Science.gov

Sample records for louis demonstration final

  1. ST. LOUIS DEMONSTRATION FINAL REPORT: POWER PLANT EQUIPMENT, FACILITIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the results of the evaluation of the equipment and facilities for the firing of refuse-derived fuel and the assessment of the gaseous aqueous, and solid waste discharges associated with firing refuse-derived fuel during the St. Louis-Union Electric Refuse Fu...

  2. Louis D. Brandeis High School. Demonstration Bilingual Enrichment College Preparatory Program. O.E.E. Evaluation Report, 1981-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Effie Papatzikou; Cotayo, Armando

    The Demonstration Bilingual Enrichment College Preparatory Program at Louis D. Brandeis High School in New York City is designed to address the needs of the "academically more able" student with limited English proficiency. The program supplements the school's existing services for 120 Spanish-dominant students, and offers instructional programs…

  3. ST. LOUIS DEMONSTRATION: REFUSE PROCESSING PLANT EQUIPMENT, FACILITIES, AND ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of processing plant evaluations of the St. Louis-Union Electric Refuse Fuel Project, including equipment and facilities as well as assessment of environmental emissions at both the processing and power plants. Data on plant material flows and oper...

  4. Solar heating and hot water system installed at St. Louis, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Information is provided on the solar heating and hot water system installed at the William Tao and Associates, Inc., office building in St. Louis, Missouri. The information consists of description, photos, maintenance and construction problems, final drawing, system requirements and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide 50% of the hot water requirements and 45% of the space heating needs for a 900 square foot office space and drafting room. The solar facility has 252 square foot of glass tube concentrator collectors and a 1000 gallon steel storage tank buried below a concrete slab floor. Freeze protection is provided by a propylene glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. The collectors are roof mounted on a variable tilt array which is adjusted seasonally and is connected to the solar thermal storage tank by a tube-in-shell heat exchanger. Incoming city water is preheated through the solar energy thermal storage tank.

  5. FROM THE CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE ST. LOUIS BOARD OF EDUCATION--A FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Louis Board of Education, MO.

    THE ST. LOUIS CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE WAS GIVEN THE TASK OF INVESTIGATING WHETHER OR NOT THE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF THE ST. LOUIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS HAD BEEN ENGAGED IN ANY POLICIES, PROCEDURES, OR PRACTICES WHICH MIGHT CAUSE RESEGREGATION IN THE SCHOOLS. DURING THE INVESTIGATION, THE COMMITTEE KEPT IN MIND THE TRUISM THAT THE SCHOOL, AS A UNIT…

  6. TRUEX hot demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  7. St. Louis Metro Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: 12-Month Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.; Lammert, M.

    2008-07-01

    The St. Louis Metro Bodiesel Transit Bus Evaluation project is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between NREL and the National Biodiesel Board to evaluate the extended in-use performance of buses operating on B20 fuel. The objective of this research project is to compare B20 and ultra-low sulfur diesel buses in terms of fuel economy, veicles maintenance, engine performance, component wear, and lube oil performance.

  8. Solar heating demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bonicatto, L.; Kozak, C.

    1980-01-01

    The demonstration involved a 4-panel solar collector mounted on the industrial arts building. A 120 gallon storage tank supplements a 66 gallon electric hot water heater which supplies hot water for 5 shop wash basins, girl's and boy's lavatories, and a pressure washer in the auto shop. The installation and educational uses of the system are described. (MHR)

  9. Satellite Technology Demonstration; Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federation of Rocky Mountain States, Inc., Denver, CO.

    The goal of the Satellite Technology Demonstration project (STD) was to show the feasibility of a satellite-based media system for isolated, rural populations and to test and evaluate user acceptance and the cost of various delivery modes using a variety of materials. The STD amalgamated the resources of government, health, education, and…

  10. Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.G.

    1994-12-30

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

  11. Louis D. Brandeis High School, Demonstration Bilingual Enrichment College Preparatory Program. O.E.E. Evaluation Report, 1982-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Effie Papatzikou; Collins, Carla

    The Enrichment College Preparatory Program, an Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title VII bilingual demonstration project at a Manhattan, New York City, high school, completed the final year of a two-year funding cycle in June 1983. The program, which provided cultural enrichment and advanced academic experiences to 160 intellectually…

  12. NARSTO EPA SS ST LOUIS AIR CHEM PM MET DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-07

    NARSTO EPA SS ST LOUIS AIR CHEM PM MET DATA Project Title:  NARSTO ... Amount Surface Pressure Solar Radiation Surface Air Temperature Particulates Trace Metals Order Data:  ... Data Guide Documents:  St Louis Air Chem Guide St Louis Final Report  (PDF) St Louis QA ...

  13. Model Tech Prep Demonstration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Maryland Educational Consortium, La Plata.

    The Southern Maryland Educational Consortium's Tech Prep Model Demonstration project is described in this final report. The consortium members are Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary's county school districts and Charles County Community College in southern Maryland. The project is based on a 4 + 2 model in which ninth-grade students develop career…

  14. Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gili, J.A.; Poston, V.K.

    1993-11-01

    This is the final report of the Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project, which was funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The project had two objectives: (a) to develop and demonstrate a prototype of production-scale equipment for the dry, horizontal consolidation and packaging of spent nuclear fuel rods from commercial boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies, and (b) to report the development and demonstration results to the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. This report summarizes the activities and conclusions of the project management contractor, EG&G Idaho, Inc., and the fabrication and testing contractor, NUS Corporation (NUS). The report also presents EG&G Idaho`s assessments of the equipment and procedures developed by NUS.

  15. Expedited technology demonstration project final report: final forms

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, R W

    1999-05-01

    ETDP Final Forms was an attempt to demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a ceramic waste form immobilizing the hazardous and radioactive elements of the MSO/SR mineral residues. The ceramic material had been developed previously. The fabrication system was constructed and functioned as designed except for the granulator. Fabrication of our particular ceramic, however, proved unsatisfactory. The ceramic material design was therefore changed toward the end of the project, replacing nepheline with zircon as the sink for silica. Preliminary results were encouraging, but more development is needed. Fabrication of the new ceramic requires major changes in the processing: Calcination and granulation would be replaced by spray drying; and sintering would be at higher temperature. The main goal of the project--demonstrating the fabrication and performance of the waste form--was not achieved. This report summarizes Final Forms' activities. The problem of immobilizing the MSO/SR mineral residues is discussed.

  16. Fuel consolidation demonstration program: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    EPRI, Northeast Utilities, Baltimore Gas and Electric, the US Department of Energy and Combustion Engineering are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel and a method of storing the consolidated fuel in the spent fuel storage pool which is licensable by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent fuel storage pools. This is a final report of the Fuel Consolidation Demonstration Program. It provides a review of the overall program, a summary of the results obtained, the lessons learned, and an assessment of the present status of the consolidation system developed in the program. 7 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  18. Technical Education Demonstration Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milwaukee Area Technical Coll., WI.

    The Technical Education Demonstration Program helped students aged 16-25 traditionally excluded from technical careers because of lack of training to attain academic and technical skills. Eighty-one teachers attended four-credit summer courses; 500 teachers, counselors, and administrators attended seminars. A demonstration model interfacing…

  19. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft{sup 3} of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a ``cold test pit`` that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 {times} 9 {times} 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub`s proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were performed.

  20. Final report for the cryogenic retrieval demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Valentich, D.J.; Yokuda, E.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents a demonstration of a proposed buried transuranic waste retrieval concept that uses cryogenic ground freezing and remote excavation. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), there are over 8 million ft[sup 3] of intermingled soil and transuranic (TRU) wastes in shallow land burial, and retrieval of the material is one of the options being considered by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration for the Environmental Restoration program. Cryogenically freezing contaminated soil and buried waste has been proposed as a way to greatly reduce or eliminate the climate the threat of contamination spread during retrieval activities. In support of this idea, a demonstration of an innovative ground freezing and retrieval technology was performed at the INEL. This initial demonstration was held near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at a cold test pit'' that was built in 1988 as a test bed for the demonstration of retrieval contamination control technologies. This pit is not contaminated with any radioactive or hazardous wastes. Barrels and boxes filled with metals, plastics, tools, paper, cloth, etc. configured in the same manner as expected in contaminated pits and trenches are buried at the cold test pit. After design, fabrication, and shop testing, Sonsub mobilized to the field in early July 1992 to perform the field demonstration. It was planned to freeze and extract four pits, each 9 [times] 9 [times] 10 ft. Each pit represented a different configuration of buried waste (stacked boxes, stacked barrels, random dumped barrels and boxes, and random dumped barrels). Sonsub's proposed technology consisted of driving a series of freeze pipes into the soil and waste, using liquid nitrogen to freeze the mass, and extracting the soil and debris using a series of remote operated, bridge crane mounted tools. In conjunction with the freezing and removal activities, temperature and moisture measurements, and air monitoring were performed.

  1. The Quantum Opportunity Program Demonstration: Final Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirm, Allen; Stuart, Elizabeth; McKie, Allison

    2006-01-01

    From July 1995 through September 2001, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and the Ford Foundation (Ford) operated a demonstration of the Quantum Opportunity Program (QOP). QOP offered intensive and comprehensive services to help at-risk youth graduate from high school and enroll in postsecondary education or training. QOP was mainly an…

  2. Prototype nickel component demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, D.E.

    1994-11-14

    We have been developing a process to produce high-purity nickel structures from nickel carbonyl using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The prototype demonstration effort had been separated into a number of independent tasks to allow Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) the greatest flexibility in tailoring the project to their needs. LANL selected three of the proposed tasks to be performed--Task 1- system modification and demonstration, Task 2-stainless steel mandrel trials, and Task 4-manufacturing study. Task 1 focused on converting the CVD system from a hot-wall to a cold-wall configuration and demonstrating the improved efficiency of the reactor type by depositing a 0.01-inch-thick nickel coating on a cylindrical substrate. Since stainless steel substrates were preferred because of their low {alpha}-emitter levels, Task 2 evaluated mandrel configurations which would allow removal of the nickel tube from the substrate. The manufacturing study was performed to develop strategies and system designs for manufacturing large quantities of the components needed for the Sudbury Nuetrino Observatory (SNO) program. Each of these tasks was successfully completed. During these efforts, BIRL successfully produced short lengths of 2-inch-diameter tubing and 6-inch-wide foil with levels of {alpha}-radiation emitting contaminants lower than either conventional nickel alloys or electroplated materials. We have produced both the tubing and foil using hot-substrate, cold-wall reactors and clearly demonstrated the advantages of higher precursor efficiency and deposition rate associated with this configuration. We also demonstrated a novel mandrel design which allowed easy removal of the nickel tubing and should dramatically simplify the production of 1.5-meter-long tubes in the production phase of the program.

  3. Opportunistic MSPA Demonstration #1: Final Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, D. S.; Finley, S. G.; Heckman, D. P.; Lay, N. E.; Lush, C. M.; MacNeal, B. E.

    2015-02-01

    The Opportunistic Multiple Spacecraft Per Antenna (OMSPA) concept seeks to provide smallsat missions with a low-attributed-aperture-fee technique for obtaining routine downlink in a manner that is very low cost to the Deep Space Network (DSN). Unlike traditional MSPA in which the number of spacecraft that can be supported is limited by the number of available receivers, OMSPA makes use of a digital recorder at each station that is capable of capturing IF signals from every spacecraft in the antenna beam within the frequency bands of interest. When smallsat missions see one or more opportunities to intercept the traditionally scheduled antenna beam of a "host" spacecraft, they can transmit open loop during those opportunities. Via a secure Internet site, the smallsat mission operators can then retrieve relevant portions of the digital recording for subsequent demodulation and decoding or subscribe to a service that does it for them. The demonstration discussed in this article was intended to provide prospective smallsat users and the DSN, as the prospective service provider, with demonstrable proof that the OMSPA concept is, in fact, an operationally viable means for obtaining routine downlink telemetry. To do this, the demonstration began by treating Mars Odyssey as a "smallsat" and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) as the "host" spacecraft. Using a specially created Beam Intercept Planning System (BIPS) and a DSN 7-Day Schedule Cross-Comparison (7-DSC) tool, opportunities were identified when Mars Odyssey would be transmitting while in MRO's ground antenna beam. Existing Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receivers (VSRs) were used to record the Mars Odyssey downlink telemetry during these opportunities. The recordings were played back to a secure server outside the Flight Operations Network firewall, but inside the JPL firewall. The demonstration team's signal processing personnel retrieved the recordings from this secure server and downloaded them

  4. Innovative grout/retrieval demonstration final report

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, G.G.; Thompson, D.N.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of an innovative retrieval technique for buried transuranic waste. Application of this retrieval technique was originally designed for full pit retrieval; however, it applies equally to a hot spot retrieval technology. The technique involves grouting the buried soil waste matrix with a jet grouting procedure, applying an expansive demolition grout to the matrix, and retrieving the debris. The grouted matrix provides an agglomeration of fine soil particles and contaminants resulting in an inherent contamination control during the dusty retrieval process. A full-scale field demonstration of this retrieval technique was performed on a simulated waste pit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Details are reported on all phases of this proof-of-concept demonstration including pit construction, jet grouting activities, application of the demolition grout, and actual retrieval of the grouted pit. A quantitative evaluation of aerosolized soils and rare earth tracer spread is given for all phases of the demonstration, and these results are compared to a baseline retrieval activity using conventional retrieval means. 8 refs., 47 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Buffalo river dredging demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Averett, D.E.; Zappi, P.A.; Tatem, H.E.; Gibson, A.C.; Tominey, E.A.

    1996-02-01

    The Corps of Engineers Buffalo District conducted a demonstration of equipment for dredging contaminated sediments. Several thousand cubic yards of sediment were removed from outside the Buffalo River Federal navigation channel limits using three dredge types: (1) open bucket, (2) enclosed bucket, and (3) submersible pump. The effectiveness of a silt screen deployed downstream of the dredge to reduce suspended sediment transport was also evaluated. Extensive sediment and water column monitoring and sampling were conducted during the 2-week demonstration as part of the effort to determine sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases associated with the dredging operations. Water column samples were analyzed for total suspended solids, total organic carbon, PCBs, PAHs, metals, ammonia, and pH. A water column bioassay test using Daphnia magna was also performed to assess toxicity effects of the dredging operation. Results of this study were used to assess and refine techniques and laboratory tests that have been previously developed by the Corps of Engineers to predict sediment resuspension rates and contaminant releases. In another phase of the study, the Bureau of Mines demonstrated the use of polyelectrolytes for rapid removal of suspended solids from a dilute dredged material slurry.

  6. Baltimore residential assistance demonstration project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    At the request of the City of Baltimore for assistance in developing the Global Action Plan (GAP) EcoTeam Program, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided GAP with $10,000 for a one-year demonstration project. The results of this action are as follows: four EcoTeams were established representing 28 households and 47 people; the self reported resource savings to date per household are on average: energy savings--9%, auto emission reduction--16%, solid waste reduction--52%, water savings--25%, dollar savings--$174; the initial seed team (prior to this funding) replicated and started 2 new teams, one of those teams replicated and started 2 more teams, the other team did not replicate; 4 volunteer coaches were recruited to coach each of these teams; a volunteer coordinator was recruited to provide local guidance for this demonstration project and help GAP reach out to the Fairfield low-income neighborhood, the volunteer coordinator was unable to establish any EcoTeams in this neighborhood as their priorities were establishing a neighborhood action team and addressing immediate health-related environmental issues; the volunteers have communicated information about this demonstration project among many community and Baltimore government leaders to solicit support for a full campaign and to assess the level of that support.

  7. CHP Fuel Cell Durability Demonstration - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher J

    2014-07-21

    Plug Power has managed a demonstration project that has tested multiple units of its high-temperature, PEM fuel cell system in micro-combined heat and power (μ-CHP) applications in California. The specific objective of the demonstration project was to substantiate the durability of GenSys Blue, and, thereby, verify its technology and commercial readiness for the marketplace. In the demonstration project, Plug Power, in partnership with the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and Sempra, will execute two major tasks: • Task 1: Internal durability/reliability fleet testing. Six GenSys Blue units will be built and will undergo an internal test regimen to estimate failure rates. This task was modified to include 3 GenSys Blue units installed in a lab at UCI. • Task 2: External customer testing. Combined heat and power units will be installed and tested in real-world residential and/or light commercial end user locations in California.

  8. Environmentally conscious manufacturing integrated demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, D.E.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration was to show that several of the individually developed materials and processes to reduce hazardous materials and waste could be successfully used on a single assembly. A methodology was developed that could be used on any product to plan the approach to eliminating hazardous materials. Sample units of an existing design electronic unit were fabricated applying this methodology and substituting nonhazardous materials and processes. The results of this project show that total waste can be drastically reduced by at least an order of magnitude and hazardous material and waste can be essentially eliminated in the manufacture of this type of electronic devices.

  9. The Kwajalein bioremediation demonstration: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.R. Jr.; Walker, A.B.

    1994-12-01

    The US Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Base, located in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) in the east-central Pacific Ocean, has significant petroleum hydrocarbon contamination resulting from years of military activities. Because of its remoteness, the lack of on-site sophisticated remediation or waste disposal facilities, the amenability of petroleum hydrocarbons to biodegradation, and the year-round temperature favorable for microbial activity, USAKA requested, through the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), that a project be conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using bioremediation for environmental restoration of contaminated sites within the atoll. The project was conducted in four distinct phases: (1) initial site characterization and on-site biotreatability studies, (2) selection of the demonstration area and collection of soil columns, (3) laboratory column biotreatability studies, and (4) an on-site bioremediation demonstration. The results of phases (1) and (3) have been detailed in previous reports. This report summarizes the results of phases (1) and (3) and presents phases (2) and (4) in detail.

  10. High phase order transmission demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krizauskas, E.; Landers, T.L.; Richeda, R.J.; Oppel, L.J.; Stewart, J.R.

    1997-12-01

    High-phase-order (HPO), or six-phase, transmission is an extension of line compaction that further increases the power transfer capability of a limited transmission line right-of-way. On July 1, 1992, the first commercially operated six-phase transmission line was energized as a tie line integrated into the New York State Electric and Gas (NYSEG) existing three-phase power system. Previous Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) Project EP 88-23 reports detail the analytical framework and conceptual studies (Phase 1) and the detailed engineering and design/construction (Phase 2) that preceded the 1992 energization. After the six-phase line was constructed, a testing program verified the theoretical predictions of electrical effects due to six-phase construction. This Final Project Report details the results of the Phase 3 testing program and examines steady-state power frequency parameters, partial switching, corona effects, and field effects. In addition, this report details the results of two unplanned unstaged faults, and low-level staged faults. After one year of operation, results led to the identification of aspects that warranted additional study and evaluation. This report summarizes these additional investigations and evaluations of midspan spacers, off-the-shelf microprocessor-based relays for six-phase line protection, live line maintenance, possible standard six-phase station designs, and an economic evaluation of break-even distances for which six-phase is more economical than conventional double-circuit three-phase applications for line upgrades and new construction.

  11. WSF Biodiesel Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Washington State University; University of Idaho; The Glosten Associates, Inc.; Imperium Renewables, Inc.

    2009-04-30

    engines. Each test vessel did experience a microbial growth bloom that produced a build up of material in the fuel purifiers similar to material witnessed in the 2004 fuel test. A biocide was added with each fuel shipment and the problem subsided. In January of 2009, the WSF successfully completed an eleven month biodiesel fuel test using approximately 1,395,000 gallons of biodiesel blended fuels. The project demonstrated that biodiesel can be used successfully in marine vessels and that current ASTM specifications are satisfactory for marine vessels. Microbial growth in biodiesel diesel interface should be monitored. An inspection of the engines showed no signs of being negatively impacted by the test.

  12. Professor Louis Michel (1923-1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, J.

    2001-04-01

    Professor Louis Michel was born on May 4, 1923 in Roanne, France and died of aneurysm on December 30, 1999 in Bures-Sur-Yvette, France. With the untimely and sudden death of Louis Michel the world physics community has lost one of its most prominent members. The extraordinary popularity and respect to Louis as a scientist and a man was demonstrated in his funeral ceremony at l'Eglise de Bures-Sur-Yvette when many people from all over the world came to part from him. Many obituaries appeared in Louis' memory in different journals and among them Physics Today, Cern Courier, Physics Reports, in the Bulletin of the French Embassy in Israel and others. It is certainly impossible in this short lecture to give an adequate description of Prof. Michel's contributions in physics but if one looks for a way to identify a niche that Louis occupies in science of the 20th century, this can best be done by his relation to Eugene Wigner whom Louis much admired. On July 16, 1996 Prof. Michel gave the Wigner Memorial Lecture at the 21st International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics. 1 This was the first Colloquium after Wigner's death (who died on January 1, 1995). Wigner had a very great influence on Louis which started during Louis' membership at the Institute of Advanced Studies at Princeton in the years 1953-55. For Louis Wigner was (in Louis' words) a "model in science: a complete physicist, drawing, when necessary, from his deep mathematical culture". In my view, on the world arena of science, Prof. Michel was one of Wigner's successors in the field of symmetries in physics, and many of us would agree that the above quotation applies equally well to Louis himself. In his famous book "Group Theory" Wigner thanks in the Preface 4 people, with one of them being Louis Michel, and I quote: "The author also wishes to thank his colleagues for many stimulating discussions on the role of group theory in quantum mechanics as well as on more specific subjects. He wishes

  13. Student Assistance Program Demonstration Project Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, John A.; Houle, Denise M.

