merchandise, and to find partners for romance and sex. The specific characteristics of the medium have made it attractive for engaging in sexual behaviors that are regulated by societal and cultural norms offline. Thus, the Internet has made it easier to explore and express one's sexuality at less risk of negative personal sanctions. In this regard, the technological innovation has meant a sexual revolution, particularly for disenfranchised groups. While generally being perceived as positive, concerns have been raised about potential risks associated with the Internet. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the reader with an empirical and theoretical overview of the first 15 years of research in the field of Internet sexuality. PMID:22005208

  18. The Internet in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoso, Suely; Maldonado, Alberto Efendy

    This article addresses the diverse patterns of internet access, uses and appropriations by different populations in Latin America. The correlation between nequalities in access and economic disparities is not sufficient to define or explain the region's complexity. In an attempt to avoid economic and technological determinism while simultaneously visualizing the general picture of the internet in Latin America without disregarding its finer grain idiosyncrasies, the text is organized in three sections. First, a brief overall picture of the global position of Latin America with respect to the internet. Second, a discussion of three profiles of internet penetration and appropriation vis a vis similar local socioeconomic conditions. Third, qualitatively significant examples of the forms of use and appropriation of the internet in Latin America.

  19. Ethical issues involving the internet

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, T.J.; Kallman, E.A.; Lelewer, D.

    1994-12-31

    During the 90`s, the {open_quotes}Information Superhighway{close_quotes} has received widespread publicity. Many campuses have participated in this drive to an information based society by becoming participating nodes on the Internet. As an information provider, the Internet has the potential to change the college experience in many ways, both good and bad. It also poses a number of problems for college students in areas such as privacy, access, and honesty. It provides professors with a dynamic information storage and retrieval tool that offers the opportunity to modernize both curriculum experiences and pedagogical approaches. On some campuses, Internet access and capability has become so important that course modules and whole courses are being built. The panelists will each discuss a different issue involved with making the Internet more integral to the collegiate environment. The first panelist will consider risks and threats that an institution of higher learning must consider as it approaches Internet use will be presented. The steps an institution took to build policies and deal with {open_quotes}inevitable incidents{close_quotes} that will occur as the Internet is opened to full use by both students and faculty. The second panelist will present four computer ethics Each module uses the abundance and dynamism of Internet information to provide challenging {open_quotes}Ethics in the Computer Workplace{close_quotes} experiences that could not easily be done by traditional means. The third panelist will discuss a course module that explores both the positive and negative potential of the Internet. The costs and ease of Internet access, as well as normally available Internet tools, are also presented. This module has been used in a course called {open_quotes}Ethical and Social Issues in Computer Science{close_quotes} and will be used in a general-education course to be offered beginning in 1994-95.

  20. Internet's impact on publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Giordano B.

    1997-04-01

    In 1990, the first monochrome print-on-demand (POD) systems wee successfully brought to market. Subsequent color versions have been less successful, in my view mostly because they require a different workflow than traditional systems and the highly skilled specialists have not been trained. This hypothesis is based on the observation that direct-to-plate systems for short run printing, which do not require a new workflow, are quite successful in the market place. The internet and the World Wide Web are the enabling technologies that are fostering a new print model that is very likely to replace color POD before the latter can establish itself. In this model the consumers locate the material they desire from a contents provider, pay through a digital cash clearinghouse, and print the material at their own cost on their local printer. All the basic technologies for this model are in place; the main challenge is to make the workflow sufficiently robust for individual use.

  1. DXplain on the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, G. O.; Famiglietti, K. T.; Kim, R. J.; Hoffer, E. P.; Feldman, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    DXplain, a computer-based medical education, reference and decision support system has been used by thousands of physicians and medical students on stand-alone systems and over communications networks. For the past two years, we have made DXplain available over the Internet in order to provide DXplain's knowledge and analytical capabilities as a resource to other applications within Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and at outside institutions. We describe and provide the user experience with two different protocols through which users can access DXplain through the World Wide Web (WWW). The first allows the user to have direct interaction with all the functionality of DXplain where the MGH server controls the interaction and the mode of presentation. In the second mode, the MGH server provides the DXplain functionality as a series of services, which can be called independently by the user application program. PMID:9929291

  2. Internet marketing 101.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan J

    2010-11-01

    In an era when social media sites like YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter dominate the popular press, many surgeons overlook the foundational tactics and strategies necessary for long-term practice development and lead generation on the Internet. This article analyzes common errors made by surgeons during the development and implementation of Web site projects, focusing on the areas of strategy development; domain name identification; site plan creation; design considerations; content development; vendor selection; and launch, promotion, and staff training. The article emphasizes that, because the Web site remains the foundation of a surgeon's branding message, minimizing errors during development and construction is critical, particularly in highly competitive or saturated markets, for today's facial plastic surgery practice. PMID:20974391

  3. The internet worm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    In November 1988 a worm program invaded several thousand UNIX-operated Sun workstations and VAX computers attached to the Research Internet, seriously disrupting service for several days but damaging no files. An analysis of the work's decompiled code revealed a battery of attacks by a knowledgeable insider, and demonstrated a number of security weaknesses. The attack occurred in an open network, and little can be inferred about the vulnerabilities of closed networks used for critical operations. The attack showed that passwork protection procedures need review and strengthening. It showed that sets of mutually trusting computers need to be carefully controlled. Sharp public reaction crystalized into a demand for user awareness and accountability in a networked world.

  4. The Los Alamos accelerator code group

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Billen, J.H.; Ryne, R.D.; Takeda, Harunori; Young, L.M.

    1995-05-01

    The Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group (LAACG) is a national resource for members of the accelerator community who use and/or develop software for the design and analysis of particle accelerators, beam transport systems, light sources, storage rings, and components of these systems. Below the authors describe the LAACG`s activities in high performance computing, maintenance and enhancement of POISSON/SUPERFISH and related codes and the dissemination of information on the INTERNET.

  5. Internet resources for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Anthes, D. L.; Berry, R. E.; Lanning, A.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: The internet has experienced tremendous growth over the past few years and has many resources in the field of family medicine. However, many family physicians remain unaware of how the Internet can be used to enhance their practice and of how to gain access to this powerful tool. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To characterize components of the Internet, to explore how family physicians can use the Internet to enhance practice, and to increase awareness of how to gain access to Internet sites relevant to family medicine. MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM: An on-line search through the World Wide Web was conducted using multiple search engines including Lycos, WebCrawler, OpenText, and Yahoo as well as a conventional MEDLINE search of Internet publications for the past 5 years. A website containing an evolving selection of resources can be found at http:@dfcm 18.med.utoronto.ca/anthes/hpgdfcm1.htm. CONCLUSION: The Internet has useful applications and resources for family physicians including rapid communication between physicians, access to medical literature, continuing medical education programs, and lists of patient support and discussion groups. PMID:9189299

  6. Internet gaming addiction: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Daria J

    2013-01-01

    In the 2000s, online games became popular, while studies of Internet gaming addiction emerged, outlining the negative consequences of excessive gaming, its prevalence, and associated risk factors. The establishment of specialized treatment centers in South-East Asia, the US, and Europe reflects the growing need for professional help. It is argued that only by understanding the appeal of Internet gaming, its context, and neurobiologic correlates can the phenomenon of Internet gaming addiction be understood comprehensively. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into current perspectives on Internet gaming addiction using a holistic approach, taking into consideration the mass appeal of online games, the context of Internet gaming addiction, and associated neuroimaging findings, as well as the current diagnostic framework adopted by the American Psychiatric Association. The cited research indicates that the individual's context is a significant factor that marks the dividing line between excessive gaming and gaming addiction, and the game context can gain particular importance for players, depending on their life situation and gaming preferences. Moreover, the cultural context is significant because it embeds the gamer in a community with shared beliefs and practices, endowing their gaming with particular meaning. The cited neuroimaging studies indicate that Internet gaming addiction shares similarities with other addictions, including substance dependence, at the molecular, neurocircuitry, and behavioral levels. The findings provide support for the current perspective of understanding Internet gaming addiction from a disease framework. The benefits of an Internet gaming addiction diagnosis include reliability across research, destigmatization of individuals, development of efficacious treatments, and the creation of an incentive for public health care and insurance providers. The holistic approach adopted here not only highlights empirical research that

  7. Internet gaming addiction: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kuss, Daria J

    2013-01-01

    In the 2000s, online games became popular, while studies of Internet gaming addiction emerged, outlining the negative consequences of excessive gaming, its prevalence, and associated risk factors. The establishment of specialized treatment centers in South-East Asia, the US, and Europe reflects the growing need for professional help. It is argued that only by understanding the appeal of Internet gaming, its context, and neurobiologic correlates can the phenomenon of Internet gaming addiction be understood comprehensively. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into current perspectives on Internet gaming addiction using a holistic approach, taking into consideration the mass appeal of online games, the context of Internet gaming addiction, and associated neuroimaging findings, as well as the current diagnostic framework adopted by the American Psychiatric Association. The cited research indicates that the individual’s context is a significant factor that marks the dividing line between excessive gaming and gaming addiction, and the game context can gain particular importance for players, depending on their life situation and gaming preferences. Moreover, the cultural context is significant because it embeds the gamer in a community with shared beliefs and practices, endowing their gaming with particular meaning. The cited neuroimaging studies indicate that Internet gaming addiction shares similarities with other addictions, including substance dependence, at the molecular, neurocircuitry, and behavioral levels. The findings provide support for the current perspective of understanding Internet gaming addiction from a disease framework. The benefits of an Internet gaming addiction diagnosis include reliability across research, destigmatization of individuals, development of efficacious treatments, and the creation of an incentive for public health care and insurance providers. The holistic approach adopted here not only highlights empirical research that

  8. Navigating the internet maze.

    PubMed

    Singer, K P; Tan, B K

    2000-08-01

    The 'internet-driven information age' is a term in common usage, implying that everyone can access all the information they need, when they need it. The purpose of this brief paper is to outline some web sources that highlight the possibilities and potential for accessing web-based knowledge. From this the clinician will be encouraged to follow leads along the labyrinth of links to a greater appreciation of how this resource can be used to shape their practice. Examples of web links are provided for: search engines; library-based sources, including medical databases and electronic journals; evidence-based practice databases, mail-groups; electronic conferences; research centres; and general health sources. Importantly, this review does not aspire to be all-inclusive, for the web changes, chameleon-like, to the seasons. The web is here to stay. It will provide the framework for much education and will guide clients to a greater appreciation of their disease or disability than ever before. It may ultimately be the tool through which health fund agents will promote best practice, including self-help to clients, and therefore direct discriminating individuals to select health practitioners who have been endorsed by professional and fund agencies as providing a contemporary service which conforms to evidence-based practice. PMID:11034887

  9. Internet experiments: methods, guidelines, metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

    2009-02-01

    The Internet experiment is now a well-established and widely used method. The present paper describes guidelines for the proper conduct of Internet experiments, e.g. handling of dropout, unobtrusive naming of materials, and pre-testing. Several methods are presented that further increase the quality of Internet experiments and help to avoid frequent errors. These methods include the "seriousness check", "warm-up," "high hurdle," and "multiple site entry" techniques, control of multiple submissions, and control of motivational confounding. Finally, metadata from sites like WEXTOR (http://wextor.org) and the web experiment list (http://genpsylab-wexlist.uzh.ch/) are reported that show the current state of Internet-based research in terms of the distribution of fields, topics, and research designs used.

  10. Class Projects on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Danny

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the use of the Internet in the classroom. Presents a project on renewable energy sources in which students produce web pages. Provides the web page address of the project completed by students. (ASK)

  11. Drugs, the Internet and change.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the symbiotic relationship between drugs and the Internet, focusing (though not exclusively) on psychedelics. Programming on psychedelics in Silicon Valley from the 1960s to date is detailed, as are the twinned conceptualizations of drugs as a technology and technology as a drug. The correlation between drugs, the Internet, and consumerism is explored: the Internet is a medium through which "white," "grey" and "black" drug markets flourish. Thus, this article details the burgeoning online trades in pharmaceuticals, recreational, and "life-style" drugs that turn the Internet into a veritable candy store. Drug forums transmogrify into street corners, threatening the continued existence of the current system of global prohibition. However, it is arguably the use of the Web as an information source that may offer the greatest challenge to the incumbent paradigm, with experiential discourses offering alternatives to the hegemonic narrative, as the relationships between drugs, those who sell drugs and drug takers are reconfigured online. PMID:21615008

  12. An Overview of Internet biosurveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, David M.; Nelson, Noele P.; Arthur, Ray; Barboza, P.; Collier, Nigel; Lightfoot, Nigel; Linge, J. P.; van der Goot, E.; Mawudeku, A.; Madoff, Lawrence; Vaillant, L.; Walters, Ronald A.; Yangarber, Roman; Mantero, Jas; Corley, Courtney D.; Brownstein, John S.

    2013-06-21

    Internet biosurveillance utilizes unstructured data from diverse Web-based sources to provide early warning and situational awareness of public health threats. The scope of source coverage ranges from local based media in the vernacular to international media in widely read languages. Internet biosurveillance is a timely modality available to government and public health officials, health care workers, and the public and private sector, serving as a real-time complementary approach to traditional indicator-based public health disease surveillance methods. Internet biosurveillance also supports the broader activity of epidemic intelligence. This review covers the current state of the field of Internet biosurveillance and provides a perspective on the future of the field.

  13. Security Issues on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Ilan, Judit

    1996-01-01

    Discusses some basic notions of modern cryptography: public key systems and digital signatures. Describes how theoretical modern cryptography can help solve security problems on the Internet. (Author/JKP)

  14. An overview of internet biosurveillance.

    PubMed

    Hartley, D M; Nelson, N P; Arthur, R R; Barboza, P; Collier, N; Lightfoot, N; Linge, J P; van der Goot, E; Mawudeku, A; Madoff, L C; Vaillant, L; Walters, R; Yangarber, R; Mantero, J; Corley, C D; Brownstein, J S

    2013-11-01

    Internet biosurveillance utilizes unstructured data from diverse web-based sources to provide early warning and situational awareness of public health threats. The scope of source coverage ranges from local media in the vernacular to international media in widely read languages. Internet biosurveillance is a timely modality that is available to government and public health officials, healthcare workers, and the public and private sector, serving as a real-time complementary approach to traditional indicator-based public health disease surveillance methods. Internet biosurveillance also supports the broader activity of epidemic intelligence. This overview covers the current state of the field of Internet biosurveillance, and provides a perspective on the future of the field. PMID:23789639

  15. Internet Use for Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... household incomes of 400 percent or more of poverty had used the Internet for health information in ... one-third of those with incomes below the poverty level (66.3 versus 29.2 percent, respectively). ...

  16. International Collaboration on Internet Subject Gateways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Place, Emma

    A number of libraries in Europe are involved in the development of Internet subject gateways--services that aim to help users find high quality resources on the Internet. Subject gateways such as SOSIG (Social Science Information Gateway) have been available on the Internet for some years now, and they offer an alternative to Internet search…

  17. Internet Access in School Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Examines Internet resources available for elementary school children and discusses why Internet access should be provided through school library media centers. Highlights include appropriate Web sites, a case study, equity of access, censorship, integrating Internet resources into the curriculum, Internet usage guidelines, and identification and…

  18. Mental Health Counselors and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Jeffrey T.; Kirk, Margaret Ann

    1999-01-01

    Presents a brief history and discussion of the Internet. Discusses current and potential uses of the Internet among mental health counselors and ways in which the Internet can be understood from a postmodern perspective. Presents Internet use among the general population as a reason for counselors to gain an understanding of the medium.…

  19. Innovativeness and Variety of Internet Shopping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Brian F.; Neuendorf, Kimberly A.; Valdiserri, Colin M.

    2003-01-01

    This survey of 208 Internet users examined the factors underlying Internet usage and shopping. Data were gathered on Information shopping (IS) innovativeness, overall IS frequency, visit variety, purchase variety, network prevalence, education, age, gender, employment, extensiveness of Internet use, and non-shopping Internet applications. (MES)

  20. The Internet as a Telephone Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMillo, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Some Internet technologists predict that Internet telephony will topple the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) and become the next telephone network. This article examines Internet telephony (real-time and non-real-time communications); its potential for integrating wireline, wireless, and Internet network services; and factors determining…

  1. Will the Real Internet Please Stand Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Priscilla

    1997-01-01

    Discusses problems with the current Internet and describes new Internet developments. Topics include Internet2, which is being developed for innovative high performance computing applications for member universities and corporate affiliates; the Next Generation Internet (NGI); the role of the NSF (National Science Foundation); and quality of…

  2. Engineering & Technical Resources on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarzwalder, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Offers pointers on finding resources on the Internet that may be useful to engineers and scientists. Suggests steps that beginners can take to become acquainted with the Internet and defines common Internet terms. Presents a list of engineering Internet resources that include listservs, USENET groups, gophers, and World Wide Web sites. (Author/JMV)

  3. Internet tools for gastroenterology nurses and associates.

    PubMed

    Chappell, S M

    1999-01-01

    The Internet is a worldwide network of computers with powerful communication capabilities. Electronic mail, World Wide Web, search engines, Usenet, listservs, and databases are tools to send, receive, and search for information via the Internet. This article defines common Internet terminology and describes the basic Internet tools that can enhance the practice of gastroenterology nurses and associates. PMID:10776110

  4. Job Search Methods: Internet versus Traditional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Peter; Skuterud, Mikal

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, 15 percent of unemployed job seekers used the Internet to seek jobs, as did half of all job seekers with online access from home. Internet search rates exceeded those of traditional methods, but Internet job seekers were more likely to use traditional methods as well. Unemployed blacks and Hispanics used the Internet least in job…

  5. Application of the Internet of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaming; Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-12-01

    The Internet of Things is not yet very widespread, many people have little information about Internet of things. But, for magical properties of the Internet of things , its appearance immediately aroused people's great interest. This paper, aiming application of the Internet of Things , use AHP to analyze and look forward to prospects of IOT in many fields.

  6. The Internet: A California Policy Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbach, Kenneth W.

    This paper reviews the background and key terminology of the Internet, its current scope and use, and a selection of public policy issues. "Chapter 1: What Is the Internet?" includes an overview; capsule history; explanation of how the Internet works; basic terminology; and the kinds of information available on the Internet. "Chapter 2: Commerce…

  7. Libraries and the Internet. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Mary

    The Internet is an international computer network encompassing thousands of smaller interconnected networks. This digest describes various uses of the Internet and its impact on libraries, as well as Internet-related library issues. The Internet applications of electronic mail (E-mail), telnet, and file transfer protocol (FTP) are briefly…

  8. Internet.edu: A Sourcebook for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raese, Robert

    This book provides a working knowledge of the Internet to assist teachers in implementing Internet resources in the K-12 curriculum. Part 1 - The Basics includes chapters 1-3. The first chapter deals with the information glut on the Internet and the time management problems this poses and presents a conceptual image of the Internet. Chapter 2…

  9. Substance abuse precedes Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sik; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Sun Mi; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate possible overlapping substance abuse and internet addiction in a large, uniformly sampled population, ranging in age from 13 to 18 years. Participants (N=73,238) in the current study were drawn from the 6th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-V) for students from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools in 16 cities within South Korea. Of adolescent internet users, 85.2% were general users (GU), 11.9% were users with potential risk for internet addiction (PR), and 3.0% were users with high risk for internet addiction (HR). There was a difference in the number of students with alcohol drinking among the GU, PR, and HR groups (20.8% vs 23.1% vs 27.4%). There was a difference in the number of students who smoked among the GS, PR, and HR groups (11.7% vs 13.5% vs 20.4%). There was a difference in the number of students with drug use among the GU, PR, and HR groups (1.7% vs 2.0% vs 6.5%). After adjusting for sex, age, stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation, smoking may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=1.203, p=0.004). In addition, drug use may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=2.591, p<0.001). Because students with a high risk for internet addiction have vulnerability for addictive behaviors, co-morbid substance abuse should be evaluated and, if found, treated in adolescents with internet addiction. PMID:23384457

  10. [Patients, doctors and the internet].

    PubMed

    Jeannot, Jean Gabriel; Bischoff, Thomas

    2015-05-13

    The majority of the Swiss population uses the internet to seek information about health. The objective is to be better informed, before or after the consultation. Doctors can advise their information-seeking patients about high quality websites, be it medical portals or websites dedicated to a specific pathology. Doctors should not see the internet as a threat but rather as an opportunity to strengthen the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:26118229

  11. Using Gopher on the Internet

    SciTech Connect

    Davidoff, G.

    1994-04-01

    This report is a complication of vugraphs with respect to the use of Gopher on Internet. There are viewgraphs on using Gopher at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Examples of other Internet Gopher servers around the world are given. Also discussed is the Library of Congress Gopher and JUGHEAD which is an acronym for Jonzy`s Universal Gopher Hierarchy Excavation And Display.

  12. Technology in the Internet Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Dennis D.

    2001-01-01

    In the PC Era, Microcomputer (μC) and memory were the components that drove growth of the PC industry. In the Internet Era, Digital Signal Processing (DSP) and Analog will be the components that drive growth in Internet Products. Over the next 10 years, technology will continue to follow Moore's Law of scaling, and in addition System-on-a-Chip (SOC) integration will drive technology.

  13. Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stühmer, Roland; Dörflinger, Jörg; Rahmani, Tirdad; Thomas, Susan; Stojanovic, Ljiljana

    Rich Internet Applications significantly raise the user experience compared with legacy page-based Web applications because of their highly responsive user interfaces. Although this is a tremendous advance, it does not solve the problem of the one-size-fits-all approach1 of current Web applications. So although Rich Internet Applications put the user in a position to interact seamlessly with the Web application, they do not adapt to the context in which the user is currently working. In this paper we address the on-the-fly personalization of Rich Internet Applications. We introduce the concept of ARRIAs: Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications and elaborate on how they are able to adapt to the current working context the user is engaged in. An architecture for the ad hoc adaptation of Rich Internet Applications is presented as well as a holistic framework and tools for the realization of our on-the-fly personalization approach. We divided both the architecture and the framework into two levels: offline/design-time and online/run-time. For design-time we explain how to use ontologies in order to annotate Rich Internet Applications and how to use these annotations for conceptual Web usage mining. Furthermore, we describe how to create client-side executable rules from the semantic data mining results. We present our declarative lightweight rule language tailored to the needs of being executed directly on the client. Because of the event-driven nature of the user interfaces of Rich Internet Applications, we designed a lightweight rule language based on the event-condition-action paradigm.2 At run-time the interactions of a user are tracked directly on the client and in real-time a user model is built up. The user model then acts as input to and is evaluated by our client-side complex event processing and rule engine.

  14. Dermatology resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    George, Dean D; Wainwright, Brent D

    2012-09-01

    Both patients and medical professionals are increasingly accessing the Internet for health information. Today's Web enables features that facilitate information sharing in a social and collaborative manner, thus transforming the way we access data and communicate with our patients and colleagues. The visual nature of the field of dermatology lends itself to the use of the Internet for reference and educational purposes. To generate a list of Web sites commonly used by academic dermatologists, the authors polled the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Dermatology Program Directors for their top 3 Web resources. The purpose of this article is to identify resources used by dermatologists as well as patients and examine factors that can influence Internet search results. Concerns regarding professionalism in the era of social media are also explored. As the volume of health information on the Internet continues to increase, it is essential for physicians to be aware of what is available in cyberspace. Reference and learning tools for the physician, learning and support tools for the patient, and physician Internet presence are key aspects of modern dermatology practice. PMID:22929356

  15. [INTERNET AIDS FOR THE GASTROENTEROLOGIST

    PubMed

    Curioso, W H; Curioso, W I

    2000-01-01

    The medical Internet is growing in paralell with the online information explotion. The aim of this study is to identify the online resources available to gastroenterologists, both in English and Spanish on the Internet.We searched the internet using the following resources: general and medical search engines, biomedical databases, books and listservs.We included for analisis the websites that fulfilled the following criteria: content, autorship, attribution, currency and disclosure.We identified 46 websites in Spanish and 104 in English that met the inclussion criteria. We further categorized these sites into six categories: digestive diseases search resources, professionals organizations, academic department sites, sites with focused areas of interest to gastroenterologists, on line journals and discussion groups (listservs).A variety of very useful web sites related to digestive diseases exist on the Internet, and their numbers are growing. Many of these sites have valuable information that can be used to improve patient care, promote medical education, and facilitate research. The Internet represents a useful source of information of increasing utility for daily gastroenterologic practice. PMID:12138388

  16. The physician and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Wang, K K; Wong Kee Song, L M

    1997-01-01

    The Internet is one of the greatest developments in informational exchange during the past century. It allows almost anyone to access information available throughout the world. Nonetheless, the Internet is often misunderstood by physicians. It can be considered a super computer network that allows users to transfer a wide variety of information at a low cost. The information can be transferred through functions such as electronic mail, file transfer protocols, the Usenet, or the most widely recognized World Wide Web. Electronic mail functions like the usual postal service but is carried through the Internet, and delivery is usually within the hour. It can serve as a method of communication between physicians and patients. File transfer protocols function as a method for transferring large amounts of information such as software through the Internet. The Usenet acts like an international bulletin board service, allowing users anywhere to post messages and to respond to messages from other users. Several patient support groups have Usenet sites for exchanging specific disease information. The World Wide Web has received the greatest attention because most of the information on the Internet is text, sound, or pictures. Numerous medical organizations have established Web sites. This article attempts to describe each of these functions and the benefits to physicians. PMID:9005289

  17. Corporate Internet policy and procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beseke, Kermit

    1996-01-01

    Every corporation is rushing to get hooked up to the Internet. Several years ago this trend started slowly with the technical folks and today forward thinking marketing types want a corporate Internet connection to push their wares on the World Wide Web. What has changed? 40,000,000 people is what's changed: the whole world, spanning 100+ countries and nation-states, is hooked together by the Internet. This Net is growing like crazy and whatever you say about it is probably already obsolete. The Net is a collection of networks where no one is in charge, no formal concrete legal or law enforcement mechanisms exist and there is little or no recourse against system abuse.

