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Sample records for low-degree mantle melts

  1. Ascent Dynamics of Low Degree Mantle Partial Melts, Constrained from CO2 Solubility Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, Y.; Morizet, Y.; Massuyeau, M.; Gaillard, F.

    2014-12-01

    Low degree partial melting of carbonated mantle peridotite generates strongly silica-undersaturated melts containing substantial amount of carbon dioxide (several tens of wt%). Kimberlite melts are one of these volatile-rich mantle product and are believed to ascent through the upper mantle and crust at great speed (~5 to 50 ms-1). The role of volatiles in propelling this ascent has remained poorly quantified due to experimental difficulties in quenching such compositions to a glass. In this study, we used a range of melt compositions in the Si-C-Al-Ca-Mg-Fe-Na-K-O system addressing the chemical complexity needed to closely mimic kimberlitic to carbonatitic characteristics. These melts can, furthermore, be quenched fast enough to produce a glass and be used to determine the CO2 solubility as a function of composition and pressure. Our results suggest that the solubility of CO2 decreases steadily with increasing amount of network forming cations from ~30 wt% CO2 at 12 wt% SiO2 down to ~3 wt% CO2 at 40 wt% SiO2 and that pressure has limited effect on the solubility of CO2 up until very shallow depth (~ last 3 km). This peculiar pressure-solubility relation in kimberlite melt can explain the highly explosive nature of kimberlite magma and characteristic geo-morphological features of their root zone. We present a general CO2 solubility model based on thermodynamic formalism covering a large range of melt composition from 11 to 53 wt% SiO2 spanning the transition from carbonatitic to basaltic melts at pressures up to 1500 MPa.

  2. Evidence from meimechites and other low-degree mantle melts for redox controls on mantle-crust fractionation of platinum-group elements

    PubMed Central

    Mungall, James E.; Hanley, Jacob J.; Arndt, Nicholas T.; Debecdelievre, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of the geochemistry of the chalcophile elements [i.e., Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd (platinum-group elements), and Au, Cu, Ni] has been informed for at least 20 years by the common assumption that when crust-forming partial melts are extracted from the upper mantle, sulfide liquid in the restite sequesters chalcophile elements until the extent of partial melting exceeds ≈25% and all of the sulfide has been dissolved in silicate melt [Hamlyn, P. R. & Keays, R. R. (1985) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 49, 1797–1811]. Here we document very high, unfractionated, chalcophile element concentrations in small-degree partial melts from the mantle that cannot be reconciled with the canonical residual sulfide assumption. We show that the observed high, unfractionated platinum-group element concentrations in small-degree partial melts can be attained if the melting takes place at moderately high oxygen fugacity, which will reduce the amount of sulfide due to the formation of sulfate and will also destabilize residual monosulfide solid solution by driving sulfide melts into the spinel-liquid divariant field. Magmas formed at high oxygen fugacity by small degrees of mantle melting can be important agents for the transfer of chalcophile elements from the upper mantle to the crust and may be progenitors of significant ore deposits of Pt, Pd, and Au. PMID:16908861

  3. Low-degree melting of a metasomatized lithospheric mantle for the origin of Cenozoic Yulong monzogranite-porphyry, east Tibet: Geochemical and Sr Nd Pb Hf isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yao-Hui; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Ling, Hong-Fei; Dai, Bao-Zhang

    2006-01-01

    SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating, mineral chemical, element geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic data have been determined for the Yulong monzogranite-porphyry in the eastern Tibet, China. The Yulong porphyry was emplaced into Triassic strata at about 39 Ma. The rocks are weakly peraluminous and show shoshonitic affinity, i.e., alkalis-rich, high K 2O contents with high K 2O / Na 2O ratios, enrichment in LREE and LILE. They also show some affinities with the adakite, e.g., high SiO 2 and Al 2O 3, and low MgO contents, depleted in Y and Yb, and enrichment in Sr with high Sr / Y and La / Yb ratios, and no Eu anomalies. The Yulong porphyry has radiogenic 87Sr / 86Sr (0.7063-0.7070) and unradiogenic 143Nd / 144Nd ( ɛNd = - 2.0 to - 3.0) ratios. The Pb isotopic compositions of feldspar phenocrysts separated from the Yulong porphyry show a narrow range of 206Pb / 204Pb ratios (18.71-18.82) and unusually radiogenic 207Pb / 204Pb (15.65-15.67) and 208Pb / 204Pb (38.87-39.00) ratios. In situ Hf isotopic composition of zircons that have been SHRIMP U-Pb dated is characterized by clearly positive initial ɛHf values, ranging from + 3.1 to + 5.9, most between + 4 and + 5. Phenocryst clinopyroxene geothermometry of the Yulong porphyry indicates that the primary magmas had anomalously high temperature (> 1200 °C). The source depth for the Yulong porphyry is at least 100 km inferred by the metasomatic volatile phase (phlogopite-carbonate) relations. Detailed geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions not only rule out fractional crystallization or assimilation-fractional crystallization processes, but also deny the possibility of partial melting of subducted oceanic crust or basaltic lower crust. Instead, low degree (1-5%) partial melting of a metasomatized lithosphere (phlogopite-garnet clinopyroxenite) is compatible with the data. This example gives a case study that granite can be derived directly by partial melting of an enriched lithospheric mantle, which is important to

  4. Olivine flotation in mantle melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, Carl B.; Walker, David

    1993-01-01

    Molten komatiite and peridotite have been compressed in an octahedral multi-anvil device up to 10 GPa. Densities of the melts were measured at pressure intervals in the range 7 to 10 GPa by observing sinking and floating San Carlos olivines and synthetic forsterite marker spheres. The multi-anvil results for komatiite, when combined with piston-cylinder measurements done at 4 to 6 GPa and a calculated reference density at 10 5 Pa, yield a Birch-Murnaghan isothermal bulk modulus of (K 1900C) = 26 GPa and pressure derivative K' = 4.25. The pressure of neutral buoyancy for olivine in komatiite is confirmed to be near 8 GPa as predicted in earlier work. Olivine flotation in the experimental komatiite commences at a pressure close to where the liquidus phase changes from olivine to denser garnet, leading to the possibility of density driven crystal sorting during fractionation. Molten peridotite (KLB-1) shows an isothermal compression (2000°C) of 0.065 g cm -3 GPa -1 in the interval 10 5 Pa to 8.2 GPa. The olivine/liquid peridotite density crossover is predicted to lie between 9 and 11 GPa, indicating that olivine flotation can operate at depths of 300-500 km in a molten peridotitic mantle.

  5. Melt migration through Io's convecting mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, C. M.; Showman, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The extensive volcanism occurring on the surface of Io suggests that its interior must contain at least some partial melt. Unlike Earth, Io cannot lose its internal heat through convection alone [1]. Instead, melt moving through the solid mantle helps remove heat from Io's interior by carrying its latent heat towards the surface as it buoyantly ascends through the mantle. We investigate this process by considering melt migration in a column of rock rising through the mantle between downwelling plumes. Convective scaling laws provide the upwelling velocity and the temperature of the rising mantle. Properties of melt migration in this rising mantle are calculated using porous flow equations and an equation for the conservation of energy which includes latent heat consumption, heat advection and heat conduction [2]. This combination of convective scaling laws and porous flow laws allows us to self-consistently determine the radial melt fraction profile in Io's interior, the average melt fraction in Io's interior and the heat flux due to advection of melt. The average melt fraction can be compared to the melt fraction constraints calculated by [3] from Galileo magnetometer measurements. The surface heat flux calculations can be compared to the value of Io's observed surface heat flux which ranges with observation from 1.5-4 W m-2 [4]. [1] Moore W. B. (2003) J. Geophys. Res., 108, E8, 15-1. [2] Hewitt I. J. and Fowler A. C. (2008) Proc. R. Soc. A., 464, 2467-2491. [3] Khurana K. K. et al. (2011) Science, 332, 1186-1189. [4] Moore, W. B. et al. (2007) In: Io After Galileo, Springer-Praxis, 89-108.

  6. Wet Melting in the Oceanic Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Kelley, K.

    2003-12-01

    Mantle melting beneath spreading centers is driven by adiabatic decompression, but the amount of melt generated is a function of both mantle potential temperature (Tp) and water content. Separating these two effects, while a petrological challenge, is of fundamental consequence to the structure and rheology of the oceanic plate and upper mantle. Back-arc basin spreading centers provide a natural setting to quantify the effects of water and Tp on mantle melting. In one view, back-arc basins are like small mid-ocean ridges, where the volume and composition of mantle melts is well explained by Tp variations. Viewed another way, back-arc basins tap regions of mantle that have been recently hydrated by subduction, and so should reflect water-fluxed melting systematics. Here we try to reconcile these two views, and quantify the melting systematics of the oceanic mantle. Almost ten years ago, Stolper & Newman (EPSL, 1994) illustrated a linear relationship between the amount of water (H2Oo) and the fraction of melting (F) in the mantle beneath the Mariana back-arc. Here we extend their approach to several back-arc basins where recent studies have determined water contents in submarine basaltic glasses. We use Ti as a proxy for F after correcting for crystal fractionation, and account for Ti source composition with a model based on Ti/Y variations in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). We use F then to calculate H2Oo, which varies from low values typical of average MORB mantle (100's ppm) to 0.5 wt% H2O. Each back-arc basin forms a distinct, nominally linear trend in F vs. H2Oo, where the F intercept at zero H2Oo reflects dry, decompression melting driven by Tp variations similar to global MORB (Tp = 1300 - 1500° C, in the order of Scotia, Marianas, Manus and Lau). The slopes of the trends also appear to vary with Tp, with more productive wet melting at higher Tp (dF/dH2O =25-75 wt% melting/ wt% H2O). These systematics should also apply to melting beneath mid-ocean ridges

  7. Oceanic slab melting and mantle metasomatism.

    PubMed

    Scaillet, B; Prouteau, G

    2001-01-01

    Modern plate tectonic brings down oceanic crust along subduction zones where it either dehydrates or melts. Those hydrous fluids or melts migrate into the overlying mantle wedge trigerring its melting which produces arc magmas and thus additional continental crust. Nowadays, melting seems to be restricted to cases of young (< 50 Ma) subducted plates. Slab melts are silicic and strongly sodic (trondhjemitic). They are produced at low temperatures (< 1000 degrees C) and under water excess conditions. Their interaction with mantle peridotite produces hydrous metasomatic phases such as amphibole and phlogopite that can be more or less sodium rich. Upon interaction the slab melt becomes less silicic (dacitic to andesitic), and Mg, Ni and Cr richer. Virtually all exposed slab melts display geochemical evidence of ingestion of mantle material. Modern slab melts are thus unlike Archean Trondhjemite-Tonalite-Granodiorite rocks (TTG), which suggests that both types of magmas were generated via different petrogenetic pathways which may imply an Archean tectonic model of crust production different from that of the present-day, subduction-related, one. PMID:11838241

  8. Platinum group elements in mantle melts and mantle samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Stephen J.; Mungall, James E.; Maier, Wolfgang D.

    2015-09-01

    A large data compilation has been assembled of platinum group element (PGE) analyses in mantle melts and mantle rocks, the latter including an assortment of xenoliths and obducted mantle massifs. The degree of correlation has been investigated among the PGEs and with other major element variables such as Al2O3, TiO2 and Mg number, and the results are considered in the context of the current paradigm for the behaviour of highly siderophile elements in the silicate Earth. Primitive mantle melts have a wide range of PGE contents. Komatiites have the highest abundances of all the PGEs, show the strongest correlations between Pt and Rh, Pt and Pd and between the iridium-group PGEs Ir, Ru and Os (IPGEs). Most basalts of all affinities have lower levels of Pt and Pd and much lower levels of Ir, Ru and Os than komatiites. Within the basalt grouping Rh has stronger affinities with the IPGEs. Picrites and Archaean basalts are intermediate between these two groups. MORBs and a small proportion of continental LIP basalts show strong depletions in all PGEs attributable to retention of sulfide in their mantle source rocks, or sulfide liquid fractionation on ascent. The degree of PGE depletion in other basalts is probably attributable to equilibration with sulfide, but is less than would be expected under conventional models of sulfide extraction, and is instead attributed to mixing of magmas generated at variable depths incorporating both sulfide-saturated and undersaturated components. Basalts with Pt and Pd contents higher than typical komatiites are rare, a notable example being B1-type parent magmas to the Bushveld Complex, which have komatiite-like relative PGE abundances and Pt, Pd and Rh abundances up to a factor of two higher than komatiites for comparable Ti contents. The mantle composition array as a whole is characterized by variable degrees of depletion of Pt, Pd and Rh in Al-poor, melt-depleted harzburgite/dunite lithologies; lack of depletion in these elements in

  9. Melting and Crystallization at Core Mantle Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Pradhan, G. K.; Siebert, J.; Auzende, A. L.; Morard, G.; Antonangeli, D.; Garbarino, G.

    2015-12-01

    Early crystallization of magma oceans may generate original compositional heterogeneities in the mantle. Dense basal melts may also be trapped in the lowermost mantle and explain mantle regions with ultralow seismic velocities (ULVZs) near the core-mantle boundary [1]. To test this hypothesis, we first constructed the solidus curve of a natural peridotite between 36 and 140 gigapascals using laser-heated diamond anvil cells. In our experiments, melting at core-mantle boundary pressures occurs around 4100 ± 150 K, which is a value that can match estimated mantle geotherms. Similar results were found for a chondritic mantle [2] whereas much lower pyrolitic melting temperatures were recently proposed from textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples [3]. We also investigated the melting properties of natural mid ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), we obtain a MORB solidus temperature of 3950 ±150 K. If our solidus temperatures are in good agreement with recent results proposed for a similar composition [4], the textural and chemical characterizations of our recovered samples made by analytical transmission electron microscope indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such partial melts could be gravitationnally stable at the core mantle boundary. Our observations are tested against calculations made using a self-consistent thermodynamic database for the MgO-FeO-SiO2 system from 20 GPa to 140 GPa [5]. These observations and calculations provide a first step towards a consistent thermodynamic modelling of the crystallization sequence of the magma ocean, which shows that the existence of a dense iron rich and fusible layer above the CMB at the end of the crystallization is plausible [5], which is in contradiction with the conclusions drawn in [4]. [1] Williams

  10. Relations between ore deposits and granites resulting from low degree of melting of the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuney, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Ore deposits present three major types of relations with granites: syn-magmatic mineralization disseminated in the granites themselves (such as rare metal granites or pegmatites), magmatic-hydrothermal mineralization occurring as veins within the granites or in enclosing rocks (such as porphyry type deposits), and deposits generated by hydrothermal fluids of variable origin and occurring within the granites or their vicinity soon or much later than granite emplacement (such as vein-type uranium deposits). Besides this diversity of relations between granites and mineral deposits there is also a large diversity of magma types which may in relation with mineral deposits. We will focus our contribution on magmas produced by moderate degree of partial melting within the continental crust leading to the formation of anatectic pegmatoids for very low rate of partial melting and peraluminous leucogranites for low rate of partial melting. The major processes controlling the solubility of the metals in these magmas will be reviewed. The role of metal enrichment: (i) in the sources lithologies, (ii) as external input by fluids liberated during granulitisation of metasediments by a carbonic wave, (iii) extraction from enclosing metamorphic rocks, will be discussed.

  11. Transcrystalline melt migration and Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Schiano, Pierre; Provost, Ariel; Clocchiatti, Roberto; Faure, François

    2006-11-10

    Plate tectonics and volcanism involve the formation, migration, and interaction of magma and gas. Experiments show that melt inclusions subjected to a thermal gradient migrate through olivine crystals, under the kinetic control of crystal-melt interface mechanisms. Exsolved gas bubbles remain fixed and eventually separate from the melt. Scaled to thermal gradients in Earth's mantle and geological times, our results account for the grain-scale segregation of primitive melts, reinterpret CO2-rich fluid inclusions as escaped from melt, and question the existence of a free, deeply percolating fluid phase. Melt migration experiments also allow us to quantify crystal growth kinetics at very low undercoolings in conditions appropriate to many natural systems. PMID:17095697

  12. The Contribution from Hot, Subducted Lithosphere to Mantle Wedge: Melt or Fluid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    In the Mt. Shasta region, N. Calif., USA, primitive basaltic andesites and andesites (similar to adakites) preserve a remarkable record of subducted lithosphere and mantle wedge elemental contributions. Estimates of pre-eruptive water contents allow the development of models of magma generation. When combined with a mantle melting model, one can characterize the chemical composition of the subducted slab contribution. Mt. Shasta lies above the young Juan de Fuca plate, where a hot slab environment has been proposed for the origin of the lavas. Melting is modeled as a process where an initial melt is formed in the mantle wedge above the slab by vapor-saturated melting of peridotite, metasomatized and enriched by the slab-derived melt or fluid. Vapor-saturated melting leads to the production of a water-rich melt (25-30 wt. % H2O) that ascends into the overlying mantle and continuously reacts as it encounters hotter, shallower mantle. The melt fraction increases, the water content decreases and the slab contribution is modified and diluted. The result is a flux melt whose major elements are dominantly derived by mantle melting and whose trace elements and isotopic characteristics reflect the subducted oceanic lithosphere. Two distinct sources are indicated by Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic evidence: a MORB and a sediment source. When the major element signature of the mantle wedge is removed, the slab contribution more closely resembles a low degree melt (2 to 5 wt. %) of a garnet + clinopyroxene source. The subducted component is less similar to experimental fluids equilibrated with eclogite. Although the LIL elements are a good match with a fluid, the model abundances of rare earth elements (Ce, Sm and Yb) are low by several orders of magnitude. Thus, a melt seems a better fit at Mt. Shasta based on our current state of understanding of melt vs. fluid equilibrium in the deep subduction environment.

  13. Microscale effects of melt infiltration into the lithospheric mantle: Peridotite xenoliths from Xilong, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianggu; Zheng, Jianping; Griffin, William L.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Pearson, Norman J.

    2015-09-01

    Melting and reactions between minerals and melts are important processes in the evolution of the lithospheric mantle, and are usually inferred from their geochemical fingerprints in mantle samples. However, a suite of mantle-derived peridotite xenoliths from the Xilong area, South China, records the reaction of successive silicate melts of different compositions with mineral assemblages in the mantle, preserved by quenching during entrainment. These xenoliths form two groups and record a compositionally layered mantle. Group 1 has olivine Mg# ~ 91, (and is thus relatively refractory), is derived from depths of ~ 50-65 km, and shows the trace-element geochemical signature of "old" carbonatitic metasomatism. Group 2 is more fertile with olivine Mg# mainly ~ 89-90, is derived from ~ 40 to 55 km and has ubiquitous modal spinel. Xenoliths of both groups then show sequential infiltration by two compositionally distinct melts (Na-rich and K-rich) not long before eruption. The Na-rich melts are enclosed in spongy clinopyroxene and spinel rims and are inferred to have triggered the reactions that formed the spongy rims, which have lower Al2O3, Na2O and Mg#, but higher FeO, TiO2 and Cr# than the primary phases. The undersaturated Na-rich mafic melts were probably formed in the asthenosphere by low-degree melting. The K-rich melts occur mainly in reaction zones around orthopyroxene and in reaction patches containing fine-grained secondary olivine, clinopyroxene and minor spinel. The melts have high contents of SiO2, K2O (mean 14.3 wt.%), Rb, Ba, and LREE but very low Na2O/K2O (0.01-0.29), positive anomalies in Eu and Sr, and variable HFSE anomalies. These compositional characteristics are consistent with an origin as low-degree partial melts of pre-existing phlogopite-bearing rocks. The K-rich melts also react with primary olivine, and the spongy-textured secondary clinopyroxene and spinel inferred to have formed by reaction with the Na-rich melts, yielding secondary olivine

  14. Mantle Mineral/Silicate Melt Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, E. A.; Drake, M. J.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction: The partitioning of elements among mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. It has been proposed that the elevated Mg/Si ratio of the upper mantle of the Earth is a consequence of the flotation of olivine into the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). Agee and Walker (1988) have generated a model via mass balance by assuming average mineral compositions to generate upper mantle peridotite. This model determines that upper mantle peridotite could result from the addition of 32.7% olivine and 0.9% majorite garnet into the upper mantle, and subtraction of 27.6% perovskite from the upper mantle (Agee and Walker, 1988). The present contribution uses experimental data to examine the consequences of such multiple phase fractionations enabling an independent evaluation of the above mentioned model. Here we use Mg-perovskite/melt partition coefficients from both a synthetic and a natural system (KLB-1) obtained from this laboratory. Also used are partition coefficient values for majorite garnet/melt, beta spinel/melt and olivine/melt partitioning (McFarlane et al., 1991b; McFarlane et al., 1992). Multiple phase fractionations are examined using the equilibrium crystallization equation and partition coefficient values. The mineral proportions determined by Agee and Walker (1988) are converted into weight fractions and used to compute a bulk partition coefficient value. Discussion: There has been a significant debate concerning whether measured values of trace element partition coefficients permit large-scale fractionation of liquidus phases from an early terrestrial magma ocean (Kato et al., 1988a,b; Walker and Agee, 1989; Drake, 1989; Drake et al., 1991; McFarlane et al., 1990, 1991). It should be noted that it is unclear which, if any, numerical values of partition coefficients are appropriate for examining this question, and certainly the assumptions for the current model must be more fully

  15. Subduction: The Gatekeeper for Mantle Melting.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kincaid, C. R.; Druken, K. A.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    Geodynamic models are used to show the importance of subduction in controlling vertical thermal and chemical fluxes from Earth's interior to surface. In our models subduction-induced circulation produces conditions favorable to both steady-state and episodic melt production and also plays the role of gatekeeper in thwarting large scale melt production from rising plumes. We use laboratory experiments to characterize three-dimensional (3D) flow fields in convergent margins in response to a range of subduction and back-arc deformation styles, and how these flows interact with upwellings. Models utilize a glucose working fluid with a temperature dependent viscosity to represent the upper 2000 km of the mantle. Subducting lithosphere is modeled with a descending Phenolic plate and back-arc extension is produced by moving Mylar sheets. Thermal plumes are generated from a pressurized, temperature controlled source. Our results show that naturally occurring transitions from downdip- to rollback-dominated subduction produce conditions that favor both widespread decompression melting in the mantle wedge and short-lived pulses of extensive slab melting. For cases of plume-subduction interaction, 3D slab-induced flow quickly converts the active upwelling to a passive thermal anomaly that bears little to no resemblance to traditional models for plume surface expressions. Instead of rising to make LIPs with age-progressive chains, the bulk of the original plume material is trapped below depths of melt production before being re-subducted by the slab. A limited volume of this passive, former plume material is capable of surfacing. Interestingly, this is seen to occur through a range of morphologies that are consistently offset from the original rise location (e.g., conduit). Surface expressions include anything from small circular patches to long, linear features with complex age trends (e.g., progressive or regressive) resulting from the competition between plate motions and

  16. Primordial metallic melt in the deep mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhou; Dorfman, Susannah M.; Labidi, Jabrane; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Mingming; Manga, Michael; Stixrude, Lars; McDonough, William F.; Williams, Quentin

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography models reveal two large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that identify large-scale variations in temperature and composition in the deep mantle. Other characteristics include elevated density, elevated bulk sound speed, and sharp boundaries. We show that properties of LLSVPs can be explained by the presence of small quantities (0.3-3%) of suspended, dense Fe-Ni-S liquid. Trapping of metallic liquid is demonstrated to be likely during the crystallization of a dense basal magma ocean, and retention of such melts is consistent with currently available experimental constraints. Calculated seismic velocities and densities of lower mantle material containing low-abundance metallic liquids match the observed LLSVP properties. Small quantities of metallic liquids trapped at depth provide a natural explanation for primitive noble gas signatures in plume-related magmas. Our model hence provides a mechanism for generating large-scale chemical heterogeneities in Earth's early history and makes clear predictions for future tests of our hypothesis.

  17. Continuous eclogite melting and variable refertilisation in upwelling heterogeneous mantle

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Anja; Yaxley, Gregory M.; Green, David H.; Hermann, Joerg; Kovács, István; Spandler, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale tectonic processes introduce a range of crustal lithologies into the Earth's mantle. These lithologies have been implicated as sources of compositional heterogeneity in mantle-derived magmas. The model being explored here assumes the presence of widely dispersed fragments of residual eclogite (derived from recycled oceanic crust), stretched and stirred by convection in the mantle. Here we show with an experimental study that these residual eclogites continuously melt during upwelling of such heterogeneous mantle and we characterize the melting reactions and compositional changes in the residue minerals. The chemical exchange between these partial melts and more refractory peridotite leads to a variably metasomatised mantle. Re-melting of these metasomatised peridotite lithologies at given pressures and temperatures results in diverse melt compositions, which may contribute to the observed heterogeneity of oceanic basalt suites. We also show that heterogeneous upwelling mantle is subject to diverse local freezing, hybridization and carbonate-carbon-silicate redox reactions along a mantle adiabat. PMID:25130275

  18. Continuous eclogite melting and variable refertilisation in upwelling heterogeneous mantle.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Anja; Yaxley, Gregory M; Green, David H; Hermann, Joerg; Kovács, István; Spandler, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale tectonic processes introduce a range of crustal lithologies into the Earth's mantle. These lithologies have been implicated as sources of compositional heterogeneity in mantle-derived magmas. The model being explored here assumes the presence of widely dispersed fragments of residual eclogite (derived from recycled oceanic crust), stretched and stirred by convection in the mantle. Here we show with an experimental study that these residual eclogites continuously melt during upwelling of such heterogeneous mantle and we characterize the melting reactions and compositional changes in the residue minerals. The chemical exchange between these partial melts and more refractory peridotite leads to a variably metasomatised mantle. Re-melting of these metasomatised peridotite lithologies at given pressures and temperatures results in diverse melt compositions, which may contribute to the observed heterogeneity of oceanic basalt suites. We also show that heterogeneous upwelling mantle is subject to diverse local freezing, hybridization and carbonate-carbon-silicate redox reactions along a mantle adiabat. PMID:25130275

  19. Low-Degree Partial Melting Experiments of CR and H Chondrite Compositions: Implications for Asteroidal Magmatism Recorded in GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Jones, John H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of differentiated meteorites have revealed a diversity of differentiation processes on their parental asteroids; these differentiation mechanisms range from whole-scale melting to partial melting without the core formation [e.g., 1]. Recently discovered paired achondrites GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 (hereafter referred to as GRA) represent unique asteroidal magmatic processes. These meteorites are characterized by high abundances of sodic plagioclase and alkali-rich whole-rock compositions, implying that they could originate from a low-degree partial melt from a volatile-rich oxidized asteroid [e.g., 2, 3, 4]. These conditions are consistent with the high abundances of highly siderophile elements, suggesting that their parent asteroid did not segregate a metallic core [2]. In this study, we test the hypothesis that low-degree partial melts of chondritic precursors under oxidizing conditions can explain the whole-rock and mineral chemistry of GRA based on melting experiments of synthesized CR- and H-chondrite compositions.

  20. Melting of subducted basalt at the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Andrault, Denis; Pesce, Giacomo; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Hénot, Jean-Marc; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-05-23

    The geological materials in Earth's lowermost mantle control the characteristics and interpretation of seismic ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the core-mantle boundary. Partial melting of the bulk lower mantle is often advocated as the cause, but this does not explain the nonubiquitous character of these regional seismic features. We explored the melting properties of mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB), which can reach the lowermost mantle after subduction of oceanic crust. At a pressure representative of the core-mantle boundary (135 gigapascals), the onset of melting occurs at ~3800 kelvin, which is ~350 kelvin below the mantle solidus. The SiO2-rich liquid generated either remains trapped in the MORB material or solidifies after reacting with the surrounding MgO-rich mantle, remixing subducted MORB with the lowermost mantle. PMID:24855266

  1. Carbonate melts in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gygi, F.; Caracas, R.; Cohen, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    We perform a molecular dynamics study of the properties of the carbonated silicate melts at realistic thermodynamic conditions of the Earth’s mantle. We employ the Qbox package based on a highly efficient plane wave and pseudopotentials implementation of density-functional theory. We work on three distinct compositions: Mg2SiO4, 16Mg2SiO4+CO2 and 16Mg2SiO4+MgCO3 and study the effect of the carbonization on the melt properties as well as the difference in effects between the CO2 molecule and the CO32- anionic group. We focus on the Earth-relevant isotherm at 3000K. At ambient pressure the silicon is in tetrahedral coordination as SiO4 with no polymerization between the tetrahedra. The C atoms are the most mobile in the system followed by O. The diffusion of the CO2 molecule takes place through intermediate short-lived CO32- states. In agreement with previous studies on pure magnesium silicate melts the polymerization of the tetrahedra is enhanced by pressure; the onset of the five-fold coordination of the silicon atoms occurs after 40 GPa. The thermal dilatation of the CO2-bearing fluid is 17kbars/1000K at ambient pressure and 3000K. The density differences due to the addition of CO2 and of MgCO3 to the Mg2SiO4 melts are small at ambient pressures and 3000K. Most significantly, we find that independent linear CO2 molecules at low pressures change to CO3 groups that are part of the melt structure with increasing pressure.

  2. The importance of melt extraction for tracing mantle heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stracke, Andreas; Bourdon, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Numerous isotope and trace element studies of mantle rocks and oceanic basalts show that the Earth's mantle is heterogeneous. The isotopic variability in oceanic basalts indicates that most mantle sources consist of complex assemblages of two or more components with isolated long-term chemical evolution, on both global and local scales. The range in isotope and highly incompatible element ratios observed in oceanic basalts is commonly assumed to directly reflect that of their mantle sources. Accordingly, the end-points of isotope arrays are taken to represent the isotopic composition of the different components in the underlying mantle, which is then used to deduce the origin of mantle heterogeneity. Here, a melting model for heterogeneous mantle sources is presented that investigates how and to what extent isotope and trace element signatures are conveyed from source to melt. We model melting of a pyroxenite-bearing peridotite using recent experimental constrains for melting and partitioning of pyroxenite and peridotite. Identification of specific pyroxenite melting signatures allows finger-printing of pyroxenite melts and confirm the importance of lithological heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle. The model results and the comparison of the calculated and observed trace element-isotope systematics in selected MORB and OIB suites (e.g. from the East Pacific Rise, Iceland, Tristan da Cunha, Gough and St.Helena) further show that factors such as the relative abundance of different source components, their difference in solidus temperature, and especially the extent, style and depth range of melt aggregation fundamentally influence the relationship between key trace element and isotope ratios (e.g. Ba/Th, La/Nb, Sr/Nd, La/Sm, Sm/Yb, 143Nd/ 144Nd). The reason for this is that any heterogeneity present in the mantle is averaged or, depending on the effectiveness of the melt mixing process, even homogenized during melting and melt extraction. Hence to what degree mantle

  3. Experimental derivation of nepheline syenite and phonolite liquids by partial melting of upper mantle peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Didier; Lambart, Sarah; Schiano, Pierre; Ottolini, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Piston-cylinder experiments were performed to characterize the composition of liquids formed at very low degrees of melting of two fertile lherzolite compositions with 430 ppm and 910 ppm K2O at 1 and 1.3 GPa. We used the microdike technique (Laporte et al., 2004) to extract the liquid phase from the partially molten peridotite, allowing us to analyze liquid compositions at degrees of melting F down to 0.9%. At 1.3 GPa, the liquid is in equilibrium with olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + spinel in all the experiments; at 1 GPa, plagioclase is present in addition to these four mineral phases up to about 5% of melting (T≈1240 °C). Important variations of liquid compositions are observed with decreasing temperature, including strong increases in SiO2, Na2O, K2O, and Al2O3 concentrations, and decreases in MgO, FeO, and CaO concentrations. The most extreme liquid compositions are phonolites with 57% SiO2, 20-22% Al2O3, Na2O + K2O up to 14%, and concentrations of MgO, FeO, and CaO as low as 2-3%. Reversal experiments confirm that low-degree melts of a fertile lherzolite have phonolitic compositions, and pMELTS calculations show that the amount of phonolite liquid generated at 1.2 GPa increases from 0.3% in a source with 100 ppm K2O to 3% in a source with 2000 ppm K2O. The enrichment in silica and alkalis with decreasing melt fraction is coupled with an increase of the degree of melt polymerization, which has important consequences for the partitioning of minor and trace elements. Thus Ti4+ in our experiments and, by analogy with Ti4+, other highly charged cations, and rare earth elements become less incompatible near the peridotite solidus. Our study brings a strong support to the hypothesis that phonolitic lavas or their plutonic equivalents (nepheline syenites) may be produced directly by partial melting of upper mantle rock-types at moderate pressures (1-1.5 GPa), especially where large domains of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has been enriched in

  4. Experimental Partitioning of Chalcophile Elements between Mantle Silicate Minerals and Basaltic Melt at High Pressures and Temperatures - Implications for Sulfur Geochemistry of Mantle and Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Jego, S.; Ding, S.; Li, Y.; Lee, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of chalcophile elements during mantle melting, melt extraction, and basalt differentiation is critical for formation of ore deposits and geochemical model and evolution of crust-mantle system. While chalcophile elements are strongly partitioned into sulfides, their behavior with different extent of melting, in particular, in the absence of sulfides, can only be modeled with complete knowledge of the partitioning behavior of these elements between dominant mantle minerals and basaltic melt with or without dissolved sulfide (S2-). However, experimental data on mineral-melt partitioning are lacking for many chalcophile elements. Crystallization experiments were conducted at 3 GPa and 1450-1600 °C using a piston cylinder and synthetic silicate melt compositions similar to low-degree partial melt of peridotite. Starting silicate mixes doped with 100-300 ppm of each of various chalcophile elements were loaded into Pt/graphite double capsules. To test the effect of dissolved sulfur in silicate melt on mineral-melt partitioning of chalcophile elements, experiments were conducted on both sulfur-free and sulfur-bearing (1100-1400 ppm S in melt) systems. Experimental phases were analyzed by EPMA (for major elements and S) and LA-ICP-MS (for trace elements). All experiments produced an assemblage of cpx + melt ± garnet ± olivine ± spinel and yielded new partition coefficients (D) for Sn, Zn, Mo, Sb, Bi, Pb, and Se for cpx/melt, olivine/melt, and garnet/melt pairs. Derived Ds (mineral/basalt) reveal little effect of S2- in the melt on mineral-melt partition coefficients of the measured chalcophile elements, with Ds for Zn, Mo, Bi, Pb decreasing by less than a factor of 2 from S-free to S-bearing melt systems or remaining similar, within error, between S-free and S-bearing melt systems. By combining our data with existing partitioning data between sulfide phases and silicate melt we model the fractionation of these elements during mantle melting and basalt

  5. Trace element mass balance in hydrous adiabatic mantle melting: The Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    numerical mass balance calculation model for the adiabatic melting of a dry to hydrous peridotite has been programmed in order to simulate the trace element compositions of basalts from mid-ocean ridges, back-arc basins, ocean islands, and large igneous provinces. The Excel spreadsheet-based calculator, Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1) uses (1) a thermodynamic model of fractional adiabatic melting of mantle peridotite, with (2) the parameterized experimental melting relationships of primitive to depleted mantle sources in terms of pressure, temperature, water content, and degree of partial melting. The trace element composition of the model basalt is calculated from the accumulated incremental melts within the adiabatic melting regime, with consideration for source depletion. The mineralogic mode in the primitive to depleted source mantle in adiabat is calculated using parameterized experimental results. Partition coefficients of the trace elements of mantle minerals are parameterized to melt temperature mostly from a lattice strain model and are tested using the latest compilations of experimental results. The parameters that control the composition of trace elements in the model are as follows: (1) mantle potential temperature, (2) water content in the source mantle, (3) depth of termination of adiabatic melting, and (4) source mantle depletion. HAMMS1 enables us to obtain the above controlling parameters using Monte Carlo fitting calculations and by comparing the calculated basalt compositions to primary basalt compositions. Additionally, HAMMS1 compares melting parameters with a major element model, which uses petrogenetic grids formulated from experimental results, thus providing better constraints on the source conditions.

  6. Dihedral angle of carbonatite melts in mantle residue near the upper mantle and transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. K.; Rohrbach, A.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate melts are thought to be ideal metasomatic agents in the deep upper mantle (Green & Wallace, 1988) and these melts are low in viscosities (10-1-10-3 Pa·s) compared to primitive basalt (101-102 Pa·s), furthermore the ability to form an interconnected grain-edge melt network at low melt fractions (< 1%) make carbonate melts extremely mobile. They are molten at relatively low temperatures and have solidus temperatures hundreds of degrees lower than silicate melts at >3 GPa (Dasgupta et al. 2006, Ghosh et al., 2009), dissolve a number of geochemically incompatible elements much better than silicate melts (Blundy and Dalton, 2000). Previous studies of carbonate melt dihedral angles in olivine-dominated matrices yielded 25-30oat 1-3 GPa, relatively independent of melt composition (Watson et al., 1990) and temperature (Hunter and McKenzie, 1989). Dihedral angles of carbonate melts in contact with deep mantle silicate phases (e.g. garnet, wadsleyite, and ringwoodite) which constitute more than 70 % of the deep upper mantle and transition zone have not been studied yet. We have performed multi-anvil experiments on carbonate-bearing peridotites with 5.0 wt% CO2 from 13.5 to 20 GPa 1550 oC to investigate the dihedral angle of magnesio-carbonatite melts in equilibrium with garnet, olivine (and its high-pressure polymorphs), and clinoenstatite. The dihedral angle of carbonate melts in the deep upper mantle and transition zone is ~30° for majorite garnet and olivine (and its polymorphs) dominated matrices. It does not change with increasing pressure in the range 13.5-20 GPa. Our results suggest that very low melt fractions of carbonatite melt forming in the deep upper mantle and transition zone are interconnected at melt fractions less than 0.01. Consistent with geophysical observations, this could possibly explain low velocity regions in the deep mantle and transition zone.