    This document presents the final report on the evaluation of California's model student assistance program (SAP) demonstration projects implemented in five locations across the state from July 1989 through June 1992. The report provides an overall, integrated review of the evaluation of the SAP demonstration projects, summarizes important findings…

  14. National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-07-01

    This report discusses key analysis results based on data from early 2005 through September 2011 from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. It is the fifth and final such report in a series, with previous reports being published in July 2007, November 2007, April 2008, and September 2010.

  15. National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-07-01

    This report discusses key analysis results based on data from early 2005 through September 2011 from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. This report serves as one of many mechanisms to help transfer knowledge and lessons learned within various parts of DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, as well as externally to other stakeholders. It is the fifth and final such report in a series, with previous reports being published in July 2007, November 2007, April 2008, and September 2010.

  16. The St. Louis Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock…

  17. Real Time Technology Application Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, John; Hampson, Steve; Johnson, Robert L

    2008-09-01

    The work and results described in this final report pertain to the demonstration of real-time characterization technologies applied to potentially contaminated surface soils in and around Area of Concern (AOC) 492 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The work was conducted under the auspices of Kentucky Research Consortium for Energy and Environment (KRCEE). KRCEE was created to support the Department of Energy's (DOE) efforts to complete the expeditious and economically viable environmental restoration of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), and surrounding areas.

  18. Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project: Public final design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This Public Final Design Report describes the 70 MW(e) Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant under construction in Brilliant, Ohio. This project is receiving cost-sharing from the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administered by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-87 MC24132.000. The project is also receiving costsharing from the State of Ohio. This award is being administered by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project is the first utility-scale demonstration project in the US. Its objective is to demonstrate that the Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined-cycle technology is an economic, reliable, and environmentally superior alternative to conventional technology in using high-sulfur coal to generate electricity. Detailed design of the plant began in May 1987, leading to the start of construction in April 1988. First coal fire occurred in November 1990, and the three-year test program began in February 1991.

  19. The St. Louis Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2011-10-01

    The St. Louis Motor, invented in 1909, is unique among physics apparatus for being named for a geographical place rather than a physicist. The sturdy little device (Fig. 1) has never been out of production. Any older school or physics department that has not done a catastrophic housecleaning in the last 20 years will certainly have a small flock of them in the back room.

  20. St. Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    St. Louis is tucked in a bend of the Mississippi River, just south of the point at which the Illinois River joins the larger Mississippi, and where the Missouri River flows in from the west. Drainage patterns to the east, on the Illinois side, are highlighted with green vegetation. Meandering rivers in the verdant Ozark Plateau appear to the south and west.

    This true-color view from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) was taken with the instrument's downward looking (nadir) camera on October 15, 2005. The urban areas of greater St. Louis show up as grey-white, including nearby Kirkwood, Webster Groves, Clayton, University City, Ferguson, St. Ann, St. Charles, and East St. Louis. The region is home to nearly three million people.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  1. Final Report on the Joule-Scale Experimental Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M

    2008-10-01

    We describe the final results of the High Power Laser Pulse Recirculation project. We have developed and implementing a novel technique for picosecond, Joule-class laser pulse recirculation inside a passive cavity. The aim of this project was to develop technology compatible with increasing the efficiency of Compton based light sources by more than an order of magnitude. In year 1 of the project, we achieved a greater than 40 times average power enhancement of the mJ-scale laser pulses inside a passive cavity with internal focus. In year 2, we demonstrated recirculation of lasers pulses with energies up to 191 mJ at 532 nm, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, and a pulse duration of 20 ps. In this high energy regime, we achieved up to 14 times average power enhancement inside the cavity. This enhancement factor is compatible with the new X-band based mono-energetic gamma-ray machine, Velociraptor, being constructed at LLNL. The demonstrated cavity enhancement is primarily limited by the poor spatial beam quality of the high power laser beam. We expect a nearly diffraction limited laser beam to achieve 40 times or better cavity enhancement, as demonstrated in low energy experiments in FY-07. The two primary obstacles to higher average brightness and conversion efficiency of laser pulse energy to gamma-rays are the relatively small Compton scattering cross-section and the typically low repetition rates of Joule-class interaction lasers (10 Hz). Only a small fraction (10{sup -10}) of the available laser photons is converted to gamma-rays, while the rest is discarded. To significantly reduce the average power requirements of the laser and increase the overall system efficiency, we can recirculate laser light for repeated interactions with electron bunches. Our pulse recirculation scheme is based on nonlinear frequency conversion, termed recirculation injection by nonlinear gating (RING), inside a passive cavity. The main objectives of the two year project were: (1) Validate

  2. Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program. Final technology performance report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-02-10

    This document represents the final Regional Demonstration Project Technical Performance Report (TPR) for Pecan Street Inc.’s (Pecan Street) Smart Grid Demonstration Program, DE-OE-0000219. Pecan Street is a 501(c)(3) smart grid/clean energy research and development organization headquartered at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). Pecan Street worked in collaboration with Austin Energy, UT, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the City of Austin, the Austin Chamber of Commerce and selected consultants, contractors, and vendors to take a more detailed look at the energy load of residential and small commercial properties while the power industry is undergoing modernization. The Pecan Street Smart Grid Demonstration Program signed-up over 1,000 participants who are sharing their home or businesses’s electricity consumption data with the project via green button protocols, smart meters, and/or a home energy monitoring system (HEMS). Pecan Street completed the installation of HEMS in 750 homes and 25 commercial properties. The program provided incentives to increase the installed base of roof-top solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, plug-in electric vehicles with Level 2 charging, and smart appliances. Over 200 participants within a one square mile area took advantage of Austin Energy and Pecan Street’s joint PV incentive program and installed roof-top PV as part of this project. Of these homes, 69 purchased or leased an electric vehicle through Pecan Street’s PV rebate program and received a Level 2 charger from Pecan Street. Pecan Street studied the impacts of these technologies along with a variety of consumer behavior interventions, including pricing models, real-time feedback on energy use, incentive programs, and messaging, as well as the corresponding impacts on Austin Energy’s distribution assets.The primary demonstration site was the Mueller community in Austin, Texas. The Mueller development, located less than three miles from the Texas State Capitol

  3. Low Income Family Day Care Home Demonstration. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    A 1-year demonstration project was conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) to help remove or reduce barriers to the participation of low-income family day care homes in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). FNS funded six grantees to conduct a demonstration of three different strategies.…

  4. In-Situ Radiation Detection Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    MOHAGHEGHI,AMIR H.; REESE,ROBERT; MILLER,DAVID R.; MILLER,MARK LAVERNE; DUCE,STEPHEN

    2000-06-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has hundreds of facilities where radioactive materials have been used or are being used, including firing ranges, low-level radioactive waste disposal areas, and areas where past activities have resulted in environmental contamination. Affected sites range in size from a few acres to square miles. Impact to the DoD comes through military base closure and release to the public. It is important that radioactive contaminants are remediated to levels that result in acceptable risk to the public. Remediation requires characterization studies, e.g., sampling and surveys, to define the affected areas, removal actions, and final confirmatory sampling and surveys. Characterization of surface contamination concentrations has historically been performed using extensive soil sampling programs in conjunction with surface radiation surveys conducted with hand-held radiation monitoring equipment. Sampling is required within the suspect affected area and a large buffer area. Surface soil contaminant characterization using soil sampling and hand held monitoring are costly, time consuming, and result in long delays between submission of samples for analysis and obtaining of final results. This project took an existing, proven radiation survey technology that has had limited exposure and improved its capabilities by documenting correlation factors for various detector/radionuclide geometries that commonly occur in field surveys. With this tool, one can perform characterization and final release surveys much more quickly than is currently possible, and have detection limits that are as good as or better than current technology. This paper will discuss the capabilities of a large area plastic scintillation detector used in conjunction with a global positioning system (GPS) to improve site characterization, remediation, and final clearance surveys of the radioactively contaminated site. Survey results can rapidly identify areas that require remediation as

  5. Final Results from U.S. FCEV Learning Demonstration (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-05-01

    This presentation discusses the objectives of the U.S. DOE Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Project, describes NREL's technology validation approach, and summarizes key technical results from the project.

  6. Low-cost flywheel demonstration program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    The Applied Physics Laboratory/Department of Energy Low Cost Flywheel Demonstration Program was initiated on 1 October 1977 and was successfully concluded on 31 December 19'9. The total cost of this program was $355,190. All primary objectives were successfully achieved as follows: demonstration of a full-size, 1)kWh flywheel having an estimated cost in large-volume production of approximately $50/kWh; developmeNt of a ball-bearing system having losses comparable to the losses in a totally magnetic suspension system; successful and repeated demonstration of the low-cost flywheel in a complete flywheel energy-storage system based on the use of ordinary house voltage and frequency; and application of the experience gained in the hardware program to project the system design into a complete, full-scale, 30-kWh home-type flywheel energy-storage system.

  7. Use of alcohol fuel: engine-conversion demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The use of ethanol as a fuel extender when mixed with gasoline, and the use of both hydrated and anhydrous ethanol as a fuel in gasoline and diesel engines are discussed. Required engine modifications for efficient use of ethanol are described, and include engine compression alterations, carburetor adjustments, and arrangement for fuel preheating. In 1981 and 1982 a demonstration of ethanol use in spark ignition engines was conducted at a major public park in South Carolina. The demonstration included a controlled road test with a pick-up truck and a demonstration of ethanol use in small, air cooled gasoline engines. One problem that was identified was that of contaminated fuel that clogged the fuel system after a few days' operation. (LEW)

  8. Final report: In situ radio frequency heating demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Jarosch, T.R.; Beleski, R.J.; Faust, D.

    1994-01-05

    A field demonstration of in situ radio frequency heating was performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the US Department of Energy-Office of Technology Development`s Integrated Demonstration. The objective of the demonstration was to investigate the effectiveness of in situ radio frequency (RF) heating as an enhancement to vacuum extraction of residual solvents (primarily trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene) held in vadose zone clay deposits. Conventional soil vacuum extraction techniques are mass transfer limited because of the low permeabilities of the clays. By selectively heating the clays to temperatures at or above 100{degrees}C, the release or transport of the solvent vapors will be enhanced as a result of several factors including an increase in the contaminant vapor pressure and diffusivity and an increase in the effective permeability of the formation with the release of water vapor.

  9. Final Results from U.S. FCEV Learning Demonstration: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-04-01

    The 'Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project,' also known as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration, is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project started in 2004 and concluded in late 2011. The purpose of this project was to conduct an integrated field validation that simultaneously examined the performance of fuel cell vehicles and the supporting hydrogen fueling infrastructure. The DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) received and analyzed all of the raw technical data collected by the industry partners through their participation in the project over its seven-year duration. This paper reviews highlights from the project and draws conclusions about the demonstrated status of the fuel cell vehicle and hydrogen fueling infrastructure technology.

  10. Out-of-tank evaporator demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, A.J.; Jennings, H.L.; VanEssen, D.C.

    1998-02-01

    The project reported here was conducted to demonstrate a skid-mounted, subatmospheric evaporator to concentrate liquid low-level waste (LLLW) stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This waste is similar to wastes stored at Hanford and Savannah River. A single-stage subatmospheric evaporator rated to produce 90 gallons of distillate per hour was procured from Delta Thermal, Inc., of Pensacola, Florida, and installed in an existing building. During the 8-day demonstration, 22,000 gal of LLLW was concentrated by 25% with the evaporator system. Decontamination factors achieved averaged 5 x 10{sup 6} (i.e., the distillate contained five million times less Cesium 137 than the feed). Evaporator performance substantially exceeded design requirements and expectations based on bench-scale surrogate test data. Out-of tank evaporator demonstration operations successfully addressed the feasibility of hands-on maintenance. Demonstration activities indicate that: (1) skid-mounted, mobile equipment is a viable alternative for the treatment of ORNL LLLW, and (2) hands-on maintenance and decontamination for movement to another site is achievable. Cost analysis show that 10% of the demonstration costs will be immediately recovered by elimination of solidification and disposal costs. The entire cost of the demonstration can be recovered by processing the inventory of Melton Valley Storage Tank waste and/or sluice water prior to solidifications. An additional savings of approximately $200,000 per year can be obtained by processing newly generated waste through the system. The results indicate that this type of evaporator system should be considered for application across the DOE complex. 25 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Demonstration of a commercial solar greenhouse. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Figueras, A.

    1982-03-31

    The greenhouse is located in the town of Russell, in St. Lawrence County, New York. It was built to demonstrate the economics of using the solar greenhouse design as a commercial greenhouse growing vegetables for local sale. The design and construction of the greenhouse are briefly described. Records of temperatures monitored and produce grown and sold are included. (BCS)

  12. Rural Workplace Literacy Demonstration Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enterprise State Junior Coll., AL.

    In April 1991, Enterprise State Junior College and MacArthur State Technical College established a rural workplace literacy demonstration project in partnership with adult basic education, seven employers, and a labor organization. The project served 615 persons in classes offered at the 2 colleges, 4 partner locations, and 3 additional worksites.…

  13. DEMONSTRATION OF RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES - PHASE II. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of radon resistant construction techniques. Sub-slab mitigation systems were installed (in accordance with draft standards) in 15 new Florida houses in 1992, and these houses have undergone extensive testing to validate techniques used ...

  14. Puerto Rico Nursing Career Cooperative Demonstration Program. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey.

    The Puerto Rico Nursing Career Cooperative Demonstration Project and Associate Nursing Program provided education and onsite occupational training laboratory to upgrade the education of 20 licensed practical nurses (LPNs) from 1989-90. The nurses were upgraded to associate nurses in an 18-month period at the Technological Institute of Puerto Rico.…

  15. Stimulus Shift: A Demonstration Motion Picture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, James E.

    The purposes of the project described were to demonstrate the use of innovative stimulus shift techniques in articulation and language training, and to experiment with use of motion picture photography in the education and instruction of clinicians and therapists working with speech handicapped children. A 37-minute sound color film was produced…

  16. Ventures in Community Improvement. Final Report of the Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Wendy C.; And Others

    The development and operation of the Federally funded Ventures in Community Improvement Demonstration Project (VICI) and its impact on participant youths and communities are summarized in this report. VICI's purposes were (1) to provide young, minority, inner-city, high school dropouts with intensive skills training in the workplace that could…

  17. FINAL SIMULATION RESULTS FOR DEMONSTRATION CASE 1 AND 2

    SciTech Connect

    David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland

    2003-10-15

    The goal of this DOE Vision-21 project work scope was to develop an integrated suite of software tools that could be used to simulate and visualize advanced plant concepts. Existing process simulation software did not meet the DOE's objective of ''virtual simulation'' which was needed to evaluate complex cycles. The overall intent of the DOE was to improve predictive tools for cycle analysis, and to improve the component models that are used in turn to simulate equipment in the cycle. Advanced component models are available; however, a generic coupling capability that would link the advanced component models to the cycle simulation software remained to be developed. In the current project, the coupling of the cycle analysis and cycle component simulation software was based on an existing suite of programs. The challenge was to develop a general-purpose software and communications link between the cycle analysis software Aspen Plus{reg_sign} (marketed by Aspen Technology, Inc.), and specialized component modeling packages, as exemplified by industrial proprietary codes (utilized by ALSTOM Power Inc.) and the FLUENT{reg_sign} computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (provided by Fluent Inc). A software interface and controller, based on an open CAPE-OPEN standard, has been developed and extensively tested. Various test runs and demonstration cases have been utilized to confirm the viability and reliability of the software. ALSTOM Power was tasked with the responsibility to select and run two demonstration cases to test the software--(1) a conventional steam cycle (designated as Demonstration Case 1), and (2) a combined cycle test case (designated as Demonstration Case 2). Demonstration Case 1 is a 30 MWe coal-fired power plant for municipal electricity generation, while Demonstration Case 2 is a 270 MWe, natural gas-fired, combined cycle power plant. Sufficient data was available from the operation of both power plants to complete the cycle configurations. Three runs

  18. Polyethylene encapsulation full-scale technology demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Lageraaen, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    A full-scale integrated technology demonstration of a polyethylene encapsulation process, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD), was conducted at the Environmental & Waste Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL.) in September 1994. As part of the Polymer Solidification National Effort, polyethylene encapsulation has been developed and tested at BNL as an alternative solidification technology for improved, cost-effective treatment of low-level radioactive (LLW), hazardous and mixed wastes. A fully equipped production-scale system, capable of processing 900 kg/hr (2000 lb/hr), has been installed at BNL. The demonstration covered all facets of the integrated processing system including pre-treatment of aqueous wastes, precise feed metering, extrusion processing, on-line quality control monitoring, and process control.

  19. Demonstration of wind turbine. Final technical report at grant program

    SciTech Connect

    Pendola, W. Jr.

    1982-06-01

    Proposal F-602 is a demonstration of a commercially available wind-electric device - an Enertech Corp. Series 1800 model wind turbine. The demonstration site selected was the New Directions school campus, a public school facility, in Sarasota, Florida. During testing, an investigation of the wind power potential for the area was undertaken. In addition, negotiations with the Florida Power and Light Company for parallel operation of the wind system (utility interface), were initiated. An Operating Agreement contract is now pending approval by the Sarasota County School Board. The results to date, of this site's wind power potential, have been well below computational expectancies based upon wind speed data for the area. Analysis will continue, to determine the cause of the windplant's low net output.

  20. Demonstrated reserve base for coal in New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, G.K.

    1995-02-01

    The new demonstrated reserve base estimate of coal for the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, is 11.28 billion short tons. This compares with 4.429 billion short tons in the Energy Information Administration`s demonstrated reserve base of coal as of January 1, 1992 for all of New Mexico and 2.806 billion short tons for the San Juan Basin. The new estimate includes revised resource calculations in the San Juan Basin, in San Juan, McKinley, Sandoval, Rio Arriba, Bernalillo and Cibola counties, but does not include the Raton Basin and smaller fields in New Mexico. These estimated {open_quotes}remaining{close_quotes} coal resource quantities, however, include significant adjustments for depletion due to past mining, and adjustments for accessibility and recoverability.

  1. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Colorado-Ute Electric Association began a study to evaluate options for upgrading and extending the life of its Nucla power station in 1982. Located in southwestern Colorado near the town of Nucla, this station was commissioned in 1959 with a local bituminous coal as its design fuel for three identical stoker-fired units, each rated at 12.6 MW(e). Poor station efficiency, high fuel costs, and spiraling boiler maintenance costs forced the Nucla Station into low priority in the CUEA dispatch order as early as 1981. Among the options CUEA considered was to serve as a host utility to demonstrate Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) technology. The anticipated environmental benefits and apparent attractive economics of a circulating AFBC led to Colorado-Ute`s decision to proceed with the design and construction of a demonstration project in 1984 at the Nucla facility.

  2. BMDO: New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The BMDO-New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project(BMDO-NM) was a collaborative effort among the national laboratories to identify and evaluate the commercial potential of selected SDI-funded technologies. The project was funded by BMDO (formerly known as the Strategic Defense Initiative Office or SDIO), the Technology Enterprise Division (NM-TED) of the NM Economic Development Division, and the three National Laboratories. The project was managed and supervised by SAGE Management Partners of Albuquerque, and project funding was administered through the University of New Mexico. The BMDO-NM Demonstration Project focused on the development of a process to assist technology developers in the evaluation of selected BMDO technology programs so that commercialization decisions can be made in an accelerated manner. The project brought together BMDO, the NM-TED, the University of New Mexico, and three New Mexico Federal laboratories -- Los Alamos (DOE), Phillips (DOD) and Sandia (DOE). Each national laboratory actively participated throughout the project through its technology transfer offices. New Mexico was selected as the site for the Demonstration Program because of its three national and federal research laboratories engaged in BMDO programs, and the existing relationship among state govemment, the labs, universities and local economic development and business assistance organizations. Subsequent Commercialization and Implementation phases for the selected technologies from LANL and SNL were completed by SAGE and the Project Team. Funding for those phases was provided by the individual labs as well as BMDO and NM-TED in kind services. NM-TED played a proactive role in this New Mexico partnership. Its mandate is to promote technology-based economic development, with a commitment to facilitate the use of technology by industry and business statewide. TED assumed the role of program manager and executing agent for BMDO in this demonstration project.