  18. Internet resources for the anaesthesiologist

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Edward

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable useful information about anaesthesia available on the World Wide Web. However, at present, it is very incomplete and scattered around many sites. Many anaesthetists find it difficult to get the right information they need because of the sheer volume of information available on the internet. This article starts with the basics of the Internet, how to utilize the search engine at the maximum and presents a comprehensive list of important websites. These important websites, which are felt to offer high educational value for the anaesthesiologists, have been selected from an extensive search on the Internet. Top-rated anaesthesia websites, web blogs, forums, societies, e-books, e-journals and educational resources are elaborately discussed with relevant URLs. PMID:22923818

  19. Technology in the Internet era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Dennis D.

    2001-08-01

    In the PC Era, Microcomputer ((mu) C) and memory were the components that drove growth of the PC industry. In the Internet Era, Digital Signal Processor (DSP) and Analog will be the components that drive growth in Internet Products. Over the next 10 years, technology will continue to follow Moore's Law of scaling, and in addition, System-on-a-Chip (SOC) integration will drive technology. Of the many challenges to continued scaling, lithography will continue to rank near the top throughout most of this decade. However, toward the end of the decade, other limitations will retard scaling. Continued system cost reduction will result from expanded SOC integration, consistent with the needs of the Internet.

  20. Resource Discovery on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adorf, H.-M.

    The prime sources for astronomical information resources on the Internet are the AstroWeb and the Star ∗s databases. For topics not covered by these databases, the Internet hosts a bewildering variety of resource discovery services including AliWeb, Harvest, InfoSeek, Lycos, WebCrawler, and the WWW Worm. These and other discovery tools are reviewed. They can be used to locate e.g. on-line library services, books and CD-ROMs, software, and people's e-mail addresses.

  1. Zebrafish resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen A

    2012-01-01

    The use of the zebrafish, Danio (Brachydanio) rerio in research laboratories, teaching curricula, and home aquariums has exploded over the past two decades. They have been used to study embryology, developmental and reproductive biology, behavior, neurobiology, immunology, toxicology, oncology, teratology, stem cell and regenerative biology, and a wide range of human diseases and disorders. This has been paralleled by a corresponding increase in the amount of information and literature about this species on the Internet. This overview of Internet resources is intended to aid both beginning and experienced individuals in the search for such information. PMID:23382352

  2. Why internet-based education?

    PubMed

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    This essay illustrates five ways that Internet-based higher education can capitalize on fundamental principles of learning. Internet-based education can enable better mastery through distributed (shorter, more frequent) practice rather than massed (longer, less frequent) practice; it can optimize performance because it allows students to learn at their peak time of their day; it can deepen memory because it requires cheat-proof assignments and tests; it can promote critical thinking because it necessitates intellectual winnowing and sifting; and it can enhance writing skills by requiring students to write frequently and for a broad audience. PMID:25653625

  3. Why internet-based education?

    PubMed Central

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2015-01-01

    This essay illustrates five ways that Internet-based higher education can capitalize on fundamental principles of learning. Internet-based education can enable better mastery through distributed (shorter, more frequent) practice rather than massed (longer, less frequent) practice; it can optimize performance because it allows students to learn at their peak time of their day; it can deepen memory because it requires cheat-proof assignments and tests; it can promote critical thinking because it necessitates intellectual winnowing and sifting; and it can enhance writing skills by requiring students to write frequently and for a broad audience. PMID:25653625

  4. The Internet Navigator: An Online Internet Course for Distance Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Carol

    2001-01-01

    Describes the history and recent developments in the Internet Navigator Online Course that was developed by the Utah Academic Library Consortium (UALC) to teach information literacy competencies for online and distance learning students. Highlights include the UALC as a model for academic library cooperation; and administration and funding.…

  5. Internet gambling in problem gambling college students

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nancy M.; Gonzalez-Ibanez, Angels

    2014-01-01

    Internet gambling is popular in college students and associated with problem gambling behaviors. This study evaluated Internet gambling in 117 students participating in study evaluating brief interventions to reduce gambling; the brief interventions consisted of minimal advice, motivational enhancement therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (1–4 sessions). Compared to their counterparts who did not gamble via the Internet (n = 60), those who reported recent Internet gambling (n = 57) wagered in greater frequencies and amounts and reported missing school more often and more problems with family and anxiety due to gambling. Recent Internet gamblers demonstrated similar reductions in gambling over time and in response to the brief interventions as non-Internet gamblers. These data suggest that Internet gambling is common in problem gambling college students, and students who wager over the Internet can benefit from brief interventions. PMID:24337905

  6. Retailing and Shopping on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    Internet advertising and commercial activity are increasing. This article examines challenges facing the retail industry on the Internet: location; comparison shopping; security, especially financial transactions; customer base and profile; nature of the shopping experience; and legal and marketplace controls. (PEN)

  7. Finding Good Health Information on the Internet

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus Advantage Finding Good Health Information on the Internet Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Millions ... get health information from magazines, TV, or the Internet. Some is reliable and up to date, some ...

  8. Use of the Internet in Survey Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaworth, Rosalee C.

    2001-01-01

    An Internet survey of families dealing with a rare disease received responses that provided data about diagnosis and caregiver concerns. The project demonstrated the usefulness of the Internet for research and its potential for research opportunities for distance learners. (SK)

  9. Academic Freedom and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heins, Marjorie

    1998-01-01

    A 1998 court decision ruled that a recent Virginia law requiring official approval for state employees to put materials with "sexually explicit content" on the Internet was unconstitutional. However, the extent to which the First Amendment will protect academic freedom in cyberspace in this case and for other issues is not clear. (MSE)

  10. HR Positions on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coghill, Carey Cox; Kirk, James J.

    The question of whether the online job market reflects the trends predicted for the job market was examined in a study of a random sample of 690 Internet job postings over a 6-month period. Each listing was categorized by type of position, desired qualifications, salary, and job specifications. Of the human resources (HR) jobs posted, 7.2% were…

  11. Internet Roadside Cafe #6. [Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association Video/Library Video Network, Towson, MD.

    This 30-minute videotape takes an in-depth look at World Wide Web business transactions, potential risks, client privacy and security issues by asking businesses and consumers how they do business on the Internet. Also featured in the program is advice about choosing a secure password, the use of credit cards for Web purchasing and a review of…

  12. Day Tripping to Internet World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorner, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    Describes the 1996 Internet World conference (New York, NY), and lists--alphabetically by company--products and services for professional online searchers offered by the selected top 40 (out of 550) exhibitors. Includes a product matrix chart for finding products that match needed applications. (AEF)

  13. Internet Training Manual for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Ling

    A series of Internet workshops funded through the Research Excellence Fund of the State of Michigan and administered by the Projects for Urban and Regional Affairs at the University of Michigan-Flint was provided to all of the educators in Beecher Community School District, Flint, Michigan. Training consisted of 5 two-hour workshops during the…

  14. Commercial Security on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddy, Carrie

    1996-01-01

    Discusses commercial security on the Internet and explains public key technology as successfully melding the conflicting requirements of openness for practical business applications and isolation and confidentiality for protection of data. Examples of public key value-added products are described, including encryption, digital signature and…

  15. Student Team Projects by Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Paula R.; Tullar, William L.; McKowen, Diana

    2000-01-01

    Presents a project where educators assign a joint class project to students at the University of Northern Carolina at Greensboro, at Indiana University, and at Fachhochschule Rheinland-Pfalz in Worms, Germany. Discusses how team members use the Internet to participate in electronic meetings leading to a group consensus. Encourages readers to…

  16. Emotional Maturity of Internet Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dangwal, Kiran Lata; Srivastava, Shipra

    2016-01-01

    Internet has been emerged as a most powerful tool for communication and exchange of information all over the world. More recently the web 2.0 tools has provoked a revolution and unlocked a new dimension in the field of communication and technology; this ongoing digital revolution has touched and turned almost every sphere of life of its users…

  17. Strategies for Teaching Internet Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Martha H.

    2002-01-01

    Ten strategies for teaching Internet ethics are as follows: establish acceptable use policy; communicate ethical codes; model behaviors and values; encourage discussion of ethical issues; reinforce ethical conduct; monitor student behavior; secure systems and software; discourage surfing without supervision; monitor e-mail and websites; and…

  18. 10 Tips for Internet Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    It is not always easy to find the balance between protecting students from Internet dangers and distractions and reaping its benefits--but it is certainly on every district's tech priority list. Sharnell Jackson, chief e-learning officer for the 415,000-student Chicago Public Schools, and Miguel Guhlin, director of instructional technology…

  19. Internet 2 Health Sciences Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2003-01-01

    The Internet 2 (I2) health sciences initiative (I2HSI) involves the formulation of applications and supporting technologies, and guidelines for their use in the health sciences. Key elements of I2HSI include use of visualization, collaboration, medical informatics, telemedicine, and educational tools that support the health sciences. Specific…

  20. Information Policy and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahin, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The development of an infrastructure of computer networks based on the present Internet is creating a new environment for dissemination of public information, and government information will be an integral force in the expansion of computer networks. These factors will blur the distinction between information dissemination and access to…

  1. Internet Addiction: Stability and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined five indices of stability and change in Internet addiction: structural stability, mean-level stability, differential stability, individual-level stability, and ipsative stability. The study sample was 351 undergraduate students from end of freshman year to end of junior year. Convergent findings revealed stability…

  2. Internet Addiction: A Logotherapeutic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Didelot, Mary J.; Hollingsworth, Lisa; Buckenmeyer, Janet A.

    2012-01-01

    Internet addiction (IA) is both the most rapidly growing addiction and the least understood addiction (Watson, 2005). For counselors, treatment issues surrounding the disease are also growing. At the forefront is the lack of understanding concerning treatment protocol to manage the challenging recovery and maintenance stages after IA behavior has…

  3. Wonderful Wikis and Internet Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Sami

    2009-01-01

    Wikis are collaborative websites where visitors can edit anything they want, anytime they want. Essentially online "whiteboards," wikis allow groups of people to create documents and projects together. Internet forums, also known as message boards or discussion boards, are web applications that provide online discussions. Like wikis, your forum…

  4. Internet Technology To Run Workflows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Uthmann, Christoph; Speck, Mario

    1998-01-01

    Explains and evaluates the conceptual and technical aspects of INTERFYS, an Internet-based system for making the review and revision processes in distributed editorial work more efficient by applying the concepts of workflow management using Web technologies only. Discusses systems architecture, management of editorial workflows, and functions of…

  5. Internet School Library Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Inez L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the development of a Web site called Internet School Library Media Center (ISLMC) that grew out of a library science class. Topics include Web search engines; content selection; the roles of a school library media professional; curriculum support, including lesson plans; technical issues; and future goals. (LRW)

  6. Document Delivery over the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mary E.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses three innovative Internet-based electronic document delivery systems: Ariel, developed by the Research Libraries Group; Digitized Document Transmission Project, developed by North Carolina State University; and Network Fax Project, developed by Ohio State University. System are compared in terms of equipment, operation, advantages and…

  7. Entertainment Resources on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowgill, Allison

    1997-01-01

    Describes 14 Internet sites on popular entertainment subjects that provide information on books and book reviews, celebrities, movies, and restaurants. These were selected because they provide a great deal of authoritative information that is easy to find. A brief summary describes the contents of each site. (Author)

  8. Automated Filtering of Internet Postings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Louis B.; Holland, Maurita P.

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of the use of dynamic data resources, such as Internet LISTSERVs or Usenet newsgroups, focuses on an experiment using an automated filtering system with Usenet newsgroups. Highlights include user satisfaction, based on retrieval size, data sources, and user interface and the need for some human mediation. (Contains two references.) (LRW)

  9. Plagiarism in the Internet Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Rebecca Moore; Davies, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    In an age when students gravitate to online sources for research--and when tremendous amounts of both reputable and questionable information are available online--many have come to regard the Internet itself as a culprit in students' plagiarism. Some teachers go so far as to forbid students from researching online, in the mistaken assumption that…

  10. Mining Mathematics through the Internet!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynes, Kristine

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of the Internet to investigate mathematical problems, create and share information, discover patterns and relationships, and find out more about the world. This unit investigates pet ownership and introduces children to telecommunications, the use of the computer as a tool, and scientific research methods. Other units address…

  11. History Sources on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Kenneth D.

    This paper provides descriptions of key online history resources useful to teachers, librarians, and other education professionals. Highlights include: primary sources on the Internet; archives; Online Public Access Catalogs (OPACs); the American Historical Association (AHA) Web site; state and federal government resources; business history…

  12. Women, Violence and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Pamela M.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores a hypothesis that the Internet and the World Wide Web form an alternative resource to that provided by conventional adult education providers. The example used is the dissemination and transfer of information on and analysis of issues concerning women and violence. Four important issues for adult (that is, post-compulsory)…

  13. Navigating the Internet: A Beginning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, George H., II

    1992-01-01

    Explains how to become more knowledgeable about using resources available on Internet. Four main areas are discussed: (1) print media resources; (2) learning to use a personal computer effectively, including the maintenance of hard disks; (3) electronic mail; and (4) interactive networking. Current and future improvements to make networks more…

  14. Visual Resources on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaber, William E.; Hou, Feng

    With the development of the Internet technology and proliferation of the network application, visual materials have been digitized and archived on many publicly accessible computer servers. However, these visual resources can be beneficial to educators only when they know what they are, what they look like, in what format they are created, and how…

  15. Spectrum Allocation and the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Bruce M.; Rosston, Gregory L.

    The Internet is transforming communications around the world, even with the downturn in the technology market that we saw at the start of this century. This transformation permeates all forms of communications, but its success at realizing maximum consumer benefits depends, at least in part, on the flexibility of communications regulation. Regulation must not constrain firms responding to competitive incentives.

  16. Learning English on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meagher, Mary Elaine

    1995-01-01

    The Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is connecting its 14 high schools to Internet. Three UNAM institutions designed a foreign-languages instruction model based on international cultural and scientific exchanges via computer networks. Mexican students studying English are interacting with English-speaking people, solving real problems, and…

  17. Digital Libraries on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharon, Taly; Frank, Ariel J.

    This paper discusses digital libraries on the Internet. The resource repository hierarchy, consisting of two major paradigms, search engines (SEs) and digital libraries, is presented. SEs are classified into three categories: basic-SE, directory, and meta-SE. The following six major characteristics of a library are summarized: collection of data…

  18. Internet Gambling in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to overview the issues, concerns and challenges relating to gambling--and more specifically internet gambling--in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Using psychological literature, this paper outlines a number of important and inter-related areas including brief overviews of gambling and problem gambling,…

  19. Space Internet-Embedded Web Technologies Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foltz, David A.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center recently demonstrated the ability to securely command and control space-based assets by using the Internet and standard Internet Protocols (IP). This is a significant accomplishment because future NASA missions will benefit by using Internet standards-based protocols. The benefits include reduced mission costs and increased mission efficiency. The Internet-Based Space Command and Control System Architecture demonstrated at the NASA Inspection 2000 event proved that this communications architecture is viable for future NASA missions.

  20. Using Simulation on the Internet To Teach Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Vee Ming; Wong, Khoon Yoong

    1999-01-01

    Shares some reflections about using simulations on the Internet to teach statistics. Discusses problems of learning statistics, Internet terminology, statistical resources on the Internet, interactivity, and problems related to the use of Internet resources. (ASK)

  1. The Association between Internet User Characteristics and Dimensions of Internet Addiction among Greek Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreou, Eleni; Svoli, Hionia

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how internet users' psychological characteristics, amount of internet use and demographic factors contribute to particular dimensions of internet addiction. The sample consisted of 384 adolescents, ranging in age from 15 to 18 years. Participants were asked to complete the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), measures of Locus of…

  2. The Internet and Education: Findings of the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenhart, Amanda; Simon, Maya; Graziano, Mike

    Research by the Pew Internet & American Life Project shows that teenagers use the Internet as an essential study aid outside the classroom and that the Internet increasingly has a place inside the classroom. Findings from a survey of 754 youths ages 12-17 conducted November and December 2000 include: 94% who have Internet access say they use the…

  3. Internet Self-Efficacy Preferences of Internet Based Environments and Achievement of Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozyalcin Oskay, Ozge

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study are to determine prospective chemistry teachers' internet self-efficacy and preferences of constructivist internet-assisted environments and to examine the relationship between their internet self-efficacy and their preferences for constructivist internet-assisted environments, the relationship between their achievement in…

  4. Aviation Research and the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Antoinette M.

    1995-01-01

    The Internet is a network of networks. It was originally funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or DOD/DARPA and evolved in part from the connection of supercomputer sites across the United States. The National Science Foundation (NSF) made the most of their supercomputers by connecting the sites to each other. This made the supercomputers more efficient and now allows scientists, engineers and researchers to access the supercomputers from their own labs and offices. The high speed networks that connect the NSF supercomputers form the backbone of the Internet. The World Wide Web (WWW) is a menu system. It gathers Internet resources from all over the world into a series of screens that appear on your computer. The WWW is also a distributed. The distributed system stores data information on many computers (servers). These servers can go out and get data when you ask for it. Hypermedia is the base of the WWW. One can 'click' on a section and visit other hypermedia (pages). Our approach to demonstrating the importance of aviation research through the Internet began with learning how to put pages on the Internet (on-line) ourselves. We were assigned two aviation companies; Vision Micro Systems Inc. and Innovative Aerodynamic Technologies (IAT). We developed home pages for these SBIR companies. The equipment used to create the pages were the UNIX and Macintosh machines. HTML Supertext software was used to write the pages and the Sharp JX600S scanner to scan the images. As a result, with the use of the UNIX, Macintosh, Sun, PC, and AXIL machines, we were able to present our home pages to over 800,000 visitors.

  5. 77 FR 57086 - Open Internet Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ...The Commission announces the next meeting date, time, and agenda of the Open Internet Advisory Committee (Committee). The Committee was established to track and evaluate the effects of the Commission's Open Internet rules, and to provide any recommendations it deems appropriate to the Commission regarding policies and practices related to preserving the open Internet. The Committee will......

  6. Internet Connections: Understanding Your Access Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes levels of Internet connectivity, physical connections, and connection speeds. Compares options for connecting to the Internet, including terminal accounts, dial-up terminal accounts, direct connections through a local area network, and direct connections using SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol) or PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol). (eight…

  7. Multicultural Resources on the Internet: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Trudi E.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the Internet system and Internet resources for particular culture groups. The author provides some Internet definitions as well as descriptions of available resources listed by cultural group including resources for African American, Chicano/Latino, Native American, Middle Eastern/Jewish/Islamic, and Asian American/Asian people. (GR)

  8. Useful Internet Information for Oklahoma Literacy Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

    This publication introduces some Internet sites relevant to adult education and literacy. It begins with some definitions for the Internet. Next, it lists two guides to using the Internet. A listing of listservs includes name, brief description of literacy-related topics covered, and directions for subscribing. The listservs are as follows:…

  9. Designing Environment for Teaching Internet of Things

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic, Konstantin; Vujin, Vladimir; Labus, Aleksandra; Stepanic, Ðorde; Stevanovic, Mladen

    2014-01-01

    One of the new topics taught at technical universities is Internet of Things. In this paper, a workshop for organizing a lab in academic environment for the subject Internet of Things is described. The architecture of the platform, scenario and a description of components used for creating the environment for learning Internet of things are also…

  10. Internet Anxiety among Foreign Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Selami

    2011-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to the demotivating potential of new technologies in foreign language research. Thus, this study aims to investigate Internet anxiety among foreign language learners and to determine the relationships between Internet anxiety and certain variables. A background questionnaire, an Internet information test, and an…

  11. Young People's Internet Use: Divided or Diversified?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonaert, Tom; Vettenburg, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    This article critically analyses research on young people's internet use. Based on a literature analysis, it examines which young people do what on the internet. These results invite a reflection on the dominant discourse on the digital divide. Within this discourse, there is a strong focus on the use of the internet for information purposes only,…

  12. Older Adults' Knowledge of Internet Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Galen A.; Hough, Michelle G.; Mazur, Elizabeth; Signorella, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Older adults are less likely to be using computers and less knowledgeable about Internet security than are younger users. The two groups do not differ on trust of Internet information. The younger group shows no age or gender differences. Within the older group, computer users are more trusting of Internet information, and along with those with…

  13. Internet technologies and requirements for telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaster, H.; Meylor, J.; Meylor, F.

    1997-01-01

    Internet technologies are briefly introduced and those applicable for telemedicine are reviewed. Multicast internet technologies are described. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) 'Telemedicine Space-bridge to Russia' project is described and used to derive requirements for internet telemedicine. Telemedicine privacy and Quality of Service (QoS) requirements are described.

  14. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  15. Issues on Internet-Based Teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes experiments of Internet modeling and of Internet-based teleoperation aimed at developing suitable control laws to overcome the variable time-delay and the data losses typical of Internet communication. The effects of packet delay jitter and losses on teleoperation performance are demonstrated using a 2-dof force feedback master.

  16. Using the Internet: Concept to Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhalgh, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    State, federal, and corporate grants enabled Georgian Court College (New Jersey) to connect to the Internet, establish a multimedia lab, and purchase equipment for interactive distance learning. Describes the implementation of new programs utilizing Internet technology and highlights sample Internet projects in social work, education, aquatic and…

  17. Using the Internet As an Instructional Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson River Center for Program Development, Glenmont, NY.

    This manual is designed to introduce adult educators to the Internet and examine ways that it can enhance instruction. An overview of the Internet covers its evolution. These three sections focus on the three areas of the Internet essential to instructional application: communication, information access, and search tools. The section on…

  18. Using the Internet as an Instructional Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson River Center for Program Development, Glenmont, NY.

    This manual is designed to help adult educators to understand and use the Internet in teaching adult students. The manual examines what the Internet is, how one can connect to it, and how it can be used. It also describes ways to communicate on the Internet, identifies sites where information can be accessed, and explains how search tools are…

  19. Facilitating Internet-Scale Code Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajracharya, Sushil Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Internet-Scale code retrieval deals with the representation, storage, and access of relevant source code from a large amount of source code available on the Internet. Internet-Scale code retrieval systems support common emerging practices among software developers related to finding and reusing source code. In this dissertation we focus on some…

  20. The Internet: A Ready Reference Library?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    An academic librarian answered 24 questions using reference books, then tried to answer the same questions using an Internet search engine (Metacrawler). Evaluates the results of the Internet searches and discusses implications for library reference services and reference book publishers; Internet user expectations and satisfaction; and librarians…

  1. Involvement in Internet Aggression during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Nicole E.; Bumpus, Matthew F.; Rock, Daquarii

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal predictors of early adolescents' involvement in Internet aggression. Cross-sectional results (N = 330; 57% female) showed that the likelihood of reporting Internet aggression was higher among youth who spent more time using Internet-based technologies to communicate with friends and who were…

  2. College Student Internet Use: Convenience and Amusement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve M.

    2007-01-01

    Four hundred five college students completed a questionnaire that assessed patterns of Internet use. Results describe college students, with rare exception, as Internet users. The vast majority of college students frequently communicate online and access websites. While an Internet game experience is typical, relatively few college students are…

  3. Internet Chat in Simulations: Taking BULLYING Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Emily Blackshear

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the pedagogical implications of using Internet chat in simulations for second-language learners. The author reviews several published simulations and explains how to use Internet chat effectively in the classroom. The author also relays her experience with using Internet chat with the BULLYING simulation.

  4. University Faculty Use of the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-mei; Cohen, Arlene

    This exploratory study was designed to investigate the use of services available on the Internet by faculty in a public university in the United States. It examined the manner and frequency of faculty use of the Internet, their perception of the role of different Internet services in support of teaching and research, and the factors associated…

  5. An Internet Primer for Community College Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumbaugh, Kenneth E.; McRae, Mary S.