  7. Melt migration modeling in partially molten upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Abdolreza

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the importance of melt migration in shaping major characteristics of geological features associated with the partial melting of the upper mantle, such as sea-floor spreading, continental flood basalts and rifting. The partial melting produces permeable partially molten rocks and a buoyant low viscosity melt. Melt migrates through the partially molten rocks, and transfers mass and heat. Due to its much faster velocity and appreciable buoyancy, melt migration has the potential to modify dynamics of the upwelling partially molten plumes. I develop a 2-D, two-phase flow model and apply it to investigate effects of melt migration on the dynamics and melt generation of upwelling mantle plumes and focusing of melt migration beneath mid-ocean ridges. Melt migration changes distribution of the melt-retention buoyancy force and therefore affects the dynamics of the upwelling plume. This is investigated by modeling a plume with a constant initial melt of 10% where no further melting is considered. Melt migration polarizes melt-retention buoyancy force into high and low melt fraction regions at the top and bottom portions of the plume and therefore results in formation of a more slender and faster upwelling plume. Allowing the plume to melt as it ascends through the upper mantle also produces a slender and faster plume. It is shown that melt produced by decompressional melting of the plume migrates to the upper horizons of the plume, increases the upwelling velocity and thus, the volume of melt generated by the plume. Melt migration produces a plume which lacks the mushroom shape observed for the plume models without melt migration. Melt migration forms a high melt fraction layer beneath the sloping base of the impermeable oceanic lithosphere. Using realistic conditions of melting, freezing and melt extraction, I examine whether the high melt fraction layer is able to focus melt from a wide partial melting zone to a narrow region

  8. Melting of MORB at core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Gopal K.; Fiquet, Guillaume; Siebert, Julien; Auzende, Anne-Line; Morard, Guillaume; Antonangeli, Daniele; Garbarino, Gaston

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of natural mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) up to core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. We used in situ X-ray diffraction primarily for phase identification whereas our melting criterion based on laser power versus temperature plateau combined with textural analysis of recovered solidus and subsolidus samples is accurate and unambiguous. At CMB pressure (135 GPa), the MORB solidus temperature is 3970 (± 150) K. Quenched melt textures observed in recovered samples indicate that CaSiO3 perovskite (CaPv) is the liquidus phase in the entire pressure range up to CMB. The partial melt composition derived from the central melt pool is enriched in FeO, which suggests that such melt pockets may be gravitationally stable at the core mantle boundary.

  9. Hot, shallow mantle melting under the Cascades volcanic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elkins Tanton, Linda T.; Grove, Timothy L.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie

    2001-01-01

    Melting occurs at progressively greater depths and higher temperatures from west to east across the Cascades volcanic arc in northern California, as demonstrated by compositional variations observed in high-alumina olivine tholeiites. The lavas studied erupted from seven vents defining a 75-km-long, east-west transect across the arc, from near Mount Shasta to east of Medicine Lake volcano. The increase in melting depth across the arc parallels modeled isotherms in the mantle wedge and does not parallel the inferred dip of the slab. The depth of mantle melting at which the high-alumina olivine tholeiites were created is ∼36 km at the western end of the transect and 66 km at the eastern end. The very high temperatures of dry melting so close to the crust indicate a transitory condition of the mantle.

  10. Mantle Melting as a Function of Water Content in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, K. A.; Plank, T.; Newman, S.; Stolper, E.; Grove, T. L.; Parman, S.; Hauri, E.

    2003-12-01

    Subduction zone magmas are characterized by high concentrations of dissolved H2O, presumably derived from the subducted plate and ultimately responsible for melt generation in this tectonic setting. Almost ten years ago, Stolper and Newman (EPSL, 1994) illustrated a linear relationship between the concentration of water (H2Oo) and the fraction of melting (F) in the mantle beneath the Mariana back-arc. Here we report new major element and volatile data for olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the Mariana Islands to test this relationship for melting beneath an arc. Basaltic melt inclusions from the Mariana arc have water contents (2.3-6.1 wt% H2O) significantly higher than all basaltic glasses or melt inclusions from the Mariana back-arc (0.2-2.2 wt% H2O). We use TiO2 as a proxy for F, after correcting for crystal fractionation, and evaluate the Ti source composition with a model based on Ti/Y variations in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). Each calculated F thus represents the amount of mantle melting for a single melting episode. Even after accounting for mantle depletion, the TiO2 concentrations in Mariana arc magmas record higher extents of mantle melting (F = 10-30%) than recorded in back-arc magmas (F = 5-24%). As a whole, the Mariana arc broadly extends the linear H2Oo-F array defined by the back-arc, although in detail the islands show important differences. Two islands from the Mariana arc (Guguan and Pagan) define a H2Oo-F slope similar to the Mariana back-arc, suggesting similar mantle potential temperature beneath the arc and back-arc ( ˜1360 +/- 20° C). Melts from Agrigan island, however, indicate a steeper slope suggestive both of cooler mantle beneath Agrigan and of along-strike thermal variations beneath the Mariana Islands. Both the arc and back-arc arrays project to finite F at zero water in the mantle, providing evidence for decompression melting in both settings. These relationships may be extended globally to other back-arc and arc systems

  11. Timing of melt migration and pyroxenite formation in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, V.; Sun, C.; Nielsen, S.; Yao, L.

    2015-12-01

    Layered pyroxenites are the dominant type of ultramafic heterogeneities associated with exhumed peridotites. Although they usually represent less than 5% in volume of exposed mantle rocks, they are widely observed in various tectonic environments such as the sub-continental, sub-arc and sub-oceanic mantle. Here we show that mm-scale chemical variations across layered pyroxenites and peridotites can provide a wealth of information on the timing and pathways of migrating melts in the Earth's mantle, and on temperatures and timing of equilibration of lithospheric peridotites. We describe a novel approach that uses a combination of diffusion and temperature calculations with isotope ages, on multiple pyroxenite layers formed by melt migration in the Lherz massif, to reconstruct the timing of melt migration. We show that after melt fronts froze into the lithosphere, they were preserved in the lithospheric mantle for hundreds of Ma. To constrain the timing of melt migration, we determine the trace element composition of the percolating melt; we use isotopes to estimate the maximum age at which minerals reacted and precipitated from that melt; based on the melt percolation age, and the age of exhumation, we obtain a maximum amount of time between the end of melt percolation event and the exhumation age. In parallel, we calculate closure temperatures based on major elements and rare-earth element thermometers. Then, we use partition coefficients and mineral diffusivities to retrieve the cooling rates recorded by the thermometers. Finally, we will discuss the critical relationship between 'heterogeneities' in the source of basalts and the presence of veins in the lithospheric mantle.

  12. Evolved Rocks in Ocean Islands Formed by Melting of Metasomatized Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Torsvik, T. H.; Horvath, P.; Harris, C.; Webb, S. J.; Werner, S. C.; Corfu, F.

    2015-12-01

    Evolved rocks like trachyte occur as minor components of many plume-related basaltic ocean islands (e.g. Hawaii, Gran Canaria, Azores, Réunion), and are typically interpreted as products of extreme fractional crystallization from broadly basaltic magmas. Trachytes from Mauritius (Indian Ocean) suggest otherwise. Here, 6.8 Ma nepheline-bearing trachytes (SiO2 ~63%, Na2O + K2O ~12%) are enriched in all incompatible elements except Ba, Sr and Eu, which show prominent negative anomalies. Initial eNd values cluster at 4.03 ± 0.15 (n = 13), near the lower end of the range for Mauritian basalts (eNd = 3.70 - 5.75), but initial Sr is highly variable (ISr = 0.70408 - 0.71034) suggesting secondary deuteric alteration. Fractional crystallization models starting with a basaltic parent fail, because when plagioclase joins olivine in the crystallizing assemblage, residual liquids become depleted in Al2O3, produce no nepheline, and do not approach trachytic compositions. Mauritian basalts and trachytes do not fall near the ends of known miscibility gaps, eliminating liquid immiscibility processes. Partial melting of extant gabbroic bodies, either from the oceanic crust or from Réunion plume-related magmas should yield quartz-saturated melts different from the critically undersaturated Mauritian trachytes. A remaining possibility is that the trachytes represent direct, small-degree partial melts of fertile, perhaps metasomatized mantle. This is supported by the presence of trachytic glasses in many mantle xenoliths, and experimental results show that low-degree trachytic melts can be produced from mantle peridotites even under anhydrous conditions. If some feldspar is left behind as a residual phase, this would account for the negative Ba, Sr and Eu anomalies observed in Mauritian trachytes. Two trachyte samples that are less depleted in these elements contain xenocrysts of anorthoclase, Al-rich cpx and Cl-rich kaersutite that are out of equilibrium with host trachyte magmas

  13. Geophysical constraints on partial melt in the upper mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Shankland, T.J.; O'Connell, R.J.; Waff, H.S.

    1981-08-01

    This paper adresses the conditions under which partial melt can exist in the mantle in order to be observed as a geophysical 'anomaly'. Typical observed anomalies are high electrical conductivity of the order of 0.1 S/m or greater, velocity decreases of 7--10%, seismic Q values less than 100, and a frequency band for seismic effects in the region mear 1 Hz. Existing theories of electrical conduction in partial melts and of frequency-dependent seismic properties together with recent measurements of melt electrical conductivity, viscosity, and partial melt texture can be used to establish requirements for melt to be observed by geophysical methods. From electrical anomalies, mainly sensitive to melt volume and its interconnection, one can require a minimum melt fraction of several percent at temperatures close to the solidus (1150/sup 0/--1300/sup 0/C). However, seismic models demand only a small volume in very flattened shapes (aspect ratio approx. =0.001, melt fraction approx.0.1%). Further, if melt configuration permits seismic dissipation in bulk, that is, there exist flattened voids intersecting more or less equant voids, then it is possible to infer melt fractions for elastic anomalies that are consistent with the several percent required for electrical anomalies. Observed equilibrium textures of partly melted peridotite together with inferred melt-solid surface energies suggest that melt on a grain size scale in a gravitational field segregates into a strongly anisotropic pattern. Thus if partial melt causes mantle geophysical anomalies, it should exist in a variety of void shapes and probably of sizes. While the association of electrical and elastic anomalies with indications of reduced density, volcanism, and high heat flow makes the hypothesis of partial melting an attractive explanation, the minimum physical requirement is for existence of relatively high temperature.

  14. Equilibration during mantle melting: a fractal tree model.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, S R

    1993-01-01

    Many basalts from oceanic islands, ridges, and arcs show strong trace element evidence for melting at great depths, where garnet is a stable phase in mantle peridotites. If partial melts ascend to the surface by porous (intergranular) flow processes, the high-pressure garnet signature will be obliterated by diffusive reequilibration at shallower depths in the mantle. Spiegelman and Kenyon [Spiegelman, M. & Kenyon, P. (1992) Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 109, 611-620] argued that partial melts must therefore be focused into a coarser transport network, for high-speed delivery to the surface. Numerous natural network systems, such as rivers and the human vascular and bronchial systems, have fractal structures that are optimal for minimizing energy expenditure during material transport. I show here that a fractal magma "tree" with these optimal properties provides a network in which magma rapidly loses diffusive chemical "contact" with its host matrix. In this fractal network, magma conduits combine by twos, with the radius and flow velocities scaling as (2)n/3, where n is the generation number. For reasonable values of volume diffusivities, viscosities, and aspect ratios, melts will experience only limited diffusive reequilibration once they have traveled some hundreds of meters from their source. Melts thus represent rather local mantle domains, and there is little problem in delivering melts with deep (<100 km) geochemical signatures to the surface. PMID:11607445

  15. Melting the hydrous, subarc mantle: the origin of primitive andesites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Alexandra L.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2015-08-01

    This experimental study is the first comprehensive investigation of the melting behavior of an olivine + orthopyroxene ± spinel—bearing fertile mantle (FM) composition as a function of variable pressure and water content. The fertile composition was enriched with a metasomatic slab component of ≤0.5 % alkalis and investigated from 1135 to 1470 °C at 1.0-2.0 GPa. A depleted lherzolite with 0.4 % alkali addition was also studied from 1225 to 1240 °C at 1.2 GPa. Melts of both compositions were water-undersaturated: fertile lherzolite melts contained 0-6.4 wt% H2O, and depleted lherzolite melts contained ~2.5 wt% H2O. H2O contents of experimental glasses are measured using electron microprobe, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and synchrotron-source reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, a novel technique for analyzing H2O in petrologic experiments. Using this new dataset in conjunction with results from previous hydrous experimental studies, a thermobarometer and a hygrometer-thermometer are presented to determine the conditions under which primitive lavas were last in equilibration with the mantle. These predictive models are functions of H2O content and pressure, respectively. A predictive melting model is also presented that calculates melt compositions in equilibrium with an olivine + orthopyroxene ± spinel residual assemblage (harzburgite). This model quantitatively predicts the following influences of H2O on mantle lherzolite melting: (1) As melting pressure increases, melt compositions become more olivine-normative, (2) as melting extent increases, melt compositions become depleted in the normative plagioclase component, and (3) as melt H2O content increases, melts become more quartz-normative. Natural high-Mg# [molar Mg/(Mg + Fe2+)], high-MgO basaltic andesite and andesite lavas—or primitive andesites (PAs)—contain high SiO2 contents at mantle-equilibrated Mg#s. Their compositional characteristics cannot be readily explained by melting

  16. Melt Migration in the Mantle Lithosphere: Evidence From Ophiolitic Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, G.; Piccardo, G. B.; Poggi, E.

    2006-12-01

    Records of diffuse porous flow migration of asthenospheric melts through the lithospheric mantle are evident in mantle peridotites deriving from the oceanic lithosphere of the Jurassic Ligurian Tethys, exposed in the Alpine- Apennine orogenic system of Northern Italy. The migrating melts caused structural and chemical modifications, as a consequence of melt/peridotite interaction. Microstructures indicating pyroxene(Px)-dissolving/olivine(Ol)-forming reactions suggest that early percolating melts were Px(-silica)-undersaturated and their intergranular flow through the peridotite enhanced melt/peridotite interaction. Px dissolution modified: 1) the peridotite composition: in fact, the reacted peridotites changed their bulk rock characteristics to significantly SiO2-depleted, MgO-enriched compositions, and their mineral modal contents to significantly Ol-enriched compositions, with respect to any refractory residua after any kink of mantle partial melting; 2) the melt composition: in fact, the melt composition progressively attained Px(-silica)-saturation at the end of the reactive percolation, as evidenced by late Px interstitial crystallization. Depending on the degree of Px dissolution, the reacted peridotites from the same peridotite body have highly variable Px contents but their clinopyroxenes(Cpx) have closely similar trace element contents. This decoupling between mineral modal content and geochemical composition strongly suggests that these peridotites cannot have been originated by partial melting but it supports the evidence of melt/peridotite interaction. Thus, Cpx trace element composition depends on the geochemical equilibration with the percolating melt; it indicates, moreover, the MORB affinity of the percolating melt. Significant evidences of melt migration through lithospheric peridotites are represented by the plagioclase(Plg)- enriched peridotites, which are frequently present within the ophiolitic peridotites and particularly abundant in those

  17. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dannberg, Juliane; Dohmen, Janik; Kalousova, Klara; Maurice, Maxim; Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana; Soucek, Ondrej; Spiegelman, Marc; Thieulot, Cedric; Tosi, Nicola; Wallner, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we carry out a benchmark comparison. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, cases 1a to 1c (Blankenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and Rayleigh numbers of 104 to 10^6. Melting is modelled using a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) five cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 is identical to case 1 except that latent heat is switched on. Case 3 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm) and depletion buoyancy, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms), the maximum and the total melt volume and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 4 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases are carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction formulation. For cases 1 - 3 very good agreement

  18. Experimental evidence supports mantle partial melting in the asthenosphere.

    PubMed

    Chantel, Julien; Manthilake, Geeth; Andrault, Denis; Novella, Davide; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin

    2016-05-01

    The low-velocity zone (LVZ) is a persistent seismic feature in a broad range of geological contexts. It coincides in depth with the asthenosphere, a mantle region of lowered viscosity that may be essential to enabling plate motions. The LVZ has been proposed to originate from either partial melting or a change in the rheological properties of solid mantle minerals. The two scenarios imply drastically distinct physical and geochemical states, leading to fundamentally different conclusions on the dynamics of plate tectonics. We report in situ ultrasonic velocity measurements on a series of partially molten samples, composed of mixtures of olivine plus 0.1 to 4.0 volume % of basalt, under conditions relevant to the LVZ. Our measurements provide direct compressional (V P) and shear (V S) wave velocities and constrain attenuation as a function of melt fraction. Mantle partial melting appears to be a viable origin for the LVZ, for melt fractions as low as ~0.2%. In contrast, the presence of volatile elements appears necessary to explaining the extremely high V P/V S values observed in some local areas. The presence of melt in LVZ could play a major role in the dynamics of plate tectonics, favoring the decoupling of the plate relative to the asthenosphere. PMID:27386548

  19. Experimental evidence supports mantle partial melting in the asthenosphere

    PubMed Central

    Chantel, Julien; Manthilake, Geeth; Andrault, Denis; Novella, Davide; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin

    2016-01-01

    The low-velocity zone (LVZ) is a persistent seismic feature in a broad range of geological contexts. It coincides in depth with the asthenosphere, a mantle region of lowered viscosity that may be essential to enabling plate motions. The LVZ has been proposed to originate from either partial melting or a change in the rheological properties of solid mantle minerals. The two scenarios imply drastically distinct physical and geochemical states, leading to fundamentally different conclusions on the dynamics of plate tectonics. We report in situ ultrasonic velocity measurements on a series of partially molten samples, composed of mixtures of olivine plus 0.1 to 4.0 volume % of basalt, under conditions relevant to the LVZ. Our measurements provide direct compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities and constrain attenuation as a function of melt fraction. Mantle partial melting appears to be a viable origin for the LVZ, for melt fractions as low as ~0.2%. In contrast, the presence of volatile elements appears necessary to explaining the extremely high VP/VS values observed in some local areas. The presence of melt in LVZ could play a major role in the dynamics of plate tectonics, favoring the decoupling of the plate relative to the asthenosphere. PMID:27386548

  20. Constraints on melt migration in the Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapic, Gordana

    Melting and melt segregation are key processes in the geochemical evolution of the Earth. However, mechanism and time scale of melt transport from the source to the surface are still not well understood and are dependent on the grain-scale distribution of melt. A related question is the retention of melt in partially molten regions of the Earth's upper mantle. Seismic observations from mid-ocean ridges (MOR) and subduction zones are interpreted to show in-situ melt contents up to 3%, while geochemical observations from MOR basalts are inferred to indicate very efficient extraction of melt (porosities of order of 0.1%). Earlier theoretical models of the melt distribution were based on the balance of surface tension between melt and uniform crystalline grains, predicting a simple network of melt along three-grain edges. Analyses of experimentally produced samples of olivine and basaltic melt show that the melt geometry is much more complex, and includes wetted two-grain boundaries. I reconstructed the 3-D model of melt geometry of two experimentally produced samples by serial sectioning and rendering of the pore space which demonstrates for the first time that melt exists in thin layers on two-grain boundaries. This confirms the inferences from previous 2-D observations and has significant implications for physical properties of partially molten regions, for example seismic velocities and attenuation. The wetted two-grain boundaries are inferred to be a consequence of continuous grain growth. Due to the complexity of the 3-D melt geometry the permeability of partially molten rocks can not be predicted from simple models. I therefore investigated the permeability as a function of porosity for both synthetic and experimentally determined pore geometries using a lattice-Boltzmann method. The calculated permeability is not a simple function of porosity, but increases rapidly at a critical fraction of wetted two-grain boundaries. To extrapolate the experimentally based

  1. Melting of the Primitive Mercurian Mantle, Insights into the Origin of Its Surface Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boujibar, A.; Righter, K.; Rapp, J. F.; Ross, D. K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.; Fontaine, E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings of the MESSENGER mission on Mercury have brought new evidence for its reducing nature, widespread volcanism and surface compositional heteregeneity. MESSENGER also provided major elemental ratios of its surface that can be used to infer large-scale differentiation processes and the thermal history of the planet. Mercury is known as being very reduced, with very low Fe-content and high S and alkali contents on its surface. Its bulk composition is therefore likely close to EH enstatite chondrites. In order to elucidate the origin of the chemical diversity of Mercury's surface, we determined the melting properties of EH enstatite chondrites, at pressures between 1 bar and 3 GPa and oxygen fugacity of IW-3 to IW-5, using piston-cylinder experiments, combined with a previous study on EH4 melting at 1 bar. We found that the presence of Ca-rich sulfide melts induces significant decrease of Ca-content in silicate melts at low pressure and low degree of melting (F). Also at pressures lower than 3 GPa, the SiO2-content decreases with F, while it increases at 3 GPa. This is likely due to the chemical composition of the bulk silicate which has a (Mg+Fe+Ca)/Si ratio very close to 1 and to the change from incongruent to congruent melting of enstatite. We then tested whether the various chemical compositions of Mercury's surface can result from mixing between two melting products of EH chondrites. We found that the majority of the geochemical provinces of Mercury's surface can be explained by mixing of two melts, with the exception of the High-Al plains that require an Al-rich source. Our findings indicate that Mercury's surface could have been produced by polybaric melting of a relatively primitive mantle.

  2. Melting processes and mantle sources of lavas on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namur, Olivier; Collinet, Max; Charlier, Bernard; Grove, Timothy L.; Holtz, Francois; McCammon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft provided geochemical data for surface rocks on Mercury. In this study, we use the major element composition of these lavas to constrain melting conditions and residual mantle sources on Mercury. We combine modelling and high-temperature (1320-1580 °C), low- to high-pressure (0.1 to 3 GPa) experiments on average compositions for the Northern Volcanic Plains (NVP) and the high-Mg region of the Intercrater Plains and Heavily Cratered Terrains (High-Mg IcP-HCT). Near-liquidus phase relations show that the S-free NVP and High-Mg IcP-HCT compositions are multiply saturated with forsterite and enstatite at 1450 °C - 1.3 GPa and 1570 °C - 1.7 GPa, respectively. For S-saturated melts (1.5-3 wt.% S), the multiple saturation point (MSP) is shifted to 1380 °C - 0.75 GPa for NVP and 1480 °C - 0.8 GPa for High-Mg IcP-HCT. To expand our experimental results to the range of surface compositions, we used and calibrated the pMELTS thermodynamic calculator and estimated phase equilibria of ∼5800 compositions from the Mercurian surface and determined the P-T conditions of liquid-forsterite-enstatite MSP (1300-1600 °C; 0.25-1.25 GPa). Surface basalts were produced by 10 to 50% partial melting of variably enriched lherzolitic mantle sources. The relatively low pressure of the olivine-enstatite-liquid MSP seems most consistent with decompression batch melting and melts being segregated from their residues near the base of Mercury's ancient lithosphere. The average melting degree is lower for the young NVP (0.27 ± 0.04) than for the older IcP-HCT (0.46 ± 0.02), indicating that melt productivity decreased with time. The mantle potential temperature required to form Mercurian lavas and the initial depth of melting also decreased from the older High-Mg IcP-HCT terrane (1650 °C and 360 km) to the younger lavas covering the NVP regions (1410 °C and 160 km). This evolution supports strong secular cooling of Mercury's mantle between 4.2 and 3.7 Ga and

  3. A benchmark initiative on mantle convection with melting and melt segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Harro; Dohmen, Janik; Wallner, Herbert; Noack, Lena; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Maurice, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    In recent years a number of mantle convection models have been developed which include partial melting within the asthenosphere, estimation of melt volumes, as well as melt extraction with and without redistribution at the surface or within the lithosphere. All these approaches use various simplifying modelling assumptions whose effects on the dynamics of convection including the feedback on melting have not been explored in sufficient detail. To better assess the significance of such assumptions and to provide test cases for the modelling community we initiate a benchmark comparison. In the initial phase of this endeavor we focus on the usefulness of the definitions of the test cases keeping the physics as sound as possible. The reference model is taken from the mantle convection benchmark, case 1b (Blanckenbach et al., 1989), assuming a square box with free slip boundary conditions, the Boussinesq approximation, constant viscosity and a Rayleigh number of 1e5. Melting is modelled assuming a simplified binary solid solution with linearly depth dependent solidus and liquidus temperatures, as well as a solidus temperature depending linearly on depletion. Starting from a plume free initial temperature condition (to avoid melting at the onset time) three cases are investigated: Case 1 includes melting, but without thermal or dynamic feedback on the convection flow. This case provides a total melt generation rate (qm) in a steady state. Case 2 includes batch melting, melt buoyancy (melt Rayleigh number Rm), depletion buoyancy and latent heat, but no melt percolation. Output quantities are the Nusselt number (Nu), root mean square velocity (vrms) and qm approaching a statistical steady state. Case 3 includes two-phase flow, i.e. melt percolation, assuming a constant shear and bulk viscosity of the matrix and various melt retention numbers (Rt). These cases should be carried out using the Compaction Boussinseq Approximation (Schmeling, 2000) or the full compaction

  4. Water storage and early hydrous melting of the Martian mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Grove, T. L.; Charlier, B.

    2012-06-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the near-solidus phase equilibria of a water-saturated analog of the Martian mantle. Experiments were performed at low temperatures (700-920 °C) and high pressure (4-7 GPa) using multi-anvil apparatus and piston cylinder device (4 GPa). The results of this study are used to explore the role of water during early melting and chemical differentiation of Mars, and to further our understanding of the near-solidus behavior in planetary mantle compositions at high pressure. Water has a significant effect on the temperature of melting and, therefore, on accretion and subsequent differentiation processes. Experiments locate the wet solidus at ∼800 °C, and is isothermal between 4 GPa and 7 GPa. The Martian primitive mantle can store significant amounts of water in hydrous minerals stable near the solidus. Humite-group minerals and phase E represent the most abundant hydrous minerals stable in the 4-7 GPa pressure range. The amount of water that can be stored in the mantle and mobilized during melting ranges from 1 to up to 4 wt% near the wet solidus. We discuss thermal models of Mars accretion where the planet formed very rapidly and early on in solar system history. We incorporate the time constraint of Dauphas and Pourmand (2011) that Mars had accreted to 50% of its present mass in 1.8 Myr and include the effects of 26Al radioactive decay and heat supplied by rapid accretion. When accretion has reached 30% of Mars current mass (∼70% of its present size), melting starts, and extends from 100 to 720 km depth. Below this melt layer, water can still be bound in crystalline solids. The critical stage is at 50% accretion (∼80% of its size), where Mars is above the wet and dry solidi with most of its interior melted. This is earlier in the accretion process than what would be predicted from dry melting. We suggest that water may have promoted early core formation on Mars and rapidly extended melting over a large portion of Mars

  5. Two-component mantle melting-mixing model for the generation of mid-ocean ridge basalts: Implications for the volatile content of the Pacific upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kei; Saal, Alberto E.; Myers, Corinne E.; Nagle, Ashley N.; Hauri, Erik H.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Niu, Yaoling

    2016-03-01

    We report major, trace, and volatile element (CO2, H2O, F, Cl, S) contents and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses from the Northern East Pacific Rise (NEPR) off-axis seamounts, the Quebrada-Discovery-GoFar (QDG) transform fault system, and the Macquarie Island. The incompatible trace element (ITE) contents of the samples range from highly depleted (DMORB, Th/La ⩽ 0.035) to enriched (EMORB, Th/La ⩾ 0.07), and the isotopic composition spans the entire range observed in EPR MORB. Our data suggest that at the time of melt generation, the source that generated the EMORB was essentially peridotitic, and that the composition of NMORB might not represent melting of a single upper mantle source (DMM), but rather mixing of melts from a two-component mantle (depleted and enriched DMM or D-DMM and E-DMM, respectively). After filtering the volatile element data for secondary processes (degassing, sulfide saturation, assimilation of seawater-derived component, and fractional crystallization), we use the volatiles to ITE ratios of our samples and a two-component mantle melting-mixing model to estimate the volatile content of the D-DMM (CO2 = 22 ppm, H2O = 59 ppm, F = 8 ppm, Cl = 0.4 ppm, and S = 100 ppm) and the E-DMM (CO2 = 990 ppm, H2O = 660 ppm, F = 31 ppm, Cl = 22 ppm, and S = 165 ppm). Our two-component mantle melting-mixing model reproduces the kernel density estimates (KDE) of Th/La and 143Nd/144Nd ratios for our samples and for EPR axial MORB compiled from the literature. This model suggests that: (1) 78% of the Pacific upper mantle is highly depleted (D-DMM) while 22% is enriched (E-DMM) in volatile and refractory ITE, (2) the melts produced during variable degrees of melting of the E-DMM controls most of the MORB geochemical variation, and (3) a fraction (∼65% to 80%) of the low degree EMORB melts (produced by ∼1.3% melting) may escape melt aggregation by freezing at the base of the oceanic lithosphere, significantly enriching it in

  6. Predicting isotopic signatures resulting from melting in global mantle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, Hein; Davies, Huw; Elliott, Tim; Porcelli, Don

    2014-05-01

    Many outstanding problems in Earth science relate to the geodynamical explanation of geochemical observations. Nowadays, extensive geochemical databases of surface observations exist, but satisfying explanations of underlying processes are lacking. Longstanding problems such as; the possible existence and sustainability of chemically distinct reservoirs in the Earth's mantle; the possible need of layered convection through much of Earth's history to explain chemical observations; and the heat flow paradox remain unsolved. One way to address these problems is through numerical modeling of mantle convection while tracking chemical information throughout the convective mantle. In the past decade, both numerical mantle convection codes and computer power have grown sufficiently to begin to grasp much of the full problem of the complex interlocking physics, chemistry and thermodynamics of the convecting mantle, lithosphere, continents and atmosphere. We implemented a new way to track both bulk composition and concentration of trace elements in the well-developed mantle convection code TERRA. Our approach is to track bulk composition and trace element abundance via particles. One value on each particle represents bulk composition; it can be interpreted as the basalt component. The system is set up to track both radioactive isotopes (in the U, Th, K system) and noble gases (He, Ar). In our model, chemical separation on bulk composition and trace elements happens at self-consistent, evolving melting zones. Melting is defined via a composition dependent solidus, such that the amount of melt generated depends on pressure, temperature and bulk composition of each particle. A novel aspect is that we do not move particles that undergo melting; instead we transfer the chemical information carried by the particle to other particles. Molten material is instantaneously transported to the surface, thereby increasing the basalt component carried by the particles close to the surface

  7. The distribution of H2O between silicate melt and nominally anhydrous peridotite and the onset of hydrous melting in the deep upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novella, Davide; Frost, Daniel J.; Hauri, Erik H.; Bureau, Helene; Raepsaet, Caroline; Roberge, Mathilde

    2014-08-01

    The partitioning of H2O between a mantle peridotite assemblage and low degree hydrous melt has been investigated at 6 GPa (corresponding to ∼180 km depth) at a temperature of 1400 °C. Peridotite mineral phases were analysed from 6 melting experiments performed in a natural chemical system. The experiments contained ∼80 wt% of a low degree hydrous melt that was obtained through a series of experiments where the melt composition was iteratively adjusted until saturation with the appropriate peridotite assemblage was achieved. The melt is fluid-undersaturated at the conditions of the experiment. Ion microprobe measurements of the mineral phases indicate olivine H2O concentrations of 434±61 ppm wt and average clinopyroxene (cpx) concentrations of 1268±173 ppm wt H2O. Orthopyroxene (opx) and garnet contain 700±46 ppm wt and 347±83 ppm wt H2O, respectively. The H2O content of the hydrous melts was determined by mass balance to be 11±0.5 wt% H2O. H2O partition coefficients between minerals and melt (DH2Omin/melt=XH2Omin/XH2Omelt) are 0.0040±0.0006 for olivine, 0.0064±0.0004 for opx, 0.0115±0.0016 for cpx and 0.0032±0.0008 for garnet. Using the determined H2O partition coefficients the onset and extent of melting at conditions equivalent to 180 km below mid-ocean ridges was determined as a function of mantle H2O content. Current estimates for the H2O content of the depleted mantle (50-200 ppm wt H2O) are insufficient to induce mantle melting at this depth, which requires ∼700 ppm wt H2O to produce 0.1% melting and 1600 ppm wt H2O for 1% melting, along an adiabat with a potential temperature of 1327 °C. Melting can occur at these conditions within the mantle source of ocean island basalts, which are estimated to contain up to 900 ppm wt H2O. If adiabatic temperatures are 200 °C higher within such plume related sources, then melt fractions of over 1% can be reached at 180 km depth. In addition, a model for the distribution of H2O between peridotite mineral

  8. Consequences and Resolution of Lunar Lower Mantle Partial Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuqua, H.; Bremner, P. M.; Diamond, M. R.; Garapic, G.; Lock, S. J.; Mallik, A.; Nishikawa, Y.; Panovska, S.; Shahar, A.; Lognonne, P. H.; Panero, W. R.; Faul, U.; Panning, M. P.; Jimenez-Perez, H.; Schmerr, N. C.; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    Existence of a partially molten layer at depth has been proposed to explain the lack of observed farside deep moonquakes, the observation of reflected phases from deep moonquakes, and the dissipation of tidal energy within the lunar interior. However, subsequent models explore the possibility that dissipation due to elevated temperatures alone can explain the observed dissipation factor (Q) and tidal love numbers. We have explored the hypothesis that high titanium melt compositions associated with lunar mantle overturn may sink to the base of the mantle, locally or regionally. We have performed forward calculations varying composition and thickness of layers to evaluate if a partially molten layer at the base of the mantle is well constrained by the observational data. Self-consistent physical parameters are calculated for each compositional model that are then compared against the observed data to determine a subset of permissible models. The data constraints considered by this study include bulk density, moment of inertia, real and imaginary parts of the Love numbers, seismic travel times, and electrical conductivity. Dynamic calculations using ASPECT have also been considered to determine the implications of early lunar mantle convection for the survivability of the partially molten layer. Finally, and as a perspective for a future NASA New Frontiers Geophysical Network, we present 1D synthetic seismograms calculated for each proposed structure of the Moon to investigate the future seismological resolution of these deep lunar structure features. This work was initiated at the CIDER 2014 program.

  9. Melting and reactive flow of a volatilized mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges: theory and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Tobias; Katz, Richard F.

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory experiments indicate that even small concentrations volatiles (H2O or CO2) in the upper mantle significantly affect the silicate melting behavior [HK96,DH06]. The presence of volatiles stabilizes volatile-rich melt at high pressure, thus vastly increasing the volume of the upper mantle expected to be partially molten [H10,DH10]. These small-degree melts have important consequences for chemical differentiation and could affect the dynamics of mantle flow. We have developed theory and numerical implementation to simulate thermo-chemically coupled magma/mantle dynamics in terms of a two-phase (rock+melt), three component (dunite+MORB+volatilized MORB) physical model. The fluid dynamics is based on McKenzie's equations [McK84], while the thermo-chemical formulation of the system is represented by a novel disequilibrium multi-component melting model based on thermo-dynamic theory [RBS11]. This physical model is implemented as a parallel, two-dimensional, finite-volume code that leverages tools from the PETSc toolkit. Application of this simulation code to a mid-ocean ridge system suggests that the methodology captures the leading-order features of both hydrated and carbonated mantle melting, including deep, low-degree, volatile-rich melt formation. Melt segregation leads to continuous dynamic thermo-chemical dis-equilibration, while phenomenological reaction rates are applied to continually move the system towards re-equilibration. The simulations will be used first to characterize volatile extraction from the MOR system assuming a chemically homogeneous mantle. Subsequently, simulations will be extended to investigate the consequences of heterogeneity in lithology [KW12] and volatile content. These studies will advance our understanding of the role of volatiles in the dynamic and chemical evolution of the upper mantle. Moreover, they will help to gauge the significance of the coupling between the deep carbon cycle and the ocean/atmosphere system. REFERENCES

  10. Global-scale modelling of melting and isotopic evolution of Earth's mantle: melting modules for TERRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, Hein J.; Davies, J. Huw; Elliott, Tim; Porcelli, Don

    2016-04-01

    Many outstanding problems in solid-Earth science relate to the geodynamical explanation of geochemical observations. Currently, extensive geochemical databases of surface observations exist, but satisfying explanations of underlying mantle processes are lacking. One way to address these problems is through numerical modelling of mantle convection while tracking chemical information throughout the convective mantle. We have implemented a new way to track both bulk compositions and concentrations of trace elements in a finite-element mantle convection code. Our approach is to track bulk compositions and trace element abundances via particles. One value on each particle represents bulk composition and can be interpreted as the basalt component. In our model, chemical fractionation of bulk composition and trace elements happens at self-consistent, evolving melting zones. Melting is defined via a composition-dependent solidus, such that the amount of melt generated depends on pressure, temperature and bulk composition of each particle. A novel aspect is that we do not move particles that undergo melting; instead we transfer the chemical information carried by the particle to other particles. Molten material is instantaneously transported to the surface layer, thereby increasing the basalt component carried by the particles close to the surface and decreasing the basalt component in the residue. The model is set to explore a number of radiogenic isotopic systems, but as an example here the trace elements we choose to follow are the Pb isotopes and their radioactive parents. For these calculations we will show (1) the evolution of the distribution of bulk compositions over time, showing the buildup of oceanic crust (via melting-induced chemical separation in bulk composition), i.e. a basalt-rich layer at the surface, and the transportation of these chemical heterogeneities through the deep mantle; (2) the amount of melt generated over time; (3) the evolution of the

  11. Melting of the primitive martian mantle at 0.5-2.2 GPa and the origin of basalts and alkaline rocks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinet, Max; Médard, Etienne; Charlier, Bernard; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline; Grove, Timothy L.

    2015-10-01

    We have performed piston-cylinder experiments on a primitive martian mantle composition between 0.5 and 2.2 GPa and 1160 to 1550 °C. The composition of melts and residual minerals constrain the possible melting processes on Mars at 50 to 200 km depth under nominally anhydrous conditions. Silicate melts produced by low degrees of melting (<10 wt.%) were analyzed in layers of vitreous carbon spheres or in micro-cracks inside the graphite capsule. The total range of melt fractions investigated extends from 5 to 50 wt.%, and the liquids produced display variable SiO2 (43.7-59.0 wt.%), MgO (5.3-18.6 wt.%) and Na2O + K2O (1.0-6.5 wt.%) contents. We provide a new equation to estimate the solidus temperature of the martian mantle: T (°C) = 1033 + 168.1 P (GPa) - 14.22P2 (GPa), which places the solidus 50 °C below that of fertile terrestrial peridotites. Low- and high-degree melts are compared to martian alkaline rocks and basalts, respectively. We suggest that the parental melt of Adirondack-class basalts was produced by ∼25 wt.% melting of the primitive martian mantle at 1.5 GPa (∼135 km) and ∼1400 °C. Despite its brecciated nature, NWA 7034/7533 might be composed of material that initially crystallized from a primary melt produced by ∼10-30 wt.% melting at the same pressure. Other igneous rocks from Mars require mantle reservoirs with different CaO/Al2O3 and FeO/MgO ratios or the action of fractional crystallization. Alkaline rocks can be derived from mantle sources with alkali contents (∼0.5 wt.%) similar to the primitive mantle.