  3. Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

    2007-03-31

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

  4. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sippel, M.A.

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, and methods for improved completion efficiency. The investigations and demonstrations were focussed on Red River and Ratcliffe reservoirs in the Williston Basin within portions of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Both of these formations have been successfully explored with conventional 2-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) seismic was investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterizations were integrated with geological and engineering studies. The project tested lateral completion techniques, including high-pressure jetting lance technology and short-radius lateral drilling to enhance completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary oil where low permeability is a problem and higher-density drilling of vertical infill wells is limited by drilling cost. New vertical wells were drilled to test bypassed oil in ares that were identified by 3D seismic. These new wells are expected to recover as much or greater oil than was produced by nearby old wells. The project tested water injection through vertical and horizontal wells in reservoirs where application of waterflooding has been limited. A horizontal well was drilled for testing water injection. Injection rates were tested at three times that of a vertical well. This demonstration well shows that water injection with horizontal completions can improve injection rates for economic waterflooding. This report is divided into two sections, part 1 covers the Red River and part 2 covers the Ratcliffe. Each part summarizes integrated reservoir characterizations and outlines methods for targeting by-passed oil reserves in the respective formation and locality.

  5. Mine demonstration of longwall dust control techniques: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pothini, B.R.

    1988-07-01

    This report represents the results of in-mine demonstration of three dust control techniques for controlling respirable dust levels on shearer-longwall faces. The techniques were: water infusion, foam spray and reverse shearer drum rotation. The mines in which tests were conducted were in Upper Freeport seam and Pocahontas No. 3 seam. Both gravimetric samplers and GCA RAM-1 real time dust monitors were used for dust surveys. Dust control technology was reviewed, pertinent techniques were selected, equipment was procured and demonstrated as part of the program. The results indicated that water infusion can be readily implemented, foam spray holds promise, but requires more work to be done, and reverse drum rotations effective in select conditions. The tests showed that reversing cutting drum rotation has brought several positive results: (1) lower dust levels; (2) lower methane liberations; (3) improved productivity and (4) less fines. Although the improvements were only in the 10% range, the costs except for the initial change of cutting drums are nil. Therefore this technique should further be tested in soft seams with thick binder rock and also in hard blocky seams. Such investigations may lead to universal application of reverse drum rotation in the industry for beneficial reductions in respirable dust levels at insignificant costs. 13 refs., 34 figs.

  6. Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Chartrand

    2011-08-31

    A program to complete the design, construction and demonstration of a PEMFC system fuelled by Ethanol, LPG or NG for telecom applications was initiated in October 2007. Early in the program the economics for Ethanol were shown to be unfeasible and permission was given by DOE to focus on LPG only. The design and construction of a prototype unit was completed in Jun 2009 using commercially available PEM FC stack from Ballard Power Systems. During the course of testing, the high pressure drop of the stack was shown to be problematic in terms of control and stability of the reformer. Also, due to the power requirements for air compression the overall efficiency of the system was shown to be lower than a similar system using internally developed low pressure drop FC stack. In Q3 2009, the decision was made to change to the Plug power stack and a second prototype was built and tested. Overall net efficiency was shown to be 31.5% at 3 kW output. Total output of the system is 6 kW. Using the new stack hardware, material cost reduction of 63% was achieved over the previous Alpha design. During a November 2009 review meeting Plug Power proposed and was granted permission, to demonstrate the new, commercial version of Plug Power's telecom system at CERL. As this product was also being tested as part of a DOE Topic 7A program, this part of the program was transferred to the Topic 7A program. In Q32008, the scope of work of this program was expanded to include a National Grid demonstration project of a micro-CHP system using hightemperature PEM technology. The Gensys Blue system was cleared for unattended operation, grid connection, and power generation in Aug 2009 at Union College in NY state. The system continues to operate providing power and heat to Beuth House. The system is being continually evaluated and improvements to hardware and controls will be implemented as more is learned about the system's operation. The program is instrumental in improving the efficiency and

  7. In Situ Gaseous Reduction Pilot Demonstration - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, E.C.; Phelan, J.M.; Giblin, J.T.; Olsen, K.B.; Miller, R.D.; Gilmore, T.J.

    1999-02-23

    The demonstration of the IGRS approach conducted at SWMU 143 on the White Sands Missile Range has provided information needed to complete a technical performance assessment and cost analysis of the technology. At least 70% of the Cr(VI) present in contaminated sediment at the site was reduced, thus verifying the effectiveness of the approach. Most of the treatment occurred in a zone located from {approximately}4 to 10 ft below ground surface, which appears to be a higher permeability interval. A deeper zone from {approximately}10 to 16 ft that contains lower levels of contamination was essentially unaffected. The deeper zone is somewhat finer grained and has a higher clay content and is, thus, less permeable. It appears that most of the treatment gas was channeled through the higher, more-permeable zone and the lower zone was bypassed. Treatment of the lower zone could probably be accomplished, however, if a second injection well were installed and screened across the zone so that treatment gas could be forced into this interval. The amount of H{sub 2}S consumed during the test exceeded the amount predicted by the laboratory treatability study. In addition, the levels of H{sub 2}S observed at the extraction wells were relatively low, even though a significant level of treatment was observed at the site. It is inferred that interfering reactions or slower reaction kinetics are the likely source of consumption of extra H{sub 2}S observed in the field. Future laboratory work will be undertaken to investigate the nature of these chemical reactions and the reaction rates associated with the gaseous reduction of Cr(VI) in soils. Elucidation of these effects may reveal methods for improving the effectiveness of the technology and reducing unit costs. A life-cycle cost model was developed for the technology based on demonstration information (Hogan 1998). This model suggests that the technology should compare favorably with excavation from a cost basis for larger sites

  8. Solar-heated commercial-greenhouse demonstration. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    Poly Solar Company was formed to design and fabricate a demonstration of a solar heating system for commercial greenhouses in moderate climates. This system is built of readily available materials, and can be constructed using conventional techniques available to most builders and farmers. Construction began on the demonstration project in August 1981 and the system was placed into operation that winter. Energy savings were calculated by monitoring the running time on an oil furnace in a duplicate greenhouse with the same crop as the solar heated greenhouse with an oil backup furnace. The first monitoring period was before the Christmas season with poinsettias used as the comparison crop with 60/sup 0/ to 64/sup 0/F. During this period the 126 ton mass storage and waste heat recovery sections of the system were used. These trials showed energy savings over the 100% oil heated structure to be 23.4%. After the crops were removed from the greenhouse trials were ran which showed this portion of the system could maintain night time temperatures as high as 56/sup 0/F with no other heat source and an outside temperature of 26/sup 0/F. The 1860 sq ft solar collector/storage system was monitored with a winter-spring crop of geraniums at a night time temperature of 60/sup 0/ to 64/sup 0/F. In April 1982 a severe storm with wind gusts in excess of 50 mph destroyed a section of duct that feeds heated air from the collector to the rock storage bed and caused light damage to the collector itself.

  9. Silo 3 Vacuum Wand Demonstration Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Birrer

    2003-06-01

    Silo 3, a freestanding, pre-stressed concrete, domed cylindrical tank, located at the Fernald Closure Project near Cincinnati, Ohio, contains approximately 5,100 cubic yards of metal oxide waste generated from Fernald operations that extracted uranium from ore material. The baseline for the Silo 3 Project is to remove a portion of this material from the silo pneumatically by inserting vacuum retrieval wands and/or hoses in existing manways on the silo dome. After the loose material has been removed by the pneumatic system, the project intends to cut an opening in the silo wall and use a mechanical excavator to complete removal of the remaining material, including possible combination with pneumatic retrieval. Fluor Fernald previously requested that the Department of Energy Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology provide a Technical Assistance Team to review this approach. One of the key recommendations made by this team was to assess the wand operability, effectiveness, reliability, and safety in a mock-up test. A team was convened to develop the test plan, build the demonstration test loop, and perform the tests. The tests focused primarily on the operability of the system, and to a significantly lesser extent process performance. This report documents the results for the testing completed in April 2003. Based upon the testing performed, the team identified several key issues to be incorporated into the design and operation of the retrieval system.

  10. Town of Edinburg landfill reclamation demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    Landfill reclamation is the process of excavating a solid waste landfill to recover materials, reduce environmental impacts, restore the land resource, and, in some cases, extend landfill life. Using conventional surface mining techniques and specialized separation equipment, a landfill may be separated into recyclable material, combustible material, a soil/compost fraction and residual waste. A landfill reclamation demonstration project was hosted at the Town of Edinburg municipal landfill in northwest Saratoga County. The report examines various separation techniques employed at the site and appropriate uses for reclaimed materials. Specifications regarding engineered work plans, health and safety monitoring, and contingency preparedness are discussed. Major potential applications and benefits of using landfill reclamation technology at existing landfills are identified and discussed. The research and development aspect of the report also examines optimal screening technologies, site selection protocol and the results of a test burn of reclaimed waste at a waste-to-energy facility. Landfill reclamation costs are developed, and economic comparisons are made between reclamation costs and conventional landfill closure costs, with key criteria identified. The results indicate that, although dependent on site-specific conditions and economic factors, landfill reclamation can be a technically and economically feasible alternative or companion to conventional landfill closure under a range of favorable conditions. Feasibility can be determined only after an investigation of the variety of landfill conditions and reclamation options.

  11. Staunton 1 reclamation demonstration project. Aquatic ecosystems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vinikour, W. S.

    1981-02-01

    To provide long-term indications of the potential water quality improvements following reclamation efforts at the Staunton 1 Reclamation Demonstration Project, macroinvertebrates were collected from three on-site ponds and from the receiving stream (Cahokia Creek) for site drainage. Implications for potential benthic community differences resulting from site runoff were disclosed, but macroinvertebrate diversity throughout Cahokia Creek was limited due to an unstable, sandy substrate. The three ponds sampled were the New Pond, which was created as part of the reclamation activities; the Shed Pond, which and the Old Pond, which, because it was an existing, nonimpacted pond free of site runoff, served as a control. Comparisons of macroinvertebrates from the ponds indicated the potential for the New Pond to develop into a productive ecosystem. Macroinvertebrates in the New Pond were generally species more tolerant of acid mine drainage conditions. However, due to the present limited faunal densities and the undesirable physical and chemical characteristics of the New Pond, the pond should not be stocked with fish at this time.

  12. Final report on Thermally Modified Sand demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-23

    The use of salt and salt/sand mixtures on icy roadway surfaces has dramatically increased during the past 30 years. Despite extensive documentation on salt related damage to the roadway improvements, vehicles and the environment, road maintenance departments have continued to rely on this practice. Road maintenance departments in northern climate areas have long recognized the safety benefits for public mobility on icy roadways from the use of sand. As an abrasive material, the sand improves the surface traction that results in more drivable and less hazardous road conditions during the winter months. Stockpiles of pure sand stored during the winter months oftentimes freeze into large unworkable, monolithic piles. To maintain a free-flowing condition, it has been found to be necessary to add salt to the sand. The addition of salt in amounts ranging from 5 to 10 percent to that of sand, is usually sufficient to provide relatively free-flowing abrasive material that could be stored in stockpiles and applied to icy road surfaces with conventional sand spreading trucks. Another alternative for winter storage of pure sand to maintain a free-flowing condition is in humidity-controlled, heated buildings. As would be expected, this method has high capital and operating costs. and not cost effective for general highway maintenance use. The invention demonstrated herein is a method of thermally modifying pure sand that will remain in a free-flowing state throughout the winter season without the need for the salt additive. The thermally modified sand provides an abrasive material that when applied to icy roads does not cause environmental and corrosive damage as done by the application of sand with salt. By employing a very simple process of freezing screened sand particles by forced air convection under subfreezing conditions, the invention creates a product that has significant value in terms of economic and environmental benefits.

  13. Customer-focused planning: Demonstration project summaries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.S.

    1992-12-01

    To succeed in the increasingly competitive and dynamic markets in which they operate, electric utilities are focusing ever greater attention on understanding and meeting customer needs. EPRI`s Customer Focused Planning (CFP) project was established to develop concepts and tools that will help utilities enhance their commitment to customer service. The project team conducted a series of interviews and meetings with participating utilities to collaboratively implement crucial steps in the CFP process. Although there is no unique set of tools or single management approach for improving product and service delivery, customer-focused companies have at least five ideals in common. They (1) define goals and objectives in concrete terms, (2) extend the planning boundaries of the organization to include all members of the energy services infrastructure, (3) painstakingly link functional activities directly to customer needs, (4) incorporate the customer`s voice in new product/ service design, and (5) align performance measures with customer needs. In addition, customer-focused companies use a variety of methods to improve customer satisfaction and company performance. These methods include conducting market research, developing market processes such as demand-side management contracting or bidding to reveal customer preferences, and involving customers more directly in the planning process. This report summarizes two brief demonstration projects conducted as part of EPRI`s CFP project, one at Commonwealth Edison Company (CECo) and one at PSI Energy. The CECo project emphasized developing customer-focused performance measures for telephone inquiries. The PSI Energy project involved a one-day workshop underscoring two important CFP elements-understanding customer wants and explicitly linking those wants to utility activities.

  14. St. Louis FUSRAP Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Eberlin, J.; Williams, D.; Mueller, D.

    2003-02-26

    The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learned from fours years' experience conducting Remedial Investigation and Remedial Action activities at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Many FUSRAP sites are experiencing challenges conducting Remedial Actions within forecasted volume and budget estimates. The St. Louis FUSRAP lessons learned provide insight to options for cost effective remediation at FUSRAP sites. The lessons learned are focused on project planning (budget and schedule), investigation, design, and construction.

  15. Louis Sokoloff (1921-2015).

    PubMed

    Agranoff, Bernard W

    2016-05-01

    This is an obituary to Louis Sokoloff (1921-2015), an outstanding neurochemist and neuroscientist, whose groundbreaking work on the use of [14C]deoxyglucose in brain imaging was a milestone among many achievements throughout his career. Picture taken by the author, June 1974, Ann Arbor. PMID:27086737

  16. Remembering Louis: Why Teach Poetry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiley, Jerome

    1998-01-01

    Relates the experience of the author as a young man struggling to write a chapter of his dissertation called "Why Teach Poetry?". Notes that poet Louis Ginsberg (father of poet Allen Ginsberg) provided him with a two-paragraph answer, as meaningful and pertinent now as it was 50 years ago. (SR)

  17. Final report for the Department of Energy funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project'' [University electronic research administration demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, John

    1998-07-31

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy (DOE) funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project (DE-FC02-92ER35180)'' for the period August 1994-July 1998. The goal of the project, referred to as NewERA, was to demonstrate the use of open standards for electronic commerce to support research administration, otherwise referred to as Electronic Research Administration (ERA). The NewERA demonstration project provided a means to test interagency standards developed within the Federal Grant Electronic Commerce Committee, a group comprised of federal granting agencies. The NewERA program was initiated by DOE. NewERA was comprised of three separate, but related, ERA activities in preaward administration, postaward administration, and secure Internet commerce. The goal of New ERA was to demonstrate an open standard implementation of ERA using electronic data interchange, e-mail and Internet transaction security between grant applicants and DOE, along with t h e other participating agencies.

  18. [Saint Louis encephalitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Carballo, Carolina; Cabana, Magdalena; Ledezma, Francisca; Pascual, Carolina; Cazes, Claudia; Mistchenko, Alicia; López, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis is transmitted by Culex mosquitoes. In Argentina sporadic cases are registered. Symptomatic illness is unusual in children. We present a case of meningoencephalitis caused by an uncommon viral infection. The clinical signs and symptoms are unusual for pediatric patients and the bilateral thalamic compromise showed on magnetic resonance has not been described previously. An 8-year-old girl consulted due to fever, behavior disorders and ataxia. Clonus and neck stiffness were detected at physical exam. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed mononuclear leukocytosis; bilateral ischemic compromise was observed in thalamus by magnetic resonance. Saint Louis virus was confirmed by serology: serum and cerebrospinal fluid IgM were positive during the acute phase of the disease and serum IgG was positive four weeks later. Most of the signs and symptoms of the disease were resolved, however mild behavior disorders were observed as acute sequelae up to 45 days after hospital discharge. PMID:27399031

  19. St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Robert A.; Steckel, Phyllis; Schweig, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    St. Louis has experienced minor earthquake damage at least 12 times in the past 200 years. Because of this history and its proximity to known active earthquake zones, the St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project will produce digital maps that show variability of earthquake hazards in the St. Louis area. The maps will be available free via the internet. They can be customized by the user to show specific areas of interest, such as neighborhoods or transportation routes.

  20. WATER TREATMENT AT ST. LOUIS, MO

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Edward E.

    1920-01-01

    With three kinds of water, Mississippi, Missouri and Illinois rivers, of different natures, and coming in an infinite variety of mixtures, St. Louis has peculiar water supply problems. This outline of methods will interest water engineers. Of the success of the St. Louis methods, the low mortality rates of the city are evidence. PMID:18010313

  1. Approach to forecasting daily maximum ozone levels in St. Louis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prior, E. J.; Schiess, J. R.; Mcdougal, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements taken in 1976 from the St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study (RAPS) data base, conducted by EPA, were analyzed to determine an optimum set of air-quality and meteorological variables for predicting maximum ozone levels for each day in 1976. A 'leaps and bounds' regression analysis was used to identify the best subset of variables. Three particular variables, the 9 a.m. ozone level, the forecasted maximum temperature, and the 6-9 a.m. averaged wind speed, have useful forecasting utility. The trajectory history of air masses entering St. Louis was studied, and it was concluded that transport-related variables contribute to the appearance of very high ozone levels. The final empirical forecast model predicts the daily maximum ozone over 341 days with a standard deviation of 11 ppb, which approaches the estimated error.

  2. Design for an Analysis and Assessment of the Education Satellite Communications Demonstration: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Practical Concepts, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A 3-month evaluation design effort developed a strategy and implementation plan for a policy level evaluation of the Educational Satellite Communications Demonstration (ESCD). The final report of the effort covers: (1) development of the evaluation strategy and plan; (2) data collection and analysis; (3) measurement of the impact of satellite TV…

  3. Hawaii Demonstration Project to Avert Unintended Teenage Pregnancy: 1978-1982. Final Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt-Merin, Marta; Sutter, Sharon Kingdon

    This final report provides a descriptive overview of three approaches which the Hawaii Demonstration Project initiated to reduce unintended teenage pregnancies. Project evaluation findings are summarized; both qualitative and quantitative data are presented for a comprehensive picture of the project and its input. Project limitations and successes…

  4. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix (1926-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, W.

    2005-12-01

    On 27 June 2005 the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage lost its founder and Australia lost one of its leading historians of astronomy when John Louis Perdrix died in Dubai after a brief battle with cancer.

  5. Planning and Evaluating Telecommunications Demonstration Projects and Assessing the Costs of Telecommunications Demonstration Projects. Final Report #146-03.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clippinger, John H.; Fain, Sanford B.

    This two-report volume was prepared to describe approaches for evaluating individual Office of Telecommunications Policy (OTP) demonstration projects in the future and to aid demonstration project directors in project planning and development. The first report focuses on the role of planning and evaluation activities, stressing their importance in…

  6. Economic Development Program, St. Louis, Volume 1. The Economic Development of a St. Louis Poverty Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Management and Economics Research, Inc., Palo Alto, CA.

    Part of a larger study to formulate an economic development program for St. Louis, this document discusses the growth potential or expected decline of industry in the inner city; factors influencing the retention and the location of industries in greater St. Louis; and ways of stimulating new business, especially Negro owned businesses in the…

  7. Space Radar Image of St. Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a spaceborne radar image of the area surrounding St. Louis, Missouri, where the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers come together. The city of St. Louis is the bright gold area within a bend in the Mississippi River at the lower center of the image. The rivers show up as dark blue sinuous lines. Urbanized areas appear bright gold and forested areas are shown as a brownish color. Several bridges can be seen spanning the river near downtown St. Louis. The Missouri River flows east, from left to right, across the center of the image, and meets the Mississippi River, which flows from top to bottom of the image. A small stretch of the Illinois River is shown at the top of the image where it merges with the Mississippi. The Mississippi forms the state boundary between Illinois (to the right) and Missouri (to the left). Flat farmland areas within the river floodplains appear blue on the image. The major roadways that pass through the area can be seen radiating out from, and encircling, the city of St. Louis. These highways, the rivers and the bridges help maintain St. Louis' reputation as the 'Gateway to the West.

