Science.gov

Sample records for low-background gamma spectroscopy

  1. Applications of the low-background gamma spectroscopy to the geographical origin of marine salts and prunes

    SciTech Connect

    Perrot, F.

    2007-03-28

    The low background gamma spectroscopy has been applied to try to sign the geographical origin of the French atlantic marine salts and of the prunes from Agen. Most of the activity measurements have been done using low background Ge spectrometers located in Bordeaux. Results have shown that a clear signature exists in the case of the French atlantic salts using the 40K, 137Cs and 226Ra isotopes but not in the case of the prunes.

  2. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-background gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden.

    PubMed

    Gastrich, Holger; Gößling, Claus; Klingenberg, Reiner; Kröninger, Kevin; Neddermann, Till; Nitsch, Christian; Quante, Thomas; Zuber, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The Dortmund Low Background Facility is an instrument for low-level gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden of ten meters of water equivalent, an inner shielding, featuring a neutron absorber, and an active muon veto. An integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV of (2.528±0.004)counts/(kgmin) enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry with sensitivities in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time. PMID:27082973

  3. Low Background Gamma-Ray Spectrometry in the 'Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane'

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Ph.; Hubert, F.

    2007-03-28

    Most of the underground experiments in physics and many studies in geology, biology or environmental sciences face a common requirement with the necessity of using experimental devices with ultra-low background radioactivity. Many developments involving many different techniques have been used in order to be able to measure extremely low levels of radioactivity in materials. This report will focus on low background gamma-ray spectrometry and will describe the work which has been carried out over the last fifteen years in the 'Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane' (LSM)

  4. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  5. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Norman, E. B.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  6. Application of low-background gamma-ray spectrometry to monitor radioactivity in the environment and food.

    PubMed

    Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Beach, S E; Haines, D K; Bradt, C J; Bari, A; Syed, U-F; Torres, M; Marrantino, J; Kitto, M E; Menia, T; Fielman, E

    2014-08-01

    The results are described of an upgrade of the low-background gamma-ray spectrometry laboratory at New York State Department of Health by acquiring sensitivity to low-energy gamma rays. Tuning of the spectrometer and its low-energy response characteristics are described. The spectrometer has been applied to monitor the environment by measuring aerosols and water in New York State contaminated by the 2011 Fukushima accident plume. In addition, the spectrometer has been used to monitor radioactivity in food by performing a study of cesium in Florida milk. PMID:24836905

  7. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  8. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  9. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  10. Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with high count rates and low background using dielectric microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Aouani, Heykel; Schön, Peter; Brasselet, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence is a powerful technique commonly used for biological imaging. However, the low absorption cross section of this non-linear process is a critical issue for performing biomolecular spectroscopy at the single molecule level. Enhancing the two-photon fluorescence signal would greatly improve the effectiveness of this technique, yet current methods struggle with medium enhancement factors and/or high background noise. Here, we show that the two-photon fluorescence signal from single Alexa Fluor 488 molecules can be enhanced up to 10 times by using a 3 µm diameter latex sphere while adding almost no photoluminescence background. We report a full characterization of the two-photon fluorescence enhancement by a single microsphere using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This opens new routes to enhance non-linear optical signals and extend biophotonic applications. PMID:21258531

  11. Low-Background In-Trap Decay Spectroscopy with TITAN at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, K. G.; Lennarz, A.; Grossheim, A.; Klawitter, R.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Gallant, A. T.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Macdonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Seeraji, S.; Andreoiu, C.; Frekers, D.; Dilling, J.

    An in-trap decay spectroscopy setup has been developed and constructed for use with the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. The goal of this device is to observe weak electron-capture (EC) branching ratios for the odd-odd intermediate nuclei in the ββ decay process. This apparatus consists of an up-to 6 Tesla, open-access spectroscopy ion-trap, surrounded radially by up to 7 planar Si(Li) detectors which are separated from the trap by thin Be windows. This configuration provides a significant increase in sensitivity for the detection of low-energy photons by providing backing-free ion storage and eliminating charged-particle-induced backgrounds. An intense electron beam is also employed to increase the charge-states of the trapped ions, thus providing storage times on the order of minutes, allowing for decay-spectroscopy measurements. The technique of multiple ion-bunch stacking was also recently demonstrated, which further extends the measurement possibilities of this apparatus. The current status of the facility and initial results from a 116In measurement are presented.

  12. Low background screening capability in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-01

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  13. Low background screening capability in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-17

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  14. Total internal reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS) with low background and high count-rate per molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Kai; Leutenegger, Marcel; Rigler, Per; Rao, Ramachandra; Rigler, Rudolf; Gösch, Michael; Lasser, Theo

    2005-09-01

    We designed a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system for measurements on surfaces. The system consists of an objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy setup, adapted to measure FCS. Here, the fluorescence exciting evanescent wave is generated by epi-illumination through the periphery of a high NA oil-immersion objective. The main advantages with respect to conventional FCS systems are an improvement in terms of counts per molecule (cpm) and a high signal to background ratio. This is demonstrated by investigating diffusion as well as binding and release of single molecules on a glass surface. Furthermore, the size and shape of the molecule detection efficiency (MDE) function was calculated, using a wave-vectorial approach and taking into account the influence of the dielectric interface on the emission properties of fluorophores.

  15. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  16. The LBNL Low Background Facility - Services and Recent Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan; Smith, Alan; Norman, Eric; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Poon, Alan; Lesko, Kevin

    2014-09-01

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at a recently established underground location (4300 m.w.e) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD (relocated from Oroville, CA). These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described in detail including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects. The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at a recently established underground location (4300 m.w.e) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD (relocated from Oroville, CA). These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic

  17. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies escaping from a planetary surface can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 32 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models for the source processes. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted form a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 292 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes were used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with measurements from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed.

  18. Ultra high vacuum high precision low background setup with temperature control for thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDA-MS) of hydrogen in metals.

    PubMed

    Merzlikin, Sergiy V; Borodin, S; Vogel, D; Rohwerder, M

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly developed UHV-based high precision low background setup for hydrogen thermal desorption analysis (TDA) of metallic samples is presented. Using an infrared heating with a low thermal capacity enables a precise control of the temperature and rapid cool down of the measurement chamber. This novel TDA-set up is superior in sensitivity to almost every standard hydrogen analyzer available commercially due to the special design of the measurement chamber, resulting in a very low hydrogen background. No effects of background drift characteristic as for carrier gas based TDA instruments were observed, ensuring linearity and reproducibility of the analysis. This setup will prove to be valuable for detailed investigations of hydrogen trapping sites in steels and other alloys. With a determined limit of detection of 5.9×10(-3)µg g(-1) hydrogen the developed instrument is able to determine extremely low hydrogen amounts even at very low hydrogen desorption rates. This work clearly demonstrates the great potential of ultra-high vacuum thermal desorption mass spectroscopy instrumentation. PMID:25702992

  19. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L. (Editor); Ramaty, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of gamma ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics are discussed. Line spectra from solar, stellar, planetary, and cosmic gamma rays are examined as well as HEAO investigations, the prospects of a gamma ray observatory, and follow-on X-ray experiments in space.

  20. Astrophysical gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of gamma-ray lines from solar flares, the Galactic Center, and transient celestial events are reviewed. The lines observed in each case are identified, and possible emission sources are considered. Future prospects for gamma-ray line astronomy are briefly discussed.

  1. Gamma spectroscopy of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, P. B.

    2013-05-01

    We describe experiments for the undergraduate laboratory that use a high-resolution gamma detector to measure radiation in environmental samples. The experiments are designed to instruct the students in the quantitative analysis of gamma spectra and secular equilibrium. Experiments include the radioactive dating of Brazil nuts, determining radioisotope concentrations in natural samples, and measurement of the 235U abundance in uranium rich rocks.

  2. Simultaneous beta/gamma digital spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.

    A state-of-the-art radiation detection system for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta-particles and gamma-rays has been developed. The system utilizes a triple-layer phoswich detector and a customized Digital Pulse Processor (DPP) built in our laboratory. The DPP board was designed to digitally capture the analog signal pulses and, following several digital preprocessing steps, transfer valid pulses to the host computer for further digital processing. A MATLAB algorithm was developed to digitally discriminate beta and gamma events and reconstruct separate beta and gamma-ray energy spectra with minimum crosstalk. The spectrometer proved to be an effective tool for recording separate beta and gamma-ray spectra from mixed radiation fields. The system as a beta-gamma spectrometer will have broad-ranging applications in nuclear non-proliferation, radioactive waste management, worker safety, systems reliability, dose assessment, and risk analysis.

  3. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, J. G.; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J. F.; Christensen, F. E.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Decker, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; García, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Hill, R. M.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jakobsen, A. C.; Jourde, D.; Mirallas, H.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Ruz, J.; Tomás, A.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10-6 counts/keV/cm2/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10-7 counts/keV/cm2/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  4. Gamma-ray spectroscopy - Status and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Contemporary gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments and their results are reviewed. Sensitivities of 10 to the -4th to 10 to the -3rd ph/sq cm-sec have been achieved for steady sources and 10 to the -2nd to 1 ph/sq cm-sec for transient sources. This has led to the detection of gamma-ray lines from more than 40 objects representing 6 classes of astrophysical phenomena. The lines carry model-independent information and are of fundamental importance to theoretical modeling and our understanding of the objects. The objectives and anticipated results of future instruments are discussed. Several instruments in development will have a factor of 10 sensitivity improvement to certain phenomena over contemporary instruments. A factor of 100 improvement in sensitivity will allow the full potential of gamma-ray spectroscopy to be realized. Instrument concepts which would achieve this with both present and advanced techniques are discussed.

  5. Low Background Counting At SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce

    2011-04-27

    It is a continuous and ongoing effort to maintain radioactivity in materials and in the environment surrounding most underground experiments at very low levels. These low levels are required so that experiments can achieve the required detection sensitivities for the detection of low-energy neutrinos, searches for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to determine these low background levels in the materials and the underground environment. This proceedings will describe the SNOLAB High Purity Germanium Detector which has been in continuous use for the past five years and give results of many of the items that have been counted over that period. Brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be given, and the radon levels at SNOLAB will be discussed.

  6. Gamma-ray spectroscopy - Requirements and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The only previous space instrument which had sufficient spectral resolution and directionality for the resolution of astrophysical sources was the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer carried by HEAO-3. A broad variety of astrophysical investigations entail gamma-ray spectroscopy of E/Delta-E resolving power of the order of 500 at 1 MeV; it is presently argued that a sensitivity to narrow gamma-ray lines of a few millionths ph/sq cm, from about 10 keV to about 10 MeV, should typify the gamma-ray spectrometers of prospective missions. This performance is achievable with technology currently under development, and could be applied to the NASA's planned Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer.

  7. Low-Background Counting at Homestake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Iseley

    2009-10-01

    Background characterization at Homestake is an ongoing project crucial to the experiments located there. From neutrino physics to WIMP detection, low-background materials and their screening require highly sensitive detectors. Naturally, shielding is needed to lower ``noise'' in these detectors. Because of its vast depth, Homestake will be effective in shielding against cosmic-ray radiation. This means little, however, if radiation from materials used still interferes. Specifically, our group is working on designing the first low-background counting facility at the Homestake mine. Using a high-purity germanium crystal detector from ORTEC, measurements will be taken within a shield that is made to specifically account for radiation underground and fits the detector. Currently, in the design, there is a layer of copper surrounded by an intricate stainless steel casing, which will be manufactured air tight to accommodate for nitrogen purging. Lead will surround the stainless steel shell to further absorb gamma rays. A mobile lift system has been designed for easy access to the detector. In the future, this project will include multiple testing stations located in the famous Davis Cavern where future experiments will have the ability to use the site as an efficient and accurate counting facility for their needs (such as measuring radioactive isotopes in materials). Overall, this detector (and its shield system) is the beginning of a central testing facility that will serve Homestake's scientific community.

  8. The Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Norman, Eric; Smith, Alan; Poon, Alan; Chan, Yuen-Dat

    2015-10-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility at LBNL provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors, such as those studying dark matter or neutrinos. The BLBF also makes a variety of environmental measurements in search of other radioisotopes, such as fallout from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011 and other radioisotope monitoring activities. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. In 2015, the BLBF will be relocating its underground counting stations to a new, dedicated space on the 4850L of SURF. The Black Hills State University Underground Campus will host several low background counting stations and operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC will be presented.

  9. Low background aspects of GERDA

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, Hardy

    2011-04-27

    The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in {sup 76}Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio-impurities coming from the liquid argon, the stainless steel cryostat and the front-end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from {sup 222}Rn. The main source of {sup 222}Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio-pure components for front-end electronics resulted in the development of a pre-amplifier with a total activity of less than 1 mBq {sup 228}Th.

  10. Quantification of 235U and 238U activity concentrations for undeclared nuclear materials by a digital gamma-gamma coincidence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Yi, Jing; Mekarski, Pawel; Ungar, Kurt; Hauck, Barry; Kramer, Gary H

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of verifying depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), low enriched uranium (LEU) and high enriched uranium (HEU) by a developed digital gamma-gamma coincidence spectroscopy. The spectroscopy consists of two NaI(Tl) scintillators and XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The results demonstrate that the spectroscopy provides an effective method of (235)U and (238)U quantification based on the count rate of their gamma-gamma coincidence counting signatures. The main advantages of this approach over the conventional gamma spectrometry include the facts of low background continuum near coincident signatures of (235)U and (238)U, less interference from other radionuclides by the gamma-gamma coincidence counting, and region-of-interest (ROI) imagine analysis for uranium enrichment determination. Compared to conventional gamma spectrometry, the method offers additional advantage of requiring minimal calibrations for (235)U and (238)U quantification at different sample geometries. PMID:21411329

  11. Optimized Derivative Kernels for Gamma Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vlachos, D. S.; Kosmas, O. T.; Simos, T. E.

    2007-12-26

    In gamma ray spectroscopy, the photon detectors measure the number of photons with energy that lies in an interval which is called a channel. This accumulation of counts produce a measuring function that its deviation from the ideal one may produce high noise in the unfolded spectrum. In order to deal with this problem, the ideal accumulation function is interpolated with the use of special designed derivative kernels. Simulation results are presented which show that this approach is very effective even in spectra with low statistics.

  12. Directions in gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Candey, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    Current and future instrumentation for gamma-ray spectroscopy in the spectral range from 10 keV to 10 MeV is described. New technologies for Germanium (Ge) spectrometers and emerging detector technologies are highlighted. Scientific objectives are considered, with emphasis on capabilities beyond those of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). A list of instrument requirements is given. Technologies under development for an NAE-era spectrometer are presented. Spectrometers beyond NAE and other types of future technologies are discussed, and a partial list of current and future spectrometers is provided.

  13. Microsatellite gamma-ray spectroscopy experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asa, G.; Ruzin, Arie; Jakobson, Claudio G.; Shaviv, G.; Nemirovsky, Yael

    1999-10-01

    Preliminary results from Gamma ray experiment installed on a micro-satellite, Techsat 1, are reported. The experiment is based on CdZnTe detectors coupled to custom designed CMOS electronics, which includes low noise charge sensitive preamplifiers, pulse shaping amplifiers and sampling circuits. It was realized as a mile stone towards a micro- satellite mounted Gamma ray space telescope. The experiment is a stand-alone spectroscopy system that measures the radiation inside the micro-satellite and transmits the spectra to ground station via the main satellite computer. The radiation level inside micro-satellites is expected to be significantly lower compared to that inside large satellites. Additional goal of the experiment is to test the CdZnTe detectors and the front-end electronics, implemented in a standard CMOS process, under space radiation environment. In particular, the degradation in performance will be monitored. The Techsat 1 micro-satellite has been designed and constructed at Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. The satellite is approximately 50 X 50 X 50 cm-3 cube with a total weight of about 50 kilograms. It was successfully launched in July 1998 to a 820 km orbit.

  14. Validating the Melusine Gamma Spectroscopy Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, Luke E.; Keillor, Martin E.; Stavenger, Timothy J.

    2013-11-26

    This technical report describes testing to evaluate the gamma spectroscopy tool, Melusine, under development by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The goal was to verify that the software can successfully be used to provide accurate results and statistical uncertainties for the detection of isotopes of interest and their activities. Of special interest were spectra similar to those produced by radionuclide stations that contribute to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization’s International Monitoring System. Two data sets were used to test Melusine’s capabilities. The first was the result of a multi-lab calibration effort based on neutron activations produced at the University of California at Davis. The second was taken from the Proficiency Test Exercises conducted by the CTBTO directly in 2005. In 37 of 42 cases, Melusine produced results in agreement with the best answer presently available, in most cases with calculated uncertainties comparable to or better than competing analyses. In fact, Melusine technically provided one more result than CTBTO’s PTE analyses that agreed with the “book answer” (Monte Carlo simulation). Despite these promising results, the Melusine software is still under development. Effort is especially needed to simplify its analysis process, improve stability, and provide user documentation. Some significant analysis tasks require further vetting, such as those to address summing effects. However, our test results indicate that Melusine’s calculations as presently implemented are sound and can be used to reliably analyze spectra from the CTBTO’s radionuclide stations.

  15. Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of Nearby OB Associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1997-01-01

    This final report is a summary of the study on gamma ray spectroscopy of nearby OB associations. The goal of this work is to investigate the gamma ray line emission detected with the Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) from the Orion star forming region. This is accomplished by searching for similar emission from other nearby OB associations.

  16. DUSEL Ultra-Low Background Counting Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan

    2007-10-01

    The Homestake Mine in western South Dakota has been confirmed by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as the site for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). Many of the physics, geosciences, and microbiology experiments in the facility will be funded by DOE and NSF, and will benefit the missions of these agencies. In support of these programs, physics faculty in South Dakota and scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been working together to establish a multidisciplinary research cluster to provide baseline characterization for physics and geosciences/geomicrobiology experiments at the Homestake Mine through an Ultra-Low Background Counting Facility (ULBCoF). The proposed project utilizes two low-background germanium detectors with massive shielding underground to carefully analyze materials for low background experiments. Low background experiments such as double-beta decay, solar neutrino, geoneutrino, and dark matter must control the purity of all the materials used in the construction of a detector. Measuring such low counting rates is a very challenging task that will be best accomplished by primarily using high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors.

  17. Low background counting techniques at SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce

    2013-08-08

    Many of the experiments currently searching for dark matter, studying properties of neutrinos or searching for neutrinoless double beta decay require very low levels of radioactive backgrounds both in their own construction materials and in the surrounding environment. These low background levels are required so that the experiments can achieve the required sensitivities for their searches. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to directly measure these radioactive backgrounds. This proceedings will describe SNOLAB's High Purity Germanium Detectors, one of which has been in continuous use for the past seven years measuring materials for many experiments in operation or under construction at SNOLAB. A description of the characterisation of SNOLAB's new germanium well detector will be presented. In addition, brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be presented and a description of SNOLAB's future low background counting laboratory will be given.

  18. Solar flare gamma-ray line spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Forrest, D. J.; Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1985-01-01

    The techniques and the results of solar elemental abundance determinations using observations of gamma ray lines from the April 27 1981 olar flare were outlined. The techniques are elaborated on and observed and the best-fitting theoretical spectra are presented. Numerical values for the photon fluences and the total number of protons involved in the thick-target production of these gamma rays are derived.

  19. Low-background detector arrays for infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Estrada, J. A.; Goebel, J. H.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Mckibbin, D. D.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Weber, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    The status of a program which develops and characterizes integrated infrared (IR) detector array technology for space astronomical applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, coupled to silicon readout electronics. Low-background laboratory test results include measurements of responsivity, noise, dark current, temporal response, and the effects of gamma-radiation. In addition, successful astronomical imagery has been obtained on some arrays from this program. These two aspects of the development combine to demonstrate the strong potential for integrated array technology for IR space astronomy.

  20. HYPERNUCLEAR STRUCTURE FROM GAMMA-RAY SPECTROSCOPY.

    SciTech Connect

    MILLENER,D.J.

    2003-10-14

    The energies of p-shell hypernuclear {gamma} rays obtained from recent experiments using the Hyperball at BNL and KEK are used to constrain the YN interaction which enters into shell-model calculations which include both {Lambda} and {Sigma} configurations.

  1. A system for simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsoni, A. T.; Hamby, D. M.

    2007-08-01

    A state-of-the-art radiation detection system for real-time and simultaneous spectroscopy of beta-particles and gamma-rays has been developed. The system utilizes a triple-layer phoswich detector and a customized Digital Pulse Processor (DPP) designed and built in our laboratory. The DPP board digitally captures the analog signal pulses and, following several digital preprocessing steps, transfers valid pulses to the host computer for further digital processing. A resolving algorithm also was developed to digitally discriminate beta and gamma events, and reconstruct separate beta and gamma-ray energy spectra with minimal crosstalk. The spectrometer has proven to be an effective tool for recording separate beta and gamma-ray spectra from mixed radiation fields. The system as a beta-gamma spectrometer will have broad-ranging applications in nuclear non-proliferation, radioactive waste management, worker safety, systems reliability, dose assessment, and risk analysis.