    1995-01-01

    Provides information designed to assist administrators in utilizing the advanced information technologies available on the Internet. Describes the uses of such elements of the Internet as "e-mail,""ftp (file transfer protocol),""gopher," and "telnet." Indicates that administrators can use the internet to communicate with colleagues and perform…

  6. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect

    Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2003-03-06

    The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

  7. Hospital marketing and the Internet: revisited.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, C D; Fell, D

    1998-01-01

    In 1995 a study was conducted to explore the use of the Internet in hospital marketing. Use of the Internet has exploded since that study was published. This manuscript replicates the 1995 study and extends it by investigating several managerial and operational issues concerning the use of the Internet in hospital marketing. PMID:10339086

  8. Internet Implementation in Brazilian K-12 Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joia, Luiz Antonio

    1997-01-01

    Presents a framework for implementing the Internet in Brazilian elementary and secondary schools. Topics include schools as assembly lines in the information society; pedagogical uses of the Internet, including research, educational projects, and video conferences; and obstacles to implementing the Internet, including cost, cultural differences,…

  9. Cell Phone Internet Access, Online Sexual Solicitation, Partner Seeking, and Sexual Risk Behavior among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Eric; Winetrobe, Hailey; Holloway, Ian W.; Montoya, Jorge; Plant, Aaron; Kordic, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Online partner seeking is associated with sexual risk behavior among young adults (specifically men who have sex with men), but this association has yet to be explored among a probability sample of adolescents. Moreover, cell phone internet access and sexual risk taking online and offline have not been explored. A probability sample (N = 1,831) of Los Angeles Unified School District high school students was collected in 2011. Logistic regression models assessed relationships between specific sexual risk behaviors (online sexual solicitation, seeking partners online, sex with internet-met partners, condom use) and frequency of internet use, internet access points, and demographics. Students with cell phone internet access were more likely to report being solicited online for sex, being sexually active, and having sex with an internet-met partner. Bisexual-identifying students reported higher rates of being approached online for sex, being sexually active, and not using condoms at last sex. Gay, lesbian, and questioning (GLQ) students were more likely to report online partner seeking and unprotected sex at last sex with an internet-met partner. Additionally, having sex with an internet-met partner was associated with being male, online sexual solicitation, and online partner seeking. Internet- and school-based sexual health programs should incorporate safety messages regarding online sexual solicitation, seeking sex partners online, and engaging in safer sex practices with all partners. Programs must target adolescents of all sexual identities, as adolescents may not yet be “out,” and bisexual and GLQ adolescents are more likely to engage in risky sex behaviors. PMID:25344027

  10. The health sciences librarian as Internet navigator and interpreter.

    PubMed Central

    Warling, B N; Stave, C D

    1995-01-01

    Over the past several years, thousands of networked information resources have become available to individuals and institutions with access to the Internet. Unfortunately, the dizzying array of computing and networking environments often frustrates end users' attempts to navigate the Internet. Librarians have begun to take responsibility not only for instructing users in the use of basic network tools such as file transfer, remote log-in, and electronic mail, but also for answering questions concerning network access and even information system design. The authors show how, by continuing to adapt to this new and volatile environment, health sciences librarians find themselves playing increasingly important roles in shaping the information policies and practices of their institutions. To illustrate these new roles, the authors review the experiences of health sciences librarians at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, San Diego. These institutions have varying and complex networking environments, and their biomedical libraries have taken lead roles in clarifying and interpreting their particular Internet features. PMID:8547896

  11. Internet safety education for youth: stakeholder perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Internet use is nearly ubiquitous among US youth; risks to internet use include cyberbullying, privacy violations and unwanted solicitation. Internet safety education may prevent these negative consequences; however, it is unclear at what age this education should begin and what group is responsible for teaching this topic. Methods Surveys were distributed to key stakeholders in youth safety education including public school teachers, clinicians, parents and adolescents. Surveys assessed age at which internet safety education should begin, as well as experiences teaching and learning internet safety. Surveys of adults assessed willingness to teach internet safety. Finally, participants were asked to identify a group whose primary responsibility it should be to teach internet safety. Results A total of 356 participants completed the survey (93.4% response rate), including 77 teachers, 111 clinicians, 72 parents and 96 adolescents. Stakeholders felt the optimal mean age to begin teaching internet safety was 7.2 years (SD = 2.5), range 2-15. Internet safety was regularly taught by some teachers (20.8%), few clinicians (2.6%) and many parents (40.3%). The majority of teachers, clinicians and parents were willing to teach internet safety, but all groups surveyed identified parents as having primary responsibility for teaching this topic. Conclusions Findings suggest agreement among key stakeholders for teaching internet safety at a young age, and for identifying parents as primary teachers of this topic. Clinicians have a unique opportunity to support parents by providing resources, guidance and support. PMID:23738647

  12. Internet developments and their significance for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Briggs, J S; Early, G H

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent developments in the technology of the Internet, and shows how they may affect the way in which healthcare is provided. Starting with a brief technical history of the Internet, the paper discusses some of the technical developments that have taken place or been proposed in recent years, and speculates on the realities of their adoption within the next five years. The paper also discusses trends in public accessibility to the Internet and the development of Internet services. Finally, the impact of the technological developments on the way in which new healthcare services may be provided is discussed. Our conclusions are that the growth rate in Internet access and the improvements in performance resulting from the new technologies will make the Internet the focus of many new healthcare developments, in particular in the areas of telemedicine and in communication between patient and healthcare professionals. Increasingly, the Internet will be used to convey more 'real-time' information. PMID:10654809

  13. [Internet addiction--a case report].

    PubMed

    Pejović-Milovancević, Milica; Popović-Deusić, Smiljka; Draganić-Gajić, Saveta; Lecić-Tosevski, Dusica

    2009-01-01

    Some addictions cannot be connected with substance abuse (pathological gambling, video games playing, binge eating, compulsive physical activity, emotional relationship addiction, TV addiction). Since 1995, Internet addiction has been accepted as a clinical entity with profound negative effect on social, familial, educational and economical personal functioning. The diagnosis of Internet addiction could be established if the person spends more than 38 hours per week on the Internet exempting online professional needs. Basic symptoms are the increased number of hours spent in front of the computer along with the Internet use, development of abstinent syndrome if the Internet access is prohibited, sleep inversion, neglect of basic social requirements and personal hygiene, many somatic symptoms developed due to prolonged sitting or monitor watching, dissocial behaviour. In this paper, data about the Internet addiction are presented and a case report of an adolescent with developed Internet addiction. PMID:19370973

  14. Using the internet in middle schools: A model for success

    SciTech Connect

    Addessio, B.; Boorman, M.; Eker, P.; Fletcher, K.; Judd, B.; Trainor, M.; Corn, C.; Olsen, J.; Trottier, A.

    1994-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed a model for school networking using Los Alamos Middle School as a testbed. The project was a collaborative effort between the school and the Laboratory. The school secured administrative funding for hardware and software; and LANL provided the network architecture, installation, consulting, and training. The model is characterized by a computer classroom linked with two GatorBoxes and a UNIX-based workstation server. Six additional computers have also been networked from a teacher learning center and the library. The model support infrastructure includes: local school system administrators/lead teachers, introductory and intermediate hands-on teacher learning, teacher incentives for involvement and use, opportunities for student training and use, and ongoing LANL consulting. Formative evaluation data reveals that students and teachers alike are finding the Internet to be a tool that crosses disciplines, allowing them to obtain more, timely information and to communicate with others more effectively and efficiently. A lead teacher`s enthusiastic comments indicate some of the value gained: ``We have just scratched the surface. Each day someone seems to find something new and interesting on the Internet. The possibilities seem endless.``

  15. Clinical encounters with internet pornography.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Thomas P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Pornography, if understood to involve the depiction of sexual activity, organs, and experiences, is perhaps as old as human civilization itself. Historically linked to various technological innovations, pornography viewing in the Internet age has reached epic proportions, with large numbers of individuals taking advantage of ease of access, affordability, and presumed anonymity to explore sexual material online. Within the mental health professions substantial research exists on the effects of viewing general pornography; however, the distinctive effects of the marriage of pornography and cyberspace is only beginning to be examined. In addition to reviewing some historical and statistical material about pornography and the relevant psychiatric and psychoanalytic literature, four detailed clinical vignettes are presented to illustrate the types of problems related to Internet pornography use that are being presented to practicing psychotherapists. PMID:19113956

  16. [Internet use in clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Refolo, P; Sacchini, D; Minacori, R; Spagnolo, A G

    2014-01-01

    Recruiting patients is a critical point of today's clinical research and, along the years, several solutions have been proposed, even if their efficacy seems to be doubtful. On the other hand, nowadays, Internet represents a great opportunity for improving clinical trial recruitments. Nevertheless, on-line recruitment services (e-recruitment) could ensure some advantages (such as facilitating interaction between supply and demand of clinical research, time and money savings/optimizations, data entry errors reduction), but also raise some issues (such as those related to sampling, information, consent, real identity of participants and risks for data breaches). The article debates on the difficulties to recruit patients for clinical research, in general, and e-recruitment particularly, discussing some ethical issues raised by internet enrolment. PMID:24589968

  17. Internet confessions of postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira

    2013-12-01

    Women with postpartum depression may suffer in silence due to the stigma of depression and failed motherhood. It is important to consider how mothers are able to talk about postpartum depression and what strategies they use. Foucault's idea that confession is a widespread technique for producing truth in Western societies was tested through discourse analysis of posts on an Internet forum for women with postpartum depression. The Internet forum showed women's use of confessionary language and self-judgments as well as their sense of disconnected mothering, shame, and disembodiment. Discourses of depression included the good mother, biomedical illness, and social dysfunction. Findings have implications for creating safe spaces for helping mothers with postpartum depression. PMID:24274243

  18. Multilingual system using Internet imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Tadashi; Hata, Yoshitsugu; Iida, Ryouji; Kakugawa, Hirotsugu; Ae, Tadashi; Murakami, Hisae

    2000-12-01

    In these years, multilingual system becomes important, but, most computer environment cannot handle all languages (scripts) in ths world. This paper presents a multilingual imaging system on the Internet. In this system, characters are converted into bitmaps, and therefore, we can display multilingual text on WWW browsers. In order to convert multilingual plain text into bitmap images, we have developed software named ctext2pgm and VFlib. VFlib is a software component to rasterize fonts in various file formats, and ctext2pgm generates bitmap image files form multilingual plain texts. Ctext2pgm is an application program of VFlib, and it supports about 30 languages. We also introduce a language education system for various languages. This is an example of the multilingual system using internet imaging.

  19. The Internet for Louisiana physicians.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M S

    2000-09-01

    Fewer than 50% of Louisiana physicians actively use the Internet, and many of them confine their usage to e-mailing among family and friends. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with many of the benefits of exploiting the incredible potential of this technological invention. I provide addresses and information about sites that I believe warrant usage by our colleagues. Of the vast smorgasbord of data available we highlight educational Web sites for professionals and the public, how to determine credibility of information, clinical research of scientific articles, computer security, federal and state government sites, newspapers, political and socioeconomic functions, medical supply shops, e-mail and other computerized communication, electronic medical records, personal or professional Web sites, and future medical internet uses. It is hoped that this process will encourage nonparticipating colleagues to begin using this modality while also supplying sites that current users may not yet have discovered. PMID:11064554

  20. Exchanging clinical knowledge via Internet.

    PubMed

    Buchan, I E; Hanka, R

    1997-11-01

    The need for effective and efficient exchange of clinical knowledge is increasing. Paper based methods for managing clinical knowledge are not meeting the demand for knowledge and this has undoubtedly contributed to the widely reported failures of clinical guidelines. Internet affords both opportunities and dangers for clinical knowledge. Systems such as Wax have demonstrated the importance of intuitive structure in the management of knowledge. We report on a new initiative for the global management of clinical knowledge. PMID:9506390

  1. The potential of the internet.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jamie J; McDowell, Sarah E

    2012-06-01

    The internet and the World Wide Web have changed the ways that we function. As technologies grow and adapt, there is a huge potential for the internet to affect drug research and development, as well as many other aspects of clinical pharmacology. We review some of the areas of interest to date and discuss some of the potential areas in which internet-based technology can be exploited. Information retrieval from the web by health-care professionals is common, and bringing evidence-based medicine to the bedside affects the care of patients. As a primary research tool the web can provide a vast array of information in generating new ideas or exploring previous research findings. This has facilitated systematic reviewing, for example. The content of the web has become a subject of research in its own right. The web is also widely used as a research facilitator, including enhancement of communication between collaborators, provision of online research tools (such as questionnaires, management of large scale multicentre trials, registration of clinical trials) and distribution of information. Problems include information overload, ignorance of early data that are not indexed in databases, difficulties in keeping web sites up to date and assessing the validity of information retrieved. Some web-based activities are viewed with suspicion, including analysis by pharmaceutical companies of drug information to facilitate direct-to-consumer advertising of novel pharmaceuticals. Use of these technologies will continue to expand in often unexpected ways. Clinical pharmacologists must embrace internet technology and include it as a key priority in their research agenda. PMID:22360652

  2. Parents, ADHD and the internet.

    PubMed

    Terbeck, Sylvia; Chesterman, L Paul

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the potential impact of using the internet on medical consultations by analysing the attitudes, attributions, and emotional responses of parents who have been informed by specialists that their child does not have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and to examine the nature of the feedback they obtained from members of online internet support groups. Over 40,000 messages from the five most popular international internet forums discussing children with ADHD were analysed. Messages from parents who reported that they had seen at least one specialist (e.g. paediatrician, psychiatrist or psychologist) because of their concerns that their child had ADHD were identified. The children included boys and girls with an age range from 2 to 16 years. Of these, we analysed messages where the parents additionally reported that the specialist had excluded a diagnosis of ADHD. Using these criteria, 91 messages from parents who had consulted over 200 different specialists and 398 replies to these messages were identified for content analysis. The replies to concerned parents were analysed to determine whether they were offered impartial advice. A majority of the parents reported that they did not believe the specialist and were unhappy about their child not being diagnosed with ADHD. They expressed dissatisfaction with the professional's opinions and the implication that their child's conduct was caused by their poor parenting skills. Importantly, 87.6 % of the responses that these parents received, from other members of online forums, reinforced the parent's negative attitude towards the professional's judgement. It was generally suggested that the parents should not believe the expert and should seek a further opinion. The use of the internet may encourage "doctor shopping" and mistrust in health services. Medical professionals and others may need to be aware of this, and parents may need more support than is generally

  3. Endocrinological cancers and the internet.

    PubMed

    Bid, H K; Konwar, R; Kumar, S

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine cancers are some of the commonest forms of cancer getting mention as early as in old papyruses of Egypt. Our current knowledge about this cluster of cancer has grown immensely with improved survival rates. In the era of specialization and super specialization, we started peeking into these conditions more elaborately and beyond microscopically. The growing awareness demanded categorization of information into disease basics like molecular pathology of initiation and progression; advanced diagnostics; new therapeutic options; patient awareness and involvement in clinical trials. Recent advances in genomics and hereditary counseling have delineated pre-disease forecasting possibilities. With advanced diagnostics and therapeutic modalities, we saw an increase in cancer survivors demanding extra care and moral support. Throughout these developments, we went through a boost in global information communications, the main thrust being the Internet. Networking of computers globally generated a platform that created a ripple of knowledge far and wide. The purpose of this review is to investigate how the Internet is supporting the growth and development of the field of endocrine cancer, and present and future scope of the Internet as a tool for professionals involved in this area. The information furnished here were collected from cited references as well as all websites mentioned in the tables. PMID:19282562

  4. Internet firewalls: questions and answers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, Keith

    1996-03-01

    As organizations consider connecting to the Internet, the issue of internetwork security becomes more important. There are many tools and components that can be used to secure a network, one of which is a firewall. Modern firewalls offer highly flexible private network security by controlling and monitoring all communications passing into or out of the private network. Specifically designed for security, firewalls become the private network's single point of attack from Internet intruders. Application gateways (or proxies) that have been written to be secure against even the most persistent attacks ensure that only authorized users and services access the private network. One-time passwords prevent intruders from `sniffing' and replaying the usernames and passwords of authorized users to gain access to the private network. Comprehensive logging permits constant and uniform system monitoring. `Address spoofing' attacks are prevented. The private network may use registered or unregistered IP addresses behind the firewall. Firewall-to-firewall encryption establishes a `virtual private network' across the Internet, preventing intruders from eavesdropping on private communications, eliminating the need for costly dedicated lines.

  5. Ultra-broadband photonic internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, there is presented a review of our today's understanding of the ultimately broadband photonic Internet. A simple calculation is presented showing the estimate of the throughput of the core photonic network branches. Optoelectronic components, circuits, systems and signals, together with analogous electronic entities and common software layers, are building blocks of the contemporary Internet. Participation of photonics in development of the physical layer in the future Internet will probably increase. The photonics leads now to a better usage of the available bandwidth (increase of the spectral efficiency measured in Bit/s/Hz), increase in the transmission rate (from Gbps, via Tbps up to probably Pbps), increase in the transmission distance without signal regeneration (in distortion compensated active optical cables), increase in energy/power efficiency measured in W/Gbps, etc. Photonics may lead, in the future, to fully transparent optical networks and, thus, to essential increase in bandwidth and network reliability. It is expected that photonics (with biochemistry, electronics and mechatronics) may build psychological and physiological interface for humans to the future global network. The following optical signal multiplexing methods were considered, which are possible without O/E/O conversion: TDM-OTDM, FDM-CO-OFDM, OCDM-OCDMA, WDM-DWDM.

  6. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Reed, Phil; Vile, Rebecca; Osborne, Lisa A; Romano, Michela; Truzoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales), social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire), sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and their current health - General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28). This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol. PMID:26244339

  7. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Phil; Vile, Rebecca; Osborne, Lisa A.; Romano, Michela; Truzoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales), social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire), sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and their current health – General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28). This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol. PMID:26244339

  8. Secure HL7 transactions using Internet mail (Internet draft).

    PubMed

    Schadow, Gunther; Tucker, Mark; Rishel, Wes

    2002-01-01

    The document describes the applicability of the Internet standardisation efforts on secure electronic data interchange (EDI) transactions for Health Level-7 (HL7), an EDI standard for Healthcare used world-wide. The document heavily relies on the work in progress by the IETF EDIINT working group. It is in most parts a restatement of the EDIINTs requirements document and application statement 1 (AS#1) tailored to the needs of the HL7 audience. The authors tried to make the document as self consistent as possible. The goal is to give to the reader who is not a security or Internet standards expert enough foundational and detail information to enable him to build communication software that complies to the Internet standards. Even though the authors rely on and promote the respective Internet standards and drafts, they did not withstand from commenting on and criticising the work where they see upcoming problems in use with HL7 or other EDI protocols that have not been in the initial focus of the EDIINT working group. The authors make suggestions to add parameters to the specification of the MIME type for EDI messages in RFC 1767 in order to enhance functionality. The authors give use cases for a larger subset of disposition types and modifiers of message disposition notifications. One key issue where the document goes beyond the current EDIINT drafts is the concept of non-repudiation of commitment to an EDI transaction. Secure EDI transactions should be regarded as "distributed contracts," i.e. not only the sending and receiving of single messages should be non-refutable but also the connection between messages interchanges. In anticipation of this requirement HL7 usually requires a response message to be sent to acknowledge every transaction. The authors therefore have the requirement to securely couple an EDI response message to its request message. Given the current shape of RFC 1767 this is generally possible only if a response message is coupled with an MDN

  9. Developing an Internet Presence for Your Practice

    PubMed Central

    Maley, Catherine; Baum, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Yesterday, it was the Yellow Pages that informed the public where and how to reach their physicians. Today, it is the Internet. With the Internet, patients have 24/7 access to your practice that will do far more than any Yellow Pages or advertising could possibly do. This article discusses the importance of the Internet for the contemporary physician and how to create a useful and interactive Web site. PMID:21603434

  10. Brief: Touch the world through Internet

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, T.C. )

    1994-06-01

    Internet is the world's largest computer network. Access to Internet allows users to communicate with colleagues around the world, to access vast software archives, to visit university and public libraries, to search on-line databases, to participate in lively discussions on thousands of topics, to receive electronic journals, and much more. This paper describes Internet and discusses its current and future uses, ways to obtain access, and some of the resources available.

  11. Developing an internet presence for your practice.

    PubMed

    Maley, Catherine; Baum, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Yesterday, it was the Yellow Pages that informed the public where and how to reach their physicians. Today, it is the Internet. With the Internet, patients have 24/7 access to your practice that will do far more than any Yellow Pages or advertising could possibly do. This article discusses the importance of the Internet for the contemporary physician and how to create a useful and interactive Web site. PMID:21603434

  12. Where is the Internet heading to?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Olivier

    2010-04-01

    A review of the state of the Internet in terms of traffic and services trends covering both the Research and Education and the Commercial Internet will first be given. The problematic behind the IPv4 to IPv6 migration will be explained shortly, a short review of the ongoing efforts to re-design the Internet in a clean-slate approach will then be made.

  13. Safe and efficient use of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Downes, P K

    2007-07-14

    A minority of people abuse the freedom of the Internet to the detriment of the vast majority. Many people feel that the Internet requires more regulation to reduce the burden of hackers, viruses, hoaxes, adverts and spam that continue to proliferate unabated. Until this ever happens, it is down to the individual person or business to protect themselves against malicious attacks and to use the Internet in a safe and efficient manner. PMID:17632481

  14. Legal highs on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Jennifer; Olszewski, Deborah; Sedefov, Roumen

    2010-02-01

    This article describes the findings of a descriptive analysis of 27 online drug retailers selling legal alternatives to illegal drugs, commonly referred to as "herbal highs" and "legal highs" in 2008 . The study attempted to quantify the online availability of drug retailers, to describe common products and characteristics in EU-based retail sales. The findings highlight the concern about the lack of objective information about products offered, including potential risks to health. Systems should be developed to assess the contents of products and the accuracy of information provided on the Internet, alongside continued monitoring of this market for "legal high" substances. PMID:20141450

  15. Child pornography and the internet.

    PubMed

    Temporini, Humberto

    2012-12-01

    The dramatic increase in child pornography offenses over the past 10 years is directly related to the availability of such material on the Internet. Child pornography can be found on the Web, in newsgroups, and on peer-to-peer networks (the most common source at present). Offenders are a heterogeneous group, with different motivations and levels of risk. The possibility of crossover to a contact sexual offense exists, depending on the presence of other risk factors. Possession of child pornography without a history of contact offenses does not appear to increase the risk of future contact reoffending. PMID:23107565

  16. Nonprescription steroids on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Clement, Christen L; Marlowe, Douglas B; Patapis, Nicholas S; Festinger, David S; Forman, Robert F

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated the degree to which anabolic-androgenic steroids are proffered for sale over the Internet and how they are characterized on popular Web sites. Searches for specific steroid product labels (e.g., Dianabol) between March 2006 and June 2006 revealed that approximately half of the Web sites advocated their "safe" use, and roughly one third offered to sell them without prescriptions. The Web sites frequently presented misinformation about steroids and minimized their dangers. Less than 5% of the Web sites presented accurate health risk information about steroids or provided information to abusers seeking to discontinue their steroid use. Implications for education, prevention, treatment, and policy are discussed. PMID:22080724

  17. Nonprescription Steroids on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Christen L.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Patapis, Nicholas S.; Festinger, David S.; Forman, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree to which anabolic-androgenic steroids are proffered for sale over the Internet and how they are characterized on popular websites. Searches for specific steroid product labels (e.g., Dianabol) between March and June, 2006 revealed that approximately half of the websites advocated their “safe” use, and roughly one-third offered to sell them without prescriptions. The websites frequently presented misinformation about steroids and minimized their dangers. Less than 5% of the websites presented accurate health risk information about steroids or provided information to abusers seeking to discontinue their steroid use. Implications for education, prevention, treatment and policy are discussed. PMID:22080724

  18. Uses of the internet in emergency response.

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C. L.; Newsom, D. E.; Swietlik, C. E.; Bertram, K. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    1999-01-01

    Past and potential future uses of the Internet in emergency preparedness and emergency response are examined. Discussion of past experience in use of the Internet in crises includes some examples from the Kobe earthquake in 1995, the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989, and the ice storm in the northeastern United States in 1998. Various advantages and drawbacks of use of the Internet in emergency response are examined. Both some promising applications and issues that may arise in use of the Internet for emergency response are discussed.

  19. Medical group adoption of Internet services.

    PubMed

    Coye, M J; Jacks, G; Everett, W E; Akay, L

    2001-10-01

    Physician leaders and office-based practicing physicians in medium and large practice organizations were surveyed regarding their use of administrative and clinical systems enabled by the Internet. More than 85% of medical groups reported using one or more Internet-enabled services and 35 reported use of more than five Internet-enabled services, including both business and clinical applications. Physician leaders and practicing physicians identified six Internet-enabled services as "essential" for the future success of their practice and indicated that reduced administrative costs, faster payments, and improved quality of care are the most important benefits derived from Internet-enabled applications. Ninety-six percent of survey respondents estimated that Internet-enabled technologies will have a significant, positive impact on the practice of medicine in general and will improve the quality of care before 2003. The lack of industrywide standards for health information and the inability of current computer systems to exchange information across health care delivery networks were cited as the most important barriers to the adoption of Internet-enabled applications by physicians. Respondents believed that action by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) or major health plans to require participating physicians to use the Internet for administrative services will be needed to bring about rapid migration to Internet-enabled services. PMID:11680240

  20. Netz ohne doppelten Boden: Internet-Sicherheit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Johann

    2002-07-01

    Die Sicherheitslücken des heutigen Internets haben zwei Ursachen: sein ursprüngliches Design für rein militärische Zwecke sowie die gefährliche Sorglosigkeit der Entwickler und Betreiber von Internet-Komponenten. Dabei kann ein kleiner Kreis von Experten Angriffe auf die eigentlichen Netzknoten ausführen. Typische Hacker-Angriffe kommen von Endsystemen des Internets und richten sich auch gegen Endsysteme wie Firmen-Intranets oder einzelne PCs. Dagegen gibt es eine Reihe von Schutzmöglichkeiten. Es ist jedoch keine einfache Lösung zur Erhöhung der Internet-Sicherheit in Sicht.

  1. 77 FR 38630 - Open Internet Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... meeting. By notice of intent to establish the Open Internet Advisory Committee, published at 76 FR 22395... Research Scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Computer Science and Artificial...

  2. An Introduction to the Internet. Consumer Guide, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Judith

    This newsletter presents an introduction to the Internet. A definition of the Internet and its three principle uses--electronic mail, USENET newsgroups, and information files--are provided. A discussion on how to explore the Internet includes equipment needs, university Internet accounts, commercial vendors, navigating the Internet through the…

  3. The Case of Hallucinogenic Plants and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micke, Marion M.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how to determine Internet information validity and cultivate students' Internet consumer skills, highlighting Internet access to information about locally available hallucinogenic plants. Textbook information on common psychotropic plants is contrasted with pro-drug Internet information. Guidelines for evaluating Internet information and…

  4. Older Adolescent's Perceptions of Personal Internet Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koff, Rosalind N.; Moreno, Megan A.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use is widespread among the older adolescent population. Given the pervasiveness and frequency of internet use, concerns have been raised regarding the impact of excess internet use on adolescent health. In order to understand the impact of internet use on health, we must have accurate and reliable measures of internet use. This study…

  5. The Internet and Education: Some Lessons on Privacy and Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Don E.

    1997-01-01

    Most users have misconceptions about how the Internet works. Provides a brief history of the Internet and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP); discusses electronic mail, privacy, and voluntary and involuntary information gathering; and contrasts the Internet and libraries, focusing on the Internet's lack of consistent…

  6. Internet Basics: Your Online Access to the Global Electronic Superhighway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Steve; Howe, Walt

    This clear and simple handbook is a guide to use of the Internet. For readers without free Internet access through work or school, the book includes membership and 5 hours of time on Delphi Internet Services Corporation, a widely used commercial access to the Internet. Chapters review the following: (1) an introduction to the Internet; (2) ways to…

  7. The Consequences of Internet Addiction: Implications for Counseling Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karyn Dayle; Minatrea, Neresa B.