  8. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sumit; Krok, Michael

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  9. 13. Photocopy of illustration in St. Louis Illustrated, 1876. Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of illustration in St. Louis Illustrated, 1876. Original in library of Lehmann Building, Missouri Botanical Garden. 'SHAW'S GARDEN,' BIRD'S EYE VIEW FROM THE SOUTH - Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  10. Genetic variation of St. Louis encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    May, Fiona J.; Li, Li; Zhang, Shuliu; Guzman, Hilda; Beasley, David W. C.; Tesh, Robert B.; Higgs, Stephen; Raj, Pushker; Bueno, Rudy; Randle, Yvonne; Chandler, Laura; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2008-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) has been regularly isolated throughout the Americas since 1933. Previous phylogenetic studies involving 62 isolates have defined seven major lineages (I–VII), further divided into 14 clades. In this study, 28 strains isolated in Texas in 1991 and 2001–2003, and three older, previously unsequenced strains from Jamaica and California were sequenced over the envelope protein gene. The inclusion of these new sequences, and others published since 2001, has allowed better delineation of the previously published SLEV lineages, in particular the clades of lineage II. Phylogenetic analysis of 106 isolates identified 13 clades. All 1991 and 2001–2003 isolates from Nueces, Jefferson and Harris Counties (Texas Gulf Coast) group in clade IIB with other isolates from these counties isolated during the 1980s and 1990s. This lack of evidence for introduction of novel strains into the Texas Gulf Coast over a long period of time is consistent with overwintering of SLEV in this region. Two El Paso isolates, both from 2002, group in clade VA with recent Californian isolates from 1998–2001 and some South American strains with a broad temporal range. Overall, these data are consistent with multiple introductions of SLEV from South America into North America, and provide support for the hypothesis that in most situations, SLEV circulates within a locality, with occasional incursions from other areas. Finally, SLEV has much lower nucleotide (10.1 %) and amino acid variation (2.8 %) than other members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex (maximum variation 24.6 % nucleotide and 11.8 % amino acid). PMID:18632961

  11. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-04-05

    This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating.

  12. Public School in St. Louis: Place, Performance, and Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Charter School Authorizers (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This report compares the demand for public education in St. Louis during the 2007-08 school year with both the supply and location of public schools operated by St. Louis Public Schools and charter schools. The geographic areas of analysis are the city of St. Louis and its zip codes. The first four sections of this report contain background…

  13. Demonstration Senior High Schools: A Career Education Demonstration and Replication Effort. A Final Report from the Florida Career Education Demonstration Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Career Education Demonstration Consortium, Tallahassee.

    Three Florida counties (Broward, Orange, and Pinellas) formed a consortium for demonstrating the most effective methods and techniques in career education at the secondary level. A career education model was developed which was designed to provide (1) career awareness and exploration experiences for all students, 9-12; (2) alternative salable…

  14. Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, January 1, 1987--February 9, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-03

    Department of Energy Participation in the Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project began officially on November 9, 1987. Even though their financial participation began at this time, they will receive technical information from the start of the project which was on January 1, 1987. The Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project is progressing in Phase I with the majority of the emphasis on facility design, site characterization and the environmental work. The site characterization field work is estimated to be completed by the end of February with the final report completion towards the end of Phase I. The facility design effort is close to the 40% level. It is anticipated that all permits will be applied for in Phase I and most of them will be granted by the end of Phase I. The obtaining of the private financing continues to be a major activity in the project. All of the financing must be in place before the continuation for DOE funding to Phase II will be applied for.

  15. The Method of Jean Louis Nicolet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattegno, Caleb

    2007-01-01

    Jean Louis Nicolet is a Swiss teacher of mathematics who found his subject so fascinating that he was puzzled as to why so many pupils could not share this enjoyment in their studies. He came to a conclusion which is now supported by the results of psychological research into the learning process: he suggested that the mind does not spontaneously…

  16. St. Louis Educational Museum: A Centennial Commemoration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The St. Louis, Missouri Educational Museum has its roots in the 1904 Centennial Exposition, held at Forest Park on the edge of the city. The theme of the exposition was education and technology. Seventy thousand local school children visited the exposition, and at its conclusion an initiative was launched to purchase some of the exhibitions as…

  17. Louis Guttman's Contributions to Classical Test Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Donald W.; Williams, Richard H.; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Ross, Donald

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on Louis Guttman's contributions to the classical theory of educational and psychological tests, one of the lesser known of his many contributions to quantitative methods in the social sciences. Guttman's work in this field provided a rigorous mathematical basis for ideas that, for many decades after Spearman's initial work,…

  18. Loftin Collection (Spirit of St. Louis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1928-01-01

    Ryan NYP 'Spirit of St. Louis' equipped with 220 HP Wright Whirlwind engine. Charles A. Lindbergh flew this aircraft non-stop from New York to Paris in the period May 20-21 1927. Photographed in San Diego, California. This photo was used in a report, NACA TN, written by Donald Hall who designed the aircraft.

  19. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  20. Baseline risk assessment for exposure to contaminants at the St. Louis Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The St. Louis Site comprises three noncontiguous areas in and near St. Louis, Missouri: the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), the St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS), and the Latty Avenue Properties. The main site of the Latty Avenue Properties includes the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and the Futura Coatings property, which are located at 9200 Latty Avenue. Contamination at the St. Louis Site is the result of uranium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1970s. Uranium processing took place at the SLDS from 1942 through 1957. From the 1940s through the 1960s, SLAPS was used as a storage area for residues from the manufacturing operations at SLDS. The materials stored at SLAPS were bought by Continental Mining and Milling Company of Chicago, Illinois, in 1966, and moved to the HISS/Futura Coatings property at 9200 Latty Avenue. Vicinity properties became contaminated as a result of transport and movement of the contaminated material among SLDS, SLAPS, and the 9200 Latty Avenue property. This contamination led to the SLAPS, HISS, and Futura Coatings properties being placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the St. Louis Site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The primary goal of FUSRAP is the elimination of potential hazards to human health and the environment at former Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) sites so that, to the extent possible, these properties can be released for use without restrictions. To determine and establish cleanup goals for the St. Louis Site, DOE is currently preparing a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS). This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is a component of the process; it addresses potential risk to human health and the environment associated wi

  1. Phase 1 Final status survey plan for the West Valley demonstration project.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. L.

    2011-05-31

    This plan provides the technical basis and associated protocols to support Phase 1 final status survey (FSS) data collection and interpretation as part of the West Valley Demonstration Project Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan process. This plan is consistent with the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). The Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan provides the relevant derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the Phase 1 radionuclides of interest. This plan includes protocols that will be applied to the deep excavations planned for Waste Management Area (WMA) 1 and WMA 2, for surface soils outside the WMA 1 and WMA 2 excavations that do not have contamination impacts at depths greater than one meter, and for areas that are used for Phase 1 contaminated soil lay-down purposes. All excavated and lay-down areas will be classified as MARSSIM Class 1 areas. Surface soils that have not been excavated, are not expected to exceed DCGLs, and do not have contamination impacts at depths greater than one meter will be divided into either Class 1 or Class 2 areas depending on the expected potential for surface soil contamination in those areas. The plan uses gamma scans combined with biased soil samples to address DCGLemc concerns. The plan uses systematic soil sampling combined with area factors to address DCGLw and DCGLemc concerns. The Sign test will be used to statistically evaluate DCGLw compliance. If the results from the characterization sampling and analysis plan (CSAP) data collection indicate that background may be a significant issue for Sign test implementation, the Wilcoxon rank sum (WRS) test will be used instead to demonstrate DCGLw compliance. A reference area will be selected on the basis of CSAP data results if the WRS test becomes a necessity. The WMA 1 excavation footprint includes approximately 476 foundation pilings that will be trimmed and left in place. Piling-specific systematic and biased sampling will be conducted to

  2. Chicago-St. Louis high speed rail plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, M.E.

    1994-12-31

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), in cooperation with Amtrak, undertook the Chicago-St. Louis High Speed Rail Financial and Implementation Plan study in order to develop a realistic and achievable blueprint for implementation of high speed rail in the Chicago-St. Louis corridor. This report presents a summary of the Price Waterhouse Project Team`s analysis and the Financial and Implementation Plan for implementing high speed rail service in the Chicago-St. Louis corridor.

  3. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer July, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer July, 1962 SLAVE BUILDING AND KITCHENS. - Robinson-Aiken Slave Building & Kitchens, 48 Elizabeth Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  4. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer CONSTRUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer CONSTRUCTION DETAIL, SECOND FLOOR ROOM. - Harvey-Lining House & Pharmacy, Broad & Kings Streets, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  5. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer July, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer July, 1958 INTERIOR, UPPER PART OF FIRST FLOOR. - Farmers' & Exchange Bank, 141 East Bay Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer July, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer July, 1958 INTERIOR, LOWER PART OF FIRST FLOOR. - Farmers' & Exchange Bank, 141 East Bay Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  7. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer August, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Louis I. Schwartz, Photographer August, 1958 HOUSE AND ENVIRONMENT, FROM NORTHWEST. - John Falls Walker House, 344 East Bay Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  8. Cometabolic bioreactor demonstration at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, A.J.; Donaldson, T.L.; Jennings, H.L.; Morris, M.I.; Palumbo, A.V.; Herbes, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a demonstration of cometabolic technology for bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents. The technology demonstration was located at a seep from the K-1070-C/D Classified Burial Ground at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The technology demonstration was designed to evaluate the performance of two different types of cometabolic processes. In both cases, the TCE is cometabolized in the sense that utilization of a different primary substrate is necessary to obtain the simultaneous cometabolism of TCE. Trichloroethylene alone is unable to support growth and maintenance of the microorganisms. Methanotrophic (methane-utilizing) technology was demonstrated first; aromatic-utilizing microorganisms were demonstrated later. The demonstration was based on scaleup of laboratory and bench-scale prototype equipment that was used to establish the technical feasibility of the processes.This report documents the operation of the methanotrophic bioreactor system to treat the seep water at the demonstration site. The initial objectives were to demonstrate stable operation of the bioreactors and associated equipment, including the pretreatment and effluent polishing steps; and evaluate the biodegradation of TCE and other organics in the seep water for the three operating modes--air oxidation pretreatment, steam-stripping pretreatment, and no pretreatment.

  9. Virgin Islands Demonstration Library Network Study: Exploring Library Networking in Remote, Disadvantaged Areas. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Henry C.; And Others

    The Virgin Islands Demonstration Library Network Study (VIDLNS) seeks to determine whether the development of either local or regional library networks would be the key to optimal organization of small library collections in isolated areas. This report describes the research and demonstration components of the exploratory phase of the project: (1)…

  10. A Demonstration Project: Group Care of Infants and Toddlers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Greensboro.

    This research and demonstration project involved the establishment of a demonstration Nursery Center to provide for the daytime care of infants and toddlers in groups and for the evaluation of this experience. A descriptive account is given of the founding of the center and of its operation over a three-year period. Finding housing and suitable…

  11. The Detection and Remediation of Learning Disabilities. Child Welfare Research and Demonstration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechtel, Leland P.

    Reported are the final 2 years of a program which provided identification and remediation services for 60 potentially dyslexic preschool children and 45 dyslexic elementary grade children. Described for the preschool program are materials and evaluative devices and methods of remediation which stressed development of perceptual motor skills,…

  12. PITTSBURGH TECHNICAL HEALTH TRAINING INSTITUTE DEMONSTRATION PROJECT. FINAL REPORT, VOLUME II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KISHKUNAS, LOUIS J.

    APPENDIXES TO THE "FINAL REPORT," VOLUME I (VT 005 511), ARE INCLUDED--(1) A SCHEMATIC REPRESENTATION OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, (2) TECHNICAL BEHAVIOR CHECKLISTS, (3) PERFORMANCE INVENTORY FORMS USED IN ON-THE-JOB OBSERVATIONS, (4) REPORT FORM FOR TYPICAL JOB BEHAVIOR OF EMPLOYEE, (5) COOPERATING AREA HEALTH INSTITUTIONS, (6) TABLES OF Z SCORES…

  13. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  14. Child Service Demonstration Center, July 1, 1974 to June 30, 1975. Final Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillside School, Cushing, OK.

    Presented is the final evaluation report of a project designed to develop a prescriptive program for learning disabled children (grades 7-12) which included a screening/assessment program with 96 students and the writing and implementation of individual educational programs with 171 students. It is noted that in the area of research and…

  15. Short wavelength chemical laser demonstration based on N({sup 2}D) chemistry. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-19

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate lasing on the NCl(b{yields}x) transition at 665 nm. Our scheme is based on chemical production of excited nitrogen atoms in the {sup 2}D metastable state and subsequent reaction of N({sup 2}D) with Cl{sub 2} to produce NCl(b). Our intermediate objectives were: (1) demonstrate chemical generation of N({sup 2}D), (2) identify and measure rate constants important to the chemical scheme, and (3) demonstrate production of NCl(b) from the N({sup 2}D) + Cl{sub 2} reaction. The program results and accomplishments are summarized in this report.

  16. Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project. Final report, March 1, 1994--March 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, D.A.; Hoffman, J.D.; Marrocco, M.; Mudd, M.J.; Reinhart, W.P.; Stogran, H.K.

    1995-08-01

    The Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Demonstration Plant was the first utility-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor to operate in combined-cycle mode in the US. The 45-year old pulverized coal plant was repowered with PFBC components in order to demonstrate that PFBC combined-cycle technology is an economic, reliable, and environmentally superior alternative to conventional technology in using high-sulfur coal to generate electricity. The three-year demonstration period started on February 28, 1991 and terminated on February 28, 1994. The fourth year of testing started on March 1, 1994 and terminated on March 30, 1995. This report reviews the experience of the 70-MW(e), Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant during the fourth year of operation.

  17. Expedited demonstration of molten salt mixed waste treatment technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-02

    This final report discusses the molten salt mixed waste project in terms of the various subtasks established. Subtask 1: Carbon monoxide emissions; Establish a salt recycle schedule and/or a strategy for off-gas control for MWMF that keeps carbon monoxide emission below 100 ppm on an hourly averaged basis. Subtask 2: Salt melt viscosity; Experiments are conducted to determine salt viscosity as a function of ash composition, ash concentration, temperature, and time. Subtask 3: Determine that the amount of sodium carbonate entrained in the off-gas is minimal, and that any deposited salt can easily be removed form the piping using a soot blower or other means. Subtask 4: The provision of at least one final waste form that meets the waste acceptance criteria of a landfill that will take the waste. This report discusses the progress made in each of these areas.

  18. Demonstration of the use of hydrogen fuel for food service. Final report, October 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Back, D.D.

    1999-03-01

    This Phase 1 effort demonstrated the use of hydrogen-gas fuel for use in food service applications. Energy efficiencies of 40--50 percent were achieved with Mainstream Engineering's hydrogen burner, with usable energy supply rates of 15,000 BTU/hr, fulfilling the requirements of the US Army. It was demonstrated that hydrogen-fuel could be used for food service using compressed cylinders of hydrogen or by using metal-hydride derived hydrogen.

  19. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix, 1926-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, D. Wayne

    2006-12-01

    John Perdrix, astronomical historian and co-founder of the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, died on 27 June 2005. John Louis Perdrix was born in Adelaide, Australia, on 30 June 1926. After studying chemistry at Melbourne Technical College and working in industry, he joined the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's Division of Minerals and Geochemistry. In 1974 the Division relocated to the Western Australian capital, Perth, and John spent the rest of his working life there involved in geochemical research. From his teenage years John had a passion for astronomy, which he fine-tuned through the Astronomical Society of Victoria and the Victorian Branch of the British Astronomical Association. He was very active in both groups, serving as President of the former and Secretary/Treasurer of the latter. He was also an FRAS, and a member of the AAS, the BAA parent body, and the IAU (Commission 41)?no mean feat for an Australian amateur astronomer. Throughout his life, he was a strong advocate of close amateur-professional relations. John's main research interest was history of astronomy, and over the years he wrote a succession of research papers, mainly about aspects of Australian astronomy. His well-researched and neatly-illustrated papers on the Melbourne Observatory and the Great Melbourne Telescope are classics, and when the Observatory's future was in the balance they played a key role in the State Government's decision to convert this unique facility into a museum precinct. To support his research activities, John built up an amazing library that developed its own distinctive personality and quickly took over his house and garage before invading commercial storage facilities! Apart from writing papers, John had an even greater passion for editing and publishing. From 1985 to 1997 he produced the Australian Journal of Astronomy, and in 1998 this was replaced by the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage (JAH2). Both

  20. Demonstration and implementation of ethanol as an aviation fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the viability of ethanol as an aviation fuel at appropriate locations and audiences in the participating Biomass Energy Program Regions, and to promote implementation projects in the area. Seven demonstrations were to be performed during the Summer 1995 through December 1996 period. To maximize the cost effectiveness of the program, additional corporate co-sponsorships were sought at each demonstration site and the travel schedule was arranged to take advantage of appropriate events taking place in the vicinity of the schedule events or enroute. This way, the original funded amount was stretched to cover another year of activities increasing the number of demonstrations from seven to thirty-nine. While the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) contract focused on ethanol as an aviation fuel, RAFDC also promoted the broader use of ethanol as a transportation fuel. The paper summarizes locations and occasions, and gives a brief description of each demonstration/exhibit/presentation held during the term of the project. Most of the demonstrations took place at regularly scheduled air shows, such as the Oshkosh, Wisconsin Air Show. The paper also reviews current and future activities in the areas of certification, emission testing, the international Clean Airports Program, air pollution monitoring with instrumented aircraft powered by renewable fuels, training operation and pilot project on ethanol, turbine fuel research, and educational programs.

  1. Drought-induced amplification of Saint Louis encephalitis virus, Florida.

    PubMed

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Day, Jonathan F; Stieglitz, Marc

    2002-06-01

    We used a dynamic hydrology model to simulate water table depth (WTD) and quantify the relationship between Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) transmission and hydrologic conditions in Indian River County, Florida, from 1986 through 1991, a period with an SLEV epidemic. Virus transmission followed periods of modeled drought (specifically low WTDs 12 to 17 weeks before virus transmission, followed by a rising of the water table 1 to 2 weeks before virus transmission). Further evidence from collections of Culex nigripalpus (the major mosquito vector of SLEV in Florida) suggests that during extended spring droughts vector mosquitoes and nestling, juvenile, and adult wild birds congregate in selected refuges, facilitating epizootic amplification of SLEV. When the drought ends and habitat availability increases, the SLEV-infected Cx. nigripalpus and wild birds disperse, initiating an SLEV transmission cycle. These findings demonstrate a mechanism by which drought facilitates the amplification of SLEV and its subsequent transmission to humans. PMID:12023912

  2. Demonstration Project 111, ITS/CVO Technology Truck, Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gambrell, KP

    2002-01-11

    In 1995, the planning and building processes began to design and develop a mobile demonstration unit that could travel across the nation and be used as an effective outreach tool. In 1997, the unit was completed; and from June 1997 until December 2000, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)/Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) mobilized the Technology Truck, also known as Demonstration Project No. 111, ''Advanced Motor Carrier Operations and Safety Technologies.'' The project featured the latest available state-of-the-practice intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies designed to improve both the efficiency and safety of commercial vehicle operations (CVO). The Technology Truck was designed to inform and educate the motor carrier community and other stakeholders regarding ITS technologies, thus gaining support and buy-in for participation in the ITS program. The primary objective of the project was to demonstrate new and emerging ITS/CVO technologies and programs, showing their impact on motor carrier safety and productivity. In order to meet the objectives of the Technology Truck project, the FHWA/FMCSA formed public/private partnerships with industry and with Oak Ridge National Laboratory to demonstrate and display available ITS/CVO technologies in a cooperative effort. The mobile demonstration unit was showcased at national and regional conferences, symposiums, universities, truck shows and other venues, in an effort to reach as many potential users and decision makers as possible. By the end of the touring phase, the ITS/CVO Technology Truck had been demonstrated in 38 states, 4 Canadian provinces, 88 cities, and 114 events; been toured by 18,099 people; and traveled 115,233 miles. The market penetration for the Technology Truck exceeded 4,000,000, and the website received more than 25,000 hits. In addition to the Truck's visits, the portable ITS/CVO kiosk was demonstrated at 31 events in 23 cites in 15 states.

  3. Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System Cold Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Max R; McKinnon, M. A.