  12. Melting Processes at the Base of the Mantle Wedge: Melt Compositions and Melting Reactions for the First Melts of Vapor-Saturated Lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.; Till, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Vapor-saturated melting experiments have been performed at pressures near the base of the mantle wedge (3.2 GPa). The starting composition is a metasomatized lherzolite containing 3 wt. % H2O. Near-solidus melts and coexisting mineral phases have been characterized in experiments that span 925 to 1100 oC with melt % varying from 6 to 9 wt. %. Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and garnet coexist with melt over the entire interval and rutile is also present at < 1000 oC. Melt is andesitic in composition and varies from 60 wt. % SiO2 at 950 oC to 52 wt. % at 1075 oC. The Al2O3 contents of the melt are 13 to 14 wt. %, and CaO contents range from 1 and 4 wt. %. Melting is peritectic with orthopyroxene + liquid produced by melting of garnet + olivine + high-Ca pyroxene. In addition to quenched melt, we observe a quenched silicate component that is rhyolitic (>72 % SiO2) that we interpret as a precipitate from the coexisting supercritical H2O-rich vapor. Extrapolation of the measured compositional variation toward the solidus suggests that the first melt may be very SiO2 rich (i.e., granitic). We suggest that these granitic melts are the first melts of the mantle near the slab-wedge interface. As these SiO2-rich melts ascend into shallower, hotter overlying mantle, they continue to interact with the surrounding mantle and evolve in composition. These first melts may elucidate the geochemical and physical processes that accompany the beginnings of H2O flux melting.

  13. Formation of harzburgite by pervasive melt/rock reaction in the upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelemen, P.B.; Dick, H.J.B.; Quick, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Many mantle peridotite samples are too rich in SiO2 (in the form of orthopyroxene) and have ratios of light to heavy rare earth elements that are too high to be consistent with an origin as the residuum of partial melting of the primitive mantle. Trace element studies of melt/rock reaction zones in the Trinity peridotite provide evidence for reaction of the mantle lithosphere with ascending melts, which dissolved calcium-pyroxene and precipitated orthopyroxene as magma mass decreased. This process can account for the observed major and trace element compositions of lithospheric mantle samples, and may accordingly be prevalent in the upper mantle.

  14. Insights into mantle composition and mantle melting beneath mid-ocean ridges from postspreading volcanism on the fossil Galapagos Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, Karsten M.; Regelous, Marcel; Duncan, Robert A.; Brandl, Philipp A.; Stroncik, Nicole; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2011-05-01

    New major and trace element and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope data, together with 39Ar-40Ar ages for lavas from the extinct Galapagos Rise spreading center in the eastern Pacific reveal the evolution in magma compositions erupted during slowdown and after the end of active spreading at a mid-ocean ridge. Lavas erupted at 9.2 Ma, immediately prior to the end of spreading are incompatible element depleted mid-ocean ridge tholeiitic basalts, whereas progressively younger (7.5 to 5.7 Ma) postspreading lavas are increasingly alkalic, have higher concentrations of incompatible elements, higher La/Yb, K/Ti, 87Sr/86Sr, and lower 143Nd/144Nd ratios and were produced by smaller degrees of mantle melting. The large, correlated variations in trace element and isotope compositions can only be explained by melting of heterogenous mantle, in which incompatible trace element enriched lithologies preferentially contribute to smaller degree mantle melts. The effects of variable degrees of melting of heterogeneous mantle on lava compositions must be taken into account when using mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) to infer the conditions of melting beneath active spreading ridges. For example, the stronger "garnet signature" inferred from Sm/Nd and 143Nd/144Nd ratios for postspreading lavas from the Galapagos Rise results from a larger contribution from enriched lithologies with high La/Yb and Sm/Yb, rather than from a greater proportion of melting in the stability field of garnet peridotite. Correlations between ridge depth and Sm/Yb and fractionation-corrected Na concentrations in MORB worldwide could result from variations in mantle fertility and/or variations in the average degree of melting, rather than from large variations in mantle temperature. If more fertile mantle lithologies are preferentially melted beneath active spreading ridges, then the upper mantle may be significantly more "depleted" than is generally inferred from the compositions of MORB.

  15. Mantle Sources, Mantle Melting and the Genesis of the Central East Greenland Plateau Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. L.; Barfod, G. H.; Lesher, C. E.

    2006-12-01

    The Central East Greenland (CEG) plateau lavas (56-54 Ma) contain a very complete geochemical record of the opening of the North Atlantic basin in response to the breakup of Pangaea. This record provides an unique opportunity for identifying the mantle source compositions and melting processes involved in the genesis of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). The plateau lavas consist of three compositional suites: the volumetrically dominant high-Ti suite (TiO2 ca. 1.67 - 4 wt. %) (HTS) and the minor low-Ti (TiO2 < 1.96 wt. %) and very high-Ti (TiO2 ca. 4 - 6 wt. %) suites (LTS and VHTS, respectively). We present detailed Hf-Nd-Sr data and trace element data for VHTS and LTS lavas closely associated within the lava succession. These uncontaminated lava suites represent the extreme compositional ranges of the plateau lavas and show limited variability in ɛHf (9.58 - 10.96 [VHTS] and 14.39 - 14.68 [LTS]) and a somewhat broader variation in ɛNd (5.42 - 6.73 [VHTS] and 8.29 - 9.68 [LTS]). The LTS and VHTS source compositions bracket the chemical range observed for the HTS lavas. Drawing from the model of [1], we propose that the mantle sources for the VHTS and LTS were intimately associated within the mantle melting regime beneath CEG and were present throughout the generation of the plateau lavas. Correlations between trace element and isotopic data can be accounted for by a forward melting model involving a heterogeneous source containing fusible eclogite and refractory peridotite. These findings are in contrast to the model of [2] proposing that temporal sampling of three distinct and isolated mantle domains within a zoned plume is the dominant control on plateau lava chemistry. Our study highlights the importance of combining isotope and trace element data in understanding melt production in the NAIP and elsewhere. (1) Tegner et al., 1998, Nature, v 395, p 591-594; (2) Barker et al., 2006, Geology, v 34, p 481-484

  16. Unlocking the Secrets of the Mantle Wedge: New Insights Into Melt Generation Processes in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.

    2007-05-01

    Recent laboratory studies of the melting and crystallization behavior of mantle peridotite and subduction zone lavas have led to new insights into melting processes in island arc settings. Melting of the mantle wedge in the presence of H2O begins at much lower temperatures than previously thought. The solidus of mantle peridotite at 3 GPa is ~ 800 °C, which is 200 °C below previous estimates. At pressures greater than 2.4 GPa chlorite becomes a stable phase on the solidus and it remains stable until ~ 3.5 GPa. Therefore, melting over this pressure range occurs in the presence of chlorite, which contains ~ 12 wt. % H2O. Chlorite stabilized on the peridotite solidus by slab-derived H2O may be the ultimate source of H2O for subduction zone magmatism. Thus, chlorite could transport large amounts of H2O into the descending mantle wedge to depths where it can participate in melting to generate hydrous arc magmas. Our ability to identify primitive mantle melts at subduction zones has led to the following observations. 1) Primitive mantle melts show evidence of final equilibration at shallow depths near the mantle - crust boundary. 2) They contain variable amounts of dissolved H2O (up to 6 wt. %). 3) They record variable extents of melting (up to > 25 wt. %). To produce melts with such variable characteristics requires more than one melting process and requires consideration of a new type of melting called hydrous flux melting. Flux melting occurs when the H2O - rich melt initially produced on the solidus near the base of the mantle wedge ascends and continuously reacts with overlying hotter, shallower mantle. The mantle melts and magmatic H2O content is constantly diluted as the melt ascends and reacts with shallower, hotter mantle. Anhydrous mantle melts are also found in close temporal and spatial proximity to hydrous flux melts. These melts are extracted at similar depths near the top of the mantle wedge when mantle is advected up and into the wedge corner and melted

  17. Constraints on Mantle Plume Melting Conditions in the Martian Mantle Based on Improved Melting Phase Relationships of Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Yamato 980459

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Usui, Tomohiro; Draper, David S.; Filiberto, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Martian meteorite Yamato 980459 (hereafter Y98) is an olivine-phyric shergottite that has been interpreted as closely approximating a martian mantle melt [1-4], making it an important constraint on adiabatic decompression melting models. It has long been recognized that low pressure melting of the Y98 composition occurs at extremely high temperatures relative to martian basalts (1430 degC at 1 bar), which caused great difficulties in a previous attempt to explain Y98 magma generation via a mantle plume model [2]. However, previous studies of the phase diagram were limited to pressures of 2 GPa and less [2, 5], whereas decompression melting in the present-day martian mantle occurs at pressures of 3-7 GPa, with the shallow boundary of the melt production zone occurring just below the base of the thermal lithosphere [6]. Recent experimental work has now extended our knowledge of the Y98 melting phase relationships to 8 GPa. In light of this improved petrological knowledge, we are therefore reassessing the constraints that Y98 imposes on melting conditions in martian mantle plumes. Two recently discovered olivine- phyric shergottites, Northwest Africa (NWA) 5789 and NWA 6234, may also be primary melts from the martian mantle [7, 8]. However, these latter meteorites have not been the subject of detailed experimental petrology studies, so we focus here on Y98.

  18. Redox freezing and melting in the Earth's deep mantle resulting from carbon-iron redox coupling.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, Arno; Schmidt, Max W

    2011-04-14

    Very low seismic velocity anomalies in the Earth's mantle may reflect small amounts of melt present in the peridotite matrix, and the onset of melting in the Earth's upper mantle is likely to be triggered by the presence of small amounts of carbonate. Such carbonates stem from subducted oceanic lithosphere in part buried to depths below the 660-kilometre discontinuity and remixed into the mantle. Here we demonstrate that carbonate-induced melting may occur in deeply subducted lithosphere at near-adiabatic temperatures in the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle. We show experimentally that these carbonatite melts are unstable when infiltrating ambient mantle and are reduced to immobile diamond when recycled at depths greater than ∼250 kilometres, where mantle redox conditions are determined by the presence of an (Fe,Ni) metal phase. This 'redox freezing' process leads to diamond-enriched mantle domains in which the Fe(0), resulting from Fe(2+) disproportionation in perovskites and garnet, is consumed but the Fe(3+) preserved. When such carbon-enriched mantle heterogeneities become part of the upwelling mantle, diamond will inevitably react with the Fe(3+) leading to true carbonatite redox melting at ∼660 and ∼250 kilometres depth to form deep-seated melts in the Earth's mantle. PMID:21441908

  19. Experimental Phase Relations of Hydrous, Primitive Melts: Implications for variably depleted mantle melting in arcs and the generation of primitive high-SiO2 melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, S.; Wallace, P. J.; Johnston, A.

    2010-12-01

    There has been considerable experimental and theoretical work on how the introduction of H2O-rich fluids into the mantle wedge affects partial melting in arcs and chemical evolution of mantle melts as they migrate through the mantle. Studies aimed at describing these processes have become largely quantitative, with an emphasis on creating models that suitably predict the production and evolution of melts and describe the thermal state of arcs worldwide. A complete experimental data set that explores the P-T conditions of melt generation and subsequent melt extraction is crucial to the development, calibration, and testing of these models. This work adds to that data set by constraining the P-T-H2O conditions of primary melt extraction from two end-member subduction zones, a continental arc (Mexico) and an intraoceanic arc (Aleutians). We present our data in context with primitive melts found worldwide and with other experimental studies of melts produced from fertile and variably depleted mantle sources. Additionally, we compare our experimental results to melt compositions predicted by empirical and thermodynamic models. We used a piston-cylinder apparatus and employed an inverse approach in our experiments, constraining the permissible mantle residues with which our melts could be in equilibrium. We confirmed our inverse approach with forced saturation experiments at the P-T-H2O conditions of melt-mantle equilibration. Our experimental results show that a primitive, basaltic andesite melt (JR-28) from monogenetic cinder cone Volcan Jorullo (Central Mexico) last equilibrated with a harzburgite mantle residue at 1.2-1.4 GPa and 1150-1175°C with H2O contents in the range of 5.5-7 wt% H2O prior to ascent and eruption. Phase relations of a tholeiitic high-MgO basaltic melt (ID-16) from the Central Aleutians (Okmok) show the conditions of last equilibration with a fertile lherzolite mantle residue at shallower (1.2 GPa) but hotter (1275°C) conditions with

  20. Density of hydrous silicate melt at the conditions of Earth's deep upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukage, Kyoko N.; Jing, Zhicheng; Karato, Shun-Ichiro

    2005-11-01

    The chemical evolution of the Earth and the terrestrial planets is largely controlled by the density of silicate melts. If melt density is higher than that of the surrounding solid, incompatible elements dissolved in the melt will be sequestered in the deep mantle. Previous studies on dry (water-free) melts showed that the density of silicate melts can be higher than that of surrounding solids under deep mantle conditions. However, melts formed under deep mantle conditions are also likely to contain some water, which will reduce the melt density. Here we present data constraining the density of hydrous silicate melt at the conditions of ~410km depth. We show that the water in the silicate melt is more compressible than the other components, and therefore the effect of water in reducing melt density is markedly diminished under high-pressure conditions. Our study indicates that there is a range of conditions under which a (hydrous) melt could be trapped at the 410-km boundary and hence incompatible elements could be sequestered in the deep mantle, although these conditions are sensitive to melt composition as well as the composition of the surrounding mantle.

  1. Experimental study of the partitioning of Cu during partial melting of Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellows, Steve A.; Canil, Dante

    2012-07-01

    Primitive basaltic glasses from mid-ocean ridges (MORB), ocean islands (OIB) and arcs contain three to five times the Cu as the currently accepted primitive upper mantle (PUM) value, suggesting a bulk partition coefficient DCumantle/melt of ˜0.20. Sulfide, with a DCusulfide/melt of 250-960 is presumed to be ubiquitous in the mantle. The Cu abundances in basalts are unable to be achieved if Cu behaves compatibly, or if a high enough modal abundance of sulfide exists during the onset of melting to sequester significant Cu. To address this conundrum we determined DCu in olivine and orthopyroxene at 1250-1525 °C and 1.0 GPa in a hydrous basalt and KLB1 peridotite, at ƒO2 of FMQ-1, near to melting conditions of the upper mantle. The measured DCuol/liq of 0.06-0.21 and DCuopx/liq 0.15-0.82 do not vary with melt fraction, or significantly with ƒO2, and can be combined with estimates for DCu for clinopyroxene into melting models to examine the Cu contents of mantle-derived melts. The Cu abundances for MORB, OIB, and arc glasses are all explicable by up to 15% melting of the silicate—only portion of the mantle in which Cu behaves as a mildly incompatible element (DCumantle/melt˜0.26). For Cu to be enriched in basaltic melts in the presence of sulfide, the melt/sulfide ratio, or the oxidation state of the mantle during melting, must be significantly high to diminish the potential of sulfide to sequester any Cu. Our results suggest the role of sulfide during mantle melting may be insignificant with regards to controlling the concentration of moderately chalcophile elements like Cu, and confirm that the previously estimated Cu content for PUM of 20 ppm is correct.

  2. Effects of present-day deglaciation in Iceland on mantle melt production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, P.; Lund, B.; Hieronymus, C.; Maclennan, J.; Árnadóttir, T.; Pagli, C.

    2013-07-01

    Ongoing deglaciation in Iceland not only causes uplift at the surface but also increases magma production at depth due to decompression of the mantle. Here we study glacially induced decompression melting using 3-D models of glacial isostatic adjustment in Iceland since 1890. We find that the mean glacially induced pressure rate of change in the mantle increases melt production rates by 100-135%, or an additional 0.21-0.23 km3 of magma per year beneath Iceland. Approximately 50% of this melt is produced underneath central Iceland. The greatest volumetric increase is found directly beneath Iceland's largest ice cap, Vatnajökull, colocated with the most productive volcanoes. Our models of the effect of deglaciation on mantle melting predict a significantly larger volumetric response than previous models which only considered the effect of deglaciation of Vatnajökull, and only mantle melting directly below Vatnajökull. Although the ongoing deglaciation significantly increases the melt production rate, the increase in melt supply rate at the base of the lithosphere is delayed and depends on the melt ascent velocity through the mantle. Assuming that 25% of the melt reaches the surface, the upper limit on our deglaciation-induced melt estimates for central Iceland would be equivalent to an eruption the size of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull summit eruption every seventh year.

  3. Microtomography of partially molten rocks : three-dimensional melt distribution in mantle peridotite.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; Gaetani, G.; Fusseis, F.; Montesi, L.; De Carlo, F.

    2011-04-01

    The permeability of the upper mantle controls melt segregation beneath spreading centers. Reconciling contradictory geochemical and geophysical observations at ocean ridges requires a better understanding of transport properties in partially molten rocks. Using x-ray synchrotron microtomography, we obtained three-dimensional data on melt distribution for mantle peridotite with various melt fractions. At melt fractions as low as 0.02, triple junctions along grain edges dominated the melt network; there was no evidence of an abrupt change in the fundamental character of melt extraction as melt fraction increased to 0.2. The porosity of the partially molten region beneath ocean ridges is therefore controlled by a balance between viscous compaction and melting rate, not by a change in melt topology.

  4. Microtomography of partially molten rocks: three-dimensional melt distribution in mantle peridotite.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenlu; Gaetani, Glenn A; Fusseis, Florian; Montési, Laurent G J; De Carlo, Francesco

    2011-04-01

    The permeability of the upper mantle controls melt segregation beneath spreading centers. Reconciling contradictory geochemical and geophysical observations at ocean ridges requires a better understanding of transport properties in partially molten rocks. Using x-ray synchrotron microtomography, we obtained three-dimensional data on melt distribution for mantle peridotite with various melt fractions. At melt fractions as low as 0.02, triple junctions along grain edges dominated the melt network; there was no evidence of an abrupt change in the fundamental character of melt extraction as melt fraction increased to 0.2. The porosity of the partially molten region beneath ocean ridges is therefore controlled by a balance between viscous compaction and melting rate, not by a change in melt topology. PMID:21454786

  5. Melt-rock reaction in the asthenospheric mantle: Perspectives from laboratory dissolution experiments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Wang, C.; Saper, L.; Dygert, N. J.; Xu, W.

    2013-12-01

    The primary motivation for melt-rock interaction in the mantle is chemical disequilibrium that arises when melt generated in the deep mantle percolates through the overlying mantle. This is a continuous process involving both thermal and chemical exchange between the melt and the solid matrix. It occurs in all major active tectonic regimes within the upper mantle and is responsible for a range of petrologic and geochemical observations. Factors that are important in controlling the kinetics of melt-rock interaction include temperature, pressure, and melt composition. The present study focuses on the effect of reacting melting composition, especially water and silica content, on reaction kinetics. In terms of melt composition, we can broadly divide melt-rock interaction into three groups: (1) reaction between peridotite and silica-undersaturated (anhydrous) melt; (2) reaction between peridotite and silica-saturated (anhydrous) melt; and (3) reaction between peridotite and hydrous melt. (1) is important to melt migration beneath mid-ocean ridges, (2) is relevant to magma genesis involving pyroxenite, and (3) is important to melt generation in the mantle wedge and back-arc basin. Reaction between peridotites and silica-undersaturated melts such as alkali basalt and MORB at moderate to low pressures can produce a melt-bearing dunite-harzburgite or dunite-harzburgite-lherzolite sequence. Reaction between peridotites and siliceous melts derived from melting of eclogite or garnet pyroxenite do not form dunite at moderate to high pressures (1-3.5 GPa and 1200-1550°C). Instead, they produce melt-bearing harzburgite at moderate pressure and opx-rich harzburgite or orthopyroxenite at high pressure. The opx is produced at the expense of olivine and the siliceous melt, which may hinder further reaction because of porosity reduction in these reactions. The rate of peridotite dissolution is considerably lower when the peridotite is subsolidus, and a high-porosity harzburgite or

  6. The Asthenosphere Melting Regimes Alteration due to Changing Conditions of Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepechko, Y. V.; Sharapov, V. N.; Sorokin, K., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Analyzed in the article are different asthenosphere magma generation regimes above the upper mantle hot spots as thermodynamic and geometric parameters of the upper mantle and the conditions on its boundaries vary. The two-layer mantle model is applied to consider the formation of decompression melting areas. The thickness of metasomatically altered lithospheric mantle is determined by the mantle substance rheology and the location of the upper boundary of asthenosphere. We also take into consideration the principal solid state phase transitions by using the mantle substance state equation. The sizes and distribution of hot spots as well as their maximal temperature were defined by the thermodynamic conditions of the perovskite transition existence. The numerical analysis results demonstrate the manifestation of three main mantle dynamics modes; the conditions necessary to form the partial melting zones are not reached; some melting areas with the 30 to 65 Ma existence time do occur; the melting areas that are formed exist permanently. The permanently existing asthenosphere zones are marked by quasiperiodical variation in thickness and the degree of melting. The typical temperatures of a hot spot sharing these modes are the 1740°С and 2020°С correspondingly. The originally presupposed heating degree and the temperature ratio of the upper mantle do influence the decompression melting degree substantially and - to a lesser extent - they influence the size of melting zones. The primary evolution of the second mode is described by the development of a complex system of asthenosphere zones that lead to the occurrence of additional convectional cells dividing the partial melting zone. The variation in the rheological properties of the mantle substance also contributes to the manifestation of the complex structure of asthenosphere zone. The work was made with support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant #12-05-00625.

  7. Structure and density of basaltic melts at mantle conditions from first-principles simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bajgain, Suraj; Ghosh, Dipta B.; Karki, Bijaya B.

    2015-01-01

    The origin and stability of deep-mantle melts, and the magmatic processes at different times of Earth's history are controlled by the physical properties of constituent silicate liquids. Here we report density functional theory-based simulations of model basalt, hydrous model basalt and near-MORB to assess the effects of iron and water on the melt structure and density, respectively. Our results suggest that as pressure increases, all types of coordination between major cations and anions strongly increase, and the water speciation changes from isolated species to extended forms. These structural changes are responsible for rapid initial melt densification on compression thereby making these basaltic melts possibly buoyantly stable at one or more depths. Our finding that the melt-water system is ideal (nearly zero volume of mixing) and miscible (negative enthalpy of mixing) over most of the mantle conditions strengthens the idea of potential water enrichment of deep-mantle melts and early magma ocean. PMID:26450568

  8. The amount of recycled crust in sources of mantle-derived melts.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Alexander V; Hofmann, Albrecht W; Kuzmin, Dmitry V; Yaxley, Gregory M; Arndt, Nicholas T; Chung, Sun-Lin; Danyushevsky, Leonid V; Elliott, Tim; Frey, Frederick A; Garcia, Michael O; Gurenko, Andrey A; Kamenetsky, Vadim S; Kerr, Andrew C; Krivolutskaya, Nadezhda A; Matvienkov, Vladimir V; Nikogosian, Igor K; Rocholl, Alexander; Sigurdsson, Ingvar A; Sushchevskaya, Nadezhda M; Teklay, Mengist

    2007-04-20

    Plate tectonic processes introduce basaltic crust (as eclogite) into the peridotitic mantle. The proportions of these two sources in mantle melts are poorly understood. Silica-rich melts formed from eclogite react with peridotite, converting it to olivine-free pyroxenite. Partial melts of this hybrid pyroxenite are higher in nickel and silicon but poorer in manganese, calcium, and magnesium than melts of peridotite. Olivine phenocrysts' compositions record these differences and were used to quantify the contributions of pyroxenite-derived melts in mid-ocean ridge basalts (10 to 30%), ocean island and continental basalts (many >60%), and komatiites (20 to 30%). These results imply involvement of 2 to 20% (up to 28%) of recycled crust in mantle melting. PMID:17395795

  9. Structure and density of basaltic melts at mantle conditions from first-principles simulations.

    PubMed

    Bajgain, Suraj; Ghosh, Dipta B; Karki, Bijaya B

    2015-01-01

    The origin and stability of deep-mantle melts, and the magmatic processes at different times of Earth's history are controlled by the physical properties of constituent silicate liquids. Here we report density functional theory-based simulations of model basalt, hydrous model basalt and near-MORB to assess the effects of iron and water on the melt structure and density, respectively. Our results suggest that as pressure increases, all types of coordination between major cations and anions strongly increase, and the water speciation changes from isolated species to extended forms. These structural changes are responsible for rapid initial melt densification on compression thereby making these basaltic melts possibly buoyantly stable at one or more depths. Our finding that the melt-water system is ideal (nearly zero volume of mixing) and miscible (negative enthalpy of mixing) over most of the mantle conditions strengthens the idea of potential water enrichment of deep-mantle melts and early magma ocean. PMID:26450568

  10. Earth's interior. Dehydration melting at the top of the lower mantle.

    PubMed

    Schmandt, Brandon; Jacobsen, Steven D; Becker, Thorsten W; Liu, Zhenxian; Dueker, Kenneth G

    2014-06-13

    The high water storage capacity of minerals in Earth's mantle transition zone (410- to 660-kilometer depth) implies the possibility of a deep H2O reservoir, which could cause dehydration melting of vertically flowing mantle. We examined the effects of downwelling from the transition zone into the lower mantle with high-pressure laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and seismic P-to-S conversions recorded by a dense seismic array in North America. In experiments, the transition of hydrous ringwoodite to perovskite and (Mg,Fe)O produces intergranular melt. Detections of abrupt decreases in seismic velocity where downwelling mantle is inferred are consistent with partial melt below 660 kilometers. These results suggest hydration of a large region of the transition zone and that dehydration melting may act to trap H2O in the transition zone. PMID:24926016

  11. Melting Temperature and Partial Melt Chemistry of H2O-Saturated Mantle Peridotite to 11 Gigapascals

    PubMed

    Kawamoto; Holloway

    1997-04-11

    The H2O-saturated solidus of a model mantle composition (Kilborne Hole peridotite nodule, KLB-1) was determined to be just above 1000°C from 5 to 11 gigapascals. Given reasonable H2O abundances in Earth's mantle, an H2O-rich fluid could exist only in a region defined by the wet solidus and thermal stability limits of hydrous minerals, at depths between 90 and 330 kilometers. The experimental partial melts monotonously became more mafic with increasing pressure from andesitic composition at 1 gigapascal to more mafic than the starting peridotite at 10 gigapascals. Because the chemistry of the experimental partial melts is similar to that of kimberlites, it is suggested that kimberlites may be derived by low-temperature melting of an H2O-rich mantle at depths of 150 to 300 kilometers. PMID:9092469

  12. Carbon-dioxide-rich silicate melt in the Earth's upper mantle.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Mallik, Ananya; Tsuno, Kyusei; Withers, Anthony C; Hirth, Greg; Hirschmann, Marc M

    2013-01-10

    The onset of melting in the Earth's upper mantle influences the thermal evolution of the planet, fluxes of key volatiles to the exosphere, and geochemical and geophysical properties of the mantle. Although carbonatitic melt could be stable 250 km or less beneath mid-oceanic ridges, owing to the small fraction (∼0.03 wt%) its effects on the mantle properties are unclear. Geophysical measurements, however, suggest that melts of greater volume may be present at ∼200 km (refs 3-5) but large melt fractions are thought to be restricted to shallower depths. Here we present experiments on carbonated peridotites over 2-5 GPa that constrain the location and the slope of the onset of silicate melting in the mantle. We find that the pressure-temperature slope of carbonated silicate melting is steeper than the solidus of volatile-free peridotite and that silicate melting of dry peridotite + CO(2) beneath ridges commences at ∼180 km. Accounting for the effect of 50-200 p.p.m. H(2)O on freezing point depression, the onset of silicate melting for a sub-ridge mantle with ∼100 p.p.m. CO(2) becomes as deep as ∼220-300 km. We suggest that, on a global scale, carbonated silicate melt generation at a redox front ∼250-200 km deep, with destabilization of metal and majorite in the upwelling mantle, explains the oceanic low-velocity zone and the electrical conductivity structure of the mantle. In locally oxidized domains, deeper carbonated silicate melt may contribute to the seismic X-discontinuity. Furthermore, our results, along with the electrical conductivity of molten carbonated peridotite and that of the oceanic upper mantle, suggest that mantle at depth is CO(2)-rich but H(2)O-poor. Finally, carbonated silicate melts restrict the stability of carbonatite in the Earth's deep upper mantle, and the inventory of carbon, H(2)O and other highly incompatible elements at ridges becomes controlled by the flux of the former. PMID:23302861

  13. Melt segregation and strain partitioning: implications for seismic anisotropy and mantle flow.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, B K; Kohlstedt, D L; Zimmerman, M E; Heidelbach, F; Hiraga, T; Hustoft, J

    2003-08-29

    One of the principal means of understanding upper mantle dynamics involves inferring mantle flow directions from seismic anisotropy under the assumption that the seismic fast direction (olivine a axis) parallels the regional flow direction. We demonstrate that (i) the presence of melt weakens the alignment of a axes and (ii) when melt segregates and forms networks of weak shear zones, strain partitions between weak and strong zones, resulting in an alignment of a axes 90 degrees from the shear direction in three-dimensional deformation. This orientation of a axes provides a new means of interpreting mantle flow from seismic anisotropy in partially molten deforming regions of Earth. PMID:12947196

  14. Diffusive fractionation of U-series radionuclides during mantle melting and shallow-level melt cumulate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Orman, James A.; Saal, Alberto E.; Bourdon, Bernard; Hauri, Erik H.

    2006-09-01

    U-series radioactive disequilibria in basaltic lavas have been used to infer many important aspects of melt generation and extraction processes in Earth's mantle and crust, including the porosity of the melting zone, the solid mantle upwelling rate, and the melt transport rate. Most of these inferences have been based on simplified theoretical treatments of the fractionation process, which assume equilibrium partitioning of U-series nuclides among minerals and melt. We have developed a numerical model in which solid-state diffusion controls the exchange of U-series nuclides among multiple minerals and melt. First the initial steady-state distribution of nuclides among the phases, which represents a balance between diffusive fluxes and radioactive production and decay, is calculated. Next, partial melting begins, or a foreign melt is introduced into the system, and nuclides are again redistributed among the phases via diffusion. U-series nuclides can be separated during this stage due to differences in their diffusivity; radium in particular, and possibly protactinium as well, can be strongly fractionated from slower-diffusing thorium and uranium. We show that two distinct processes are not required for the generation of 226Ra and 230Th excesses in mid-ocean ridge basalts, as has been argued previously; instead the observed negative correlations of the ( 226Ra/ 230Th) activity ratio with ( 230Th/ 238U) and with the extent of trace element enrichment may result from diffusive fractionation of Ra from Th during partial melting of the mantle. Alternatively, the ( 226Ra/ 230Th) disequilibrium in mid-ocean ridge basalts may result from diffusive fractionation during shallow-level interaction of mantle melts with gabbroic cumulates, and we show that the results of the interaction have a weak dependence on the age of the cumulate if both plagioclase and clinopyroxene are present.

  15. Melting of Bridgmanite to 135 Gpa: Toward a Coherent Model for the Melting Behavior in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrault, D.; Pesce, G.; Mezouar, N.

    2015-12-01

    Our knowledge on the melting behavior in the deep mantle remains based on a limited number of experimental and theoretical works. Today, thanks to (i) availability of very brilliant X-ray synchrotron sources and (ii) improved control of the P-T conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC), the experimental results should reach some agreement about the melting diagrams. However, it is not the case and major controversies remain. For example, liquidi of peridotitic (1) and chondritic-type (2) mantles are reported with a temperature difference of ~1000 K at a pressure of ~90 GPa (corresponding to ~2000 km depth), which cannot be explained by the relatively small compositional difference between these two materials. To bring new insights about the melting properties of the deep mantle, our strategy has been to study the melting curve of the end-member liquidus phase, the (Mg,Fe)(Al,Si)O3 bridgmanite (Bg), before applying a basic thermodynamical approach to the mineralogical system made of Bg, CaSiO3-perovskite and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase. Our approach cannot be as formal as currently done for melting in the shallow mantle, due to lack of major thermodynamical parameters. Still, our analysis yields original information, such as the degree of partial melting as a function of P, T and fraction of Bg in the geological material. The Mg/Si ratio in melts can also be addressed. Concerning the controversy between LH-DAC experiments, it can be solved taking into account migration in the temperature gradient of the pseudo-eutectic melt, when the sample starts to melt. This effect is expected to occur more extensively in absence of an insulating material between the sample and the diamond anvils. It yields an overestimation of the liquidus temperature for a given chemical composition, due to loss of the most fusing elements. References:1. Fiquet et al. (2010) Melting of Peridotite to 140 Gigapascals. Science 329, 1516-1518. 2. Andrault et al. (2011) Melting curve of

  16. Identification in primitive basalts of a single melt reaction from an isotopically heterogeneous mantle source region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondes, M. S.; Brandon, M. T.

    2008-12-01

    Though the broad scale effects of recycled material in the source mantle are seen through isotopic variations in basalts, how this material explicitly contributes to the melting process is less constrained. The Big Pine Volcanic Field, CA, provides an excellent natural laboratory to study processes associated with mantle melting. The monogentic vents there preserve primitive, short-lived (< 100 year) eruptive sequences that show a simple chemical evolution, unrelated to shallow-level processes, that repeats at different vents throughout the volcanic field. Furthermore, these chemical trends are paralleled by an increase in ɛNd and a decrease 87Sr/86Sr, indicating the progressive interaction between a mantle melt from a depleted source with a more isotopically evolved unit. We present new evidence here that show that the chemical evolution of these eruptive sequences are controlled by a single, univariant reaction seen as straight chemical and isotopic trends in log compositional space. Generalized equations for dynamic melting reaction progress indicate that straight trends are only possible for continuous reactions with constant distribution coefficients, modes, and melting modes. This relationship is remarkable given that the eruptive sequences shows clear evidence of an isotopically heterogeneous source region. Inversion of rare earth elements (REEs) using published partition coefficients indicate a non-modal melt reaction involving, at the minimum, garnet and pyroxene. The degree of reaction progress indicates the generation of 12% of new melt from a depleted source, and a melt porosity of 15%. These estimates should be viewed as apparent values since they depend on the geometry of the magmatic plumbing system and the percentage of the actual melt that is in equilibrium with the surrounding solid phases. We consider two models consistent with the inversion: 1) melting of a heterogeneous mantle source, consisting of a "plum pudding" mixture of peridotite and

  17. Electrical conductivity of partially-molten olivine aggregate and melt interconnectivity in the oceanic upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laumonier, Mickael; Frost, Dan; Farla, Robert; Katsura, Tomoo; Marquardt, Katharina

    2016-04-01

    A consistent explanation for mantle geophysical anomalies such as the Lithosphere-Astenosphere Boundary (LAB) relies on the existence of little amount of melt trapped in the solid peridotite. Mathematical models have been used to assess the melt fraction possibly lying at mantle depths, but they have not been experimentally checked at low melt fraction (< 2 vol. %). To fill this gap, we performed in situ electrical conductivity (EC) measurement on a partially-molten olivine aggregate (Fo92-olivine from a natural peridotite of Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain) containing various amount of basaltic (MORB-like composition) melt (0 to 100%) at upper mantle conditions. We used the MAVO 6-ram press (BGI) combined with a Solartron gain phase analyser to acquire the electrical resistance of the sample at pressure of 1.5 GPa and temperature up to 1400°C. The results show the increase of the electrical conductivity with the temperature following an Arrhenius law, and with the melt fraction, but the effect of pressure between 1.5 and 3.0 GPa was found negligible at a melt fraction of 0.5 vol.%. The conductivity of a partially molten aggregate fits the modified Archie's law from 0.5 to 100 vol.%. At melt fractions of 0.25, 0.15 and 0.0 vol.%, the EC value deviates from the trend previously defined, suggesting that the melt is no longer fully interconnected through the sample, also supported by chemical mapping. Our results extend the previous results obtained on mixed system between 1 and 10% of melt. Since the melt appears fully interconnected down to very low melt fraction (0.5 vol.%), we conclude that (i) only 0.5 to 1 vol.% of melt is enough to explain the LAB EC anomaly, lower than previously determined; and (ii) deformation is not mandatory to enhance electrical conductivity of melt-bearing mantle rocks.

  18. Dynamics of melt and water circulation in the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David

    2010-05-01

    The presence of melt above the mantle transition zone has been predicted by several groups, and its formation has been attributed - according to the 'water filter model" (Bercovici & Karato 2003) - with causing whole mantle convection to appear geochemically layered. In recent years, various seismological studies (e.g., most recently Jasbinsek and Dueker, 2007) have collectively inferred an extensive low velocity region at 410km depth, suggestive of the predicted melt zone. The leading mechanism proposed for generating this melt zone is by dehydration melting, which is supported by modest transition-zone water concentrations inferred by electromagnetic sounding (Huang, Xu, Karato, 2005). In this mechanism, warm upwelling 'damp" transition-zone material (wadsleyite) crosses the 410km boundary, and arrives above the solidus water limit in the upper-mantle (olivine) partial melt stability field. The fate of the subsequently produced melt is important for inferring the structure, observability and stability of this melt region. The most recent models of a wet melt layer spreading along the 410km boundary and reacting with a background mantle flow predict that the layer will be several 10s of kilometers thick, and that the melt's material will be entrained into the lower mantle well before it reaches any slabs (Leahy & Bercovici, 2010). At these pressures the melt is possibly more dense than the solid, although the density cross-over point is not likely to be far above the 410km boundary. However, unless the density cross-over actually intersects the melt zone, the melt is stable to any Rayleigh-Taylor instability (Youngs & Bercovici, 2009). Finally, continued re-hydration of the transition zone is required to supply the melt layer in the presence of background mantle flow. Slabs foundering and flowing horizontally across the transition zone provide one of the best means for transporting water across the transition zone. Slabs at the bottom of the transition zone

  19. Carbonatite melt infiltration in mantle xenoliths from the Eurasian plate - North American modern plate collision zone (Ruditch, Yakutia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschegg, Cornelius; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Akinin, Viacheslav; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Within the seismic active Chersky belt, the modern border between North American and Eurasian plates (Indigirka River area, Sakha-Yakutia Republic), mantle xenoliths were found in eroded alkaline basalt dike remnants.The peridotite xenoliths are represented by mainly anhydrous spinel lherzolites that appear together with subordinate orthpyroxene, clinopyroxene and feldspar megacrysts. Spinel lherzolites have protogranular textures and are well equilibrated, lacking any mineral zonation. The constituent minerals have minor compositional variations whithin and between different samples. Olivine compositions range from Fo 89-90.5, with CaO contents between 0.04 and 0.06 wt.%. Orthopyroxenes indicate a very narrow composititional variance (Wo1En63Fs36, Mg# 90-91 and Al2O3 from 4 to 4.7 wt.%), just like clinopyroxene phases that are represented by Wo38En40Fs22, with Mg#s from 90 to 91 and Al2O3 between 6.8 and 7.6 wt.%. Spinels also show a fertile composition with Cr#s ranging between 26 and 29 and Mg#s between 77 and 78 respectively. Equlibration temperature estimations gives approx. 1000 °C at 15 kbar pressure for all studied samples. In one xenolith, a round melt pocket with 200 microns in diameter consisting of well crystallized dolomite (25 wt.% CaO, 31 wt.% MgO) in perfect contact with homogeneous glass (16 wt.% Na2O, 51 wt.% SiO2, 20 wt.% Al2O3), apparently an immiscibility of carbonatite and silicate melt, was found at the triple point of olivine, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene. Mineral chemistries show that the lithospheric mantle underneath the study area is a fertile lherzolith. Clinopyroxene LA-ICP-MS trace element analyses confirm the fertile nature of the xenoliths. The primitive mantle normalized REE patterns show a slight depletion of LREE with respect to HREE. The majority of the analyzed cpx have (La/Yb)N that vary between 0.1 and 0.5 and (Tb/Yb)N from 1.0 to 1.1 indicating the overal absense and metasomatic processes and low degree of melt

  20. Melting in the Earth's deep upper mantle caused by carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Hirschmann, Marc M.