    2001-01-01

    With an increase in Internet use has come the potential problem of excessive Internet usage or "Internet addiction." It is important that counselors recognize the signs and symptoms of Internet addiction. The purpose of this article is to present the characteristics, the consequences, and the emerging treatment approaches of Internet addiction.…

  8. Theoretical Backgrounds: Internet for Training Teachers and the Development of the HyperCard Internet Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel K.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses theoretical backgrounds for training teachers to use the Internet, including: a history of the Internet, education reform, technology and education, teacher training, affective domains, learning styles, and evaluation. Instructional design considerations are described for developing the HyperCard Internet Primer, software introducing…

  9. The Impact of Pathological Levels of Internet-Related Anxiety on Internet Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Mark; Joiner, Richard; Gavin, Jeff; Crook, Charles; Maras, Pam; Guiller, Jane; Scott, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    This article compares the use of the Internet during the first year of university education of students who have pathological levels of Internet anxiety with those who do not. Two hundred and sixteen first year psychology students (females 184, males 32) were surveyed for their levels of Internet-related anxiety, from which 12 (5.6%) were…

  10. Problematic Internet Use among Turkish University Students: A Multidimensional Investigation Based on Demographics and Internet Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekinarslan, Erkan; Gurer, Melih Derya

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the Turkish undergraduate university students' problematic Internet use (PIU) levels on different dimensions based on demographics (e.g., gender, Internet use by time of day), and Internet activities (e.g., chat, entertainment, social networking, information searching, etc.). Moreover, the study explored some predictors of…

  11. Internet Parenting Styles and the Impact on Internet Use of Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valcke, M.; Bonte, S.; De Wever, B.; Rots, I.

    2010-01-01

    Next to available data about actual Internet use of young children at home, most research especially focuses on the threats and opportunities about active Internet usage. Limited empirical research focuses on the role and impact of parents in this context. In the present study, Internet parenting styles are defined and operationalized to study the…

  12. The Relationship between Internet-Specific Epistemological Beliefs and Learning within Internet Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braten, Ivar; Stromso, Helge I.; Samuelstuen, Marit S.

    2005-01-01

    In a sample of 157 Norwegian political science undergraduates, two dimensions of epistemological beliefs concerning Internet-based knowledge and knowing were identified through factor analysis. The first dimension, general Internet epistemology, ranged from the integrated view that the Internet is an essential source of true, specific facts to…

  13. PDM and the Internet: A Look at Product Management and Its Internet Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the impact of internet technology on product data management (PDM) vendor's and the users' purchasing decisions. Internet users anticipate graphical user interface (GUI) and two-way communication which allow users to enter and modify data as well as access it. Examines PDM and the Internet: price and performance, the World Wide Web,…

  14. The NIST Internet time service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Judah

    1994-01-01

    We will describe the NIST Network Time Service which provides time and frequency information over the Internet. Our first time server is located in Boulder, Colorado, a second backup server is under construction there, and we plan to install a third server on the East Coast later this year. The servers are synchronized to UTC(NIST) with an uncertainty of about 0.8 ms RMS and they will respond to time requests from any client on the Internet in several different formats including the DAYTIME, TIME and NTP protocols. The DAYTIME and TIME protocols are the easiest to use and are suitable for providing time to PC's and other small computers. In addition to UTC(NIST), the DAYTIME message provides advance notice of leap seconds and of the transitions to and from Daylight Saving Time. The Daylight Saving Time notice is based on the US transition dates of the first Sunday in April and the last one in October. The NTP is a more complex protocol that is suitable for larger machines; it is normally run as a 'daemon' process in the background and can keep the time of the client to within a few milliseconds of UTC(NIST). We will describe the operating principles of various kinds of client software ranging from a simple program that queries the server once and sets the local clock to more complex 'daemon' processes (such as NTP) that continuously correct the time of the local clock based on periodic calibrations.

  15. Internet Resources for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, H.

    A subjective overview of Internet resources for radio-astronomical information is presented. Basic observing techniques and their implications for the interpretation of publicly available radio data are described, followed by a discussion of existing radio surveys, their level of optical identification, and nomenclature of radio sources. Various collections of source catalogues and databases for integrated radio source parameters are reviewed and compared, as well as the web interfaces to interrogate the current and ongoing large-area surveys. Links to radio observatories with archives of raw (uv-) data are presented, as well as services providing images, both of individual objects or extracts (``cutouts'') from large-scale surveys. While the emphasis is on radio continuum data, a brief list of sites providing spectral line data, and atomic or molecular information is included. The major radio telescopes and surveys under construction or planning are outlined. A summary is given of a search for previously unknown optically bright radio sources, as performed by the students as an exercise, using Internet resources only. Over 200 different links are mentioned and were verified, but despite the attempt to make this report up-to-date, it can only provide a snapshot of the situation as of mid-1998.

  16. Astronomy research via the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.

    Small developing countries may not have a dark site with good seeing for an astronomical observatory or be able to afford the financial commitment to set up and support such a facility. Much of astronomical research today is however done with remote observations, such as from telescopes in space, or obtained by service observing at large facilities on the ground. Cutting-edge astronomical research can now be done with low-cost computers, with a good Internet connection to get on-line access to astronomical observations, journals and most recent preprints. E-mail allows fast easy collaboration between research scientitists around the world. An international program with some short-term collaborative visits, could mine data and publish results from available astronomical observations for a fraction of the investment and cost of running even a small local observatory. Students who have been trained in the use of computers and software by such a program would also be more employable in the current job market. The Internet can reach you wherever you like to be and give you direct access to whatever you need for astronomical research.

  17. Developing products on Internet time.

    PubMed

    Iansiti, M; MacCormack, A

    1997-01-01

    The rise of the World Wide Web has provided one of the most challenging environments for product development in recent history. The market needs that a product is meant to satisfy and the technologies required to satisfy them can change radically--even as the product is under development. In response to such factors, companies have had to modify the traditional product-development process, in which design implementation begins only once a product's concept has been determined in its entirety. In place of that traditional approach, they have pioneered a flexible product-development process that allows designers to continue to define and shape products even after implementation has begun. This innovation enables Internet companies to incorporate rapidly evolving customer requirements and changing technologies into their designs until the last possible moment before a product is introduced to the market. Flexible product development has been most fully realized in the Internet environment because of the turbulence found there, but the foundations for it exist in a wide range of industries where the need for responsiveness is paramount. When technology, product features, and competitive conditions are predictable or evolve slowly, a traditional development process works well. But when new competitors and technologies appear overnight, when standards and regulations are in flux, and when a company's entire customer base can easily switch to other suppliers, businesses don't need a development process that resists change--they need one that embraces it. PMID:10170327

  18. Using the Internet for ESL Beginners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Judith

    This brief paper argues for using the Internet for English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction. Students of all ages and levels share an enthusiasm for exploring information and interacting online, and the often heard conventional wisdom that the Internet is too difficult for all but the most advanced ESL students is not true. ESL teachers need…

  19. Browsing for the Best Internet Access Provider?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Marty

    1996-01-01

    Highlights points to consider when choosing an Internet Service Provider. Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP) and Point to Point Protocol (PPP) are compared regarding price, performance, bandwidth, speed, and technical support. Obtaining access via local, national, consumer online, and telephone-company providers is discussed. A pricing chart and…

  20. Internet Reference Sources in the Performing Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AmRhein, Richard

    1997-01-01

    There are a number of Web-based Internet resources available in the performance arts, created by hobbyists, amateurs, professionals, and corporations for commercial and recreational purposes. Collected here are Internet sites in the areas of music, dance, film/cinema, and theater/drama that are useful when answering typical reference questions in…

  1. Finding a Job in the Internet Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fountain, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Internet job searching offers an empirical setting in which to explore the trade-off between quality and quantity of information. As both firms and workers turn to the internet for unprecedented amounts of labor market information, it is unclear whether this makes the matching process more efficient. Using longitudinal data on two samples of…

  2. Self-Regulated Learning and Internet Searching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Donna; Swan, Karen

    2004-01-01

    As the Internet becomes a resource in the classroom, students must learn to glean maximally from that information using skills that enhance their understandings. Students engage in activities involved with Internet searching to the degree that they are skilled and motivated. This article reports on a research study that demonstrates that the model…

  3. Reflective Internet Searching: An Action Research Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Sylvia Lauretta; Bruce, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Presents an action research model of planning, acting, recording, and reflecting as an approach to Internet searching. Explains how the constantly changing Internet environment requires continuous reassessment of search tools and strategies and development of new techniques. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  4. Teaching Marketing Research with the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Wai-Sum; Chau, Lewis Long-Fung

    1998-01-01

    A Web site used to teach business students to use the Internet for marketing research was evaluated by 54 students. They thought its information content was useful but wanted it to be easier to use. Educators should identify students' level of Internet literacy and develop online materials accordingly. (SK)

  5. Prospecting for Science Sites on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Vicki F.

    1996-01-01

    Provides a descriptive list of web sites that can provide teachers with a good starting place for Internet exploration. Includes: Big Sky Science Gopher menu; Dem Dry Bones; EE Link: Environmental Education on the Internet; Energy Quest; ERIC Science Gopher; Exploratorium Science Snackbook; and Newton's Apple. Twenty sites are described, with web…

  6. Using the Internet for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherritt, Caroline; Basom, Margaret

    Use of the Internet by colleges and universities for delivery of distance education is one trend likely to continue. Unlike previous educational trends driven by research and tradition inside the academic community, Internet use for education is enthusiastically supported by forces outside of academe. The most widely used practices are formal…

  7. Teaching Internet Security, Safety in Our Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFranco, Joanna F.

    2011-01-01

    Internet security is an important topic for educators due to curriculums now incorporating tools such as the Internet, Google docs, e-portfolios, and course management systems. Those tools require students to spend more time online, where they are susceptible to manipulation or intimidation if they do not stay on task. Kids of all ages lack…

  8. Crossing the Internet Threshold: An Instructional Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy; And Others

    This handbook is addressed to people who have access to the Internet and want to learn how to use it and to people who want to teach Internet skills to others. It includes the content of a 14-hour training institute and beginning and advanced level exercises, as well as discussion topics, sample overheads and other materials, and a checklist of…

  9. Resources for Economists on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goffe, William L.; Braden, Elise

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Web site Resources for Economists on the Internet (RFE) that is sponsored by the American Economic Association under the Journal of Economic Literature. States that RFE focuses on the needs of academic economists. Explains that RFE includes over 900 Internet resources and discusses the "Teaching Resources" section. (CMK)

  10. Attitudes towards the Use of the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Otaibi, Khaled Nahes

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the attitude towards the use of the Internet and its cognitive, emotional and behavioral components. To achieve the objective of the study, the researcher used the scale of the attitude towards the Internet of a random sample of students (n = 216) at Teachers College at…

  11. The Use of Internet of EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srichanyachon, A. Napaporn

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated attitudes toward using the Internet as a learning tool among students at Bangkok University; students' expectation of social networks and search engines in learning English, as well as their perceived usefulness. It also examined their use of the Internet for learning English. The samples were 198 undergraduate…

  12. Plagiarism and the Internet: Turning the Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Thomas; Nelson, Gene

    2001-01-01

    Notes the problem of Net-based plagiarism in student papers. Describes a solution that turns the tables by using the Internet: TurnItIn.com, an Internet scanner that annotates/marks unattributed material in student papers and compiles a report for the teacher overnight. (SR)

  13. Teacher Tech. Internet Safety Net: A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Teachers must help students learn how to use the Internet appropriately and apply prior precautionary knowledge to Internet use. They must safeguard students by recognizing potential dangers when going online and establishing guidelines to minimize risk. These include previewing all sites, installing filtering software, teaching about Internet…

  14. Towards Practical Privacy-Preserving Internet Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shiyuan

    2012-01-01

    Today's Internet offers people a vast selection of data centric services, such as online query services, the cloud, and location-based services, etc. These internet services bring people a lot of convenience, but at the same time raise privacy concerns, e.g., sensitive information revealed by the queries, sensitive data being stored and…

  15. A Teacher's Project Guide to the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crotchett, Kevin R.

    This book is a step-by-step guide to the Internet, suggesting creative K-12 classroom projects ranging from one of the most basic Internet functions, e-mail, to one of the more difficult, writing World Wide Web homepages. Intervening chapters describe projects using Usenet Newsgroups, File Transfer Protocols (FTP), Gopher, Veronica, the World Wide…

  16. The Internet: A Powerful Resource for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pachnowski, Lynne M.

    The Internet is a wealth of information for researchers and educators as well as students from high school to graduate school who can access huge amounts of data via an Internet account. This paper presents basic terms and methodology for locating resources from the comfort of a personal computer, communications software, and a modem. Internet…

  17. Using the Internet in Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seguin, Armand

    This document contains ideas and information regarding using the Internet in the professional development of vocational education teachers. Presented first is basic information about what the Internet is and its value as a tool for professional development (including its role as a vehicle for accessing the ERIC database, taking online classes, and…

  18. Tailoring the Internet to Primary Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobiason, Kathy

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to customize Internet resources for the elementary school classroom. Discusses bookmarking appropriate Web sites; arranging student-developed material for a Web page; creating a Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) unit Web page; pasting Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) for sites supporting unit activities; and Internet training for…

  19. Using the Internet Poster. Teaching Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan to help students explore the rights of free expression and privacy, copyright laws, and forms of Internet communication; asks students to evaluate possible uses of the Internet based on these explorations. Includes a background statement, list of objectives, outline of procedures, and a student handout. (DSK)

  20. An Analysis of Fraud on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, C. Richard

    1999-01-01

    Examines the issue of fraud on the Internet and discusses three areas with significant potential for misleading and fraudulent practices: securities sales and trading; electronic commerce, including privacy and information protection; and the rapid growth of Internet companies, including advertising issues. (Author/LRW)

  1. An Action Plan for Smart Internet Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teicher, Jim

    1999-01-01

    Empowering children to use the Internet safely and responsibly is essential. Students can also be taught to communicate positively with others. The CyberSmart! School Program offers a framework that teachers can use to discuss the Internet with students and raise awareness. Tips regarding etiquette, advertising, and privacy protection are also…

  2. Chapter 5. Students' Involvement with the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine a number of questions that make it possible to characterize the different aspects of students' involvement with the Internet. They will analyse the regularity of students in using the Internet, the age at which they begin to use means of electronic communication, the place where they use it, the intensiveness…

  3. Internet Abuse Risk Factors among Spanish Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Carballo, José L; Marín-Vila, María; Espada, José P; Orgilés, Mireia; Piqueras, José A

    2015-01-01

    Empirical evidence has revealed various factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of Internet abuse. The aim of this paper was to analyze, on a sample of Spanish adolescents, the relationship between Internet abuse and: (1) Personal and interpersonal risk factors, including social skills in both virtual and real-life contexts; (2) Drug use. A total of 814 high school students aged between 13 and 17 participated in this study, and were divided into two groups: Internet Abusers (IA = 173) and Non-Internet Abusers (NIA = 641). Questionnaires were used to analyze Internet and drug use/abuse, as well as social skills, in virtual and real contexts. Various interpersonal risk factors (family and group of friends) were also assessed. IA showed a more severe pattern of Internet and drug use, as well as poorer social skills in both contexts. Moreover, their groups of friends appeared more likely to become involved in risky situations related to Internet and drug abuse. Both IA and NIA showed more adaptive social skills in the virtual context than in the real one. There is a need for further research to build on these findings, with a view to designing specific preventive programs that promote responsible Internet use. PMID:26611139

  4. [Internet use and adolescents' sexual health].

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ying-Hua; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chou, Fan-Hao

    2012-12-01

    Internet use is an important part of the daily life of adolescents. The ease of searching the internet for information makes finding information on sex, a topic of particular interest to adolescents, easy. Although the internet is replete with sexual information, the influence of internet use on adolescents' sexual health is analogous to a double-edged sword. This article identifies the four main sexual dilemmas facing Taiwan adolescents and analyzes the pros and cons of internet use with regard to adolescents' sexual health. Cons include the predominance of internet pornography and the potential risks of making friends online. Pros include the internet's role as an optimal communications platform and tool for sex-related research. We suggest that nurses have a unique role and functions to play in promoting adolescent sexual health. We also offer recommendations for school health nursing and clinical nursing. Further internet-based quantitative and qualitative research is necessary to clarify relevant sexual health issues. Finally, we offer design suggestions for sexual education homepages. PMID:23212259

  5. Product Characteristics and Internet Shopping Intentions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vijayasarathy, Leo R.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of electronic commerce and online marketing focuses on an empirical study that investigated differences between Internet shopping intentions for products categorized by cost and tangibility. Highlights include hypotheses; respondent characteristics; results that showed that intentions to shop using the Internet differ by tangibility of…

  6. Netwar: Studying Rebels on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elison, William

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the role of the Internet in studying various rebel groups. Reviews the Zapatistas of the Chiapas region of Mexico and the Albanians and Serbs of the Balkans in order to see what resources some of the websites offer. Considers the power of each group on the Internet. (CMK)

  7. Using the Internet To Investigate Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Walter

    The lesson plans in this book engage students by using a tool they enjoy--the Internet--to explore key concepts in algebra. Working either individually or in groups, students learn to approach algebra from a problem solving perspective. Each lesson shows learners how to use the Internet as a resource for gathering facts, data, and other…

  8. Webometrics: Can we measure the Internet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliczynska, Malgorzata

    2004-07-01

    This paper refers issues connected with webometrics -- science, which allow conducting various researches over model and content of the Internet, especially WWW sites. Webometrics methodology connections with other disciplines and numerous examples of various, sometimes completely different Internet measures were shown. This paper presents the state of the art in webometrics.

  9. Assessing the Global Accessibility of the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngini, Chukwuma U.; Furnell, Steven M.; Ghita, Bogdan V.

    2002-01-01

    Presents the findings of an investigation into Internet connectivity and use in 19 countries to determine the extent of Internet access and whether it is considered beneficial. Discusses available telecommunications infrastructure, access costs, limitations to access, personal opinions, and results of a Web-based questionnaire. (Author/LRW)

  10. The Internet in Swaziland: Services under Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muswazi, Paiki

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the history of libraries in Swaziland and discusses the introduction of computers in 1974 and Internet access in 1996. Topics include censorship laws that have restricted access; e-commerce; e-mail; obstacles, including limited user access in libraries and lack of computer literacy; and suggestions for extending Internet information…

  11. Rethinking Marketing Curricula in the Internet Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevan-Dye, A. L.; Venter, P. F.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research is to identify an inventory of topics pertaining to the Internet-driven marketing principles that have emerged from the Internet's implication to and application in marketing that bear relevance to the study field of mainstream marketing. Empirical research was conducted to measure South African marketing educators' and…

  12. The Internet and Careers Work. NICEC Briefing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offer, Marcus; Watts, Tony

    This briefing reviews the state of the art in the application of the Internet in career guidance and counseling. It describes how the Internet works and the main services offered: electronic mail, newsgroups, the World Wide Web, file transfer, and intranets. A glossary is provided. The following current and potential uses are discussed: access to…

  13. Copyright, the Internet, and Other Legal Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasaway, Laura N.

    1998-01-01

    Copyright and other intellectual property issues have dominated discussions of legal issues surrounding the Internet. There are other issues of considerable importance that also attract attention. Five legal issues affecting the Internet are addressed: copyright, online service-provider liability, database protection, obscenity, and privacy. Cited…

  14. Internet Fraud: Information for Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nkotagu, Gabriel Hudson

    2011-01-01

    Internet fraud takes a number of forms with the responsible individuals changing tactics rapidly to avoid detection. The perpetrators rely on telemarketing, emails, as well as presenting themselves personally to unsuspecting people. The evolution of internet marketing as well as ecommerce and the ease of connectivity create increasing…

  15. Predicting Internet/E-Commerce Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Randall S.; Johnson, Richard A.; Hignite, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study that analyzed variables in order to identify accurate predictors of individuals' use of the Internet and e-commerce. Results of survey research and a neural network identifies gender, overall computer use, job-related use, and home access as important characteristics that should influence use of the Internet and e-commerce.…

  16. An Hour with the Internet Curmudgeon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgovsky, Joel

    While the Internet undeniably contains an enormous amount of information, community colleges should consider some key issues before joining the headlong rush toward virtual classrooms. First, information can be very difficult to find on the Internet. Although search engines, web databases, and subject directories have been developed to help users…

  17. Understanding Dispositions toward Reading on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coiro, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Students' perceptions about the Internet's usefulness and potential to engage them in academic learning tasks have been found to influence their success in reading for information in online tasks. This article helps to understand the types of dispositions that adolescents may have toward reading on the Internet and how to characterize these…

  18. Coordinating Council. Eighth Meeting: Using the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program Coordinating Council meeting theme was entitled 'Using Internet'. Individual topics included STI LAN migration, NSF and NREN (National Science Foundation and the National Research and Education Network), and the New NASA Headquarters LAN. Discussions are recorded for each topic and visuals are provided for STI LAN migration and NSI - NASA Science Internet.

  19. Internet Resources for Injury and Violence Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Krista; Sleet, David A.; Mickalide, Angela; Gorcowski, Susan; Bryn, Stephanie; Balsley, Tara; Mitchko, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Access to injury prevention information is being transformed by the Internet and information technology. These new strategies for "knowledge management" are creating new opportunities for health education and injury prevention. This article provides an overview and a list of internet resources on unintentional injury prevention, acute care and…

  20. Manufacturing in the world of Internet collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.J.; Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The Internet and the applications it supports are revolutionizing the way people work together. This paper presents four case studies in engineering collaboration that new Internet technologies have made possible. These cases include assembly design and analysis, simulation, intelligent machine system control, and systems integration. From these cases, general themes emerge that can guide the way people will work together in the coming decade.

  1. Teaching Undergraduate Mathematics on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Harding, Ansie

    2005-01-01

    Internet education in mathematics is developing as a new mode of teaching with its own characteristics and possibilities, different from the traditional way of teaching. In a study presented in two parts, we attempt to capture the world of Internet teaching of undergraduate mathematics. In the first part of the study (Engelbrecht, J. and Harding,…

  2. Internet Primer: Workshop Design and Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverty, Corinne Y. C.

    1996-01-01

    Outlines the design, objectives, and evaluation of an introductory Internet workshop offered with library instruction classes in an electronic classroom at Queens University (Kingston, Ontario, Canada). Presents teaching tips and frequently-asked questions. The Internet primer handouts are appended. (AEF)

  3. The Internet: Logon to Lesson Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmbacher, Staci

    1996-01-01

    Encourages teachers to follow their students' example of learning to use and exploit the capabilities of the Internet by logging on, exploring the possibilities for researching a topic, documenting sources, and utilizing new types of information. Gives list of valuable Internet sites by subject area to aid in lesson planning and assignments. (ET)

  4. Addressing Student Needs: Teaching on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubala, Tom

    1998-01-01

    Describes the experiences of a university professor who has been teaching graduate courses in Florida via the Internet. Topics include course preparation, including an initial face-to-face session; Netiquette for working on the Internet; the importance of technical staff; assignments and exams; and student evaluations. (LRW)

  5. Office gynecology in the internet age.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Robert L

    2012-09-01

    Historically, the stethoscope is representative of the type of medical tool that dominated the clinician-patient interaction. In the future, electronic tools will dominate the clinician-patient interaction. Most electronic tools will be accessed through the internet. The internet will become a key portal for enhancing the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:22828092

  6. Surfing Social Studies: The Internet Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Joseph A., Jr., Ed.; Risinger, C. Frederick, Ed.

    The Internet makes available an unparalleled, and seemingly unlimited, repository of resources and ideas for social studies teachers. This book provides guidance and explores how the Internet can become an essential element in a teacher's repertoire of tools for engaging students in social studies curriculum. Chapters in the book are: (1)…

  7. Nuke@ - a nuclear information internet server

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, B.J. III.; Richardson, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    To facilitate Internet communications between nuclear utilities, vendors, agencies, and other interested parties, an Internet server is being established. This server will provide the nuclear industry with its first file-transfer protocol (ftp) connection point, its second mail server, and a potential telnet connection location.

  8. Internet Addiction among High Schoolers in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Sunny S. J.; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and valid measurement for the identification of Internet addictive high school students. There were 615 subjects selected by a stratified sampling from the population of Taiwanese 10th to 12th graders. The final version of the Internet Addiction Scale for Taiwan High Schoolers (IAST) contained 20…

  9. Investigating the Future of Internet Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, Heidemarie; Towell, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 86 Internet providers in 38 countries found that, although Internet providers felt they had the most control over material accessed, more than half do not censor content. Respondents indicated that some regulation may be necessary, but the cultural diversity in the world will make it difficult to implement. (PEN)

  10. A Beginner's Guide to the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Charles A.; Nelson, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that the Internet offers services and opportunities for music teachers and students. Provides an overview of topics such as electronic mail, File Transfer Protocol (FTP), Gopher, and the World Wide Web (WWW). Includes two lists of music resources available on the Internet. (CFR)

  11. SALBIN: PC Software for Accessing Internet Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of SALBIN software at Oxford University's Bodelian Library to handle Internet information resources and make them easily available to readers. Steps in setting up SALBIN software on library microcomputers are covered, including obtaining the software by file transfer protocol, obtaining information on Internet services, exploring…

  12. The Internet for Educators: A User's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Brian D.; Dharm, Matthew

    1995-01-01

    Presents a practical guide to use of the Internet. Topics discussed include getting connected; the UNIX operating system; electronic mail; FTP (File Transfer Protocol); Finger; Telnet; Archie; Veronica; Gopher; teacher education; the Yanoff List; and expansion of the Internet. (three references) (LRW)

  13. Integrating the Internet into the Business Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Mary J.; Schroeder, David L.