    1999-12-01

    The spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) provides an interface between large and small casks and between storage-only and transportation casks. It permits decommissioning of reactor pools after shutdown and allows the use of large storage-only casks for temporary onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel irrespective of reactor or fuel handling limitations at a reactor site. A cold demonstration of the DTS prototype was initiated in August 1996 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The major components demonstrated included the fuel assembly handling subsystem, the shield plug/lid handling subsystem, the cask interface subsystem, the demonstration control subsystem, a support frame, and a closed circuit television and lighting system. The demonstration included a complete series of DTS operations from source cask receipt and opening through fuel transfer and closure of the receiving cask. The demonstration included both normal operations and recovery from off-normal events. It was designed to challenge the system to determine whether there were any activities that could be made to jeopardize the activities of another function or its safety. All known interlocks were challenged. The equipment ran smoothly and functioned as designed. A few "bugs" were corrected. Prior to completion of the demonstration testing, a number of DTS prototype systems were modified to apply lessons learned to date. Additional testing was performed to validate the modifications. In general, all the equipment worked exceptionally well. The demonstration also helped confirm cost estimates that had been made at several points in the development of the system.

  4. A Model Demonstration Service Delivery Continuum for Preschool Handicapped Children. Final Program Performance Report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schennum, Ruth H.

    The final report details achievements and slippages of a model demonstration center which served 46 preschool handicapped children. Documented are milestones in such areas as direct and supplementary services to children (identification, evaluation); parent/family participation (large and small group meetings, individual parent participation);…

  5. Wisconsin's ERIC On-Line Information Retrieval - Demonstration and Research. (Information Retrieval and Research Project). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Roger H.; Grady, Carl R.

    In compiling the final report of Wisconsin's ERIC on-line Information Retrieval Demonstration and Research Project, an extensive review of research on information science, user needs and perceptions, and information use and saturation was seen as a vital first step. Such knowledge might help explain the successes and failures of the Project, which…

  6. Demonstrating the Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation of Developmental Guidance, Counseling, and Placement Components in a Career Education System. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    In this final report, the demonstration project conducted by the Mesa schools from 1973 to 1976 is shown to have been successful in reaching its goals of staff training, information dissemination, and student benefits in developmental career guidance, counseling, and placement services for grades K-12. Student-related objectives which are listed…

  7. The multifaceted career of Louis Borsch.

    PubMed

    Ravin, James G

    2009-11-01

    John Louis Borsch Jr, MD (1873-1929), was an ophthalmologist from Philadelphia who spent most of his career in France. During his lifetime he was probably best known as the inventor of the first fused bifocal lens, which was marketed very successfully as the Kryptok lens. He may be better known today for performing cataract surgery on Mary Cassatt (1844-1926), the American Impressionist artist, and on James Joyce (1882-1941), the Irish author. Little known, but remarkable, is his thesis for his second medical degree, Le Traitement Chirurgical de l'Astigmie (The Surgical Treatment of Astigmatism). PMID:19901225

  8. Volunteers build Bay St. Louis playground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    More than 650 volunteers - many of them employees at NASA's Stennis Space Center - weathered rain and cold to transform Bay St. Louis' old City Park into a playground Dec. 17. Volunteers assembled and erected a slide, swing set, jungle gym, sand box and planter benches in an eight-hour time frame. The playground was the first new structure built in the town devastated by Hurricane Katrina and the first on the Gulf Coast after the storm. The project was financed and led by nonprofit organization KaBOOM!, whose vision is to create a great place to play within walking distance of every child in America.

  9. Demonstration of coal reburning for cyclone boiler NO{sub x} control. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program, under Round 2, a project for Full Scale Demonstration of Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x},) Control was selected. DOE sponsored The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company, with Wisconsin Power & Light (WP&L) as the host utility, to demonstrate coal reburning technology at WP&L`s 110 MW{sub c}, cyclone-fired Unit No.2 at the Nelson Dewey Generating Station in Cassville, Wisconsin. The coal reburning demonstration was justified based on two prior studies. An Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and B&W sponsored engineering feasibility study indicated that the majority of cyclone-equipped boilers could successfully apply reburning technology to reduce NO{sub x}, emissions by 50 to 70%. An EPRI/Gas Research Institute (GRI)/B&W pilot-scale evaluation substantiated this conclusion through pilot-scale testing in B&W`s 6 million Btu/hr Small Boiler Simulator. Three different reburning fuels, natural gas, No. 6 oil, and pulverized coal were tested. This work showed that coal as a reburning fuel performs nearly as well as gas/oil without deleterious effects of combustion efficiency. Coal was selected for a full scale demonstration since it is available to all cyclone units and represents the highest level of technical difficulty-in demonstrating the technology.

  10. Clean coal technology III 10 MW demonstration of gas suspension absorption. Final public design report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report provides the nonproprietary design information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA)`` Demonstration Project at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emission Research (CER). The 10 MW Demonstration of GSA program is designed to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating the flue gas from a boiler burning high sulfur coal. This project involves design, manufacturing, construction and testing of a retrofitted GSA system. This report presents a nonproprietary description of the technology and overall process performance requirements, plant location and plant facilities. The process, mechanical, structural and electrical design of the GSA system as well as project cost information are included. It also includes a description the modification or alterations made during the course of construction and start-up. Plant start-up provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for the process. This report, initially drafted in 1993, covers design information available prior to startup of the demonstration project. It does not reflect the results obtained in that project, which is now complete.

  11. Low-cost flywheel demonstration program. Final report, 1 October 1977-31 December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenhorst, D.W.; Small, T.R.; Wilkinson, W.O.

    1980-04-01

    The Applied Physics Laboratory/Department of Energy Low Cost Flywheel Demonstration Program was initiated on 1 October 1977 and was successfully concluded on 31 December 1979. The total cost of this program was $355,190. All primary objectives were successfully achieved as follows: demonstration of a full-size, 1-kWh flywheel having an estimated cost in large-volume production of approximately $50/kWh; development of a ball-bearing system having losses comparable to the losses in a totally magnetic suspension system; successful and repeated demonstration of the low-cost flywheel in a complete flywheel energy-storage system based on the use of ordinary house voltage and frequency; and application of the experience gained in the hardware program to project the system design into a complete, full-scale, 30-kWh home-type flywheel energy-storage system.

  12. Hanford Tanks Initiative alternate retrieval system demonstrations - final report of testing performed by Grey Pilgrim LLC

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, E.J.

    1997-07-24

    A waste retrieval system has been defined to provide a safe and cost-effective solution to the Hanford Tanks Initiative. This system consists of the EMMA robotic manipulator (by GreyPilgrim LLC) and the lightweight Scarifier (by Waterjet Technology, Inc.) powered by a 36-kpsi Jet-Edge diesel powered high pressure pumping system. For demonstration and testing purposes, an air conveyance system was utilized to remove the waste from the simulated tank floor. The EMMA long reach manipulator utilized for this demonstration was 33 feet long. It consisted of 4 hydraulically controlled stages of varying lengths and coupling configurations. T

  13. Passive solar commercial buildings: design assistance and demonstration program. Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-26

    The final design of the Mount Airy Public Library is given. Incremental passive design costs are discussed. Performance and economic analyses are made and the results reported. The design process is thoroughly documented. Considerations discussed are: (1) building energy needs; (2) site energy potentials, (3) matching energy needs with site energy potentials, (4) design indicators for best strategies and concepts, (5) schematic design alternatives, (6) performance testing of the alternatives, (7) design selection, and (8) design development. Weather data and Duke Power electric rates are included. (LEW)

  14. Urban and rural demonstration of a wind-powered water pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    One of the two prototype windmills is still being modified, and the final results are not yet in. Our original intent was to complete a four-year design effort so that the prototype Sailwing could be built by a do-it-yourselfer completely from off-the-shelf components. Once the design modifications were completed, we proposed to construct two mills - one at an urban community garden in Boston, the other at the Cape Code Bioshelter in Hatchville, Massachusetts. Plans for the machine would then be published and made available in several forms.

  15. Health Care and ADA Language Education Programs. Cooperative Demonstration Program: High Technology. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion County Schools, Fairmont, WV.

    A project implemented cooperative training programs in the three occupational areas: ADA computer language use; respiratory therapy technician; and hospital pharmacy technician. The project's purpose was to demonstrate high technology training programs for adults as a cooperative effort among the West Virginia Department of Education, local…

  16. Demonstration Program in Infant Care and Education (September 1968 - June 1971). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William

    The Ontario Institute and the Canadian Mothercraft Society report accumulated findings on all phases of their 3-year demonstration infant day care center. Infants enrolled in the center were either advantaged or disadvantaged, had working mothers and ranged in age from 3 to 30 months of age. The center also served as a training facility for infant…

  17. A Practical Demonstration Project in Teaching Technical Mathematics; Final Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Thomas J.; Witzke, Paul T.

    The primary purposes of this developmental and demonstration project were to reduce the number of dropouts and failures and to increase the amount of learning in the technical mathematics core courses. In June 1965 a decision was made to pilot test locally developed programed units in technical mathematics. After the identification of the desired…

  18. A Demonstration Project of Speech Training for the Preschool Cleft Palate Child. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Robert J.

    To ascertain the efficacy of a program of language and speech stimulation for the preschool cleft palate child, a research and demonstration project was conducted using 137 subjects (ages 18 to 72 months) with defects involving the soft palate. Their language and speech skills were matched with those of a noncleft peer group revealing that the…

  19. Cesium removal demonstration utilizing crystalline silicotitanate sorbent for processing Melton Valley Storage Tank supernate: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Taylor, P.A.; Cummins, R.L.

    1998-03-01

    This report provides details of the Cesium Removal Demonstration (CsRD), which was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on radioactive waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks. The CsRD was the first large-scale use of state-of-the-art sorbents being developed by private industry for the selective removal of cesium and other radionuclides from liquid wastes stored across the DOE complex. The crystalline silicotitanate sorbent used in the demonstration was chosen because of its effectiveness in laboratory tests using bench-scale columns. The demonstration showed that the cesium could be removed from the supernate and concentrated on a small-volume, solid waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Nevada Test Site. During this project, the CsRD system processed > 115,000 L (30,000 gal) of radioactive supernate with minimal operational problems. Sluicing, drying, and remote transportation of the sorbent, which could not be done on a bench scale, were successfully demonstrated. The system was then decontaminated to the extent that it could be contact maintained with the use of localized shielding only. By utilizing a modular, transportable design and placement within existing facilities, the system can be transferred to different sites for reuse. The initial unit has now been removed from the process building and is presently being reinstalled for use in baseline operations at ORNL.

  20. Final Evaluation and Monitoring Report of Demonstration Project for Adult Education "Mobilizing Adult Basic Education".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Dolores M.

    A demonstration adult education project aimed at a rural New Jersey population and involving class sessions 1 evening per week at 6 sites (N=85 students, including 65 caucasians, 10 blacks, and 10 Hispanic) was evaluated in terms of compliance, process, and performance. Compliance monitoring included examination of: visitations; budget; staff…

  1. Designing Scholarships to Improve College Success: Final Report on the Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Alexander K.; Patel, Reshma; Rudd, Timothy; Ratledge, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Performance-based scholarships have two main goals: (1) to give students more money for college; and (2) to provide incentives for academic progress. MDRC launched the Performance-Based Scholarship (PBS) Demonstration in 2008 to evaluate the effectiveness of these scholarships in a diverse set of states, institutions, and low-income student…

  2. Telemedicine in Alaska: The ATS-6 Satellite Biomedical Demonstration. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Dennis; And Others

    A demonstration project explored the potential of satellite video consulation to improve the quality of rural health care in Alaska. Satellite ground stations permitting both transmission and reception of black and white television were installed at clinics in Fairbanks, Fort Yukon, Galena, and Tanana. Receive-only television capability was…

  3. Documentation of the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Herhal, A J; Britton, S G; Minnucci, C A

    1982-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the methodologies used to develop the 1979 Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal. The main body of this report summarizes the methodological procedures used to develop each state reserve estimate. The appendices to the report provide a detailed description of the entire DRB process for each state.

  4. INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT--A DEMONSTRATION AND EVALUATION PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARSON, JOHN

    FOUR UNIVERSITIES COOPERATED WITH THE INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA CENTER AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY TO TEST, DEMONSTRATE, AND REFINE A MODEL FOR MEDIA INNOVATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT WHICH HAD BEEN DESIGNED IN A EARLIER PROJECT. MEDIA, EVALUATIVE, AND INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST CAPABILITIES WERE TEAMED TO THE DECISION PROCESSES OF THE INSTRUCTORS…

  5. Alabama Industrial Technician Education Cooperative Demonstration Program (I-TEC). Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John M. Patterson State Technical Coll., Montgomery, AL.

    A cooperative demonstration program between industry (General Electric) and education (John Patterson State Technical College, Alabama) designed and conducted a training program and competency assessment for individuals entering high technology positions related to industrial production in Alabama. The program was designed to develop employees as…

  6. Worker Relocation: A Review of U.S. Department of Labor Mobility Demonstration Projects. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairchild, Charles K.

    This report reviews the knowledge gained in 4 years of operation of labor mobility demonstration projects and provides guidelines on the design and operation of a permanent worker relocation program. Data were gathered both from written material covering the experience of each project and from field trips to some of the projects when additional…

  7. A Study of Library Cooperatives, Networks and Demonstration Projects. Final Report. Volume I: Findings and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Ruth; And Others

    This study evaluates the impact and effectiveness of the Library Research and Demonstration Program of the Higher Education Act (HEA II-B), and Title III, Interlibrary Cooperation, of the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA III), USOE administered grant programs to aid in developing and improving library and information services. It…

  8. An Evaluation of the Individual Training Account/Eligible Training Provider Demonstration. Final Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Ronald; Martinez, Alexandria; Salzman, Jeffrey; Wagner, Robin

    In March 2000, thirteen grants were awarded as part of the Individual Training Account/Eligible Training Provider (ITA/ETP) Demonstration. In summer and fall of 2000, the grant recipients' activities were subjected to an interim evaluation. Site visits were made to each grantee to determine what ITA policies and practices were being formulated,…

  9. SNOX demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The SNOX process, developed by Haldor Topsoe A/S and demonstrated and marketed in North America by ABB Environmental Systems (ABBES), is an innovative process which removes both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from power plant flue gases. Sulfur dioxide is recovered as high purity, concentrated sulfuric acid and nitrogen oxides are converted to nitrogen gas and water vapor; no additional waste streams are produced. As part of the Clean Coal Technology Program, this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, Ohio Coal Development Office, ABBES, Snamprogetti, and Ohio Edison. The project objective was to demonstrate the SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of the SNOX process on an electric power plant firing high-sulfur Ohio Coal. A 35-MWe demonstration has been conducted on a 108-MWe unit, Ohio Edison`s Niles Plant Unit 2, in Trumbull County, Ohio. The $31.4 million project began site preparation in November 1990 and commenced treating flue gas in March of 1992. A parametric test program has been completed. This report presents a description of the technology, results from the 33 month testing and operation phase, and information from a commercial scale economic evaluation. During the demonstration, the process met or exceeded its design goals of 95% SO{sub 2} removal, 90% NO{sub x} removal, and production of commercial grade (>93.2 wt.%) sulfuric acid. The plant was operated for approximately 8000 hours and produced more than 5600 tons of acid, which was purchased and distributed by a local supplier to end users. Projected economics for a 500 MWe commercial SNOX plant indicate a total capital requirement of 305 $/kW, levelized incremental cost of power at 6.1 mills/kWh, 219 $/ton of SO{sub 2} removed, and 198 $/ton of SO{sub 2}+NO{sub x} removed (all at constant dollars).

  10. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-30

    The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

  11. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The SNRB{trademark} Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project was cooperatively funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B&W, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ohio Edison, Norton Chemical Process Products Company and the 3M Company. The SNRB{trademark} technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. Development of the SNRB{trademark} process at B&W began with pilot testing of high-temperature dry sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} removal in the 1960`s. Integration of NO{sub x} reduction was evaluated in the 1970`s. Pilot work in the 1980`s focused on evaluation of various NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, SO{sub 2} sorbents and integration of the catalyst with the baghouse. This early development work led to the issuance of two US process patents to B&W - No. 4,309,386 and No. 4,793,981. An additional patent application for improvements to the process is pending. The OCDO was instrumental in working with B&W to develop the process to the point where a larger scale demonstration of the technology was feasible. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B&W tested the SNRB{trademark} pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB{trademark} process. The SNRB{trademark} facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993.

  12. Final Technical Report: Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration by the Delaware County Electric Cooperative, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Hilson Schneider

    2007-06-06

    This demonstration project contributes to the knowledge base in the area of fuel cells in stationary applications, propane fuel cells, edge-of-grid applications for fuel cells, and energy storage in combination with fuel cells. The project demonstrated that it is technically feasible to meet the whole-house electrical energy needs of a typical upstate New York residence with a 5-kW fuel cell in combination with in-home energy storage without any major modifications to the residence or modifications to the consumption patterns of the residents of the home. The use of a fuel cell at constant output power through a 120-Volt inverter leads to system performance issues including: • relatively poor power quality as quantified by the IEEE-defined short term flicker parameter • relatively low overall system efficiency Each of these issues is discussed in detail in the text of this report. The fuel cell performed well over the 1-year demonstration period in terms of availability and efficiency of conversion from chemical energy (propane) to electrical energy at the fuel cell output terminals. Another strength of fuel cell performance in the demonstration was the low requirements for maintenance and repair on the fuel cell. The project uncovered a new and important installation consideration for propane fuel cells. Alcohol added to new propane storage tanks is preferentially absorbed on the surface of some fuel cell reformer desulfurization filters. The experience on this project indicates that special attention must be paid to the volume and composition of propane tank additives. Size, composition, and replacement schedules for the de-sulfurization filter bed should be adjusted to account for propane tank additives to avoid sulfur poisoning of fuel cell stacks. Despite good overall technical performance of the fuel cell and the whole energy system, the demonstration showed that such a system is not economically feasible as compared to other commercially available

  13. Hopes Riding on Leader for Troubled St. Louis District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2008-01-01

    Kelvin Adams, who takes over next week as the St. Louis schools' seventh superintendent since 2003, will arrive already familiar with the dynamics of a district under state supervision. Still, the leadership and management challenges he faces are daunting. The St. Louis schools have been run since June 2007 by an appointed, three-person Special…

  14. Evaluating impacts of pulp and paper mill process changes on bioactive contaminant loading to the St. Louis River, Duluth, MN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past in vivo and in vitro studies have found estrogenic and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated bioactivities associated with final treated effluent from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharging to the St. Louis River Area of Concern near Duluth, MN, USA. A long-stand...

  15. [Louis Maurice Champagne and the "Ecole dentaire française"].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Claude

    2002-01-01

    The Royal Edict of Louis XIV had created a new category of practitioners, "The Teeth Experts", and at the dawn of the second half of the 19th century, France had no dental school nor specific legislation. The situation worsened when many American dentists settled in France. Thus the creating of the "Ecole dentaire de Paris" in 1880 constituted a significant event which was followed by the opening of the "Ecole Dentaire de France" in 1884 and of the "Ecole Dentaire Française" in 1896. Louis Maurice Champagne will be its director from 1926. At the St Ouen Jules Vallés Market, we fortuitously discovered a framed document containing three photographs of Louis Maurice Champagne's surgery located, 3 Place de la Madeleine in Paris. Thanks to his son and through various documents, we could trace the exceptional professional carrier of this practitioner who eventually bought the "Ecole Dentaire Française" from Dr Louis-Jules Rousseau. Then, we discuss the legal frame work of the 1892 law created the "Chirurgien-dentiste" diploma and we describe the scientific and practical teaching for the "Ecole dentaire française". The operating layout of the clinical rooms is presented by opposing the ergonomic aspect of the demonstration surgery of the director and the two large operative dentistry rooms used for students. We conclude by emphasizing Louis Maurice Champagne's determination to overcome adversity which was peculiar to him as a young orphan immigrant without resources. To solve the problem of the "Chirurgien Dentiste" statute considered by its promoters as a stage of transition towards fuller reforms, we present various projects like from Dr Hulin's. This practitioner presided the Dental Section of the Medical Council Order before being voted in the first President of the "Chirurgien Dentiste" National Council Order in 1945. In 1942 he was the first to advocate a legislation based on the independence of the dental profession, still in force nowadays. PMID:12094814

  16. Potsdam/St. Lawrence County Recycling Demonstration project. Researching wastepaper use for animal bedding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, L.J.; McQuinn, L.

    1997-04-01

    This report describes the demonstration of a municipal recycling program and the results of the use of collected mixed paper as animal bedding. The project included demonstration of several collection methods applicable for rural communities, including a curbside collection program in the Village of Potsdam and drop-off collection in some surrounding areas. The collected materials were upgraded at a private materials-processing facility. Some mixed paper was shredded to produce three types of wastepaper animal bedding. The project also examined biodegradation of used bedding and manure and the mobility of metals found in paper of manure. In the laboratory test program, mixture of manure and wastepaper beddings decomposed more slowly than hay bedding mixtures. However in field tests at the cooperator farm, wastepaper beddings degraded quickly enough to effectively disappear soon after landspreading.