    2006-03-01

    The onset of partial melting beneath mid-ocean ridges governs the cycling of highly incompatible elements from the mantle to the crust, the flux of key volatiles (such as CO2, He and Ar) and the rheological properties of the upper mantle. Geophysical observations indicate that melting beneath ridges begins at depths approaching 300km, but the cause of this melting has remained unclear. Here we determine the solidus of carbonated peridotite from 3 to 10GPa and demonstrate that melting beneath ridges may occur at depths up to 330km, producing 0.03-0.3% carbonatite liquid. We argue that these melts promote recrystallization and realignment of the mineral matrix, which may explain the geophysical observations. Extraction of incipient carbonatite melts from deep within the oceanic mantle produces an abundant source of metasomatic fluids and a vast mantle residue depleted in highly incompatible elements and fractionated in key parent-daughter elements. We infer that carbon, helium, argon and highly incompatible heat-producing elements (such as uranium, thorium and potassium) are efficiently scavenged from depths of ~200-330km in the upper mantle.

  1. Melting in the Earth's deep upper mantle caused by carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Hirschmann, Marc M

    2006-03-30

    The onset of partial melting beneath mid-ocean ridges governs the cycling of highly incompatible elements from the mantle to the crust, the flux of key volatiles (such as CO2, He and Ar) and the rheological properties of the upper mantle. Geophysical observations indicate that melting beneath ridges begins at depths approaching 300 km, but the cause of this melting has remained unclear. Here we determine the solidus of carbonated peridotite from 3 to 10 GPa and demonstrate that melting beneath ridges may occur at depths up to 330 km, producing 0.03-0.3% carbonatite liquid. We argue that these melts promote recrystallization and realignment of the mineral matrix, which may explain the geophysical observations. Extraction of incipient carbonatite melts from deep within the oceanic mantle produces an abundant source of metasomatic fluids and a vast mantle residue depleted in highly incompatible elements and fractionated in key parent-daughter elements. We infer that carbon, helium, argon and highly incompatible heat-producing elements (such as uranium, thorium and potassium) are efficiently scavenged from depths of approximately 200-330 km in the upper mantle. PMID:16572168

  2. Partial melting and the efficiency of mantle outgasing in one-plate planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2013-04-01

    The generation of partial melting can have a major impact on the thermo-chemical evolution of a terrestrial body by the depletion of the mantle material in incompatible elements such as radioactive elements and volatiles, crust formation and volcanic outgassing. During some period in the thermal history of a terrestrial planet, the temperature in regions of the upper mantle, either below tectonic plates or a stagnant lid, rises above the solidus - the temperature at which the mineral with the lowest melting temperature among those that form the silicate mantle mixture starts to melt. The melt than rises toward the surface, forms the crust, and releases volatiles into the atmosphere. In case of one-plate (stagnant lid) planets the thickness of the present-day crust can 'tell' us already about the efficiency of mantle melting and mantle degassing - the thicker the crust the more mantle material experienced melting and thus the more efficient can be the outgassing. However, it has been shown with parameterized convection models [1] but also 2-3D convection models [2] that crustal delamination is a common process in one-plate planets. Crustal delamination allows that possibly much more crust is produced during the entire evolution (and thus more mantle material experienced differentiation) than what is observed today, implying also more efficient outgassing than expected. Crustal delamination is therefore a process that may help to generate a substantial planetary atmosphere. In the present work we investigate the influence of partial melt on mantle dynamics and the volcanic outgassing of one-plate planets using the mantle convection code GAIA [3] in a 2D cylindrical geometry. We consider the depletion of the mantle, redistribution of radioactive heat sources between mantle and crust, as well as mantle dehydration and volcanic outgassing [4]. When melt is extracted to form the crust, the mantle material left behind is more buoyant than its parent material and depleted

  3. Major element chemistry of ocean island basalts — Conditions of mantle melting and heterogeneity of mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Jackson, Matthew G.; Lee, Cin-Ty A.

    2010-01-01

    We estimate average compositions of near-primary, 'reference' ocean island basalts (OIBs) for 120 volcanic centers from 31 major island groups and constrain the depth of lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) at the time of volcanism and the possible depth of melt-mantle equilibration based on recently calibrated melt silica activity barometer. The LAB depth versus fractionation corrected OIB compositions (lava compositions, X, corrected to Mg# 73, X OIB#73, i.e., magmas in equilibrium with Fo 90, if olivine is present in the mantle source) show an increased major element compositional variability with increasing LAB depths. OIBs erupted on lithospheres < 40 km thick approach the compositions (e.g. SiO 2#73, TiO 2#73, [CaO/Al 2O 3] #73) of primitive ridge basalts and are influenced strongly by depth and extent of shallow melting. However, X OIB#73 on thicker lithospheres cannot be explained by melt-mantle equilibration as shallow as LAB. Melt generation from a somewhat deeper (up to 50 km deeper than the LAB) peridotite source can explain the OIB major element chemistry on lithospheres ≤ 70 km. However, deeper melting of volatile-free, fertile peridotite is not sufficient to explain the end member primary OIBs on ≥ 70 km thick lithospheres. Comparison between X OIB#73 and experimental partial melts of fertile peridotite indicates that at least two additional melt components need to be derived from OIB source regions. The first component, similar to that identified in HIMU lavas, is characterized by low SiO 2#73, Al 2O 3#73, [Na 2O/TiO 2] #73, and high FeO* #73, CaO #73, [CaO/Al 2O 3] #73. The second component, similar to that found in Hawaiian Koolau lavas, is characterized by high SiO 2#73, moderately high FeO* #73, and low CaO #73 and Al 2O 3#73. These two components are not evenly sampled by all the islands, suggesting a heterogeneous distribution of mantle components that generate them. We suggest that carbonated eclogite and volatile-free, silica

  4. The role of TiO 2 phases during melting of subduction-modified crust: Implications for deep mantle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromiley, Geoffrey D.; Redfern, Simon A. T.

    2008-03-01

    Partitioning of Nb, Ta, Hf and Zr between rutile, its high-pressure polymorph TiO2(II) and silicate melt has been experimentally determined at 2 GPa/1200 °C, 6 GPa/1600 °C, 8 GPa/1800 °C and 10 GPa/1900 °C. Results show that characteristic depletion of Nb and Ta in partial melts due to the presence of rutile in solid residues (for example during melting of subducting oceanic crust) is strongly dependent on depth of partial melting. With increasing pressure, changes in melt structure result in marked reduction in Dmin/melt for Nb (14.8, 5.4, 2.5, and 2.4 with increasing P/T) and Ta (28.0, 17.0, 6.9, and 5.5). A strong pressure effect is also noted in Dmin/melt for Zr (2.1, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2) and Hf (4.1, 0.9, 1.3, and 1.3), although for these elements the rutile to TiO2(II) transition also influences partitioning behaviour. Results have important implications for melting of oceanic crust in Earth's deep mantle. Ancient subduction-modified crust cannot be a direct source for ocean-island basalts (OIB) unless depth of melting is greater than 300 km, or degree of partial melting is much higher than suggested on the basis of previous trace element modeling work (and sufficient to remove TiO2 phases from solid residues). Likewise, the absence of strong depletion of Nb and Ta in OIB also provides constraints on degree of partial melting vs depth of partial melting for models where melting of ancient crust acts as an indirect source for OIB by metasomatic interaction with the mantle. The controlling influence of melt structure on partitioning behaviour of high-field strength elements (HFSE) implies that relative enrichment of Nb and Ta and reduction in Zr/Nb in high-pressure partial melts should occur even when TiO2 phases are not present in solid residues. As such, depth of partial melting may be as important a factor as mineral and melt chemistry and degree of partial melting in constraining the composition of partial melts from Earth's deep interior.

  5. Structural Stability and Mobility of Carbonate Minerals and Melts in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Caracas, R.; Fan, D.; Zhang, D.; Mao, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of potential carbon carriers such as the mantle carbonate minerals and melts is critical for our understanding of the deep-carbon cycle and related geological processes within the planet. Although rhombohedral carbonates (e.g., calcite, magnesite, and siderite) have been proposed as a major carbon carrier in the Earth's crust and upper mantle, several distinct scenarios have been proposed for these carbonates at deep-mantle conditions including chemical dissociation and various structural transitions. Recently, carbonate melts have been reported to be highly mobile at high pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions, which may have significant impact on magmatic processes in Earth's upper mantle. However, the high P-T behaviors of carbonate minerals and melts are still not well understood, in terms of their structural stability and mobility in the Earth's lower mantle. Combining in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), and Raman spectroscopy experiments in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell with complementary theoretical calculations, we investigate the phase stability of carbonates, the equation of state (EoS) of carbonatic glasses, as well as the distribution of carbonate melts in a silicate matrix up to lower-mantle conditions.

  6. Melting of the Earth's lithospheric mantle inferred from protactinium-thorium-uranium isotopic data

    PubMed

    Asmerom; Cheng; Thomas; Hirschmann; Edwards

    2000-07-20

    The processes responsible for the generation of partial melt in the Earth's lithospheric mantle and the movement of this melt to the Earth's surface remain enigmatic, owing to the perceived difficulties in generating large-degree partial melts at depth and in transporting small-degree melts through a static lithosphere. Here we present a method of placing constraints on melting in the lithospheric mantle using 231Pa-235U data obtained from continental basalts in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Combined with 230Th-238U data, the 231Pa-235U data allow us to constrain the source mineralogy and thus the depth of melting of these basalts. Our analysis indicates that it is possible to transport small melt fractions--of the order of 0.1%--through the lithosphere, as might result from the coalescence of melt by compaction owing to melting-induced deformation. The large observed 231Pa excesses require that the timescale of melt generation and transport within the lithosphere is small compared to the half-life of 231Pa (approximately 32.7 kyr). The 231Pa-230Th data also constrain the thorium and uranium distribution coefficients for clinopyroxene in the source regions of these basalts to be within 2% of one another, indicating that in this setting 230Th excesses are not expected during melting at depths shallower than 85 km. PMID:10917528

  7. Partitioning of copper between olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, spinel, garnet and silicate melts at upper mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingcheng; Xiong, Xiaolin; Audétat, Andreas; Li, Yuan; Song, Maoshuang; Li, Li; Sun, Weidong; Ding, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Previously published Cu partition coefficients (DCu) between silicate minerals and melts cover a wide range and have resulted in large uncertainties in model calculations of Cu behavior during mantle melting. In order to obtain true DCumineral/melt values, this study used Pt95Cu05 alloy capsules as the source of Cu to experimentally determine the DCu between olivine (ol), orthopyroxene (opx), clinopyroxene (cpx), spinel (spl), garnet (grt) and hydrous silicate melts at upper mantle conditions. Three synthetic silicate compositions, a Komatiite, a MORB and a Di70An30, were used to produce these minerals and melts. The experiments were conducted in piston cylinder presses at 1.0-3.5 GPa, 1150-1300 °C and oxygen fugacities (fO2) of from ∼2 log units below to ∼5 log units above fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ). The compositions of minerals and quenched melts in the run products were measured with EMP and LA-ICP-MS. Attainment of equilibrium is verified by reproducible DCu values obtained at similar experimental conditions but different durations. The results show that DCu for ol/, opx/, spl/ and possibly cpx/melt increase with increasing fO2 when fO2 > FMQ + 1.2, while DCu for cpx/ and spl/melt also increase with increasing Na2O in cpx and Fe2O3 in spinel, respectively. In the investigated P-T-fO2 conditions, the DCumineral/melt values are 0.04-0.14 for ol, 0.04-0.09 for opx, 0.02-0.23 for cpx, 0.19-0.77 for spl and 0.03-0.05 for grt. These results confirm that Cu is highly incompatible (DCu < ∼0.2) in all the silicate minerals and oxides of the upper mantle with the exception of the high-Fe spinel, in which Cu is moderately incompatible (DCu = 0.4-0.8) and thus Cu will be enriched in the derived melts during mantle partial melting and magmatic differentiation if sulfide is absent. These experimental DCu values are used to assess the controls on Cu behavior during mantle melting. The model results suggest that MORBs and most arc basalts must form by sulfide

  8. Melting and mixing states of the Earth's mantle after the Moon-forming impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Miki; Stevenson, David J.

    2015-10-01

    The Earth's Moon is thought to have formed by an impact between the Earth and an impactor around 4.5 billion years ago. This impact could have been so energetic that it could have mixed and homogenized the Earth's mantle. However, this view appears to be inconsistent with geochemical studies that suggest that the Earth's mantle was not mixed by the impact. Another outcome of the impact is that this energetic impact melted the whole mantle, but the extent of mantle melting is not well understood even though it must have had a significant effect on the subsequent evolution of the Earth's interior and atmosphere. To understand the initial state of the Earth's mantle, we perform giant impact simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) for three different models: (a) standard: a Mars-sized impactor hits the proto-Earth, (b) fast-spinning Earth: a small impactor hits a rapidly rotating proto-Earth, and (c) sub-Earths: two half Earth-sized planets collide. We use two types of equations of state (MgSiO3 liquid and forsterite) to describe the Earth's mantle. We find that the mantle remains unmixed in (a), but it may be mixed in (b) and (c). The extent of mixing is most extensive in (c). Therefore, (a) is most consistent and (c) may be least consistent with the preservation of the mantle heterogeneity, while (b) may fall between. We determine that the Earth's mantle becomes mostly molten by the impact in all of the models. The choice of the equation of state does not affect these outcomes. Additionally, our results indicate that entropy gains of the mantle materials by a giant impact cannot be predicted well by the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. Moreover, we show that the mantle can remain unmixed on a Moon-forming timescale if it does not become mixed by the impact.

  9. Phase behavior and reactive transport of partial melt in heterogeneous mantle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The reactive transport of partial melt is the key process that leads to the chemical and physical differentiation of terrestrial planets and smaller celestial bodies. The essential role of the lithological heterogeneities during partial melting of the mantle is increasingly recognized. How far can enriched melts propagate while interacting with the ambient mantle? Can the melt flow emanating from a fertile heterogeneity be localized through a reactive infiltration feedback in a model without exogenous factors or contrived initial conditions? A full understanding of the role of heterogeneities requires reactive melt transport models that account for the phase behavior of major elements. Previous work on reactive transport in the mantle focuses on trace element partitioning; we present the first nonlinear chromatographic analysis of reactive melt transport in systems with binary solid solution. Our analysis shows that reactive melt transport in systems with binary solid solution leads to the formation of two separate reaction fronts: a slow melting/freezing front along which enthalpy change is dominant and a fast dissolution/precipitation front along which compositional changes are dominated by an ion-exchange process over enthalpy change. An intermediate state forms between these two fronts with a bulk-rock composition and enthalpy that are not necessarily bounded by the bulk-rock composition and enthalpy of either the enriched heterogeneity or the depleted ambient mantle. The formation of this intermediate state makes it difficult to anticipate the porosity changes and hence the stability of reaction fronts. Therefore, we develop a graphical representation for the solution that allows identification of the intermediate state by inspection, for all possible bulk-rock compositions and enthalpies of the heterogeneity and the ambient mantle. We apply the analysis to the partial melting of an enriched heterogeneity. This leads to the formation of moving precipitation

  10. Melt transport rates in heterogeneous mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherley, Samuel M.; Katz, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent insights to melt migration beneath ridges suggest that channelized flow is a consequence of melting of a heterogeneous mantle, and that spreading rate modulates the dynamics of the localised flow. A corollary of this finding is that both mantle heterogeneity and spreading rate have implications for the speed and time scale of melt migration. Here, we investigate these implications using numerical models of magma flow in heterogeneous mantle beneath spreading plates. The models predict that a broad distribution of magma flow speeds is characteristic of the sub-ridge mantle. Within the melting region, magmatic flow is fastest in regions of average fusibility; surprisingly, magmas from sources of above-average fusibility travel to the ridge in a longer time. Spreading rate has comparatively simple consequences, mainly resulting in faster segregation speeds at higher spreading rates. The computed time scales are short enough to preserve deep origin 230 Th disequilibria and, under favourable parameter regimes, also 226 Ra excesses. An important prediction from the models is that mantle heterogeneity induces significant natural variability into U-series disequilibria, complicating the identification of relationships between disequilibria and ridge properties or chemical signatures of heterogeneity.

  11. Oxygen fugacity profile of the oceanic upper mantle and the depth of redox melting beneath ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, F. A.; Cottrell, E.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen fugacity (fO2) of a mantle mineral assemblage, controlled primarily by Fe redox chemistry, sets the depth of the diamond to carbonated melt reaction (DCO3). Near-surface fO2 recorded by primitive MORB glasses and abyssal peridotites anchor the fO2 profile of the mantle at depth. If the fO2-depth relationship of the mantle is known, then the depth of the DCO3 can be predicted. Alternatively, if the DCO3 can be detected geophysically, then its depth can be used to infer physical and chemical characteristics of upwelling mantle. We present an expanded version of a model of the fO2-depth profile of adiabatically upwelling mantle first presented by Stagno et al. (2013), kindly provided by D. Frost. The model uses a chemical mass balance and empirical fits to experimental data to calculate compositions and modes of mantle minerals at specified P, T, and bulk Fe3+/ƩFe. We added P and T dependences to the partitioning of Al and Ca to better simulate the mineralogical changes in peridotite at depth and included majorite component in garnet to increase the depth range of the model. We calculate fO2 from the mineral assemblages using the grt-ol-opx oxybarometer (Stagno et al., 2013). The onset of carbonated melting occurs at the intersection of a Fe3+/ƩFe isopleth with the DCO3. Upwelling mantle is tied to the DCO3 until all native C is oxidized to form carbonated melts by reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+. The depth of intersection of a parcel of mantle with the DCO3 is a function of bulk Fe3+/ƩFe, potential temperature, and bulk composition. We predict that fertile mantle (PUM) along a 1400 °C adiabat, with 50 ppm bulk C, and Fe3+/ƩFe = 0.05 after C oxidation begins redox melting at a depth of 250 km. The model contextualizes observations of MORB redox chemistry. Because fertile peridotite is richer in Al2O3, the Fe2O3-bearing components of garnet are diluted leading to lower fO2 at a given depth compared to refractory mantle under the same conditions. This may indicate

  12. Seismic evidence for silicate melt atop the 410-km mantle discontinuity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revenaugh, Justin; Sipkin, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    LABORATORY results demonstrating that basic to ultrabasic melts become denser than olivine-rich mantle at pressures above 6 GPa (refs 1-3) have important implications for basalt petrogenesis, mantle differentiation and the storage of volatiles deep in the Earth. A density cross-over between melt and solid in the extensively molten Archaean mantle has been inferred from komatiitic volcanism and major-element mass balances, but present-day evidence of dense melt below the seismic low-velocity zone is lacking. Here we present mantle shear-wave impedance profiles obtained from multiple-ScS reverberation mapping for corridors connecting western Pacific subduction zone earthquakes with digital seismograph stations in eastern China, imaging a ~5.8% impedance decrease roughly 330 km beneath the Sea of Japan, Yellow Sea and easternmost Asia. We propose that this represents the upper surface of a layer of negatively buoyant melt lying on top of the olivine ??? ??- phase transition (the 410-km seismic discontinuity). Volatile-rich fluids expelled from the partial melt zone as it freezes may migrate upwards, acting as metasomatic agents and perhaps as the deep 'proto-source' of kimberlites. The remaining, dense, crystalline fraction would then concentrate above 410 km, producing a garnet-rich layer that may flush into the transition zone.

  13. Density of Hydrous Ultramafic Silicate Melt under the Earth's Deep Upper Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Matsukage, K. N.; Karato, S.

    2005-12-01

    Density of silicate melts is a critical material property in our understanding of geochemical evolution of the Earth. Previous studies (e.g., Agee & Walker 1993; Suzuki et al., 1995) showed that the density of dry silicate melts can be higher than that of surrounding solids under deep upper mantle conditions. However, melts formed under such conditions likely contain some water (Bercovici & Karato, 2003), which will reduce the melt density. In this study, we performed sink/float experiments between 10 and 14GPa and at 2173K to determine the density of hydrous ultramafic silicate melts, using a Kawai-type multianvil apparatus. We choose a target melt composition based on the experimental study by Litasov & Ohtani (2002). With this chemical composition, olivine reacts with the melt above the liquidus, so we used diamond as the density marker. However, diamond is much denser than a melt with a typical mantle like Fe/Mg ratio. Therefore in this study we determined the density of melts with high Fe contents, and from the relation between Fe content and melt density, we inferred the melt density with Earth-like Fe/Mg. Four Fe-rich compositions with 5wt% water and different iron content were chosen as starting materials. Density crossovers between melts and diamond were observed for all compositions. The densities of four melts at 14GPa and 2173K were calculated using the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The pressure derivative of isothermal bulk modulus (Kt') of the melts was estimated to be around 4. The density of mantle melt with mantle value of content and 5wt% water at 14GPa, 2173K was extrapolated to be ~3.42±0.4g/cm3. We compared our density results for hydrous melts with previous results on dry melts and found that water is more compressible than other components in melt. The estimated partial molar volume of water at 14GPa and 2173K is ~8±2cm3/mol, which is significantly lower than the value at low pressures. The conditions under which the density crossover

  14. The temperature of primary melts and mantle sources of komatiites, OIBs, MORBs and LIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    There is general agreement that the convecting mantle, although mostly peridotitic in composition, is compositionally and thermally heterogeneous on different spatial scales. The amount, sizes, temperatures and compositions of these heterogeneities significantly affect mantle dynamics because they may diverge greatly from dominant peridotites in their density and fusibility. Differences in potential temperature and composition of mantle domains affect magma production and cannot be easily distinguished from each other. This has led to radically different interpretations of the melting anomalies that produce ocean-island basalts, large igneous provinces and komatiites: most scientists believe that they originate as hot, deep-sourced mantle plumes; but a small though influential group (e.g. Anderson 2005, Foulger, 2010) propose that they derive from high proportions of easily fusible recycled or delaminated crust, or in the case of komatiites contain large amount of H2O (e.g. Grove & Parman, 2004). The way to resolve this ambiguity is an independent estimation of temperature and composition of mantle sources of various types of magma. In this paper I report application of newly developed olivine-spinel-melt geothermometers based on partition of Al, Cr, Sc and Y for different primitive lavas from mid-ocean ridges, ocean-island basalts, large igneous provinces and komatiites. The results suggest significant variations of crystallization temperature for the same Fo of high magnesium olivines of different types of mantle-derived magmas: from the lowest (down to 1220 degree C) for MORB to the highest (up to over 1500 degree C) for komatiites and Siberian meimechites. These results match predictions from Fe-Mg olivine-melt equilibrium and confirm the relatively low temperature of the mantle source of MORB and higher temperatures in the mantle plumes that produce the OIB of Iceland, Hawaii, Gorgona, Archean komatiites and several LIPs (e.g Siberian and NAMP). The

  15. Mapping mantle-melting anomalies in Baja California: a combined helium-seismology approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrete-Aranda, R.; Spelz, R. M.; Hilton, D. R.; Tellez, M.; González-Yahimovich, O.

    2015-12-01

    In active tectonic settings, the presence of helium in aqueous fluids with 3He/4He ratios greater than in-situ production values (~0.05 RA where RA = air He or 1.4 x 10-6) indicates the contribution of mantle-derived volatiles to the total volatile inventory. This is an indicative of the presence of mantle-derived melts, which act to transfer volatiles from the solid Earth towards the surface. Thus, He has the potential to map regions of the underlying mantle which are undergoing partial melting - a phenomenon which should also be evident in the seismic record. Reports of high 3He/4He in hot springs in Baja California (BC) has prompted us to initiate a survey of the region to assess relationship(s) between He isotopes and geophysical images of the underlying mantle. Previous studies report 3He/4He ratios of 0.54 RA for submarine hot springs (Punta Banda 108oC; Vidal, 1982) and 1.3 RA for spring waters (81oC) at Bahia Concepcion (Forrest et al.,2005). Our new survey of hot springs in northern BC has revealed that all 6 localities sampled to date, show the presence of mantle He with the highest ratio being 1.74RA (21% mantle-derived) at Puertecitos on the Gulf coast. He ratios are generally lower on the Pacific coast with the minimum mantle He contribution being 5% at Sierra Juárez (0.11RA). Thus, preliminary trends are of a west-to-east increase in the mantle He signal across the peninsula. He results presented in this study correlate well with high resolution Rayleigh wave tomography images by Forsythe et al. (2007). Shear velocity variations in the BC crust and upper mantle have been interpreted as low velocity anomalies associated with dynamic upwelling and active melt production. More extensive sampling throughout BC coupled with analysis of other geochemical indicators of mantle degassing (e.g. CO2) will allow more detailed characterization of the extent and distribution of mantle melts in the region, facilitating assessment of the region's geothermal

  16. Volatile-rich Melts in the Earth's Upper Mantle (AGU Kuno Medal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2013-04-01

    The onset of silicate magma generation in the Earth's upper mantle influences the thermal evolution of the planet, fluxes of key volatiles to the exosphere, and geochemical and geophysical properties of the mantle. Although carbonatitic fluid with variable water content could be stable ≤250 km beneath mid oceanic ridges [1-3], owing to the small fraction (<< 1 wt.%), its effects on the mantle properties are unclear. Geophysical measurements, however, suggest that melts of greater volume may be present down to ~200 km [4-6] but large melt fractions is thought to be restricted to shallower depths. In this Kuno Award lecture, I will discuss the recent advancements on our understanding of deeper silicate melt generation induced by CO2-H2O volatiles and the relative stability of silicate versus carbonatitic melt in various tectonic settings. I will present recent experiments on carbonated peridotites that constrain the location and the slope of the onset of silicate melting in the mantle [7]. The new finding is that the pressure-temperature slope of carbonated silicate melting is steeper than the solidus of volatile-free peridotite and as a consequence the silicate melting of dry peridotite+CO2 beneath ridges commences at ~180 km. Accounting for the effect of 50-200 ppm of mantle H2O on freezing point depression, the onset of silicate melting for a sub-ridge mantle with ~100 ppm CO2 becomes as deep as ~220-300 km [7]. This melting generates a kimberlitic magma with ~25 wt.% dissolved CO2 and 1-5 wt.% dissolved H2O. Based on the recent constraints of oxygen fugacity of the mantle in the garnet peridotite field [2, 3], we suggest that on a global scale, carbonated silicate melt generation at ~250-180 km deep redox solidus, with destabilization of metal and majorite in the upwelling mantle, explains oceanic low-velocity zone and electrical conductivity structure of the mantle. In locally oxidized domains (i.e., higher than average Fe3+/Fetotal), deeper carbonated

  17. Volatile-rich Melts in the Earth's Upper Mantle (AGU Kuno Medal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2013-04-01

    The onset of silicate magma generation in the Earth's upper mantle influences the thermal evolution of the planet, fluxes of key volatiles to the exosphere, and geochemical and geophysical properties of the mantle. Although carbonatitic fluid with variable water content could be stable ≤250 km beneath mid oceanic ridges [1-3], owing to the small fraction (<< 1 wt.%), its effects on the mantle properties are unclear. Geophysical measurements, however, suggest that melts of greater volume may be present down to ~200 km [4-6] but large melt fractions is thought to be restricted to shallower depths. In this Kuno Award lecture, I will discuss the recent advancements on our understanding of deeper silicate melt generation induced by CO2-H2O volatiles and the relative stability of silicate versus carbonatitic melt in various tectonic settings. I will present recent experiments on carbonated peridotites that constrain the location and the slope of the onset of silicate melting in the mantle [7]. The new finding is that the pressure-temperature slope of carbonated silicate melting is steeper than the solidus of volatile-free peridotite and as a consequence the silicate melting of dry peridotite+CO2 beneath ridges commences at ~180 km. Accounting for the effect of 50-200 ppm of mantle H2O on freezing point depression, the onset of silicate melting for a sub-ridge mantle with ~100 ppm CO2 becomes as deep as ~220-300 km [7]. This melting generates a kimberlitic magma with ~25 wt.% dissolved CO2 and 1-5 wt.% dissolved H2O. Based on the recent constraints of oxygen fugacity of the mantle in the garnet peridotite field [2, 3], we suggest that on a global scale, carbonated silicate melt generation at ~250-180 km deep redox solidus, with destabilization of metal and majorite in the upwelling mantle, explains oceanic low-velocity zone and electrical conductivity structure of the mantle. In locally oxidized domains (i.e., higher than average Fe3+/Fetotal), deeper carbonated

  18. The generation and composition of partial melts in the earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil M.

    1985-05-01

    A set of equations is presented which combines the constraints of fluid dynamics and multicomponent phase equilibrium to provide a unified description of partial melting in the earth's mantle. The equations are applied to a one-dimensional model for pressure-release melting of a simplified mantle material, which contains only two chemical components exhibiting either (a) complete solid solution or (b) a binary eutectic. In both cases, melting occurs over a range of depths. The unmelted crystalline residue ("matrix") is modeled as a saturated porous medium, through which the melt can migrate because of its differential buoyancy. Since melt interacts continuously with the matrix during ascent, melting occurs by equilibrium rather than fractional fusion. This equilibrium fusion is not the same as batch fusion, however, since material elements are quickly dispersed by migration of melt relative to the matrix. To a first approximation, the temperature profiles (adiabats) in the partially molten zone are independent of melt migration. The slope of the adiabats varies in inverse proportion to the number of degrees of freedom which characterizes the melting. Melting of a complete solid solution occurs along a "wet" adiabat whose slope is controlled by absorption of latent heat. Melting of a eutectic system occurs along a steeper "univariant" adiabat until one solid phase is exhausted, and subsequently along a wet adiabat. The velocity of melt migration can exceed the mantle upwelling velocity by an order of magnitude or more. The volume fraction of melt present is always less than the fraction of the material which has melted, and is unlikely to exceed a few percent. For a wide range of initial conditions, melting of a eutectic system produces erupted melts having constant major element composition and widely varying trace element composition. This result may provide a partial explanation for the characteristic major- and LIL-element patterns observed in MORB. Liquid

  19. Minor and trace elements in olivines as probes into early igneous and mantle melting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Stephen F.; Prelevic, Dejan; Rehfeldt, Tatjana; Jacob, Dorrit E.

    2013-02-01

    The trace element composition of olivine is a rapidly growing research area that has several applications of great potential. Mantle olivines can be distinguished from volcanic olivines by lower concentrations of Ca (<700 ppm), Ti (<70 ppm), and often Cr. The melting of pyroxenites derived from recycled ocean crust can be recognized in volcanic olivines by correlations of Mn, Al, Sc and Co in addition to Ni. High Ni is characteristic of olivine derived from olivine-free source rocks, but alone it does not distinguish between recycling of ocean crust, continental crust, mantle wedge hybridization, and intra-mantle melt migration. Trace elements help to identify different types of non-peridotitic ultramafic rocks, including those not formed by ocean crust recycling. High Li may be caused by recycling of continental crust, as in Mediterranean post-collisional volcanics or by interaction with carbonatitic melts, and correlation with further elements such as Zn, Na, Ti and Ca will help to identify minerals in the source assemblages, such as phlogopite, spinel, garnet, amphiboles and carbonates, and thus the source of the olivine-free assemblages. Olivines often store the earliest chemical signals of melt loss in peridotites, but later absorb trace elements from passing melts, and are thus excellent monitors of the chemistry of metasomatic agents. Trace elements distinguish between Ti-enrichment by silicate melt metasomatism (high Ti, low Ca) and high-Ca signatures associated with plumes and rift regions that may be due to carbonate-silicate melts. Li may be enriched in olivine in the orogenic mantle, indicating the involvement of melted continental crustal material. Experimental data on element partitioning and diffusion currently partly conflicts with information from natural rocks.

  20. Redox Viscosity of Iron Rich Silicate Melts - Martian Mantle Analogues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, D. B.

    2004-12-01

    The dependence of shear viscosity on the oxidation state of ferrosilicate melts has been measured using the concentric cylinder method and a gas mixing furnace. Two different simple Fe-bearing systems have been studied to date: (i) anorthite-diopside eutectic composition (AnDi) with variable amount of Fe (up to 20 wt%) as a basalt analogue and (ii) sodium disilicate (NS2 up to 30 wt % Fe). In addition, the compositional range has been extended to include the more complex SNC meteorite composition, a composition more relevant to Mars. The measurements were performed under air, CO2 and CO2-CO mixture at 1 atm and in a temperature range of 1300 to 1350 \\ºC. The experimental procedure involve a continuous measurement of viscosity during stepwise reduction state. The melt was reduced by flowing CO2 and then successively reducing mixtures of CO2-CO through the alumina muffle tube. Gas flow rates were electronically controlled using Tylan mass flow controllers and oxygen fugacity was directly measured using a sensor and calculated with Nernst equation. The composition and oxidation state of the melt was monitored by obtaining a melt sample after each redox equilibrium step. The melts were sampled by dipping an alumina rod into the sample and drawing out a drop of liquid, which was then plunged into water for quenching. The resulting glasses were analyzed by electron microprobe, and the volumetric potassium dichromate titration were employed to determine FeO. In addition, the redox dependence of viscosity of our samples have been compared with data from literature (Mysen et al. 1985, Dingwell and Virgo, 1988; Dingwell 1989, Dingwell 1991). The viscosity of all melts investigated herein decreases with melt reduction. The viscosity decrease is, in general, a nonlinear function of oxidation state expressed as Fe2+/Fetot and can be fitted using logarithmic equation.

  1. Probing Seismically Melting Induced Mantle Heterogeneities in Thermal-chemical Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, H. V.; Davies, H.; Nowacki, A.; Wookey, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Two regions at the base of the Earth's mantle (the Large Low-Shear Velocity Provinces) pose a fundamental problem in understanding large-scale mantle dynamics and history. Are they dense piles of (possibly primordial) material separated from mantle circulation, or large-scale thermal features which are part of global mantle convection? Or some combination of the two? We use our numerical 3D spherical mantle convection code to perform simulations of the Earths mantle dynamical evolution. We drive the surface velocity of the model according to 200 Ma plate motion reconstructions, to arrive at Earth-like structures in the mantle at present day. Variations in bulk chemistry will be tracked in two ways: 1) by starting the calculations with a (primordial) dense layer at the base of the mantle, and 2) by tracking basalt fraction which is fractionated upon melting close to the surface. The resulting distribution of chemical heterogeneity and temperature will be converted to seismic velocities. This will be done with a thermodynamical database (Stixrude & Lithgow-Bertelloni, GJI, 2005, 2011), allowing us to compare the model with previous observations of triplications and waveform complexity near the margins of the LLSVPs. These observations have been taken as proof that strong chemical variations are present; our simulations can be used to show whether this is true, or if purely thermal convection can also cause these features. We simulate finite-frequency, 3D seismograms at ~5 s period and compare these with previous studies.

  2. Nickel and helium evidence for melt above the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Claude; Asimow, Paul D; Ionov, Dmitri A; Vidito, Chris; Jackson, Matthew G; Geist, Dennis

    2013-01-17

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios in some basalts have generally been interpreted as originating in an incompletely degassed lower-mantle source. This helium source may have been isolated at the core-mantle boundary region since Earth's accretion. Alternatively, it may have taken part in whole-mantle convection and crust production over the age of the Earth; if so, it is now either a primitive refugium at the core-mantle boundary or is distributed throughout the lower mantle. Here we constrain the problem using lavas from Baffin Island, West Greenland, the Ontong Java Plateau, Isla Gorgona and Fernandina (Galapagos). Olivine phenocryst compositions show that these lavas originated from a peridotite source that was about 20 per cent higher in nickel content than in the modern mid-ocean-ridge basalt source. Where data are available, these lavas also have high (3)He/(4)He. We propose that a less-degassed nickel-rich source formed by core-mantle interaction during the crystallization of a melt-rich layer or basal magma ocean, and that this source continues to be sampled by mantle plumes. The spatial distribution of this source may be constrained by nickel partitioning experiments at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary. PMID:23302797

  3. Chalcophile behavior of thallium during MORB melting and implications for the sulfur content of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Sune G.; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Behn, Mark D.

    2014-12-01

    present new laser ablation ICP-MS trace element concentration data for 28 elements in 97 mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses that cover all major spreading centers as well as Tl concentration data for all mineral phases in five lherzolites from the Lherz massif, France. The ratio between the elements thallium (Tl) and cerium (Ce) is nearly constant in MORB, providing evidence that the depleted MORB mantle (DMM) has uniform Ce/Tl. Lherzolite mineral data reveal that sulfides are heterogeneous and contain between 23 and 430 ng/g of Tl while all other minerals contain Tl below the analytical detection limit of ˜1 ng/g. We argue that Tl in MORB is controlled by residual sulfide during mantle melting. To investigate the observed relationship between Tl and Ce, we conduct models of fractional mantle melting, which show that the constant Ce/Tl in MORB is only reproduced if the ratio between clinopyroxene and sulfide in the upper mantle varies by less than 10%. In addition, the rate of melting for these two phases must be nearly identical as otherwise melt depletion and refertilization processes would lead to Ce/Tl fractionation. These model results allow us to establish a relationship for the sulfur content of DMM: [S]DMM = SCSS × Mcpx /Rcpx, where SCSS is the sulfur concentration of a silicate melt at sulfide saturation, Rcpx is the melt reaction coefficient, and Mcpx is the modal abundance of clinopyroxene in the DMM. Using this equation, we calculate that the average upper mantle sulfur concentration is 195 ± 45 μg/g.