  2. Nucleosynthesis and astrophysical gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Allan S.

    1987-01-01

    The HEAO-3 gamma ray spectrometer has provided evidence in the quest for the understanding of complex element formation in the universe with the discovery of Al-26 in the interstellar medium. It has demonstrated that the synthesis of intermediate mass nuclei is currently going on in the galaxy. This discovery was confirmed by the Solar Maximum Mission. The flux is peaked near the galactic center and indicates about 3 solar masses of Al-26 in the interstellar medium, with an implied ratio of Al-26/Al-27 = .00001. Several possible distributions were studied but the data gathered thus far do not allow discrimination between them. It is felt that only the spaceflight of a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer with adequate sensitivity will ultimately resolve the issue of the source of this material.

  3. Low background techniques applied in the BOREXINO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zuzel, G.

    2015-08-17

    The BOREXINO detector, located in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy, has been designed for real-time spectroscopy of low-energy solar neutrinos. Within the experiment several novel background reduction and assay techniques have been established. In many cases they are still the most sensitive world-wide. Developed methods and apparatus provided tools for a strict quality control program during the construction phase of the BOREXINO detector, which was the key to meet the background requirements. Achievement of extremely low background rate opened the possibility to probe in realtime almost entire spectrum of the solar neutrinos.

  4. Low Background Assay Results for LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey; Thomas, Keenan; Lux-Zeplin Collaboration; Berkeley Low Background Facility Team

    2016-03-01

    The next generation dark matter experiment LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) requires careful control of intrinsic radioactivity in all critical detector components in order to reach its unprecedented target sensitivity to Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs): 2 ×10-48 cm2 at 50 GeV/c2. Appropriate material selection is essential to meeting this goal, and an extensive campaign of low background screening is currently being carried out using assay devices at the Sanford Underground Research Facility and the Boulby Underground Laboratory. We will present results from this work, including measurements for the Ti cryostat, PMT bases, PMT raw materials, PTFE, and other components. This work was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Award Number DE-AC02-05CH11231, and is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. 1106400.

  5. Image Recognition Techniques for Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vlachos, D. S.; Tsabaris, C. G.

    2007-12-26

    Photons, after generated from a radioactive source and before they deposit their energy in a photo detector, are subsequent to multiple scattering mechanisms. As a result, the measured energy from the photo detector is different from the energy the photon had when generated. This is known as folding of the photon energy. Moreover, statistical fluctuation inside the detector contribute to energy folding. In this work, a new method is presented for unfolding the gamma ray spectrum. The method uses a 2-dimensional representation of the measured spectrum (image) and then uses image recognition techniques, and especially differential edge detection, to generate the original spectrum.

  6. Solar abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1989-01-01

    Determinations of solar abundances from gamma-ray line observations are reviewed. The principal results are: (1) in flare loops, at atmospheric heights betwen the transition region and the upper photosphere, the Mg/O ratio is higher by about a factor of 3 than in the photosphere, while the C/O ratio is essentially photospheric; (2) in the same region, the Ne/O ratio is higher by about a factor of 3 than the Ne/O ratio in the corona; (3) the photospheric He-3/H ratio is less than 0.000035. These results, combined with other data, suggest abundance variations in the solar atmosphere, possibly resulting from charge and mass dependent transport.

  7. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The study of hypernuclei is a frontier area of nuclear physics. As more intense beams of strange mesons have become available, methods of in-beam spectroscopy have been applied to the study of hypernuclei. The feasibility of detecting hypernuclear electromagnetic radiation has been demonstrated at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Studies have been made of the effective LAMBDA hyperon-nucleon interaction in p-shell hypernuclei. The first results are described and they place useful constraints on the effective interaction and the shell model description of hypernuclear states.

  8. Combined Gamma Ray/neutron Spectroscopy for Mapping Lunar Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Byrd, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Masarik, J.; Moss, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Some elements in the Moon can be resources, such as hydrogen and oxygen. Other elements, like Ti or the minerals in which they occur, such as ilmenite, could be used in processing lunar materials. Certain elements can also be used as tracers for other elements or lunar processes, such as hydrogen for mature regoliths with other solar-wind-implanted elements like helium, carbon, and nitrogen. A complete knowledge of the elemental composition of a lunar region is desirable both in identifying lunar resources and in lunar geochemical studies, which also helps in identifying and using lunar resources. The use of gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy together to determine abundances of many elements in the top few tens of centimeters of the lunar surface is discussed. To date, very few discussions of elemental mapping of planetary surfaces considered measurements of both gamma rays and the full range of neutron energies. The theories for gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy of the Moon and calculations of leakage fluxes are presented here with emphasis on why combined gamma ray/neutron spectroscopy is much more powerful than measuring either radiation alone.

  9. Slănic-Prahova low background calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Celarel, Aurelia; Duliu, O G; Bercea, S; Cenusa, C

    2016-03-01

    The reduced background of 2 nSv h(-1) of the Slănic-Prahova Low Background Radiation Laboratory allowed installing a calibration stand for low-dose-rates dosimetry. The stand is provided with (60)Co, (137)Cs and (241)Am low activity sources. A Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt-calibrated AUTOMESS 6150 AD-6 dose rate meter with a 6150 AD-b/H external probe was used to check to what extent this stand could serve as a low background calibration facility. A detailed analysis of possible uncertainties in measuring dose rates evidenced an extended uncertainty related to the certified calibration as well as instrument readings of about 3 % for a confidence level of 95 %. In these conditions, the experimentally determined dose rates for all three gamma ray sources and for source-to-probe distances varying between 0.3 and 2.0 m confirmed a good correlation between the calculated and measured dose rates. At the same time, dose rates perfectly obey to an inverse squared distances law. PMID:26001826

  10. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Hunt, Alan W.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.

    2012-04-01

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is investigated as a non-destructive assay technique for the determination of plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel. This approach exploits the unique isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray emission spectra detected following active interrogation with an external neutron source. A high fidelity modeling approach is described that couples radiation transport, analytical decay/depletion, and a newly developed gamma-ray emission source reconstruction code. Initially simulated and analyzed was a “one-pass” delayed gamma-ray assay that focused on the long-lived signatures. Also presented are the results of an independent study that investigated “pulsed mode” measurements, to capture the more isotope-specific, short-lived signatures. Initial modeling results outlined in this paper suggest that delayed gamma-ray assay of spent nuclear fuel assemblies can be accomplished with a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available gamma-ray detectors.

  11. Labr3:Ce scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.S.; Glodo, J.; Klugerman, M.; Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Weber, M.J.

    2002-12-02

    In this paper, we report on a relatively new scintillator -LaBr3 for gamma ray spectroscopy. Crystals of this scintillator have beengrown using Bridgman process. This material when doped with cerium hashigh light output (~;60,000 photons/MeV) and fast principal decayconstant (less than 25 ns). Furthermore, it shows excellent energyresolution for gamma-ray detection. Energy resolution of 3.2 percent(FWHM) has been achieved for 662 keV photons (137Cs source) at roomtemperature. High timing resolution (260 ps - FWHM) has been recordedwith LaBr3-PMT and BaF2-PMT detectors operating in coincidence mode using511 keV positron annihilation gamma-ray pairs. Details of itsscintillation properties, and variation of these properties with changingcerium concentration are reported. Potential applications of thismaterial are also addressed.

  12. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  13. A pneumatic sample changer for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Massoni, C.J.; Fones, R.V.; Simon, F.O.

    1973-01-01

    A gravity-feed, pneumatic-ejection sample changer has been developed. The changer is suitable for both flat and well-type detectors and permits the continuous use of gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment 24 h a day, 7 days a week. The electronic circuitry has a fail-safe feature which stops the operation of the changer if a malfunction occurs. ?? 1973 The American Institute of Physics.

  14. BATSE spectroscopy catalog of bright gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Fantasia, Stephan F.; Palmer, David; Cline, Thomas L.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegar, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents comprehensive results on the spectra of 30 bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs) as observed by the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The data selection was strict in including only spectra that are of high reliability for continuum shape studies. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog presents fluences, model fits (for five spectral models for three energy ranges), and photon spectra in a standard manner for each burst. Complete information is provided to describe the data selection and analysis procedures. The catalog results are also presented in electronic format (from the Compton Observatory Science Support Center) and CD-ROM format (AAS CD-ROM series, Vol. 2). These electronic formats also present the count spectra and detector response matrices so as to allow for independent study and fitting by researchers outside the BATSE Team. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog complements the catalog from BATSE Large Area Detector (LAD) data by Fishman et al. (1994).

  15. Miniaturization in x ray and gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wang, Yuzhong J.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents advances in two new sensor technologies and a miniaturized associated electronics technology which, when combined, can allow for very significant miniaturization and for the reduction of weight and power consumption in x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems: (1) Mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray technology, which allows for the first time the construction of truly portable, high-energy resolution, non-cryogenic x-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analyzer systems, with parameters approaching those of laboratory quality cryogenic instruments; (2) the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD), which is a solid-state light sensitive device with internal amplification, capable of uniquely replacing the vacuum photomultiplier tube in scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer applications, and offering substantial improvements in size, ruggedness, low power operation and energy resolution; and (3) miniaturized (hybridized) low noise, low power amplification and processing electronics, which take full advantage of the favorable properties of these new sensors and allow for the design and fabrication of advanced, highly miniaturized x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems. The paper also presents experimental results and examples of spectrometric systems currently under construction. The directions for future developments are discussed.

  16. CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital gamma ray spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Fuller, K. R.; Storms, S. A.; Soldner, S. A.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Browne, M. C.; Moss, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    We present the design and analysis of a new gamma ray spectrometer for planetary science that uses an array of CdZnTe detectors to achieve the detection efficiency needed for orbital measurements. The use of CdZnTe will provide significantly improved pulse height resolution relative to scintillation-based detectors, with commensurate improvement in the accuracy of elemental abundances determined by gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. The spectrometer can be flown either on the instrument deck of the spacecraft or on a boom. For deck-mounted systems, a BGO anticoincidence shield is included in the design to suppress the response of the CdZnTe detector to gamma rays that originate in the spacecraft. The BGO shield also serves as a backup spectrometer, providing heritage from earlier planetary science missions and reducing the risk associated with the implementation of new technology.

  17. Atmospheric measurements at Mars via gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Albert E.; Haines, Eldon L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes three methods for measuring the Martian atmosphere using gamma ray spectroscopy. One method determines atmospheric thickness based on the energy-dependent differential attenuation of gamma-ray line pairs from a common element. Another makes a direct determination based on measurements of the line flux generated in the atmosphere, requires knowledge of the concentration of the component being used. The third, which makes use of a single line emitted from the surface where its flux can be established. The effects of stratigraphy on the differential attenuation method are studied, and calculations are reported which show that the measurement of atmospheric argon will be a sensitive indicator of the atmospheric fractionation accompanying CO2 precipitation in south polar regions.

  18. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  19. Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Norbert Pietralla

    2006-03-29

    The research project ''Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Stability'' with sponsor ID ''DE-FG02-04ER41334'' started late-summer 2004 and aims at the investigation of highly excited low-spin states of selected key-nuclei in the vicinity of the particle separation threshold by means of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in electromagnetic excitation reactions. This work addresses nuclear structures with excitation energies close to the binding energy or highly excited off-yrast states in accordance with the NSAC milestones. In 2005 the program was extended towards additional use of virtual photons and theoretical description of the low-lying collective excitations in the well deformed nuclei.

  20. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, R. S.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides) was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  1. Gamma ray spectroscopy and timing using LSO and PIN photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Melcher, C.L.; Manente, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    The high density, high light output, and short decay time of LSO (lutetium orthosilicate, Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce) make it an attractive scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy. The low cost, small size, high quantum efficiency, and ruggedness of silicon photodiodes make them attractive photodetectors for this same application, although their high noise (Compared to a photomultiplier tube) reduces their appeal. In this work the authors measure the gamma ray energy resolution, timing accuracy, and conversion factor from gamma energy to number of electron-hole pairs produced with a 3 x 3 x 22 mm{sup 3} LSO scintillator crystal read out with a 3 x 3 mm{sup 2} silicon PIN photodiode. When the detector is excited with 511 keV photons, a photopeak centered at 1,940 e{sup {minus}} with 149 keV fwhm is observed and a timing signal with 35 ns fwhm jitter is produced. When the detector is excited with 1,275 keV photons, a photopeak centered at 4,910 e{sup {minus}} with 149 keV fwhm is observed and a timing signal with 25 ns fwhm jitter is produced. While these performance measures are inferior to those obtained with photomultiplier tubes, they are acceptable for some applications.

  2. Shielding concepts for low-background proportional counter arrays in surface laboratories.

    PubMed

    Aalseth, C E; Humble, P H; Mace, E K; Orrell, J L; Seifert, A; Williams, R M

    2016-02-01

    Development of ultra low background gas proportional counters has made the contribution from naturally occurring radioactive isotopes - primarily α and β activity in the uranium and thorium decay chains - inconsequential to instrumental sensitivity levels when measurements are performed in above ground surface laboratories. Simple lead shielding is enough to mitigate against gamma rays as gas proportional counters are already relatively insensitive to naturally occurring gamma radiation. The dominant background in these surface laboratory measurements using ultra low background gas proportional counters is due to cosmic ray generated muons, neutrons, and protons. Studies of measurements with ultra low background gas proportional counters in surface and underground laboratories as well as radiation transport Monte Carlo simulations suggest a preferred conceptual design to achieve the highest possible sensitivity from an array of low background gas proportional counters when operated in a surface laboratory. The basis for a low background gas proportional counter array and the preferred shielding configuration is reported, especially in relation to measurements of radioactive gases having low energy decays such as (37)Ar. PMID:26720259

  3. Empirical Correction of Crosstalk in a Low-Background Germanium γ–γ Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Keillor, Martin E.; Erikson, Luke E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Mizouni, Leila K.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Seifert, Allen; Stavenger, Timothy J.

    2013-05-01

    ABSTRACT The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is currently developing a custom software suite capable of automating many of the tasks required to accurately analyze coincident signals within gamma spectrometer arrays. During the course of this work, significant crosstalk was identified in the energy determination for spectra collected with a new low-background intrinsic germanium (HPGe) array at PNNL. The HPGe array is designed for high detection efficiency, ultra-low-background performance, and sensitive gamma gamma coincidence detection. The first half of the array, a single cryostat containing 7 HPGe crystals, was recently installed into a new shallow underground laboratory facility. This update will present a brief review of the germanium array, describe the observed crosstalk, and present a straight-forward empirical correction that significantly reduces the impact of this crosstalk on the spectroscopic performance of the system.

  4. High-spin. gamma. -ray spectroscopy: past successes, future hopes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.

    1983-04-01

    Nuclei can carry angular momentum by aligning individual particles along the rotation axis or by rotation of a deformed nucleus as a whole. The interweaving of these modes leads to a variety of behavior that is just beginning to be observed and explained. The discrete ..gamma..-ray studies have led to a new backbending spectroscopy, which is telling us about the details of particle alignments and monopole and quadrupole pairing. The high-spin continuum studies, as yet less well developed, are indicating changes in shape and structure, as well as particle alignments from higher shells. New developments in detector systems and in theory promise much more detailed comparisons of experiment and theory and consequent increase in our knowledge of nuclear behavior at high spin.

  5. Stopping Muons Study for Ultra-Low Background Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Stopping negative muons can be captured by nucleus in various materials in which neutrons and gamma rays can be produced. These energetic secondary particles can be background events for ultra-low background experiments in searching for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. The stopping negative muons captures rates in different materials have been mostly evaluated theoretically. The secondary particles in particular the energy of neutrons is not well understood for heavy elements. Experimental study of the capture rates and secondary particles is of interest of nuclear physics and rare event physics. Two plastic scintillation panels were used to create a muon detection system allowing study of stopping muons. These panels are each made of EJ200 scintillator measuring approximately 100 × 50 × 2.54 cm and attached on one side to EJ280 plastic strip measuring 2.54 × 2.54 × 50 cm. A 1'' Hamamatsu R1924A PMT is affixed to the end of each strip to collect light. The setup measures the lifetime of muons at earth's surface by detecting the time difference between stopped muons and muon decay. Data is collected for 21 hours and a mean muon lifetime of 2.02 +/- .06 microseconds is obtained. The setup will be used at Homestake to measure captures rates and secondary neutron energy spectrum. Stopping negative muons can be captured by nucleus in various materials in which neutrons and gamma rays can be produced. These energetic secondary particles can be background events for ultra-low background experiments in searching for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. The stopping negative muons captures rates in different materials have been mostly evaluated theoretically. The secondary particles in particular the energy of neutrons is not well understood for heavy elements. Experimental study of the capture rates and secondary particles is of interest of nuclear physics and rare event physics. Two plastic scintillation panels were used to create a muon

  6. Determination of plutonium isotopic composition by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, T.E.; Hsue, S.T.; Parker, J.L.; Johnson, S.S.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss the general approach, computerized data analysis methods, and results of measurements used to determine the isotopic composition of plutonium by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The simple techniques are designed to be applicable to samples of arbitrary size, geometry, age, chemical, and isotopic composition. The combination of the gamma spectroscopic measurement of isotopic composition coupled with calorimetric measurement of total sample power is shown to give a totally nondestructive determination of sample plutonium mass with a precision of 0.6% for 1000-g samples of PuO/sub 2/ with 12% /sup 240/Pu content. The precision of isotopic measurements depends upon many factors, including sample size, sample geometry, and isotopic content. Typical ranges are found to be /sup 238/Pu, 1 to 10%; /sup 239/Pu, 0.1 to 0.5%; /sup 240/Pu, 2 to 5%; /sup 241/Pu, 0.3 to 0.7%; /sup 242/Pu (determined by isotopic correlation); and /sup 241/Am, 0.2 to 10%.

  7. Pileup recovery algorithms for digital gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, I. I.; El Tokhy, M. S.; Konber, H. A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents algorithms for overcoming a common problem of gamma ray spectroscopy, namely the peak pileup recovery problem. Three different approaches are studied and evaluated within a spectroscopy system. The algorithms are evaluated by the means of parameters error and fitting error calculations. The first approach is a direct search based on Nelder-Mead technique without any derivatives in order to find the local minimum points. A Gaussian shape in conjunction with the peak height and its position of each pulse are used to construct the pulse. So, the main pulse parameters such as peak amplitude, position and width can be determined. The second algorithm is based on the nonlinear least square method. In this paper another technique is tried. This technique which is proposed as third algorithm is based on a maximum peak search method combined with the first derivative method to determine peak position of each pulse. Comparison among these approaches is conducted in terms of parameters errors. The pulse parameters have been calculated and compared with the actual one. The second approach shows the best accuracy, for determining peak height and position, but the width parameter scored the highest error.

  8. Bismuth-Loaded Polymer Scintillators for Gamma Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, B L; Cherepy, N J; Sturm, B W; Sanner, R D; Dai, Z; Payne, S A

    2011-04-11

    We synthesize a series of polyvinylcarbazole monoliths containing varying loadings of triphenyl bismuth as a high-Z dopant and varying fluors, either organic or organometallic, in order to study their use as scintillators capable of gamma ray spectroscopy. A trend of increasing bismuth loading resulting in a better-resolved photopeak is observed. For PVK parts with no fluor or a standard organic fluor, diphenylanthracene, increasing bismuth loading results in decreasing light yield while with samples 1 or 3 % by weight of the spin-orbit coupling organometallic fluor FIrpic, which emits light from both singlet and triple excitons, show increasing light yield with increasing bismuth loading. Our best performing PVK/ BiPh{sub 3}/FIrpic scintillator with 40 wt % BiPh3 and 3 wt % FIrpic has an emission maximum of 500 nm, a light yield of {approx}30,000 photons/MeV, and energy resolution better than 7% FWHM at 662 keV. Replacing the Ir complex with an equal weight of diphenylanthracene produces a sample with a light yield of {approx}6,000 photons/MeV, with an emission maximum at 420 nm and energy resolution of 9% at 662 keV. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the BiPh{sub 3} forms small clusters of approximately 5 nm diameter.

  9. Strontium Iodide Instrument Development for Gamma Spectroscopy and Radioisotope Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, P; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Swanberg, E.; Nelson, K.; Thelin, P; Fisher, S E; Hunter, Steve; Wihl, B; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Momayezi, M; Stevens, K; Randles, M H; Solodovnikov, D

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (>80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z=49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5 and 2 diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

  10. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  11. Strontium iodide instrument development for gamma spectroscopy and radioisotope identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P. R.; Cherepy, N. J.; Payne, S. A.; Swanberg, E. L.; Nelson, K. E.; Thelin, P. A.; Fisher, S. E.; Hunter, S.; Wihl, B. M.; Shah, K. S.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, A.; Boatner, L. A.; Momayezi, M.; Stevens, K. T.; Randles, M. H.; Solodovnikov, D.

    2014-09-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu2+), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu2+) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (<80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z = 49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5" and 2" diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

  12. Ultra-low background measurement capabilities at SNOLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Ian

    2016-05-01

    Experiments currently searching for dark matter, studying properties of neutrinos or searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay require very low levels of radioactive backgrounds both in their own construction materials and in the surrounding environment. These low background levels are required so that the current generation of experiments can achieve the required sensitivities for their searches. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to directly measure these radioactive backgrounds. This paper will describe SNOLAB’s ultra-low background germanium detectors, describe the data analysis techniques used and present results from these detectors. A description of SNOLAB’s alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be presented and the underground low background counting laboratory currently under construction at SNOLAB will be presented.