  17. Scott river riparian woodland revegetation demonstration project, FY 1994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jopson, T.M.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate techniques that could lead to the successful restoration of riparian woodland along the Scott River and elsewhere at a reasonable cost. Three sites were selected for the projects on the basis of need for restoration (i.e. the lack of vegetation), the applicability of the site as a demonstration area (how typical of other areas it was), exclusionary fencing, and the willingness of the landowner to participate. Three woody plant species, black cottonwood (Populus nigra), willow (Salix sp.) and Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) were chosen for planting on the site. These species were known to occur naturally in the riparian zone of the river, were relatively easy to grow in the available time, would produce a variety of habitats when mature, and would grow tall enough to provide shade for the water.

  18. Demonstration projects for coalbed methane and Devonian shale gas: Final report. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Verrips, A.M.; Gustavson, J.B.

    1987-04-01

    In 1979, the US Department of Energy provided the American Public Gas Association (APGA) with a grant to demonstrate the feasibility of bringing unconventional gas such as methane produced from coalbeds or Devonian Shale directly into publicly owned utility system distribution lines. In conjunction with this grant, a seven-year program was initiated where a total of sixteen wells were drilled for the purpose of providing this untapped resource to communities who distribute natural gas. While coalbed degasification ahead of coal mining was already a reality in several parts of the country, the APGA demonstration program was aimed at actual consumer use of the gas. Emphasis was therefore placed on degasification of coals with high methane gas content and on utilization of conventional oil field techniques. 13 figs.

  19. Peroxene demonstration performance and cost evaluation. Final report, July 1995--March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Liptak, L.; Nay, M.; Stewart, B.

    1998-04-02

    The US Army Environmental Center (USAEC) implemented the Peroxone groundwater treatment plant demonstration to study the performance and analyze the cost of the new Peroxone technology. The effort is part of the Department of Defense (DoD) Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP). TRW and their subcontractor, Montgomery Watson, demonstrated the Peroxone system at the Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant (CAAP) in Grand Island, Nebraska. The CAAP groundwater was contaminated from the manufacture and loading of explosives for World War II, the Korean Conflict, and the Vietnam Conflict, and was placed on the National Priority List (NPL) (i.e. Superfund site). Therefore, CAAP was a candidate for the Peroxone technology, which is suitable for remediation of groundwater contaminated with residuals and wastes from the manufacturing and loading of conventional explosives products.

  20. Heber Geothermal Binary Demonstration Project. Final design availability assessment. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mulvihill, R.J.; Reny, D.A.; Geumlek, J.M.; Purohit, G.P.

    1983-02-01

    An availability assessment of the principal systems of the Heber Geothermal Power Plant has been carried out based on the final issue of the process descriptions, process flow diagrams, and the approved for design P and IDs prepared by Fluor Power Services, Inc. (FPS). The principal systems are those which contribute most to plant unavailability. The plant equivalent availability, considering forced and deferred corrective maintenance outages, was computed using a 91 state Markov model to represent the 29 principal system failure configurations and their significant combinations. The failure configurations and associated failure and repair rates were defined from system/subsystem availability assessments that were conducted using the availability assessments based on the EPRI GO methodology and availability block diagram models. The availability and unavailability ranking of the systems and major equipment is presented.

  1. Solar energy system demonstration project at Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System located at the Wilmington, Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. This active solar system is composed of 2,700 square feet of Revere liquid flat plate collectors piped to a 2,800 gallon concrete storage tank located below ground near the building. A micro-computer based control system selects the optimal applications of the stored energy among space, domestic water and pool alternatives. The controlled logic is planned for serving the heat loads in the following order: space heat-new addition, domestic water-entire facility, and pool heating-entire facility. A modified trombe wall passive operation the active system will bypass the areas being served passively. The system was designed for a 40 percent heating and a 30 percent hot water solar contribution.

  2. UCA{trademark} demonstration project at United Power Association. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    Integrated communications, field device interfaces, and control center operations are key aspects of successful distribution automation projects. This project demonstrated substation, feeder, and customer automation functions supported by twelve vendors using EPRI`s Utility Communications Architecture (UCA{trademark}) in an end-to-end implementation of the UCA 2.0 standard. A key project highlight was the ability of the vendor team to achieve the common goal of UCA implementation in a distribution automation setting.

  3. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

  4. Wisconsin electric and hybrid vehicle demonstration project. Final report, 1981-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-10

    In 1981, the Wisconsin Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education (WBVTAE) was selected by the US Department of Energy for participation in the National Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Demonstration Program. On September 30, 1985, the data collection phase of the project was completed. The project was to purchase ten (10) electric vehicles and assign five (5) to Northeast Wisconsin Technical Institute (NWTI) in Green Bay and five (5) vehicles to the Madison Area Technical College.

  5. Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

  6. Tung FDG Test Facility. Phase 2, Pilot plant demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Tung FGD Process is a regenerative process which extracts SO{sub 2} from a scrubbing liquor into an organic medium using mixer-settlers followed by steam-stripping the SO{sub 2} off from the organic medium. For the process to operate satisfactorily, (1) the organic must be stable, (2) phase separation must be relatively fast, (3) crud (i.e. solids in-between two phases) must not form and (4) SO{sub 2} must be able to be stripped off from the organic medium readily. The demonstration confirmed that the first three conditions can be met satisfactorily. Much lower stripping efficiency was attained in the pilot plant demonstration than what was previously attained in a bench-scale demonstration. Engineering analysis showed that the pilot plant stripping column was scaled up from the bench-scale column incorrectly. A new scale-up criterion for stripping a relatively viscous liquid medium is proposed based upon pilot plant data.

  7. Power-efficient hydraulic systems. Volume 2. Hardware demonstration phase. Final report, October 1985-July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hupp, R.V.; Haning, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    Energy-saving concepts for aircraft hydraulic systems were studied in a two-phase program. Task I was an investigation of methods and techniques to reduce overall hydraulic-system power requirements by lowering system demands and increasing component efficiencies. Task II involved hardware demonstration tests on selected concepts. Task I: Study phase. A baseline hydraulic system for an advanced aircraft design was established. Twenty energy-saving techniques were studied as candidates for application to the baseline vehicle. A global systems analysis approach was employed. The candidates were compared on the basis of total fuel consumption and six qualitative factors. Task II: Hardware demonstration phase. Two techniques demonstrated for energy savings were control valves with overlap and dual pressure-level systems. Tests were conducted on control valves, a servo actuator, dual pressure pumps, and a lightweight hydraulic system simulator. Valves with 0.002-in. overlap reduced system energy consumption 18% compared to using valves with zero lap. Operation at 4000 psi reduced system energy consumption 53% compared to operation at 8000 psi. Pressure-level switching was accomplished with excellent results.

  8. Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, May 10, 1988--August 9, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-30

    The US Department of Energy and Energy International, Inc. have entered into a Cooperative Agreement to conduct a cost-shared field test demonstrating the operation of commercial-scale steeply dipping bed underground coal gasification (UCG) modules to provide the synthesis gas for a small-scale commercial ammonia plant. The field test and the commercial ammonia plant will be located near Rawlins, Wyoming. During this demonstration test, two or more modules will be operated simultaneously until one module is completely consumed and an additional module is brought on line. During this period, the average coal gasification rate will be between 500 and 1,200 tons per day. A portion of the raw UCC product gas. The UCG facility will continue to operate subsequent. to the demonstration to provide feedstock for the commercial plant. Energy International is responsible for accomplishing specific objectives in accordance with the Statement of Work by designing, installing, operating and monitoring the performance of the UCG modules as the feedstock source for the small-scale commercial ammonia plant. During this period, the project activities focused on project structuring, financing, and project management activities. Because the negotiations with investors were not completed on the schedule anticipated, adjustment of the schedule and activities was necessary. All major activities requiring the expenditure of funds were halted and work was suspended pending the availability of funds and new schedules. These changes have dictated the level of progress or delays for all of the tasks of the project throughout the period of this report.

  9. Grout for closure of the demonstration vault at the US DOE Hanford Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Ernzen, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    The Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout to be used as a cold- (nonradioactive) cap or void-fill grout between the solidified low-level waste and the cover blocks of a demonstration vault for disposal of phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Facility. The project consisted of formulation and evaluation of candidate grouts and selection of the best candidate grout, followed by a physical scale-model test to verify grout performance under project-specific conditions. Further, the project provided data to verify numerical models (accomplished elsewhere) of stresses and isotherms inside the Hanford demonstration vault. Evaluation of unhardened grout included obtaining data on segregation, bleeding, flow, and working time. For hardened grout, strength, volume stability, temperature rise, and chemical compatibility with surrogate wasteform grout were examined. The grout was formulated to accommodate unique environmental boundary conditions (vault temperature = 45 C) and exacting regulatory requirements (mandating less than 0.1% shrinkage with no expansion and no bleeding); and to remain pumpable for a minimum of 2 hr. A grout consisting of API Class H oil-well cement, an ASTM C 618 Class F fly ash, sodium bentonite clay, and a natural sand from the Hanford area met performance requirements in laboratory studies. It is recommended for use in the DOE Hanford demonstration PSW vault.

  10. Radon reduction and radon-resistant construction demonstrations in New York State. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) cosponsored a project in New York State to demonstrate radon migration techniques in existing homes with elevated radon concentrations and to test radon-resistant construction techniques in new houses. The first part of the existing home evaluation demonstrated radon migration techniques in homes where the indoor radon concentrations exceeded the EPA guidance of 4 pCi/L. Results demonstrated that sealing all accessible foundation penetrations in the basement was an effective way to reduce the radon concentration, although not below the EPA guideline, and that sealing aids in the effectiveness of an active depressurization system. Basement pressurization also proved to be an effective method. Water aeration systems were effective at mitigating radon from residential water supplied although the system tested was large and noisy. Activated charcoal filters adsorbed the radon and eventually became an unacceptable source of gamma radiation. The second part of the existing home evaluation involved the inspection of homes where radon mitigation systems were installed in 1984 as part of an earlier NYSERDA/Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) project. It was found that new systems and techniques, such as in- line centrifugal fans, were generally superior to the earlier method using axial computer-type fans. Polyurethane caulk was found to be in good condition; butyl caulk, on the other hand, had deteriorated. In the new house task, a radon-resistant system was developed for integration into a house during construction. This system included sealing foundation floors, sealing concrete block foundation walls, and passive sub-slab ventilation. This integrated system reduced the radon concentration in new test houses below that of control houses, but the reduction was not usually sufficient to meet the EPA guideline.

  11. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Puneet; Casey, Dan

    2011-03-29

    This report summarizes the work conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) contract DE-FC36-04GO14286 by Chevron Technology Ventures (CTV, a division of Chevron U.S.A., Inc.), Hyundai Motor Company (HMC), and UTC Power (UTCP, a United Technologies company) to validate hydrogen (H2) infrastructure technology and fuel cell hybrid vehicles. Chevron established hydrogen filling stations at fleet operator sites using multiple technologies for on-site hydrogen generation, storage, and dispensing. CTV constructed five demonstration stations to support a vehicle fleet of 33 fuel cell passenger vehicles, eight internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, three fuel cell transit busses, and eight internal combustion engine shuttle busses. Stations were operated between 2005 and 2010. HMC introduced 33 fuel cell hybrid electric vehicles (FCHEV) in the course of the project. Generation I included 17 vehicles that used UTCP fuel cell power plants and operated at 350 bar. Generation II included 16 vehicles that had upgraded UTC fuel cell power plants and demonstrated options such as the use of super-capacitors and operation at 700 bar. All 33 vehicles used the Hyundai Tucson sports utility vehicle (SUV) platform. Fleet operators demonstrated commercial operation of the vehicles in three climate zones (hot, moderate, and cold) and for various driving patterns. Fleet operators were Southern California Edison (SCE), AC Transit (of Oakland, California), Hyundai America Technical Center Inc. (HATCI), and the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC, in a site agreement with Selfridge Army National Guard Base in Selfridge, Michigan).

  12. SRC-I demonstration plant analytical laboratory methods manual. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Klusaritz, M.L.; Tewari, K.C.; Tiedge, W.F.; Skinner, R.W.; Znaimer, S.

    1983-03-01

    This manual is a compilation of analytical procedures required for operation of a Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC-I) demonstration or commercial plant. Each method reproduced in full includes a detailed procedure, a list of equipment and reagents, safety precautions, and, where possible, a precision statement. Procedures for the laboratory's environmental and industrial hygiene modules are not included. Required American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) methods are cited, and ICRC's suggested modifications to these methods for handling coal-derived products are provided.

  13. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Glen; Atkinson, Barbara; Rhyne, Ivin

    2009-09-09

    Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process and electricity demand is especially high during the utilities summer peak electricity demand periods. This makes wastewater treatment facilities prime candidates for demand response programs. However, wastewater treatment is often peripheral to food processing operations and its demand response opportunities have often been overlooked. Phase I of this wastewater demonstration project monitored wastewater energy and environmental data at Bell-Carter Foods, Inc., California's largest olive processing plant. For this monitoring activity the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS) automated enterprise energy management (EEM) technologies. This report presents results from data collected by GEMS from September 15, 2008 through November 30, 2008, during the olive harvest season. This project established and tested a methodology for (1) gathering baseline energy and environmental data at an industrial food-processing plant and (2) using the data to analyze energy efficiency, demand response, daily peak load management, and environmental management opportunities at the plant. The Phase I goals were to demonstrate the measurement and interrelationship of electricity demand, electricity usage, and water quality metrics and to estimate the associated CO{sub 2} emissions.

  15. Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Project at Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This document is the final technical report of the solar energy facility located at the Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas, 78766. This system has been operational since April 1977. Major components of this system include 36 Northrup collectors, a 1500 gallon fiberglass thermal storage tank, an ARKLA absorption cooling unit and cooling tower, a Servel heating coil, pumps, heat exchanger, and a conventional backup heating and air conditioning unit. System controls consist of a dual-stage thermostat, a control panel, a differential temperature controller, and three absolute temperature controllers. The system is designed to operate in several modes with evaluation of each mode. System performance monitoring is accomplished through 47 sensors which are sampled and recorded every five minutes by a data acquisition system. An on-site-monitor test set allows instantaneous testing and evaluation. This report also references Monthly Performance Reports, a Solar Energy System Performance Evaluation Report, a Solar Project Cost Report and a Solar Project Description Report for this site which are available through the National Technical Information Service.

  16. Torbett-Hutchings-Smith Memorial Hospital geothermal-system demonstration at Marlin, Texas. Final design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    The final design and economics of the Torbett-Hutchings-Smith (THS) Memorial Hospital geothermal heating system at Marlin, Texas are outlined. A brief description of the existing heating system, an overview of the geothermal retrofit, and the results of an economic analysis are included. It is estimated that the geothermal heating system will displace approximately 84 percent of the hospital's average annual natural gas consumption. In summer conditions, approximately 45 gpm of geothermal fluid will be utilized at a wellhead temperature of 139/sup 0/F. In peak demand winter conditions, approximately 160 gpm will be utilized at a wellhead temperature of 148/sup 0/F. The geothermal fluid temperature drop across the system will range from about 5/sup 0/F in summer to over 45/sup 0/F during winter. Total capital costs for the system are estimated to be $673,000, including the production well, a geothermal equipment room, engineering and architectural costs, and all equipment. The average annual natural gas savings are expected to be $28,200 while average annual operating and maintenance costs are estimated to be $7750. A before tax life cycle economic analysis of the THS system shows the breakeven period (BEP) of 29 years falling slightly below the 30 year expected life. This BEP is significantly influenced by the developmental nature of this project and by its lack of tax incentives.

  17. Documentation of the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States. Final report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Herhal, A J; Britton, S G; Minnucci, C A

    1982-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the methodologies used to develop the 1979 Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal. All primary source documents used to prepare the 1979 DRB were reviewed. Using the methodologies and documentation found in the 1979 DRB published report as a guide, each of the state-level published reserve estimates were re-derived. In those cases where the estimates could not be reproduced, EIA personnel from the Eastern and Western Energy Data Offices were consulted and the differences, for the most part, were resolved. Throughout this report an attempt was made to describe the information flow that was an integral part of the DRB development. Particular attention and emphasis was given to those instances where deviations from standard, published EIA procedures were used to derive the DRB estimates. The main body of this report summarizes the methodological procedures used to develop each state reserve estimate.

  18. Oxygen-enriched multiple-hearth sewage sludge incineration demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Oxygen-enhanced multiple-hearth sludge incineration was the focus of a five-month joint study by Praxair and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Testing and demonstration were conducted in Rochester NY, at Monroe County`s Frank E. Van Lare Sewage Treatment Plant. A simple retrofit of high-momentum oxygen lances created a convection hearth in which convective heat and mass transfer with the drying sludge were greatly enhanced, while hearth temperatures were moderated by the wet sludge to prevent overheating. Based on the results of short- and long-term controlled tests discussed in this report, oxygen enhancement of multiple-hearth sludge incinerators can be economically viable, with a savings between $30 and $60 per hour at Van Lare based upon increased sludge throughput and reduced fuel consumption.

  19. HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

  20. Electric G-Van demonstration and commercial assessment project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Braga, B.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute was awarded this grant to continue the joint effort initiated by EPRI, and VE International to proceed beyond the prototype phase of the electric G-Van development. The goal of EPRI and VEHMA was to develop a market for the electric G-Van, and to distribute them to commercial fleet operators. The objective of this project was to produce G-Vans in a production facility that would be comparable to the GMC Truck internal combustion engine Vandura Van produced by General Motors in quality, reliability, durability and safety. An initial market assessment/demonstration phase of sixty (60) vehicles was to be undertaken, with the ability to expand production volume quickly to meet market demands. Brief description of each task of this grant is given and the actions taken by EPRI to complete them.

  1. Demonstration of rapid and sensitive module leak certification for space station freedom. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.

    1991-03-01

    A leak detection and quantification demonstration using perflurocarbon tracer (PFT) technology was successfully performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on January 25, 1991. The real-time Dual Trap Analyzer (DTA) at one-half hour after the start of the first run gave an estimated leak rate of 0.7 mL/min. This has since been refined to be 1.15 {plus_minus} 0.09 mL/min. The leak rates in the next three runs were determined to be 9.8 {plus_minus} 0.7, {minus}0.4 {plus_minus} 0.3, and 76 {plus_minus} 6 mL/min, respectively. The theory on leak quantification in the steady-state and time-dependent modes for a single zone test facility was developed and applied to the above determinations. The laboratory PFT analysis system gave a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 0.05 fL for ocPDCH. This is the tracer of choice and is about 100-fold better than that for the DTA. Applied to leak certification, the LOD is about 0.00002 mL/s (0.000075 L/h), a 5 order-of-magnitude improvement over the original leak certification specification. Furthermore, this limit can be attained in a measurement period of 3 to 4 hours instead of days, weeks, or months. A new Leak Certification Facility is also proposed to provide for zonal (three zones) determination of leak rates. The appropriate multizone equations, their solutions, and error analysis have already been derived. A new concept of seal-integrity certification has been demonstrated for a variety of controlled leaks in the range of module leak testing. High structural integrity leaks were shown to have a linear dependence of flow on {Delta}p. The rapid determination of leak rates at different pressures is proposed and is to be determined while subjecting the module to other external force-generating parameters such as vibration, torque, solar intensity, etc. 13 refs.