  4. Isotopic equilibrium between mantle peridotite and melt: Evidence from the Corsica ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, Elisabetta; Hofmann, Albrecht W.; Raczek, Ingrid

    2009-11-01

    A widely used assumption of mantle geochemistry and the theory of partial melting at oceanic settings is the existence of isotopic equilibrium between mantle source and melt. Yet, recent diffusion studies and isotopic investigations of ophiolites, abyssal peridotites and associated MORBs have cast doubts on this assumption, by providing evidence for isotopic disequilibrium between residual peridotites and MORBs. Here we present Sr and Sm-Nd isotope data on mantle peridotites and gabbroic intrusions from the Mt. Maggiore (Alpine Corsica, France) Tethyan ophiolite, which document Nd isotopic homogeneity, implying isotopic equilibrium, on a 1-kilometer scale. The peridotites record multi-stage melt-rock interaction and melt intrusion occurring at different lithospheric depths. Samples studied are residual cpx-poor spinel lherzolites, reactive spinel harzburgites, impregnated plagioclase peridotites and related gabbronoritic veinlets, later gabbroic dykes. Strontium isotopes in peridotites and gabbros are highly variable, due to interaction with sea-water derived fluids, and cannot be used to test melt-residue isotopic equilibrium. In contrast, Nd isotopes are unaffected by sea-water alteration. Peridotites display present-day high 147Sm/ 144Nd (0.49-0.59) and 143Nd/ 144Nd (0.513367-0.513551) ratios, with no appreciable differences between residual and reactive spinel peridotites, and between spinel and plagioclase peridotites. Gabbroic dykes have present-day Nd isotopic compositions typical of MORB ( 143Nd/ 144Nd = 0.513122-0.513138). Internal (plag-whole rock-cpx) Sm-Nd isochrons for olivine gabbro dykes and a gabbronoritic veinlet yield Jurassic ages (162 ± 10 and 159 ± 15 Ma in ol-gabbros, 155 ± 6 Ma in gabbronorite), and initial ɛNd = 8.9-9.7 indicative of a MORB-type source. Sm-Nd isotopic compositions of peridotites conform to the linear array defined by the gabbroic rocks, and yield initial (160 Ma) ɛNd values of 7.6-8.9, again consistent with a MORB

  5. Fate of MgSiO3 melts at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Petitgirard, Sylvain; Malfait, Wim J; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Kupenko, Ilya; Hennet, Louis; Harries, Dennis; Dane, Thomas; Burghammer, Manfred; Rubie, Dave C

    2015-11-17

    One key for understanding the stratification in the deep mantle lies in the determination of the density and structure of matter at high pressures, as well as the density contrast between solid and liquid silicate phases. Indeed, the density contrast is the main control on the entrainment or settlement of matter and is of fundamental importance for understanding the past and present dynamic behavior of the deepest part of the Earth's mantle. Here, we adapted the X-ray absorption method to the small dimensions of the diamond anvil cell, enabling density measurements of amorphous materials to unprecedented conditions of pressure. Our density data for MgSiO3 glass up to 127 GPa are considerably higher than those previously derived from Brillouin spectroscopy but validate recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. A fourth-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reproduces our experimental data over the entire pressure regime of the mantle. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, the density of MgSiO3 glass is 5.48 ± 0.18 g/cm(3), which is only 1.6% lower than that of MgSiO3 bridgmanite at 5.57 g/cm(3), i.e., they are the same within the uncertainty. Taking into account the partitioning of iron into the melt, we conclude that melts are denser than the surrounding solid phases in the lowermost mantle and that melts will be trapped above the CMB. PMID:26578761

  6. Fate of MgSiO3 melts at core–mantle boundary conditions

    PubMed Central

    Petitgirard, Sylvain; Malfait, Wim J.; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Kupenko, Ilya; Hennet, Louis; Harries, Dennis; Dane, Thomas; Burghammer, Manfred; Rubie, Dave C.

    2015-01-01

    One key for understanding the stratification in the deep mantle lies in the determination of the density and structure of matter at high pressures, as well as the density contrast between solid and liquid silicate phases. Indeed, the density contrast is the main control on the entrainment or settlement of matter and is of fundamental importance for understanding the past and present dynamic behavior of the deepest part of the Earth’s mantle. Here, we adapted the X-ray absorption method to the small dimensions of the diamond anvil cell, enabling density measurements of amorphous materials to unprecedented conditions of pressure. Our density data for MgSiO3 glass up to 127 GPa are considerably higher than those previously derived from Brillouin spectroscopy but validate recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. A fourth-order Birch–Murnaghan equation of state reproduces our experimental data over the entire pressure regime of the mantle. At the core–mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, the density of MgSiO3 glass is 5.48 ± 0.18 g/cm3, which is only 1.6% lower than that of MgSiO3 bridgmanite at 5.57 g/cm3, i.e., they are the same within the uncertainty. Taking into account the partitioning of iron into the melt, we conclude that melts are denser than the surrounding solid phases in the lowermost mantle and that melts will be trapped above the CMB. PMID:26578761

  7. Progressive enrichment of island arc mantle by melt-peridotite interaction inferred from Kamchatka xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepezhinskas, Pavel; Defant, Marc J.; Drummond, Mark S.

    1996-04-01

    The Pliocene (7 Ma) Nb-enriched arc basalts of the Valovayam Volcanic Field (VVF) in the northern segment of Kamchatka arc (Russia) host abundant xenoliths of spinel peridotites and pyroxenites. Textural and microstructural evidence for the high-temperature, multistage creep-related deformations in spinel peridotites supports a sub-arc mantle derivation. Pyroxenites show re-equilibrated mosaic textures, indicating recrystallization during cooling under the ambient thermal conditions. Three textural groups of clinopyroxenes exhibit progressive enrichment in Na, Al, Sr, La, and Ce accompanied by increase in Sr/Y, La/Yb, and Zr/Sm. Trace elements in various mineral phases and from felsic veins obtained through ion microprobe analysis suggest that the xenoliths have interacted with a siliceous (dacitic) melt completely unlike the host basalt. The suite of xenoliths grade from examples that display little evidence of metasomatic reaction to those containing an assemblage of minerals that have been reproduced experimentally from the reaction of a felsic melt with ultramafic rock, e.g., pargasitic amphibole, albite-rich plagioclase, Al-rich augite, and garnet. The dacitic veins within spinel lherzolite display a strong enrichment in Sr and depletion in Y and the heavy rare earth elements (e.g., Yb). The dacites are comparable to adakites (melts derived from subducted metabasalt), and not typical arc melts. We believe that these potential slab melts were introduced into the mantle beneath this portion of Kamchatka subsequent to partial melting of a relatively young (and hot) subducted crust. Island arc metasomatism by peridotite-slab melt interaction is an important mantle hybridization process responsible for arc-related alkaline magma generation from a veined sub-arc mantle.

  8. Oxidation state of iron in komatiitic melt inclusions indicates hot Archaean mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.J.; Danyushevsky, L.; O'Neill, H.C.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.R.

    2008-10-16

    Komatiites are volcanic rocks mainly of Archaean age that formed by unusually high degrees of melting of mantle peridotite. Their origin is controversial and has been attributed to either anhydrous melting of anomalously hot mantle or hydrous melting at temperatures only modestly greater than those found today. Here we determine the original Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratio of 2.7-Gyr-old komatiitic magma from Belingwe, Zimbabwe, preserved as melt inclusions in olivine, to be 0.10 {+-} 0.02, using iron K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. This value is consistent with near-anhydrous melting of a source with a similar oxidation state to the source of present-day mid-ocean-ridge basalt. Furthermore, this low Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe value, together with a water content of only 0.2--0.3 wt%, excludes the possibility that the trapped melt contained significantly more water that was subsequently lost from the inclusions by reduction to H{sub 2} and diffusion. Loss of only 1.5 wt% water by this mechanism would have resulted in complete oxidation of iron (that is, the Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratio would be {approx}1). There is also no petrographic evidence for the loss of molecular water. Our results support the identification of the Belingwe komatiite as a product of high mantle temperatures ({approx}1,700 C), rather than melting under hydrous conditions (3--5-wt% water), confirming the existence of anomalously hot mantle in the Archaean era.

  9. Experimental melting of phlogopite-bearing mantle at 1 GPa: Implications for potassic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condamine, Pierre; Médard, Etienne

    2014-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the fluid-absent melting of a phlogopite peridotite at 1.0 GPa (1000-1300 °C) to understand the source of K2O- and SiO2-rich magmas that occur in continental, post-collisional and island arc settings. Using a new extraction technique specially developed for hydrous conditions combined with iterative sandwich experiments, we have determined the composition of low- to high-degree melts (Φ=1.4 to 24.2 wt.%) of metasomatized lherzolite and harzburgite sources. Due to small amounts of adsorbed water in the starting material, amphibole crystallized at the lowest investigated temperatures. Amphibole breaks down at 1050-1075 °C, while phlogopite-breakdown occurs at 1150-1200 °C. This last temperature is higher than the previously determined in a mantle assemblage, due to the presence of stabilizing F and Ti. Phlogopite-lherzolite melts incongruently according to the continuous reaction: 0.49 phlogopite + 0.56 orthopyroxene + 0.47 clinopyroxene + 0.05 spinel = 0.58 olivine + 1.00 melt. In the phlogopite-harzburgite, the reaction is: 0.70 phlogopite + 1.24 orthopyroxene + 0.05 spinel = 0.99 olivine + 1.00 melt. The K2O content of water-undersaturated melts in equilibrium with residual phlogopite is buffered, depending on the source fertility: from ∼3.9 wt.% in lherzolite to ∼6.7 wt.% in harzburgite. Primary melts are silica-saturated and evolve from trachyte to basaltic andesite (63.5-52.1 wt.% SiO2) with increasing temperature. Calculations indicate that such silica-rich melts can readily be extracted from their mantle source, due to their low viscosity. Our results confirm that potassic, silica-rich magmas described worldwide in post-collisional settings are generated by melting of a metasomatized phlogopite-bearing mantle in the spinel stability field.

  10. Carbon-saturated monosulfide melting in the shallow mantle: solubility and effect on solidus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhou; Lentsch, Nathan; Hirschmann, Marc M.

    2015-12-01

    We present high-pressure experiments from 0.8 to 7.95 GPa to determine the effect of carbon on the solidus of mantle monosulfide. The graphite-saturated solidus of monosulfide (Fe0.69Ni0.23Cu0.01S1.00) is described by a Simon and Glatzel (Z Anorg Allg Chem 178:309-316, 1929) equation T (°C) = 969.0[ P (GPa)/5.92 + 1]0.39 (1 ≤ P ≤ 8) and is 80 ± 25 °C below the melting temperature found for carbon-free conditions. A series of comparison experiments using different capsule configurations and preparations document that the observed solidus-lowering is owing to graphite saturation and not an artifact of different capsules or hydrogen contamination. Concentrations of carbon in quenched graphite-saturated monosulfide melt measured by electron microprobe are 0.1-0.3 wt% in monosulfide melt and below the detection limit (<0.2 wt%) in crystalline monosulfide solid solution. Although there is only a small amount of carbon dissolved in monosulfide melts, the substantial effect on monosulfide solidus temperature means that the carbon-saturated monosulfide (Fe0.69Ni0.23Cu0.01S1.00) solidus intersects continental mantle geotherms inferred from diamond inclusion geobarometry at 6-7 GPa ( 200 km), whereas carbon-free monosulfide (Fe0.69Ni0.23Cu0.01S1.00) solidus does not. The composition investigated (Fe0.69Ni0.23Cu0.01S1.00) has a comparatively low metal/sulfur (M/S) ratio and low Ni/(Fe + Ni), but sulfides with higher (M/S) and with greater Ni/(Fe + Ni) should melt at lower temperatures and these should have a broader melt stability field in the diamond formation environment and in the continental lithosphere. Low carbon solubility in monosulfide melt excludes the possibility that diamonds are crystallized from sulfide melt. Although monosulfide melt can store no more than 2 ppm C in a bulk mantle with 225 ppm S, melts with higher M/S could be a primary host of carbon in the deeper part of the upper mantle. For example, the storage capacity of C in sulfide melts in the

  11. Compatibility of rhenium in garnet during mantle melting and magma genesis

    PubMed

    Righter; Hauri

    1998-06-12

    Measurements of the partitioning of rhenium (Re) between garnet and silicate liquid from 1.5 to 2.0 gigapascals and 1250 degrees to 1350 degreesC show that Re is compatible in garnet. Oceanic island basalts (OIBs) have lower Re contents than mid-ocean ridge basalt, because garnet-bearing residues of deeper OIB melting will retain Re. Deep-mantle garnetite or eclogite may harbor the missing Re identified in crust-mantle mass balance calculations. Oceanic crust recycled into the upper mantle at subduction zones will retain high Re/Os (osmium) ratios and become enriched in radiogenic 187Os. Recycled eclogite in a mantle source should be easily traced using Re abundances and Os isotopes. PMID:9624048

  12. Feedbacks between deformation and reactive melt transport in the mantle lithosphere during rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, A.; Baptiste, V.; Vauchez, A. R.; Fort, A.

    2014-12-01

    The East-African rift associates lithospheric thinning with extensive volcanism. Melts, even at low fractions, reduce the mantle viscosity. They also carry and exchange heat, mainly via reactions (latent heat), modifying the temperature and the rheology, which in turn controls their transport through the lithospheric mantle. Analysis of microstructures and crystal preferred orientations of mantle xenoliths from different localities along the East-African rift system highlights strong feedbacks between deformation, melt transport, and thermal evolution in the lithospheric mantle. Microstructures change markedly from south (young) to north (mature rift). In Tanzania, mylonitic to porphyroclastic peridotites predominate in on-axis localities, while off-axis ones are coarse-granular to porphyroclastic, pointing to heterogeneous deformation and variable annealing due to local interaction with fluids or to different time lags between deformation and extraction. Mylonites point to strain localization but there is no evidence for dominant grain boundary sliding: ubiquituous intracrystalline deformation in olivine and orthopyroxene and strong CPO record dislocation creep with dominant [100] glide in olivine. Synkinematic replacement of opx by olivine in both mylonitic and porphyroclastic peridotites suggests that deformation continued in the presence of melt under near-solidus conditions. This heating was transient: exsolutions in opx record cooling before extraction. Mega peridotites, which sample the southern border of the Ethiopian plateau, are coarse-porphyroclastic and show widespread metasomatism by basalts or by evolved volatile-rich low melt fractions. The former predated or was coeval to deformation, since olivine and pyroxene CPO are coherent. Exsolutions in opx imply that the high primary equilibration temperatures, which are consistent with the coarse-grained microstructures, are linked to transient heating. Finally, the fine-grained polygonal microstructures

  13. Cenozoic magmatism in the South China Basin: Decompression melting and implications of an enriched mantle source

    SciTech Connect

    Flower, M.F.J.; Kan Tu; Ming Zhang ); Guanghong Xie )

    1990-06-01

    A widespread eposide of interplate volcanism followed the cessation of seafloor spreading in the South China Basin (SCB), affecting the South China Sea, and fringing areas of southern China and Indochina. Geochemical data for basalts from South China Sea islands and seamounts, Hainan Island, and Taiwan define an enriched (Dupal-like) mantle domain yielding oceanic island basalt (OIB) suites with {Delta}7/4Pb = 2-13, {Delta}8/4Pb = 45-73, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr > {approximately}0.70325, Th/Ta > 2, and Th/Ba > 0.02. Opening of the SCB resulted from disaggregation of the South China block in response to the Indo-Eurasian collision, a process involving at least one seafloor spreading episode, terminated by collision of microcontinents with the Philippines and Borneo. The lack of precursive flood basalt suggests that active mantle upwelling was not involved and that melting was a passive effect of lithosphere stretching. However, while mantle decompression at ambient stretching factors ({approximately}1.7-2.5) appears to permit melting on the observed scale, the enriched source may preclude such a simple mantle dynamic. Three alternatives are considered: (1) passive melting of a mature metasomatised boundary layer, (2) active melting of thermally eroded subcontinental lithosphere (deep enrichment) or metasomatised boundary layer (shallow enrichment), and (3) relict diapirs of pre-SCB and/or Java trench subduction slabs (intermediate/deep enrichment). These models are evaluated in terms of chemical and isotopic mass balances associated with the generation and movement of small melt fractions in depleted, nondepleted, and enriched mantle.

  14. Morphology of melt-rich channels formed during reaction infiltration experiments on partially molten mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, Matej; Holtzman, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    Geochemical, geophysical and geological observations suggest that melt extraction from the partially molten mantle occurs by some sort of channelized flow. Melt-solid reactions can lead to melt channelization due to a positive feedback between melt flow and reaction. If a melt-solid reaction increases local permeability, subsequent flow is increased as well and promotes further reaction. This process can lead to the development of high-permeability channels which emerge from background flow. In nature, anastomozing tabular dunite bodies within peridotitic massifs are thought to represent fossilized channels that formed by reactive flow. The conditions under which such channels can emerge are treated by the reaction infiltration instability (RII) theory (e.g. Szymczak and Ladd 2014). In this contribution, we report the results of a series of Darcy type experiments designed to study the development of channels due to RII in mantle lithologies (Pec et al. 2015). We sandwiched a partially molten rock between a melt source and a porous sink and annealed it at high-pressures (P = 300 MPa) and high-temperatures (T = 1200° or 1250° C) under a controlled pressure gradient (∇P = 0-100 MPa/mm) for up to 5 hours. The partially molten rock is formed by 50:50 mixtures of San Carlos olivine (Ol, Fo ˜ 88) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) with either 4, 10 or 20 vol% of alkali basalt added. The source and sink are disks of alkali basalt and porous alumina, respectively. During the experiments, silica undersaturated melt from the melt source dissolves Cpx and precipitates an iron rich Ol (Fo ˜ 82) thereby forming a Cpx-free reaction layer at the melt source - partially molten rock interface. The melt fraction in the reaction layer increases significantly (40% melt) compared to the protolith, confirming that the reaction increases the permeability of the partially molten rock. In experiments annealed under a low pressure gradient (and hence slow melt flow velocity) the reaction layer is

  15. Global scale modeling of melting and isotopic evolution of Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, H. J.; Davies, J. H.; Elliott, T.; Porcelli, D.

    2015-11-01

    Many outstanding problems in solid Earth science relate to the geodynamical explanation of geochemical observations. Currently, extensive geochemical databases of surface observations exist, but satisfying explanations of underlying mantle processes are lacking. One way to address these problems is through numerical modelling of mantle convection while tracking chemical information throughout the convective mantle. We have implemented a new way to track both bulk compositions and concentrations of trace elements in a finite element mantle convection code. Our approach is to track bulk compositions and trace element abundances via particles. One value on each particle represents bulk composition, and can be interpreted as the basalt component. In our model, chemical fractionation of bulk composition and trace elements happens at self-consistent, evolving melting zones. Melting is defined via a composition-dependent solidus, such that the amount of melt generated depends on pressure, temperature and bulk composition of each particle. A novel aspect is that we do not move particles that undergo melting; instead we transfer the chemical information carried by the particle to other particles. Molten material is instantaneously transported to the surface layer, thereby increasing the basalt component carried by the particles close to the surface, and decreasing the basalt component in the residue. The model is set to explore a number of radiogenic isotopic systems but as an example here the trace elements we choose to follow are the Pb isotopes and their radioactive parents. For these calculations we will show: (1) The evolution of the distribution of bulk compositions over time, showing the build up of oceanic crust (via melting-induced chemical separation in bulk composition); i.e. a basalt-rich layer at the surface, and the transportation of these chemical heterogeneities through the deep mantle. (2) The amount of melt generated over time. (3) The evolution of the

  16. Numerical models of mantle lithosphere weakening, erosion and delamination induced by melt extraction and emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2016-06-01

    Continental rifting caused by extension and heating from below affects the lithosphere or cratons in various ways. Volcanism and melt intrusions often occur along with thinning, weakening and even breaking lithosphere. Although mechanical necking models of the lithosphere are often applied, the aspects of melting and the implications due to melt transport and emplacement at shallower depths are not well understood. A two-phase flow approach employing melt extraction and shallow emplacement associated with thermal weakening is developed and compared with observations. The results of this comparison indicate the importance of partial melts and an asthenospheric magma source for increasing the rising rate of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary during extension. Thermo-mechanical physics of visco-plastic flow is approximated using the Finite Difference method with Eulerian formulation in 2D. The conservation of mass, momentum and energy equations are solved for a multi-component (crust-mantle) and two-phase (melt-matrix) system. Rheology is temperature- and stress-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. Melt is extracted and emplaced in predefined depth regions (emplacement zones) in the lithospheric mantle and crust. The Compaction Boussinesq Approximation was applied; its validity was tested against the Full Compaction formulation and found fully satisfactory for the case of sublithospheric melting models. A simple model guided by the geodynamic situation of the Rwenzori region typically results in updoming asthenosphere with melt-assisted erosion of the lithosphere's base. Even with a conservative approach for a temperature anomaly melting alone doubles the lithospheric erosion rate in comparison with a model without melting. With melt extraction and intrusion lithospheric erosion and upwelling of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary speeds up by a

  17. Primitive, high-Mg basaltic andesites: direct melts of the shallow, hot, wet mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A.; Grove, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    Direct mantle melts are rare in subduction zone settings. Such melts are identified by Mg #s (Mg # = Mg / (Mg+Fe)) greater than ~0.73, indicating chemical equilibrium with Fo90 mantle olivine. Most of these primitive arc melts are basaltic, characterized by SiO2 contents of ~48-50 wt % and MgO contents ranging from 8-10 wt %. However, primitive basaltic andesites with mantle-equilibrated Mg #s have also been found at subduction zones worldwide. These basaltic andesites have higher SiO2 contents (53-58 wt %) than typical primitive basalts as well as high MgO (8-10 wt %). Because these rocks have high SiO2 contents and yet retain evidence for chemical equilibrium with the mantle (Mg #s), their petrogenesis has sparked intense debate as researchers have tried to discern how these samples fit into the paradigm of mantle melting at subduction zones. Through an understanding of the conditions and processes that produce the SiO2 enrichment in these rocks, we also aim to understand the role of these melts in producing the observed andesitic compositional characteristics of the continental crust. To understand the petrogenesis of primitive, high-Mg basaltic andesites, this study investigates the experimental melts of undepleted mantle peridotite plus a slab component (Na-2O + K2O) from 1,205-1,470°C at 1.0-2.0 GPa under water-undersaturated conditions (0-5 wt % H2O). At 1.0 and 1.2 GPa, the experimental melts reproduce the compositions of natural primitive, high-Mg basaltic andesites in all major elements (SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, FeO, MnO, MgO, and Na2O+K2O) except CaO. CaO contents are higher than the range of the natural samples by ~2 wt % at the highest silica contents of the experiments (54-56 wt% SiO2). This suggests that at 1.0-1.2 GPa, a higher percent of melting (30-35 %) with 3-5 wt % H2O is required to drive the chemical compositions of the experiments toward the representative compositions of the natural rocks. The experimental melts also show that mantle-wall rock

  18. Origin and Constraints on Ilmenite-rich Partial Melt in the Lunar Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Fuqua, H.; Bremner, P. M.; Panovska, S.; Diamond, M. R.; Lock, S. J.; Nishikawa, Y.; Jiménez-Pérez, H.; Shahar, A.; Panero, W. R.; Lognonne, P. H.; Faul, U.

    2015-12-01

    Existence of a partially molten layer at the lunar core-mantle boundary has been proposed to explain the lack of observed far-side deep moonquakes, the observation of reflected seismic phases from deep moonquakes, and the dissipation of tidal energy within the lunar interior [1,2]. However, subsequent models explored the possibility that dissipation due to elevated temperatures alone can explain the observed dissipation factor (Q) and tidal love numbers [3]. Using thermo-chemical and dynamic modeling (including models of the early lunar mantle convection), we explore the hypothesis that an ilmenite-rich layer forms below crustal anorthosite during lunar magma ocean crystallization and may sink to the base of the mantle to create a partial melt layer at the lunar core-mantle boundary. Self-consistent physical parameters (including gravity, pressure, density, VP and Vs) are forward calculated for a well-mixed mantle with uniform bulk composition versus a mantle with preserved mineralogical stratigraphy from lunar magma ocean crystallization. These parameters are compared against observed mass, moment of inertia, real and imaginary parts of the Love numbers, and seismic travel times to further limit the acceptable models for the Moon. We have performed a multi-step grid search with over twenty thousand forward calculations varying thicknesses of chemically/mineralogically distinct layers within the Moon to evaluate if a partially molten layer at the base of the lunar mantle is well-constrained by the observed data. Furthermore, dynamic mantle modeling was employed on the best-fit model versions to determine the survivability of a partially molten layer at the core-mantle boundary. This work was originally initiated at the CIDER 2014 program. [1] Weber et al. (2011). Science 331(6015), 309-12. [2] Khan et al. (2014). JGR 119. [3] Nimmo et al. (2012). JGR 117, 1-11.

  19. Melting and refertilization history of the mantle peridotites from the SSZ-type Guleman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, Samet; Uysal, Ibrahim; Melih Akmaz, Recep

    2016-04-01

    Guleman ophiolite from the eastern Turkey, is composed of mantle peridotites and overlying ultramafic to mafic cumulates and diabase dykes. Mantle peridotites is represented by varying degrees of serpantinized dunite and harzburgite. TiO2 and Na2O (<0.02 wt.%) as well as Al2O3 (0.18-1.07 wt.%) and CaO (0.03-2.27 wt.%) contents were depleted compared to the primitive mantle. Modal composition of clinopyroxene is less than 4 vol.%, and some samples were observed to contain amphibole with tremolite-hornblende in composition. Forsterite values of olivine range between 87.7 and 92.8. Spinel has Cr# values varying from 44 to 73 and generally contain low TiO2 (<0.1% wt%); however spinel in some samples are represented by up to 0.23 wt.% TiO2. Primitive mantle-normalized whole rock Lantanum Group Elements (LGE) patterns reflect melting histrory of the samples at different pressure conditions such as spinel (Group-1 samples) and garnet+spinel (Group-2 samples) stability fields. Heavy LGE patterns of Group-1 samples show slight depletion towards middle LGE. However, heavy LGE patterns of Group-2 samples show rapider depletion towards middle LGE. Heavy LGE to middle LGE patterns of the Group-1 samples follow the melting lines produced by various degrees of fractional melting in spinel stability field and they are modeled ~16-20 fractional melting in spinel stability feld. However, heavy LGE to middle LGE patterns of the Group-2 samples do not follow the melting lines produced by various degrees of fractional melting in spinel stability field. These samples require melting started in garnet stability field and followed in spinel stability field with a total depletion of ~17 to 30%. Cr# values of spinel of the Group-1 and Group-2 peridotites reflect partial melting degrees between %20-40, and these numbers are found to be inconsistent as the partial melting degrees obtained by LGE modeling are lesser. This might indicate a various degree of enrichment of LGE after the depletion

  20. Origin of primitive andesites by melt-rock reaction in the sub-arc mantle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    The genetic relationship between primitive granitoids, including high-Mg andesites (HMAs) and bajaites, and primary granitoids, or "pristine" adakites, has been vigorously debated since Defant and Drummond (1991; henceforth D&D) first applied the term "adakite" to refer to Cenozoic arc magmas (andesites and dacites) "associated with young subducting lithosphere", with low Y and Yb, low high-field strength elements (HFSEs), high Sr, and high Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N ratios "relative to island arc andesite-dacite-rhyolite". These characteristics were attributed to an origin for adakites by partial melting of basaltic crust within the subducting slab (hence "slab melts"). That such a process can produce melts with the characteristics described by D&D has since been largely confirmed by dehydration melting experiments on hydrous metabasalt at ~1-4 GPa. Attention was also drawn to the geochemical similarities between "adakites" and large-ion lithophile element (LILE)-enriched, high-field strength element (HFSE) depleted magnesian andesites (HMAs) from Adak Island in the western Aleutians, first described by Kay (1978), implying a genetic relationship between primary granitoid (adakites) formed by partial melting of basaltic ocean crust in the subducting slab, transformed to garnet-amphibolite or eclogite, and primitive magnesian andesites (HMAs) with high Mg-numbers (Mg# = molar Mg/(Mg+Fe)x100) and high concentrations of Ni and Cr. What then is the true origin of these enigmatic arc magmas, with both crustal and mantle, derivative and primitive, geochemical signatures? Kay (1978) suggested a "hybrid" model, in which "hydrous melting of eclogite (slab melting) results in a small volume of dacitic melt ("pristine adakite"), which rises into the hotter overlying peridotite wedge and equilibrates with olivine and orthopyroxene, reacting with olivine until it becomes andesitic". In this paper, I will discuss the results of melt-rock reaction experiments modelling this peridotite

  1. Depth-dependent lithospheric extension: a numerical model for the mantle and crustal melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Bai, J.; Huang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    In an uncollisional orogen setting, anatexis is often interpreted as a result of the basaltic underplating (Huppert and Sparks, 1988). However, this interpretation is not fully consistent with observational data. For example, basaltic underplating is well established through multidisciplinary studies in mafic large igneous provinces(Cox, 1993), but the coeval silicic igneous rocks are rare and are mainly derived from the extreme fractionation of basalt or partial melting of juvenile crust (re-melting of the underplated basalt), e.g., Emeishan and Siberia (Lightfoot et al., 1987; Xu et al., 2008). Moreover, basalts are rare, or even absent in some large silicic igneous provinces (Bryan et al., 2002). In addition, the bimodal systems are hard to be explained since crustal and mantle melting are not coupled in previous computational geodynamic studies (Annen et al., 2006; Bown and White, 1995). In this study, we simulate the crustal and mantle melt generation during the depth-dependent lithospheric extension (Huismans and Beaumont, 2008). The followings are the main results and conclusions: (1) For a normal mantle potential temperature (1300-1400°C), the thinning factor of the lithospheric mantle and the lower crust are extremely high due to the depth-dependent extension. If the extension rate of the lithosphere is less than 1cm/year and the totalβ>4 (the initial thickness of the lithosphere is 125km), the mantle melt can not be generated due to conductive heat loss from the upwelling asthenosphere, but a large amount of crustal melt can be generated; If the extension rate of the lithosphere is large than 1cm/year, the bimodal system can be formed. (2) The reason for the existing of rare anatexis melt in large mafic igneous provinces is that the lithosphere is still thick enough after extension (the thickness of the lithosphere is calculated using the methods of Lee et al., 2009). Therefore, if the only direct heat source is the underplated basalt, the crust can not

  2. Numerical Modeling of Mantle Convection with Heat-pipe Melt Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Sebastian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2015-04-01

    During the early evolution of terrestrial bodies, a large amount of mantle melting is expected to affect significantly the energy budget of the interior through heat transport by volcanism. Partial melt, generated when the mantle temperature exceeds the solidus, can propagate to the surface through dikes, thereby advecting upwards a large amount of heat. This so-called heat-pipe mechanism is an effective way to transport thermal energy from the meltregion to the planetary surface. Indeed, recent studies suggest that this mechanism may have shaped the Earth's earliest evolution by controlling interior heat loss until the onset of plate tectonics [1]. Furthermore, heat-piping is likely the primary mechanism through which Jupiter's moon Io loses its tidally generated heat, leading to massive volcanism able to cause a present-day heat-flux about 40 times higher than the Earth's average heat-flux [2]. However, despite its obvious importance, heat-piping is often neglected in mantle convection models of terrestrial planets because of its additional complexity and vaguely defined parameterization. In this study, adopting the approach of [1] we model mantle convection in a generic stagnant lid planet and study heat-piping effects in a systematic way. Assuming that melt is instantaneously extracted to the surface and melting regions are refilled by downward advection of cold mantle material in order to ensure mass conservation, we investigate the influence of heat-pipes on the mantle temperature and stagnant lid thickness using the numerical code Gaia [3]. To this end, we run a large set of simulations in 2D Cartesian geometry spanning a wide parameter space. Our results are consistent with [1] and show that in systems with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity the heat-pipe mechanism sets in at a Rayleigh number Ra ~ 2 × 107. Upon increasing Ra up to ~ 6 × 107mantle temperature accompanied by an increase of the

  3. Differentiation of partial melts in the mantle: Evidence from the Balmuccia peridotite, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigoi, S.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.; Demarchi, G.; Siena, F.

    1983-06-01

    The Balmuccia peridotite shows evidence, in the form of a network of dykes, of partial melting and flow crystallization processes. The partial melting processes probably occurred over a fairly long time interval, and seem to have been related to different “melting pulses”. Resultant liquids were broadly picritic. Melting occurred incongruently according to the scheme cpx+opx+(ol+sp)=Mg-richer ol+Cr-richer sp+L. Partial melts tended at first to accumulate in horizontal layers; then, as the critical melting threshold was exceeded, liquids were able to filter slowly towards lower pressure zones. In doing so liquids fractionated initially in situ, via crystallisation of websteritic dykes of the Cr-diopside suite, and later, in the overlying mantle, via crystallisation of transitional dykes and those of the Al-augite suite. This filter-pressing stage, when flow velocities were very low and discontinuous, probably corresponded to the period of maximum deformability of the peridotite. The type of differentiation testified by the dykes of the Balmuccia peridotite, is characterized by a decrease in SiO2, a rapid enrichment in Al2O3 and a mild increase in FeO, and is substantially in accordance with experimental trends from the fo-an-di-SiO2 system in the spinel-peridotite stability field. A close relationship between type of differentiation, flow velocity and mechanical behaviour of the mantle peridotite is a feature of the proposed model.

  4. Silicate melts density, buoyancy relations and the dynamics of magmatic processes in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Malfait, Wim J.

    2016-04-01

    Although silicate melts comprise only a minor volume fraction of the present day Earth, they play a critical role on the Earth's geochemical and geodynamical evolution. Their physical properties, namely the density, are a key control on many magmatic processes, including magma chamber dynamics and volcanic eruptions, melt extraction from residual rocks during partial melting, as well as crystal settling and melt migration. However, the quantitative modeling of these processes has been long limited by the scarcity of data on the density and compressibility of volatile-bearing silicate melts at relevant pressure and temperature conditions. In the last decade, new experimental designs namely combining large volume presses and synchrotron-based techniques have opened the possibility for determining in situ the density of a wide range of dry and volatile-bearing (H2O and CO2) silicate melt compositions at high pressure-high temperature conditions. In this contribution we will illustrate some of these progresses with focus on recent results on the density of dry and hydrous felsic and intermediate melt compositions (rhyolite, phonolite and andesite melts) at crustal and upper mantle conditions (up to 4 GPa and 2000 K). The new data on felsic-intermediate melts has been combined with in situ data on (ultra)mafic systems and ambient pressure dilatometry and sound velocity data to calibrate a continuous, predictive density model for hydrous and CO2-bearing silicate melts with applications to magmatic processes down to the conditions of the mantle transition zone (up to 2773 K and 22 GPa). The calibration dataset consist of more than 370 density measurements on high-pressure and/or water-and CO2-bearing melts and it is formulated in terms of the partial molar properties of the oxide components. The model predicts the density of volatile-bearing liquids to within 42 kg/m3 in the calibration interval and the model extrapolations up to 3000 K and 100 GPa are in good agreement

  5. Amphibious Magnetotelluric Investigation of the Aleutian Arc: Mantle Melt Generation and Migration beneath Okmok Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenak, G.; Key, K.; Bennington, N. L.; Bedrosian, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the factors controlling the release of volatiles from the downgoing slab, the subsequent generation of melt in the overlying mantle wedge, the migration of melt to the crust, and its evolution and emplacement within the crust are important for advancing our understanding of arc magmatism and crustal genesis. Because melt and aqueous fluids are a few orders of magnitude more electrically conductive than unmelted peridotite, the conductivity-mapping magnetotelluric (MT) method is well-suited to imaging fluids and melt beneath arc volcanoes. Here we present conductivity results from an amphibious MT profile crossing Okmok volcano in the central Aleutian arc. The Aleutian arc is one of the most volcanically active regions in North America, making it an ideal location for studying arc magnetism. Okmok volcano, located on the northeastern portion of Umnak Island, is among the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian chain. In addition to two caldera-forming events in the Holocene, numerous eruptions in the past century indicate a robust magmatic supply. Previous coarse resolution seismic studies have inferred a crustal magma reservoir. In order to investigate the role fluids play in melting the mantle wedge, how melts ascend through the corner flow regime of the mantle wedge, how melt migrates and is stored within the upper mantle and crust, and how this impacts explosive caldera forming eruptions, we carried out an amphibious geophysical survey across the arc in June-July 2015. Twenty-nine onshore MT stations and 10 offshore stations were collected in a 3D array covering Okmok, and 43 additional offshore MT stations completed a 300 km amphibious profile starting at the trench, crossing the forearc, arc and backarc. Thirteen onshore passive seismic stations were also installed and will remain in place for one year to supplement the twelve permanent stations on the island. Data collected by this project will be used to map seismic velocity and electrical

  6. Highly refractory peridotites in Songshugou, Qinling orogen: Insights into partial melting and melt/fluid-rock reactions in forearc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Song, Shuguang; Su, Li; Jung, Haemyeong; Niu, Yaoling

    2016-05-01

    The Songshugou ultramafic massif is located in the eastern segment of the Qinling orogenic belt, central China. It is a large spinel peridotite body dominated by coarse-grained, porphyroclastic, and fine-grained dunite with minor harzburgite, olivine clinopyroxenite, and banded/podiform chromitite. The compositions of the bulk-rock dunite and harzburgite, and the constituent olivine and spinel, together with the textures and chemical characteristics of multiphase mineral inclusions, point to the highly refractory nature of these rocks with complex histories of high-temperature boninite melt generation and boninitic melt-rock reaction, probably in a young, warm, and volatile-rich forearc lithospheric mantle setting. Additionally, a subsequent low-temperature fluid-rock reaction is also recorded by TiO2-rich spinel with Ti solubility/mobility enhanced by chloride- or fluoride-rich subduction-zone fluids as advocated by Rapp et al. (2010). The olivine clinopyroxenite, on the other hand, was likely crystallized from a residual boninitic melt that had reacted with harzburgitic residues. The ubiquitous occurrences of hydrous minerals, such as anthophyllite, tremolite, Cr-chlorite, and serpentine (stable at lower P-T crustal conditions) in the matrix, suggest that further low-temperature fluid-rock reaction (or retrograde metamorphism) has affected the original volatile-poor peridotites either in a mature and cool subduction zone, or in a continental crust during their exhumation into the Qinling collisional orogeny at early Paleozoic era, or both. The prolonged and intense ductile/brittle deformation can decrease the mineral grain size through dynamic recrystallization and fracturing, and thus aid the fluid-rock reaction or retrograde metamorphism and mineral chemical re-equilibration processes. Therefore, the Songshugou peridotites present a good example for understanding the petrogenesis and evolution of the mantle wedge, with the emphasis on the complex partial

  7. Seismic evidence of effects of water on melt transport in the Lau back-arc mantle.

    PubMed

    Wei, S Shawn; Wiens, Douglas A; Zha, Yang; Plank, Terry; Webb, Spahr C; Blackman, Donna K; Dunn, Robert A; Conder, James A

    2015-02-19

    Processes of melt generation and transport beneath back-arc spreading centres are controlled by two endmember mechanisms: decompression melting similar to that at mid-ocean ridges and flux melting resembling that beneath arcs. The Lau Basin, with an abundance of spreading ridges at different distances from the subduction zone, provides an opportunity to distinguish the effects of these two different melting processes on magma production and crust formation. Here we present constraints on the three-dimensional distribution of partial melt inferred from seismic velocities obtained from Rayleigh wave tomography using land and ocean-bottom seismographs. Low seismic velocities beneath the Central Lau Spreading Centre and the northern Eastern Lau Spreading Centre extend deeper and westwards into the back-arc, suggesting that these spreading centres are fed by melting along upwelling zones from the west, and helping to explain geochemical differences with the Valu Fa Ridge to the south, which has no distinct deep low-seismic-velocity anomalies. A region of low S-wave velocity, interpreted as resulting from high melt content, is imaged in the mantle wedge beneath the Central Lau Spreading Centre and the northeastern Lau Basin, even where no active spreading centre currently exists. This low-seismic-velocity anomaly becomes weaker with distance southward along the Eastern Lau Spreading Centre and the Valu Fa Ridge, in contrast to the inferred increase in magmatic productivity. We propose that the anomaly variations result from changes in the efficiency of melt extraction, with the decrease in melt to the south correlating with increased fractional melting and higher water content in the magma. Water released from the slab may greatly reduce the melt viscosity or increase grain size, or both, thereby facilitating melt transport. PMID:25642964

  8. Seismic evidence of effects of water on melt transport in the Lau back-arc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S. Shawn; Wiens, Douglas A.; Zha, Yang; Plank, Terry; Webb, Spahr C.; Blackman, Donna K.; Dunn, Robert A.; Conder, James A.