  13. Low-background temperature sensors fabricated on parylene substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, A.; Loach, J. C.; Barton, P. J.; Larsen, J. T.; Poon, A. W. P.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature sensors fabricated from ultra-low radioactivity materials have been developed for low-background experiments searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay and the interactions of WIMP dark matter. The sensors consist of electrical traces photolithographically-patterned onto substrates of vapor-deposited parylene. They are demonstrated to function as expected, to do so reliably and robustly, and to be highly radio-pure. This work is a proof-of-concept study of a technology that can be applied to broad class of electronic circuits used in low-background experiments.

  14. Neutron Spallation Measurements And Impacts On Low Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2014-09-01

    Ultra-low background experiments, such as neutrinoless double beta decay, carried out deep underground to escape cosmic ray backgrounds can nonetheless be limited in sensitivity by cosmogenically induced signals. This limit can either be produced directly during operation from cosmic muon events in the detector volume, or can be produced by radioactive decay of cosmogenically generated radionuclides created while the detector materials were above ground. An accurate knowledge of the production of the latter source of background is of paramount importance in order to be able to interpret the results of low-background experiments.

  15. Design of a Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for a Shallow Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrell, John; Aalseth, Craig; Bernacki, Bruce; Douglas, Matt; Erchinger, Jennifer; Fuller, Erin; Keillor, Martin; Morley, Shannon; Mullen, Crystal; Panisko, Mark; Shaff, Sarah; Warren, Glen; Wright, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates a 35-meter water-equivalent overburden, shallow underground laboratory for measuring low-concentration radioactive isotopes in environmental samples collected. A low-background liquid scintillation counter is under development. Liquid scintillation counting is useful for beta-emitting isotopes without (or low) gamma ray yields. The high-efficiency beta detection in a liquid scintillation cocktail coupled with the low-background environment of a shield located in a clean underground laboratory provides for increased-sensitivity measurements to a range of isotopes. Benchmarked simulations have evaluated the shield design requirements to assess the background rate achievable. Assay of shield construction materials provides the basis for the shield design development. The low background design is informed by efforts in experimental design of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, direct detection dark matter experiments, and low energy neutrino detection experiments. In this vein a background budget for the instrument is presented with attention to low background methods directed toward applications of nuclear measurements.

  16. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratary test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  17. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratory test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  18. Gamma-ray/neutron spectroscopy from the Mars observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Squyres, S. W.; Evans, L. G.; Boynton, W. V.

    1987-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) experiment on Mars Observer will measure gamma rays and neutrons that escape from Mars. The intensities of gamma-ray lines and of the thermal and epithermal neutrons can be used to study many problems related to Martian volcanism and volatiles. The results of theoretical calculations for the production and transport of gamma rays and neutrons indicate that the GRS should be able to determine the abundances of many elements and the amounts and stratigraphy of H2O and CO2 on and in the top meter of the Martian surface. Design considerations of the GRS are discussed.

  19. Abundances from solar-flare gamma-ray line spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Ramaty, R.; Forrest, D. J.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1985-01-01

    Elemental abundances of the ambient gas at the site of gamma ray line production inthe solar atmosphere are deduced using gamma ray line observations from a solar flare. The resultant abundances are different from local galactic abundances which are thought to be similar to photospheric abundances.

  20. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  1. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-08-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  2. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy. [for element distribution over planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies escaping from a planetary surface can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The fluxes of the more intense gamma ray lines emitted from 32 elements have been calculated using current nuclear data and existing models for the source processes. The fluxes emitted from a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 292 gamma ray lines. Detection sensitivities for various elements are examined and applications of gamma ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar system objects are discussed.

  3. Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors for Low Background Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Singh, A.; Liu, J. K.; Luong, E. M.; Mumolo, J. M.; McKelvey, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    High performance long-wavelength GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As quantum well infrared photodetectors for low background applications have been demonstrated. This is the first theoretical analysis of quantum well infrared photodetectors for low background applications and the detectivity D* of 6 x 10(exp 13) cm.square root of Hz/W has been achieved at T = 40 K with 2 x 10(exp 9) photons/cm2/sec background. In addition, this paper describes the demonstration of mid-wavelength/long-wavelength dualband quantum well infrared photodetectors and long-wavelength/very long-wavelength dualband quantum well infrared photodetectors in 4-26 micrometers wavelength region.

  4. Low background HPGe spectrometer in investigations of 2β decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rukhadze, Ekaterina [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horska 3a Collaboration: OBELIX Collaboration; TGV Collaboration; SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    The low background high sensitive HPGe spectrometer called OBELIX is briefly described. The calibration measurements using {sup 152}Eu, {sup 133}Ba and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} sources in different geometries, the obtained efficiency curves for OBELIX HPGe detector, the results of measurements of radioactivity of the NEMO-3 sources ({sup 100}Mo, {sup 150}Nd) as well as future plans for OBELIX detector (e.g. 0νEC/EC decay of {sup 106}Cd) are presented.

  5. Design Considerations for Large Mass Ultra-Low Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-07-01

    Summary The objective of this document is to present the designers of the next generation of large-mass, ultra-low background experiments with lessons learned and design strategies from previous experimental work. Design issues divided by topic into mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements are addressed. Large mass low-background experiments have been recognized by the scientific community as appropriate tools to aid in the refinement of the standard model. The design of these experiments is very costly and a rigorous engineering review is required for their success. The extreme conditions that the components of the experiment must withstand (heavy shielding, vacuum/pressure and temperature gradients), in combination with unprecedented noise levels, necessitate engineering guidance to support quality construction and safe operating conditions. Physical properties and analytical results of typical construction materials are presented. Design considerations for achieving ultra-low-noise data acquisition systems are addressed. Five large-mass, low-background conceptual designs for the one-tonne scale germanium experiment are proposed and analyzed. The result is a series of recommendations for future experiments engineering and for the Majorana simulation task group to evaluate the different design approaches.

  6. GeMSE: A new low-background facility for meteorite and material screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivers, M. V.; Hofmann, B. A.; Rosén, Å. V.; Schumann, M.

    2015-08-01

    We are currently setting up a facility for low-background gamma-ray spectrometry based on a HPGe detector. It is dedicated to material screening for the XENON and DARWIN dark matter projects as well as to the characterization of meteorites. The detector will be installed in a medium depth (˜620 m.w.e.) underground laboratory in Switzerland with several layers of shielding and an active muon-veto. The GeMSE facility will be operational by fall 2015 with an expected background rate of ˜250 counts/day (100-2700 keV).

  7. Sub-Kelvin Thermal Conductivity and Radioactivity of Some Useful Materials in Low Background Cryogenic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellaris, N.; Daal, M.; Epland, M.; Pepin, M.; Kamaev, O.; Cushman, P.; Kramer, E.; Sadoulet, B.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Golwala, S.; Runyan, M.

    2014-08-01

    We present measurements of the thermal conductivity between 0.05 and 1 K, and radioactive contamination levels, for some thermally isolating materials. TIMET Ti 15-3-3-3, Mersen grade 2020 graphite, Vespel SP-1, Vespel SP-22, Vespel SCP-5000, Vespel SCP-5050, Graphlite CFRP, and a Kapton/epoxy composite are all investigated. Thermal conductivities were measured using a single-heater longitudinal heat flow method. Material radioactivity was determined for the materials at a low background counting facility using a high-purity gamma detector and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Gamma ray production cross section from energetic neutron inelastic scattering for methodical improvements in planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, C.M.; Gearhart, R.; Sanii, B.; Englert, P.A.J.; Drake, D.M.; Reedy, R.C.

    1991-12-31

    Planetary Gamma ray spectroscopy can be used to chemically analyze the top soil from planets in future planetary missions. The production from inelastic neutron interaction plays an effective role in the determination on the C and H at the surface. The gamma ray production cross section from the strongest lines excited in the neutron bombardment of Fe have been measured by the use of a time analyzed quasi-mono-energetic neutron beam and a high purity germanium detector. The results from En=6.5, 32, 43, and 65 MeV are presented.

  9. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kehl, S.R.; Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.

    1995-09-01

    From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA`s radiochemistry department were accepted.

  10. CASCADES: An Ultra-Low-Background Germanium Crystal Array at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keillor, M. E.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J. E.; Glasgow, B. D.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Seifert, A.; Stavenger, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    State-of-the-art treaty verification techniques, environmental surveillance, and physics experiments require increased sensitivity for detecting and quantifying radionuclides of interest. This can be accomplished with new detector designs that establish high detection efficiency and reduced instrument backgrounds. Current research is producing an intrinsic germanium (HPGe) array designed for high detection efficiency, ultra-low-background performance, and sensitive γ—γ coincidence detection. The system design is optimized to accommodate filter paper samples, e.g. samples collected by the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer. The system will provide high sensitivity for weak collections on atmospheric filter samples (e.g.<105 fissions) as well as offering the potential to gather additional information from higher activity filters using gamma cascade coincidence detection. The first of two HPGe crystal arrays in ultra-low-background vacuum cryostats has been assembled, with the second in progress. Traditional methods for constructing ultra-low-background detectors were followed, including use of materials known to be low in radioactive contaminants, use of ultra-pure reagents, and clean room assembly. The cryostat is constructed mainly from copper electroformed into near-final geometry at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Details of the detector assembly and initial background and spectroscopic measurement results are presented; also a description of the custom analysis package used by this project is given.

  11. Development of a low background liquid scintillation counter for a shallow underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Russell O.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-08-20

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has recently opened a shallow underground laboratory intended for measurement of lowconcentration levels of radioactive isotopes in samples collected from the environment. The development of a low-background liquid scintillation counter is currently underway to further augment the measurement capabilities within this underground laboratory. Liquid scintillation counting is especially useful for measuring charged particle (e.g., B, a) emitting isotopes with no (orvery weak) gamma-ray yields. The combination of high-efficiency detection of charged particle emission in a liquid scintillation cocktail coupled with the low-background environment of an appropriately-designed shield located in a clean underground laboratory provides the opportunity for increased-sensitivity measurements of a range of isotopes. To take advantage of the 35-meter water-equivalent overburden of the underground laboratory, a series of simulations have evaluated the instrumental shield design requirements to assess the possible background rate achievable. This report presents the design and background evaluation for a shallow underground, low background liquid scintillation counter design for sample measurements.

  12. Development of a low background liquid scintillation counter for a shallow underground laboratory.

    PubMed

    Erchinger, J L; Aalseth, C E; Bernacki, B E; Douglas, M; Fuller, E S; Keillor, M E; Morley, S M; Mullen, C A; Orrell, J L; Panisko, M E; Warren, G A; Williams, R O; Wright, M E

    2015-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has recently opened a shallow underground laboratory intended for measurement of low-concentration levels of radioactive isotopes in samples collected from the environment. The development of a low-background liquid scintillation counter is currently underway to further augment the measurement capabilities within this underground laboratory. Liquid scintillation counting is especially useful for measuring charged particle (e.g., β and α) emitting isotopes with no (or very weak) gamma-ray yields. The combination of high-efficiency detection of charged particle emission in a liquid scintillation cocktail coupled with the low-background environment of an appropriately designed shield located in a clean underground laboratory provides the opportunity for increased-sensitivity measurements of a range of isotopes. To take advantage of the 35m-water-equivalent overburden of the underground laboratory, a series of simulations have evaluated the scintillation counter's shield design requirements to assess the possible background rate achievable. This report presents the design and background evaluation for a shallow underground, low background liquid scintillation counter design for sample measurements. PMID:26334781

  13. Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2011-06-01

    Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

  14. Material Analysis/Characterization for Ultra-Low Background Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Ben

    For the discovery of rare event physics processes related to new physics beyond the Standard Model, the next generation of physics experiments requires to be built underground. For instance, the Large Underground Xenon experiment and MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, both located underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), require an ultra-low background rate for their respective discovery of Dark Matter and the Majorana particle. The next generation of detectors designated for these ultra-low background experiments require a complete understanding of the materials used in the experiment to achieve the detection sensitivity below the current limits. Experimental limits can be seen in ton scale detector designs where ultrapure materials are needed for detector performance, suppression of background radiation, and electronic noise. This thesis studies the three main aspects of ultra-low background experiments. First, an investigation of the mechanical design constraints for SURF underground physics experiments is performed. Second, a study into each detector's characterization and performance is described for the SURF experiments. Lastly, an optimization of data analysis algorithm for rare event physics is discussed. We describe the techniques used for the above three investigations in detail. First, the test of the mechanical design constraints is investigated using an adaptive sample holder capable of testing sample materials of gas, liquid or solid state. Second, the characterization of materials is studied with a design of a Capacitance-Voltage Measurement system. Lastly, the optimization of data analysis algorithm for small signals is performed by a detailed data analysis to verify isotopic enrichment obtained from a novel isotope separation method of molecules of CO2.

  15. Low background techniques for the Borexino nylon vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Pocar, Andrea

    2005-09-08

    Borexino is an organic liquid scintillator underground detector for low energy solar neutrinos. The experiment has to satisfy extremely stringent low background requirements. The thin nylon spherical scintillator containment vessel has to meet cleanliness and low radioactivity levels second only, within the detector, to the scintillator itself. Overall, the background from the vessel in the fiducial volume of the detector must be kept at the level of one event per day or better. The requirements, design choices, results from laboratory tests, and fabrication techniques that have been adopted to meet this goal are presented. Details of the precautions taken during the installation of the vessels inside the Borexino detector are also discussed.

  16. LWIR detector requirements for low-background space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluccia, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    Detection of cold bodies (200 to 300 K) against space backgrounds has many important applications, both military and non-military. The detector performance and design characteristics required to support low-background applications are discussed, with particular emphasis on those characteristics required for space surveillance. The status of existing detector technologies under active development for these applications is also discussed. In order to play a role in future systems, new, potentially competing detector technologies such as multiple quantum well detectors must not only meet system-derived requirements, but also offer distinct performance or other advantages over these incumbent technologies.

  17. Experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jehyun; Hwang, Seho; Kim, Jongman; Won, Byeongho

    2015-03-10

    This article discusses experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system. Considering the size of borehole sonde, we customize 2 x 2 inches inorganic scintillators and the system including high voltage, preamplifier, amplifier and multichannel analyzer (MCA). The calibration chart is made by test using standard radioactive sources so that the measured count rates are expressed by energy spectrum. Optimum high-voltage supplies and the measurement parameters of each detector are set up by experimental investigation. Also, the responses of scintillation detectors have been examined by analysis according to the distance between source and detector. Because gamma spectroscopy well logging needs broad spectrum, high sensitivity and resolution, the energy resolution and sensitivity as a function of gamma ray energy are investigated by analyzing the gamma ray activities of the radioactive sources.

  18. Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 ..mu..g of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for /sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Effects of material mixing on planetary gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, Steven W.; Evans, Larry G.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of mixing of rocks and soil on the gamma-ray signal emitted by Martian surface was investigated with special consideration given to the effect of the geometry of mixing. It is shown that, under certain circumstances, this scale can have a significant effect on the gamma-ray spectrum observed. The techniques that can be used to address this problem are discussed, showing that, using these techniques, rock compositions can be inferred from the signal produced by a rock-soil mixtures of unknown rock concentration and mixing geometry.

  20. A simple technique for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy using plastic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, Akhilesh P.; Rudra, Sharmili; Neog, Himangshu; Biswas, S.; Mahapatra, S.; Mohanty, B.; Samal, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    A new and simple technique has been developed using plastic scintillator detectors for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy without single channel analyzer (SCA) or multichannel analyzer (MCA). In these experiments only a leading edge discriminator (LED) and NIM scalers have been used. Energy calibration of gamma spectra in plastic scintillators has been done using Co60 and Cs137 sources. The details of the experimental technique, analysis procedure and experimental results have been presented in this paper.

  1. Solar neon abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy and He-3-rich particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Ramaty, R.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    Ambient solar atmospheric abundances derived from gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared with observations of solar energetic particles. Agreement is found between the gamma-ray-derived Ne/O ratio and the corresponding mean ratio for He-3-rich flares. Both of these values are significantly higher than inferred coronal Ne/O ratios. It is suggested that the mean Ne/O ratio in He-3-rich flares reflects the composition of the flare plasma rather than the acceleration process.

  2. The ultra-pure Ti for the low background experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chepurnov, Alexander; Nisi, Stefano; Vacri, Maria Laura di; Suvorov, Yury

    2013-08-08

    The constant increase in mass of the cryostats, containment tanks, passive shielding and other mechanical elements of the modern low background detectors put more stringent requirements on their radiopurity levels. In general they have to be ∼1 mBq/kg of {sup 238}U/{sup 232}Th or lower, which means that mass concentration should be < 0.1 ppb for {sup 238}U and < 0.25 ppb for {sup 232}Th. Traditionally, the field relies on specially selected low background stainless steel, electrochemical oxygen-free copper, or a combination of the two. However, the most promising material in terms of physical and mechanical properties is Titanium. Our study of various Ti samples show that the levels of contaminations of commercially available industrial titanium can varies from 0.2 to 100 mBq/kg for U/Th. Therefore, the only possible way to obtain the material with a low and controlled level of contamination is to develop (or improve the existing) the production technology and to build the dedicated manufactory line.

  3. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry in the environment using dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kim, Chang-Jong; Chung, Kun Ho; Choi, Hee-Yeoul; Lee, Wanno; Kang, Mun Ja; Park, Sang Tae

    2016-02-01

    In order to expand the application of dose rate spectroscopy to the environment, in situ gamma-ray spectrometry was first conducted at a height of 1 m above the ground to calculate the ambient dose rate and individual dose rate at that height, as well as the radioactivity in the soil layer for the detected gamma nuclides from the dose rate spectroscopy. The reliable results could be obtained by introducing the angular correction factor to correct the G-factor with respect to incident photons distributed in a certain range of angles. The intercomparison results of radioactivity using ISOCS software, an analysis of a sample taken from the soil around a detector, and dose rate spectroscopy had a difference of <20% for 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 212Bi, 208Tl, and 40K, except for 212Pb with low-energy photons, that is, <300 keV. In addition, the drawback of using dose rate spectroscopy, that is, all gamma rays from a nuclide should be identified to accurately assess the individual dose rate, was overcome by adopting the concept of contribution ratio of the key gamma ray to the individual dose rate of a nuclide, so that it could be accurately calculated by identifying only a key gamma ray from a nuclide.

  4. Proton range verification through prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verburg, Joost M.; Seco, Joao

    2014-12-01

    We present an experimental study of a novel method to verify the range of proton therapy beams. Differential cross sections were measured for 15 prompt gamma-ray lines from proton-nuclear interactions with 12C and 16O at proton energies up to 150 MeV. These cross sections were used to model discrete prompt gamma-ray emissions along proton pencil-beams. By fitting detected prompt gamma-ray counts to these models, we simultaneously determined the beam range and the oxygen and carbon concentration of the irradiated matter. The performance of the method was assessed in two phantoms with different elemental concentrations, using a small scale prototype detector. Based on five pencil-beams with different ranges delivering 5 × 108 protons and without prior knowledge of the elemental composition at the measurement point, the absolute range was determined with a standard deviation of 1.0-1.4 mm. Relative range shifts at the same dose level were detected with a standard deviation of 0.3-0.5 mm. The determined oxygen and carbon concentrations also agreed well with the actual values. These results show that quantitative prompt gamma-ray measurements enable knowledge of nuclear reaction cross sections to be used for precise proton range verification in the presence of tissue with an unknown composition.

  5. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich products of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thick-target {gamma}{gamma} coincidence techniques are being used to explore the spectroscopy of otherwise hard-to-reach neutron-rich products of deep-inelastic heavy ion reactions. Extensive {gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements were performed at ATLAS using pulsed beams of {sup 80}Se, {sup 136}Xe, and {sup 238}U on lead-backed {sup 122,124}Sn targets with energies 10-15% above the Coulomb barrier. Gamma-ray coincidence intensities were used to map out yield distributions with A and Z for even-even product nuclei around the target and around the projectile. The main features of the yield patterns are understandable in terms of N/Z equilibration. We had the most success in studying the decays of yrast isomers. Thus far, more than thirty new {mu}s isomers in the Z = 50 region were found and characterized. Making isotopic assignments for previously unknown {gamma}-ray cascades proves to be one of the biggest problems. Our assignments were based (a) on rare overlaps with radioactivity data, (b) on the relative yields with different beams, and (c) on observed cross-coincidences between {gamma} rays from light and heavy reaction partners. However, the primary products of deep inelastic collisions often are sufficiently excited for subsequent neutron evaporation, so {gamma}{gamma} cross-coincidence results require careful interpretation.

  6. Instrument Development and Gamma Spectroscopy with Strontium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Sturm, Benjamin; Drury, Owen; O’Neal, S P; Thelin, P; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo; Momayezi, M; Hurst, B.; Wiggen, B.; Bhattacharya, P.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine

    2012-01-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu), involves advances in crystal growth, optics and readout methodology for prototype detectors. We have demonstrated energy resolution of 3% at 662 keV for a 26 cm3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, which is comparable to the performance obtained with Cerium-doped Lanthanum Bromide of equivalent size. Compared to standard analog readout, use of a digital readout method allows improved energy resolution to be obtained with large-volume SrI2(Eu) crystals. Comparative gamma spectra acquired with LaBr3(Ce) and NaI(Tl) quantitatively depict the value of the high resolution and low intrinsic radioactivity of SrI2(Eu) in discriminating closely spaced gamma lines for radioisotope identification applications.