  2. Final Technical Report: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Grasman

    2011-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-FC36-04GO14285 by Mercedes-Benz & Research Development, North America (MBRDNA), Chrysler, Daimler, Mercedes Benz USA (MBUSA), BP, DTE Energy and NextEnergy to validate fuel cell technologies for infrastructure, transportation as well as assess technology and commercial readiness for the market. The Mercedes Team, together with its partners, tested the technology by operating and fueling hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under real world conditions in varying climate, terrain and driving conditions. Vehicle and infrastructure data was collected to monitor the progress toward the hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure performance targets of $2.00 to 3.00/gge hydrogen production cost and 2,000-hour fuel cell durability. Finally, to prepare the public for a hydrogen economy, outreach activities were designed to promote awareness and acceptance of hydrogen technology. DTE, BP and NextEnergy established hydrogen filling stations using multiple technologies for on-site hydrogen generation, storage and dispensing. DTE established a hydrogen station in Southfield, Michigan while NextEnergy and BP worked together to construct one hydrogen station in Detroit. BP constructed another fueling station in Burbank, California and provided a full-time hydrogen trailer at San Francisco, California and a hydrogen station located at Los Angeles International Airport in Southern, California. Stations were operated between 2005 and 2011. The Team deployed 30 Gen I Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) in the beginning of the project. While 28 Gen I F-CELLs used the A-Class platform, the remaining 2 were Sprinter delivery vans. Fuel cell vehicles were operated by external customers for real-world operations in various regions (ecosystems) to capture various driving patterns and climate conditions (hot, moderate and cold). External operators consisted of F-CELL partner organizations in California and Michigan

  3. Final Report on Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    to evaluate the best performers on processes and coatings specific to the agency. Laser systems used during this project were all of a similar design, most of which had integrated vacuum systems in order to collect materials removed from substrate surfaces during operation. Due to the fact that the technology lends itself to a bide variety of processes, several site demonstrations were organized in order to allow for greater evaluation of the laser systems across NASA. The project consisted of an introductory demonstration and a more in-depth evaluation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Additionally, field demonstrations occurred at Glenn Research Center and Kennedy Space Center. During these demonstrations several NASA specific applications were evaluated, including the removal of coatings within Orbiter tile cavities and Teflon from Space Shuttle Main Engine gaskets, removal of heavy grease from Solid Rocket Booster components and the removal of coatings on weld lines for Shuttle and general ground service equipment for non destructive evaluation (NDE). In addition, several general industry applications such as corrosion removal, structural coating removal, weld-line preparation and surface cleaning were evaluated. This included removal of coatings and corrosion from surfaces containing lead-based coatings and applications similar to launch-structure maintenance and Crawler maintenance. During the project lifecycle, an attempt was made to answer process specific concerns and questions as they arose. Some of these initially unexpected questions concerned the effects lasers might have on substrates used on flight equipment including strength, surface re-melting, substrate temperature and corrosion resistance effects. Additionally a concern was PPE required for operating such a system including eye, breathing and hearing protection. Most of these questions although not initially planned, were fully explored as a part of this project. Generally the results from tesng

  4. Stirling Engine Natural Gas Combustion Demonstration Program. Final report, October 1989-January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.; Moryl, J.; Riecke, G.

    1991-02-01

    Fueled on natural gas, the Stirling engine is an inherently clean, quiet, and efficient engine. With increasing environmental concern for air quality and the increasingly more stringent requirements for low engine exhaust emissions, the Stirling engine may be an attractive alternative to internal combustion (IC) engines. The study has demonstrated that ultra low emissions can be attained with a Stirling-engine-driven electric generator configured to burn natural gas. Combustion parameters were optimized to produce the lowest possible exhaust emissions for a flame-type combustor without compromising overall engine thermal efficiency. A market application survey and manufacturing cost analysis indicate that a market opportunity potentially exists in the volumes needed to economically manufacture a newly designed Stirling engine (Mod III) for stationary applications and hybrid vehicles. The translation of such potential markets into actual markets does, however, pose difficult challenges as substantial investments are required. Also, the general acceptance of a new engine type by purchasers requires a considerable amount of time.

  5. Final review of the Campbell Creek demonstrations showcased by Tennessee Valley Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, Anthony C.; Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Miller, William A.; New, Joshua Ryan; Khowailed, Giannate

    2015-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery and Utilization Office funded and managed a showcase demonstration located in the suburbs of west Knox county, Tennessee. Work started March 2008 with the goal of documenting best practices for retrofitting existing homes and for building new high-efficiency homes. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided technical support. An analytical base was developed for helping homeowners, homebuyers, builders, practitioners and the TVA make informed economic decisions for the materials and incentives necessary to build a new high-efficiency home or retrofit an existing home. New approaches to more efficiently control active energy subsystems and information for selecting or upgrading to Energy Star appliances, changing all lights to 100% CFL s and upgrading windows to low-E gas filled glazing yields a 40% energy savings with neutral cash flow for the homeowner. Passive designs were reviewed and recommendations made for envelope construction that is durable and energy efficient. The Campbell Creek project complements the DOE Building Technologies Program strategic goal. Results of the project created technologies and design approaches that will yield affordable energy efficient homes. The 2010 DOE retrofit goals are to find retrofit packages that attain 30% whole house energy savings as documented by pre and post Home Energy rating scores (HERS). Campbell Creek met these goals.

  6. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  7. Preparation for commercial demonstration of biomass-to-ethanol conversion technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this program was to complete the development of a commercially viable process to produce fuel ethanol from renewable cellulosic biomass. The program focused on pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation technologies where Amoco has a unique proprietary position. Assured access to low-cost feedstock is a cornerstone of attractive economics for cellulose to ethanol conversion in the 1990s. Most of Amoco`s efforts in converting cellulosic feedstocks to ethanol before 1994 focused on using paper from municipal solid waste as the feed. However, while many municipalities and MSW haulers expressed interest in Amoco`s technology, none were willing to commit funding to process development. In May, 1994 several large agricultural products companies showed interest in Amoco`s technology, particularly for application to corn fiber. Amoco`s initial work with corn fiber was encouraging. The project work plan was designed to provide sufficient data on corn fiber conversion to convince a major agriculture products company to participate in the construction of a commercial demonstration facility.

  8. Solar-assisted heat pumps and alternative-energy-awareness demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, O.K. Jr.

    1981-09-11

    The water to air solar assisted heat pump installation is added to an existing service/training center in Dallas, Texas. The design uses three separate water systems. The first consists of the solar collectors, circulating pump, draindown tank, heat exchanger, attendant piping and controls. The second is a closed loop system consisting of an insulated buried steel tank, an above ground expansion tank, the loop water circulating pump, the backup gas boiler, and the cooling tower. It serves six heat pumps. The third system is an open system for the cooling tower, consisting of a pump, spray heads in the cooling tower. The operation of each of the three systems is described. The system's thermodynamic efficiency is discussed, as well as a solar domestic hot water system. System performance is found to be much less than expected, with a solar fraction estimated at 30% as opposed to an expected 80%. A self-teaching solar awareness demonstration in the building is described. (LEW)

  9. UCA{trademark}/DAIS{trademark} demonstration project by Kansas City Power and Light Company. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCPL) demonstrated the use of EPRI`s Utility Communication Architecture (UCA{trademark}) and Database Access Integrated Services (DAIS{trademark}) to provide KCPL employees seamless and transparent access to corporate data resources from their desktops. The major components of the KCPL project are client workstations with a Graphical User Interface which builds the necessary Structured Query Language (SQL) requests from the user`s data directory selections and provides a Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) interface and programmer Application Program Interface (API). DAIS Directory Services provided data browsing and search capability and allows users to select data items for analysis. DAIS Servers provided database-related functions to both relational databases (customer data in Oracle) and non-relational data sources (PMAX performance monitoring system and PI historical database). The DAIS client software was provided by Automation Technology, Inc. (ATI); and the DAIS directory services software was provided by UNISYS. The Oracle DAIS server was provided by ATI, the PMAX non-relational DAIS server was developed by Black and Veatch, and the PI DAIS server was developed by ATI. The project was deemed a success as the corporate data was made available at the employee`s desktop for search and analysis, with the look and feel of a relational database, regardless of the source of the data.

  10. Coolside waste management demonstration OCDO grant agreement No. CDO/D-902-9. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    The objectives of this project were to evaluate the potential utilization in road construction of wastes produced from the Coolside, LIMB (limestone injection multi-stage burner) and FBC (fluidized-bed combustion) processes, and to specify criteria for landfill disposal of waste from the Coolside process. These three processes are considered to be clean coal technologies. The Coolside process involves injecting an aqueous slurry of hydrated lime into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater in a coal-fired boiler. The hydrated lime captures sulfur dioxide from the flue gas producing anhydrous calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate, which are collected along with the unused hydrated lime and fly ash. The LIMB process involves injection of lime or hydrated lime directly into the furnace to capture sulfur dioxide. The waste consists principally of anhydrous calcium sulfate, lime, and fly ash. Both processes were demonstrated successfully at the Edgewater Station of Ohio Edison in Lorrain, OH, from 1989 to 1992. Circulating fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is a commercial technology which combines steam generation with SO{sub 2} control by burning coal in a circulating bed of limestone. The waste, chemically similar to LIMB waste, is produced by bleed-off of the bed material and by collection of the flue dust. All three processes produce a dry solid waste, which must either be used or disposed of and managed to ensure environmental compliance and economic feasibility. The project was completed in June 1996.

  11. Range 8C Rehabilitation Demonstration Project, Hohenfels Training Area, Germany: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zellmer, S.D.; Hinchman, R.R.; Johnson, D.O.; Severinghaus, W.D.; Brent, J.J.

    1991-11-01

    More than 30 years of intensive and continual tactical training has caused extensive environmental damage at the US Army Hohenfels Training Area in Germany. The Range 8C Rehabilitation Demonstration Project, followed by a three-year monitoring effort, was conducted to develop and evaluate the environmental and economic effectiveness of seven revegetation and four erosion control prescriptions implemented at a 16-ha site. The point-intercept method was used to measure the types and amounts of vegetation established and the changes in the vegetative community during three years of military use on the seven areas treated with revegetation prescriptions. Field observations were made to determine the suitability and durability of four types of erosion control structures. Soil fertility and a source of seed appeared to be the most limiting factors in establishing vegetation, while seedbed preparation had only a minor influence. Grasses appeared to be more resistant to vehicle traffic than did other types of vegetation. Because grassed waterways were used as roads by military vehicles and a system of graded terraces was expensive, these erosion control prescriptions were unsuitable and uneconomical for use on training areas. Low-cost riprap waterbars and porous check dams slowed the velocity of runoff, trapped sediments, and were durable. Recommendations were formulated to improve the environmental and economic effectiveness of future rehabilitation efforts on tactical training areas.

  12. BWR (boiling-water reactor) radiation control: In-plant demonstration at Vermont Yankee: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

    1987-10-01

    Results of the RP1934 program, which was established by EPRI in 1981 to demonstrate the adequacy of BRAC program (RP819) principles for BWR radiation control at Vermont Yankee, are presented. Evaluations were performed of the effectiveness of optimization of purification system performance, control of feedwater dissolved oxygen concentrations, minimization of corrosion product and ionic transport, and improved startup, shutdown, and layup practices. The impact on shutdown radiation levels of these corrective actions was assessed based on extensive primary system radiation survey and component gamma scan data. Implementation of the BRAC recommendations was found to be insufficient to reduce the rate of activity buildup on out-of-core surfaces at Vermont Yankee, and additional corrective actions were found necessary. Specifically, replacement of cobalt-bearing materials in the control rod drive pins and rollers and feedwater regulating valves was pursued as was installation of electropolished 316 stainless steel during a recirculation piping replacement program. Aggressive programs to further reduce copper concentrations in the reactor water by improving condensate demineralizer efficiency and to minimize organic ingress to the power cycle by reducing organic concentrations in recycled radwaste also were undertaken. Evaluations of the impact on activity buildup of several pretreatment processes including prefilming in moist air, preexposure to high temperature water containing zinc, and electropolishing also were performed in a test loop installed in the reactor water cleanup system. A significant beneficial impact of electropolishing was shown to be present for periods up to 6000 hours.

  13. Potential uses for the slag from the Cool Water demonstration plant: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, D.M.; Choudhry, V.

    1987-02-01

    Coal gasification processes produce waste materials which represent a significant expense in both disposal costs and real estate requirements. Other coal combustion wastes, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, are increasingly being used in construction applications. Similarly, there is considerable potential for utilizing coal gasification wastes, but to date very little evaluation has been carried out on these wastes. Praxis Engineers, Inc. prepared this report as part of an EPRI-sponsored study investigating the utilization potential of the gasification waste (slag) produced by the Cool Water facility, which uses integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) technology. Basic chemical and physical properties of the slag were determined during this study. Its chemistry is quite similar to that of other coal combustion wastes, but its physical characteristics are considerably different due to the method of its formation, i.e., quenching of the molten mineral matter. On the basis of this work, sixteen potential applications were recommended for evaluation and show promise. The study also included evaluation of the utilization potential of the slag as a material for road construction and as a substitute for aggregate in cement concrete. However, before wider acceptance can be achieved larger-scale demonstration projects are required, both to overcome existing biases in favor of currently used materials, and to establish the economic competitiveness of the slag. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  14. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

  15. Maglev demonstration, design and develoment plan. Final report, February 1990-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Yarwood, G.; Gray, H.A.; Ligocki, M.P.; Whitten, G.Z.

    1994-08-01

    This study examines the feasibility of a regional high speed magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) system connecting the Greater Pittsburgh airport with strategic stops between the Midwest and the East Coast. A suburban commuter system, which operates on the same lines as the regional system, is also investigated. The first link of the regional and suburban MAGLEV system consists of a demonstration line connecting the Greater Pittsburgh International Airport with downtown Pittsburgh. This study considers the economic value of such a system from the aspects of transportation, manufacturing and economic development. The study concludes that an investment of $41 billion over the next 30 years would be required to build a regional MAGLEV system, cover its operating cost and produce enough additional transportation revenue to pay back part of this investment in the private sector financial markets. A substantial portion of this investment must come from the public sector. The additional economic activity generated by this investment would be over $78 billion. Over 675,000 person-years of work would be created by such a venture.The current regulatory approach to achieving ozone and related air quality standards is based on emissions estimation and modeling. In recent years, several studies have attempted to evaluate the emissions estimates and methods against ambient measurements by comparing non-methane organic compound (NMOC) species profiles, NMOC:NOx ratios, CO:NOx ratios, and using receptor modeling of NMOCs. Areas of interest have included the relative contributions of mobile, stationary, and biogenic sources, and evidence for underestimation of sources and/or missing sources. However, over the same time period the emission estimates have also been revised to reflect the latest information.

  16. Demonstration [sic] of a System for Removing Malachite Green : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Marking, Leif L.

    1989-04-01

    Activated carbon has been used effectively to remove tastes, odors, and contaminants from public water supplies. The adsorption efficiency is influenced by the size of carbon granules, flow rate, column depth, and retention time. A study was designed to (1) determine the type of filter and kind of carbon that was most efficient and (2) demonstrate that carbon filters can be used to remove malachite green from water used for egg incubation or to hold adult salmon before spawning. Minicolumn simulation studies showed that 8 /times/ 30 mesh granular carbon manufactured from bituminous coal was effective for continuously removing malachite green from water for 230 days at a flow rate of 500 gpm and for 62 days at a flow rate of 1000 gpm. The removal capacity at the slower flow rate was 69 mg of malachite green per gram of carbon. A filter system that contained 20,000 pounds of activated carbon in each of two chambers was effective for removal of malachite green from treated water in adult salmon holding ponds at flows of 500 gpm and greater. The removal efficiency was 99.8% after 105 hours of operation, and the adsorption capacity of the system was projected to be 20 or more years of routine hatchery operation. A filter system that contained 2000 pounds of activated carbon in each of two chambers was effective for removal of malachite green from treated water in salmon egg incubation units at the designated flow rate of 50 gpm and also at faster flow rates. 14 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. St. Louis Airport site environmental report for calendar year 1989, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1990-05-01

    The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1984, continued during 1989 at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) in St. Louis County, Missouri. SLAPS and its vicinity properties, including ditches north and south of the site, were designated for cleanup as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive material remains from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program. The monitoring program at SLAPS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma dose rates; and uranium, thorium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. To assess the potential effect of SLAPS on public health, the potential radiation dose was estimated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring program conducted at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) during calendar year 1989. 19 refs., 13 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. From One Generation to the Next--160 Years of Catholic Education in Saint Louis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faherty, William Barnaby; And Others

    The history of Catholic schools began in the Archdiocese of St. Louis 160 years ago, significantly antedating Catholic schools on the eastern seaboard. The first Catholic college and university west of the Mississippi were in St. Louis. Catholic education began in St. Louis with four giants, Bishop Louis Du Bourg, Bishop Joseph Rosati, Blessed…

  19. The Economic Impact of Eight Cultural Institutions on the Economy of the St. Louis SMSA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwi, David

    The impact of eight cultural institutions on the economy of the St. Louis (Missouri) area was determined by measuring their 1978 direct and indirect financial effects. The institutions are the St. Louis Art Museum, St. Louis Conservatory and School for the Arts, Missouri Botannical Garden, St. Louis Symphony, McDonnell Planetarium, Loretto-Hilton…

  20. Saint Louis University's Role as Midwife to Urban Rebirth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinert, Paul C.

    1982-01-01

    Saint Louis University has taken to heart its responsibility to the communities surrounding its metropolitan campuses in a series of cooperative neighborhood renewal projects. With both financial resources and ongoing commitment, the university has brought about substantial revitalization. (MSE)

  1. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Collection Louis L. Stein, Jr. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Collection Louis L. Stein, Jr. Photo: 1885 PANORAMIC VIEW OF VICENTE MARTINEZ COMPLEX (Dr. John Stentzel in foreground) - Vicente Martinez Adobe, Pleasant Hill & Franklin Canyon Roads, Martinez, Contra Costa County, CA

  2. The Chinese Program at St. Louis University High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, August

    1977-01-01

    Chinese courses at the St. Louis University High School teach language, culture and calligraphy. Daily classes feature language labs, slides, filmstrips and movies. Statements from students testify that the language is useful and not difficult to learn. (CHK)

  3. 76 FR 56492 - Environmental Impact Statement: St. Louis County, Missouri

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... Charbonier Road between Earth City Expressway and Howdershell/Shackelford Road in northwestern St. Louis... flood-related detours between Charbonier Road and Earth City Expressway, (2) address capacity needs...

  4. 153. Copy of Louis Rosenberg Etching (original in the Tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    153. Copy of Louis Rosenberg Etching (original in the Tower City Development Office, Cleveland, Ohio) TERMINAL TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION, PUBLIC SQUARE ELEVATION, VIEW NORTHWEST TO SOUTHEAST - Terminal Tower Building, Cleveland Union Terminal, 50 Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. 158. Copy of Louis Rosenberg Etching (original in the Tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    158. Copy of Louis Rosenberg Etching (original in the Tower City Development Office) TERMINAL TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION, PUBLIC SQUARE FACADE, VIEW WEST TO EAST - Terminal Tower Building, Cleveland Union Terminal, 50 Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. Uranium characterization at the St. Louis Airport Site

    SciTech Connect

    Schilk, A.J.; Hubbard, C.W.; Bowyer, T.W.; Reiman, R.T.

    1995-05-01

    In support of the Department of Energy/Office of Technology Development`s Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) project (coordinated by Ames Laboratory), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory demonstrated two complementary technologies at the St. Louis Airport (SLAP) site that have been designed and optimized for the rapid, in situ quantification of radionuclide contamination in surface soils. The sensors are optimized for the detection of high-energy beta particles or gamma rays emitted from the decay of specific radionuclides of interest. These technologies were demonstrated by measuring the beta and gamma fluxes at several locations within the SLAP site. Measurements were converted to average contamination levels, using detector calibrations performed with spiked samples (beta) or sealed sources (gamma). Additionally, subsurface activity levels were derived from discrete soil samples (provided by the ESC field crew) via gamma-ray spectrometry in a controlled laboratory setting. Since the beta and gamma sensor technologies are intrinsically sensitive to different types of radiation and activity distributions (i.e., surface and shallow subsurface, respectively), the data obtained from the two detectors provide complementary information about the distribution of the contamination. The results reported here suggest that a number of locations within the SLAP site have elevated levels of {sup 211}U, and the differences between the beta and gamma activities indicate that the contamination is largely located near the surface of the soil.

  7. Jean-Louis Vignes: California's forgotten winemaker.

    PubMed

    Macconnell, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This article represents a first step in the process of restoring the legacy of pioneer California winemaker Jean-Louis Vignes (1780–1862). Vignes was a native of France who established and operated a commercial winery (El Aliso) in Los Angeles for 22 years (1833–1855). The article includes the first known photograph of Vignes discovered by the author. While prominent twentieth-century American wine historians have acknowledged Vignes, the author emphasizes a key distinction made by French historian Leonce Jore. Vignes left France to go to the Sandwich Islands as part of a commercial enterprise that traveled with Catholic missionaries (Picpus Fathers). Only after five years of frustration did Vignes move to Los Angeles and establish a winery. The author uses the remembrances of well-known nineteenth-century commentator William Heath Davis [Seventy-Five Years in California (San Francisco, 1929)] to give some personal insights into Vignes as a winemaker. Davis visited him at El Aliso three times as a young man and lived long enough (1909) to validate Vignes’s vision for the potential of winemaking in California. The article also includes the first known full citation for Vignes’s gravesite at Evergreen Cemetery in Los Angeles. PMID:21591314

  8. Louis J. Battan 1923”1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, David

    Dr. Louis J. Battan died on October 29, 1986, after a short illness. Although he had been a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Arizon a since 1958 and director of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics there from 1973 to 1982 (and associate director from 1958 to 1973), his activities on the national and international scenes were so varied that he was known in different ways by the numerous communities with which he was involved. However, all who knew him shared his uncommonly good humor, took pride in his friendship, and respected his wisdom and good judgment. Lou is survived by his wife Jeanette, daughter Suzette, and son Paul.Battan was born in New York City on February 9, 1923. He was the second of four sons born to Annibale and Luisa Battan, immigrants to the United States from the village of Vigo in the Tyrolean Alps of Austria. He grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y., in a family environment that encouraged the highest moral standards and a devotion to hard work and self-reliance, qualities that remained with him throughout his life.