    1996-01-01

    Provides an introduction to the communication resources of the Internet and provides several specific examples of business solutions in the areas of electronic mail communications, business applications software support, system design, and databases, Advantages and disadvantages for management when integrating the Internet into a business…

  14. Delivering Multimedia Teaching Modules via the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudge, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet for delivering teaching modules and makes recommendations for successful use of the Internet. Highlights include the availability of information at all times and from remote locations, multimedia capabilities, infrastructure needed, security issues, updating, needed skills, and…

  15. Excessive internet use and depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Mihajlović, Goran; Hinić, Darko; Damjanović, Aleksandar; Gajić, Tomislav; Dukić-Dejanović, Slavica

    2008-03-01

    Recent studies of Internet influence on behavioural disorders of its users, have created quite a polarised ambience. On the one hand, there are those who believe that the Internet is a new better medium for enabling various patterns of communication and social relations. On the other hand, others maintain that Internet use can lead to social isolation and other forms of psychological disorders, for an example depression. The aim of this work is a review of research attempts to confirm a connection between increased Internet use and psychological disorders, in the first place, depression. The number of studies on this subject is not very great thus far. This is mainly because depression and similar disorders are serious distorsions in basic psychological processes; this suggests how difficult it may be to work with such examinees, and how complex it may appear to distinguish etiological factors. These facts do not lessen the importance of the aim itself, i.e. defining potential consequences of excessive Internet use when it comes to psychological wellbeing, since the Internet is expected to become a basic form of social interaction in the near future, and consequently one of the major factors of socialisation and constitution of one's psychological identity. Due to that fact, the aim of this work is to indicate methodological and conceptual flaws of the studies which have attempted to make a connection between mood disorders and the Internet, so as to establish the base for future studies of the psychological consequences of Internet development. PMID:18376325

  16. Training in the Use of the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Rita M.

    This paper outlines how to teach an introductory workshop about the Internet. It includes field-tested instruction and materials, training session agendas, exercises, materials for use with or without hands-on computer work, a pre-workshop needs assessment form, an instructor evaluation form, and Internet navigation exercises. Although the field…

  17. Inquiry-Based Learning via the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Alexa B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the history of the Internet and its use as a learning resource tool for instructors. Suggests that the Internet allows students to interact with their world and promotes inquiry-based skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, and research. Includes a variety of classroom exercises. (Author)

  18. School PE through Internet Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauritsalo, Kirsti; Sääkslahti, Arja; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical education is a subject that generates strong feelings and emotions, as can be seen in written accounts of PE experiences. It is also important to listen to students' voices in the research context. Nowadays, students can be listened to in a new way--through the Internet. Various discussion forums on the Internet make it…

  19. From Internet User to Cyberspace Citizen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Ippei

    1997-01-01

    Discusses social and cultural challenges that Internet technology raises. Highlights include preserving the freedom in cyberspace, the information distribution scheme of the Internet, two-way interactivity, search engines as marketing tools, the insecurity of cyberspace, online safety rules for children, educating children to "walk alone" in…

  20. The New Curriculum in the Age of Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backer, Jimmy

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how each of the four domains of Israel's New English Curriculum takes on additional definitions in the age of the Internet. Provides Internet addresses for both new and experienced Internet users. (Author/VWL)

  1. The Geoscience Internet of Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K.; Klump, J.

    2012-04-01

    Internet of Things is a term that refers to "uniquely identifiable objects (things) and their virtual representations in an Internet-like structure" (Wikipedia). We here use the term to describe new and innovative ways to integrate physical samples in the Earth Sciences into the emerging digital infrastructures that are developed to support research and education in the Geosciences. Many Earth Science data are acquired on solid earth samples through observations and experiments conducted in the field or in the lab. The application and long-term utility of sample-based data for science is critically dependent on (a) the availability of information (metadata) about the samples such as geographical location where the sample was collected, time of sampling, sampling method, etc. (b) links between the different data types available for individual samples that are dispersed in the literature and in digital data repositories, and (c) access to the samples themselves. Neither of these requirements could be achieved in the past due to incomplete documentation of samples in publications, use of ambiguous sample names, and the lack of a central catalog that allows researchers to find a sample's archiving location. New internet-based capabilities have been developed over the past few years for the registration and unique identification of samples that make it possible to overcome these problems. Services for the registration and unique identification of samples are provided by the System for Earth Sample Registration SESAR (www.geosamples.org). SESAR developed the International Geo Sample Number, or IGSN, as a unique identifier for samples and specimens collected from our natural environment. Since December 2011, the IGSN is governed by an international organization, the IGSN eV (www.igsn.org), which endorses and promotes an internationally unified approach for registration and discovery of physical specimens in the Geoscience community and is establishing a new modular and

  2. Construction of a teaching package on promoting prosocial internet use and preventing antisocial Internet use.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hing Keung; Chu, Miranda K Y; Chan, Winnie W Y

    2011-01-01

    In the construction of the teaching package on the Internet use, two major moral characters, respect and responsibility, form the core theoretical basis. The respect character consists of respect for others and self-respect while the responsibility character contains social, civil, and global responsibility. There are a total of nine units on the Internet use in the junior secondary curriculum. There are two units in Secondary One curriculum: the first unit deals with cheating behavior and privacy issues concerning the Internet, and the second one discusses the effect of excessive use of the Internet on life and study. In Secondary Two curriculum, we discuss the following social phenomena on the Internet with students: online shopping, pornographic materials on internet, and infringement of a copyright. Finally, we have designed four units on the Internet use in Secondary Three curriculum which focuses more on the relationship between the Internet use and our health. We try to answer the question on how we can use the Internet healthily and also the possibility on how it may hurt us. Similar to the second unit in Secondary One curriculum, we have designed three more units on discussing the effects of excessive use of the Internet with students. We would like to alert students that ineffective use of the Internet will hurt us mentally and physically. For illustrative purposes, two units in the Secondary One and Two curriculums are outlined in this paper. PMID:22125462

  3. Construction of a Teaching Package on Promoting Prosocial Internet Use and Preventing Antisocial Internet Use

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hing Keung; Chu, Miranda K. Y.; Chan, Winnie W. Y.

    2011-01-01

    In the construction of the teaching package on the Internet use, two major moral characters, respect and responsibility, form the core theoretical basis. The respect character consists of respect for others and self-respect while the responsibility character contains social, civil, and global responsibility. There are a total of nine units on the Internet use in the junior secondary curriculum. There are two units in Secondary One curriculum: the first unit deals with cheating behavior and privacy issues concerning the Internet, and the second one discusses the effect of excessive use of the Internet on life and study. In Secondary Two curriculum, we discuss the following social phenomena on the Internet with students: online shopping, pornographic materials on internet, and infringement of a copyright. Finally, we have designed four units on the Internet use in Secondary Three curriculum which focuses more on the relationship between the Internet use and our health. We try to answer the question on how we can use the Internet healthily and also the possibility on how it may hurt us. Similar to the second unit in Secondary One curriculum, we have designed three more units on discussing the effects of excessive use of the Internet with students. We would like to alert students that ineffective use of the Internet will hurt us mentally and physically. For illustrative purposes, two units in the Secondary One and Two curriculums are outlined in this paper. PMID:22125462

  4. Technological Advancements and Internet Sexuality: Does Private Access to the Internet Influence Online Sexual Behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, Sven-Axel; Ross, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate whether demographic characteristics and sexual behavior online and offline were associated with private, respectively, nonprivate access to the Internet in a Web sample of people who use the Internet for sexual purposes. A total of 1,913 respondents completed an online questionnaire about Internet sexuality, and 1,614 reported using the Internet for sexual purposes. The majority of these respondents reported having access to an Internet-connected computer no one else had access to (62 percent women and 70 percent men). The results showed that it is possible to differentiate between those who have access to an Internet-connected computer no one else has access to and those who have shared access to an Internet-connected computer. Not only did they differ in demographic characteristics, but also in the sexual activities they engaged in on the Internet. Different patterns were found for women and men. For example, men who had private access to Internet-connected computers were more likely than those who had shared access to seek information about sexual issues. Thus, having access to Internet computers no one else has access to may promote sexual knowledge and health for men. The results of this study along with the technological development implies that in future research, attention should be paid to where and how people access the Internet in relation to online behavior in general and online sexual behavior in particular. PMID:22823598

  5. Molecular and Functional Imaging of Internet Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunqi; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive use of the Internet results in Internet addiction (IA), which is associated with various negative consequences. Molecular and functional imaging techniques have been increasingly used for analysis of neurobiological changes and neurochemical correlates of IA. This review summarizes molecular and functional imaging findings on neurobiological mechanisms of IA, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). MRI studies demonstrate that structural changes in frontal cortex are associated with functional abnormalities in Internet addicted subjects. Nuclear imaging findings indicate that IA is associated with dysfunction of the brain dopaminergic systems. Abnormal dopamine regulation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) could underlie the enhanced motivational value and uncontrolled behavior over Internet overuse in addicted subjects. Further investigations are needed to determine specific changes in the Internet addictive brain, as well as their implications for behavior and cognition. PMID:25879023

  6. The Internet Process Addiction Test: Screening for Addictions to Processes Facilitated by the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Northrup, Jason C.; Lapierre, Coady; Kirk, Jeffrey; Rae, Cosette

    2015-01-01

    The Internet Process Addiction Test (IPAT) was created to screen for potential addictive behaviors that could be facilitated by the internet. The IPAT was created with the mindset that the term “Internet addiction” is structurally problematic, as the Internet is simply the medium that one uses to access various addictive processes. The role of the internet in facilitating addictions, however, cannot be minimized. A new screening tool that effectively directed researchers and clinicians to the specific processes facilitated by the internet would therefore be useful. This study shows that the Internet Process Addiction Test (IPAT) demonstrates good validity and reliability. Four addictive processes were effectively screened for with the IPAT: Online video game playing, online social networking, online sexual activity, and web surfing. Implications for further research and limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:26226007

  7. The Internet Process Addiction Test: Screening for Addictions to Processes Facilitated by the Internet.

    PubMed

    Northrup, Jason C; Lapierre, Coady; Kirk, Jeffrey; Rae, Cosette

    2015-01-01

    The Internet Process Addiction Test (IPAT) was created to screen for potential addictive behaviors that could be facilitated by the internet. The IPAT was created with the mindset that the term "Internet addiction" is structurally problematic, as the Internet is simply the medium that one uses to access various addictive processes. The role of the internet in facilitating addictions, however, cannot be minimized. A new screening tool that effectively directed researchers and clinicians to the specific processes facilitated by the internet would therefore be useful. This study shows that the Internet Process Addiction Test (IPAT) demonstrates good validity and reliability. Four addictive processes were effectively screened for with the IPAT: Online video game playing, online social networking, online sexual activity, and web surfing. Implications for further research and limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:26226007

  8. Service providers and users discover the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, E M; Backus, J E; Lyon, B J

    1994-01-01

    Although the Internet has evolved over more than twenty years, resources useful to health information professionals have become available on the Internet only recently. A survey conducted by the Regional Medical Libraries of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in the fall of 1993 indicates that libraries at academic institutions are much more likely to have access to the Internet (72%) than are libraries in hospital environments (24%). Health information professionals who take on the challenge and exploit the Internet's resources find rewards for themselves and their clients. The basic electronic mail capability of the Internet allows colleagues to collaborate, communicate, and participate in daily continuing education. Internet terminal and file-transfer capabilities provide improved access to traditional resources and first-time access to new electronic resources. Through the Internet, online catalogs are available worldwide, and document delivery is faster, cheaper, and more reliable than ever before. Institutions can make organizational, full-text, online, and publication information available through Internet tools such as direct file-transfer protocol (FTP), menu-based Gopher, and hypertext-based Mosaic. The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is among organizations finding new ways to provide service through the Internet. NLM now uses electronic mail to communicate with users, FTP service to distribute publications, and tools such as Gopher and Mosaic to distribute publications and graphics and connect users to online services. The Internet allows service providers and health sciences information professionals to work in a rich, new medium whose potential is just beginning to be explored. At the same time, its characteristics--including lack of formal organization, standards, quality control, and permanence--pose a challenge. PMID:7841912

  9. History, structure, and function of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Glowniak, J

    1998-04-01

    The Internet stands at the forefront of telecommunications in medicine. This worldwide system of computers had its beginnings in networking projects in the United States and western Europe in the 1960s and 1970s. The precursor of the Internet was ARPANET, a long-distance telecommunication network funded by the Department of Defense that linked together computers throughout the United States. In the 1980s, ARPANET was superseded by NSFNET, a series of networks created by the National Science Foundation, which established the present-day structure of the Internet. The physical structure of the Internet resembles and is integrated with the telephone system. Long-distance data transport services are provided by large telecommunication companies, called network service providers (NSPs), through high-capacity, high-speed national and international fiber optic cables. These transport services are accessed through Internet service providers, ISPs. ISPs, the equivalent of regional Bell operating companies, provide the physical link to the NSPs for individuals and organizations. Telecommunications on the Internet are standardized by a set of communications protocols, the TCP/IP protocol suite, that describe routing of messages over the Internet, computer naming conventions, and commonly used Internet services such as e-mail. At present, the Internet consists of over 20 million computer worldwide and is continuing to grow at a rapid rate. Along with the growth of the Internet, higher speed access methods are offering a range of new services such as real-time video and voice communications. Medical education, teaching, and research, as well as clinical practice, will be affected in numerous different ways by these advances. PMID:9579415

  10. Internet Services for Professional Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, H.

    A (subjective) overview of Internet resources relevant to professional astronomers is given. Special emphasis is put on databases of astronomical objects and servers providing general information, e.g. on astronomical catalogues, finding charts from sky surveys, bibliographies, directories, browsers through multi-wavelength observational archives, etc. Archives of specific observational data will be discussed in more detail in other chapters of this book, dealing with the corresponding part of the electromagnetic spectrum. About 200 different links are mentioned, and every attempt was made to make this report as up-to-date as possible. As the field is rapidly growing with improved network technology, it will be just a snapshot of the situation in mid-1998.

  11. Experimental Internet Environment Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.

    1998-01-01

    Geographically distributed project teams need an Internet based collaborative work environment or "Intranet." The Virtual Research Center (VRC) is an experimental Intranet server that combines several services such as desktop conferencing, file archives, on-line publishing, and security. Using the World Wide Web (WWW) as a shared space paradigm, the Graphical User Interface (GUI) presents users with images of a lunar colony. Each project has a wing of the colony and each wing has a conference room, library, laboratory, and mail station. In FY95, the VRC development team proved the feasibility of this shared space concept by building a prototype using a Netscape commerce server and several public domain programs. Successful demonstrations of the prototype resulted in approval for a second phase. Phase 2, documented by this report, will produce a seamlessly integrated environment by introducing new technologies such as Java and Adobe Web Links to replace less efficient interface software.

  12. Internet use and attitudes towards illicit internet use behavior in a sample of Russian college students.

    PubMed

    Palesh, Oxana; Saltzman, Kasey; Koopman, Cheryl

    2004-10-01

    This study assessed Internet use and attitudes toward illicit use of the Internet in a sample of Russian college students. A sample comprised of 198 students was recruited from a university in Moscow. Each participant completed a survey assessing demographic characteristics, Internet use, and attitudes towards engaging in illicit behaviors over the Internet. About half of the students reported that they used the Internet at least several times a year, with 8% reporting daily use of the Internet. Among Internet users, most reported having Internet access either at home or at a friends' home, and 16 % reported having Internet access from work, school, or a computer center. Among Internet users, the main purpose was for school-related activities (60%), followed by e-mail (55%), entertainment (50%), chatting (24%), and searching for pornography (6%). Although most students thought it was inappropriate to read someone else's e-mail, use someone else's password or credit card information without their permission, or break into someone's computer, many students did endorse those illicit behaviors. Over a fifth of the students reported that they knew hackers. Forty three percent of students agreed that people make too much fuss about watching videos, movies or downloading music on the Internet without paying. Males were more likely than females to report using the Internet for entertainment purposes (p = 0.006) and were more likely to agree that it was okay to break into someone's computer (p = 0.04). The results of this study suggest that these Russian college students predominately use the Internet to help with their schoolwork, to communicate with others, and for entertainment. These results also suggest that interventions may be useful to change attitudes endorsing illicit uses of the Internet. PMID:15667050

  13. Internetting tactical security sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Douglas W.; Bryan, W. D.; Nguyen, Hoa G.

    1998-08-01

    The Multipurpose Surveillance and Security Mission Platform (MSSMP) is a distributed network of remote sensing packages and control stations, designed to provide a rapidly deployable, extended-range surveillance capability for a wide variety of military security operations and other tactical missions. The baseline MSSMP sensor suite consists of a pan/tilt unit with video and FLIR cameras and laser rangefinder. With an additional radio transceiver, MSSMP can also function as a gateway between existing security/surveillance sensor systems such as TASS, TRSS, and IREMBASS, and IP-based networks, to support the timely distribution of both threat detection and threat assessment information. The MSSMP system makes maximum use of Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) components for sensing, processing, and communications, and of both established and emerging standard communications networking protocols and system integration techniques. Its use of IP-based protocols allows it to freely interoperate with the Internet -- providing geographic transparency, facilitating development, and allowing fully distributed demonstration capability -- and prepares it for integration with the IP-based tactical radio networks that will evolve in the next decade. Unfortunately, the Internet's standard Transport layer protocol, TCP, is poorly matched to the requirements of security sensors and other quasi- autonomous systems in being oriented to conveying a continuous data stream, rather than discrete messages. Also, its canonical 'socket' interface both conceals short losses of communications connectivity and simply gives up and forces the Application layer software to deal with longer losses. For MSSMP, a software applique is being developed that will run on top of User Datagram Protocol (UDP) to provide a reliable message-based Transport service. In addition, a Session layer protocol is being developed to support the effective transfer of control of multiple platforms among multiple control

  14. EDITORIAL: The Internet and physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Paul

    1998-05-01

    Feature Issue Editor The World Wide Web has been described as a `distributed heterogeneous collaborative multimedia information system'. It began as a networked information project at CERN, where Tim Berners-Lee, now Director of the World Wide Web Consortium [W3C], developed a vision of the project. The Web has a body of software and a set of protocols and conventions. Through the use of hypertext and multimedia techniques, the Web is easy for anyone to roam, browse and contribute to. It was developed by physicists at CERN to fulfil a communication need, and is one of the fastest growing resources worldwide. The number of available sites increases hourly, the ability to find information becomes easier, and contacting anyone with an e-mail address is as easy as picking up the telephone and talking to them. A pupil researching a project on say `alternative energy' simply launches a web browser with the relevant search criteria. Some 13 500 references later they cut and paste sections together and, hey presto, they have their article. The teacher, on the other hand, has to discern what input to this work the pupil has made! What credit should be given for such an attempt? I believe we are going to have to teach how to value a site, by comparing it with other similar sites and exercising some judgement on what we find. Using a search with `physics' as my only keyword found more than 3.5 million references! Clearly the researcher has to become discerning, being judge and jury as it were. Will the Internet catch on? I fear so, is the simple answer. However, I am concerned that with so much information available the ability to discern quality sites from inferior ones and fact from fiction will become a major issue for educationalists. Pupils are going to have to be taught how to assess a site, how to judge its validity and learn to give correct references in their reports. Because Internet sites are ephemeral, a reference given today may not be active next week. Indeed

  15. [Internet in medicine--development and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Dezelić, Gjuro

    2002-01-01

    Internet is one of information technologies marking the transition from the second to the third millennium. The present role and expansion of Internet in medicine and healthcare is reviewed together with the perspective of further development. The beginning and initial expansion of the use of Internet in medicine are described. The World Wide Web (WWW or Web) is recognized as a major reason for this expansion, reaching a state described as a Web-pandemic. The rapid increase of the number of papers dealing with Internet in medical literature is presented as well as the appearance of several journals dedicated to Internet in medicine. First specialized symposia, among them MEDNET world conferences, are noted. First uses of Internet in medicine comprised databases, discussion groups, electronic newsletters, software archives and online public access catalogues. The appearance of the Web has led to a significant improvement of the Internet use in medicine, which is reflected in an exponential increase in the number of publications. It is noted that Internet allows "to do old things in new ways", but also "to do new things". It has become clear that the information revolution evoked by the internet shall leave a deep trace in medicine, as health information has become accessible to the public and ceased to be in exclusive control of health professionals. New medical fields--telemedicine and cybermedicine--appeared as the result of the development and global expansion of information and communication technologies, with cybermedicine dealing more specifically with the use of Internet. The advantages and disadvantages of cybermedicine are discussed, and major problems related to the quality of health information are highlighted. Several systems for quality criteria of health related Web-sites are described, indicating that Websites have to conform with the quality criteria such as transparency and honesty, accountability, privacy and data protection, currency

  16. Internet self-efficacy, the need for cognition, and sensation seeking as predictors of problematic use of the internet.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junqi; Chen, Zhuo; Tian, Mei

    2011-04-01

    We conducted a study of the relationships between Internet self-efficacy, sensation seeking, the need for cognition, and problematic use of the Internet. The study was based on a randomly selected sample of 979 adult Internet users. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis of these subjects' responses on a questionnaire consisting of relevant items indicated that Internet self-efficacy and sensation seeking positively predicted problematic Internet use. Contrastingly, the need for cognition was significantly negatively associated with problematic Internet use. PMID:20969453

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  18. Internet impact felt on plant floor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikles, L.

    1997-06-01

    While the Internet has gone from relative obscurity to being included in Microsoft Word`s spell checker in about four years. Its true power has yet to be realized. The Internet acts today as a low-cost, simple communication vehicle for one-to-one or many-to-many relationships through e-mail and the World Wide Web (WWW). Its future power lies with terms like {open_quotes}distributed computing,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}object orientation,{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}network computers.{close_quotes} While pushing the factory onto the information superhighway might not make the most sense today, taking advantage of the tools and approaches developed for the Internet to create an internal Internet, or intranet, may be key. Implemented properly, an Internet approach will deliver exciting opportunities to the plant floor to increase flexibility, speed up information flow, and improve decision making. While the Internet offers tremendous power through global connectivity, the communication security and reliability risks are still too great for connecting plant-floor operations without expensive firewall configurations. The tools developed for using the Internet, on the other hand, offer tremendous opportunity for secure internal operations until the security issues can be worked out. 4 figs.

  19. Internet over-users' psychological profiles: a behavior sampling analysis on internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Whang, Leo Sang-Min; Lee, Sujin; Chang, Geunyoung

    2003-04-01

    What kinds of psychological features do people have when they are overly involved in usage of the internet? Internet users in Korea were investigated in terms of internet over-use and related psychological profiles by the level of internet use. We used a modified Young's Internet Addiction Scale, and 13,588 users (7,878 males, 5,710 females), out of 20 million from a major portal site in Korea, participated in this study. Among the sample, 3.5% had been diagnosed as internet addicts (IA), while 18.4% of them were classified as possible internet addicts (PA). The Internet Addiction Scale showed a strong relationship with dysfunctional social behaviors. More IA tried to escape from reality than PA and Non-addicts (NA). When they got stressed out by work or were just depressed, IA showed a high tendency to access the internet. The IA group also reported the highest degree of loneliness, depressed mood, and compulsivity compared to the other groups. The IA group seemed to be more vulnerable to interpersonal dangers than others, showing an unusually close feeling for strangers. Further study is needed to investigate the direct relationship between psychological well-being and internet dependency. PMID:12804026

  20. [Internet use and pathological internet engagement in a sample of college students].

    PubMed

    Tsouvelas, G; Giotakos, O

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies indicate multiple consequences of pathologically excessive internet use. This study investigated the correlate of internet usage, with pathological internet engagement. Participants were 514 college students from the University of Athens who completed a questionnaire covering various aspects of internet use, Young's Internet Addiction Test, scales investigating online gambling addiction and cybersexual addiction and scales investigating suicidal ideation and the use of psychoactive substances. We found that the daily Internet use (b=0,38, t=10,38, p<0,001), the use of interactive online games (b=0,21, t=5,15, p<0,001), making acquaintances on the internet (b=0,20, t=5,11, p<0,001) and the participation in online forums (b=0,15, t=3,64, p<0,001) account for 42% of the variance of pathological internet engagement. Subjects at risk for developing pathological internet engagement had significantly higher levels of online gambling addiction, cybersexual addiction, suicidal ideation and alcohol abuse, compared with other groups. Pathological internet engagement, particularly in young people, is a new psychopathological parameter that should be incorporated in the diagnostic and therapeutic horizon of mental health professionals. PMID:21971197

  1. What Influences Children's and Adolescents' Understanding of the Complexity of the Internet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zheng

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing complex relationships among Internet use, Internet users, and conceptual understanding of the Internet. It used path models to examine factors related to Internet use (duration of Internet use, frequency of Internet use, and informal Internet classes) and Internet users (age and gender) in affecting understanding of…

  2. Heritability of compulsive Internet use in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Vink, Jacqueline M; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C E M; Huppertz, Charlotte; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decades, Internet use has grown substantially, and it now serves people as a supportive tool that is used regularly and-in large parts of the world-inevitably. Some people develop problematic Internet use, which may lead to addictive behavior and it is becoming important to explore the risk factors for compulsive Internet use. Data were analyzed on compulsive Internet use [with the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS)] from 5247 monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) adolescent twins registered with the Netherlands Twin Register. The participants form a sample that is informative for genetic analyses, allowing the investigation of the causes of individual differences in compulsive Internet use. The internal consistency of the instrument was high and the 1.6-year test-retest correlation in a subsample (n = 902) was 0.55. CIUS scores increased slightly with age. Remarkably, gender did not explain variation in CIUS scores, as mean scores on the CIUS were the same in boys and girls. However, the time spent on specific Internet activities differed: boys spent more time on gaming, whereas girls spent more time on social network sites and chatting. The heritability estimates were the same for boys and girls: 48 percent of the individual differences in CIUS score were influenced by genetic factors. The remaining variance (52 percent) was due to environmental influences that were not shared between family members. Because a life without Internet is almost impossible nowadays, it is important to further explore the determinants of compulsive Internet use, including genetic risk factors. PMID:25582809

  3. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Auden C.; Tanski, Susanne E.; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. METHODS A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. RESULTS At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. CONCLUSIONS Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. PMID:26738886

  4. PHYSICS EDUCATION AND THE INTERNET: Graduate education on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venables, John A.