  7. Radiation detection system for portable gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2006-06-20

    A portable gamma ray detection apparatus having a gamma ray detector encapsulated by a compact isolation structure having at least two volumetrically-nested enclosures where at least one is a thermal shield. The enclosures are suspension-mounted to each other to successively encapsulate the detector without structural penetrations through the thermal shields. A low power cooler is also provided capable of cooling the detector to cryogenic temperatures without consuming cryogens, due to the heat load reduction by the isolation structure and the reduction in the power requirements of the cooler. The apparatus also includes a lightweight portable power source for supplying power to the apparatus, including to the cooler and the processing means, and reducing the weight of the apparatus to enable handheld operation or toting on a user's person.

  8. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Future role of scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurfess, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The future role of conventional scintillation detector telescopes for line gamma-ray astronomy is discussed. Although the energy resolution of the germanium detectors now being used by several groups is clearly desirable, the larger effective areas and higher efficiencies available with scintillation detectors is advantageous for many observations. This is particularly true for those observations of astrophysical phenomena where significant line broadening is expected.

  9. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Solar gamma ray astronomy on solar maximum mission. [experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SMM gamma ray experiment and the important scientific capabilities of the instrument are discussed. The flare size detectable as a function of spectrum integration time was studied. A preliminary estimate indicates that a solar gamma ray line at 4.4 MeV one-fifth the intensity of that believed to have been emitted on 4 August 1972 can be detected in approximately 1000 sec with a confidence level of 99%.

  10. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 197}At

    SciTech Connect

    Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Baeck, T.; Hadinia, B.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Sandzelius, M.; Wyss, R.; Jakobsson, U.; Uusitalo, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Juutinen, S.; Julin, R.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.

    2008-10-15

    Excited states of the extremely neutron-deficient nucleus {sup 197}At have been studied in an in-beam experiment using the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 118}Sn({sup 82}Kr,p2n){sup 197}At. {gamma} rays belonging to {sup 197}At feeding the I{sup {pi}}=(9/2{sup -}) ground state, as well as {gamma} rays feeding the 311-keV I{sup {pi}}=(13/2{sup +}) isomer, decaying via the emission of {gamma} rays, and the 52-keV I{sup {pi}}=(1/2{sup +}){alpha}-decaying isomer have been identified using the recoil-{alpha}-decay tagging technique. Total Routhian surface calculations predict a near-spherical shape for the (9/2{sup -}) ground state and oblate shapes with {beta}{sub 2} around -0.2 for the (1/2{sup +}) and the (13/2{sup +}) states. These predictions agree with our experimental findings.

  11. High resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy: The first 85 years

    SciTech Connect

    Deslattes, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear {gamma} rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford's laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). The authors perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and interatomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting {gamma}-ray wavelengths with optical wave-lengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed {gamma}-ray data to contribute to determine of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop.

  12. The BiPo low-background detector project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, R. V.

    2009-05-01

    A low-background detector designed to search for weak radioactive pollution by 208Tl and 214Bi in thin samples of a large area is described. The samples are 12-m2 source foils made of 82Se or 150Nd enriched isotopes. Such samples are planned for use in investigating neutrinoless double β decay in the SuperNEMO experiment. The principle of the detector operation is based on registering the delayed β-α coincidence from the uranium and thorium radioactive chains. The sensitivity of the detector is planned to be at the level of 208Tl < 2 μBq/kg and 214Bi < 10 μBq/kg. Alternate versions of the detector are described. The first results obtained by the prototype detector, operated in the Frejus Underground Laboratory in France, are presented.

  13. Characterization and modeling of a low background HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokania, N.; Singh, V.; Mathimalar, S.; Nanal, V.; Pal, S.; Pillay, R. G.

    2014-05-01

    A high efficiency, low background counting setup has been made at TIFR consisting of a special HPGe detector (~ 70 %) surrounded by a low activity copper+lead shield. Detailed measurements are performed with point and extended geometry sources to obtain a complete response of the detector. An effective model of the detector has been made with GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulations which agrees with experimental data within 5%. This setup will be used for qualification and selection of radio-pure materials to be used in a cryogenic bolometer for the study of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in 124Sn as well as for other rare event studies. Using this setup, radio-impurities in the rock sample from India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) site have been estimated.

  14. Radiation shielding for underground low-background experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D. Y.; Harrison, P. F.; Morgan, B.; Ramachers, Y.

    2006-11-17

    The design task of creating an efficient radiation shield for the new COBRA double-beta decay experiment led to a comprehensive study of commercially available shielding materials. The aim was to find the most efficient combination of materials under the constraints of an extreme low-background experiment operating in a typical underground laboratory. All existing shield configurations for this type of experiment have been found to perform sub-optimally in comparison to the class of multilayered configurations proposed in this study. The method used here to create a specific shield configuration should yield a close to optimal result when applied to any experiment utilising a radiation shield. In particular, the survey of single material response to a given radiation source turns out to give a guideline for the construction of efficient multilayer shields. Note that these proceedings are a short version of a recently submitted, more detailed discussion.

  15. Low-spin structure of 156Dy through gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Caprio, M.A.; Zamfir, N.V.; Casten, R.F.; Barton, C.J.; Beausang, C.W.; Cooper, J.R.; Hecht, A.A.; Kruecken, R.; Newman, H.; Novak, J.R.; Pietralla, N.; Wolf, A.; Zyromski, K.E.

    2002-11-27

    Excited states of 156Dy were populated by beta decay and studied through gamma-ray spectroscopy. Extensive data led to improved information of the electromagnetic properties of low-spin states and to a substantially revised level scheme. The results are compared to those of other N=90 isotones and to predictions of the X(5) dynamical symmetry.

  16. Mass measurement of 80Y by beta-gamma coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, C.J.; Brenner, D.S.; Zamfir, N.V.; Caprio, M.A.; Aprahamian, A.; Wiescher, M.C.; Beausang, C.W.; Berant, Z.; Casten, R.F.; Cooper, J.R.; Gill, R.L.; Kruecken, R.; Novak, J.R.; Pietralla, N.; Shawcross, M.; Teymurazyan, A.; Wolf, A.

    2003-03-24

    The Qec value for 80Y has been measured by beta-gamma coincidence spectroscopy. Combining this result with the adopted mass excess of the daughter 80Sr gives a mass excess of >-61376(83) keV. Results are compared with other measurements and predictions of mass formulas. Implications of this measurement are considered for the rp-process.

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy: The diffuse galactic glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of a numerical code that provides statistical models of the sky distribution of gamma-ray lines due to the production of radioactive isotopes by ongoing Galactic nucleosynthesis. We are particularly interested in quasi-steady emission from novae, supernovae, and stellar winds, but continuum radiation and transient sources must also be considered. We have made significant progress during the first half period of this project and expect the timely completion of a code that can be applied to Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) Galactic plane survey data.

  18. Development of Magnetic Microcalorimeters for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, L. N.; Hummatov, R.; Hall, J. A.; Cantor, R. C.; Boyd, S. T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Integrating the SQUIDs and sensing coils of magnetic microcalorimeters onto the same die is a promising approach for maximizing flux coupling and signal/noise. However, new challenges in microfabrication must be overcome, because the underlying SQUID devices are sensitive to chemical attack and elevated processing temperatures. In this report, we describe development and details of a microfabrication process for integrated SQUID/sensor gamma-ray magnetic microcalorimeters with electroformed gold absorbers, starting from a modified version of the STAR Cryoelectronics "Delta 1000" Josephson Junction process.

  19. Development of Magnetic Microcalorimeters for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, L. N.; Hummatov, R.; Hall, J. A.; Cantor, R. C.; Boyd, S. T. P.

    2016-07-01

    Integrating the SQUIDs and sensing coils of magnetic microcalorimeters onto the same die is a promising approach for maximizing flux coupling and signal/noise. However, new challenges in microfabrication must be overcome, because the underlying SQUID devices are sensitive to chemical attack and elevated processing temperatures. In this report, we describe development and details of a microfabrication process for integrated SQUID/sensor gamma-ray magnetic microcalorimeters with electroformed gold absorbers, starting from a modified version of the STAR Cryoelectronics "Delta 1000" Josephson Junction process.

  20. Environmental Radioactivity: Gamma Ray Spectroscopy with Germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Gargi; Beausang, Cornelius; Hughes, Richard; Tarlow, Thomas; Gell, Kristen; University of Richmond Physics Team

    2013-10-01

    A CF-1000BRL series portable Air Particle Sampler with filter paper as filter media was placed in one indoor and one outdoor location at 100 LPM flow rate on six dates under alternating rainy and warm weather conditions over the course of sixteen days in May 2013. The machine running times spanned between 6 to 69 hours. Each filter paper was then put in a germanium gamma ray detector, and the counts ranged from 93000 to 250000 seconds. The spectra obtained were analyzed by the CANBERRA Genie 2000 software, corrected using a background spectrum, and calibrated using a 20.27 kBq activity multi-nuclide source. We graphed the corrected counts (from detector analysis time)/second (from air sampler running time)/liter (from the air sampler's flow rate) of sharp, significantly big peaks corresponding to a nuclide in every sample against the sample number along with error bars. The graphs were then used to compare the samples and they showed a similar trend. The slight differences were usually due to the different running times of the air sampler. The graphs of about 22 nuclides were analyzed. We also tried to recognize the nuclei to which several gamma rays belonged that were displayed but not recognized by the Genie 2000 software.

  1. Low background counting of 222Rn, 220Rn and 219Rn with electrostatic counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, Brian; EXO-200 Collaboration; nEXO Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The radon counting technique based on electrostatic precipitation of progenies in gas followed by alpha spectroscopy has been applied to support the material selection programs of low background, neutrino and dark matter experiments with emphasis on EXO. An array of 8 counters operated by Laurentian University at SNOLAB and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant have reached the sensitivity of 10 atoms/day in the uranium, thorium and actinium chains. Hardware improvements are underway to further increase the capacity and sensitivity in support of nEXO. The radon counting technique based on electrostatic precipitation of progenies in gas followed by alpha spectroscopy has been applied to support the material selection programs of low background, neutrino and dark matter experiments with emphasis on EXO. An array of 8 counters operated by Laurentian University at SNOLAB and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant have reached the sensitivity of 10 atoms/day in the uranium, thorium and actinium chains. Hardware improvements are underway to further increase the capacity and sensitivity in support of nEXO. Supported by NSERC Project Grants ``Search for Double Beta Decay with EXO.''

  2. Instructions for calibrating gamma detectors using the Canberra-Nuclear Data Genie Gamma Spectroscopy System

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    A straight forward protocol provides a way to guide the calibration of a gamma detector for a particular geometry and material. Several programs have used the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to count a variety of large environmental samples contained in several unique geometries. The equipment and calibration requirements needed to analyze these types of samples are explained. This document describes the calibration protocol that has been developed and describes how it is used to calibrate the detectors.

  3. HIGH ENERGY DELAYED GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY FOR PLUTONIUM ASSAY OF SPENT REACTOR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, L. E.; Misner, Alex C.

    2011-07-18

    Nuclear safeguards requires accountancy of plutonium present in spent reactor fuels. Current non-destructive methods do not directly measure plutonium content but instead rely on indirect measurements that require operator declarations of the fuel history. Delayed gamma spectroscopy is one method being investigated which can overcome these limitations. Delayed gamma rays from fission depend on the isotopic fission yield of the fissile isotope, and thus can be used to fingerprint the isotopes undergoing fission. However, difficulties arise because of the intense background due to long lived fission radionuclides already present in the fuel. We report on progress on simulated measurements of the delayed gamma spectrum in the presence of this background, using neutrons from a D-T source thermalized in an interrogation chamber slipped over a fuel assembly. By focusing on delayed gammas in the 3 to 4 MeV range, the passive spectrum becomes negligible, while allowing the preferential attenuation of the passive background to acceptable levels.

  4. Achieving low backgrounds in a variety of situations

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, H.S.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Reeves, J.H.; Avignone, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    To be sufficiently interesting, a physics experiment must measure a process that is relatively rare. The process may be rare due to small cross sections, low detector mass, or low detector efficiency. In any case, the process of interest must compete with processes in the detector`s environment that are much more prolific. Although these processes may have been of interest last year, they serve only to hide signals of interest today. The most common method of background reduction is to construct a lead shield around the detector. A less common technique is to reconstruct a detector apparatus with materials with a lower specific activity. The effects of cosmic rays are also frequently reduced by using an active veto system or relocating underground. However, the judicious use of these and other techniques requires some knowledge of the vulnerability of the detector and the relative sizes of potential backgrounds. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory-University of South Carolina (PNL-USC) double beta-decay collaboration and more recently the International Germanium Experiment (IGEX) collaboration have accrued a great deal of experience with semiconductor detectors operated above ground, in shallow below-ground locations (36 m), and in several deep underground locations. The effect of low-background materials, coincidence techniques, cosmic neutrons, and ubiquitous uranium and thorium decay products will be discussed as a function of depth and specifically for above-ground experiments.

  5. Measurement techniques for characterizing and using low background germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, William H.; Wagner, Sanford E.

    1984-06-01

    An investigation has been undertaken to determine whether an order of magnitude background reduction from present typical cryostat-detector systems can be obtained through the use of low background components. In order to measure progress in this task, a standard, ten-centimeter lead shield was fitted with a five-centimeter, oxygen-free high-conductivity copper liner and a borated polyethylene neutron absorber. This reduced the contribution of uranium-238, thorium daughters, and radium daughters from the shield as seen by the detector by 1.3, 0.02, and 0.1 Bq respectively. The methodology of determining very low net photon peak areas in the presence of high continuum levels to assure maximum accuracy was verified and is presented. By these means the background activities of detectors are being measured at the -10 2 Bq per nuclide and detector component materials at the Bq per gram level, both with total uncertainties of less than 50% 1σ. The hardware and software developed is being used to measure the background activity of the detectors and for the analysis of low activity samples.

  6. Low-background tracker development for SuperNEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, James; Collaboration: SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    The SuperNEMO experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) with a target sensitivity of T{sub 1/2}(0ν) > 10{sup 26} years, corresponding to an effective neutrino mass of 50-100 meV. At its heart there is a low-background gaseous tracking detector which allows for extremely efficient background rejection and, if 0νββ is observed, may provide important insights into the mechanism via which it may be mediated. Radon inside the tracker, which can mimic rare ββ events, is one of the most dangerous backgrounds for SuperNEMO. To reach the target sensitivity the radon concentration inside the tracking volume must be < 0.15 mBq/m{sup 3}. To reach this challengingly-low level of radon, a considerable program of R and D has been undertaken. This includes automation of the tracker-wiring process, development of a dedicated setup to measure radon diffusion and a 'radon concentration line' which will be able to measure levels of radon in the μBq/m{sup 3} range.

  7. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  8. Isotopically enriched germanium detectors for astrophysical gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    1990-01-01

    A study is presented of the instrumental background in astrophysical gamma-ray spectrometers using isotopically enriched germanium detectors. Calculations show that the beta-decay background, which is the largest component between approximately 0.1 and 1.0 MeV in balloonborne and satellite spectrometers, is dominated by the activation of Ge-74. This component can be reduced by an order of magnitude using detectors enriched to more than 80 percent in (Ge-70). The predicted reduction in the total background for current balloonborne instruments is more than a factor of 1.7 between 0.2 and 1.0 MeV. For future satellite instruments, the reduction in this energy range is by more than a factor of 5.

  9. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy at the RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Doornenbal, Pieter

    2015-10-15

    At the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory stable primary beams are accelerated up to 345 MeV/u and incident on a primary target to produce secondary cocktail beams with the fragment separator BigRIPS ranging from the lightest nuclei up to the uranium region. For in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy, the secondary beam impinge on a reaction target at energies between 100 and 300 MeV/u. Reaction residues are identified with the ZeroDegree spectrometer and γ-rays detected with the NaI(Tl) based DALI2 array. This conference paper outlines the experimental setup and presents recent exemplary results.

  10. Study well-shaped germanium detectors for low-background counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.-Z.; Mei, D.-M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-05-01

    Radiogenic particles are known as the main sources of background for all ultra-low background experiments in the detection of dark matter and neutrino properties. In particular, the radiogenic gamma rays from PMTs are a main component of the observed backgrounds in the noble liquid detectors such as XENON100 and LUX. This suggests a more accurate screening of PMTs is needed for the next generation experiments such as LUX-Zplin or Xenon1T. Hence, we propose to develop well-shaped germanium detectors for a better understanding of the radiogenic background from PMTs. A well-shaped germanium detector array and PMT (R11410MOD) have been designed in a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation, in which three radiogenic background isotopes from 238U, 232Th and 40K have been studied. In this work, we show the detector performance including the detector efficiency, energy resolution and the detector sensitivity for low-background counting in the detection of rare event physics.

  11. Calibration of an Ultra-Low-Background Proportional Counter for Measuring 37Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Allen; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Bowyer, Ted W.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Humble, Paul H.; Keillor, Martin E.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Merriman, Jason H.; Miley, Harry S.; Myers, Allan W.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Williams, Richard M.

    2013-08-08

    Abstract. An ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) design has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using clean materials, primarily electrochemically-purified copper. This detector, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS), was developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (30 meters water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. The ULBCS design includes passive neutron and gamma shielding, along with an active cosmic-veto system. This system provides a capability for making ultra-sensitive measurements to support applications like age-dating soil hydrocarbons with 14C/3H, age-dating of groundwater with 39Ar, and soil-gas assay for 37Ar to support On-Site Inspection (OSI). On-Site Inspection is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclides created by an underground nuclear explosion are valuable signatures of a Treaty violation. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar, produced from neutron interactions with calcium in soil, provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This work describes the calibration techniques and analysis methods developed to enable quantitative measurements of 37Ar samples over a broad range of pressures. These efforts, along with parallel work in progress on gas chemistry separation, are expected to provide a significant new capability for 37Ar soil gas background studies.

  12. Calibration of an ultra-low-background proportional counter for measuring {sup 37}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, A.; Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Bowyer, T. W.; Day, A. R.; Fuller, E. S.; Haas, D. A.; Hayes, J. C.; Hoppe, E. W.; Humble, P. H.; Keillor, M. E.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; and others

    2013-08-08

    An ultra-low-background proportional counter design has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using clean materials, primarily electro-chemically-purified copper. This detector, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS), was developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (30 meters water-equivalent) at PNNL. The ULBCS design includes passive neutron and gamma shielding, along with an active cosmic-veto system. This system provides a capability for making ultra-sensitive measurements to support applications like age-dating soil hydrocarbons with {sup 14}C/{sup 3}H, age-dating of groundwater with {sup 39}Ar, and soil-gas assay for {sup 37}Ar to support On-Site Inspection (OSI). On-Site Inspection is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclides created by an underground nuclear explosion are valuable signatures of a Treaty violation. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of {sup 37}Ar, produced from neutron interactions with calcium in soil, provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This work describes the calibration techniques and analysis methods developed to enable quantitative measurements of {sup 37}Ar samples over a broad range of proportional counter operating pressures. These efforts, along with parallel work in progress on gas chemistry separation, are expected to provide a significant new capability for {sup 37}Ar soil gas background studies.

  13. Sensitivity of LDEF foil analyses using ultra-low background germanium vs. large NaI(Tl) multidimensional spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, James H.; Arthur, Richard J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

    1993-01-01

    Cobalt foils and stainless steel samples were analyzed for induced Co-60 activity with both an ultra-low background germanium gamma-ray spectrometer and with a large NaI(Tl) multidimensional spectrometer, both of which use electronic anticoincidence shielding to reduce background counts resulting from cosmic rays. Aluminum samples were analyzed for Na-22. The results, in addition to the relative sensitivities and precisions afforded by the two methods, are presented.

  14. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune

    2013-09-15

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because {sup 134}Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as {sup 40}K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from {sup 134}Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  15. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune

    2013-09-01

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because (134)Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as (40)K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from (134)Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium. PMID:24089828

  16. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune

    2013-09-01

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because 134Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as 40K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from 134Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  17. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.; Warren, G. A.; Runkle, R. C.

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  18. A Shallow Underground Laboratory for Low-Background Radiation Measurements and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Day, Anthony R.; Erikson, Luke E.; Fast, James E.; Forrester, Joel B.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Merriman, Jason H.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Overman, Nicole R.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Runkle, Robert C.

    2012-11-08

    Abstract: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths worldwide houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This manuscript describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  19. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R.; and others

    2012-11-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  20. A broadband THz receiver for low background space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, C.; Benford, D. J.; Clapp, A. C.; Richards, P. L.; Timbie, P.

    We have developed a sensitive bolometric receiver for low background space applications. In a 10 percent bandwidth at 1 THz, this receiver is approximately 100 times more sensitive than a quantum limited heterodyne receiver with a 1 GHz IF bandwidth. This receiver is designed to be used for the long wavelength band (200-700 microns) in the MIPS instrument on NASA's SIRTF satellite. The bolometers are cooled to 100 mK by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Roughly 60 g of cesium chrome alum salt is partially demagnetized to 100 mK, followed by a slow regulated downramp to compensate for the heat leak. The hold time of the ADR system is about 18 hours with a temperature stability of delta T(sub rms) approx. equals 10 micro-K. The composite bolometers have electrical responsivities of 10(exp 9)V/W and electrical NEP's of about 3x10(exp -17) W/square root of Hz. The bolometer signals are read out by JFET preamplifiers located on the helium plate and operated at 120 K. We have addressed a number of space qualification issues, such as the development of an analog magnet controller, construction of a cryogenic shake-table for bolometers and selection of the paramagnetic salt CCA which can survive a bakeout at 50 C. The receiver is scheduled to be flown in the spring of 1992 on a balloon telescope. This flight has a dual purpose. One is to provide realistic test of the capabilities of the new receiver. The other is to search for anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background on scales of a few degrees.