  9. Louis Pasteur, the Father of Immunology?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kendall A.

    2012-01-01

    Louis Pasteur is traditionally considered as the progenitor of modern immunology because of his studies in the late nineteenth century that popularized the germ theory of disease, and that introduced the hope that all infectious diseases could be prevented by prophylactic vaccination, as well as also treated by therapeutic vaccination, if applied soon enough after infection. However, Pasteur was working at the dawn of the appreciation of the microbial world, at a time when the notion of such a thing as an immune system did not exist, certainly not as we know it today, more than 130 years later. Accordingly, why was Pasteur such a genius as to discern how the immune system functions to protect us against invasion by the microbial world when no one had even made the distinction between fungi, bacteria, or viruses, and no one had formulated any theories of immunity. A careful reading of Pasteur’s presentations to the Academy of Sciences reveals that Pasteur was entirely mistaken as to how immunity occurs, in that he reasoned, as a good microbiologist would, that appropriately attenuated microbes would deplete the host of vital trace nutrients absolutely required for their viability and growth, and not an active response on the part of the host. Even so, he focused attention on immunity, preparing the ground for others who followed. This review chronicles Pasteur’s remarkable metamorphosis from organic chemist to microbiologist to immunologist, and from basic science to medicine. PMID:22566949

  10. Astrocyte response to St. Louis encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Zuza, Adriano Lara; Barros, Heber Leão Silva; de Mattos Silva Oliveira, Thelma Fátima; Chávez-Pavoni, Juliana Helena; Zanon, Renata Graciele

    2016-06-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), a flavivirus transmitted to humans by Culex mosquitoes, causes clinical symptoms ranging from acute febrile disorder to encephalitis. To reach the central nervous system (CNS) from circulating blood, the pathogen must cross the blood-brain barrier formed by endothelial cells and astrocytes. Because astrocytes play an essential role in CNS homeostasis, in this study these cells were infected with SLEV and investigated for astrogliosis, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I-dependent immune response, and apoptosis by caspase-3 activation. Cultures of Vero cells were used as a positive control for the viral infection. Cytopathic effects were observed in both types of cell cultures, and the cytotoxicity levels of the two were compared. Astrocytes infected with a dilution of 1E-01 (7.7E+08 PFU/mL) had a reduced mortality rate of more than 50% compared to the Vero cells. In addition, the astrocytes responded to the flavivirus infection with increased MHC-I expression and astrogliosis, characterized by intense glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and an increase in the number and length of cytoplasmic processes. When the astrocytes were exposed to higher viral concentrations, a proportional increase in caspase-3 expression was observed, as well as nuclear membrane destruction. SLEV immunostaining revealed a perinuclear location of the virus during the replication process. Together, these results suggest that mechanisms other than SLEV infection in astrocytes must be associated with the development of the neuroinvasive form of the disease. PMID:26975980

  11. Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, F.E.

    1995-08-01

    The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

  12. USDOE Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project: Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark}. Final report: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Final Report provides available design, operational, and maintenance information, and marketing plans, on the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} demonstration Project at the Dragon Products company`s cement plant at Thomaston, Maine. In addition, data on pollutant removal efficiencies and system economics are reviewed. The Recovery Scrubber was developed to simultaneously address the emission of acid gas pollutants and the disposal of alkaline solid waste at a cement plant. The process, however, has general application to other combustion processes including waste or fossil fuel fired boilers. Selected chemistry of the exhaust gas, (before and after treatment by the Recovery Scrubber), selected chemistry of the cement plant kiln baghouse dust catch (before and after treatment by the Recovery Scrubber), and Dragon cement plant economics are presented. current marketing efforts and potential markets for the Recovery Scrubber in several industries are discussed.

  13. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 1 discusses the following topics: the background of the project; test program description; summary of tests and test results; problem evaluation; functional requirements confirmation; recommendations; and completed test documentation for tests performed in Phase 3.

  14. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 4 of Volume IV, discusses: Off-normal operating and recovery procedures; Emergency response procedures; Troubleshooting procedures; and Preventive maintenance procedures.

  15. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 2 discusses the following topics: Fuel Rod Extraction System Test Results and Analysis Reports and Clamping Table Test Results and Analysis Reports.

  16. LIFAC demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2. Final report, Volume 1 - public design

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report discusses the demonstration of LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s (RP&L) Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North American (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and several other organizations including the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Final Report Volume 1: Public Design is to consolidate, for public use, all design and cost information regarding the LIFAC Desulfurization Facility at the completion of construction and startup.

  17. Bilingual Readiness in Earliest School Years; A Curriculum Demonstration Project. Bilingual Readiness in Primary Grades; An Early Childhood Demonstration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finocchiaro, Mary; King, Paul F.

    These two curriculum demonstration projects on bilingual readiness in the earliest school years contain many similarities. Both were formed on the thesis that young children can and will learn a second language readily and that the urban classroom mixture of Spanish-speaking, English-speaking, and Negro-dialect speaking children can be capitalized…

  18. District steam and the St. Louis steam loop

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, T.M.; Sauer, H.J. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Owned and operated by large public electric utilities, district steam systems flourished in most northern US cities in the first half of this century. Following World War II, however, district steam systems became minor and, in some cases, unprofitable portions of the utilities' operations. Consequently, public utilities ceased promoting district steam to existing and potential customers, leading to the decline of their use. In recent years, district steam systems have been revitalized by independent enterprises that have the commitment and expertise to make these systems once again reliable and cost-effective energy sources. This paper reports on one such system, The St. Louis Steam Loop. The St. Louis steam loop consists of 22 miles of insulated underground steam piping encompassing a 400-square block area in the city's downtown business district. The loop is supplied with steam by the Ashley Plant, which was built in 1904 for the St. Louis World's Fair. Due to the rising cost of oil, which has been used to fuel the Ashley Plant since 1972, and the subsequent loss of customers, many people considered the steam system a dinosaur in the jet age. In 1982, Trigen-St. Louis Energy Corporation purchased the steam system and embarked on an aggressive campaign to upgrade all aspects of the system, including valves, piping, and meters. In 1999, Trigen-St. Louis will install an ISMW state-of-the-art combustion turbine cogenerator to provide 95% of the steam to the steam loop. A primary reason for the St. Louis Steam Loop's longevity is that it has reliably supplied steam to many downtown buildings for the better part of the 20th century.

  19. Quality assurance plan for placement of cold-cap grout, demonstration vault, Hanford Grout Vault Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, P.T.; Wakeley, L.D.; Ernzen, J.J.; Walley, D.M.

    1992-08-01

    During FY 91, the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout to be used as a cold cap, a nonradioactive layer, between the solidified waste and the cover blocks of a demonstration waste disposal vault at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Facility. This document recommends requirements for a quality assurance (QA) plan for field mixing and placing of the cold-cap grout during final closure of the demonstration vault. Preplacement activities emphasize selection and testing of materials that will match the performance of materials used in the WES grout. Materials sources and applicable American Society of Testing and Materials, American Concrete Institute, and American Petroleum Institute specifications and requirements are provided. Archiving of physical samples of materials is essential, in addition to careful maintenance of test reports and laboratory data. Full-scale field trial mixing and a detailed preconstruction conference are recommended. Placement activities focus on production and placement of a grout that remains sufficiently constant throughout all batches and meets performance requirements. QA activities must be coordinated between the batch plant and delivery site. Recommended sampling during placement includes cylinders cast for subsequent tests of compressive strength and for nondestructive evaluation and prisms cast for monitoring volume stability. A minimum of two lifts is recommended. Postplacement activities include long-term monitoring of the properties of grout specimens cast during placement. Minimum testing of cylinders includes pulse velocity, fundamental frequency, and unconfined compressive strength. Monitoring characteristics of the microstructure also are recommended. The QA plan should designate an organization to have responsibility for maintaining complete records, reports, and archived samples, including details of deviations from plans written before field placement.

  20. Stray current control for the St. Louis Metrolink rail system

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, J.H. III

    1995-01-01

    The new 18-mile (11-km) Metrolink light rail transit system, which runs from St. Louis, Missouri, to East St. Louis, Illinois, was constructed in an area devoid of rail transit for decades and thus unprepared for the effects of stray current on newer underground structures. Various steps were taken to control stray current because of the complexity of the underground structures along the right of way. The rail system is now in operation, and the effectiveness of the stray current control program is being evaluated.

  1. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Final report, Volume 2, Appendices A to E

    SciTech Connect

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-04-05

    This is a final report presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOC`s and other organic chemicals. Although it may be applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by air flow.

  2. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    SciTech Connect

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  3. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 4 discusses the following topics: Rod Compaction/Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Collection System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Container Transfer Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; Staging and Cutting Table Test Results and Analysis Report; and Upper Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report.

  4. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-165-1605, St. Louis Police Auto Body Shop, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, G.A.

    1985-07-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for toluene, lead, and total dust at the Saint Louis Police Auto Body Shop, Saint Louis, Missouri in January and February, 1985. The evaluation was requested by the Health Commissioner of the City of Saint Louis to investigate working conditions in the body shop. A prior health department investigation had indicated that there might be health hazards in the shop area. The author concludes that a potential health hazard exists due to overexposure to total dust while performing certain repairs at the facility. Recommendations include installing a supply air ventilation system for the exhaust fans, orienting vehicles in the shop so that technicians are always working upstream of the airflow, and providing respiratory protection when it is not possible to control dust emissions.

  5. In-plant demonstration of energy optimization in beck dyeing of carpet. Final report, June 1, 1979-January 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Tincher, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Several energy-conservative technologies have been successfully combined and transferred to a commercial carpet finishing plant to optimize beck dyeing. The technology of bump-and-run, in which the dyebath temperature was allowed to drift for the last 85% of the hold time instead of being maintained by active steam sparging, reduced the energy consumption by 38% with negligible capital investment required. Merging of dyebath reuse with bump-and-run only marginally increased the energy consumption (to 39%), but substantially lowered the plant's finishing costs further by directly recycling dyes, auxiliary chemicals, and water. Final optimization, which merged a technique whereby the carpet was pulled directly from the hot bath with bump-and-run and dyebath reuse, further improved the economics by drastically reducing water/sewer requirements by 90% and eliminating the holding tank/pumping assembly as a reuse requirement. From a carpet industry viewpoint, the demonstrated modifications have a direct energy conservation potential of 2.4 x 10/sup 5/ barrels of oil equivalent per year assuming the technology is directly transferable to similar atmospheric dyeing processes, e.g., beck dyeing of nylon and polyester fabrics, the potential to the entire textile industry is 2.6 x 10/sup 6/ BOE/year. Economically, total potential savings for the carpet industry on reuse incorporation was $1.2 x 10/sup 7//year, based on a 2.3 cents/lb. savings figure. When the allied fabric industry was included, the national potential was raised to $1.0 x 10/sup 8//year. These figures include cost savings due to materials recycled (water, auxiliary chemicals and dyes) as well as energy conservation.

  6. Field demonstration for bioremediation treatment: Technology demonstration of soil vapor extraction off-gas at McClellan Air Force Base. Final report November 1997--April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Magar, V.S.; Tonga, P.; Webster, T.; Drescher, E.

    1999-01-12

    McClellan Air Force Base (AFB) is a National Test Location designated through the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), and was selected as the candidate test site for a demonstration of soil vapor extraction (SVE) off-gas treatment technology. A two-stage reactor system was employed for the treatment of the off-gas. The biological treatment was conducted at Operable Unit (OU) D Site S, located approximately 400 ft southwest of Building 1093. The SVE system at this area normally operates at a nominal volumetric flowrate of approximately 500 to 600 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm). The contaminated air stream from the SVE system that was fed to the reactor system operated at a flowrate of 5 to 10 scfm. The two-stage reactor system consisted of a fixed-film biofilter followed by a completely mixed (by continuous stirring), suspended-growth biological reactor. This reactor configuration was based on a review of the literature, on characterization of the off-gas from the SVE system being operated at McClellan AFB, and on the results of the laboratory study conducted by Battelle and Envirogen for this study.

  7. A Conservation with...Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Lynne V.

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview between National Endowment for the Humanities chairman, Lynne V. Cheney, and Harvard professor, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Includes discussion of multiculturalism as it relates to free speech, sexism, racism, hate speech, and ethnocentrism. Emphasizes both the open tradition of Western culture and the recent pressure for…

  8. Isolation of Genotype V St. Louis Encephalitis Virus in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Jason H.; White, Gregory S.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Stark, Lillian M.

    2009-01-01

    We isolated and characterized St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) from cloacal swabs of naturally exposed adult sentinel chickens in 2006. Phylogenetic analysis of SLEV strains isolated in Florida indicated that Brazilian SLEV circulated in 1972 and 2006; lineages were VA and VB. PMID:19331744

  9. School Food Environment of Charter Schools in St. Louis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsenmeyer, Whitney; Kelly, Patrick; Jenkins, Steve; Mattfeldt-Berman, Mildred

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the school food environment of charter schools in Saint Louis, Missouri. The objectives were to: (1) describe the participation of charter schools in the National School Lunch Program and (2) describe the prevalence of competitive foods in charter schools. Methods: School administrators…

  10. Varieties and Commonalities of Career Transitions: Louis' Typology Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Reginald A.; Scott, Susanne G.

    1994-01-01

    Navy officers (n=742) rated the magnitude and desirability of 16 career events. Cluster analysis supported Louis' typology and his assertion that different career events have similar meanings to individuals. Findings suggest that effects of exit transitions (retirement, resignation) are qualitatively different from those of other events. (SK)

  11. The Badge of Poverty: The St. Louis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Carl E.; And Others

    This booklet reports a study designed to probe into some of the important human dimensions that characterize poverty. The study was restricted to a specific low-income area in the heart of St. Louis, Mo. Personal household interviews were conducted, covering topics about problems and topics as seen by the respondents. Among the findings were that:…

  12. High Resolution Elevation Data for the Saint Louis River

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several data collections in the area of the Saint Louis River Estuary have recently become available. These include the Minnesota Elevation Mapping Project (MN Statewide LIDAR collect), South Shore LIDAR project (WI Collect), and NOAA’s bathymetric LIDAR. The EPA Mid-Continent ...

  13. Phenology of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little work has been done on the phenology of fish larvae in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. As part of an aquatic invasive species early detection study, we conducted larval fish surveys in the St. Louis River estuary (SLRE) in 2012 and 2013. Using multiple gears in a spatially ba...

  14. MICROSCOPICAL ANALYSIS OF AEROSOLS COLLECTED IN ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the concentration of total suspended particulates (TSP) was conducted at two sampling sites in St. Louis, Missouri during July 1975. One site located at the southeastern boundary of the city was adjacent to an industrial area. The other sampling site was located in the...

  15. Larval fish distribution in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to determine what study design, environmental, and habitat variables contribute to the distribution and abundance of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary. Larval fish habitat associations are poorly understood in Great Lakes coastal wetlands, yet critical ...

  16. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River estuary (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of ecosystems for sustainable provision of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching EPA goal of community sust...

  17. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable management of ecosystems for the perpetual flow of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching U.S. EPA goal of ...

  18. Louis Bachelier: The Father of Modern Option Pricing Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Edward J.; Weithers, Timothy M.

    1991-01-01

    Observes that, before 1973, determining a valuation formula for option prices was an elusive goal of financial economics. Discusses Louis Bachelier's early twentieth-century work on the problem. Notes that Bachelier derived a normal distribution for stock price movements by modeling price changes in specific way. Reviews Bachelier's option pricing…

  19. Long-term Trends in St. Louis River Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality impairments caused by sewage and industrial waste discharge into the St. Louis River have been a primary concern for clean-up efforts throughout the last century. Surveys dating back to 1928 reveal severely degraded water quality in much of the river below Fond du L...

  20. NEAR-SURFACE AIR PARCEL TRAJECTORIES - ST. LOUIS, 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of air parcel trajectories is described for the diagnosis of mesometeorological and urban air pollution problems. A technique is described that uses the St. Louis Regional Air Monitoring System (RAMS) to provide wind measurements for the local urban scale. A computeri...

  1. Annual Convention in St. Louis: A Dynamic Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emeagwali, N. Susan

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 3,000 career and technical educators from across the country converged upon St. Louis, Missouri, for the premier professional development event in career and technical education (CTE). The Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) held its Annual Convention and Career Tech Expo November 17-19, bringing together teachers,…

  2. Conceptualising Childhood: Robert Louis Stevenson's "A Child's Garden of Verses."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the construct of childhood in Robert Louis Stevenson's collection of poems, "A Child's Garden of Verses," by employing notions of child development drawn from Jean Piaget and Lev Vygotsky. Finds, from a literary perspective, Stevenson's collection located on the boundaries of romanticism and modernism. (BT)

  3. Invasion by stages in the St Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River estuary is recognized as an invasive species “hotspot” - the harbor ranks among the top locations in the Great Lakes reporting the first occurrence of new, aquatic non-native species. To date, 18 non-native benthic invertebrate, 4 non-native crusta...

  4. 75 FR 68662 - Environmental Impact Statement: St. Louis County, MO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: St. Louis County, MO AGENCY: Federal... advise the public that an environmental impact statement (EIS) will be prepared for a proposed highway... impacts associated with the proposed improvements. Agencies with jurisdiction by law will be asked...

  5. 76 FR 49526 - Environmental Impact Statement; Saint Louis County, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement; Saint Louis County, MN AGENCY: Federal... advise the public that an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will be prepared to respond to the terms... impacts of alternatives, including (1) No-build, (2) Purchasing title and possession of the existing TH...

  6. EVALUATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF LOW-NOX BURNER SYSTEMS FOR TEOR (THERMALLY ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY) STEAM GENERATORS: FINAL REPORT - FIELD EVALUATION OF COMMERCIAL PROTOTYPE BURNER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the final phase of a program to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a low-NOx burner for crude-oil-fired steam generators used for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR). The burner designed and demonstrated under this program was developed from design ...

  7. Assisting Newcomers through Employment and Support Services: An Evaluation of the New Americans Centers Demonstration Project in Arkansas and Iowa. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koralek, Robin; Johnson, Heidi; Ratcliffe, Caroline; Vericker, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the final results for the evaluation of the New Americans Centers (NACs) demonstration project in Arkansas and Iowa. It focuses on program operations and plans for program sustainability, while highlighting services provided through the demonstration projects in Arkansas and Iowa. It also documents outcomes for New Iowan…

  8. 76 FR 55158 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, St. Louis, MO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... International Airport, Airport Planning & Development, 11495 Navaid Road, Bridgeton, Missouri 63044. The Record... CONTACT: FAA, Todd Madison, ACE-611B, 901 Locust, Kansas City, Missouri, 64106-2325, todd.madison@faa.gov... Kansas City, Missouri. The Lambert-St. Louis International Airport study contains a proposed...

  9. [The painting 'The anatomical lesson by Professor Louis Bolk' by Martin Monnickendam].

    PubMed

    Baljet, B

    1993-12-18

    In 1992 the painting 'The anatomy of professor Louis Bolk' by the Dutch painter Martin Monnickendam (1874-1943), was finally returned to its place in the 'Tulp-room' of the Department of Anatomy and Embryology at the University of Amsterdam, after the department had been moved to new premises in 1985. The professor of anatomy at the University of Amsterdam, Louis Bolk, is seated in the middle surrounded by his, at that time, former pupils, from left to right: Boeke, Barge and van den Broek, authors of a Dutch textbook of anatomy. The four professors are gathered around a cadaver of an orang-utan, placed not on a dissection table but on a console. Bolk is facing the observer and holding a scalpel in one hand while steadying the animal's head with the other; he is ready to make an incision. In the back of the painting a bust of the 18th century anatomist Petrus Camper is visible. The four professors all wear a white coat over their suits. Bolk finishes this off with an artistic bow tie whilst the others use an ordinary necktie. The painting is signed in the left upper corner 'Martin Monnickendam 1925'. PMID:8277996

  10. [Project Upper Cumberland. Final Report. Project Upper Cumberland Cultural Arts Program. Final Evaluation. Demonstration Program in Guidance and Counseling. An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanders, John N.; And Others

    Project Upper Cumberland was a three year endeavor which served 16 Tennessee counties. The final report and evaluation, in three documents, summarizes the three innovative programs which it engendered: (1) teacher inservice training, emphasizing human relations; (2) a pilot cultural arts program (art, music, drama) for grades 1-12; and (3) a pilot…