    2015-02-01

    Processes of melt generation and transport beneath back-arc spreading centres are controlled by two endmember mechanisms: decompression melting similar to that at mid-ocean ridges and flux melting resembling that beneath arcs. The Lau Basin, with an abundance of spreading ridges at different distances from the subduction zone, provides an opportunity to distinguish the effects of these two different melting processes on magma production and crust formation. Here we present constraints on the three-dimensional distribution of partial melt inferred from seismic velocities obtained from Rayleigh wave tomography using land and ocean-bottom seismographs. Low seismic velocities beneath the Central Lau Spreading Centre and the northern Eastern Lau Spreading Centre extend deeper and westwards into the back-arc, suggesting that these spreading centres are fed by melting along upwelling zones from the west, and helping to explain geochemical differences with the Valu Fa Ridge to the south, which has no distinct deep low-seismic-velocity anomalies. A region of low S-wave velocity, interpreted as resulting from high melt content, is imaged in the mantle wedge beneath the Central Lau Spreading Centre and the northeastern Lau Basin, even where no active spreading centre currently exists. This low-seismic-velocity anomaly becomes weaker with distance southward along the Eastern Lau Spreading Centre and the Valu Fa Ridge, in contrast to the inferred increase in magmatic productivity. We propose that the anomaly variations result from changes in the efficiency of melt extraction, with the decrease in melt to the south correlating with increased fractional melting and higher water content in the magma. Water released from the slab may greatly reduce the melt viscosity or increase grain size, or both, thereby facilitating melt transport.

  9. The behaviour of tungsten during mantle melting revisited with implications for planetary differentiation time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babechuk, Michael G.; Kamber, Balz S.; Greig, Alan; Canil, Dante; Kodolányi, János

    2010-02-01

    Tungsten is a moderately siderophile high-field-strength element that is hydrophile and widely regarded as highly incompatible during mantle melting. In an effort to extend empirical knowledge regarding the behaviour of W during the latter process, we report new high-precision trace element data (W, Th, U, Ba, La, Sm) that represent both terrestrial and planetary reservoirs: MORB (11), abyssal peridotites (8), eucrite basalts (3), and carbonaceous chondrites (8). A full trace element suite is also reported for Cordilleran Permian ophiolite peridotites (12) to better constrain the behaviour of W in the upper mantle. In addition, we report our long-term averages for a number of USGS (BIR-1, BHVO-1, BHVO-2, PCC-1, DTS-1) and GSJ (JA-3, JP-1) standard reference materials, some of which we conclude to be heterogeneous and contaminated with respect to W. The most significant finding of this study is that many of the highly depleted upper mantle peridotites contain far higher W concentrations than expected. In the absence of convincing indications for alteration, re-enrichment or contamination, we propose that the W excess was caused by retention in an Os-Ir alloy phase, whose stability is dependent on fO 2 of the mantle source region. This explanation could help to account for the particularly low W content of N-MORB and implies that the lithophile behaviour of W in basaltic rocks is not an accurate representation of the behaviour in the melt source. These findings then become relevant to the interpretation of W-isotopic data for achondrites, where the fractionation of Hf from W during melting is used to infer the Hf/W of the parent body mantle. This is exemplified by the differentiation chronology of the eucrite parent body (EPB), which has been modeled with a melt source with high Hf/W. By contrast, we explore the alternative scenario with a low mantle Hf/W on the EPB. Using available eucrite literature data, a maximum core segregation age of 1.2 ± 1.2 Myr after the

  10. Slab and Sediment Melting during Subduction Initiation: Mantle Plagiogranites from the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinson, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Granitoid dykes up to several hundred metres wide and 2 km long are found in depleted harzburgites in the mantle section of the Oman ophiolite. They vary in composition from tonalite to potassic granite and are generally more potassic than the crustal plagiogranites found within the sheeted dyke complex higher up within the ophiolite stratigraphy. Some granites are strongly peraluminous and contain garnet and andalusite. They are geochemically variable, some with REE that are relatively unfractionated ((La/Yb)n= 3.5-6.0, flat middle to heavy REE, steep light REE) to those which are highly fractionated ((La/Yb)n= 28-220). On primitive-mantle normalised plots some have very high concentrations of fluid-mobile elements - Cs, Rb, Th, U and Pb. Few have significant Ta-Nb anomalies. On the Ca-Fe-Mg-Ti discrimination diagram of Patino Douce (J. Petrol., 1999) whole-rock compositions define a spectrum between felsic-pelite derived melts and amphibolite-derived melts. There is a chemical similarity between the least REE fractionated plagiogranites (generally tonalites and granodiorites) and melts of an amphibolitic parent. This is supported by the occurrence of mafic xenoliths in some dykes, the presence of hornblende and highly calcic cores (up to An85) in some plagioclase grains. Trace element modelling using Oman Geotimes lavas as the starting composition indicates that melting took place in the garnet stability field, although enrichment in the melt in Cs, Rb, Ba and Pb suggests that there was another component present in addition to the mafic parent. Other plagiogranites (trondhjemites and granites) have a strongly peraluminous chemistry and mineralogy and geochemical similarities with the Himalayan leucogranites implying that they were derived from a sedimentary protolith. These mantle plagiogranites are more prevalent in the northern outcrops of the ophiolite. The volume of granitoid melt and the depth of melting preclude their derivation from the sole of the

  11. Permeability of asthenospheric mantle and melt extraction rates at mid-ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Connolly, James A D; Schmidt, Max W; Solferino, Giulio; Bagdassarov, Nikolai

    2009-11-12

    Magmatic production on Earth is dominated by asthenospheric melts of basaltic composition that have mostly erupted at mid-ocean ridges. The timescale for segregation and transport of these melts, which are ultimately responsible for formation of the Earth's crust, is critically dependent on the permeability of the partly molten asthenospheric mantle, yet this permeability is known mainly from semi-empirical and analogue models. Here we use a high-pressure, high-temperature centrifuge, at accelerations of 400g-700g, to measure the rate of basalt melt flow in olivine aggregates with porosities of 5-12 per cent. The resulting permeabilities are consistent with a microscopic model in which melt is completely connected, and are one to two orders of magnitude larger than predicted by current parameterizations. Extrapolation of the measurements to conditions characteristic of asthenosphere below mid-ocean ridges yields proportionally higher transport speeds. Application of these results in a model of porous-media channelling instabilities yields melt transport times of approximately 1-2.5 kyr across the entire asthenosphere, which is sufficient to preserve the observed (230)Th excess of mid-ocean-ridge basalts and the mantle signatures of even shorter-lived isotopes such as (226)Ra (refs 5,11-14). PMID:19907492

  12. Stability of carbonated basaltic melt at the base of the Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Litasov, K.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.

    2006-12-01

    Seismological observations of low velocity zones (LVZ) at the top of the 410-km discontinuity reveal possible existence of dense melt at this boundary (e.g. Reveanugh and Sipkin, 1994). Density measurements of anhydrous basaltic melts indicate that it is denser than surrounding mantle near 410-km depth (Ohtani and Maeda, 2001). However, melting temperature of peridotite is much higher than about 1400°C, estimated at 410-km depth. It has been shown recently that hydrous basaltic melt containing up to 2 wt.% H2O is denser than peridotite atop 410-km and therefore can be accumulated at the base of the upper mantle (Sakamaki et al., 2006). CO2 is another major volatile component in the mantle and it could be also important for explanation of LVZ near 410 km. In the present study, we have measured the density of carbonated basaltic melt at high pressures and high temperatures and discussed its possible stability at the base of the upper mantle. The density of the melt was determined using sink/float technique. The starting material was synthetic MORB glass. 5 and 10 wt.% CO2 was added to the glass as CaCO3 and Na2CO3, adjusting to proportions of related oxides. Experiments were carried out at 16-22 GPa and 2200-2300°C using a multianvil apparatus at Tohoku University, Japan. We observed neutral buoyancy of diamond density marker in MORB + 5 wt.% CO2 at 18 GPa and 2300°C, whereas, diamond was completely dissolved in the carbonated MORB melt containing 10 wt.% CO2 in 0.5-1 minute experiments. Based on the buoyancy test, the density of the carbonated basaltic melt, containing 5 wt.% CO2, is 3.56 g/cm3 at 18 GPa and 2300°C using an equation of state of diamond. To calculate the bulk modulus we assume that the pressure derivative of the isothermal bulk modulus is the same as that of the dry MORB melt, dKT/dP=5.0 and zero-pressure partial molar volume of CO2 is 32 cm3/mol (based on low-pressure experiments on carbonated basaltic melts and carbonatites, e.g. Dobson et al

  13. Formation of an interconnected network of iron melt at Earth’s lower mantle conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Crystal Y.; Zhang, Li; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Yijin; Wang, Junyue; Meng, Yue; Andrews, Joy C.; Mao, Wendy L.

    2013-10-06

    Core formation represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth’s history. Our planet’s present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying mantle implies that there must be a mechanism to separate iron alloy from silicates in the initially accreted material. At upper mantle conditions, percolation has been ruled out as an efficient mechanism because of the tendency of molten iron to form isolated pockets at these pressures and temperatures. Here we present experimental evidence of a liquid iron alloy forming an interconnected melt network within a silicate perovskite matrix under pressure and temperature conditions of the Earth’s lower mantle. Using nanoscale synchrotron X-ray computed tomography, we image a marked transition in the shape of the iron-rich melt in three-dimensional reconstructions of samples prepared at varying pressures and temperatures using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. We find that, as the pressure increases from 25 to 64GPa, the iron distribution changes from isolated pockets to an interconnected network. Our results indicate that percolation could be a viable mechanism of core formation at Earth’s lower mantle conditions.

  14. Spin crossover and iron-rich silicate melt in the Earth's deep mantle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, K.; Nomura, R.; Ozawa, H.; Tateno, S.; Hernlund, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The volume difference between a silicate solid and its melt diminishes at high pressure, and the possibility that a melt sufficiently enriched in iron might then become more dense than solids at the pressures in the interior of the Earth and other terrestrial bodies has long been a source of considerable speculation. The occurrence of such dense silicate melts in the Earth's lowermost mantle would carry important consequences for its physical and chemical evolution and could provide a unifying model for explaining a variety of observed features in the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region [e.g., Labrosse et al., 2007 Nature]. Recent theoretical calculations [Stixrude et al., 2009 EPSL] combined with estimates of Fe partitioning between (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite and melt at shallower mantle conditions suggest that melt is more dense than solids at pressures in the Earth's deepest mantle, consistent with analysis of shockwave experiments. Here we extend measurements of Fe partitioning in (Mg0.89Fe0.11)2 SiO4 bulk composition over the entire mantle pressure range, by a combination of laser-heated diamond-anvil cell experiments and chemical analyses of recovered samples using field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). The results demonstrate that the Fe-Mg distribution coefficient KD = ([FePv]/[MgPv]) / ([Femelt]/[Mgmelt]) between perovskite and melt is about 0.25 up to 75 GPa, consistent with earlier data found at 25 GPa in Al-free or -depleted peridotite materials using multi-anvil apparatus. On the other hand, the KD suddenly dropped to 0.07±0.02 at 76 GPa, resulting in strong Fe-enrichment in melts. It was almost constant at 0.06-0.08 at higher pressures to 159 GPa. The value did not change practically across the perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition. Additional x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements on (Mg0.95Fe0.05)SiO3 glass indicate the loss of spin around 60-70 GPa, suggesting that the observed change in Fe partitioning could be explained by a

  15. Mantle seismic structure beneath the MELT region of the east pacific rise from P and S wave tomography

    PubMed

    Toomey; Wilcock; Solomon; Hammond; Orcutt

    1998-05-22

    Relative travel time delays of teleseismic P and S waves, recorded during the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment, have been inverted tomographically for upper-mantle structure beneath the southern East Pacific Rise. A broad zone of low seismic velocities extends beneath the rise to depths of about 200 kilometers and is centered to the west of the spreading center. The magnitudes of the P and S wave anomalies require the presence of retained mantle melt; the melt fraction near the rise exceeds the fraction 300 kilometers off axis by as little as 1%. Seismic anisotropy, induced by mantle flow, is evident in the P wave delays at near-vertical incidence and is consistent with a half-width of mantle upwelling of about 100 km. PMID:9596567

  16. Effect of Mantle Wedge Hybridization by Sediment Melt on Geochemistry of Arc Magma and Arc Mantle Source - Insights from Laboratory Experiments at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.; Tsuno, K.; Nelson, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Generation of arc magmas involves metasomatism of the mantle wedge by slab-derived H2O-rich fluids and/or melts and subsequent melting of the modified source. The chemistry of arc magmas and the residual mantle wedge are not only regulated by the chemistry of the slab input, but also by the phase relations of metasomatism or hybridization process in the wedge. The sediment-derived silica-rich fluids and hydrous partial melts create orthopyroxene-rich zones in the mantle wedge, due to reaction of mantle olivine with silica in the fluid/melt [1,2]. Geochemical evidence for such a reaction comes from pyroxenitic lithologies coexisting with peridotite in supra-subduction zones. In this study, we have simulated the partial melting of a parcel of mantle wedge modified by bulk addition of sediment-derived melt with variable H2O contents to investigate the major and trace element chemistry of the magmas and the residues formed by this process. Experiments at 2-3 GPa and 1150-1300 °C were conducted on mixtures of 25% sediment-derived melt and 75% lherzolite, with bulk H2O contents varying from 2 to 6 wt.%. Partial reactive crystallization of the rhyolitic slab-derived melt and partial melting of the mixed source produced a range of melt compositions from ultra-K basanites to basaltic andesites, in equilibrium with an orthopyroxene ± phlogopite ± clinopyroxene ± garnet bearing residue, depending on P and bulk H2O content. Model calculations using partition coefficients (from literature) of trace elements between experimental minerals and silicate melt suggest that the geochemical signatures of the slab-derived melt, such as low Ce/Pb and depletion in Nb and Ta (characteristic slab signatures) are not erased from the resulting melt owing to reactive crystallization. The residual mineral assemblage is also found to be similar to the supra-subduction zone lithologies, such as those found in Dabie Shan (China) and Sanbagawa Belt (Japan). In this presentation, we will also

  17. Nanoscale 3D distribution of low melt and fluid fractions in mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardes, Emmanuel; Morales, Luiz; Heinrich, Wilhelm; Sifre, David; Hashim, Leila; Gaillard, Fabrice; Katharina, Marquardt

    2016-04-01

    The presence of melts or fluids in the intergranular medium of rocks strongly influences their bulk physico-chemical properties (e.g. mass transport and chemical reactivity, electrical conductivity, seismic wave velocity, etc). Actually, the effects can be so large that only small melt or fluid fractions must sometimes be involved for explaining mantle geophysical discontinuities and anomalies. The investigation of the distribution of such small fractions in the intergranular medium of mantle rocks is therefore crucial for relating them to bulk and large scale properties. However, it involves submicrometric structures which are hardly characterizable using conventional techniques. Here we present how the FIB-SEM-STEM microscope can be used to produce 3D imaging at unequalled resolution. We show that low melt and fluid fractions can form films as thin as 20 nm at olivine grain boundaries, and that they can modify the physico-chemical properties of mantle rocks by orders of magnitude. The fine relationships between films at grain boundaries, tubules at triple junctions and pockets at grain corners can be explored, and appear to be complex and to differ from usual visions.

  18. Progressive melting of a hot mantle diapir with entrainment beneath southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuyama, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Shibata, T.; Nakai, S.; Sumino, H.; Ozawa, K.

    2009-12-01

    In back arc regions, many geophysical and petrological studies suggest that the lithosphere is at high temperature and the upper mantle is influenced by fluid supplied from the subducting slab. The distribution of volatile components, the thermal structure, and their relationship with magmatism, together with the thermal and material transportation mechanisms, all of which are relevant to mantle dynamics in back arc regions, are, however, still open to question. We have conducted comprehensive major and trace element, and isotope analyses, as well as geochronological investigations on intra-plate back arc volcanism in the Kita-Matsuura area (8.5~6 Ma) in southwestern Japan, active over the time scale of ~2.5 Myr and horizontal scale of ~35km to address this issue. The geochemistry of the Kita-Matsuura basalts vary temporally from low- (47~50 wt%), through medium- (49~52 wt%), to high- (51~54 wt%) SiO2: these three groups exhibit separate trends, which can only be reproduced by unique fractionation of phenocryst minerals from their respective least differentiated sample. The water contents of the least differentiated magma for the low-, medium, and high-SiO2 groups are estimated to be 0~0.5, 0.25~1.0, and 1.0~2.0 wt%, respectively, which are constrained by respective fractionation path and An content of plagioclase. The average melt segregation pressures and temperatures, calculated by comparing the estimated primary melt compositions with melt compositions obtained in high pressure melting experiments on peridotite, are estimated to be 3.0~2.3, 2.7~1.8, and 2.0~1.3 GPa, and 1410~1550, 1370~1510, and 1290~1400°C, for each group respectively. The temporal decrease of melting temperature and pressure with increase of water content in the primary melt over a few Myr requires melting of actively upwelling mantle with a progressive supply of water from external source. The abundance of incompatible trace elements, Zr/Y, Nb/Th, and LREE/HREE ratios smoothly decrease from

  19. Water Content of Earth's Continental Mantle Is Controlled by the Circulation of Fluids or Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne; Woodland, Alan B.; Bell, David R.; Lazarov, Marina; Lapen, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    A key mission of the ARES Directorate at JSC is to constrain models of the formation and geological history of terrestrial planets. Water is a crucial parameter to be measured with the aim to determine its amount and distribution in the interior of Earth, Mars, and the Moon. Most of that "water" is not liquid water per se, but rather hydrogen dissolved as a trace element in the minerals of the rocks at depth. Even so, the middle layer of differentiated planets, the mantle, occupies such a large volume and mass of each planet that when it is added at the planetary scale, oceans worth of water could be stored in its interior. The mantle is where magmas originate. Moreover, on Earth, the mantle is where the boundary between tectonic plates and the underlying asthenosphere is located. Even if mantle rocks in Earth typically contain less than 200 ppm H2O, such small quantities have tremendous influence on how easily they melt (i.e., the more water there is, the more magma is produced) and deform (the more water there is, the less viscous they are). These two properties alone emphasize that to understand the distribution of volcanism and the mechanism of plate tectonics, the water content of the mantle must be determined - Earth being a template to which all other terrestrial planets can be compared.

  20. Redox Interactions between Iron and Carbon in Planetary Mantles: Implications for Degassing and Melting Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Righter, K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon stability in planetary mantles has been studied by numerous authors because it is thought to be the source of C-bearing atmospheres and of C-rich lavas observed at the planetary surface. In the Earth, carbonaceous peridotites and eclogites compositions have been experimentally studied at mantle conditions [1] [2] [3]. [4] showed that the fO2 variations observed in martian meteorites can be explained by polybaric graphite-CO-CO2 equilibria in the Martian mantle. Based on thermodynamic calculations [4] and [5] inferred that the stable form of carbon in the source regions of the Martian basalts should be graphite (and/or diamond), and equilibrium with melts would be a source of CO2 for the martian atmosphere. Considering the high content of iron in the Martian mantle (approx.18.0 wt% FeO; [6]), compared to Earth s mantle (8.0 wt% FeO; [7]) Fe/C redox interactions should be studied in more detail.

  1. How hot is red? Thermal structure of the melting mantle from seismic tomography and thermobarometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Forsyth, D. W.; Bendersky, C.; Ferguson, D. J.; Gazel, E.; Lee, C.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic tomography is providing ever sharper views of the upper mantle, but the ability to interpret these images continues to be limited by the confounding effects of temperature, water and melt content on S wave velocities (Vs). Globally low Vs is found in many active rift zones (e.g., Basin and Range, East African Rift, mid ocean ridges), and yet it is still not clear if velocities reflect variations in mantle temperature, water concentrations, or melt retention in the mantle. Here we combine Vs results from recent tomographic models with melt thermobarometry to isolate the temperature effect on Vs. We focus on the Western US where we have combined surface and body wave tomography using data from EarthScope's Transportable Array to yield excellent models of Vs to depths of 300 km or more. The widespread basaltic volcanism that has occurred over the past 1 Ma across the region provides samples of the melting mantle. We employ a revised version of the Lee et al. (2009) thermobarometer to estimate pressures and temperatures of last equilibration in the mantle from the Si and Mg compositions of basalts. Results are highly dependent on oxygen fugacity and water content, which we determine with new measurements of water and vanadium in melt inclusions and their olivine hosts. Temperatures and pressures range from ~ 1200°C and 1 GPa (40 km) beneath Big Pine volcanic field to ~ 1450°C and 3.5 GPa (115 km) beneath Lunar Crater volcanic field. Most of the equilibration depths are near the base of the seismically determined lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, although some are deeper, in the low velocity zone, and some are shallower, in the fast seismic lid. Vs in the source regions varies from ~ 4.4 km/s to 3.9 km/s. There is a good negative correlation of Vs with temperature of equilibration, based on nine volcanic fields across the Basin and Range. Other rifting regions around the world, including back-arc basins, the East Pacific Rise and the East Africa Rift, also

  2. Mantle Melting Controls on Liquid Lines of Descent in Magmatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.; Elkins Tanton, L. T.; Parman, S. W.; Chatterjee, N.; Gaetani, G. A.; Muentener, O.

    2002-12-01

    Compositional variations in basaltic rock suites preserve information on the conditions of high-pressure mantle melting and low-pressure fractional crystallization (e.g. pressure, temperature and volatile content). The significance of compositional variations in igneous rock series was of considerable interest to N.L. Bowen, and the famous Bowen - Fenner controversy was a protracted discussion that concerned the possibility of the existence of multiple liquid lines of descent (LLD) in magmatic systems. Miyashiro (1974) introduced the FeO*/MgO vs. SiO2 diagram and used it to demonstrate the existence of more than one LLD in arc and tholeiite suites. In detail, Miyashiro recognized that there was not a single calc-alkaline or tholeiitic suite, but that a continuum existed from tholeiitic to calc-alkaline. Each arc has its own distinctive signature produced by an interplay of varying melting and crystallization conditions. Subsequent experimental work (Sisson and Grove, 1993) demonstrated that the different LLDs were caused by variable H2O contents (calc-alkaline = hydrous, tholeiitic = anhydrous). Sisson and Grove (1993) found that the calc-alkaline trends characteristic of a large volume of the Earth's current output of arc magmatism represent fractional crystallization that occurs at high magmatic H2O contents (~4 to 6 wt. %). These hydrous fractional crystallization trends are ones expected to result when the starting point for fractionation is an H2O -rich, high pressure mantle melt saturated with oliv + opx + cpx + spinel or oliv + opx + cpx + garnet. A rarer calc-alkaline differentiation trend exemplified by lavas from the Mt. Shasta region, USA, Adak, Aleutians and Setouchi Belt, Japan lie in a portion of the diagram that is not as commonly represented by modern arc environments. These important magmas, plot in the low FeO*/MgO and high SiO2 portion of the Miyashiro diagram. This unique compositional signature is imparted by unusually high degrees of melting

  3. Archaean ultra-depleted komatiites formed by hydrous melting of cratonic mantle.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A H; Shirey, S B; Carlson, R W

    2003-06-19

    Komatiites are ultramafic volcanic rocks containing more than 18 per cent MgO (ref. 1) that erupted mainly in the Archaean era (more than 2.5 gigayears ago). Although such compositions occur in later periods of Earth history (for example, the Cretaceous komatiites of Gorgona Island), the more recent examples tend to have lower MgO content than their Archaean equivalents. Komatiites are also characterized by their low incompatible-element content, which is most consistent with their generation by high degrees of partial melting (30-50 per cent). Current models for komatiite genesis include the melting of rock at great depth in plumes of hot, diapirically rising mantle or the melting of relatively shallow mantle rocks at less extreme, but still high, temperatures caused by fluxing with water. Here we report a suite of ultramafic lava flows from the Commondale greenstone belt, in the southern part of the Kaapvaal Craton, which represents a previously unrecognized type of komatiite with exceptionally high forsterite content of its igneous olivines, low TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratio, high silica content, extreme depletion in rare-earth elements and low Re/Os ratio. We suggest a model for their formation in which a garnet-enriched residue left by earlier cratonic volcanism was melted by hydration from a subducting slab. PMID:12815428

  4. Correction for volatile fractionation in ascending magmas: noble gas abundances in primary mantle melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnard, Pete

    2001-09-01

    Accurate relative noble gas abundances of mantle-derived melts are required in order to further understand the distribution of noble gases in the mantle and fractionation of noble gases during the melting process. Noble gas relative abundances in the majority of oceanic basalts are highly fractionated, at least in part due to late stage, solubility controlled fractionation. Noble gas concentrations in the volatile phase (≡ noble gas:CO 2 ratio) will vary systematically during solubility controlled degassing of a magma. This contribution models the noble gas concentrations in the volatile phase during degassing at different pressures and vesicularities in order to develop a method for correcting fractionation resulting from magmatic degassing, and thereby estimate the "initial" (pre-degassing) noble gas compositions. Correcting for fractionation during magmatic degassing requires: a) a method for determining the volatile fractionation trajectory during degassing; and b) one well constrained mantle volatile composition with which to "fix" the extrapolation. The trajectory of volatile fractionation can be estimated by sequential crushing of basaltic glasses. Vesicles grow during ascent, therefore large vesicles trap early (less fractionated) volatiles while small vesicles trap late (fractionated) volatiles. Sequential crushing of basaltic glasses releases volatiles from progressively smaller vesicles, thereby allowing the fractionation trajectory resulting from degassing to be determined on individual samples. The production rate of both 21Ne and 4He in the mantle is a function of U concentration only, resulting in a constant 21Ne/ 4He production ratio in the mantle which can be used to "fix" the degassing fractionation trajectory determined by sequential crushing. This correction then allows fractionation of 4He from 40Ar prior to degassing to be assessed. This method is illustrated using multiple crushes of a single basaltic glass from the mid-Atlantic Ridge that

  5. Slab and sediment melting during subduction initiation: granitoid dykes from the mantle section of the Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinson, Hugh

    2015-09-01

    New geochemical data are presented for a suite of tonalites, granodiorites, trondhjemites and granites intrusive into depleted mantle harzburgites of the Oman-UAE ophiolite. A detailed field, petrological and geochemical examination suggests that these `mantle granitoids' are the product of three processes: (a) the mixing of melts derived from both mafic and metasedimentary sources, (b) interaction with the mantle harzburgite host and (c) the fractional crystallisation of plagioclase, hornblende ± accessory phases. Geochemical data are used to characterise the identity of the protolith(s) by first screening the data for those samples which have experienced fractional crystallisation during emplacement. The resultant `reduced' data set has moderately fractionated REE, with small negative Eu anomalies and fractionated primitive mantle-normalised trace element patterns with high concentrations of fluid mobile elements and lower concentrations of HFS elements and with positive peaks for Rb and Pb and negative troughs for Ba, Nb, Sr and Ti. The character of the protolith was quantified using a melting model based upon a MORB-type basalt similar in composition to the Oman Geotimes lavas and a model using the MUQ (MUd from Queensland) global sediment composition (Kamber et al. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 69:1041-1058, 2005) both with an amphibolite/granulite facies mineralogy. The two compositions bracket the mantle granitoid data set with partial melts of the MORB source yielding trace element compositions lower than the granitoids, whereas melts of the MUQ source yield melts with compositions higher than the granitoids. Mixing of the calculated melt compositions indicates that the measured granitoid compositions represent between 10 and 30 % mixing of a metasedimentary melt into the melt of a mafic source. Current petrological, structural and geochronological data suggest a model for the origin of the Oman ophiolite in which it is formed by spreading above a subduction zone

  6. Evidence of unadulterated mantle-depth, granitic melt inclusions: kumdykolite and kokchetavite crystallized from melt in Bohemian Massif granulites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O´Brien, Patrick J.; Ferrero, Silvio; Ziemann, Martin A.; Walczak, Katarzyna; Wunder, Bernd; Hecht, Lutz; Wälle, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Partial melting under near-UHP conditions of metagranitoids (now HP felsic granulites) at mantle depth in the Orlica-Śnieżnik Dome (Bohemian Massif, Poland) is recorded in small volumes of hydrous melt trapped as primary melt inclusions (MI) in peritectic garnets. When free of cracks connecting the inclusion with the leucocratic matrix, these "nanogranites" (≤ 50μm inclusion diameter) contain a unique assemblage including kumdykolite, kokchetavite and cristobalite - polymorphs of albite, K-feldspar and quartz, respectively. These usually metastable phases crystallized from the melt (glass?) during rapid exhumation (cm/a) at high T but the crack-free state strongly suggests over-pressuring of the inclusion with respect to the pressure-time path followed by the matrix. Reports of both kumdykolite and kokchetavite have been mainly from natural rocks equilibrated in the diamond stability field. The precise calculation of the PT path of the MI on cooling and the comparison with previous studies suggests, however, that pressure is not influential to their formation, ruling out the possible interpretation of kumdykolite and kokchetavite as indicators of ultra-high pressure conditions. Experimental re-homogenization of these crack-free nanogranites was achieved using a piston cylinder apparatus at 2.7 GPa and 875°C. These conditions are consistent with the results of geothermobarometric calculations on the host rock, suggesting that no H2O loss occurred during exhumation as this would have caused a shift of the inclusion melting T toward higher values. Coupled with the absence of H2O-loss microstructural evidence, e.g. decrepitation cracks and/or vesciculation in re-homogenized nanogranites, this evidence suggests that the nanogranites still preserve the original H2O content of the melt. Both experimental and microstructural evidence support the hypothesis that the presence of these polymorphs should be regarded as direct mineralogical criterion to identify former

  7. Formation of iron melt channels in silicate perovskite at Earth's lower mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, C. Y.; Liu, Y.; Wang, J.; Zhang, L.; Yang, W.; Mao, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    Core-formation represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's current layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle requires mechanism(s) to separate the iron alloy from the silicates in the initially accreted material. Many mechanisms have been proposed. At upper mantle conditions, percolation was ruled out as an efficient mechanism due to the tendency of liquid iron alloy to form isolated pockets at these pressures and temperatures. We investigated the ability of a liquid iron alloy to form an interconnected melt network with (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite (pv) under Earth's lower mantle conditions using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). Using nanoscale synchrotron X-ray computed tomography, we imaged a dramatic change in the shape of the iron-rich melt in the three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of samples prepared at varying pressures and temperatures. We found that the iron distribution went from isolated pockets to an interconnected network as the pressure increased.

  8. A conceptual model for the asthenosphere: redox melting in the C-O-H-bearing mantle vs. geophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Tarits, Pascal; Massuyeau, Malcolm; David, Sifre; Leila, Hashim; Emmanuel, Gardes

    2013-04-01

    The asthenosphere has classically been considered as a convective layer, with its viscosity decreased by the presence of 100's ppm water in olivine, and being overtopped by a rigid and dry lithosphere. It, however, needs a new conceptual definition as the presence of water seems not able to affect the rheology of olivine; furthermore, properties such as electrical conductivity and seismic wave's velocity are not sensibly affected by water content in olivine, leaving the geophysical features of the asthenosphere unexplained. An asthenosphere impregnated by low melt fractions is consistent with constraints on melting behavior of C-O-H-bearing peridotites and may also better explain electrical conductivity and seismic features. The challenge is therefore to confront and reconcile the complexity of mantle melting in the C-O-H system with geophysical observations. This work reviews and discusses several key properties of the asthenosphere and relates their vertical and lateral heterogeneities to geodynamic processes. The first discussion is about the top of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere boundary in the oceanic mantle. The discontinuity identified by seismic and electrical surveys is located at an average depth of 65km and is weakly influenced by the age, and therefore, the temperature of the lithosphere. This puzzling observation is shown here to be in perfect line the onset of peridotite melting in presence of both H2O and CO2. Mantle melting is therefore expected at 65 km depth, where the melt is essentially carbonatitic, inducing weakening and imposing transition in the regime of thermal transfer. Deeper, the melt evolve to silica-richer compositions. Twenty years of petrological investigations on processes that control mantle redox state unanimously concur on an increasingly reduced mantle with increasing depth. The conventional wisdom defines garnet as being increasingly abundant and increasingly able to concentrate ferric iron with increasing depth. Such oxygen

  9. Melt in the mantle and seismic azimuthal anisotropy: evidence from Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnik, Lev; Oreshin, Sergey; Erduran, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Observations of shear wave splitting in SKS seismic phase play a key role in the current efforts to understand kinematics and dynamics of mantle flow, but azimuthal anisotropy as a depth-localized phenomenon still is poorly known. Here we analyse stratification of seismic azimuthal anisotropy beneath central and northern Anatolia (a microplate within the Alpine belt) by inverting P-wave receiver functions jointly with shear wave splitting in SKS seismic phase. The analysis is based on recordings of stations of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) passive seismic experiment. In the resulting model in a depth interval from 120 to 200 km fast direction of anisotropy is nearly parallel to the plate motion direction (˜E-W), whilst a normal direction (close to S-N) is found in the low velocity zone (LVZ) between 60 and 90 km. Our preferred interpretation of these data suggests that the flow in upper mantle is nearly parallel to the Anatolian plate motion direction in the depth range from the LAB to 200 km, but in part of the LVZ fast direction of anisotropy is normal to the direction of shear in the mantle. This relation between anisotropy and shear is known from laboratory experiments with peridotite-type rock containing melt. A similar relation between anisotropy and flow in the LVZ is found in Fennoscandia. These findings may have far-reaching implications for interpreting mantle anisotropy elsewhere.

  10. Evidence of alkali rich melt reactions with mantle peridotite : Natural observations and experimental analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, T. B.; Milke, R.; Wunder, B.