  1. A broadband THz receiver for low background space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, C.; Benford, D. J.; Clapp, A. C.; Richards, P. L.; Timbie, P.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive bolometric receiver for low background space applications. In a 10 percent bandwidth at 1 THz, this receiver is approximately 100 times more sensitive than a quantum limited heterodyne receiver with a 1 GHz IF bandwidth. This receiver is designed to be used for the long wavelength band (200-700 microns) in the MIPS instrument on NASA's SIRTF satellite. The bolometers are cooled to 100 mK by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Roughly 60 g of cesium chrome alum salt is partially demagnetized to 100 mK, followed by a slow regulated downramp to compensate for the heat leak. The hold time of the ADR system is about 18 hours with a temperature stability of delta T(sub rms) approx. equals 10 micro-K. The composite bolometers have electrical responsivities of 10(exp 9)V/W and electrical NEP's of about 3x10(exp -17) W/square root of Hz. The bolometer signals are read out by JFET preamplifiers located on the helium plate and operated at 120 K. We have addressed a number of space qualification issues, such as the development of an analog magnet controller, construction of a cryogenic shake-table for bolometers and selection of the paramagnetic salt CCA which can survive a bakeout at 50 C. The receiver is scheduled to be flown in the spring of 1992 on a balloon telescope. This flight has a dual purpose. One is to provide realistic test of the capabilities of the new receiver. The other is to search for anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background on scales of a few degrees.

  2. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K. I.; Dimov, K. G.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2014-10-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to “cellulose-like” EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical “sugar-like“ spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation.

  3. SrI2 scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, N. J.; Sturm, B. W.; Drury, O. B.; Hurst, T. A.; Sheets, S. A.; Ahle, L. E.; Saw, C. K.; Pearson, M. A.; Payne, S. A.; Burger, A.; Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; van Loef, E. V.; Glodo, J.; Hawrami, R.; Higgins, W. M.; Shah, K. S.; Moses, W. W.

    2009-08-01

    We are working to perfect the growth of divalent Eu-doped strontium iodide single crystals and to optimize the design of SrI2(Eu)-based gamma ray spectrometers. SrI2(Eu) offers a light yield in excess of 100,000 photons/MeV and light yield proportionality surpassing that of Ce-doped lanthanum bromide. Thermal and x-ray diffraction analyses of SrI2 and EuI2 indicate an excellent match in melting and crystallographic parameters, and very modest thermal expansion anisotropy. We have demonstrated energy resolution with SrI2(4-6%Eu) of 2.6% at 662 keV and 7.6% at 60 keV with small crystals, while the resolution degrades somewhat for larger sizes. Our experiments suggest that digital techniques may be useful in improving the energy resolution in large crystals impaired by light-trapping, in which scintillation light is re-absorbed and re-emitted in large and/or highly Eu2+ -doped crystals. The light yield proportionality of SrI2(Eu) is found to be superior to that of other known scintillator materials, such as LaBr3(Ce) and NaI(Tl).

  4. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy based-on interferon-gamma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guan-Wei; Kuo, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Pei-I.; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient disease constituted a long-term menace to public health. According to World Health Organization (WHO), mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infected nearly a third of people of the world. There is about one new TB occurrence every second. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is associated with susceptibility to TB, and interferongamma release assays (IGRA) is considered to be the best alternative of tuberculin skin test (TST) for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Although significant progress has been made with regard to the design of enzyme immunoassays for IFN-γ, adopting this assay is still labor-intensive and time-consuming. To alleviate these drawbacks, we used IFN-γ antibody to facilitate the detection of IFN-γ. An experimental verification on the performance of IGRA was done in this research. We developed two biosensor configurations, both of which possess high sensitivity, specificity, and rapid IFN-γ diagnoses. The first is the electrochemical method. The second is a circular polarization interferometry configuration, which incorporates two light beams with p-polarization and s-polarization states individually along a common path, a four photo-detector quadrature configuration to arrive at a phase modulated ellipsometer. With these two methods, interaction between IFN-γ antibody and IFN-γ were explored and presented in detail.

  5. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pietropaolo, A.; Gorini, G.; Festa, G.; Andreani, C.; De Pascale, M. P.; Reali, E.; Grazzi, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2009-09-15

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of {gamma}-detection based on the new device.

  6. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy of planetary surfaces and atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The neutrons and gamma rays escaping from a planet can be used to map the concentrations of various elements in its surface. In a planet, the high-energy particles in the galactic cosmic rays induce a cascade of particles that includes many neutrons. The ..gamma.. rays are made by the decay of the naturally-occurring radioelements and by nuclear excitations induced by cosmic-ray particles and their secondaries (especially neutron capture or inelastic scattering reactions). After a short history of planetary ..gamma..-ray and neutron spectroscopy, the ..gamma..-ray spectrometer and active neutron detection system planned for the Mars Observer Mission are presented. The results of laboratory experiments that simulate the cosmic-ray bombardments of planetary surfaces and the status of the theoretical calculations for the processes that make and transport neutrons and ..gamma.. rays will be reviewed. Studies of Mars, including its atmosphere, are emphasized, as are new ideas, concepts, and problems that have arisen over the last decade, such as Doppler broadening and peaks from neutron scattering with germanium nuclei in a ..gamma..-ray spectrometer. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Towards combining in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, P.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pakarinen, J.; Butler, P. A.; Cresswell, J. R.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Seddon, D. A.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Simpson, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.

    2009-01-28

    The SAGE spectrometer will combine a segmented Si-detector with a Ge-detector array aiming to take the simultaneous in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy to the next level. It will be coupled with the GREAT focal plane spectrometer and the RITU gas-filled recoil separator at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. Its high efficiency and resolution will open the door to a new era of complete spectroscopy directed, amongst others, at the study of superheavy nuclei aiming to investigate the properties of the next spherical proton shell above Z = 82.

  9. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Alan W. Hunt; Edward T. Reedy; Heather A. Seipel

    2015-06-01

    Modeling capabilities were added to an existing framework and codes were adapted as needed for analyzing experiments and assessing application-specific assay concepts including simulation of measurements over many short irradiation/spectroscopy cycles. The code package was benchmarked against the data collected at the IAC for small targets and assembly-scale data collected at LANL. A study of delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear safeguards was performed for a variety of assemblies in the extensive NGSI spent fuel library. The modeling results indicate that delayed gamma-ray responses can be collected from spent fuel assemblies with statistical quality sufficient for analyzing their isotopic composition using a 1011 n/s neutron generator and COTS detector instrumentation.

  10. Germanium-Based Detectors for Gamma-Ray Imaging andSpectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Amman, Mark; Luke, Paul N.; Boggs, Steven E.

    2006-10-13

    Germanium-based detectors are the standard technology usedfor gamma-ray spectroscopy when high efficiency and excellent energyresolution are desired. By dividing the electrical contacts on thesedetectors into segments, the locations of the gamma-ray interactionevents within the detectors can be determined as well as the depositedenergies. This enables simultaneous gamma-ray imaging and spectroscopyand leads to applications in the areas of astronomy, nuclear physics,environmental remediation, nuclear nonproliferation, and homelandsecurity. Producing the fine-pitched electrode segmentation oftenrequired for imaging has been problematic in the past. To address thisissue, we have developed an amorphous-semiconductor contact technology.Using this technology, fully passivated detectors with closely spacedcontacts can be produced using a simple fabrication process. The currentstate of the amorphous-semiconductor contact technology and thechallenges that remain will be given in this paper.

  11. {gamma}-Spectroscopy of Positive Parity Bands In The {sup 156}Gd Nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Vancraeyenest, A.; Guinet, D.; Stezowski, O.; Doan, Q. T.; Redon, N.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.

    2011-10-28

    During an experiment at Jyvaeskylae laboratory involving a 27 MeV {alpha} beam on a thick {sup 154}Sm target, {gamma}-spectroscopy of {sup 156}Gd was performed using JUROGAM HPGe multidetector array. We will present here experimental results concerning positive parity bands of this nucleus. Level scheme was enriched with more than ten new transitions as well as a new level in a band observed recently.

  12. X-ray and. gamma. -ray spectroscopy of solids under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, R.L.

    1990-04-20

    This report briefly describes our studies of various materials at high pressures by means of x-ray and {gamma}-ray absorption spectroscopy. High pressure provides a very effective means of studying materials. Virtually every property is altered from the color and crystal structure to the electrical and magnetic properties. The fundamental reason, of course, is that the quantum levels depend upon the atomic spacing so that both the electronic and vibrational structure is affected.

  13. Ge-diode detector combined with crystal-diffraction spectrometer permits high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namenson, A. I.; Smither, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Crystal-diffraction spectrometer, combined with a lithium-drifted Ge-diode detector, performs high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy on the complicated neutron-capture gamma ray spectra. The system is most useful in the 1-3 MeV energy range and improves the signal to background ratio.

  14. The transient gamma-ray spectrometer: A new high resolution detector for gamma-ray burst spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, H.; Baker, R.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Jermakian, J.; Nolan, T.; Ramaty, R.; Sheppard, D.A.; Smith, G.; Stilwell, D.E.; Teegarden, B.J.; Trombka, J.; Owens, A.; Cork, C.P.; Landis, D.A.; Luke, P.N.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.; Pehl, R.H.; Yaver, H.; Hurley, K.; Mathias, S.; Post, A.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) to be flown aboard the WIND spacecraft is primarily designed to perform high resolution spectroscopy of transient gamma-ray events, such as cosmic [gamma]-ray bursts and solar flares, over the energy range 20 keV to 10 MeV with an expected spectroscopic resolution of E/[delta]E = 500. The detector itself consists of a 215 cm[sup 3] high purity n-type Ge crystal kept at cryogenic temperatures by a passive radiative cooler. The geometric field of view defined by the cooler is 170[degrees]. To avoid continuous triggers caused by soft solar events, a thin Be/Cu sun-shield around the sides of the cooler has been provided. A passive Mo/Pb occulter, which modulates signals from within [+-]5[degrees] of the ecliptic plane at the spacecraft spin frequency, is used to identify and study solar flares, as well as emission from the galactic plane and center. Thus, in addition to transient event measurements, the instrument will allow the search for possible diffuse background lines and monitor the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the galactic center. In order to handle the typically large burst count rates which can be in excess of 100 kHz, burst data are stored directly in an on-board 2.75 Mbit burst memory with an absolute timing accuracy of [+-]1.5 ms after ground processing. This capacity is sufficient to store the entire spectral data set of all but the largest bursts. The experiment is scheduled to be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral in the fall of 1993.

  15. Monitoring of the interconversion of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) to gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Tasnim; Brewster, Victoria L; Edwards, Howell G M; Hargreaves, Michael D; Jilani, Shelina K; Scowen, Ian J

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a drug-of-abuse that has recently become associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault, known as date rape. For this reason the drug is commonly found 'spiked' in alcoholic beverages. When GHB is in solution it may undergo conversion into the corresponding lactone, Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Studies have been carried out to determine the detection limits of GHB and GBL in various solutions by Raman spectroscopy and to monitor the interconversion of GHB and GBL in solution with different pH conditions and temperature. In this study, a portable Raman spectrometer was used to study the interconversion of GHB and GBL in water and ethanol solutions as a function of pH, time, and temperature. The aim of this was to determine the optimum pH range for conversion in order to relate this to the pH ranges that the drug is likely to be subjected to, first in spiked beverages and secondly after ingestion in the digestive system. The aim was also to identify a timescale for this conversion in relation to possible scenarios, for example if GHB takes a number of hours to convert to GBL, it is likely for the beverage to be ingested before esterification can take place. GHB and GBL were then spiked into a selection of beverages of known pH in order to study the stability of GHB and GBL in real systems. PMID:23225646

  16. Exploitation of Geometric Occlusion and Covariance Spectroscopy in a Gamma Sensor Array

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul; Trainham, Clifford

    2013-09-01

    The National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory has recently used an array of six small-footprint (1-inch diameter by 3-inch long) cylindrical crystals of thallium-doped sodium iodide scintillators to obtain angular information from discrete gamma ray–emitting point sources. Obtaining angular information in a near-field measurement for a field-deployed gamma sensor is a requirement for radiological emergency work. Three of the sensors sit at the vertices of a 2-inch isosceles triangle, while the other three sit on the circumference of a 3-inch-radius circle centered in this triangle. This configuration exploits occlusion of sensors, correlation from Compton scattering within a detector array, and covariance spectroscopy, a spectral coincidence technique. Careful placement and orientation of individual detectors with reference to other detectors in an array can provide improved angular resolution for determining the source position by occlusion mechanism. By evaluating the values of, and the uncertainties in, the photopeak areas, efficiencies, branching ratio, peak area correction factors, and the correlations between these quantities, one can determine the precise activity of a particular radioisotope from a mixture of radioisotopes that have overlapping photopeaks that are ordinarily hard to deconvolve. The spectral coincidence technique, often known as covariance spectroscopy, examines the correlations and fluctuations in data that contain valuable information about radiation sources, transport media, and detection systems. Covariance spectroscopy enhances radionuclide identification techniques, provides directional information, and makes weaker gamma-ray emission—normally undetectable by common spectroscopic analysis—detectable. A series of experimental results using the concept of covariance spectroscopy are presented.

  17. Imaging with INTEGRAL. [instrument for fine spectroscopy of celestial gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The INTEGRAL mission was proposed in response to the ESA M2 call for proposals and is dedicated to the fine spectroscopy and imaging of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy range 15 keV to 10 MeV. Cosmic gamma-rays are emitted on a wide range of angular scales and structures for a diverse population of astronomical objects. The emission, which includes discrete spectral lines and continuum radiation is derived from point sources, localized regions, as well as a diffuse band along the Galactic plane. Much of the gamma-ray sky is composed from transient phenomena which range from the few second timescale associated with gamma-ray bursts to larger lived events lasting some days or more. These class of events pose the challenge of firstly identification and secondly that of precise positional location of 'random' short lived events which arrive isotropically. In this article the imaging requirements are evaluated in light of current observational astronomical data and practical solutions for the INTEGRAL telescope are discussed. Some of the key problems are highlighted.

  18. Identification of lunar rock types and search for polar ice by gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Albert E.; Drake, Darrell M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the possibility of mapping the surface composition of the moon from an orbiting spin-stabilized spacecraft, using gamma ray spectroscopy and a cooled germanium solid-state device as a detector. A design for accommodating the germanium detector gamma ray spectrometer was devised, and the detection sensitivity was applied to typical lunar-rock compositions. For sets comprising nine highland and 16 mare types, the most useful elements were found to be Mg, Al, K, Ti, Fe, U, and Th. An analysis of the expected instrument response to the gamma ray and neutron fluxes of water ice indicated that a neutron mode added to the spectrometer will be more sensitive than the gamma ray mode to the possible presence of polar ice. It was calculated that, with a pair of selected neutron absorbers and a model which provides that 2.5 percent of the area above 75-deg latitude is occupied by trapping sites, the instrument will provide a 1-yr mission detection limit of 0.056 percent H2O by weight for each polar region.

  19. Line and continuum spectroscopy as diagnostic tools for gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, E.P.

    1990-12-01

    We review the theoretical framework of both line and continuum spectra formation in gamma ray bursts. These include the cyclotron features at 10's of keV, redshifted annihilation features at {approximately}400 keV, as well as other potentially detectable nuclear transition lines, atomic x-ray lines, proton cyclotron lines and plasma oscillation lines. By combining the parameters derived from line and continuum modeling we can try to reconstruct the location, geometry and physical conditions of the burst emission region, thereby constraining and discriminating the astrophysical models. Hence spectroscopy with current and future generations of detectors should provide powerful diagnostic tools for gamma ray bursters. 48 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions.

    PubMed

    Parigger, Christian G; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10(17) cm(-3) for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 micros after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the Delta nu = +2 progression of the C(2) Swan system are discernable in the H(beta) and H(gamma) plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH(4) flow pressures of 2.7x10(5) Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10(5) Pa (80 psig). PMID:19122690

  1. BATSE gamma-ray burst line search. 1: Search for narrow lines in spectroscopy detector data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, David M.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cline, Thomas L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Matteson, James L.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of data from the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has found no convincing line features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in almost 3 years of operation, in contrast to expectations based on results from other experiments. In this Letter we discuss the visual search for narrow lines in the SD data. The search has examined 192 bursts, of which approximately 18 were intense enough that lines similar to those seen by instruments on the Ginga satellite would have been visible between approximately 20 and approximately 100 keV. A simplified calculation shows that the BATSE and Ginga results are consistent at the 13% level.

  2. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  3. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parigger, Christian G.; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 {mu}s after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the {delta}{nu}=+2 progression of the C2 Swan system are discernable in the H{beta} and H{gamma} plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH4 flow pressures of 2.7x10{sup 5} Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10{sup 5} Pa (80 psig)

  4. Comparison of in situ and laboratory gamma spectroscopy of natural radionuclides in desert soil.

    PubMed

    Benke, R R; Kearfott, K J

    1997-08-01

    In situ and laboratory gamma spectroscopy were used to characterize natural background levels of radiation in the soil at eight sites around the Yucca Mountain Range. The purpose of this practical field analysis was to determine if published empirical in situ calibration factors would yield accurate quantitative specific activities (Bq kg(-1)) in a desert environment. Corrections were made to the in situ calibration factors to account for the on-axis response of a detector with a thin beryllium end window. The in situ gamma spectroscopy results were compared to laboratory gamma spectroscopy of soil samples gathered from each site. Five natural radionuclides were considered: 40K, 214Pb, 214Bi, 208Tl, and 228Ac. The in situ determined specific activities were consistently within +/-15% of the laboratory soil sample results. A quantitative discussion of the factors contributing to the uncertainty in the in situ and laboratory results is included. Analysis on the specific activity data using statistical hypothesis tests determined that three nuclides, 214Pb, 214Bi, and 228Ac showed a weak site dependence while the other two nuclides, 40K and 208Tl, did not exhibit a site dependence. Differing radiation background levels from site to site along with in situ and laboratory uncertainties in excess of 10% are two factors that account for the weak site dependence. Despite the good correlation between data, it was recommended that the in situ detector be calibrated by a detector-specific Monte Carlo code which would accurately model more complex geometries and source distributions. PMID:9228170

  5. Study of asymmetries of Cd(Zn)Te devices investigated using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, and gamma ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Zheng, Q.; Dieguez, E.; Corregidor, V.; Avles, E.; Castaldini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavalcoli, D.; Cavallini, A.; Vela, O.

    2012-10-01

    Despite these recent advancements in preparing the surface of Cd(Zn)Te devices for detector applications, large asymmetries in the electronic properties of planar Cd(Zn)Te detectors are common. Furthermore, for the development of patterned electrode geometries, selection of each electrode surface is crucial for minimizing dark current in the device. This investigation presented here has been carried out with three objectives. Each objective is oriented towards establishing reliable methods for the selection of the anode and cathode surfaces independent of the crystallographic orientation. The objectives of this study are (i) investigate how the asymmetry in I-V characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te devices may be associated with the TeO2 interfacial layer using Rutherford backscattering to study the structure at the Au-Cd(Zn)Te interface, (ii) develop an understanding of how the concentration of the active traps in Cd(Zn)Te varies with the external bias, and (iii) propose non-destructive methods for selection of the anode and cathode which are independent of crystallographic orientation. The spectroscopic methods employed in this investigation include Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, and surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, as well as gamma ray spectroscopy to demonstrate the influence on detector properties.

  6. Bismuth germanate's role in the new revolution in gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.R.; Baktash, C.; Lee, I.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the considerations on how to effectively incorporate bismuth germanate into complex detection systems are covered, and some of these new systems now in operation or under construction are discussed. Significant achievements in gamma ray spectroscopy are reviewed as well as some recent results based on data taken with coincidence arrays of germanium detectors and Compton-suppression spectrometers. Then the first impact of bismuth germanate detectors on our understanding of the properties of nuclei that have high energy and very high angular momentum states are addressed. (LEW)

  7. Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Intra-Vesicular Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke Y.-J.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under 1H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall. PMID:24109882

  8. Concentration of liquid sample for gamma-ray spectroscopy with ultrasonic nebulization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Kim, Jihyang; Jung, Jihee; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyeol

    2015-07-01

    Radionuclide analysis of sea water is necessary to monitor environmental contamination due to the radioactive substances from nuclear facilities. However, it is difficult to analyze the nuclides promptly with the conventional method of coprecipitation during emergencies because the method requires long precipitation times. In this study, an effective concentration method with ultrasonic nebulization was suggested for sea water samples. When a sea water sample of 40 L was concentrated, 30 h was required with the conventional method, whereas it took less than 11 h with the suggested method. The validity of the suggested method was verified by gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  9. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  10. Solar abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy - Comparisons with energetic particle, photospheric, and coronal abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Ramaty, R.; Reames, D. V.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1991-01-01

    Accelerated particle and ambient gas abundances have been derived using solar flare gamma-ray spectroscopy. The results with photospheric and coronal abundances, as well as with solar energetic particle abundances. This is the first time that the composition of accelerated particles interacting in an astrophysical source has been compared with the composition of particles escaping from the source. The analysis shows that the derived composition of the accelerated particles is different from the composition of particles observed in large proton flares; rather, it resembles the composition observed in He-3-rich flares. The analysis also suggests an ambient gas composition which differs from the composition of both the photosphere and the corona.