    1998-05-01

    The Internet can be advantageous for specialist graduate and research-based teaching and learning. Positive points include: ( a) faculty members can consult students interactively about the choice of material; ( b) students can access/download notes and interact with faculty members, independent of location and time; ( c) students can access web pages put up by other groups working in related areas, and can incorporate them into course projects; ( d) the fact that specialist courses cannot be given in person each term/semester/year becomes relatively unimportant: they can still be studied at other times; ( e) further material, including working programs/models can be prepared/explored as part of undergraduate projects, and/or in collaboration with other institutions. Experience has been gained delivering graduate courses and individual lectures on surface and thin film physics, and quantum physics, during 1996-8 in an international context, and attending and contributing to related workshops. Points needing further discussion and resolution include: accreditation and costing between institutions, the nature and extent of copyright problems, and most useful forms of student interaction. More details can be found at http://venables.asu.edu/grad/index.html.

  5. Internet use and misuse: a multivariate regression analysis of the predictive factors of internet use among Greek adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tsitsika, Artemis; Critselis, Elena; Kormas, Georgios; Filippopoulou, Anastasia; Tounissidou, Despoina; Freskou, Aliki; Spiliopoulou, Theodora; Louizou, Amalia; Konstantoulaki, Eleftheria; Kafetzis, Dimitrios

    2009-06-01

    The internet is an integral tool for information, communication, and entertainment among adolescents. As adolescents devote increasing amounts of time to utilizing the internet, the risk for adopting excessive and pathological internet use is inherent. The study objectives include assessing the characteristics and predictors of excessive internet use and evaluating the prevalence of pathological internet use among Greek adolescents. A cross-sectional study design was applied to this effect. The study population (n = 897) consisted of a random sample of adolescents residing in Athens, Greece. Self-completed questionnaires, pertaining to internet access characteristics and Young's Internet Addiction Scale (YIAS) score, were applied in order to investigate the study objectives. The multivariate regression analysis indicated that the most significant predictors of overall internet use included accessing the internet via one's own home portal and for the purpose of social interaction. Internet access via the school environment was a significant deterrent among low (1-3 h/week) internet users, while access via internet cafés was a significant predictor for high (11-20 h/week) internet users. Moreover, accessing the internet for the purposes of game playing was the most significant predictor for excessive (>20 h/week) internet use. The prevalence of borderline internet use among the study population was 12.8%, while 1.00% reported addictive internet use. Also, 10.4% of male excessive internet users reported addictive internet use (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, excessive internet use is predicted solely by the location of internet access (own home portal) and the scope of internet use (i.e., sites relating to socialization and game playing) and may lead to internet addiction, particularly among male adolescents. PMID:18762980

  6. Internet-based instruction in college teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flickinger, Kathleen Anne

    Distance education and Internet instruction are increasingly being used in college science teaching. In an effort to reach more students, Iowa State University's Human Anatomy and Physiology course was offered via Internet as well as via traditional lecture format. To assess the educational ramifications of this offering, three studies were conducted. In the first study, a collective case study approach was utilized to describe the learning environment created by an Internet-based college science course. In this study, three students were followed as they worked their way through the course. Collective case study methodologies were used to provide a rich description of the learning environment experienced by these students. Motivation, computer savvy, and academic and personal self-confidence appeared to impact the satisfaction level of the students enrolled in the class. To evaluate the effectiveness of the learning environment offered through the Internet-based science course, a quantitative comparison study was undertaken. In this study a comparison of achievement scores and study habits between students enrolled in the Internet-based class and those enrolled in the traditional section was made. Results from this study indicated that content understanding and retention did not appear to be effected by the type of instruction. Desirable study habits were reportedly used more frequently in the Internet section of the class than in the traditional class. To complete the description of the Internet course experience, a qualitative examination of Internet instructors' time commitment and level of teaching satisfaction was conducted. Data for this study consisted of interviews and researcher observations. Instructor time-on-task was initially quite high, and remained above the average spent on average face-to-face instruction in subsequent semesters. Additionally the role of the faculty member changed dramatically, causing some lessening of job satisfaction. Taken as

  7. Exploring Chemistry Resources on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murov, Steven

    2001-10-01

    The Internet has rapidly emerged as an important resource of chemistry information. Discovering the scope of the information available and how to find it should be a part of the undergraduate education of every chemistry student. Interesting, challenging, and relevant searches on the Internet motivate students to gain navigation experience while (it is hoped!) increasing their desire to learn chemistry. A variety of investigations are suggested to introduce students to different search techniques and reinforce and supplement their knowledge of chemistry. As a result of performing the exercises, students should have a good sense of the role the Internet can play in their chemistry literature searches.

  8. Ultrabroadband photonic internet: safety aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalicki, Arkadiusz; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2008-11-01

    Web applications became most popular medium in the Internet. Popularity, easiness of web application frameworks together with careless development results in high number of vulnerabilities and attacks. There are several types of attacks possible because of improper input validation. SQL injection is ability to execute arbitrary SQL queries in a database through an existing application. Cross-site scripting is the vulnerability which allows malicious web users to inject code into the web pages viewed by other users. Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) is an attack that tricks the victim into loading a page that contains malicious request. Web spam in blogs. There are several techniques to mitigate attacks. Most important are web application strong design, correct input validation, defined data types for each field and parameterized statements in SQL queries. Server hardening with firewall, modern security policies systems and safe web framework interpreter configuration are essential. It is advised to keep proper security level on client side, keep updated software and install personal web firewalls or IDS/IPS systems. Good habits are logging out from services just after finishing work and using even separate web browser for most important sites, like e-banking.

  9. Deindividuation and Internet software piracy.

    PubMed

    Hinduja, Sameer

    2008-08-01

    Computer crime has increased exponentially in recent years as hardware, software, and network resources become more affordable and available to individuals from all walks of life. Software piracy is one prevalent type of cybercrime and has detrimentally affected the economic health of the software industry. Moreover, piracy arguably represents a rend in the moral fabric associated with the respect of intellectual property and reduces the financial incentive of product creation and innovation. Deindividuation theory, originating from the field of social psychology, argues that individuals are extricated from responsibility for their actions simply because they no longer have an acute awareness of the identity of self and of others. That is, external and internal constraints that would typically regulate questionable behavior are rendered less effective via certain anonymizing and disinhibiting conditions of the social and environmental context. This exploratory piece seeks to establish the role of deindividuation in liberating individuals to commit software piracy by testing the hypothesis that persons who prefer the anonymity and pseudonymity associated with interaction on the Internet are more likely to pirate software. Through this research, it is hoped that the empirical identification of such a social psychological determinant will help further illuminate the phenomenon. PMID:18721086

  10. Information Economics and the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Coiera, Enrico

    2000-01-01

    Information economics offers insights into the dynamics of information across networked systems like the Internet. An information marketplace is different from other marketplaces because an information good is not actually consumed and can be reproduced and distributed at almost no cost. For information producers to remain profitable, they will need to minimize their exposure to competition. For example, information can be sold by charging site access rather than information access fees, or it can be bundled with other information or “versioned.” For information consumers, a variation of Malthus' law predicts that the exponential growth in information will mean that specific information will become increasingly expensive to find, because search costs will grow but human attention will remain limited. Furthemore, the low cost of creating poor-quality information on the Web means that the low-quality information may eventually swamp high-quality resources. The use of reputable information portals on the Web, or smart search technologies, may help in the short run, but it is unclear whether an “information famine” is avoidable in the longer term. PMID:10833157

  11. Obtaining medical information from the Internet.

    PubMed

    Klemenz, B; McSherry, D

    1997-01-01

    The Internet is rapidly expanding as an environment for electronic communication and resource sharing. The World Wide Web, a relatively new service on the Internet, provides access to a wealth of information resources through a simple point-and-click interface. Available resources of interest to physicians include bibliographical and statistical databases, literature reviews, discussion groups, press releases, newsletters, drug information, self-assessment questionnaires, multimedia textbooks, patient simulations, clinical decision aids, educational software, and much more. Access to the Internet is widely available in universities and medical libraries; physicians working at home can gain access from a personal computer linked by a modem to a telephone line, by subscribing to an Internet service provider. PMID:9263971

  12. Operating CFDP in the Interplanetary Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the design elements of CCSDS File Delivery Protocol and Interplanetary Internet technologies that will simplify their integration and discusses the resulting new capabilities, such as efficient transmission of large files via multiple relay satellites operating in parallel.

  13. Telemedical Education: Teaching Spirometry on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Esther H.; Gross, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development and evaluation of an Internet-based tutorial for teaching spirometry interpretation to nonpulmonologists. Concludes that computer-based tutorials can effectively train off-site practitioners in spirometry interpretation. Contains 23 references. (Author/WRM)

  14. Internet use, social skills, and adjustment.

    PubMed

    Engelberg, Elisabeth; Sjöberg, Lennart

    2004-02-01

    The present study investigated the extent to which inter-personal skills, personality, and emotional intelligence (EI) were related to the extent of usage of the Internet, as measured with the Internet Addiction Scale, on a sample of undergraduates. EI was assessed by performance measures derived from the identification and labeling of emotions as shown in pictures of facial expressions, and as interpreted from descriptions of social episodes. Use of the Internet was related to loneliness and adherence to idiosyncratic values (strong effects), and also to poorer balance between work and leisure and emotional intelligence (weaker effects). Big Five personality dimensions were also included in the study. No link was found between personality and usage of the Internet. Results suggest that frequent users tend to be lonely, to have deviant values, and to some extent to lack the emotional and social skills characteristic of high EI. PMID:15006168

  15. An Internet-Based Course: Leadership Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, L. James; Liu, Daonian; Brooks, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses leadership issues that arose during the creation and offering of an Internet-based course for high school chemistry teachers including course organization, recruiting students, and technological support available to participating students. (Author/WRM)

  16. Focusing Internet Searches for World Music Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Discusses the importance of focusing Internet searches for world music resources. Importance of teaching about music from various cultures; Benefits of identifying a characteristic instrument by name or stylistic terms; Types of music web sites.

  17. Internet interventions for depression: new developments

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Johanna; Berger, Thomas; Westermann, Stefan; Klein, Jan Philipp; Moritz, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of Internet interventions, mostly grounded in methods of cognitive behavioral therapy, have been developed and tested for several mental disorders. The evidence to date shows that these interventions are effective in reducing symptoms of depression. Metaanalyses report small-to-medium effect sizes when Internet interventions are delivered as stand-alone self-help interventions (d=0.25-0.36), and medium-to-large effect sizes when delivered as therapist-guided interventions (d=0.58-0.78), both compared with usual care. Only a minority of people suffering from depression receive adequate treatment, and Internet interventions might help bridge the large treatment gap. This review summarizes the current body of evidence and highlights pros and cons of Internet interventions. It also outlines how they could be implemented in mental health care systems and points out unresolved questions, as well as future directions, in this research field. PMID:27489460

  18. Analysis of Internet sites for headache.

    PubMed

    Peroutka, S J

    2001-02-01

    The Internet is capable of providing an unprecedented amount of information to both physicians and patients interested in headache. To assess the status of headache information on the Internet (as of January 2000), a search for 'headache' was performed using 10 leading Internet search engines. The number of web pages identified ranged from 4419 (WebCrawler) to 506 426 (Northern Light). The 'average' search yielded nearly 150 000 web page listings for 'headache'. The content was then reviewed of the top 10 listed web pages for each search (i.e. a total of 100 page listings). The results demonstrate that, at the present time, Internet-based information on headache is extensive but poorly organized. Editorial review of this potential valuable resource is required in order to maximize its utility in headache education and management. PMID:11298659

  19. Internet Gaming Addiction: A Technological Hazard

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Verma, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Internet is considered a beneficial tool in research, communication, and information. Still, its excessive and prolonged use has the potential of causing addiction. The presentation of this technological hazard may range from a mild socio-personal distress to a gross disorganization in behavior and self-care. No reported study on Internet gaming addiction is available from India. Case Presentation: We reported a case of two brothers, diagnosed with Internet gaming addiction, who showed grossly disorganized behavior and severely compromised self-care. The condition was managed by pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies, with sustained improvement after 6 months follow up. Conclusions: Internet gaming addiction may cause severe personal, social, and occupational problems. Despite the range of severity and various presentations of this disorder, DSM-5 lacks the severity classifier. Early identification and management may result in complete recovery. PMID:26870714

  20. Interactive Career Counseling on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ginger; Horan, John J.; Tompkins-Bjorkman, Amy; Kovalski, Theresa; Hackett, Gail

    2000-01-01

    Describes three interactive career counseling Internet programs based on cognitive restructuring and differential diagnosis: changing career beliefs of young women, helping parents facilitate children's career development, and altering attributions related to academic motivation for at-risk students. (SK)

  1. Internet resources for the petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, A.

    1995-12-31

    You`ve sur`ed http://www.yahoo.com/Science/already, you`ve checked out your Federal Express package`s location at http://www.fedex.com/ and you`ve chuckled at the latest Dilbert cartoon at http://www.unitedmedia.com/comics/dilbert/ when all of a sudden your manager walks in and wants to know what you doing about declining production (in your field, in your wells, or in yourself). Consequently, some frustrated users of the INTERNET have become skeptical of the real business value the INTERNET provides to their company. Therefore, various INTERNET resources for oil companies and experiences of a reservoir engineering accessing those resources will be presented. Examples and opinions of the INTERNET delivering tangible benefit to our industry will be highlighted.

  2. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2012-01-26

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  3. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2014-08-12

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  4. The Evolving Internet: Applications and Network Service Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the current state of the Internet as a data transport system and some of its emerging problems. Discusses two major research initiatives--Internet 2 and Next Generation Internet (NGI)--and network-level services that may see deployment in these new research testbeds. Concludes with speculations about future changes to the Internet as a…

  5. Using Internet Groups in the Learning of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arikan, Arda

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an application of one aspect of the Internet technology, namely Internet groups, into the teaching of American and British literatures is evaluated by means of a content analysis of the Internet group which was used as the course component. The aim of this paper was to see how students used the Internet group in the learning of…

  6. Functional Internet Literacy: Required Cognitive Skills with Implications for Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie

    2007-01-01

    Patterns of typical Internet use provide the basis for defining "functional Internet literacy." Internet use commonly includes communication, information, recreation, and commercial activities. Technical competence with connectivity, security, and downloads is a prerequisite for using the Internet for such activities. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive…

  7. The Internet: A Selective Annotated Bibliography of Print Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Marlene

    1993-01-01

    Describes 38 introductory print materials the novice may consult before using the Internet, including guides and directories to resources; general information about the Internet; materials about Internet applications such as electronic mail, remote login, and file transfer; and information about Internet tools such as Archie, Gopher, and WAIS…

  8. Online Programming Can Be a Library Oasis on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Lori; Peters, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The Internet is many things to many people. Some see the Internet as the Wild West, a yawning wilderness waiting to be tamed and cultivated. For companies like eBay, the Internet is a steady, transaction-based revenue stream. For the dot-com companies, the Internet was perceived as a California gold rush. In terms of online library programming for…

  9. Stress, Coping, and Internet Use of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deatherage, Scott; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Aksoz, Idil

    2014-01-01

    College students experience stressful life events and little research exists on the role the Internet may play in students' coping. Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine associations among perceived stress, time spent on the Internet, underlying motives for utilizing the Internet, problematic Internet use, and traditional…

  10. Psychometric Validation of Internet Addiction Test with Indian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhir, Amandeep; Chen, Sufen; Nieminen, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed great developments in Internet infrastructure, which have led to increased Internet usage among people of various age groups. However, at the same time, there have been some negative implications associated with increased Internet usage for some individuals. "Internet addiction" (IA) is one such negative…

  11. Why You Should Establish a Connection to the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Judy A.; Misic, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    Provides the rationale for establishing a connection to the Internet. Describes Internet services, including e-mail, telnet, file transfer protocol (FTP), USENET, gopher, Archie, and World Wide Web. Identifies reasons why the Internet is a valuable tool. Outlines steps for establishing a connection and discusses the future of the Internet. A…

  12. Time Spent on the Internet and Adolescent Blood Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Johnson, Dayna A.; Peters, Rosalind M.; Burmeister, Charlotte; Joseph, Christine L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Internet use is nearly ubiquitous among adolescents. Growing evidence suggests heavy Internet use negatively impacts health, yet the relationship between time spent on the Internet and adolescent blood pressure (BP) is unknown. We examined the association between Internet use and elevated BP in a racially diverse cross-sectional sample of 331…

  13. Internet Resources for Community College Practitioners. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Elizabeth

    This article describes the Internet and lists resources available to community college (CC) practitioners through the Internet. The Internet is described as an international computer network which links thousands of smaller networks. The digest suggests the following hardware for Internet access: an IBM-compatible computer capable of running…

  14. [Anesthesiologists and the Internet: the Internet and the Masui Discussion List].

    PubMed

    Mori, T

    1996-11-01

    The Internet is a global network that connects computer networks around the world. It enables inter-computer communication and the sharing of computer resources and information using the TCP/IP data transmission protocol. The Internet began in 1969 as the ARPAnet which connected just four computers, in California and Utah. On the Internet, computers are identified by their IP addresses and can exchange information with any other computers on the network. More than 120 Japanese anesthesiologists are subscribing to a mailing list, "the Masui Discussion List" on the Internet to exchange information with each other. They also send information to the world. PMID:8953871

  15. [Herbs on the Internet: risky information].

    PubMed

    Firenzuoli, Fabio; Gori, Luigi; Di Simone, Luisa; Morsuillo, Maria

    2006-04-01

    We analyzed Internet information about herbal products and dietary supplements regulated by Ministry of Public Health. We screened 522 Italian web sites and we found information about toxic risks on Germander (Teucrium chamaedrys), Red yeast fermented rice (Monascus ruber), Borage (Borago officinalis) and Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara) respectively in: 63%, 47%, 3% and 22% of the web sites. It is also possible the on-line purchase. Results show that in Internet there are not correct instructions about risks of herbal products. PMID:16729486

  16. International NDT Technical Collaboration Using the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Diederichs, Rolf; Jones, Marty; Onoe, Morio

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the capability of the Internet as a world-wide NDT communication tool for technical collaboration, dissemination of information and international standards. This paper was written by authors that never personally met (except for two) and despite thousands of miles distance between them the authors managed to work as a team to complete this paper in a very time efficient manner. This success is attributed to the power of the Internet and it represents a simple example of the.

  17. The future of interaction on the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maybury, Mark T.

    1994-01-01

    The federated collection of heterogeneous computers we collectively term the Internet has been the force behind revolutionary change, both in terms of actual practice and imagination of what might be. The raw numbers are staggering: IP registrations are now ten times that of only five years ago; and between 1992 - 1993 the amount of information being transferred tripled. Changes in three key areas: knowledge discovery; intelligent information access; and collaboration on the Internet are discussed.

  18. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  19. Creating your own medical Internet library

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A

    1999-01-01

    Many physicians struggle to keep up with new developments in their fields. The internet can provide a solution to this problem by allowing rapid access to a broad spectrum of reliable information. Becoming familiar with a few clinically relevant and freely available medical resources on the World Wide Web may enhance a physician's efforts to provide evidence-based care on a daily basis. This article outlines a simple strategy for physicians to make the internet a useful tool. PMID:10569106

  20. An Internet enabled impact limiter material database

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, S.; Kanipe, F.; McMurtry, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents a detailed explanation of the construction of an interest enabled database, also known as a database driven web site. The data contained in the internet enabled database are impact limiter material and seal properties. The technique used in constructing the internet enabled database presented in this paper are applicable when information that is changing in content needs to be disseminated to a wide audience.

  1. Internet Addiction and Other Behavioral Addictions.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Alicia Grattan; Hsiao, Ray Chih-Jui; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-07-01

    The Internet is increasingly influential in the lives of adolescents. Although there are many positives, there are also risks related to excessive use and addiction. It is important to recognize clinical signs and symptoms of Internet addiction (compulsive use, withdrawal, tolerance, and adverse consequences), treat comorbid conditions (other substance use disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, depression, and hostility), and initiate psychosocial interventions. More research on this topic will help to provide consensus on diagnostic criteria and further clarify optimal management. PMID:27338971

  2. Using the Internet in Competency Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seguin, Armand

    This introduction to the Internet explains what it is, how to use it, and how it can be useful to those with an interest in competency-based education. The Internet is a network of over 14,000 networks as of August 1993, with 1,000 being added per month, and at least 1 million machines and 20 million people connected to it. There are several…

  3. [Medical research using Internet questionnaire in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Hideo; Ide, Hiroo; Imamura, Tomoaki; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    As the method for questionnaire studies, mail survey and interview survey are frequently used. The utility and validity of applying the Internet method to medical studies have yet to be fully evaluated. For the present investigation, we reviewed 36 Japanese original articles using Internet questionnaire reported through to April 2005. Although original papers using the Internet method have been increasing in recent years, they are still limited in number. There is comparatively much research on disease with many patients in youth and early manhood, such as allergic ailments (allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and hives). As compared with conventional methods, the advantages of the Internet approach are convenience for both investigators and respondents and the ability to quickly collect data. The disadvantage is that the user's age range is more concentrated. Since samples are extracted from individuals who are registered as monitors, a greater sampling error may occur as compared with a random sampling method. However, it is to be expected that continued explosive growth of the Internet would decrease the limitation in user's age. If more elderly people participate in questionnaire studies using the web, research into more illnesses should be facilitated. Considering the inherent advantage, it is thought that Internet method can become the leading tool for sociomedical and clinical research in the near future. PMID:16502854

  4. Use of Internet panels to conduct surveys.

    PubMed

    Hays, Ron D; Liu, Honghu; Kapteyn, Arie

    2015-09-01

    The use of Internet panels to collect survey data is increasing because it is cost-effective, enables access to large and diverse samples quickly, takes less time than traditional methods to obtain data for analysis, and the standardization of the data collection process makes studies easy to replicate. A variety of probability-based panels have been created, including Telepanel/CentERpanel, Knowledge Networks (now GFK KnowledgePanel), the American Life Panel, the Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social Sciences panel, and the Understanding America Study panel. Despite the advantage of having a known denominator (sampling frame), the probability-based Internet panels often have low recruitment participation rates, and some have argued that there is little practical difference between opting out of a probability sample and opting into a nonprobability (convenience) Internet panel. This article provides an overview of both probability-based and convenience panels, discussing potential benefits and cautions for each method, and summarizing the approaches used to weight panel respondents in order to better represent the underlying population. Challenges of using Internet panel data are discussed, including false answers, careless responses, giving the same answer repeatedly, getting multiple surveys from the same respondent, and panelists being members of multiple panels. More is to be learned about Internet panels generally and about Web-based data collection, as well as how to evaluate data collected using mobile devices and social-media platforms. PMID:26170052

  5. Sitewide task team report for Internet policy

    SciTech Connect

    Aichele, D.R.

    1995-03-01

    The Internet is rapidly becoming the standard for communications, information transfer, and information sharing among U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organizations. It has long been used by the major laboratories, but is now beginning to be used by headquarters staff to communicate with field offices and contractors and as the access point to DOE`s repositories of information. It will soon become key to efficient conduct of operations. Sites without effective access to the Internet will have to rely on secondary, less effective communications. Therefore, the task team believes it is essential that Hanford become a full participant in utilizing this resource. To make this happen an effective access and delivery infrastructure must be provided to DOE and contractor staff and standard ways of doing business on the Internet are required. Much of the technology exists today for robust electronic interchange of information. The use of this technology needs to be expanded and coordinated throughout the DOE and Hanford contractor community. As the use of Internet within DOE is advancing rapidly, it will become the preferred method for communication and information sharing within 5 years. The conclusion of the Internet Inter-Contractor task team is that the use of the Internet is essential to communicate as well as provide and obtain information and knowledge. The Hanford Site must foster, support, and implement necessary changes to the technology infrastructure to improve user access, maintain security, and assure we are effective participants in the networked community.