    2012-04-01

    The Heldburg Phonolite, (Thuringia, Germany) is peculiar in its nature due to its absence of a Eu anomaly, and hence lack of feldspar fractionation, as well as the presence of spinel lherzolite xenocrysts. These observations suggest a higher than normal (mantle) pressure of origin, and its potential as a metasomatic agent at depth is explored in this work. Disequilibrium between the phonolite and its entrained upper mantle xenocrysts resulted in the development of secondary reaction rim assemblages of; (1) phlogopite + minor diopside around olivine, (2) pargasitic amphibole, phlogopite and minor diopside around orthopyroxene. We document both the natural rims and the attempts to reproduce them under experimental conditions, in order to elucidate the likely origin of the phonolite and its efficacy for metasomatising the upper mantle. Platinum capsules were loaded with mixtures of crushed mineral separates, (of pure synthetic forsterite, San Carlos olivine, synthetic enstatite or a natural enstatite from Kilosa, Tanzania) with a synthetic Fe-free phonolite melt in a 16:84% weight ratio, respectively. Experiments were run in a piston cylinder apparatus with CaF2 as the pressure medium. In addition to varying PT conditions, a wide range of water contents were tested (0-14wt%). It was found that pressures of 10-14 kbar, and temperatures of 900-1000°C, satisfy the conditions at which the reactions can form, thus, it is likely that the phonolite existed at upper mantle conditions. Water must be present to stabilize the desired hydrous phases, with >6wt% required at 900°C and 10 kbar. The destabilization of feldspar is also essential to the process, hence higher water contents are needed at the lowest PT conditions compared to 4-5 wt. % H2O at greater PT. The formation of amphibole around enstatite appears to be affected by sluggish reaction kinetics and the orientation of the host pyroxene, sometimes leading to diopside single rims. Furthermore we note some of the

  11. Melt extraction and mantle source at a Southwest Indian Ridge Dragon Bone amagmatic segment on the Marion Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changgui; Dick, Henry J. B.; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2016-03-01

    This paper works on the trace and major element compositions of spatially associated basalts and peridotites from the Dragon Bone amagmatic ridge segment at the eastern flank of the Marion Platform on the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. The rare earth element compositions of basalts do not match the pre-alteration Dragon Bone peridotite compositions, but can be modeled by about 5 to 10% non-modal batch equilibrium melting from a DMM source. The Dragon Bone peridotites are clinopyroxene-poor harzburgite with average spinel Cr# ~ 27.7. The spinel Cr# indicates a moderate degree of melting. However, CaO and Al2O3 of the peridotites are lower than other abyssal peridotites at the same Mg# and extent of melting. This requires a pyroxene-poor initial mantle source composition compared to either hypothetical primitive upper mantle or depleted MORB mantle sources. We suggest a hydrous melting of the initial Dragon Bone mantle source, as wet melting depletes pyroxene faster than dry. According to the rare earth element patterns, the Dragon Bone peridotites are divided into two groups. Heavy REE in Group 1 are extremely fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by ~ 7% fractional melting in the garnet stability field and another ~ 12.5 to 13.5% in the spinel stability field from depleted and primitive upper mantle sources, respectively. Heavy REE in Group 2 are slightly fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by ~ 15 to 20% fractional melting in the spinel stability field from a depleted mantle source. Both groups show similar melting degree to other abyssal peridotites. If all the melt extraction occurred at the middle oceanic ridge where the peridotites were dredged, a normal ~ 6 km thick oceanic crust is expected at the Dragon Bone segment. However, the Dragon Bone peridotites are exposed in an amagmatic ridge segment where only scattered pillow basalts lie on a partially serpentinized mantle pavement. Thus their depletion requires an

  12. Consequences of Melt-Preferred Orientation for Magmatic Segregation in Deforming Mantle Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. F.; Taylor-West, J.; Allwright, J.; Takei, Y.; Qi, C.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    In partially molten regions of the mantle, deviatoric stresses cause large-scale deformation and mantle flow. The same stresses also lead to preferential wetting of coherently oriented grain boundaries [DK97, T10]. This alignment is called melt-preferred orientation (MPO). Because of the contrast between the physical properties of melt and solid grains, MPO has the potential to introduce anisotropy into the mechanical and transport properties of the liquid/solid aggregate. Here we consider the possible consequences for (and of) anisotropic viscosity and permeability of the partially molten aggregate. The consequences are evaluated in the context of laboratory experiments on partially molten rocks. The controlled experiments involve deformation of an initially uniform mixture of solid olivine and liquid basalt [KZK10]. The resultant patterns of melt segregation include two robust features: (i) melt segregation into bands with high melt fraction oriented at a low angle to the shear plane; and (ii) melt segregation associated with an imposed gradient in shear stress, in experiments where this is present. Although there are other reproducible features of experiments, these are the most robust and provide a challenge to models. A theoretical model for the effect of MPO on mantle viscosity under diffusion creep is available [TH09] and makes predictions that are consistent with laboratory experiments [TK13,KT13,QKKT14,AK14]. We review the mechanics of this model and the predictions for flow in torsional and pipe Poiseuille flow, showing a quantitative comparison with experimental results. Furthermore, it is logical to expect MPO to lead to anisotropy of permeability, and we present a general model of tensorial permeability. We demonstrate the consequences of this anisotropy for simple shear deformation of a partially molten rock. REFERENCES: DK97 = Daines & Kohlstedt (1997), JGR, 10.1029/97JB00393. T10 = Takei (2010), JGR, 10.1029/2009JB006568. KZK10 = King, Zimmerman

  13. Depths and Temperatures of Mantle Melt Extraction in the Southern Cascadia Subduction Zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, C.; Grove, T. L.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Carlson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Plagioclase and spinel lherzolite thermometry and barometry applied to an extensive suite of <10.5 Ma primitive basaltic lavas (most Mg#>0.70) containing variable H2O contents (<<1 to ~4 wt%) suggests these melts were extracted from the mantle at 40-58 km below Oregon's High Lava Plains, 41-51 km below California's Modoc Plateau, and 37-60 km below the central-southern Cascades volcanic arc. Of the 155 basalt samples investigated, 33 are calc-alkaline basalts (CAB) and the remainder are high alumina olivine tholeiites (HAOT) or mildly alkaline basalts (MAB). All 33 of the CAB are from the subduction-influenced volcanic centers of Lassen, Mt. Shasta, Three Sisters, Medicine Lake, and Newberry in the present-day Cascades arc or rear arc. All of these volcanic centers also erupted HAOT or MAB. Olivine-plagioclase hygrometry for a representative subset of the 20 CAB from Newberry indicates they contained ~4 wt% H2O prior to eruption. Water contents for the remaining CAB were approximated using the H2O-melt composition scaling relationship developed by Ruscitto et al. [2010, EPSL 298(1-2), 153-161] yielding ≤1-3 wt% H2O. The calculated pressures and temperatures of last equilibration with mantle lherzolite for all 33 CAB were adjusted for the effects of H2O following Till et al. [2012, JGR 117(B06206)] and are on average 50×15°C (1s) cooler and 1.65×0.27 km deeper than their calculated temperatures and depths for anhydrous conditions. The minimum depths of melt extraction calculated for all basalts considered (including the CAB) are close to the Moho, as determined by regional geophysical studies. Thus, our results suggest that the geophysical Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary are located in close proximity to one another (within 5-10 km). The basalts originated at 1185-1383°C and the presence of both wet and dry basalts that were generated at such different temperatures at similar times, depths, and geographic locations in the Cascades arc and rear arc

  14. The electrical structure of the central Pacific upper mantle constrained by the NoMelt experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafian, Emily; Evans, Rob. L.; Collins, John A.; Elsenbeck, Jimmy; Gaetani, Glenn A.; Gaherty, James B.; Hirth, Greg; Lizarralde, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The NoMelt experiment imaged the mantle beneath 70 Ma Pacific seafloor with the aim of understanding the transition from the lithosphere to the underlying convecting asthenosphere. Seafloor magnetotelluric data from four stations were analyzed using 2-D regularized inverse modeling. The preferred electrical model for the region contains an 80 km thick resistive (>103 Ωm) lithosphere with a less resistive (˜50 Ωm) underlying asthenosphere. The preferred model is isotropic and lacks a highly conductive (≤10 Ωm) layer under the resistive lithosphere that would be indicative of partial melt. We first examine temperature profiles that are consistent with the observed conductivity profile. Our profile is consistent with a mantle adiabat ranging from 0.3 to 0.5°C/km. A choice of the higher adiabatic gradient means that the observed conductivity can be explained solely by temperature. In contrast, a 0.3°C/km adiabat requires an additional mechanism to explain the observed conductivity profile. Of the plausible mechanisms, H2O, in the form of hydrogen dissolved in olivine, is the most likely explanation for this additional conductivity. Our profile is consistent with a mostly dry lithosphere to 80 km depth, with bulk H2O contents increasing to between 25 and 400 ppm by weight in the asthenosphere with specific values dependent on the choice of laboratory data set of hydrous olivine conductivity and the value of mantle oxygen fugacity. The estimated H2O contents support the theory that the rheological lithosphere is a result of dehydration during melting at a mid-ocean ridge with the asthenosphere remaining partially hydrated and weakened as a result.

  15. Rapid crustal exhumation and mantle-melt extraction: Where has the crust gone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Valero, A. M.; Jagoutz, O.; Manthei, C.

    2012-04-01

    The emplacement of the Beni Bousera and Ronda ultramafic massifs of the Betico-Rifean belt (N Morocco-S Spain) has been discussed for several decades. These massifs are among the largest exposures of mantle rocks on Earth's surface, which obviously confers a special interest for mantle research in Earth Sciences. We present an integrated study of mantle and the surrounding crustal material of Beni Bousera in order to understand the interplay between melt percolation and emplacement of the ultramafic rocks and their relationships to the surrounding crust. Here we focus specifically on detailed petrological studies coupled with phase diagram modeling to elucidate the tectono-metamorphic history of the surrounding granulites. We then compare and relate these results to our understanding of the evolution of the Beni Bousera mantle rocks. The orogenic lherzolite of the ultramafic massif is surrounded by mostly metapelitic high-grade granulites (with local mylonitic layers) that are rimmed in turn by a successive sequence of lower metamorphic grade, from gneisses (with minor migmatites) to schists. The northern part of the massif offers exceptional exposures of a continuous lithospheric section from the ultramafics, via the Moho to the whole granulite packet by showing within the latter the preservation of two pressure events at fairly constant HT of c. 750 °C. A prograde higher-pressure episode (> 12 kbar) is characterized by equilibrium micro-domains with Grt+Bt+Ky+Rt followed by a lower-pressure (c. 5kbar) symplectic assemblage of Crd+Spl. This reveals a dramatic decompression event registered within less than 2 kms of crustal thickness. These results together with structures, numerical modelling and geochronology will extend the knowledge of the mechanisms of mantle emplacement in particular and global tectonics in general.

  16. Earliest step of core-mantle separation: Shock melting experiment of chondrite-like materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiichi, T.; Tsumagari, Y.; Nishio, M.; Sekine, T.

    2009-12-01

    formed even in shortest runs (Fig.1b, 1600C 10 sec). Based on these experiments, we conclude that size of the metal grains formed in each shock melting process in planet building stage depends on the connectivity of Fe-metal phase in the source materials. Pallasite (stony-iron meteorite) may represent the product of local melt pockets formed after impacts, the earliest form of core-mantle separation in planet building stage.

  17. Laboratory Measurements of Seismic Wave Attenuation in Upper-mantle Materials: the Effect of Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, I.; Faul, U. H.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    The frequency-dependent mechanical behaviour expected of Earth materials at high temperature places a special premium on laboratory measurements of wave speeds and attenuation at seismic frequencies. The symposium in honour of Mervyn Paterson provides a welcome opportunity to acknowledge his vital role in the design of the specialised equipment for this purpose described by Jackson and Paterson (PEPI 45: 349-367, 1987; Pageoph 141: 445-466, 1993). This instrument allows the study of low-strain high-temperature viscoelastic behaviour through the application of torsional forced oscillation/ microcreep techniques within the P-T environment (200 MPa, 1600 K) provided by an internally heated gas apparatus. Application of these techniques to fine-grained synthetic olivine polycrystals is beginning to provide a robust basis for the understanding of seismic wave attenuation (and dispersion) in the upper mantle under sub-solidus conditions. More recently, we have begun to explore the effects of partial melting through the fabrication, characterisation and mechanical testing of a suite of fine-grained olivine polycrystals containing up to 4% basaltic melt. The most striking effect of the added melt is the appearance of a melt-related dissipation peak superimposed upon the dissipation background characteristic of melt-free materials - which varies monotonically with period and temperature. The melt-related dissipation peak is adequately modelled as a Gaussian in log X, where X = To exp(E/RT). The melt-related dissipation peak sweeps across the seismic band from period To > 100 s to To < 1 s as temperature increases across the range 1300 - 1600 K producing pronounced systematic changes in the frequency dependence of 1/Q, that may be seismologically observable. >http://rses.anu.adu.au/petrophysics/PetroHome.html

  18. Elastic properties of silicate melts at high pressure and implications for low velocity anomalies in the crust and mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, A. N.; Lesher, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Regions of low seismic velocities in the mantle and crust are commonly attributed to the presence of silicate melt or aqueous fluid. The elastic properties of silicate melts are typically modeled at high pressure using equations of state developed for crystalline materials. However, amorphous silicates spanning a wide range of composition and structure, i.e. SiO2 to MgSiO3, and including naturally occurring basalt compositions, exhibit a weak dependence of P-wave velocity on density in clear violation of Birch's law, which governs the behavior of crystalline materials. This anomalous behavior is attributed to the high degree of flexibility of the silicate network on loading that may be a general property of naturally occurring silicate melts at crustal and upper mantle conditions. If this is the case, P-wave velocities for silicate melts will be significantly less pressure dependent than previously assumed, which in turn will enhance the effects of melt fraction on lowering aggregate mantle seismic velocities. Here we present VP calculated for partially molten mantle up to 20 GPa showing that melt fractions purported to explain VP reductions associated with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary may be overestimated by 15%, while those reported for the transition zone may be overestimated to an even greater extent. Moreover, we predict that d lnVS/d lnVP (RSP) should vary little across low velocities regions within the upper mantle due solely to the presence of melt, but will be strongly influenced by how melt is distributed, consistent the work of [1]. Finally, RSP is found to be relatively insensitive to type of fluid present, contrary to conventional wisdom, and thus caution is warranted in attributing changes in RSP to either silicate melt or aqueous fluids. The implications of these findings for interpreting low velocity anomalies beneath hotspots and arcs (e.g. Iceland and Japan) will be discussed. [1] Takei, Y. (2002) JGR vol. 107

  19. Initial Melting and wall-rock flux-melting of a wet multi-component mantle and its implications for the formation of MORB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Hasenclever, J.

    2013-12-01

    We explore several simple scenarios for wet melting of a heterogeneous multi- component mantle. In our melting formulation the mantle is viewed as a mixture consisting of a heterogeneously depleted peridotite matrix with embedded veins of fertile peridotite and/or geochemically enriched pyroxenite. These lithological units differ in their mineral composition but are assumed to have diffusively equilibrated both their water/hydrogen content and temperature over the hundreds of millions to billions of years prior to entering a melting region. During the melting process, however, only thermal but not chemical (water) equilibrium is assumed between the lithologies, which is a reasonable assumption for veins with thicknesses on the order of few tens to few hundreds of meters, a thermal diffusivity of 10^-6 m^2/s and a diffusivity of hydrogen of less than 3*10^-9 m^2/s. The thermodynamic formulation of the multi-component melting process, during which all components have to share thermal energy, is based on Phipps Morgan (2001). The wet melting parameterization by Katz et al. (2003) has been included in the thermodynamic formulation by modifying its solidus-depletion-dependence and treating water partitioning during melting as partitioning of a trace element with a D-value like that of Ce. Usually, fractional melting with a small trapped melt fraction is assumed. We will mostly discuss results from 1-D model calculations, which represent the idealized decompression of a multi-component mantle rising underneath a mid-ocean ridge. Melt-migration is assumed to occur as vertical ascent within each column. We have also extended the formulation to examine the effects of rising melts on 'flux-melting' the wall-rock through which they migrate. We are still testing to see if this mechanism can be the reason why ridge melts almost always have major element chemistries in equilibrium with a peridotitic mantle, while the incompatible trace elements in EMORB reflect the influence of

  20. Gold solubility and partitioning between sulfide liquid, monosulfide solid solution and hydrous mantle melts: Implications for the formation of Au-rich magmas and crust-mantle differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Audétat, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The solubility of Au in sulfur-free vs. sulfide-saturated melts and its partitioning behavior between sulfide liquid (SL), monosulfide solid solution (MSS) and hydrous basanite melt at variable Au activities was investigated in a fO2 range of FMQ-2 to FMQ+1.6 at 1200 °C/1.5 GPa using piston cylinder apparatus. Gold solubility in sulfur-free (<100 μg/g S) melt is low (0.6-1.6 μg/g) and increases with fO2 in a manner consistent with Au dissolution as AuO1/2, whereas in sulfide-saturated melts it is high (13.6 ± 1.7 μg/g) and independent of fO2. Variations in the chlorine content of sulfide-saturated melts (0.2-1.2 wt% Cl) had no measurable effect on Au solubility. Gold partition coefficients between sulfide liquid and silicate melt (DAuSL/SM) are very high, ∼10,000 ± 3000, which is at the upper end of values reported in previous studies. Gold partition coefficients between MSS and silicate melt (DAuMSS/SM) are much lower, 60 ± 10, which is at the lower end of previous values. Both DAuSL/SM and DAuMSS/SM are independent of fO2. The new Au partition coefficients were used in conjunction with previously published Cu and Ag partition coefficients to investigate the role of MSS versus SL during partial melting in the source region of primitive potassic magmas and during crust-mantle differentiation. The high Au content of ore deposits associated with potassic magmas has commonly been explained by the dissolution of Au-rich sulfide liquid, either during partial melting in the mantle source or during partial re-melting of sulfide-bearing cumulates at the crust-mantle boundary. We argue that MSS is the dominant sulfide phase in the mantle source region of these magmas, and thus that their high Au content is a consequence of low MSS-silicate melt partition coefficients rather than of sulfide exhaustion or partial re-melting of sulfide-bearing cumulates. Continental crust is depleted in Au, Ag and Cu relative to mantle melts, which was thought to be due to removal of

  1. Trace-element modelling of mare basalt parental melts: Implications for a heterogeneous lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallis, L. J.; Anand, M.; Strekopytov, S.

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous-source model of mare basalt formation indicates that Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) overturn produced an uneven mixture of early-formed olivine and pyroxene, and late-formed, ilmenite-rich cumulates, which subsequently partially melted to give rise to mare magmas. These heterogeneous cumulate source regions would not only have been characterised by different mineral modal abundances, but also by different trace element compositions. The aim of this work was to investigate the petrology and geochemistry of a diverse suite of Apollo mare basalts, and utilise trace-element modelling in order to understand their petrogenetic history. Chemical modelling confirms that the mare basalts were produced by relatively small degrees of partial melting (<10%) of the LMO cumulates, and that the dominant melting type (batch vs. fractional) varies among different basalt groups. Similarly, single-source mineralogy cannot be applied to all mare basalt types, confirming that the lunar mantle was heterogeneous at the time of generation of mare magmas. Plagioclase is not required in the source of most mare basalts, with the notable exception of the Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. Addition of more than 1% plagioclase to the source of other basalts produces weaker negative Eu anomalies than those observed in the samples. AFC calculations demonstrate the compositional differences between materials assimilated into the Apollo 14 high-Al and Apollo 11 high-K mare basalt partial melts, highlighting the complexities of mare basalt petrogenesis.

  2. Effects of melt percolation on highly siderophile elements and Os isotopes in subcontinental lithospheric mantle: A study of the upper mantle profile beneath Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Walker, Richard J.; Puchtel, Igor S.; Pitcher, Lynnette; Jelínek, Emil; Strnad, Ladislav

    2009-04-01

    The effects of melt percolation on highly siderophile element (HSE) concentrations and Re-Os isotopic systematics of subcontinental lithospheric mantle are examined for a suite of spinel peridotite xenoliths from the 4 Ma Kozákov volcano, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic. The xenoliths have previously been estimated to originate from depths ranging from ˜32 to 70 km and represent a layered upper mantle profile. Prior petrographic and lithophile trace element data for the xenoliths indicate that they were variably modified via metasomatism resulting from the percolation of basaltic melt derived from the asthenosphere. Chemical and isotopic data suggest that lower sections of the upper mantle profile interacted with melt characterized by a primitive, S-undersaturated composition at high melt/rock ratios. The middle and upper layers of the profile were modified by more evolved melt at moderate to low melt/rock ratios. This profile permits an unusual opportunity to examine the effects of variable melt percolation on HSE abundances and Os isotopes. Most HSE concentrations in the studied rocks are significantly depleted compared to estimates for the primitive upper mantle. The depletions, which are most pronounced for Os, Ir and Ru in the lower sections of the mantle profile, are coupled with strong HSE fractionations (e.g., Os N/Ir N ratios ranging from 0.3 to 2.4). Platinum appears to have been removed from some rocks, and enriched in others. This enrichment is coupled with lithophile element evidence for the degree of percolating melt fractionation (i.e., Ce/Tb ratio). Osmium isotopic compositions vary considerably from subchondritic to approximately chondritic ( γOs at 5 Ma from -6.9 to +2.1). The absence of correlations between 187Os/ 188Os and indicators of fertility, as is common in many lithospheric mantle suites, may suggest significant perturbation of the Os isotopic compositions of some of these rocks, but more likely reflect the normal range of isotopic

  3. Experiments on flow focusing in soluble porous media, with applications to melt extraction from the mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, P.B.; Whitehead, J.A.; Aharonov, E.; Jordahl, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate finite strucutres formed as a consequence of the `reactive infiltration instability` in a series of laboratory and numerical experiments with growth of solution channels parallel to the fluid flow direction. Our experiments demonstrate channel growth in the presence of an initial solution front and without an initial solution front where there is a gradient in the solubility of the solid matrix. In the gradient case, diffuse flow is unstable everywhere, channels can form and grow at any point, and channels may extend over the length scale of the gradient. As a consequence of the gradient results, we suggest that the reactive infiltration instability is important in the Earth`s mantle, where partial melts in the mantle ascend adiabatically. This hypothesis represents an important alternative to mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB) extraction in fractures, since fractures may not form in weak, viscously deforming asthenospheric mantle. We also briefly consider the effects of crystallization, rather than dissolution reactions, on the morphology of porous flow via a second set of experiments where fluid becomes supersaturated in a solid phase. This process may produce a series of walled conduits, as in our experiments. Development of a low-porosity cap overlying high porosity conduits may create hydrostatic overpressure sufficient to cause fracture and magma transport to the surface in dikes.

  4. Constraints on the depth and thermal vigor of melting in the Martian mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberto, Justin; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2015-01-01

    of rocks in Gale Crater and clasts within the Martian meteorite breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 (and paired stones) have expanded our knowledge of the diversity of igneous rocks that make up the Martian crust beyond those compositions exhibited in the meteorite collection or analyzed at any other landing site. Therefore, the magmas that gave rise to these rocks may have been generated at significantly different conditions in the Martian mantle than those derived from previously studied rocks. Here we build upon our previous models of basalt formation based on rocks analyzed in Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum to the new models of basalt formation for compositions from Gale Crater and a clast in meteorite NWA 7034. Estimates for the mantle potential temperature, TP based on Noachian age rock analyses in Gale Crater, Gusev Crater, and Bounce Rock in Meridiani Planum, and a vitrophyre clast in NWA 7034 are within error, which suggests that the calculated average TP of 1450 ± 70°C may represent an average global mantle temperature during the Noachian. The TP estimates for the Hesperian and Amazonian, based on orbital analyses of the chemistry of the crust, are lower in temperature than our estimates for the Noachian, which is consistent with simple convective cooling of the interior of Mars. However, the TP estimates from the young meteorites are significantly higher than the estimates based on surface chemistry and are consistent with localized "hot spot" melting and not heating up of the interior.

  5. Calcio-carbonatite melts and metasomatism in the mantle beneath Mt. Vulture (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosatelli, Gianluigi; Wall, Frances; Stoppa, Francesco

    2007-12-01

    At Mt. Vulture volcano (Basilicata, Italy) calcite globules (5-150 μm) are hosted by silicate glass pools or veins cross-cutting amphibole-bearing, or more common spinel-bearing mantle xenoliths and xenocrysts. The carbonate globules are rounded or elongated and are composed of a mosaic of 2-20 μm crystals, with varying optical orientation. These features are consistent with formation from a quenched calciocarbonatite melt. Where in contact with carbonate amphibole has reacted to form fassaitic pyroxene. Some of these globules contain liquid/gaseous CO 2 bubbles and sulphide inclusions, and are pierced by quench microphenocrysts of silicate phases. The carbonate composition varies from calcite to Mg-calcite (3.8-5.0 wt.% MgO) both within the carbonate globules and from globule to globule. Trace element contents of the carbonate, determined by LAICPMS, are similar to those of carbonatites worldwide including ΣREE up to 123 ppm. The Sr-Nd isotope ratios of the xenolith carbonate are similar to the extrusive carbonatite and silicate rocks of Mt. Vulture testifying to derivation from the same mantle source. Formation of immiscibile silicate-carbonatite liquids within mantle xenoliths occurred via disequilibrium immiscibility during their exhumation.

  6. Structural, petro-geochemical and modelling constraints on melt migration by porosity waves in sub-arc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, P.; Connolly, J. A.; Schaltegger, U.; Burg, J.; Chiaradia, M.

    2009-12-01

    Petrographic and structural observations in the mantle lithospheres provided evidence for two end-member processes of melt migration in natural rocks: (1) impregnation features indicate pervasive flow and (2) dykes denote fully segregated flow. Replacive dunite represents an intermediate mode in which porous flow has been channelized. Because the retrograde thermal regime in the upper portion of the mantle wedge is hostile to melt transport, the dominant mechanism by which melts ascend from their source through the mantle remains uncertain. We studied the petro-structural features of melt percolation in a exhumed sub-arc mantle section of the Sapat area in the Kohistan Paleo-Island Arc (NE Pakistan). Our observations indicate a continuum of transport mechanisms ranging from pervasive to fully segregated melt flow: The dominantly harzburgitic mantle section of Sapat exposes tens to hundred of meters size dunitic domains, which comprises clinopyroxene-rich cores associated with gabbroic lenses. The clinopyroxene zones show isolated Cpx blasts, aligned Cpx “trails” and Cpx bands. Gabbro lenses are 3-dimensional lenses terminated horizontally and vertically by clinopyroxene proto-lenses. Proto-lenses refer to Cpx bands prior to plagioclase appearance. Based on bulk and mineral composition, dunite zones formed by orthopyroxene dissolution and olivine crystallization via the peritectic reaction opx + melt = ol; and clinopyroxene-rich parts and gabbros were recognized to have formed from the same melt as dunite. The melt forming gabbros and cpx-rich parts were in near-equilibrium with dunite, but not with the surrounding harzburgite. The structural relationships (i.e parallelism of gabbroic lenses and cpx-trails, and 3D evolution of trails into gabbroic lenses) strengthen the co-genetic origin of the lithologies. Isolated clinopyroxene porphyroblasts evolve into trails that turn into bands in which plagioclase appears. From these observations we infer that the

  7. Subsolidus and melting phase relations of basaltic composition in the uppermostlower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Kei; Fei, Yingwei

    2002-06-01

    The phase relations and the element partitioning in a mid-oceanic ridge basalt composition were determined for both above-solidus and subsolidus conditions at 22 to 27.5 GPa by means of a multianvil apparatus. The mineral assemblage at the solidus changes remarkably with pressure; majorite and stishovite at 22 GPa, joined by Ca-perovskite at 23 GPa, further joined by CaAl 4Si 2O 11-rich CAS phase at 25.5 GPa, and Mg-perovskite, stishovite, Ca-perovskite, CF phase (approximately on the join NaAlSiO 4-MgAl 2O 4), and NAL phase ([Na,K,Ca] 1[Mg,Fe 2+] 2[Al,Fe 3+,Si] 5.5-6.0O 12) above 27 GPa. The liquidus phase is Ca-perovskite, and stishovite, a CAS phase, a NAL phase, Mg-perovskite, and a CF phase appear with decreasing temperature at 27.5 GPa. Partial melt at 27 to 27.5 GPa is significantly depleted in SiO 2 and CaO and enriched in FeO and MgO compared with those formed at lower pressures, reflecting the narrow stability of (Fe,Mg)-rich phases (majorite or Mg-perovskite) above solidus temperature. The basaltic composition has a lower melting temperature than the peridotitic composition at high pressures except at 13 to 18 GPa (Yasuda et al., 1994) and therefore can preferentially melt in the Earth's interior. Recycled basaltic crusts were possibly included in hot Archean plumes, and they might have melted in the uppermost lower mantle. In this case, Ca-perovskite plays a dominant role in the trace element partitioning between melt and solid. This contrasts remarkably with the case of partial melting of a peridotitic composition in which magnesiowüstite is the liquidus phase at this depth.

  8. Spreading-rate dependence of melt extraction at mid-ocean ridges from mantle seismic refraction data.

    PubMed

    Lizarralde, Daniel; Gaherty, James B; Collins, John A; Hirth, Greg; Kim, Sangmyung D

    2004-12-01

    A variety of observations indicate that mid-ocean ridges produce less crust at spreading rates below 20 mm yr(-1) (refs 1-3), reflecting changes in fundamental ridge processes with decreasing spreading rate. The nature of these changes, however, remains uncertain, with end-member explanations being decreasing shallow melting or incomplete melt extraction, each due to the influence of a thicker thermal lid. Here we present results of a seismic refraction experiment designed to study mid-ocean ridge processes by imaging residual mantle structure. Our results reveal an abrupt lateral change in bulk mantle seismic properties associated with a change from slow to ultraslow palaeo-spreading rate. Changes in mantle velocity gradient, basement topography and crustal thickness all correlate with this spreading-rate change. These observations can be explained by variations in melt extraction at the ridge, with a gabbroic phase preferentially retained in the mantle at slower spreading rates. The estimated volume of retained melt balances the approximately 1.5-km difference in crustal thickness, suggesting that changes in spreading rate affect melt-extraction processes rather than total melting. PMID:15592410

  9. Melting of CaO and CaSiO3 at Deep Mantle Condition Using First Principles Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajgain, S. K.; Ghosh, D. B.; Karki, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate prediction of melting temperatures of major mantle minerals at high pressures is important to understand the Hadean Earth as well as to explain the observed seismic anomalies at ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ). To further investigate the geophysical implications of our recent first principles study of molten CaO and CaSiO­3, we calculated the melting temperatures of the corresponding solid phases by integrating the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The melting behavior of their high-pressure phases can constrain the lower mantle solidus. Our calculations show melting temperature of 5700 ± 500 kelvins for CaSiO3 and 7800 ± 600 kelvins for CaO at the base of the lower mantle (136 GPa). The bulk sound velocities of CaO and CaSiO3 liquids at the core-mantle boundary are found to be 40 % lower than P-wave seismic velocity and 22 % lower than that of MgSiO3 liquid. With substantial decrease of melting temperature by freezing point depression and iron partitioning, the partial melting of multi-component silicate and its gravitational buoyancy at ULVZ cannot be ruled out.

  10. Multiple episodes of partial melting, depletion, metasomatism and enrichment processes recorded in the heterogeneous upper mantle sequence of the Neotethyan Eldivan ophiolite, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Ibrahim; Ersoy, E. Yalçın; Dilek, Yildirim; Kapsiotis, Argyrios; Sarıfakıoğlu, Ender

    2016-03-01

    The Eldivan ophiolite along the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone in north-central Anatolia represents a remnant of the Neotethyan oceanic lithosphere. Its upper mantle peridotites include three lithologically and compositionally distinct units: clinopyroxene (cpx)-harzburgite and lherzolite (Group-1), depleted harzburgite (Group-2), and dunite (Group-3). Relics of primary olivine and pyroxene occur in the less refractory harzburgites, and fresh chromian spinel (Cr-spinel) is ubiquitous in all peridotites. The Eldivan peridotites reflect a petrogenetic history evolving from relatively fertile (lherzolite and cpx-harzburgite) toward more depleted (dunite) compositions through time, as indicated by (i) a progressive decrease in the modal cpx distribution, (ii) a progressive increase in the Cr#s [Cr / (Cr + Al)] of Cr-spinel (0.15-0.78), and (iii) an increased depletion in the whole-rock abundances of some magmaphile major oxides (Al2O3, CaO, SiO2 and TiO2) and incompatible trace elements (Zn, Sc, V and Y). The primitive mantle-normalized REE patterns of the Group-1 and some of the Group-2 peridotites display LREE depletions. Higher YbN and lower SmN/YbN ratios of these rocks are compatible with their formation after relatively low degrees (9-25%) of open-system dynamic melting (OSDM) of a Depleted Mid-ocean ridge Mantle (DMM) source, which was then fluxed with small volumes of oceanic mantle-derived melt [fluxing ratio (β): 0.7-1.2%]. Accessory Cr-spinel compositions (Cr# = 015-0.53) of these rocks are consistent with their origin as residual peridotites beneath a mid-ocean ridge axis. Part of the Group-2 harzburgites exhibit lower YbN and higher SmN/YbN ratios, LREE-enriched REE patterns, and higher Cr-spinel Cr#s ranging between 0.54 and 0.61. Trace element compositions of these peridotites can be modeled by approximately 15% OSDM of a previously 17% depleted DMM, which was then fluxed (β: 0.4%) with subduction-influenced melt. The Group-3 dunite samples contain

  11. Magmatic infiltration and melting in the lower crust and upper mantle beneath the Cima volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilshire, H.G.; McGuire, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    Xenoliths of lower crustal and upper mantle rocks from the Cima volcanic field (CVF) commonly contain glass pockets, veins, and planar trains of glass and/or fluid inclusions in primary minerals. Glass pockets occupy spaces formerly occupied by primary minerals of the host rocks, but there is a general lack of correspondence between the composition of the glass and that of the replaced primary minerals. The melting is considered to have been induced by infiltration of basaltic magma and differentiates of basaltic magma from complex conduits formed by hydraulic fracturing of the mantle and crustal rocks, and to have occurred during the episode of CVF magmatism between ???7.5 Ma and present. Variable compositions of quenched melts resulted from mixing of introduced melts and products of melting of primary minerals, reaction with primary minerals, partial crystallization, and fractionation resulting from melt and volatile expulsion upon entrainment of the xenoliths. High silica melts (> ??? 60% SiO2) may result by mixing introduced melts with siliceous melts produced by reaction of orthopyroxene. Other quenched melt compositions range from those comparable to the host basalts to those with intermediate Si compositions and elevated Al, alkalis, Ti, P, and S; groundmass compositions of CVF basalts are consistent with infiltration of fractionates of those basalts, but near-solidus melting may also contribute to formation of glass with intermediate silica contents with infiltration only of volatile constituents.

  12. Evidence for pervasive melt-rock reaction within the uppermost mantle at Hess Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shejwalkar, A. S.; Coogan, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    A suite of spinel harzburgites from ODP Site 895 at Hess Deep have been analysed for the major and trace element compositions of the major mineral phases and of the bulk rock to investigate the effect of melt rock reaction on mineral and bulk rock geochemistry. The harzburgites are at the depleted end of the global array of abyssal peridotite compositions in terms of moderately incompatible elements such as Al2O3, CaO, V and Sc. The whole-rock HREE abundances can be modeled as the residues of 15-25% near fractional melting of DMM however the LREE have much higher concentrations than predicted by this model and the samples show a significant positive Eu anomaly. The data can be fit well by a model of near-fractional melting followed by 0.5 to 2% precipitation of plagioclase that has a trace element composition in equilibrium with MORB. Plagioclase impregnation is common in the mantle section drilled at Site 895 although plagioclase is not observed petrographically in the samples studied here. The rocks are 20-70% altered and we hypothesize that plagioclase was entirely replaced during this alteration. The LREE-enrichment, relative to a melting residue, observed in the bulk-rock is not observed in clinopyroxene compositions. One explanation for this could be that the rocks were relatively cool when plagioclase impregnation occurred meaning diffusion was inefficient at modifying the clinopyroxene compositions [e.g. 1]. Whether melt-rock reaction occurs on- or off-axis is currently being investigated. Refs: [1] Niu, 2004. Journal of Petrology. Volume 45 (12), 2423-2458.

  13. Primitive magmas at five Cascade volcanic fields: Melts from hot, heterogeneous sub-arc mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Bruggman, P.E.; Christiansen, R.L.; Clynne, M.A.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hildreth, W.

    1997-01-01

    ; and OIB-source-like domains. Lavas with arc and intraplate (OIB) geochemical signatures were erupted close to HAOT, and many lavas are blends of two or more magma types. Pre-eruptive H2O contents of HAOT, coupled with phase-equilibrium studies, suggest that these magmas were relatively dry and last equilibrated in the mantle wedge at temperatures of ???1300??C and depths of ???40 km, virtually at the base of the crust. Arc basalt and basaltic andesite represent greater extents of melting than HAOT, presumably in the same general thermal regime but at somewhat lower mantle separation temperatures, of domains of sub-arc mantle that have been enriched by a hydrous subduction component derived from the young, relatively hot Juan de Fuca plate. The primitive magmas originated by partial melting in response to adiabatic upwelling within the mantle wedge. Tectonic extension in this part of the Cascade arc, one characterized by slow oblique convergence, contributes to mantle upwelling and facilitates eruption of primitive magmas.

  14. Deformation, annealing, reactive melt percolation, and seismic anisotropy in the lithospheric mantle beneath the southeastern Ethiopian rift: Constraints from mantle xenoliths from Mega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, Andréa; Baptiste, Virginie; Vauchez, Alain; Holtzman, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    We explore the relations between deformation, annealing, and melt percolation during rifting and the effect of these processes on seismic anisotropy by analyzing the microstructures and crystal preferred orientations (CPO) in a suite of mantle xenoliths from Mega, in the southern end of the Ethiopian rift. Previous geochemical studies on these xenoliths showed evidence for interactions with variable melt types and volumes during the rifting process. The peridotites have dominantly coarse-porphyroclastic microstructures, but coarse granular or partially recrystallized microstructures also occur. The olivine CPO, characterized by orthorhombic to fiber-[100] patterns and moderate intensities, the common occurrence of (100) tilt walls, and the predominance of <0vw> rotation axes accommodating low angle misorientations in olivine support deformation by dislocation creep with dominant activation of the [100](010) system. Annealing (static recrystallization) of variable intensity followed this deformation. Modal enrichment in pyroxenes in > 60% of the studied peridotites corroborates extensive, but spatially heterogeneous reactive melt percolation leading to refertilization of the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Ethiopian rift. The common interstitial shapes of the pyroxenes and lack of correlation between the pyroxenes and the olivine CPOs in many samples suggest that part of the refertilization is post-kinematic. However, there is no simple relation between reactive melt percolation and annealing of the olivine deformation microstructure. Comparison with data from other xenolith localities points to changes in the metasomatic imprint in the lithospheric mantle along the East African rift system correlated with the evolution in the rift maturity. Seismic properties averaged over all samples show typical lithospheric mantle patterns with fast propagation of P- and polarization of the fast S-waves parallel to the lineation. The anisotropy is moderate (< 6% for P

  15. Melt variability in percolated peridotite: an experimental study applied to reactive migration of tholeiitic basalt in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bleeken, Greg; Müntener, Othmar; Ulmer, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Melt-rock reaction in the upper mantle is recorded in a variety of ultramafic rocks and is an important process in modifying melt composition on its way from the source region towards the surface. This experimental study evaluates the compositional variability of tholeiitic basalts upon reaction with depleted peridotite at uppermost-mantle conditions. Infiltration-reaction processes are simulated by employing a three-layered set-up: primitive basaltic powder (`melt layer') is overlain by a `peridotite layer' and a layer of vitreous carbon spheres (`melt trap'). Melt from the melt layer is forced to move through the peridotite layer into the melt trap. Experiments were conducted at 0.65 and 0.8 GPa in the temperature range 1,170-1,290°C. In this P-T range, representing conditions encountered in the transition zone (thermal boundary layer) between the asthenosphere and the lithosphere underneath oceanic spreading centres, the melt is subjected to fractionation, and the peridotite is partially melting ( T s ~ 1,260°C). The effect of reaction between melt and peridotite on the melt composition was investigated across each experimental charge. Quenched melts in the peridotite layers display larger compositional variations than melt layer glasses. A difference between glasses in the melt and peridotite layer becomes more important at decreasing temperature through a combination of enrichment in incompatible elements in the melt layer and less efficient diffusive equilibration in the melt phase. At 1,290°C, preferential dissolution of pyroxenes enriches the melt in silica and dilutes it in incompatible elements. Moreover, liquids become increasingly enriched in Cr2O3 at higher temperatures due to the dissolution of spinel. Silica contents of liquids decrease at 1,260°C, whereas incompatible elements start to concentrate in the melt due to increasing levels of crystallization. At the lowest temperatures investigated, increasing alkali contents cause silica to increase

  16. Partitioning of V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Ag, Sn, Sb, W, Au, Pb, and Bi between sulfide phases and hydrous basanite melt at upper mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Audétat, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    The partitioning of 15 major to trace metals between monosulfide solid solution (MSS), sulfide liquid (SL) and mafic silicate melt (SM) was determined in piston-cylinder experiments performed at 1175-1300 °C, 1.5-3.0 GPa and oxygen fugacities ranging from 3.1 log units below to 1.0 log units above the quartz-fayalite-magnetite fO2 buffer, which conditions are representative of partial melting in the upper mantle in different tectonic settings. The silicate melt was produced by partial melting of a natural, amphibole-rich mantle source rock, resulting in hydrous (˜5 wt% H2O) basanitic melts similar to low-degree partial melts of metasomatized mantle, whereas the major element composition of the starting sulfide (˜52 wt% Fe; 39 wt% S; 7 wt% Ni; 2 wt% Cu) was similar to the average composition of sulfides in this environment. SL/SM partition coefficients are high (≥100) for Au, Ni, Cu, Ag, Bi, intermediate (1-100) for Co, Pb, Sn, Sb (±As, Mo), and low (≤1) for the remaining elements. MSS/SM partition coefficients are generally lower than SL/SM partition coefficients and are high (≥100) for Ni, Cu, Au, intermediate (1-100) for Co, Ag (±Bi, Mo), and low (≤1) for the remaining elements. Most sulfide-silicate melt partition coefficients vary as a function of fO2, with Mo, Bi, As (±W) varying by a factor >10 over the investigated fO2 range, Sb, Ag, Sn (±V) varying by a factor of 3-10, and Pb, Cu, Ni, Co, Au, Zn, Mn varying by a factor of 3-10. The partitioning data were used to model the behavior of Cu, Au, Ag, and Bi during partial melting of upper mantle and during fractional crystallization of primitive MORB and arc magmas. Sulfide phase relationships and comparison of the modeling results with reported Cu, Au, Ag, and Bi concentrations from MORB and arc magmas suggest that: (i) MSS is the dominant sulfide in the source region of arc magmas, and thus that Au/Cu ratios in the silicate melt and residual sulfides may decrease with increasing degree of

  17. Melt-generation processes associated with the Tristan mantle plume: Constraints on the origin of EM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Thompson, R. N.; Day, J. A.; Humphris, S. E.; Dickin, A. P.