  11. Obelix, a new low-background HPGe at Modane Underground Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loaiza, P.; Piquemal, F.; Warot, G.; Zampaolo, M.

    2015-08-17

    An ultra-low background coaxial HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry with a relative efficiency of 160%, corresponding to a 600 cm{sup 3} Ge crystal, was installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, France (4800 m.w.e). To reduce the instrinsic detector background, all parts involved in the detector cryostat were selected for their low radioactivity contamination. A shielding, composed of an inner layer of roman lead and an external layer of regular lead was installed, together with a system to reduce the Rn level inside the sample chamber. The shielding was designed to allow the measurement of Marinelli-shaped samples. We present the constructional details which lead to a remarkable low detector background of 73 cts/kg·d in [40, 3000] keV. Measured samples showed that sensitivities about 100 μBq/kg in {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Th are reached for samples of some kg and 30 days of lifetime.

  12. Digital Pulse-Shape Discrimination Applied to an Ultra-Low-Background Gas-Proportional Counting System: First Results

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Richard M.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract A new ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) design was recently developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This design, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) which provides passive and active shielding with radon exclusion, has been developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (~30 meters water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. After these steps to mitigate dominant backgrounds (cosmic rays, external gamma-rays, radioactivity in materials), remaining background events do not exclusively arise from ionization of the proportional counter gas. Digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is thus employed to further improve measurement sensitivity. In this work, a template shape is generated for each individual sample measurement of interest, a "self-calibrating" template. Differences in event topology can also cause differences in pulse shape. In this work, the temporal region analyzed for each event is refined to maximize background discrimination while avoiding unwanted sensitivity to event topology. This digital PSD method is applied to sample and background data, and initial measurement results from a biofuel methane sample are presented in the context of low-background measurements currently being developed.

  13. Gamma ray spectroscopy at high energy and high time resolution at JET.

    PubMed

    Tardocchi, M; Proverbio, L I; Gorini, G; Grosso, G; Locatelli, M; Chugonov, I N; Gin, D B; Shevelev, A E; Murari, A; Kiptily, V G; Syme, B; Fernandes, A M; Pereira, R C; Sousa, J

    2008-10-01

    In fusion plasmas gamma ray emission is caused by reactions of fast particles, such as fusion alpha particles, with impurities. Gamma ray spectroscopy at JET has provided valuable diagnostic information on fast fuel as well as fusion product ions. Improvements of these measurements are needed to fully exploit the flux increase provided by future high power experiments at JET and ITER. Limiting aspects are, for instance, the count rate capability due to a high neutron/gamma background combined with slow detector response and a modest energy resolution due to the low light yield of the scintillators. This paper describes the solutions developed for achieving higher energy resolution, signal to background, and time resolution. The detector design is described based on the new BrLa3 scintillator crystal. The paper will focus on hardware development, including a photomultiplier tube capable of stable operation at counting rate as high as 1 MHz, the magnetic shielding, and the fast digital data acquisition system. PMID:19068513

  14. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Alan W. Hunt; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather

    2015-06-01

    High-­energy, beta-delayed gamma-­ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-­destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-­neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-­energy delayed gamma rays from 235U, 239Pu, and 241Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239Pu. The 241Pu/239Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-­3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-­ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235U data set. De-­convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-­rate LaBr3 detectors

  15. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Fazzi, A; Tardocchi, M; Cazzaniga, C; Lorenzoli, M; Pirovano, C; Rebai, M; Uboldi, C; Varoli, V; Gorini, G

    2014-11-01

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr3 crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%-4% in the energy range Eγ = 3-5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields. PMID:25430287

  16. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M. Gorini, G.; Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V.

    2014-11-15

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub γ} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  17. Simulation of background reduction and Compton suppression in a low-background HPGe spectrometer at a surface laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Shun-Li; Cai, Xiao; Wu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Yi; Xie, Yu-Guang; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Fang, Jian; Sun, Xi-Lei; Sun, Li-Jun; Liu, Ying-Biao; Gao, Long; Zhang, Xuan; Zhao, Hang; Zhou, Li; Lü, Jun-Guang; Hu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are well suited to analyse the radioactivity of samples. In order to reduce the environmental background for an ultra-low background HPGe spectrometer, low-activity lead and oxygen free copper are installed outside the probe to shield from gamma radiation, with an outer plastic scintillator to veto cosmic rays, and an anti-Compton detector to improve the peak-to-Compton ratio. Using Geant4 tools and taking into account a detailed description of the detector, we optimize the sizes of these detectors to reach the design requirements. A set of experimental data from an existing HPGe spectrometer was used to compare with the simulation. For the future low-background HPGe detector simulation, considering different thicknesses of BGO crystals and anti-coincidence efficiency, the simulation results show that the optimal BGO thickness is 5.5 cm, and the peak-to-Compton ratio of 40K is raised to 1000 when the anti-coincidence efficiency is 0.85. In the background simulation, 15 cm oxygen-free copper plus 10 cm lead can reduce the environmental gamma rays to 0.0024 cps/100 cm3 Ge (50 keV-2.8 MeV), which is about 10-5 of the environmental background.

  18. Development of a low background test facility for the SPICA-SAFARI on-ground calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieleman, P.; Laauwen, W. M.; Ferrari, L.; Ferlet, M.; Vandenbussche, B.; Meinsma, L.; Huisman, R.

    2012-09-01

    SAFARI is a far-infrared camera to be launched in 2021 onboard the SPICA satellite. SAFARI offers imaging spectroscopy and imaging photometry in the wavelength range of 34 to 210 μm with detector NEP of 2•10-19 W/√Hz. A cryogenic test facility for SAFARI on-ground calibration and characterization is being developed. The main design driver is the required low background of a few attoWatts per pixel. This prohibits optical access to room temperature and hence all test equipment needs to be inside the cryostat at 4.5K. The instrument parameters to be verified are interfaces with the SPICA satellite, sensitivity, alignment, image quality, spectral response, frequency calibration, and point spread function. The instrument sensitivity is calibrated by a calibration source providing a spatially homogeneous signal at the attoWatt level. This low light intensity is achieved by geometrical dilution of a 150K source to an integrating sphere. The beam quality and point spread function is measured by a pinhole/mask plate wheel, back-illuminated by a second integrating sphere. This sphere is fed by a stable wide-band source, providing spectral lines via a cryogenic etalon.

  19. In-Beam Gamma-ray Spectroscopy in the sdpf {sup 37}Ar Nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Medina, N. H.; Seale, W. A.; Ribas, R. V.; Oliveira, J. R. B. de; Zilio, S.; Lenzi, S. M.; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; Vedova, F. Della; Farnea, E.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.

    2007-10-26

    The nucleus {sup 37}Ar has been studied with {gamma}-ray spectroscopy in the {sup 24}Mg({sup 16}O,2pn) reaction at a beam energy of 70 MeV. Twenty two new excited states up to an excitation energy of 13 MeV have been observed. We compare the first negative and positive parity yrast states with large-scale-shell-model calculations using the Antoine code and the SDPF interaction, considering the excitation of the 1d{sub 5/2},2s{sub 1/2} and 1d{sub 3/2} nucleons to 1f{sub 7/2} and 2p{sub 3/2} in the sdpf valence space.

  20. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  1. Cryogenic detector development at LLNL: ultraviolet x-ray, gamma-ray and biomolecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; le Grand, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    We are developing low-temperature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present development work on these detectors and materials analysis and biomolecular mass spectrometry. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al2O3/AlNb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0.2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 227 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s.

  2. Low-Energy Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Two BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangia, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are energetic, short-duration emissions of gamma-rays from astronomical sources typically well beyond our galaxy. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) that was onboard NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) had detected an unprecedented 2704 GRBs during CGRO's nine-year mission. BATSE consisted of eight detector assemblies located at the corners of CGRO to give full sky coverage. Each assembly consisted of two detectors, a Large Area Detector (LAD) and a Spectroscopy Detector (SD). In determining the detail features of GRBs, the degree to which they possess a low-energy component (approx. 10 keV) is of interest. Preece has developed a method to study the low-energy characteristics and concluded that 14% of the 86 bright GRBs they studied had a definite low-energy component, referred to as a low-energy excess. Their study, and the present study as well, needed to use SD data, because it extends down to the low-energy range when operating in a high-gain mode. For their study, low-energy data was used from just one SD. To better quantify the low-energy behavior, this study will consider bursts for which two SDs satisfy the same criteria as used by Preece. The procedure developed by Preece to study the low-energy aspects of GRBs with BATSE data is to fit the data to a representative spectral function. In particular, two components are used, one corresponding to the low-energy component, and another representing the main part of the spectrum. The low-energy function used is the optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB) model.

  3. Investigation of LaBr3:Ce probe for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Alzimami, K. S.; Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alsafi, K. G.; Ma, A.; Alfuraih, A. A.; Alghamdi, A. A.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2014-02-01

    The main thrust of this work is the investigation of performance of relatively new commercial LaBr3:Ce probe (Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce crystal) for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry measurements in comparison to LaCl3:Ce and NaI:Tl scintillators. The crystals were irradiated by a wide range of energies (57Co, 22Na, 18F, 137Cs and 60Co). The study involved recording of detected spectra and measurement of energy resolution, photopeak efficiency, internal radioactivity measurements as well as dose rate. The Monte Carlo package, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) was used to validate the experiments. Overall results showed very good agreement between the measurements and the simulations. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has excellent energy resolution, energy resolutions of (3.37±0.05)% and (2.98±0.07)% for a 137Cs 662 keV and a 60Co 1332 keV gamma-ray point sources respectively, were recorded. The disadvantage of the lanthanum halide scintillators is their internal radioactivity. Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce scintillator has shown an accurate and quick dose measurements at Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Units which allows accurate assessment of the radiation dose received by staff members compared to the use of electronic personal dosimeters (EPD).

  4. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  5. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy for enhancing production and application of medical isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Smith, S. V.; Muench, L.; Nino, M.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Chillery, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Harding, R.; Lister, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear medicine is a field which requires precise decay data for use in planning radionuclide production and in imaging and therapeutic applications. To address deficiencies in decay data, sources of medical isotopes were produced and purified at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) then shipped to Argonne National Laboratory where high-precision, gamma-ray measurements were performed using Gammasphere. New decay schemes for a number of PET isotopes and the impact on dose calculations will be presented. To investigate the production of next-generation theranostic or radiotherapeutic isotopes, cross section measurements with high energy protons have also been explored at BLIP. The 100-200 MeV proton energy regime is relatively unexplored for isotope production, thus offering high discovery potential but at the same time a challenging analysis due to the large number of open channels at these energies. Results of cross sections deduced from Compton-suppressed, coincidence gamma-ray spectroscopy performed at Lowell will be presented, focusing on the production of platinum isotopes by irradiating natural platinum foils with 100 to 200 MeV protons. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contracts DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Raman spectroscopy of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-acrylamide copolymer using gamma irradiation for crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Saunders, Rachel M.; Davis, Rachel M.; Harvey, Scott D.; Olsen, Peter C.

    2006-02-18

    A copolymer hydrogel was made by mixing acrylamide and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate monomers in water and polymerizing with gamma irradiation. The progress of polymerization and the vibrational structure of the hydrogel was examined using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra indicated that the co-polymer has a molecular structure different from polyacrylamide or the individual monomers. The Raman data also indicate the presence of crosslinking at the C=O, NH2 and OH side chains. The spectra further suggest the continuous lengthening of the backbone of the polymers with increasing gamma dose. This is shown as the increase in C-C modes as C=C vibrations decrease. Raman spectra changed most dramatically as the monomer mixture became a gel at a dose of approximately 320 Gy. Spectral differences were subtler with doses exceeding 640 Gy, although chain lengthening continued beyond 1500 Gy. Potential applications of the copolymer hydrogel include reconstructive tissue as well as a standard material for radiation protection dosimetry. Results are discussed in relation to other potential applications of this polymer and dose-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum.

  7. Phantom experiment and calculation for in vivo 10boron analysis by prompt gamma ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Aoki, M; Aizawa, O

    1991-03-01

    In order to determine 10B concentrations in a tumour in vivo without injuring tissues, phantom experiments and calculations were carried out for boron neutron capture therapy. The experiment was based on prompt gamma ray spectroscopy and a single-crystal silicon-filtered neutron beam from a TRIGA-II reactor. Calibration curves to determine the 10B concentrations in the tumours were experimentally generated from known 10B values for simulated tumours with various volumes in a phantom. The 10B distributions in a tumour were also investigated and it was possible to distinguish the tumour with 10B from normal tissue without 10B. In addition, the 10B concentrations were estimated by calculations. A two-dimensional discrete ordinate transport code, DOT3.5, was employed for the calculations of the neutron fluence rate distributions in a phantom. The number of incidental gamma rays entering a germanium detector, which were produced in a tumour as a result of neutron reaction, were calculated by an analytical method. The results were in good agreement with the experiments. PMID:2038605

  8. Distance dependent quenching and gamma-ray spectroscopy in tin-loaded polystyrene scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Feng, Patrick L; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Anstey, Mitchell R.; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis and inclusion of rationally designed organotin compounds in polystyrene matrices as a route towards plastic scintillators capable of gamma-ray spectroscopy. Tin loading ratios of up to 15% w/w have been incorporated, resulting in photopeak energy resolution values as low as 10.9% for 662 keV gamma-rays. Scintillator constituents were selected based upon a previously reported distance-dependent quenching mechanism. Data obtained using UV-Vis and photoluminescence measurements are consistent with this phenomenon and are correlated with the steric and electronic properties of the respective organotin complexes. We also report fast scintillation decay behavior that is comparablemore » to the quenched scintillators 0.5% trans-stilbene doped bibenzyl and the commercial plastic scintillator BC-422Q-1%. These observations are discussed in the context of practical considerations such as optical transparency, ease-of-preparation/scale-up, and total scintillator cost.« less

  9. A weak magnetism observed in SnO2 doped with Fe by means of Perturbed Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. M.; Carbonari, A. W.; Martucci, T.; Costa, M. S.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Macedo, M. A. V.; Saxena, R. N.

    Nano-structured samples of SnO2 doped with Fe prepared by the sol-gel method were studied by the Perturbed Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation (PAC) Spectroscopy using 111In (111Cd) probe nuclei as well as by 57Fe Mšssbauer spectroscopy. The samples were prepared from very pure metallic Sn and Fe. Carrier-free 111In nuclei were introduced during the sol-gel process of sample preparation for PAC measurements. The PAC measurements were carried out after annealing the samples at different temperatures and the results show a combined electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole interaction for probe nuclei that do not occupy the regular Sn sites. The hyperfine parameters revealed weak magnetic interactions.

  10. Gamma-induced positron annihilation spectroscopy and application to radiation-damaged alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.; Tchelidze, L.; Kumar, J.; Smith, K.; Thompson, S.; Selim, F.; Williams, J.; Harmon, J. F.; Maloy, S.; Roy, A.

    2006-06-01

    Radiation damage and other defect studies of materials are limited to thin samples because of inherent limitations of well-established techniques such as diffraction methods and traditional positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) [P. Hautojarvi, et al., Positrons in Solids, Springer, Berlin, 1979, K.G. Lynn, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 47 (1985) 239]. This limitation has greatly hampered industrial and in-situ applications. ISU has developed new methods that use pair-production to produce positrons throughout the volume of thick samples [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B. 241 (2005) 262]. Unlike prior work at other laboratories that use bremsstrahlung beams to create positron beams (via pair-production) that are then directed at a sample of interest, we produce electron-positron pairs directly in samples of interest, and eliminate the intermediate step of a positron beam and its attendant penetrability limitations. Our methods include accelerator-based bremsstrahlung-induced pair-production in the sample for positron annihilation energy spectroscopy measurements (PAES), coincident proton-capture gamma-rays (where one of the gammas is used for pair-production in the sample) for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), or photo-nuclear activation of samples for either type of measurement. The positrons subsequently annihilate with sample electrons, emitting coincident 511 keV gamma-rays [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D

  11. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Taira, Y; Toyokawa, H; Kuroda, R; Yamamoto, N; Adachi, M; Tanaka, S; Katoh, M

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured. PMID:23742543

  12. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  13. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  14. Comparative Gamma Spectroscopy with SrI2(Eu), GYGAG(Ce) and Bi-loaded Plastic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J

    2010-11-19

    We are developing new scintillator materials that offer potential for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy at low cost. Single crystal SrI{sub 2}(Eu) offers {approx}3% resolution at 662 keV, in sizes of {approx}1 in{sup 3}. We have developed ceramics processing technology allowing us to achieve cubic inch scale transparent ceramic scintillators offering gamma spectroscopy performance superior to NaI(Tl). We fabricated a bismuth-loaded plastic scintillator that demonstrates energy resolution of {approx}8% at 662 keV in small sizes. Gamma ray spectroscopy can be used to identify the presence of weak radioactive sources within natural background. The ability to discriminate close-lying spectral lines is strongly dependent upon the energy resolution of the detector. In addition to excellent energy resolution, large volume detectors are needed to acquire sufficient events, for example, to identify a radioactive anomaly moving past a detector. We have employed a 'directed search' methodology for identifying potential scintillator materials candidates, resulting in the discovery of Europium-doped Strontium Iodide, SrI{sub 2}(Eu), Cerium-doped Gadolinium Garnet, GYGAG(Ce), and Bismuth-loaded Polymers. These scintillators possess very low self-radioactivity, offer energy resolution of 3-8% at 662 keV, and have potential to be grown cost-effectively to sizes similar to the most widely deployed gamma spectroscopy scintillator, Thallium-doped Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). In this study, gamma ray spectra of a variety of sources, were obtained employing SrI{sub 2}(Eu), GYGAG(Ce), Bi-loaded polymers, LaBr{sub 3}(Ce), and NaI(Tl). The effects of detector size, energy resolution, and background radioactivity (including self-radioactivity) on the ability to distinguish weak sources is quantified, based on a simple model, and qualitatively compared to laboratory data.

  15. Determination of environmental radiation flux and organ doses using in-situ gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Abdulrahman S.

    Contamination of buildings represent a unique problem during Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. It is necessary to determine the long-lived radionuclides and their respective specific activities in building materials before the right D&D decision can be made. At the same time, radiation risk of workers or potential occupants in the facility must be assessed as part of the D&D process. The goal of this project was to develop a methodology of obtaining gamma radiation flux and organ doses from in-situ gamma spectroscopy. Algorithms were developed to simulate the response functions of the HPGe detector and to convert the spectra into photon fluences. A Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, was used to simulate HPGe detector response and to develop the conversion algorithm. The simulated spectra obtained for an HPGe detector were converted to flux using the algorithm for various different geometries. The response functions of the detector are presented in this document for the gamma energies from 60 keV to 2.2 MeV. Published fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were used to calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent. We then tested the theory at a 100-MeV linear electron accelerator at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Samples of the activated concrete walls and floor in the target room of the Linac facility as well as some steel samples were taken to quantify the specific activities of the structures. The results show that the most important long-lived radionuclides include 22 Na, 46Sc, 54 Mn, 57Co, 60 Co, 65Zn, 152 Eu and 154Eu, depending on the location and composition of the material. The specific activities at the Linac facility range from 1.15E-01 to 765.31 muCi/Kg. The annual effective dose equivalent was assessed to be 2.44 mSv y-1 (0.244 rem y-1 ), which is about 5% of the Annual EDE limits to workers.

  16. Gamma-ray burst and spectroscopy instrumentation development at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities that are specifically related to the development of instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy. Three programs are described: (1) the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS), a balloon-borne array of seven germanium detectors for high-resolution spectrographic studies of persistent gamma-ray sources; (2) the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS), a single radiatively-cooled germanium detector for the spectrographic study of gamma-ray bursts, and (3) the Rapidly Moving Telescope (RMT), a ground-based optical telescope for the detection and study of short-lived optical transients, particularly those that occur in coincidence with gamma-ray bursts.

  17. GRBSpec: a multi-observatory database for gamma-ray burst spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Blazek, Martin; Janout, Petr; Sprimont, Pierre; Thöne, Christina C.; Gorosabel, Javier; Sánchez-Ramírez, Rubén.

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in the Universe. They are produced during the collapse of massive stellar-sized objects, which create a black hole and eject material at ultra-relativistic speeds. They are unique tools to study the evolution of our Universe, as they are the only objects that, thanks to their extraordinary luminosity, can be observed during the complete history of star formation, from the era of reionisation to our days. One of the main tools to obtain information from GRBs and their environment is optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. After 17 years of studies spectroscopic data for around 300 events that have been collected. However, spectra were obtained by many groups, at different observatories, and using instruments of very different types, making data difficult to access, process and compare. Here we present GRBspec: A collaborative database that includes processed GRB spectra from multiple observatories and makes them available to the community. The website provides access to the datasets, allowing queries based not only on the observation characteristics but also on the properties of the GRB that was observed. Furthermore, the website provides visualisation and analysis tools, that allow the user to asses the quality of the data before downloading and even make data analysis online.