  6. Forensic evaluation of problematic Internet use.

    PubMed

    Recupero, Patricia R

    2008-01-01

    Problematic Internet use appears to be a growing concern in many criminal and civil legal proceedings. Problems range from inappropriate personal use of the Internet in the workplace and excessive use of online games, pornography, and gambling, to cyberbullying among children and adolescents and numerous forms of criminal activity. Forensic psychiatric evaluations may help courts or other agencies to understand individual cases and to discern whether a psychiatric disability may be involved. Furthermore, the forensic psychiatrist may be asked to formulate a prognosis or to suggest which treatments may be helpful. Among the multiple underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms that explain problematic Internet use are: addiction, compulsion, impulse-control problems, and mood disorders. There is no definitive or standard treatment protocol for evaluation or treatment of problematic Internet use per se. A comprehensive evaluation should address the underlying psychopathology or personal problems that prompt or contribute to the problematic Internet use. This article suggests approaches that may help forensic psychiatrists to conduct a thorough evaluation with reasonable treatment recommendations. Different formulations of the problem and a discussion of DSM-IV factors are offered to provide starting points for the evaluation and to help psychiatrists to understand how problematic Internet use may relate to Axis I disorders or other factors. PMID:19092069

  7. Medical internet ethics: a field in evolution.

    PubMed

    Dyer, K A; Thompson, C D

    2001-01-01

    As in any new field, the merger of medicine, e-commerce and the Internet raises many questions pertaining to ethical conduct. Key issues include defining the essence of the patient-provider relationship, establishing guidelines and training for practicing online medicine and therapy, setting standards for ethical online research, determining guidelines for providing quality healthcare information and requiring ethical conduct for medical and health websites. Physicians who follow their professional code of ethics are obligated not to exploit the relationship they have with patients, nor allow anyone else working with them to do so. Physicians and therapists are obligated to serve those who place trust in them for treatment, whether in face-to-face or online Internet encounters with patients or clients. This ethical responsibility to patients and clients is often in direct conflict with the business model of generating profits. Healthcare professionals involved in Medical Internet Ethics need to define the scope of competent medical and healthcare on the Internet. The emerging ethical issues facing medicine on the Internet, the current state of medical ethics on the Internet and questions for future directions of study in this evolving field are reviewed in this paper. PMID:11604935

  8. [Use of the Internet in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    Górriz, C; González, F M; Trinidad, A; García, J R; Pinilla, M T; López Cortijo, C; Arellano, B

    1997-05-01

    The Internet is considered by some as one of the most important advances of the late 20th century. The Internet is the functional linking of personal computers via telephone lines to a worldwide network of millions of other computers, which enables them to exchange information freely. Although the Internet crops up in daily conversation, many persons are not aware of its usefulness and relevance for ear, nose and throat specialists. The Internet is accessed by special software that maximizes the potential of this vast computer network. The most important tools are e-mail and the World Wide Web. These tools make it possible to consult multimedia medical publications, access Medline, and carry out information searches, etc. The Internet and its most important uses in otolaryngology are summarized and a list of useful addresses is given. Although its advantages still are not widely appreciated, widespread Internet use is imminent and we think that it is a useful technology to know and use. Moreover, access is becoming easier and cheaper. PMID:9376133

  9. The Association between Internet Parenting Styles and Children's Use of the Internet at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi Mahmoud; Shawareb, Aseel Akram

    2014-01-01

    Parenting styles are known to have a powerful influence on child development, and as such they can significantly influence children's Internet use. The purpose of this study is to examine the Internet parenting style of Jordanian parents and their perspectives on their children's Internet use. Children's Internet use was evaluated…

  10. A New Benchmark for Internet Use: A Logistic Modeling of Factors Influencing Internet Use in Canada, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noce, Anthony A.; McKeown, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Internet diffusion is not homogeneous and depends on many factors. This study uses data from the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) to explore the extent demographic variables affect Internet use by individuals in Canada. A logistic model confirms that certain factors, educational attainment, and geography in particular influence Internet use in…

  11. Developing the Internet-Savviness (IS) Scale: Investigating the Relationships between Internet Use and Academically Talented Middle School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geyer, Roger W.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the development and validation of a 32-item scale that measures "Internet-Savviness" (IS). Relationships between this multidimensional construct and other primary variables of interest including age, gender, Internet access, Internet location, and Internet activities were explored. The sample population consisted of 241…

  12. Do We Really Have an Internet Problem? Statistics, Credibility and Issues Concerning Public Internet Access in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubbage, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    Discusses problems with patron Internet access in academic libraries and describes a study conducted at Northwestern University (Illinois) that used Internet tracking software to assess user Internet behavior. Topics include Internet use policies; pornography; and loss of control over library services and information content that is provided. (LRW)

  13. Internet robotics: an educational experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Matthew R.; Ratchford, Chris; Sutherland, Karen T.; Robaczewski, David

    1995-12-01

    Robotics is a subject which captures the imagination of undergraduate students in many disciplines including Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. Despite this interest, when the topic is covered at all in an undergraduate program, the critical hands-on component of the course is often omitted. This is due to a number of causes ranging from the complexity of the subject to the availability of equipment. This paper describes a project to allow experimentation with robots through the Internet for the purpose of undergraduate education. An experimental system has been developed which links computer science students at the University of Wisconsin/LaCrosse with robots and Mechanical Engineering Students at Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre PA. Unlike such systems constructed for the purpose of experimentation with time delay for shallow space or undersea manipulation, the focus of this system is the education of undergraduate students. This paper discusses how the educational goals affect the design of this system as well as the selection of tasks. Although there are clear advantages in capital and maintenance costs to sharing equipment, the emphasis here is on the significant educational benefits of this type of system. We show that remote operation leads to an understanding of the complexity and difficulty in specifying robot motions for an uncontrolled environment. This understanding is very difficult to achieve in a simulated or local settings where students have much greater control over the execution environment of the robot. The system was constructed in the summer of 1995, with experiments performed during the fall semester of 1995. Results of the experiments run by the joint undergraduate research groups as well as the associated educational outcomes are presented.

  14. The Internet Gaming Disorder Scale.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Jeroen S; Valkenburg, Patti M; Gentile, Douglas A

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the American Psychiatric Association included Internet gaming disorder (IGD) in the appendix of the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The main aim of the current study was to test the reliability and validity of 4 survey instruments to measure IGD on the basis of the 9 criteria from the DSM-5: a long (27-item) and short (9-item) polytomous scale and a long (27-item) and short (9-item) dichotomous scale. The psychometric properties of these scales were tested among a representative sample of 2,444 Dutch adolescents and adults, ages 13-40 years. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that the structural validity (i.e., the dimensional structure) of all scales was satisfactory. Both types of assessment (polytomous and dichotomous) were also reliable (i.e., internally consistent) and showed good criterion-related validity, as indicated by positive correlations with time spent playing games, loneliness, and aggression and negative correlations with self-esteem, prosocial behavior, and life satisfaction. The dichotomous 9-item IGD scale showed solid psychometric properties and was the most practical scale for diagnostic purposes. Latent class analysis of this dichotomous scale indicated that 3 groups could be discerned: normal gamers, risky gamers, and disordered gamers. On the basis of the number of people in this last group, the prevalence of IGD among 13- through 40-year-olds in the Netherlands is approximately 4%. If the DSM-5 threshold for diagnosis (experiencing 5 or more criteria) is applied, the prevalence of disordered gamers is more than 5%. PMID:25558970

  15. Internet Sex Ads for MSM and Partner Selection Criteria: The Potency of Race/Ethnicity Online

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Jay P.; Ayala, George; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2009-01-01

    The explosive growth in Internet use by MSM to find sexual partners has been noted in the research literature. However, little attention has been given to the impact of participating in this online sexual marketplace for MSM of color, despite race/ethnicity as a frequently used selection criterion in personal ads or profiles. Six focus group discussions [n=50], and 35 in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with African American, Latino, Asian and Pacific Islander MSM in Los Angeles, which included discussion of their use of Internet sites to meet/interact with other MSM. Men reported race/ethnicity as a pervasive and powerful factor in facilitating or derailing Internet-mediated sexual encounters. The racialized interactions that MSM of color reported ranged from simple expressions of race-based preferences to blatantly discriminatory/hostile interactions and often demeaning race-based sexual objectification. Experiences of rejection and a perceived hierarchy of value in the sexual market based on race had definite costs for these MSM using these online sites. Furthermore, the private and solitary nature of seeking partners online meant that there was little to buffer the corrosive aspects of those negative experiences. These online dynamics have implications for the power balance in Internet-mediated sexual liaisons, including sexual decision-making and sexual risk. PMID:21322176

  16. Evaluating Internet End-to-end Performance

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Fred B.; Cid, Victor H.; Siegel, Elliot R.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Objective: An evaluation of Internet end-to-end performance was conducted for the purpose of better understanding the overall performance of Internet pathways typical of those used to access information in National Library of Medicine (NLM) databases and, by extension, other Internet-based biomedical information resources. Design: The evaluation used a three-level test strategy: 1) user testing to collect empirical data on Internet performance as perceived by users when accessing NLM Web-based databases, 2) technical testing to analyze the Internet paths between the NLM and the user's desktop computer terminal, and 3) technical testing between the NLM and the World Wide Web (“Web”) server computer at the user's institution to help characterize the relative performance of Internet pathways. Measurements: Time to download the front pages of NLM Web sites and conduct standardized searches of NLM databases, data transmission capacity between NLM and remote locations (known as the bulk transfer capacity [BTC], “ping” round-trip time as an indication of the latency of the network pathways, and the network routing of the data transmissions (number and sequencing of hops). Results: Based on 347 user tests spread over 16 locations, the median time per location to download the main NLM home page ranged from 2 to 59 seconds, and 1 to 24 seconds for the other NLM Web sites tested. The median time to conduct standardized searches and get search results ranged from 2 to 14 seconds for PubMed and 4 to 18 seconds for Internet Grateful Med. The overall problem rate was about 1 percent; that is, on the average, users experienced a problem once every 100 test measurements. The user terminal tests at five locations and Web host tests at 13 locations provided profiles of BTC, RTT, and network routing for both dial-up and fixed Internet connections. Conclusion: The evaluation framework provided a profile of typical Internet performance and insights into network

  17. Internet café addiction of Taiwanese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-Shan; Cheng, Fei-Fei

    2007-04-01

    With the recent vigorous development, the Internet has become a part of life. And the Internet café has become an emerging industry under this new wave of Internet heat. However, the Internet café has also brought about many unexpected social problems and negative effects on society in Taiwan. For example, Internet café addiction (or pathological use) is a particular phenomenon derived from Internet café in Taiwan. But currently there are just a few scholars who attend to this problem. This study focuses mainly on the phenomenon of Internet café addiction among adolescents in Taiwan, the Internet café patronage behavior, and the cause of this phenomenon. Result of a questionnaire survey indicate that a significant difference exists between male and female adolescent in the following two aspects: "the stay hours for each visit in Internet café" and "Internet café addiction scores." Males' stay hours in Internet café are longer than females', and males also get higher Internet café addiction scores than females. The results also indicate that participants' degree of self-esteem and support from their social network can account for 30% of variance of Internet café addiction. Further, the results also suggest that social support is positively related to Internet café addiction score, whereas a negative relationship between self-esteem and Internet café addiction score is observed. PMID:17474839

  18. Secured medical imaging over the Internet.

    PubMed

    Aslan, P; Lee, B; Kuo, R; Babayan, R K; Kavoussi, L R; Pavlin, K A; Preminger, G M

    1998-01-01

    The Internet has established itself as an affordable, extremely viable and ubiquitous communications network that can be easily accessed from virtually any point in the world. This makes it ideally suited for medical image communications. Issues regarding security and confidentiality of information on the Internet, however, need to be addressed for both occasional, individual users and consistent enterprise-wide users. In addition, the limited bandwidth of most Internet connections must be factored into the development of a realistic usermodel and resulting protocol. Open architecture issues must also be considered so that images can be communicated to recipients who do not have similar programs. Further, application-specific software is required to integrate image acquisition, encryption and transmission into a single, streamlined process. Using Photomailer software provided by PhysiTel Inc., the authors investigated the use of sending secured still images over the Internet. The scope of their investigation covered the use of the Internet for communicating images for consultation, referral, mentoring and education. Photomailer software was used at several local and remote sites. The program was used for both sending and receiving images. It was also used for sending images to recipients who did not have Photomailer, but instead relied on conventional email programs. The results of the investigation demonstrated that using products such as Photomailer, images could be quickly and easily communicated from one location to another via the Internet. In addition, the investigators were able to retrieve images off of their existing email accounts, thereby providing greater flexibility and convenience than other systems which require scheduled transmission of information on dedicated systems. We conclude that Photomailer and similar products may provide a significant benefit and improve communications among colleagues, providing an inexpensive means of sending secured

  19. Shyness and locus of control as predictors of internet addiction and internet use.

    PubMed

    Chak, Katherine; Leung, Louis

    2004-10-01

    The new psychological disorder of Internet addiction is fast accruing both popular and professional recognition. Past studies have indicated that some patterns of Internet use are associated with loneliness, shyness, anxiety, depression, and self-consciousness, but there appears to be little consensus about Internet addiction disorder. This exploratory study attempted to examine the potential influences of personality variables, such as shyness and locus of control, online experiences, and demographics on Internet addiction. Data were gathered from a convenient sample using a combination of online and offline methods. The respondents comprised 722 Internet users mostly from the Net-generation. Results indicated that the higher the tendency of one being addicted to the Internet, the shyer the person is, the less faith the person has, the firmer belief the person holds in the irresistible power of others, and the higher trust the person places on chance in determining his or her own course of life. People who are addicted to the Internet make intense and frequent use of it both in terms of days per week and in length of each session, especially for online communication via e-mail, ICQ, chat rooms, newsgroups, and online games. Furthermore, full-time students are more likely to be addicted to the Internet, as they are considered high-risk for problems because of free and unlimited access and flexible time schedules. Implications to help professionals and student affairs policy makers are addressed. PMID:15667051

  20. A Research on the Purpose of Internet Usage and Learning via Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzgar, Nursel Selver

    2005-01-01

    New technologies are rapidly changing our ways of communication, and also the art of teaching, as well as extending ways of learning. The dramatic growth of Internet usage has changed the lives of millions of people around the globe during the last decade. For students and teachers, the Internet is becoming an increasingly important part of the…

  1. The Influences of the Sixth Graders' Parents' Internet Literacy and Parenting Style on Internet Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Shih, Ru-Chu; Liu, Hung-Tzu; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Tseng, Kuo-Hung

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to explore the sixth grade students' parents' Internet literacy and parenting style on Internet parenting in Kaohsiung County in Taiwan. Upon stratified cluster sampling, a total of 822 parents from 34 classes in 28 schools participated in this study. The descriptive statistics and chi-square test were used to analyze the responses…

  2. University Students' Problematic Internet Use and Communication Skills According to the Internet Use Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceyhan, Aydogan Aykut

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether the levels of university students' problematic internet use and of perceived communication skills differ with respect to their basic internet use purposes. The participants were 411 university students [215 of whom were females (52.30%) and 196 of whom were males (47.70%)]. In the study, the…

  3. Internet Abuse among Teenagers and Its Relations to Internet Usage Patterns and Demographics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gencer, Suzan Lema; Koc, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on exploring Internet abuse among teenagers and its relations to some Internet usage patterns and demographic characteristics in a digitalizing country, Turkey. It was designed as a cross-sectional research on three types of school that differ in their academic performances. The data were collected from 1380 high school students…

  4. Internet Practices of Certified Rehabilitation Counselors and Analysis of Guidelines for Ethical Internet Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Ilana S.; Crimando, William

    2011-01-01

    The Internet has become an integral part of the practice of rehabilitation counseling. To identify potential ethical issues regarding the use of the Internet by counselors, two studies were conducted. In Study 1, we surveyed a national sample of rehabilitation counselors regarding their use of technology in their work and home settings. Results…

  5. The Mac Internet Tour Guide: Cruising the Internet the Easy Way. [First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraase, Michael

    Published exclusively for MacIntosh computer users, this guide provides an overview of Internet resources for new and experienced users. E-mail, file transfer, and decompression software used to access the resources are included on a 800k, 3.5 inch disk. The following chapters are included: (1) "What Is the Internet" covers finding your way…

  6. Preservice Teachers' Internet Addiction in Terms of Gender, Internet Access, Loneliness and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirer, Veysel; Bozoglan, Bahadir; Sahin, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate pre-service teachers' Internet addiction in terms of gender, Internet accessibility, loneliness and life satisfaction. Statistical analyses were completed on the data by the 247 preservice teachers that filled the surveys completely. According to findings, pre-service teachers' level of loneliness and…

  7. A study on Turkish adolescent's Internet use: possible predictors of Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Ak, Serife; Koruklu, Nermin; Yılmaz, Yusuf

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the internet use of Turkish adolescents, with a (particular) focus on the risk of Internet addiction. A web-based questionnaire was completed by a total of 4,311 adolescents attending public high schools in grades 9-12, in a small-sized city in western Turkey. Ages ranged from 15 to 19 years, 54 percent were female and 46 percent male. The questionnaire included items on sociodemographic information, Internet usage, and a Turkish version of the Young's Internet Addiction Test. The data were analyzed in SPPS 15.0 program using the t test, the Mann-Whitney U test, correlation and hierarchic regression analysis. The findings show that, regardless of gender, Facebook ranked highest in the classification of students' purpose of Internet use; it was also found that females mainly used the Internet for communication, whereas males were more interested in playing online games and reading newspapers and magazines. The results of hierarchic regression analysis indicated that the significant predictors of the internet addiction were the presence of Internet access at home, gender, and family income levels. PMID:23253206

  8. Libraries and the Internet, Part II: Legally Speaking, What is the Internet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhler, Scott F.; Allison, Rinda Y.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the law for libraries, i.e. potential risks and liabilities of regulating, or not regulating, Internet access and use. Discusses the Communications Decency Act, use of filtering software, Internet policies, liability under local criminal statutes, ordinances for disseminating child pornography, obscene material, and hostile work…

  9. Exploring Parents' and Children's Awareness on Internet Threats in Relation to Internet Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ktoridou, Despo; Eteokleous, Nikleia; Zahariadou, Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore parents' level of awareness in relation to the threats that children are exposed to when using the internet. Additionally, it explores the parental interest to raise their awareness on internet use and threats, as well as investigating their interest in establishing household environment safety…

  10. The Impact of Internet Knowledge on College Students' Intention to Continue to Use the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Lu; Zhang, Mingxin

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Examines the effect of Internet knowledge on college students' intention to continue using the Internet. Method: Students at four public institutions in Wuhan, China, were surveyed. They completed a questionnaire during the class hours. Analysis: Psychometric analysis was performed to assess the internal consistency, convergent and…

  11. Development and Validation of the Survey of Knowledge of Internet Risk and Internet Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gable, Robert K.; Ludlow, Larry H.; McCoach, D. Betsy; Kite, Stacey L.

    2011-01-01

    The development of the Survey of Knowledge of Internet Risk and Internet Behavior is described. A total of 1,366 Grades 7 and 8 male and female students from an urban, suburban, and rural school offered agree-disagree responses to 26 statements defining one Knowledge Scale and five behavior dimensions. Literature-based support is presented for…

  12. Classifying Internet Pathological Users: Their Usage, Internet Sensation Seeking, and Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Sunny S. J.

    A study was conducted to identify pathological Internet users and to reveal their psychological features and problematic usage patterns. One thousand and fifty Taiwanese undergraduates were selected. An Internet Addiction Scale was adopted to classify 648 students into 4 clusters. The 146 users in the 4th cluster, who reported significantly higher…

  13. The Relationship of Emotional Intelligence and Mental Disorders with Internet Addiction in Internet Users University Students

    PubMed Central

    Khoshakhlagh, Hasan; Faramarzi, Salar

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the relationship of emotional intelligence and mental disorders, with internet addiction in university students. Methods The method of study was descriptive-pilot one and correlation. Two hundred internet users (male and female) from Isfahan University and Isfahan University of Technology were randomly selected. For data collection، Carson's emotional intelligence Questionnaire، SCL-90 scale and Internet Addiction Test were used. Data analysis was implemented using multivariate regression statistical method. Findings Anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, aggression, phobia, hypochondria disorders, and emotional intelligence were the most significant predictors of Internet addiction. Moreover, there were significant correlations between these variables and Internet addiction disorder (P < 0.001). Moreover، the findings showed that there were significant associations between depressive (R = 0.33), summarization (R = 0.24), and interpersonal sensitivity (R = 0.20) disorders. In this study no correlation was found between internet addiction disorder with psychosis and paranoid ideation. Moreover, among mental disorders, there was only a significant difference between the sexes in depression (P < 0.001); the men showed more depressive tendencies than women. Conclusion The results showed a correlation between emotional intelligence and mental disorders with internet addiction, but these results can help therapists, psychologists and counselors in providing services to help internet addicts. PMID:24494148

  14. A Psychometric Comparison of Internet and Non-Internet Sex Offenders from a Community Treatment Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Andrew; Metcalf, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares psychometric test assessments of 39 men convicted of internet sex offences with 39 convicted of contact offences against a specific victim. Higher rates of socially desirable responding were identified in the internet group, as well as higher rates of emotional loneliness and under assertiveness, although the latter two…

  15. Risk Factors of Internet Addiction among Internet Users: An Online Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Yi; Lee, Ming-Been; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chang, Li-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds Internet addiction (IA) has become a major public health issue worldwide and is closely linked to psychiatric disorders and suicide. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of IA and its associated psychosocial and psychopathological determinants among internet users across different age groups. Methods The study was a cross-sectional survey initiated by the Taiwan Suicide Prevention Center. The participants were recruited from the general public who responded to the online questionnaire. They completed a series of self-reported measures, including Chen Internet Addiction Scale-revised (CIAS-R), Five-item Brief Symptom Rating Scale (BSRS-5), Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI), and questions about suicide and internet use habits. Results We enrolled 1100 respondents with a preponderance of female subjects (85.8%). Based on an optimal cutoff for CIAS-R (67/68), the prevalence rate of IA was 10.6%. People with higher scores of CIAS-R were characterized as: male, single, students, high neuroticism, life impairment due to internet use, time for internet use, online gaming, presence of psychiatric morbidity, recent suicide ideation and past suicide attempts. Multiple regression on IA showed that age, gender, neuroticism, life impairment, internet use time, and BSRS-5 score accounted for 31% of variance for CIAS-R score. Further, logistic regression showed that neuroticism, life impairment and internet use time were three main predictors for IA. Compared to those without IA, the internet addicts had higher rates of psychiatric morbidity (65.0%), suicide ideation in a week (47.0%), lifetime suicide attempts (23.1%), and suicide attempt in a year (5.1%). Conclusion Neurotic personality traits, psychopathology, time for internet use and its subsequent life impairment were important predictors for IA. Individuals with IA may have higher rates of psychiatric morbidity and suicide risks. The findings provide important information for further

  16. GOOSE: semantic search on internet connected sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Klamer; Bomhof, Freek; Burghouts, Gertjan; van Diggelen, Jurriaan; Hiemstra, Peter; van't Hof, Jaap; Kraaij, Wessel; Pasman, Huib; Smith, Arthur; Versloot, Corne; de Wit, Joost

    2013-05-01

    More and more sensors are getting Internet connected. Examples are cameras on cell phones, CCTV cameras for traffic control as well as dedicated security and defense sensor systems. Due to the steadily increasing data volume, human exploitation of all this sensor data is impossible for effective mission execution. Smart access to all sensor data acts as enabler for questions such as "Is there a person behind this building" or "Alert me when a vehicle approaches". The GOOSE concept has the ambition to provide the capability to search semantically for any relevant information within "all" (including imaging) sensor streams in the entire Internet of sensors. This is similar to the capability provided by presently available Internet search engines which enable the retrieval of information on "all" web pages on the Internet. In line with current Internet search engines any indexing services shall be utilized cross-domain. The two main challenge for GOOSE is the Semantic Gap and Scalability. The GOOSE architecture consists of five elements: (1) an online extraction of primitives on each sensor stream; (2) an indexing and search mechanism for these primitives; (3) a ontology based semantic matching module; (4) a top-down hypothesis verification mechanism and (5) a controlling man-machine interface. This paper reports on the initial GOOSE demonstrator, which consists of the MES multimedia analysis platform and the CORTEX action recognition module. It also provides an outlook into future GOOSE development.

  17. Spatial structure of the internet traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, Marc; Gondran, Bernard; Guichard, Eric

    2003-03-01

    The Internet infrastructure is not virtual: its distribution is dictated by social, geographical, economical, or political constraints. However, the infrastructure's design does not determine entirely the information traffic and different sources of complexity such as the intrinsic heterogeneity of the network or human practices have to be taken into account. In order to manage the Internet expansion, plan new connections or optimize the existing ones, it is thus critical to understand correlations between emergent global statistical patterns of Internet activity and human factors. We analyze data from the French national ‘Renater’ network which has about 2 millions users and which consists in about 30 interconnected routers located in different regions of France and we report the following results. The Internet flow is strongly localized: most of the traffic takes place on a ‘spanning’ network connecting a small number of routers which can be classified either as ‘active centers’ looking for information or ‘databases’ providing information. We also show that the Internet activity of a region increases with the number of published papers by laboratories of that region, demonstrating the positive impact of the Web on scientific activity and illustrating quantitatively the adage ‘the more you read, the more you write’.

  18. Los Alamos offers Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is calling for applications for postdoctoral appointments and research fellowships. The positions are available in geoscience as well as other scientific disciplines.The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, awards J. Robert Oppenheimer Research Fellowships to scientists that either have or will soon complete doctoral degrees. The appointments are for two years, are renewable for a third year, and carry a stipend of $51,865 per year. Potential applicants should send a resume or employment application and a statement of research goals to Carol M. Rich, Div. 89, Human Resources Development Division, MS P290, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 by mid-November.

  19. 76 FR 22395 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Open Internet Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Open Internet Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Communications... ``Open Internet Advisory Committee'' (hereinafter ``the Committee''), is being established. FOR FURTHER... Internet rules (available at...

  20. Cigars, youth, and the Internet link.

    PubMed Central

    Malone, R E; Bero, L A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the accessibility and appeal to youth of cigar marketing sites on the Internet. METHODS: Sites marketing cigars (n = 141) were examined for age restrictions, prices, health warnings, and other elements. RESULTS: Although it is illegal for minors to purchase tobacco, only 36 sites (25.5%) prohibited purchases by minors. Sites offered low prices, and 32% accepted money orders, cashier's checks, or cash-on-delivery (COD) orders. Almost 30% of the sites included elements with potential youth appeal; only 3.5% displayed health warnings. CONCLUSIONS: The unregulated promotion of cigars on the Internet has the potential to attract youth, and there are few barriers to Internet tobacco purchases by minors. PMID:10800432

  1. Cryptography and the Internet: lessons and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    McCurley, K.S.

    1996-12-31

    The popularization of the Internet has brought fundamental changes to the world, because it allows a universal method of communication between computers. This carries enormous benefits with it, but also raises many security considerations. Cryptography is a fundamental technology used to provide security of computer networks, and there is currently a widespread engineering effort to incorporate cryptography into various aspects of the Internet. The system-level engineering required to provide security services for the Internet carries some important lessons for researchers whose study is focused on narrowly defined problems. It also offers challenges to the cryptographic research community by raising new questions not adequately addressed by the existing body of knowledge. This paper attempts to summarize some of these lessons and challenges for the cryptographic research community.