  18. Stimulus generation technique for code simulation of FPGA based gamma spectroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Ramli, Abdul Rahman; Lombigit, Lojius; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Khalid, Mohd Ashhar Hj

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a software that can systematically generate stimulus required for code simulation (functional and timing) of new digital processors in gamma spectroscopy system. Software must be able to produce stimulus that emulate ADC data of charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) output signal. Signal parameters such as pulse shape, amplitude, pulse width and count rate should be adjustable while allowing options such as pulse pile-up and random pulse events. To fulfill this objective, a pulse generator software PulseGEN has been developed. The software GUI is designed to operate in two modes, Single/Pile-Up Mode and Continuous Random Mode. Its ADC module simulates real-time ADC sampling. The output can be saved as input stimulus to test various functions of digital processors such as pulse height measurements, pile-up detection and correction, as well as random pulse detection and measurement that is similar to the actual real-time measurement. PulseGEN results have been compared and verified against commercial charge sensitive amplifier with NaI detector and NIM pulser.

  19. A Multi-Contact, Low Capacitance HPGe Detector for High Rate Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Christopher

    2014-12-04

    The detection, identification and non-destructive assay of special nuclear materials and nuclear fission by-products are critically important activities in support of nuclear non-proliferation programs. Both national and international nuclear safeguard agencies recognize that current accounting methods for spent nuclear fuel are inadequate from a safeguards perspective. Radiation detection and analysis by gamma-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in this field, but no instrument exists that can deliver the required performance (energy resolution and detection sensitivity) in the presence of very high background count rates encountered in the nuclear safeguards arena. The work of this project addresses this critical need by developing a unique gamma-ray detector based on high purity germanium that has the previously unachievable property of operating in the 1 million counts-per-second range while achieving state-of-the-art energy resolution necessary to identify and analyze the isotopes of interest. The technical approach was to design and fabricate a germanium detector with multiple segmented electrodes coupled to multi-channel high rate spectroscopy electronics. Dividing the germanium detector’s signal electrode into smaller sections offers two advantages; firstly, the energy resolution of the detector is potentially improved, and secondly, the detector is able to operate at higher count rates. The design challenges included the following; determining the optimum electrode configuration to meet the stringent energy resolution and count rate requirements; determining the electronic noise (and therefore energy resolution) of the completed system after multiple signals are recombined; designing the germanium crystal housing and vacuum cryostat; and customizing electronics to perform the signal recombination function in real time. In this phase I work, commercial off-the-shelf electrostatic modeling software was used to develop the segmented germanium crystal geometry

  20. New Measurement of ^39Ar in Underground Argon with a Low Background Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke

    2012-03-01

    A low background liquid argon detector has been developed for sensitive measurements of the beta radioactive ^39Ar in argon from underground sources. The measurement is motivated by the need to improve on earlier studies that showed no sign of ^39Ar in certain sources of underground argon, but with a limited sensitivity of ˜ 5% relative to ^39Ar in atmospheric argon[1]. We will report preliminary measurements taken with the low background detector that was commissioned and operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Virginia. A combination of passive and active background reduction techniques resulted in a very low background and a null result with sensitivity to ^39Ar less than 1% of atmospheric. The results confirm that underground argon is well suited for direct detection of dark matter WIMPs. [4pt] [1] D. Acosta-Kane et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 587:46 (2008)

  1. Construction of a Shallow Underground Low-background Detector for a CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, Joel B.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Miley, Harry S.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.

    2013-05-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) is a verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), and in addition to a series of radionuclide monitoring stations, contains sixteen radionuclide laboratories capable of verification of radionuclide station measurements. This paper presents an overview of a new commercially obtained low-background detector system for radionuclide aerosol measurements recently installed in a shallow (>30 meters water equivalent) underground clean-room facility at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Specifics such as low-background shielding materials, active shielding methods, and improvements in sensitivity to IMS isotopes will be covered.

  2. Geant4 simulation of continuum gamma spectroscopy with GAMMASPHERE and the SPINSPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Z.; Ferrer, M.; Cristancho, F.

    2007-10-26

    The use of the so called Hk-technique ({gamma}-energy sum and multiplicity data) is checked with simulations of the multi-detector {gamma}-arrays GAMMASPHERE and SPINSPECTROMETER. Their response to typical {gamma}-cascades is obtained and compared.

  3. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  4. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the gamma-carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sanford, D G; Kanagy, C; Sudmeier, J L; Furie, B C; Furie, B; Bachovchin, W W

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a gamma-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational gamma-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing alpha-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues -13 to -3 form an amphipathic alpha-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5 degrees C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the gamma-carboxylation recognition site, four residues (-18, -17, -16, and -15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue (-10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic alpha-helix in the gamma-carboxylation recognition site is discussed. PMID:1911775

  5. Conformational solution studies of neuropeptide gamma using CD and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia; Brzozowskl, Krzysztof; Legowska, Anna; Liwo, Adam; Silbering, Jerzy; Smoluch, Marek; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2002-05-01

    Neuropeptide gamma is one of the largest members of the tachykinin family of peptides, exhibiting strong agonistic activity towards the NK-2 tachykinin receptor. This peptide was synthesized by the solid-phase method using the Fmoc chemistry. Circular-dichroism spectroscopy (CD) investigations of this peptide were performed in phosphate buffer, in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) micelles and trifluoroethanol (TFE) solutions and in DMSO-d6 using the 2D NMR technique in conjunction with two different theoretical approaches. The first assumes multiconformational equilibrium of the peptide studied characterized by the values of statistical weights of low-energy conformations. These calculations were performed using three different force fields ECEPP/3, AMBER4.1 and CHARMM (implemented in the X-PLOR program). The second method incorporates interproton distance and dihedral angle constraints into the starting conformation using the Simulated Annealing algorithm (X-PLOR program). The CD experiments revealed that although the peptide studied is flexible in polar solvents, a tendency to adopt a helical structure was observed in the hydrophobic environment. The NMR data (NOE effects) indicate a helical or reverse structure in the Ile7-His12 fragment of the peptide studied in DMSO-d6 solution. The results obtained cannot be interpreted in terms of a single conformation. Most of the conformations obtained with the ECEPP/3 force field possess a high content of a helical structure. None of the conformers, obtained with the AMBER4.1 and CHARMM force fields, can be considered as the dominant one. In all conformations several beta-turns were detected and in some cases gamma-turns were also found. But in fact, it is rather difficult to select the position of the secondary element(s) present in the structure of NPgamma in solution. All conformers calculated with the X-PLOR program (with using NMR derived distance and torsion angle constraints) are stabilized by several

  6. Investigation of Martian H2O and CO2 via orbital gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Larry G.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1987-01-01

    The capability of an orbital gamma ray spectrometer to address presently unanswered questions concerning H2O and CO2 on Mars is investigated. The gamma ray signal produced by the Martian atmosphere and by several simple models of Martian surface materials is calculated. Results are reported for: (1) the production of neutrons in the atmosphere and in the subsurface material by cosmic ray interactions, (2) the scattering of neutrons and the resultant neutron energy spectrum and spatial distributions, (3) the reproduction of gamma rays by neutron prompt capture and nonelastic scatter reactions, (4) the production of gamma rays by natural radionuclides, (5) the attenuation of the gamma ray signal by passage through surface materials and the Martian atmosphere, (6) the production of the gamma ray continuum background, and (7) the uncertainty in gamma ray line strengths that results from the combined signal and background observed by the detector.

  7. Investigation of Martian H2O and CO2 via orbital gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, L. G.; Squyres, S. W.

    1987-08-01

    The capability of an orbital gamma ray spectrometer to address presently unanswered questions concerning H2O and CO2 on Mars is investigated. The gamma ray signal produced by the Martian atmosphere and by several simple models of Martian surface materials is calculated. Results are reported for: (1) the production of neutrons in the atmosphere and in the subsurface material by cosmic ray interactions, (2) the scattering of neutrons and the resultant neutron energy spectrum and spatial distributions, (3) the reproduction of gamma rays by neutron prompt capture and nonelastic scatter reactions, (4) the production of gamma rays by natural radionuclides, (5) the attenuation of the gamma ray signal by passage through surface materials and the Martian atmosphere, (6) the production of the gamma ray continuum background, and (7) the uncertainty in gamma ray line strengths that results from the combined signal and background observed by the detector.

  8. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c² mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  9. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalseth, C. E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, H. O.; Barabash, A. S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, W.; Burritt, T. H.; Busch, M.; Capps, G.; Chan, Y.-D.; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, J. A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Ely, J.; Esterline, J.; Farach, H.; Fast, J. E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, B.; Fuller, E.; Gehman, V. M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, G. C.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Keillor, M.; Keller, C.; Kephart, J. D.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P. N.; Macmullin, S.; Marino, M. G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, D.-M.; Miley, H. S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Meyers, A. W.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; Peterson, D.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, L.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Salazar, H.; Schubert, A. G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, D.; Strain, J.; Swift, G.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, K.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, H.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.; M Ajorana Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is building the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/ c2 mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the MAJORANA Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  10. Development of a Small-Sized, Flexible, and Insertable Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Dong Eun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated a small-sized, flexible, and insertable fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) that is composed of a sensing probe, a plastic optical fiber (POF), a photomultiplier tube (PMT)-amplifier system, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA) to obtain the energy spectra of radioactive isotopes. As an inorganic scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) crystal was used and two solid-disc type radioactive isotopes with the same dimensions, cesium-137 (Cs-137) and cobalt-60 (Co-60), were used as gamma-ray emitters. We first determined the length of the LYSO:Ce crystal considering the absorption of charged particle energy and measured the gamma-ray energy spectra using the FORS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed FORS can be used to discriminate species of radioactive isotopes by measuring their inherent energy spectra, even when gamma-ray emitters are mixed. The relationship between the measured photon counts of the FORS and the radioactivity of Cs-137 was subsequently obtained. The amount of scintillating light generated from the FORS increased by increasing the radioactivity of Cs-137. Finally, the performance of the fabricated FORS according to the length and diameter of the POF was also evaluated. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that a novel FORS can be developed to accurately measure the gamma-ray energy spectrum in inaccessible locations such as narrow areas and holes. PMID:26343667

  11. Development of a Small-Sized, Flexible, and Insertable Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Dong Eun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated a small-sized, flexible, and insertable fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) that is composed of a sensing probe, a plastic optical fiber (POF), a photomultiplier tube (PMT)-amplifier system, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA) to obtain the energy spectra of radioactive isotopes. As an inorganic scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) crystal was used and two solid-disc type radioactive isotopes with the same dimensions, cesium-137 (Cs-137) and cobalt-60 (Co-60), were used as gamma-ray emitters. We first determined the length of the LYSO:Ce crystal considering the absorption of charged particle energy and measured the gamma-ray energy spectra using the FORS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed FORS can be used to discriminate species of radioactive isotopes by measuring their inherent energy spectra, even when gamma-ray emitters are mixed. The relationship between the measured photon counts of the FORS and the radioactivity of Cs-137 was subsequently obtained. The amount of scintillating light generated from the FORS increased by increasing the radioactivity of Cs-137. Finally, the performance of the fabricated FORS according to the length and diameter of the POF was also evaluated. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that a novel FORS can be developed to accurately measure the gamma-ray energy spectrum in inaccessible locations such as narrow areas and holes. PMID:26343667

  12. The BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog. 1; High Time Resolution Spectroscopy of Bright Bursts Using High Energy Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first in a series of gamma-ray burst spectroscopy catalogs from the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Abstract: Observatory, each covering a different aspect of burst phenomenology. In this paper, we present time-sequences of spectral fit parameters for 156 bursts selected either for their high peak flux or fluence.

  13. ACTI - An MCNP Data Library for Prompt Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, S. C.; Reedy, R. C.; Young, P. G. ,

    2002-01-01

    Prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy is used in a wide variety of applications for determining material compositions. High-quality photon-production data from thermal-neutron capture reactions are essential for these applications. Radiation transport codes, such as MCNP{trademark}, are often used to design detector systems, determine minimum detection thresholds, etc. These transport codes rely on evaluated nuclear databases such as ENDF (Evaluated Nuclear Data File) to provide the fundamental data used in the transport calculations. Often the photon-production data from incident neutron reactions in the evaluations are of relatively poor quality. We have compiled the best experimental data for thermal-neutron capture for the naturally occurring isotopes for elements from H through Zn as well as for {sup 70,72,73,74,76}Ge, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 155,157}Gd, {sup 181}Ta and {sup 182,183,184,186}W. This compilation has been used to update the ENDF evaluations for {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 9}Be, {sup 14}N, {sup 16}O, {sup 19}F, Na, Mg, {sup 27}Al, {sup 32}S, S, {sup 35,37}Cl, K, Ca, {sup 45}Sc, Ti, {sup 51}V, {sup 50,52,53,54}Cr, {sup 55}Mn, {sup 54,56,57,58}Fe, {sup 58,60,61,62,64}Ni, {sup 63,65}Cu and {sup 182,183,184,186}W. In addition, the inelastic cross sections and corresponding secondary-photon distributions were updated for {sup 16}O. Complete new evaluations were submitted to ENDF for {sup 35,37}Cl. This paper will discuss the evaluation effort and the production of the MCNP data library, ACTI, based on the new evaluations. Data from the ENDF evaluations for {sup 28-30}Si were also included in the ACTI library for completeness. The silicon evaluations were updated in 1997 and include the latest experimental data for radiative capture.

  14. Proximal Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy to Predict Soil Properties Using Windows and Full-Spectrum Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Hafiz Sultan; Hoogmoed, Willem B.; van Henten, Eldert J.

    2013-01-01

    Fine-scale spatial information on soil properties is needed to successfully implement precision agriculture. Proximal gamma-ray spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising tool to collect fine-scale soil information. The objective of this study was to evaluate a proximal gamma-ray spectrometer to predict several soil properties using energy-windows and full-spectrum analysis methods in two differently managed sandy loam fields: conventional and organic. In the conventional field, both methods predicted clay, pH and total nitrogen with a good accuracy (R2 ≥ 0.56) in the top 0–15 cm soil depth, whereas in the organic field, only clay content was predicted with such accuracy. The highest prediction accuracy was found for total nitrogen (R2 = 0.75) in the conventional field in the energy-windows method. Predictions were better in the top 0–15 cm soil depths than in the 15–30 cm soil depths for individual and combined fields. This implies that gamma-ray spectroscopy can generally benefit soil characterisation for annual crops where the condition of the seedbed is important. Small differences in soil structure (conventional vs. organic) cannot be determined. As for the methodology, we conclude that the energy-windows method can establish relations between radionuclide data and soil properties as accurate as the full-spectrum analysis method. PMID:24287541

  15. Gamma-ray burst spectroscopy capabilities of the BATSE/GRO experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A scintillation spectrometer is included in each of the eight BATSE/GRO detector modules, resulting in all-sky coverage for gamma-ray bursts. The scientific motivation, design and capabilities of these spectrometers for performing spectral observations over a wide range of gamma-ray energies and burst intensities are described.

  16. Gator: a low-background counting facility at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudis, L.; Ferella, A. D.; Askin, A.; Angle, J.; Aprile, E.; Bruch, T.; Kish, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Manalaysay, A.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Schumann, M.

    2011-08-01

    A low-background germanium spectrometer has been installed and is being operated in an ultra-low background shield (the Gator facility) at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy (LNGS). With an integrated rate of ~ 0.16 events/min in the energy range between 100-2700 keV, the background is comparable to those of the world's most sensitive germanium detectors. After a detailed description of the facility, its background sources as well as the calibration and efficiency measurements are introduced. Two independent analysis methods are described and compared using examples from selected sample measurements. The Gator facility is used to screen materials for XENON, GERDA, and in the context of next-generation astroparticle physics facilities such as DARWIN.

  17. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2007-10-23

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

  18. New concepts for HgI2 scintillator gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goals of this project are development of the technology for HgI2 photodetectors (PD's), development of a HgI2/scintillator gamma detector, development of electronics, and development of a prototype gamma spectrometer. Work on the HgI2 PD's involved HgI2 purification and crystal growth, detector surface and electrical contact studies, PD structure optimization, encapsulation and packaging, and testing. Work on the HgI2/scintillator gamma detector involved a study of the optical - mechanical coupling for the optimization of CsI(Tl)/HgI2 gamma ray detectors and determination of the relationship between resolution versus scintillator type and size. The development of the electronics focused on low noise amplification circuits using different preamp input FET's and the use of a coincidence technique to maximize the signal, minimize the noise contribution in the gamma spectra, and improve the overall system resolution.

  19. Development of optimized detector/spectrophotometer technology for low background space astronomy missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B.

    1985-01-01

    This program was directed towards a better understanding of some of the important factors in the performance of infrared detector arrays at low background conditions appropriate for space astronomy. The arrays were manufactured by Aerojet Electrosystems Corporation, Azusa. Two arrays, both bismuth doped silicon, were investigated: an AMCID 32x32 Engineering mosiac Si:Bi accumulation mode charge injection device detector array and a metal oxide semiconductor/field effect transistor (MOS-FET) switched array of 16x32 pixels.

  20. The low background spectrometer TGV II for double beta decay measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneš, P.; Čermák, P.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Šimkovic, F.; Štekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.

    2006-12-01

    The low-background multi-HPGe spectrometer TGV II installed in the Modane Underground Laboratory (France) is described in detail and the results of the background measurements are reported. The spectrometer is focused on the double beta decay measurements with two isotopes— 106Cd ( 2νEC/EC mode) and 48Ca ( ββ mode). A basic summary of the physics of ββ decay (especially EC/EC mode) is also given.

  1. Assessment study of infrared detector arrays for low-background astronomical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ando, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art of infrared detector arrays employing charge coupled devices (CCD) or charge injection devices (CID) readout are assessed. The applicability, limitations and potentials of such arrays under the low-background astronomical observing conditions of interest for SIRFT (Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility) are determined. The following are reviewed: (1) monolithic extrinsic arrays; (2) monolithic intrinsic arrays; (3) charge injection devices; and (4) hybrid arrays.

  2. DESIGN OF A THERMOSIPHON FOR COOLING LOW-BACKGROUND HPGE ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.

    2012-11-26

    ABSTRACT A two-phase nitrogen thermosiphon was developed for the new generation of low-background high-purity germanium (HPGe) arrays. The cooling system for these arrays has to be able to handle the heat load (>20 W) presented by a large detector mass while meeting stringent requirements necessary for low-background systems. The HPGe detector modules should operate as close to liquid nitrogen temperature (<80K) as possible to provide adequate operating conditions for a full range of HPGe impurity concentrations. In addition, exceptional temperature stability (<1 K) is needed to reduce electronic gain shifts due to changes in the front-end electronics operating temperature. In order to meet the background requirements of state-of-the-art systems these arrays are enclosed in passive lead and copper shielding up to 1 m thick. In this paper we present a cooling system for low-background experiments that complies with these stringent geometrical restrictions. Active cooling was integrated via a horizontal thermosiphon that can be fabricated using ultra-pure electroformed copper. It was charged with nitrogen to 434 kPa (63 PSIA) at 292 K, which provided a fill ratio of 10%. The results showed that the thermosiphon can effectively remove in excess of 25 W of heat load.

  3. Evaluation of ultra-low background materials for uranium and thorium using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, E. W.; Overman, N. R.; LaFerriere, B. D.

    2013-08-08

    An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. This paper discusses how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

  4. Evaluation of Ultra-Low Background Materials for Uranium and Thorium Using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Overman, Nicole R.; LaFerriere, Brian D.

    2013-08-08

    An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. Here we will discuss how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

  5. Evaluation of ultra-low background materials for uranium and thorium using ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, E. W.; Overman, N. R.; LaFerriere, B. D.

    2013-08-01

    An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. This paper discusses how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

  6. A novel liquid-Xenon detector concept for combined fast-neutrons and gamma imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breskin, A.; Israelashvili, I.; Cortesi, M.; Arazi, L.; Shchemelinin, S.; Chechik, R.; Dangendorf, V.; Bromberger, B.; Vartsky, D.

    2012-06-01

    A new detector concept is presented for combined imaging and spectroscopy of fast-neutrons and gamma rays. It comprises a liquid-Xenon (LXe) converter and scintillator coupled to a UV-sensitive gaseous imaging photomultiplier (GPM). Radiation imaging is obtained by localization of the scintillation-light from LXe with the position-sensitive GPM. The latter comprises a cascade of Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEM), where the first element is coated with a CsI UV-photocathode. We present the concept and provide first model-simulation results of the processes involved and the expected performances of a detector having a LXe-filled capillaries converter. The new detector concept has potential applications in combined fast-neutron and gamma-ray screening of hidden explosives and fissile materials with pulsed sources.

  7. Lu1-xI3:Cex--A Scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight PET

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Kanai S.

    2009-03-17

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials comprising lutetium iodide doped with Cerium Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration. The timing resolution of the scintillators of the present invention provide compositions capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section.

  8. Feasibility on the spectrometric determination of the individual dose rate for detected gamma nuclides using the dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Chung, Kun Ho; Lee, Wanno; Park, Doo-Won; Kang, Mun-Ja

    2014-04-01

    A spectrometric determination of the dose rate using a detector is a very useful method to identify the contribution of artificial nuclides. In addition, the individual dose rate for detected gamma nuclides from the radioactive materials as well as the environment can give further information such as the in-situ measurement because of the direct relation between the individual dose rate and the activity of a nuclide. In this study, the calculation method for the individual dose rate for detected gamma nuclides was suggested by introducing the concept of the dose rate spectroscopy and the peak-to-total ratio in the energy spectrum for the dose rate, which means just a form of multiplied counts and the value of a G-factor in the spectrum. In addition, the validity of the suggested method for the individual dose rate was experimentally verified through a comparison of the calculation results on the energy spectra for several conditions of the standard source.

  9. Low-background shielding of Ge detectors for the measurement of residual 152Eu radioactivity induced by neutrons from the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Fukami, Kenji; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi

    1992-05-01

    Low-background gamma-ray spectrometers were constructed for the measurement of residual 152Eu activity induced by the atomic-bomb neutrons. Optimum thickness of lead shielding, inner linings and background characteristics were investigated for an ordinary coaxial- and a well-type Ge detector. In addition, an anticoincidence shielding was installed for the well-type detector. As a result, the background counting rate due to cosmic rays was greatly reduced. It was also shown that a sample preparation to enrich the objective activity and eliminate background activities was important in the case of the 152Eu measurement.

  10. POSITION SENSITIVE GERMANIUM DETECTORS FOR GAMMA-RAY IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gamma-ray imaging with position-sensitive germanium detectors offers the advantages of excellent energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and potentially good sptial resolution. The development of the amorphous-semiconductor electrical contact technology for germanium detec...

  11. Detection system for high-resolution gamma radiation spectroscopy with neutron time-of-flight filtering

    DOEpatents

    Dioszegi, Istvan; Salwen, Cynthia; Vanier, Peter

    2014-12-30

    A .gamma.-radiation detection system that includes at least one semiconductor detector such as HPGe-Detector, a position-sensitive .alpha.-Detector, a TOF Controller, and a Digitizer/Integrator. The Digitizer/Integrator starts to process the energy signals of a .gamma.-radiation sent from the HPGe-Detector instantly when the HPGe-Detector detects the .gamma.-radiation. Subsequently, it is determined whether a coincidence exists between the .alpha.-particles and .gamma.-radiation signal, based on a determination of the time-of-flight of neutrons obtained from the .alpha.-Detector and the HPGe-Detector. If it is determined that the time-of-flight falls within a predetermined coincidence window, the Digitizer/Integrator is allowed to continue and complete the energy signal processing. If, however, there is no coincidence, the Digitizer/Integrator is instructed to be clear and reset its operation instantly.

  12. Prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the {sup 104}Mo and {sup 108}Mo fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Guessous, A.; Schulz, N.; Bentaleb, M.; Lubkiewicz, E.; Durell, J.L.; Pearson, C.J.; Phillips, W.R.; Shannon, J.A.; Urban, W.; Varley, B.J.; Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.; Nash, K.L.; Williams, C.W.; Khazrouni, S.

    1996-03-01

    The level structures of the neutron-rich {sup 104}Mo and {sup 108}Mo nuclei have been investigated by observing prompt {gamma} rays emitted in the spontaneous fission of {sup 248}Cm with the EUROGAM spectrometer. Levels with spins up to 12{h_bar} have been observed and {gamma} branching obtained. The data can be satisfactorily described when {sup 104,108}Mo are considered as axially symmetric nuclei: in {sup 104}Mo, rotational bands based on the ground state, the one-phonon and the two-phonon {gamma}-vibrational states and a quasiparticle state have been observed, whereas in {sup 108}Mo the information is limited to the yrast band and the one phonon {gamma} band. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. {gamma}-Spectroscopy and Radioactive Beams: How To Perform Channel Selection ?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, B.; Redon, N.; Stezowski, O.; Schmitt, Ch.; Guinet, D.; Meyer, M.; Lautesse, Ph.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2006-04-26

    An experiment has been performed using a SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam at GANIL to investigate rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The EXOGAM gamma array was coupled with the DIAMANT light charged-particle detector and the VAMOS spectrometer. We report here on the powerful of this setup to extract fusion-evaporation {gamma}-rays from a large beam contamination.

  14. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of the Three Brightest and Hardest Short Gamma-ray Bursts Observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiriec, Sylvain; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaugthon, Valerie; Kara, Erin; Daigne, Frédéric; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A.; Bhat, P. N.; Foley, Suzanne; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M.; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2010-12-01

    From 2008 July to 2009 October, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected 320 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). About 20% of these events are classified as short based on their T 90 duration below 2 s. We present here for the first time time-resolved spectroscopy at timescales as short as 2 ms for the three brightest short GRBs observed with GBM. The time-integrated spectra of the events deviate from the Band function, indicating the existence of an additional spectral component, which can be fit by a power law with index ~-1.5. The time-integrated E peak values exceed 2 MeV for two of the bursts and are well above the values observed in the brightest long GRBs. Their E peak values and their low-energy power-law indices (α) confirm that short GRBs are harder than long ones. We find that short GRBs are very similar to long ones, but with light curves contracted in time and with harder spectra stretched toward higher energies. In our time-resolved spectroscopy analysis, we find that the E peak values range from a few tens of keV up to more than 6 MeV. In general, the hardness evolutions during the bursts follow their flux/intensity variations, similar to long bursts. However, we do not always see the E peak leading the light-curve rises and confirm the zero/short average light-curve spectral lag below 1 MeV, already established for short GRBs. We also find that the time-resolved low-energy power-law indices of the Band function mostly violate the limits imposed by the synchrotron models for both slow and fast electron cooling and may require additional emission processes to explain the data. Finally, we interpreted these observations in the context of the current existing models and emission mechanisms for the prompt emission of GRBs.

  15. The MAJORANA experiment: an ultra-low background search for neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keller, C.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

    2012-12-01

    The observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay would resolve the Majorana nature of the neutrino and could provide information on the absolute scale of the neutrino mass. The initial phase of the Majorana Experiment, known as the Demonstrator, will house 40 kg of Ge in an ultra-low background shielded environment at the 4850' level of the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The objective of the Demonstrator is to validate whether a future 1-tonne experiment can achieve a background goal of one count per tonne-year in a narrow region of interest around the 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay peak.

  16. Simulations of electron avalanches in an ultra-low-background proportional counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, John W.; Aalseth, Craig; Dion, Michael P.; Overman, Cory; Seifert, Allen; VanDevender, Brent

    2016-02-01

    New classes have been added to the simulation package Garfield++ to import the potential and electric field solutions generated by ANSYS ® MaxwellTM v.16. Using these tools we report results on the simulation of electron avalanches and induced signal waveforms in comparison to experimental data of the ultra-low-background gas proportional counters being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Furthermore, an improved mesh search algorithm based on Delaunay triangulation was implemented and provided at least a three order of magnitude time savings when compared to the built-in point-location search class of Garfield++.

  17. Radioactivity of Potassium Solutions: A Comparison of Calculated Activity to Measured Activity from Gross Beta Counting and Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, R F

    2005-07-26

    In order to determine if the measured beta activity for a solution containing potassium was exactly as predicted, particularly since the CES gas counter is not calibrated specifically with K-40, an experiment was conducted to compare measured activities from two radioanalytical methods (gamma spectroscopy and gas proportional counting) to calculated activities across a range of potassium concentrations. Potassium, being ubiquitous and naturally radioactive, is a well-known and common interference in gross beta counting methods. By measuring the observed beta activity due to K-40 in potassium-containing solutions across a wide range of concentrations, it was found that the observed beta activity agrees well with the beta activity calculated from the potassium concentration measured by standard inorganic analytical techniques, such as ICP-OES, and that using the measured potassium concentration to calculate the expected beta activity, and comparing this to the observed beta activity to determine if potassium can account for all the observed activity in a sample, is a valid technique. It was also observed that gamma spectroscopy is not an effective means of measuring K-40 activity below approximately 700 pCi/L, which corresponds to a solution with approximately 833 mg/L total potassium. Gas proportional counting for gross beta activity has a much lower detection limit, typically 20-50 picoCi/L for a liquid low in total dissolved solids, which corresponds to a potassium concentration of approximately 30-70 ppm K.

  18. Spectroscopy of few-particle nuclei around magic {sup 132}Sn from fission product {gamma}-ray studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C. T.

    1998-07-29

    We are studying the yrast structure of very neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic {sup 132}Sn by analyzing fission product {gamma}-ray data from a {sup 248}Cm source at Eurogam II. Yrast cascades in several few-valence-particle nuclei have been identified through {gamma}{gamma} cross coincidences with their complementary fission partners. Results for two-valence-particle nuclei {sup 132}Sb, {sup 134}Te, {sup 134}Sb and {sup 134}Sn provide empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions which, combined with single-particle energies already known in the one-particle nuclei, are essential for shell-model analysis in this region. Findings for the N = 82 nuclei {sup 134}Te and {sup 135}I have now been extended to the four-proton nucleus {sup 136}Xe. Results for the two-neutron nucleus {sup 134}Sn and the N = 83 isotones {sup 134}Sb, {sup 135}Te and {sup 135}I open up the spectroscopy of nuclei in the northeast quadrant above {sup 132}Sn.

  19. Advanced performance and scalability of Si nanowire field-effect transistors analyzed using noise spectroscopy and gamma radiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Vitusevich, S. A. Pud, S.; Offenhäusser, A.; Petrychuk, M. V.; Danilchenko, B. A.

    2013-11-28

    High-quality Si nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated using thermal nanoimprint and chemical wet etching technologies. FET structures of different lengths demonstrate high carrier mobility with values of about 750 cm{sup 2}/Vs and low volume densities of active traps in the dielectric layers of 5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} eV{sup −1}. We investigated the transport properties of these n-type channel structures using low-frequency noise spectroscopy before and after gamma radiation treatment. Before gamma irradiation, FET structures with lengths of less than 4 μm exhibited noise from contact regions with 1/(L{sup 2}) dependence for the relative 1/f noise. After gamma radiation, the spectra reflected the priority of channel noise with 1/L dependence for all samples. The transport characteristics show that the fabricated nanowire FETs improved scalability, decreased parameter scattering, and increased stability after treatment. The results demonstrate that these nanowire FETs are promising for nanoelectronic and biosensor applications due to the cost-efficient technology and advanced performance of FETs with improved stability and reliability.

  20. The Music of the Stars : Spectroscopy of Pulsations in gamma Doradus Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsden, Emily

    2013-05-01

    p>The mysteries of the interior structures of stars are being tackled with asteroseismology. The observable parameters of the surface pulsations of stars inform us of the interior characteristics of numerous classes of stars. The main-sequence gamma Doradus stars, just a little hotter than the Sun, offer the potential of determining stellar structure right down to the core. To determine the structural profile of a star, the observed frequencies and a full geometric description must be determined. This is only possible with long-term spectroscopic monitoring and careful analysis of the pulsation signature in spectral lines. This work seeks to identify the pulsational geometry of several gamma Doradus stars and to identify areas of improvement for current observation, analysis and modelling techniques. More than 4500 spectra were gathered on five stars for this purpose. For three stars a successful multi-frequency and mode identification solution was determined and significant progress has been made towards the understanding of a binary system involving a gamma Doradus star. A hybrid gamma Doradus/nbsp;delta Scuti pulsator was also intensely monitored and results from this work raise important questions about the classification of this type of star. Current analysis techniques were found to be fit-for-purpose for pure gamma Doradus stars, but stars with complexities such as hybrid pulsations and/or fast rotation require future development of the current models./p>

  1. Moisture logging in cased boreholes using capture gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert D.; Randall, Russell R.; Meisner, James E.; Boles, Jason L.; Reynolds, Kent D.

    1999-10-01

    A nuclear logging tool has been developed that determines the moisture content of subsurface earth formations by measuring the gamma rays produced by thermal neutron capture in hydrogen. The tool employs a 252Cf fast neutron source and a hyperpure germanium gamma-ray detector. The tool has demonstrated excellent sensitivity to changes in formation moisture content when used in air-filled boreholes cased with steel. The tool is also sensitive to other elements that produce neutron capture gamma rays, such as silicon, calcium, aluminum, sodium, chlorine, chromium, cadmium and mercury. Extensive computer modeling of the tool has been done to aid its design and in the interpretation of logging data taken under a variety of conditions. The logging tool has been calibrated for its moisture and chlorine response in a set of physical models and is now in use logging boreholes at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site.

  2. Development of an Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for Trace Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Finn, Erin C.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Panisko, Mark E.; Shaff, Sarah M.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-09-01

    Low-level liquid scintillation counting (LSC) has been established as one of the radiation detection techniques useful in elucidating environmental processes and environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities. The Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter (ULB-LSC) under construction in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory aims to further reduce the MDAs and/or required sample processing. Through layers of passive shielding in conjunction with an active veto and 30 meters water equivalent overburden, the background reduction is expected to be 10 to 100 times below typical analytic low-background liquid scintillation systems. Simulations have shown an expected background of around 14 counts per day. A novel approach to the light collection will use a coated hollow light guide cut into the inner copper shielding. Demonstration LSC measurements will show low-energy detection, spectral deconvolution, and alpha/beta discrimination capabilities, from trials with standards of tritium, strontium-90, and actinium-227, respectively. An overview of the system design and expected demonstration measurements will emphasize the potential applications of the ULB-LSC in environmental monitoring for treaty verification, reach-back sample analysis, and facility inspections.

  3. Development of an underground low background instrument for high sensitivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, E.; Hahn, I. S.; Kang, W. G.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, M. H.; Leonard, D. S.; Park, Su Yeon

    2016-05-01

    The Center for Underground Physics has developed in collaboration with CANBERRA a low background instrument composed of 14 HPGe detectors divided in two arrays facing each other. The performance and the background of a single detector of the array have been studied in order to improve the array final configuration. An accurate material selection, through the measurements of building material samples and Monte Carlo simulations based on Geant4, has been performed to reach the lowest possible intrinsic background. Alternative materials and configurations have been considered for the final design of the array simulating the expected intrinsic background of the instrument considering the needed changes. The expected sensitivity of the improved array configuration, concerning the low background material selection for rare events physics experiments, has been evaluated through Monte Carlo simulations considering 232Th concentration in a Copper sample. Since the array can also be used for rare decays searches, the expected sensitivity on the 156Dy resonant double electron capture has thus been calculated.

  4. Non-destructive determination of 224Ra, 226Ra and 228Ra concentrations in drinking water by gamma spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Pravin; Haines, Douglas; Bari, Abdul; Torres, Miguel

    2003-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency mandates that drinking water showing gross alpha-activity greater than 0.19 Bq L(-1) should be analyzed for radium, a known human carcinogen. The recommended testing methods are intricate and laborious. The method reported in this paper is a direct, non-destructive gamma-spectroscopic method for the determination of 224Ra, 226Ra, and 228Ra, the three radium isotopes of environmental concern in drinking water. Large-volume Marinelli beakers (4.1-L capacity), especially designed for measuring radioactive gases, in conjunction with a low-background, high-efficiency (131%) germanium detector were used in this work. It was first established that radon, the gaseous decay product of radium, and its progeny are quantitatively retained in this Marinelli beaker. The 224Ra, 226Ra, and 228Ra activity concentrations are determined from the equilibrium activities of their progeny: 212Pb, 214Pb (214Bi), and 228Ac; and the gamma-lines used in the analysis are 238.6, 351.9 (and 609.2), and 911.2 keV, respectively. The 224Ra activity is determined from the first 1,000-min measurement performed after expulsion of radon from the sample. The 226Ra activity is determined from the second, 2,400-min measurement, made 3 to 5 d later, and the 228Ra activity is determined from either the first or the second measurement, depending on its concentration level. The method's minimum detectable activities are 0.017 Bq L(-1), 0.020 Bq L(-1), and 0.027 Bq L(-1) for 224Ra, 226Ra, and 228Ra, respectively, when measured under radioactive equilibrium. These limits are well within the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations required limit of 0.037 Bq L(-1) for 226Ra and for 228Ra. The precision and accuracy of the method, evaluated using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Environmental Resource Associates' quality control samples, were found to be within acceptable limits. PMID:14571995

  5. Development of a detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, P.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Marone, A.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Piemonte, C.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Nelms, N.; Shortt, B.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the development of a new gamma detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to readout large LaBr3:Ce scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. The research is supported by the European Space Agency through the Technology Research Programme (TRP) and by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) within the Gamma project. The SDDs, produced at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) semiconductor laboratories, are designed as monolithic arrays of 3 × 3 units, each one of an active area of 8 mm × 8 mm (overall area of 26 mm × 26 mm). The readout electronics and the architecture of the camera are briefly described and then first experimental results coupling the SDD array with a 1'' × 1'' LaBr3:Ce scintillator are reported. An energy resolution of 3% FWHM at 662 keV has been measured at -20°C, better than coupling the same scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. The same scintillator is also used to evaluate position sensitivity with a 1 mm collimated Cs-137 source. The main difficulty in determining the position of the gamma-ray interaction in the crystal is associated to the high thickness/diameter ratio of the crystal (1:1) and the use of reflectors on all lateral and top sides the crystal. This last choice enhances energy resolution but makes imaging capability more challenging because light is spread over all photodetectors. Preliminary results show that the camera is able to detect shifts in the measured signals, when the source is moved with steps of 5 mm. A modified version of the centroid method is finally implemented to evaluate the imaging capability of the system.

  6. Metabolic Study of Breast MCF-7 Tumor Spheroids after Gamma Irradiation by 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Alessandra; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Guidoni, Laura; Viti, Vincenza; Rosi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important model system to investigate the response of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. They share more properties with the original tumor than cells cultured as 2D monolayers do, which helps distinguish the intrinsic properties of monolayer cells from those induced during cell aggregation in 3D spheroids. The paper investigates some metabolic aspects of small tumor spheroids of breast cancer and their originating MCF-7 cells, grown as monolayer, by means of high–resolution (HR) 1H NMR spectroscopy and MR microimaging before and after gamma irradiation. The spectra of spheroids were characterized by higher intensity of mobile lipids, mostly neutral lipids, and glutamine (Gln) signals with respect to their monolayer cells counterpart, mainly owing to the lower oxygen supply in spheroids. Morphological changes of small spheroids after gamma-ray irradiation, such as loss of their regular shape, were observed by MR microimaging. Lipid signal intensity increased after irradiation, as evidenced in both MR localized spectra of the single spheroid and in HR NMR spectra of spheroid suspensions. Furthermore, the intense Gln signal from spectra of irradiated spheroids remained unchanged, while the low Gln signal observed in monolayer cells increased after irradiation. Similar results were observed in cells grown in hypoxic conditions. The different behavior of Gln in 2D monolayers and in 3D spheroids supports the hypothesis that a lower oxygen supply induces both an upregulation of Gln synthetase and a downregulation of glutaminases with the consequent increase in Gln content, as already observed under hypoxic conditions. The data herein indicate that 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a useful tool for monitoring cell response to different constraints. The use of spheroid suspensions seems to be a feasible alternative to localized spectroscopy since similar effects were found after radiation treatment. PMID:27200293

  7. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Hunt, Alan W.; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather A.

    2015-09-28

    This project has been a collaborative effort of researchers from four National Laboratories, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Idaho State University’s (ISU) Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). Experimental measurements at the Oregon State University (OSU) were also supported. The research included two key components, a strong experimental campaign to characterize the delayed gamma-ray signatures of the isotopes of interests and of combined targets, and a closely linked modeling effort to assess system designs and applications. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Detailed signature knowledge is essential for analyzing the capabilities of the delayed gamma technique, optimizing measurement parameters, and specifying neutron source and gamma-ray detection system requirements. The research was divided into three tasks: experimental measurements, characterization of fission yields, and development of analysis methods (task 1), modeling in support of experiment design and analysis and for the assessment of applications (task 2), and high-rate gamma-ray detector studies (task 3).

  8. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors pro...

  9. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the neutron-rich nuclei {sup 89}Rb, {sup 92}Y, and {sup 93}Y with multinucleon transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bucurescu, D.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.; Mihai, C.; Suliman, G.; Rusu, C.; Marginean, N.; Ur, C. A.; Marginean, R.; De Angelis, G.; Corradi, L.; Vedova, F. Della; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Guiot, B.; Napoli, D.; Stefanini, A. M.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Beghini, S.

    2007-12-15

    The positive-parity yrast states in the {sup 89}Rb, {sup 92}Y, and {sup 93}Y nuclei were studied using {gamma}-ray spectroscopy with heavy-ion induced reactions. In the multinucleon transfer reactions {sup 208}Pb+{sup 90}Zr (590 MeV) and {sup 238}U+{sup 82}Se (505 MeV), several {gamma}-ray transitions were identified in these nuclei by means of coincidences between recoiling ions identified with the PRISMA spectrometer and {gamma} rays detected with the CLARA {gamma}-ray array in thin target experiments. Level schemes were subsequently determined from triple-{gamma} coincidences recorded with the GASP array in a thick target experiment, in the reactions produced by a 470 MeV {sup 82}Se beam with a {sup 192}Os target. The observed level schemes are compared to shell-model calculations.

  10. Estimation of Equivalent Sea Level Cosmic Ray Exposure for Low Background Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Austen T.; Orrell, John L.

    2012-08-25

    While scientists at CERN and other particle accelerators around the world explore the boundaries of high energy physics, the Majorana project investigates the other end of the spectrum with its extremely sensitive, low background, low energy detector. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR aims to detect neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ), a rare theoretical process in which two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons, without the emission of the two antineutrinos that are a product of a normal double beta decay. This process is only possible if – and therefore a detection would prove — the neutrino is a Majorana particle, meaning that it is its own antiparticle [Aaselth et al. 2004] . The existence of such a decay would also disprove lepton conservation and give information about the neutrino's mass.