  2. The internet of things for personalized health.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Advances in information and communications technologies (ICT) enable new personalized health care concepts which are often characterized by four "P" terms, i.e. personalized, predictive, preventive and participatory. However, real world implementations of the complete 4P spectrum hardly exist today. The Internet of Things (IoT) has been defined as an extension to the current Internet that enables pervasive communication between the physical and the virtual world. Smart devices and enabling elements like Near Field Communication (NFC) and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology already exist and increasingly will be a mainstream element of our lives. This future vision paper attempts to assess if and how the Internet of Things for personalized health (IoT4pH) can help to facilitate the 4P healthcare paradigm and discusses related challenges and opportunities. PMID:24851958

  3. The Future of the Internet in Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guice, Jon; Duffy, Robert

    2000-01-01

    How are scientists going to make use of the Internet several years from now? This is a case study of a leading-edge experiment in building a 'virtual institute'-- using electronic communication tools to foster collaboration among geographically dispersed scientists. Our experience suggests: Scientists will want to use web-based document management systems. There will be a demand for Internet-enabled meeting support tools. While internet videoconferencing will have limited value for scientists, webcams will be in great demand as a tool for transmitting pictures of objects and settings, rather than "talking heads." and a significant share of scientists who do fieldwork will embrace mobile voice, data and video communication tools. The setting for these findings is a research consortium called the NASA Astrobiology Institute.

  4. Domain oriented information extraction from the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, Andreas; Blaesius, Karl H.

    2003-01-01

    Information retrieval and knowledge acquisition represent the basis of the modern information age. The internet provides the possibility of nearly worldwide unlimited information search. However, for a user searching the internet the huge mass of electronic information offerings requires a lot of time and effort to find the desired information. Because of the lack of context awareness, traditional internet search engines cannot satisfy the growing need for a selective high qualitative filtering and extraction of topic and user oriented information. The aim of the project INFOX-I at the University of Applied Sciences Trier, is to develop concepts to support the user searching information in the WWW. Therefore, there is an urgent need for methods that make it possible to automatically select relevant information on a given domain. Methods from the field of document analysis and knowledge based systems are used. In this paper we outline the concepts and the current state of the project.

  5. Value of the internet in emergency response.

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C. L.; Newsom, D. E.; Swietlik, C. E.

    1999-05-26

    Can the Internet be of value in emergency response? The answer is yes, judging by its use in the Kobe earthquake in Japan in 1995, ice storms in the US and Canada in 1998, and other disasters. Current and future areas of application are numerous, including exchanging messages, documents, and data files via e-mail; accessing operational data on-line; visualizing events via photos and maps; providing backup communications in lieu of broadcast media, exchanging information between crisis managers and responders; and providing information to media and the public. However, the Internet has some drawbacks, such as hardware/software requirements, computer literacy requirements, traffic jams, dependence on power and communication networks, and risks to information integrity and security. This paper examines some of the advantages, drawbacks, concerns, and potential uses of the Internet for emergency response.

  6. Current research knowledge about adolescent victimization via the Internet.

    PubMed

    Wolak, Janis; Ybarra, Michele L; Mitchell, Kimberly; Finkelhor, David

    2007-08-01

    We review current knowledge about adolescent Internet-mediated victimization, including Internet-initiated sex crimes in which offenders use the Internet to meet victims, unwanted online sexual solicitations, Internet harassment, and unwanted and wanted exposure to online pornography. Internet-initiated sex crimes have received considerable publicity, but the media stories have contributed to stereotypes that do not accurately portray adolescent Internet experience. Adults' concerns are valid but need to be supported with information that illuminates the real safety issues and targets the specific population of youth impacted. PMID:18605649

  7. Evolution of IPv6 Internet topology with unusual sudden changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jun; Zhao, Hai; Kathleen, M. Carley; Su, Zhan; Li, Hui

    2013-07-01

    The evolution of Internet topology is not always smooth but sometimes with unusual sudden changes. Consequently, identifying patterns of unusual topology evolution is critical for Internet topology modeling and simulation. We analyze IPv6 Internet topology evolution in IP-level graph to demonstrate how it changes in uncommon ways to restructure the Internet. After evaluating the changes of average degree, average path length, and some other metrics over time, we find that in the case of a large-scale growing the Internet becomes more robust; whereas in a top—bottom connection enhancement the Internet maintains its efficiency with links largely decreased.

  8. Current experiences with internet telepathology and possible evolution in the next generation of Internet services.

    PubMed

    Della Mea, V; Beltrami, C A

    2000-01-01

    The last five years experience has definitely demonstrated the possible applications of the Internet for telepathology. They may be listed as follows: (a) teleconsultation via multimedia e-mail; (b) teleconsultation via web-based tools; (c) distant education by means of World Wide Web; (d) virtual microscope management through Web and Java interfaces; (e) real-time consultations through Internet-based videoconferencing. Such applications have led to the recognition of some important limits of the Internet, when dealing with telemedicine: (i) no guarantees on the quality of service (QoS); (ii) inadequate security and privacy; (iii) for some countries, low bandwidth and thus low responsiveness for real-time applications. Currently, there are several innovations in the world of the Internet. Different initiatives have been aimed at an amelioration of the Internet protocols, in order to have quality of service, multimedia support, security and other advanced services, together with greater bandwidth. The forthcoming Internet improvements, although induced by electronic commerce, video on demand, and other commercial needs, are of real interest also for telemedicine, because they solve the limits currently slowing down the use of Internet. When such new services will be available, telepathology applications may switch from research to daily practice in a fast way. PMID:11339559

  9. Internet gaming addiction, problematic use of the internet, and sleep problems: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lawrence T

    2014-04-01

    The effect of problematic use of the Internet on mental health, particularly depression among young people, has been established but without a probable model for the underlying mechanism. In this study, a model is presented to describe possible pathways for the linkage between Internet gaming addiction and depression possibly mediated by sleep problems. A systematic review was conducted to gather epidemiological evidence to support or refute the link between addictive Internet gaming, problematic Internet use, and sleep problems including insomnia and poor sleep quality. Seven studies were identified through a systematic literature search, of these three related to addictive Internet gaming and four on problematic Internet uses and sleep problems. Information was extracted and analysed systematically from each of the studies and tabulated as a summary. Results of the review suggest that additive gaming, particularly massively multiplayer online role-playing games MMORPG, might be associated with poorer quality of sleep. Results further indicated that problematic Internet use was associated with sleep problems including subjective insomnia and poor sleep quality. PMID:24619594

  10. Comparison of national and personal identity between person with internet addiction disorder and normal internet users

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Jannatifard, Fereshte; Maracy, Mohammad R.; Alaghemandan, Hamed; Setare, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds: The present study was carried out in order to compare national and personal identity and their subscales in internet addicts and nonaddicts. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive-analytical research, and was carried out on 384 student internet users in different universities in the city of Isfahan who were selected using quota sampling. Subjects completed the questionnaires, then, subscales of personal and national identity questionnaires in internet addict and nonaddict were analyzed via SPSS16 software. Results: Results indicated a significant difference between the scores of national identity and personal identity as well as all subscales in internet addicts and nonaddicts, except for national heritage and homeland defence factors. In addition, there was a negative and significant relationship between addiction to internet and personal and national identity, except for the fourth and fifth factors of national identity (viewpoints of others considering the national group and homeland defence). Moreover, after controlling for the sex variable, internet addiction had an effect on personal and national identity. Conclusion: The findings of this research indicate that an excess of internet use and overinvolvement in cyberspace and the addiction to them, could be associated with defects in some aspects of national and personal identity. PMID:25013835

  11. Psychiatric patients' internet use corresponds to the internet use of the general public.

    PubMed

    Trefflich, Friederike; Kalckreuth, Sophie; Mergl, Roland; Rummel-Kluge, Christine

    2015-03-30

    The use of Internet has grown in the past number of years, including the increased application of various therapy programs for psychiatric patients which can be accessed online. Few studies investigating psychiatric patients' Internet use exist. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the number of psychiatric patients that use the Internet in comparison to the general population. Since patients with mental health disorders frequently suffer from a variety of disadvantages in society, it was evaluated whether psychiatric patients were disadvantaged particularly concerning the use and access of the Internet. Three hundred and thirty-seven patients participated in the study and completed a 29-item questionnaire. A response rate of 66% was achieved. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and binary logistic regression analysis were used. Out of the participants, 79.5% were Internet users. This number corresponds to the Internet use of the general population. Young patients in particular were found to use online information, using mostly search engines to seek medical information. The results show that psychiatric patients do not rank below the general population concerning the frequency of Internet use, which is especially important for accessing health related information online or participating in online programs. PMID:25623020

  12. Building multiservice Internet protocol virtual private networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, William

    1999-11-01

    Multiservice Internet Protocol-based Virtual Private Networks (MIP- VPNs) with Quality of Service (QoS) are becoming a reality due to the availability of new standards from the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). This paper describes how components including security models, IP tunneling protocols, and service differentiation schemes fit together in order to construct such a VPN. First, the concept and rationale of VPN is presented, followed by a discussion of its supporting components. A comparison is made among the various VPN technologies.

  13. Webpress: An Internet Outreach from NASA Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biezad, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    The Technology and Commercialization Office at NASA DRyden has developed many educational outreach programs for K-12 educators. This project concentrates on the internet portion of that effort, specifically focusing on the development of an internet tool for educators called Webpress. This tool will not only provide a user-friendly access to aeronautical topics and interesting individuals on the world wide web (web), but will also enable teachers to rapidly submit and display their own materials and links for use in the classroom.

  14. Smart internet search engine through 6W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehler, Stephen; Cader, Masud; Szu, Harold

    2006-04-01

    Current Internet search engine technology is limited in its ability to display necessary relevant information to the user. Yahoo, Google and Microsoft use lookup tables or indexes which limits the ability of users to find their desired information. While these companies have improved their results over the years by enhancing their existing technology and algorithms with specialized heuristics such as PageRank, there is a need for a next generation smart search engine that can effectively interpret the relevance of user searches and provide the actual information requested. This paper explores whether a smarter Internet search engine can effectively fulfill a user's needs through the use of 6W representations.

  15. Improving visual skills: a new internet application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, M. K.

    2006-09-01

    The object of this paper is to describe an internet-based system and technique for improving performance on visuomotor tasks. The technique can be used in any setting where the internet can be accessed, and can be adapted for improving a variety of visual tasks. Sample learning curves for acquiring the visual skills of accommodative facility, saccadic tracking and binocular fusion are presented, from three subjects ages 7 and 9, including one child diagnosed with autism. The database structure of the system allows powerful data storage and retrieval options for use in providing feedback on performance, online monitoring of progress by an external observer, and statistical analysis of group and individual data.

  16. Internet-based transfusion audit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitan, Jacek; Haley, Rebecca

    1995-03-01

    This project is aimed at developing a cost-effective working environment for the transfusion medicine specialists of American Red Cross (ARC). In this project we are developing a multimedia-based consultation environment that uses Internet and teleconferencing to increase the quality of services and to replace currently used 800 telephone lines. Through the use of Internet/LAN/ISDN the physicians can share information and references while they discuss patient cases. A multimedia interface allows the physician to access data from the office and from the house. This paper discusses the approach, current status of the project and future plans to extend the approach to other areas of medicine.

  17. Review Of Internet Health Information Quality Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Dzenowagis, Joan

    2001-01-01

    Background The massive growth of health information on the Internet; the global nature of the Internet; the seismic shift taking place in the relationships of various actors in this arena, and the absence of real protection from harm for citizens who use the Internet for health purposes are seen to be real problems. One response to many of these problems has been the burgeoning output of codes of conduct by numerous organizations trying to address quality of health information. Objectives Review the major self-regulatory initiatives in the English-speaking world to develop quality and ethical standards for health information on the Internet. Compare and analyze the approaches taken by the different initiatives. Clarify the issues around the development and enforcement of standards. Methods Quality initiatives selected meet one or more of the following criteria: Self-regulatory. A reasonable constituency. Diversity (eg, of philosophy, approach and process)-to achieve balance and wide representation, and to illustrate and compare different approaches. Historic value. A wider reach than a national audience, except when its reach is a significant sector of the Internet health information industry. The initiatives were compared in 3 ways: (1) Analysis and comparison of: key concepts, mechanism, or approach. Analysis of: the obligations that a provider has to meet to comply with the given initiative, the intended beneficiaries of that initiative, and the burdens imposed on different actors. These burdens are described in terms of their effect on the long-term sustainability and maintenance of the initiative by its developers. Analysis of the enforcement mechanisms. (2) Analysis and comparison by type of sponsoring organization, the reach of the initiative, and the sources of funding of the initiative or the sponsoring organization. (3) How the various initiatives fall under 1 of 3 key mechanisms and comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of these key mechanisms

  18. Live deaths online: internet suicide and lethality.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carolina A

    2012-01-01

    The Internet provides an infinite platform for the portrayal of lethal events. Beyond mere display, however, it dispenses information, allows for participation and sharing of content, and constitutes a virtual interactive forum. The Internet may ultimately shape society's approach to perceiving and dealing with death. Thus, psychiatrists may wish to be aware of these matters so that they may be considered in assessments and clinical care. In this article, the author attempts to identify key online locations where lethality is portrayed and how it may affect the individual patient and practitioner and the population at large. PMID:23233475

  19. Internet addiction and problematic Internet use: A systematic review of clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Kuss, Daria J; Lopez-Fernandez, Olatz

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provide a comprehensive overview of clinical studies on the clinical picture of Internet-use related addictions from a holistic perspective. A literature search was conducted using the database Web of Science. METHODS: Over the last 15 years, the number of Internet users has increased by 1000%, and at the same time, research on addictive Internet use has proliferated. Internet addiction has not yet been understood very well, and research on its etiology and natural history is still in its infancy. In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association included Internet Gaming Disorder in the appendix of the updated version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as condition that requires further research prior to official inclusion in the main manual, with important repercussions for research and treatment. To date, reviews have focused on clinical and treatment studies of Internet addiction and Internet Gaming Disorder. This arguably limits the analysis to a specific diagnosis of a potential disorder that has not yet been officially recognised in the Western world, rather than a comprehensive and inclusive investigation of Internet-use related addictions (including problematic Internet use) more generally. RESULTS: The systematic literature review identified a total of 46 relevant studies. The included studies used clinical samples, and focused on characteristics of treatment seekers and online addiction treatment. Four main types of clinical research studies were identified, namely research involving (1) treatment seeker characteristics; (2) psychopharmacotherapy; (3) psychological therapy; and (4) combined treatment. CONCLUSION: A consensus regarding diagnostic criteria and measures is needed to improve reliability across studies and to develop effective and efficient treatment approaches for treatment seekers. PMID:27014605

  20. Study on the contract characteristics of Internet architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chuan; Zhang, Guoqing; Yang, Jing; Liu, Xiaona

    2011-11-01

    The importance of Internet architecture goes beyond the technical aspects. The architecture of Internet has a profound influence on the Internet-based economy in term of how the profits are shared by different market participants (Internet Server Provider, Internet Content Provider), since it is the physical foundation upon which the profit-sharing contracts are derived. In order to facilitate the continuing growth of the Internet, it is necessary to systematically study factors that curtail the Internet-based economy including the existing Internet architecture. In this paper, we used transaction cost economics and contract economics as new tools to analyse the contracts derived from the current Internet architecture. This study sheds light on how the macro characteristics of Internet architecture effect the microeconomical decisions of market participants. Based on the existing Internet architecture, we discuss the possibility of promoting Internet-based economy by encouraging user to connect their private stub network to the Internet and giving the user more right of self-governing.

  1. Internet addiction and its determinants among medical students

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Bhushan; Menon, Preethi; Saldanha, Daniel; Tewari, Abhinav; Bhattacharya, Labhanya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exponential use of internet has resulted in internet addiction in recent times. Students are particularly at risk because of their unique personal, social, and academic needs. Objectives: The study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of internet addiction and its determinants among medical students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 282 medical students with the help of semi-structured questionnaire consisting of questions related to demographic information, information related to internet use, and Young's internet addiction test. Results: We found prevalence of internet addiction among medical students to be 58.87% (mild – 51.42%, moderate –7.45%) and significantly associated factors with internet addiction being male gender, staying in private accommodation, lesser age of first internet use, using mobile for internet access, higher expenditure on internet, staying online for longer time, and using internet for social networking, online videos, and watching website with sexual content. Conclusion: Medical students are vulnerable for internet addiction and efforts should be taken to increase awareness and prevent the problem of internet addiction in them. PMID:27212820

  2. The Los Alamos primer

    SciTech Connect

    Serber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the 1943 lecture notes of Robert Serber. Serber was a protege of J. Robert Oppenheimer and member of the team that built the first atomic bomb - reveal what the Los Alamos scientists knew, and did not know, about the terrifying weapon they were building.

  3. The Journal, the Internet, and Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-11-01

    With this issue, the Journal begins to create an access to the Internet. Our future on the Internet will be achieved systematically, and it will be designed to compliment--add value to--the print Journal. Our Internet connection must be useful to our readers in ways not possible with the print Journal, however, economic considerations cannot be ignored. It would be intellectually and economically unacceptable to produce only a direct copy of theJournal for electronic distribution. The Internet--the information super highway--has been hailed by many as an important information source in the educational process and will become increasingly so in the future. Indeed, there are extant descriptions of apparently innovative uses of modern interactive communications technologies in the education of scientists at the undergraduate level. However, anyone who has attempted to obtain information from the Internet knows that you are as likely to find garbage as you are to find quality information. Webster tells us that garbage is "worthless or nonsensical matter; rubbish; inferior or offensive material; incorrect, meaningless, or unwanted information." An eye for discrimination, which is often a reflection of maturity, is essential when using the current Internet. In other words, because a bit of information appears on the Internet does not ensure its quality. Only in cases where the information sought has its source in a review-oriented process, e.g., from library holdings, can the information on the Internet be trusted. The Internet is fast becoming a "vanity press," where anything can be published with virtually no critique regarding the quality and accuracy of the content. Indeed, it is not necessarily true that the person to whom a bit of information is attributed is the person who posted it. A bit of information on the Internet lies there until someone comes across it and uses it (or links to it), forming a nucleus for further growth. Further growth may center about

  4. Reading on the Internet: The Link between Literacy and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmar-Dobler, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Studies how the Internet is used by adolescents. Considers how the union of reading and technology on the Internet is causing educators to take a new look at what it means to be literate in today's society. (SG)

  5. Using the Internet and Children's Literature To Support Interdisciplinary Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karchmer, Rachel A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes several types of resources on the Internet for children's literature that may be used to support interdisciplinary instruction: central sites, teacher-created children's literature projects, author web sites, Internet-posted lesson plans, and electronic mailing lists. (SR)

  6. Compulsive internet use among adolescents: bidirectional parent-child relationships.

    PubMed

    van den Eijnden, Regina J J M; Spijkerman, Renske; Vermulst, Ad A; van Rooij, Tony J; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2010-01-01

    Although parents experience growing concerns about their children's excessive internet use, little is known about the role parents can play to prevent their children from developing Compulsive Internet Use (CIU). The present study addresses associations between internet-specific parenting practices and CIU among adolescents, as well as the bidirectionality of these associations. Two studies were conducted: a cross-sectional study using a representative sample of 4,483 Dutch students and a longitudinal study using a self-selected sample of 510 Dutch adolescents. Results suggest that qualitatively good communication regarding internet use is a promising tool for parents to prevent their teenage children from developing CIU. Besides, parental reactions to excessive internet use and parental rules regarding the content of internet use may help prevent CIU. Strict rules about time of internet use, however, may promote compulsive tendencies. Finally, one opposite link was found whereby CIU predicted a decrease in frequency of parental communication regarding internet use. PMID:19728076

  7. Use of the Internet for Health Information: United States, 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Technical Information Service NCHS Use of the Internet for Health Information: United States, 2009 Recommend on ... more likely than men to have used the Internet for health information. Women were more likely than ...

  8. Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet KidsHealth > For Parents > Healthy Habits for TV, Video ... negative effects that violent video games can have. Internet Safety Become computer literate. Learn how to block ...

  9. Adolescents' perceptions toward the internet: a 4-T framework.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2004-08-01

    This study could be viewed as one of the initial attempts to probe adolescents' general perceptions toward the Internet. Through interviewing 40 adolescents in Taiwan, this study found the following 4-T categories for interpreting their perceptions toward the Internet, which included Technology, Tool, Toy, and Travel. Most adolescents perceived the Internet as a tool, implying that these adolescents, in general, held pragmatic views about the Internet. This paper further proposes a framework to elaborate the 4-T categories. The framework consists of the following two axes: one axis probably shows the ontology of the Internet, ranging from a "product" to a "process," whereas the other axis indicates the perceived feature of the Internet, varying from "functional" to "technical." It is finally suggested to carefully investigate the effects of people's Internet perceptions on their behaviors, as well as psychological and cognitive activities in Internet-related environments. PMID:15331033

  10. 75 FR 44216 - Cybersecurity, Innovation and the Internet Economy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... to protect Federal agencies' external access points, including access to the Internet. While the..., next generation access control, and Internet infrastructure protection (with DHS funding). NIST also is... National Telecommunications and Information Administration Cybersecurity, Innovation and the...

  11. German Experts' Views and Ideas about Information on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Kristina; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reflects ideas about the Internet presented by four German experts: possibilities and applications of chemistry; environmental informatics and documentation on the World Wide Web; views of a research-oriented pharmaceutical company; and the commercialization of the Internet. (LRW)

  12. Netiquette: The Rules of the Road for Effective Internet Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnaly, Gene

    1997-01-01

    Presents guidelines for effective Internet communication. Discusses rules for creating e-mail messages; posting messages to online discussion groups and newsgroups; and using initialism and "emoticons." Presents a glossary of common Internet terms. (AEF)

  13. A psychometric comparison of the Internet Addiction Test, the Internet-Related Problem Scale, and self-diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Widyanto, Laura; Griffiths, Mark D; Brunsden, Vivienne

    2011-03-01

    One of the more prominent issues in the field of Internet addiction is the validity of the instrument used to assess users' level of Internet involvement. Many of the instruments used to assess Internet addiction have high face validity but have yet to be tested psychometrically. The aim of this study is to compare two of the most used Internet addiction research measures, the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the Internet-Related Problem Scale (IRPS), along with a self-diagnostic question simply asking Internet users if they thought they were addicted to the Internet. A total of 225 Internet users participated in the study (69 males and 156 females). Participants who defined themselves as Internet addicts had higher scores on both the IAT and IRPS, and the three different Internet addiction measures were strongly correlated to each other. For the IAT, factor analysis generated three factors (emotional/psychological conflict; time management issues; mood modification) explaining 56.3% of the variance. For the IRPS, factor analysis generated four factors (negative effects of Internet use; mood modification; loss of control; increased Internet use) explaining 60.2% of the variance. The implications for these findings are discussed. PMID:21067282

  14. 76 FR 63567 - Internet Communication Disclaimers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ...) (``Shays I''); see also Explanation and Justification for Final Rules on Internet Communications, 71 FR... on Disclaimers, Fraudulent Solicitations, Civil Penalties, and Personal Use of Campaign Funds, 67 FR... Requirements, 60 FR 52069, 52071 (Oct. 5, 1995) (``1995 Disclaimer E&J''). That same year, the...

  15. Cellular Manufacturing Internet Performance Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

    1998-03-04

    The objective of this project was to develop an Internet-based electronic performance support system (EPSS) for cellular manufacturing providing hardware/software specifications, process descriptions, estimated cost savings, manufacturing simulations, training information, and service resources for government and industry users of Cincinnati Milacron machine tools and products. AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) used expertise in the areas of Internet design and multimedia creation to develop a performance support system (PSS) for the Internet with assistance from CM's subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. Reference information was both created and re-purposed from other existing formats, then made available on the Internet. On-line references on cellular manufacturing operations include: definitions of cells and cellular manufacturing; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing improves part throughput, resource utilization, part quality, and manufacturing flexibility; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing reduces labor and overhead costs; identification of critical factors driving decisions toward cellular manufacturing; a method for identifying process improvement areas using cellular manufacturing; a method for customizing the size of cells for a specific site; a simulation for making a part using cellular manufacturing technology; and a glossary of terms and concepts.

  16. Education on the Internet: Anonymity vs. Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyfus, Hubert L.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that learning a skill requires the kind of commitment which is undermined by the Press (the Public) and the Internet, citing Soren Kierkegaard's "The Present Age", and states that learning by apprenticeship is impossible in cyberspace. Includes: aesthetic sphere--commitment to the enjoyment of sheer information; ethical sphere--turning…

  17. The Electronic Journal on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubly, Kristin Hede

    The rise in popularity of the Internet has had an enormous impact on scholarly communication, especially with the development of the electronic journal. There are a number of advantages to reading and publishing scholarly articles in electronic form: (1) World Wide Web publications have a simple interface, easy-to-read typefaces, and hypertext…

  18. The Internet and Equality of Educational Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Janet Ward; Davidson, Ann Locke

    One benefit often expected to flow from Internet use in schools is an increase in equality of educational opportunity as all kinds of schools gain access to the same extraordinary set of resources. Yet, prior research suggests that patterns of technology access often mirror existing inequalities rather than mitigate them. This paper discusses the…

  19. Selected Internet Resources on Family History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Provides a list of Internet resources on family history that cover topics such as colonial families, shifting family ideals, families in the Early Republic, families in bondage, westward migration, families during the Great Depression, journals, reference sources, and lesson plans. (CMK)

  20. Task-Based Instruction Using the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumposky, Nancy Rennau

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) task-based module consistent with Skehan's information processing model of second language acquisition (1998) and with the framework for task design elaborated by Willis (1996), using the Internet as a primary source of language input. In settings where…