    2005-09-01

    The enriched mantle 1 (EM-1) component in ocean-island basalts (OIB, e.g., Kerguelen, Pitcairn and Walvis Ridge) has been attributed to melting in upwelling mantle plumes of either: (i) shallow-recycled delaminated subcontinental-lithospheric-mantle or crust; or (ii) deep-recycled metasomatised lithosphere, oceanic plateau or oceanic crust plus a few percent of pelagic sediment. We present new geochemical data for OIB samples from the central South Atlantic; these include 100 to 30 Ma alkali and tholeiitic basalts from the Walvis Ridge and Rio Grande Rise and < 3 Ma basanites and basalts from Tristan da Cunha, Inaccessible and Gough. Additionally, we have analysed Cretaceous mafic-potassic magmas from south-west Africa and eastern South America in order to establish the compositional variation of metasomatised lithospheric mantle that may have been delaminated during Gondwana break-up. The results of our rare-earth-element inversion and Sr-, Nd- and Pb-isotopic mixing models suggest that the 'depleted' mantle plume component resembles FOZO and that the composition of the 'enriched' mantle component in central South Atlantic OIB has varied both spatially and temporally. At least three different enriched mantle end-members are required to explain the compositional range of 100 to 30 Ma OIB magmas. These resemble the source regions of mafic-potassic magmas from: (i) the Congo craton and Damara belt of south-west Africa; (ii) the São Francisco craton and Brasilia belt of south-east Brazil; and (iii) the Rio Apa-Luis Alves craton of southern Brazil and Paraguay. The most isotopically enriched EM-1 basalts ( ɛNd = - 0.8 to - 4.5), generated on the Walvis Ridge and Rio Grande Rise between 89 and 78 Ma, appear to contain a 10% to 15% contribution from a melt source region with low ɛNd, 206Pb / 204Pb and high [La / Nb] n, similar in composition to metasomatised subcratonic lithospheric mantle beneath southern Brazil and Paraguay. Reconstructions of plate motions indicate

  18. Modeling the melting of multicomponent systems: the case of MgSiO3 perovskite under lower mantle conditions.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Cono; P Brodholt, John

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the melting properties of materials, especially at extreme pressure conditions, represents a long-standing scientific challenge. For instance, there is currently considerable uncertainty over the melting temperatures of the high-pressure mantle mineral, bridgmanite (MgSiO3-perovskite), with current estimates of the melting T at the base of the mantle ranging from 4800 K to 8000 K. The difficulty with experimentally measuring high pressure melting temperatures has motivated the use of ab initio methods, however, melting is a complex multi-scale phenomenon and the timescale for melting can be prohibitively long. Here we show that a combination of empirical and ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations can be used to successfully predict the melting point of multicomponent systems, such as MgSiO3 perovskite. We predict the correct low-pressure melting T, and at high-pressure we show that the melting temperature is only 5000 K at 120 GPa, a value lower than nearly all previous estimates. In addition, we believe that this strategy is of general applicability and therefore suitable for any system under physical conditions where simpler models fail. PMID:27444854

  19. Modeling the melting of multicomponent systems: the case of MgSiO3 perovskite under lower mantle conditions

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Cono; P. Brodholt, John

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the melting properties of materials, especially at extreme pressure conditions, represents a long-standing scientific challenge. For instance, there is currently considerable uncertainty over the melting temperatures of the high-pressure mantle mineral, bridgmanite (MgSiO3-perovskite), with current estimates of the melting T at the base of the mantle ranging from 4800 K to 8000 K. The difficulty with experimentally measuring high pressure melting temperatures has motivated the use of ab initio methods, however, melting is a complex multi-scale phenomenon and the timescale for melting can be prohibitively long. Here we show that a combination of empirical and ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations can be used to successfully predict the melting point of multicomponent systems, such as MgSiO3 perovskite. We predict the correct low-pressure melting T, and at high-pressure we show that the melting temperature is only 5000 K at 120 GPa, a value lower than nearly all previous estimates. In addition, we believe that this strategy is of general applicability and therefore suitable for any system under physical conditions where simpler models fail. PMID:27444854

  20. Modeling the melting of multicomponent systems: the case of MgSiO3 perovskite under lower mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Paola, Cono; P. Brodholt, John

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the melting properties of materials, especially at extreme pressure conditions, represents a long-standing scientific challenge. For instance, there is currently considerable uncertainty over the melting temperatures of the high-pressure mantle mineral, bridgmanite (MgSiO3-perovskite), with current estimates of the melting T at the base of the mantle ranging from 4800 K to 8000 K. The difficulty with experimentally measuring high pressure melting temperatures has motivated the use of ab initio methods, however, melting is a complex multi-scale phenomenon and the timescale for melting can be prohibitively long. Here we show that a combination of empirical and ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations can be used to successfully predict the melting point of multicomponent systems, such as MgSiO3 perovskite. We predict the correct low-pressure melting T, and at high-pressure we show that the melting temperature is only 5000 K at 120 GPa, a value lower than nearly all previous estimates. In addition, we believe that this strategy is of general applicability and therefore suitable for any system under physical conditions where simpler models fail.

  1. Zircon U Pb and Hf isotope constraints on crustal melting associated with the Emeishan mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi-Gang; Luo, Zhen-Yu; Huang, Xiao-Long; He, Bin; Xiao, Long; Xie, Lie-Wen; Shi, Yu-Ruo

    2008-07-01

    SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dates, combined with in-situ Hf isotopic data, provide new constraints on the petrogenesis and protolith of peralkaline, metaluminous and peraluminous intrusions and rhyolitic tuffs in the Emeishan large igneous province, with significant bearing on crustal melting associated with mantle plumes. Syenite and A-type granitic intrusions from Huili, Miyi and Taihe in the center of this large igneous province yield U-Pb dates at ˜260 Ma, consistent with the ages obtained for mafic layered intrusions in the same province. Zircon from these rocks exhibits a wide range of initial Hf isotope ratios ( ɛHf( t) = -1.4 to +13.4), with corresponding TDM1 of 400-900 Ma. The highest ɛHf( t) value is only marginally lower than that of depleted mantle reservoir at 260 Ma, suggesting that their source is primarily juvenile crust added during Emeishan volcanism, with incorporation of variable amounts of Neoproterozoic crust. The trigger of crustal melting is most likely related to advective heating associated with magmatic underplating. In contrast, the 255-251 Ma peraluminous granites from Ailanghe and 238 Ma rhyolitic tuff from Binchuan, have negative initial ɛHf values of -1.3 to -4.4, and of -7.7 to -14, respectively. Hf isotopic model ages and presence of inherited zircons indicate their derivation from Mesoproterozoic and Paleoproterozoic crust, respectively. Given the time lag relative to the plume impact (˜260 Ma) and insignificant mantle contribution to 255-238 Ma magmatism, conductive heating is suggested as the trigger of crustal melting that resulted in formation of delayed felsic magmas. The involvement of older crust in younger felsic magmas is consistent with upward heat transfer to the lithosphere during plume impregnation, if the age of crust is inversely stratified, i.e., changes from Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic to Permian with increasing depth. Such crust may have resulted from episodic, downward crustal growth

  2. Seismic Attenuation, Temperature, H20, Mantle Melting and Rock Uplift, Central North Island New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, M.; Savage, M.; Stern, T.

    2005-12-01

    Back-arc basins of the western Pacific are elevated some 1-2 km above the adjacent oceanic floor. Where oceanic back-arc basins propagate into continental lithosphere we also see an uplift signal, which can be mapped and evaluated with geological methods. Trying to understand the driving force for this uplift requires seismological methods to quantify temperatures, and therefore buoyancy, in the upper mantle. New Zealand's North Island is one such place where the back-arc basin has propagated into continental lithosphere. Geological records show that the North Island has undergone up to 2.5 km of broad wavelength rock uplift since 5 Ma. We use earthquake data to map variations in seismic attenuation (Qp-1) beneath the North Island. Results are used to determine some constraints on the effects of temperature, water and melt on buoyancy in the mantle wedge above the subduction zone. A region of high attenuation extending to depths of ~140 km correlates, spatially, with the region of back-arc extension, volcanism and high heat flow (Central Volcanic Region or CVR). In this region the path-averaged Qp-1 for frequencies from 1-15Hz is 4.0×10-3±0.3×10-3 and shows little variation with depth. West of the CVR, the north-western North Island shows a decrease in attenuation but Qp-1 remains slightly elevated (path-averaged Qp-1 1.4×10-3±0.2×10-3). Here attenuation increases with depth until it reaches similar values as the CVR mantle at approximately 80 km. We use Qp values to calculate temperatures at 30 km and 80 km depth below these two regions. Temperatures at 30 km below the CVR are elevated to just above the melting temperature (1.02 Tm) while to the west temperatures are just below the solidus (~0.95 Tm). At 80 km depth attenuation indicates temperatures for both regions are just above the solidus. To reconcile temperatures calculated from heat flow measurements in the north-western North Island with those calculated from attenuation, melting temperatures must

  3. CO2 and potassium in the mantle: carbonaceous pelite melts from the trailing edge of a detached slab hybridizing in the mantle to ultrapotassic kamafugite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.

    2007-12-01

    The ultrapotassic magmas from the Intra-Apennine and Roman provinces constitute worldwide endmembers in terms of K2O/Na2O, K2O content and CO2 degassing, and are associated with carbonatites. Group II kimberlites, which are geochemically similar but less extreme, occur on cratons stable since several 100 Ma. This geotectonic situation appears in strong contrast to the subduction setting of central Italy, where plate convergence has slowed down to less than a few mm/a, the slab now tearing off leading hot asthenospheric mantle to flow in between the trailing slab and the crust. A successful recipe for ultrapotassic magmas requires K/Na fractionation at some previous stage. Melts from fluid-absent melting of carbonaceous pelites at >3 GPa are ultrapottasic phonolites (SiO2 ~64 wt%) and have K2O/Na2O up to 9 because of residual cpx with jadeite80. The effect of CO2 is to stabilize residual jadeite, to lower SiO2, and to increase K2O/Na2O ratios (as compared to CO2 free melts with K2O/Na2O of 1-3 and SiO2 = 73-77 wt%). The carbonaceous pelite melts were equilibrated with fertile, refractory but cpx bearing mantle, and wherlite. At sufficient pressures (3.5 GPa) and XCO2 in the volatile component, hybridization of the carbonaceous pelite melts produces highly subsilicic kamafugites, with K2O/Na2O only slightly lowered, and XMg's >0.70 as characteristic of primitive melts. The essential role of CO2 is to reduce the olivine saturation volume and to shift the olivine-cpx-opx cotectic to lower SiO2. The Italian kamafugites are ultracalcic (CaO/Al2O3 = 1.2-1.4), and although carbonaceous pelite melts have little CaO and 20 wt% Al2O3, the assimilation of cpx and production of aluminous opx leads to ultracalcic compositions when equilibrated with refractory peridotite or wherlite. Temperatures necessary for the fluid absent carbonaceous pelite melting are 1050-1150 °C, far above any reasonable subduction geotherm. Hybridization in the mantle requires 1320-1400 °C (at 3

  4. U-series isotope and geodynamic constraints on mantle melting processes beneath the Newer Volcanic Province in South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidjuk, Zoe; Turner, Simon; Sandiford, Mike; George, Rhiannon; Foden, John; Etheridge, Mike

    2007-09-01

    Young (< 5 kyr) olivine- and clinopyroxene-phyric ne-hawaiites from Mounts Gambier and Schank in the Newer Volcanic Province in South Australia have been analysed for major and trace elements as well as for Sr and Nd isotopes and 238U- 230Th disequilibria in order to constrain the mantle melting processes responsible for their origin. The rocks are relatively primitive (6.9-9.1% MgO), incompatible trace element-enriched alkali basalts with 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.70398-0.70415 and 143Nd/ 144Nd = 0.51280-0.51271. Trace element modelling suggests that they reflect 3-6% partial melting in the presence of 2-8% residual garnet. Trends towards low K/K * are accompanied by decreasing 87Sr/ 86Sr and provide evidence for the involvement of hydrous phases during melting. 230Th excesses of 12-57% cannot be simulated by batch melting of the lithosphere and instead require dynamic melting models. It is argued that the distinction between continental basalts bearing significant U-Th disequilibria and those in secular equilibrium reflects dynamic melting in upwelling asthenosphere, rather than static batch melting within the lithosphere or the presence or absence of residual garnet. Upwelling rates are estimated at ˜ 1.5 cm/yr. A subdued, localised topographic uplift associated with the magmatism suggests that any upwelling is more likely associated with a secondary mode localised to the upper mantle, rather than a broad zone of deeply-sourced (plume) upwelling. Upper mantle, 'edge-driven' convection is consistent with seismic tomographic and anisotropy studies that imply rapid differential motion of variable thickness Australian lithosphere and the underlying asthenosphere. In this scenario, melting is linked to a significant contribution from hydrous mantle that is envisaged as resulting either from convective entrainment of lithosphere along the trailing edge of a lithospheric keel, or inherited variability in the asthenosphere.

  5. Toward Obtaining the Experimental Constraints on the Role of Water on Melting Under the Lower Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amulele, G.; Lee, K. K.; Karato, S.

    2012-12-01

    Water and other volatile components (such as carbon dioxide) are known to have important influence on the melting behavior of silicates. The role of these components on the melting under the upper mantle conditions is now reasonably well understood. Recent experimental studies in our lab as well as some of the previous studies do show that water has an important influence on the melting relationship under the lower mantle conditions. The influence of water is not only to reduce the solidus but also to change the composition of the melt to (Mg,Fe)O rich. Quantifying these observations is essential in the understanding of chemical evolution of Earth and other planets. However, there are several challenges in performing these experimental studies. In this presentation, we discuss the issue of quantifying the water effects with special attention to the capability of preserving water content during the high pressure-temperature experiments. The issue of the preservation of water is important firstly because water could escape from a capsule during an experiment, and secondly because the melt is unquenchable in a commonly used processes under the lower mantle conditions. A commonly used practice is to identify the deficit of EPMA measurement from 100% to the water content, but there is no sound basis for this practice. In this presentation, we will show some preliminary results of our new approach to quantify the water content from the high-pressure run products containing melts.

  6. Trace element partitioning in Earth's lower mantle and implications for geochemical consequences of partial melting at the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Nobumichi; van Westrenen, Wim; Fei, Yingwei

    2004-08-01

    Trace element partitioning data between CaSiO 3-perovskite (CaPv), MgSiO 3-perovskite (MgPv), calcium-aluminum silicate (CAS-phase), and coexisting melts in peridotite and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) compositions were obtained at 25-27 GPa and 2400-2530 °C using multi-anvil apparatus and ion microprobe. Results clearly show that CaPv is the predominant host for large ion lithophile elements (LILE) in the lower mantle. Because of the overwhelmingly high CaPv/melt partition coefficients (>10 for many of the LILE), partial melting in the lower mantle causes strong enrichment of LILE in the CaPv-bearing solid phase residue. CaPv has the following partitioning characteristics: (1) uniformly high partition coefficients for heavy rare earth elements (HREE) (e.g. 15 for Yb), decreasing toward light REE (e.g. 7 for La), (2) systematically lower partition coefficients for high field strength elements (Nb, Zr, Ti) and Sr relative to neighboring REE, (3) high Th and U, and systematically low Pb partition coefficients. Previous high-pressure studies have shown that the stability field of CaPv above solidus temperature is much wider in basaltic composition than in peridotite, indicating that melting of subducted oceanic crust in the lower mantle could produce significant geochemical CaPv signatures. Strong enrichment in Th and U relative to Pb in CaPv would result in radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions of the CaPv-bearing solid residue. Some clinopyroxenes in plume mantle peridotite xenoliths possess trace element patterns closely resembling those of natural CaPv found in diamonds and CaPv from the present experiments, suggesting that they were inherited from the CaPv-bearing precursor. In contrast, CaPv is the first phase to disappear during partial melting of peridotite above 24 GPa, and its geochemical signature may not be observable in nature. (MgPv + CaPv) fractional crystallization from a magma ocean has previously been put forward as a mechanism for Si depletion of the

  7. Changing conditions of mantle wedge melting across arc as illustrated by changing iron isotopes compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foden, J. D.; Halverson, G. P.; Sossi, P.; Elburg, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Active volcanoes in the eastern Sunda Arc , Indonesia are distributed across a wide range of position above the active Benioff Zone. These include the near fore-arc tholeiite suite from Ija volcano on Flores Island which is about 100 Km above the slab. Then at successively greater depths are the archetypal calcalkaline suites of Rinjani and Batur volcanoes on Lombok and Bali and then the rear arc alkalic suites from Tambora, Sangeang Api and Batu Tara. The latter approaching 200km above the slab. The fore-arc volcano Ija is clearly influenced by hydrous fluid flux from the slab, having high Ba/Th and U/Nb ratios. The strongly undersaturated alkalic suites from Tambora and Batu Tara are highly enriched in LIL incompatible elements, but do not have sufficiently anomalously high 87Sr/86Sr or Pb isotopic ratios or low 143Nd/144Nd ratios to explain this anomaly as entirely due to significantly larger components of subducted sediment. This implies that these rear arc volcanoes are the product of smaller percentage melting of the supra-slab mantle wedge. This is also consistent with the determined lower water content of Tambora basalts compared with Ija fore-arc basalts. δ56Fe values were determined and show a systematic increase across the arc that is equivalent to that determined by other workers between some global MORB and OIB suites the bulk earth. This is like across arc variation described elsewhere (New Britain; Dauphas et al., 2009). It appears that this stable isotope fractionation results from the changed mode of melt percolation and extraction from the deeper, rear arc mantle wedge domains compared to the shallow fore-arc.

  8. Melt Inclusion Evidence for Subduction-modified Mantle Beneath the Woodlark Spreading Center, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, J.; Turner, A.; Collins, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Woodlark Spreading Center (WSC) to the east of Papua New Guinea separates the Indo-Australian plate and Solomon Sea microplate. At its eastern terminus, the WSC is being subducted at the New Britain trench, forming a triple junction near the New Georgia Group arc in the Solomon Islands. Previous studies have shown that lavas recovered from greater than 100 km from the trench on the WSC are N-MORB, but closer to the trench they have arc-like Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios, enrichments in LILE, and depletions in HFSE. In the complex triple junction area of the WSC on the Simbo and Ghizo Ridges, island arc tholeiites to medium-K calc-alkaline andesites and dacites have been recovered, many with trace element and isotopic characteristics that are similar to the true arc lavas in the New Georgia Group on the other side of the trench. We suggest that subduction-modified arc mantle migrates through slab windows created by the subduction of the WSC as the plates continue to diverge after subduction. This transfer of mantle across the plate boundary leads to variable mixing between arc and N-MORB end-members, forming the hybrid to arc-like lavas recovered on the WSC. To test this hypothesis and to characterize the end-member compositions, we have analyzed melt inclusions in olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase phenocrysts in Simbo and Ghizo Ridge lava samples. Major elements were analyzed using the electron microprobe facility at Fayetteville State University and volatiles were analyzed on the ion probe facility at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The melt inclusions show a wide diversity of magmas from basalts to dacites, and mixing modeling shows that most Woodlark Spreading Center lava compositions are explained by mixing between the most extreme mafic (MORB) and felsic (arc) inclusion compositions.

  9. A comparative study of melt-rock reactions in the mantle: laboratory dissolution experiments and geological field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursack, E.; Liang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Systematic variations in major and trace elements in dunite, harzburgite, and lherzolite samples within the mantle sections of ophiolites have been widely observed. Such compositional variations may be key attributes to understanding melting, melt transport, and melt-rock reaction processes in the mantle. In order to better understand melt-rock reactions in the mantle we conducted a series of dissolution experiments where a spinel lherzolite starting composition was juxtaposed against an alkali basalt in a graphite-lined molybdenum capsule. The charges were run at 1 GPa and 1300o C for 8-24 hrs, and then were slowly cooled to 1200o C and held at 1200o C and 1 GPa for 24 hours. This additional period of cooling promotes in situ crystallization of interstitial melts, allowing us to better characterize the mineral compositional trends produced and observed by melt-rock reactions. After the experimental runs, each charge was cut and polished such that the reactive boundary layer (RBL) and the melt were fully exposed for analysis. The lithological units of resulting RBL present depend on run duration. For a short duration run (8 hrs), we observed three distinct units: dunite, harzburgite, and lherzolite. For a long duration run (24 hrs) the reaction front reached the end of capsule and we observed only a dunite unit. In contrast to previous melt-rock reaction studies, dunite in the RBLs is cpx-bearing. The cpx observed in the dunites were produced by cooling rather than melt-rock reaction. The mineral components present in the RBL of the charges were analyzed for compositional variations and assessed for general melt-rock reaction trends. Starting at the melt-rock interface, we found that the Mg number systematically increases in the olivine of each charge to the end of the capsule. Similarly, TiO2 and Al2O3 both decrease in the cpx found in each charge, whereas TiO2 decreases and Cr number increases in the spinel. Independent field studies conducted on the Josephine

  10. Experimental petrology of peridotites, including effects of water and carbon on melting in the Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David H.

    2015-02-01

    For over 50 years, the use of high-pressure piston/cylinder apparatus combined with an increasing diversity of microbeam analytical techniques has enabled the study of mantle peridotite compositions and of magmas derived by melting in the upper mantle. The experimental studies have been guided by the petrology and geochemistry of peridotites from diverse settings and by the remarkable range of mantle-derived magma types. Recent experimental study using FTIR spectroscopy to monitor water content of minerals has shown that fertile lherzolite (MORB-source upper mantle) at ~1,000 °C can store ~200 ppm H2O in defect sites in nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxenes, garnet and spinel). Water in excess of 200 ppm stabilizes amphibole (pargasite) at P < 3 GPa up to the lherzolite solidus. However, at P > 3 GPa, water in excess of 200 ppm appears as an aqueous vapour phase and this depresses the temperature of the upper mantle solidus. Provided the uppermost mantle (lithosphere) has H2O < 4,000 ppm, the mantle solidus has a distinctive P, T shape. The temperature of the vapour- undersaturated or dehydration solidus is approximately constant at 1,100 °C at pressures up to ~3 GPa and then decreases sharply to ~1,010 °C. The strongly negative d T/d P of the vapour-undersaturated solidus of fertile lherzolite from 2.8 to 3 GPa provides the basis for understanding the lithosphere/asthenosphere boundary. Through upward migration of near-solidus hydrous silicate melt, the asthenosphere becomes geochemically zoned with the `enriched' intraplate basalt source (>500 ppm H2O) overlying the `depleted' MORB source (~200 ppm H2O). From the study of primitive MOR picrites, the modern mantle potential temperature for MORB petrogenesis is ~1,430 °C. The intersection of the 1,430 °C adiabat with the vapour-saturated lherzolite solidus at ~230 km suggests that upwelling beneath mid-ocean ridges begins around this depth. In intraplate volcanism, diapiric upwelling begins from

  11. Geographic Variations in Hotspot Geochemistry Caused by 3D Dynamics and Melting of a Heterogeneous Mantle Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, T. A.; Ito, G.; van Hunen, J.; Ballmer, M.; Mahoney, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Spatial variations in magma geochemistry among hotspot volcanoes hold clues to the dynamics and composition of the mantle feeding hotspot volcanism. We use a 3D geodynamic model of plume-lithosphere interaction to explore the causes of spatial patterns of magmatic volumes and compositions at intraplate hotspots. This study focuses on coupling between upper mantle flow, heat transfer, and melting of a heterogeneous (veined) plume. We assume multiple lithologies have different solidi, trace-element, and isotope composition. We use the Cartesian finite-element code, CITCOM, (Zhong and Watts, 2002) to simulate mantle convection with the extended Boussinesq approximation in a volume of upper mantle 400 km in thickness. A parameterized melting model is used to simulate melting of materials with different water contents (Katz et al., 2003). Melt depletion (F) for each lithology is calculated at finite element nodes as a function of temperature, pressure, and water content and is advected using particle tracers. We quantify the response of the geographic pattern of the volume and composition of magmas to different lithospheric thicknesses, and plume temperatures and viscosities, which together control the melting rates and sizes of the melting zones for the different lithologies. In the case of two-lithologies, preliminary results of a sluggishly convecting plume rising beneath thick lithosphere (60-100 km) predict that the melting zone of the least refractory "lithology 1" is wider than that of the more refractory "lithology 2". This leads to the prediction that on the surface, the isotope signature of lithology 1 is most prominent at the leading edge (i.e., upwind edge of plate motion) of the hotspot, whereas the isotope signature of lithology 2 is strongest at the hotspot center. This pattern will likely change for plumes convecting more vigorously or thinner lithosphere.

  12. Lithological, Chemical and Chronological Constraints on Melt Extraction from the Mantle Section of the ~492 Ma Shetland Ophiolite Complex, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, B.; Walker, R. J.; Clay, P. L.; Day, J. M.; Ash, R. D.; Daly, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The mantle sections of ophiolites offer a means of studying the composition and structure of the oceanic mantle. In particular, the relations between different lithologies can be established in the field, permitting an assessment of the relative timing of processes such as melt extraction and melt-rock reaction. The Shetland Ophiolite Complex (SOC) contains a well-preserved mantle section that is dominated by harzburgite (≥70 vol.%), with dominantly chondritic present-day 187Os/188Os compositions1. Melt extraction and melt-rock reaction is evident in the form of dunite and chromitite layers and lenses, with thicknesses ranging from millimetres-to-metres. These lithologies are characteristic of supra-subduction zone processing and are considered to relate to closure of the Iapetus Ocean at ~492 Ma1. However, evidence of much earlier melt extraction has been suggested for some SOC harzburgites, which have relatively unradiogenic 187Os/188Os compositions that yield TRD model ages as old as ~1.4 Ga1. In order to assess the scales at which such compositional heterogeneities are preserved in the mantle, a small (45 m2) area of the SOC mantle section was selected for detailed lithological mapping and sampling. A selection of harzburgites (n=8), dunites (n=6) and pyroxenites (n=2) from this area has been analysed for their Os isotope and highly-siderophile element (HSE) compositions. Six of the harzburgites and four of the dunites have relative HSE abundances and gOs values that are approximately chondritic, with gOs ranging only from -0.6 to +2.7 (n=10). Two dunites have more radiogenic gOs (up to +7.5), that is correlated with enhanced concentrations of accessory base-metal sulphides, suggesting formation via melt percolation and melt-rock reaction. The two remaining harzburgites have less radiogenic gOs (-3.5 and -4), yielding Mesoproterozoic TRD ages. The new data indicate that a comparable range of Os isotope compositions to that previously measured across the

  13. Tracing partial melting and subduction-related metasomatism in the Kamchatkan mantle wedge using noble gas compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Jens; Ionov, Dmitri A.

    2011-02-01

    We determined noble gas composition of minerals separated from mantle-derived xenoliths hosted by andesites in the active Avacha volcano, Kamchatka peninsula, Russia in order to better constrain the provenance and nature of fluids involved in partial melting and metasomatism in the mantle wedge. The lithospheric mantle beneath Avacha mainly consists of spinel harzburgites produced by high degrees of melt extraction. Data on coarse olivine separated from seven harzburgite xenoliths constrain fluid regime during flux melting in arc settings. Pyroxenes from two websterite veins cross-cutting the harzburgites characterize post-melting metasomatism by subduction-related melts or fluids. 3He/4He-ratios of 5.2 ± 0.6 to 8.1 ± 0.3 RA obtained on both olivines and pyroxenes overlap the highest values reported for volcanic rocks from Kamchatka and fall into the typical range of continental lithospheric mantle worldwide. This rules out significant contributions of slab-derived radiogenic 4He*. The highest 40Ar/36Ar ratios are 400; Ne and Xe isotope ratios are indistinguishable from those in the air. We consider the slab as the initial source of a major portion of these ‘atmospheric’ gases. Element composition of noble gases in olivine differs markedly from that in vein pyroxene indicating that the composition of the fluid phase involved in partial melting was distinct from that during metasomatism. In particular, the harzburgites and veins define distinct linear trends on plots of 3He/36Ar vs. 40Ar/36Ar and of 132Xe/36Ar vs. 40Ar/36Ar. Estimates of ‘mantle’ 132Xe/36Ar values by extrapolating 40Ar/36Ar to 40 000 yield unrealistically high values of 0.5-0.8 (olivine) and 4-5 (vein pyroxene) ruling out a simple two-component mixing of mantle and atmospheric noble gases. Rather a two-stage mixing process applies: (1) Changes in relative proportions of slab-derived element-fractionated atmospheric gases and ‘mantle’ produce two hybrid mixtures dominated by atmospheric

  14. Quantitative Model to Predict Melts on the Ol-Opx Saturation Boundary during Mantle Melting: The Role of H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. L.; Grove, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Two quantitative, empirical models are presented that predict mantle melt compositions in equilibrium with olivine (ol) + orthopyroxene (opx) ± spinel (sp) as a function of variable pressure and H2O content. The models consist of multiple linear regressions calibrated using new data from H2O-undersaturated primitive and depleted mantle lherzolite melting experiments as well as experimental literature data. The models investigate the roles of H2O, Pressure, 1-Mg# (1-[XMg/(XMg+XFe)]), NaK# ((Na2O+K2O)/(Na2O+K2O+CaO)), TiO2, and Cr2O3 on mantle melt compositions. Melts are represented by the pseudoternary endmembers Clinopyroxene (Cpx), Olivine (Ol), Plagioclase (Plag), and Quartz (Qz) of Tormey et al. (1987). Model A returns predictive equations for the four endmembers with identical predictor variables, whereas Model B chooses predictor variables for the four compositional endmember equations and temperature independently. We employ the use of Akaike Information Criteria (Akaike, 1974) to determine the best predictor variables from initial variables chosen through thermodynamic reasoning and by previous models. In both Models A and B, the coefficients for H2O show that increasing H2O drives the melt to more Qz normative space, as the Qz component increases by +0.012(3) per 1 wt.% H2O. The other endmember components decrease and are all three times less affected by H2O (Ol: -0.004(2); Cpx: -0.004(2); Plag: -0.004(3)). Consistent with previous models and experimental data, increasing pressure moves melt compositions to more Ol normative space at the expense of the Qz component. The models presented quantitatively determine the influence of H2O, Pressure, 1-Mg#, NaK#, TiO2, and Cr2O3 on mantle melts in equilibrium with ol+opx±sp; the equations presented can be used to predict melts of known mantle source compositions saturated in ol+opx±sp. References Tormey, Grove, & Bryan (1987), doi: 10.1007/BF00375227. Akaike (1974), doi: 10.1109/TAC.1974.1100705.

  15. Subduction zone Hf-anomalies: Mantle messenger, melting artefact or crustal process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhead, Jon; Hergt, Janet; Greig, Alan; Edwards, Louise

    2011-04-01

    The origin of Hf elemental depletions in subduction zone magmas is investigated using new major- and trace-element data for cumulate xenoliths from the Mariana arc, and deep sea sediments recovered by the DSDP and ODP drilling programmes. Results indicate that most of the rare earth element (REE) and Hf inventory in the xenoliths is contained within two minerals—clinopyroxene and titanomagnetite—and that removal of a typical gabbroic fractionating assemblage reduces the depletion in Hf relative to neighbouring REE on a mantle normalised trace element diagram (commonly denoted Hf/Hf*) in the evolving magmas. Confirmation of this observation is provided by a variety of literature data from different subduction zones in which bulk-rock samples also define a positive correlation between Hf/Hf* and the silica content of the magmas. In agreement with experimental studies on REE-HFSE partitioning, we observe that the ability of clinopyroxene to influence the Hf/Hf* of fractionating magmas is associated with its aluminium content. This decoupling of Hf from the REE in differentiating arc magmas suggests that bulk rock Hf/Hf* values, when used in isolation, are unlikely to provide a robust measure of source REE-Hf characteristics, even when suites are filtered to exclude all but the most mafic samples. It may be possible to normalise data to a constant degree of fractionation, and in this way distinguish subtle changes in source Hf/Hf* but most existing datasets are of neither the size nor quality to attempt such calculations. Modification of Hf/Hf* is also seen when modelling mantle melting processes and there are strong suggestions that source variations are influenced by not only subducted sediment, which exhibits a remarkably wide range in Hf/Hf*, but also subduction zone fluids. These observations remove some of the constraints imposed on recent models that attempt to reconcile Hf isotope data with Hf-REE abundance data in some arc suites. Although a case may be

  16. Melt/mantle interaction and melt evolution in the Sartohay high-Al chromite deposits of the Dalabute ophiolite (NW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.-F.; Robinson, P. T.; Malpas, J.; Aitchison, J.; Sun, M.; Bai, W.-J.; Hu, X.-F.; Yang, J.-S.

    2001-06-01

    The Sartohay block of the Dalabute ophiolite consists chiefly of mantle harzburgite and lherzolite with minor dunite. These rocks host voluminous chromite deposits with lenticular or vein-like shapes. The podiform chromitites are associated with, and cross-cut by, numerous troctolite dykes. Chromite in the chromitites has Al 2O 3 (23-31 wt%), TiO 2 (0.29-0.44 wt%), and Cr 2O 3 contents (<45 wt%) with Cr#s [100Cr/(Cr+Al)] (<60), typical of high-Al chromite deposits. The host peridotites in Sartohay have been texturally and geochemically modified by magmas from which the high-Al chromitites and mafic dykes formed. Dunites commonly envelop the podiform chromite bodies and show transitional contacts with the peridotites. Some of the peridotites and chromitites contain plagioclase that crystallized from impregnated melts. The dunite locally grades into troctolite with increasing plagioclase contents. As a result of melt impregnation, peridotites and dunites show variable Ca and Al contents and LREE enrichment. The parental magma of the chromitites was likely tholeiitic in composition, derived from partial melting of the asthenospheric mantle in a rising diapir. The interaction between this magma and pre-existing lithospheric mantle, composed of depleted lherzolite, would have formed a more silicic, tholeiitic magma from which high-Al chromitites crystallized. During this interaction, harzburgite and dunite were depleted in modal pyroxene and enriched in some incompatible elements (such as Al, Ca and LREE) due to melt impregnation.

  17. Mantle refertilization by melts of crustal-derived garnet pyroxenite: Evidence from the Ronda peridotite massif, southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Claudio; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bosch, Delphine; Bodinier, Jean-Louis; Gervilla, Fernando; Hidas, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical studies of primitive basalts have documented the presence of crustal-derived garnet pyroxenite in their mantle sources. The processes whereby melts with the signature of garnet pyroxenite are produced in the mantle are, however, poorly understood and somewhat controversial. Here we investigate a natural example of the interaction between melts of garnet pyroxenite derived from recycled plagioclase-rich crust and surrounding mantle in the Ronda peridotite massif. Melting of garnet pyroxenite at ˜1.5 GPa generated spinel websterite residues with MREE/HREE fractionation and preserved the positive Eu anomaly of their garnet pyroxenite precursor in whole-rock and clinopyroxene. Reaction of melts from garnet pyroxenite with depleted surrounding peridotite generated secondary fertile spinel lherzolite. These secondary lherzolites differ from common spinel lherzolite from Ronda and elsewhere by their lower-Mg# in clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and olivine, lower-Cr# in spinel and higher whole-rock Al2O3, CaO, Sm/Yb and FeO* at a given SiO2. Remarkably, secondary spinel lherzolite shows the geochemical signature of ghost plagioclase in the form of positive Eu and Sr anomalies in whole-rock and clinopyroxene, reflecting the transfer of a low-pressure crustal imprint from recycled pyroxenite to hybridized peridotite. Garnet pyroxenite melting and melt-peridotite interaction, as shown in the Ronda massif, may explain how the signature of subducted or delaminated crust is transferred to the mantle and how a garnet pyroxenite component is introduced into the source region of basalts. The efficiency of these processes in conveying the geochemical imprint of crustal-derived garnet pyroxenite to extruded lavas depends on the reactivity of pyroxenite melt with peridotite and the mantle permeability, which may be controlled by prior refertilization reactions similar to those documented in the Ronda massif. Highly fertile heterogeneities produced by pyroxenite

  18. Unraveling the geochemistry of melts in exhumed mantle domains in present-day and fossil magma-poor rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Méderic; Ulrich, Marc; Autin, Julia; Manatschal, Gianreto; Epin, Marie-Eva; Müntener, Othmar; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Sauter, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The role of magmatic processes occurring during the continental break-up and the onset of steady-state seafloor spreading are still a matter of debate. Beside the tectonic processes like stretching, thinning and exhumation, magmatic processes also play a key role in the evolution and breakup of magma-poor rifted margins. To unravel the impact of such processes, Ocean-Continent-Transitions (OCTs) are of particular interest. OCTs are complex areas where hyper-extended continental crust, exhumed mantle and proto-oceanic crust occur. All these domains have been identified and sampled in both present-day (Iberia/Newfoundland margins) and fossil margins (Platta/Err nappes). In this study, we present preliminary results that enable to characterize the nature of the mantle rocks and the melts found in the OCTs of these paleo- and present-day margins with the aim to investigate how the mantle evolves from initial exhumation to final lithospheric breaks. In OCTs two types of mantle rocks can be observed: (i) a « sub-continental type » free of syn-exhumation melt imprint preserving the early geochemical evolution, and (ii) a « refertilized type » characterized by melt infiltration and mantle-melt interaction. Melts from these domains have different major, trace element and isotopic compositions and can therefore be used to constrain how melt interacts with the mantle and to understand the role of magmatic processes in the break-up. We therefore summarized whole-rock, in-situ and isotopic analysis available in the literature from the Iberia/Newfoundland present-day margin system and completed the existing database with new additional data from the Iberia margin. These new data have been obtained using in-situ technics mainly on clinopyroxenites, serpentinized peridotites and gabbros of ODP drill cores. Around 200 new data have been acquired using the LA-ICPMS technic. Preliminary results show that clinopyroxenes in serpentinized peridodite breccia from ODP site 637A and

  19. Subduction of fracture zones controls mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs.

    PubMed

    Manea, Vlad C; Leeman, William P; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-01-01

    For some volcanic arcs, the geochemistry of volcanic rocks erupting above subducted oceanic fracture zones is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here we use enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas as a proxy to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent fracture zones in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones where fracture zone subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs. Geodynamic models of subduction have not previously considered how fracture zones may influence the melt and fluid distribution above slabs. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that enhanced production of slab-derived fluids and mantle wedge melts concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in significant along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes. PMID:25342158

  20. Subduction of fracture zones controls mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Vlad C.; Leeman, William P.; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-10-01

    For some volcanic arcs, the geochemistry of volcanic rocks erupting above subducted oceanic fracture zones is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here we use enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas as a proxy to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent fracture zones in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones where fracture zone subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs. Geodynamic models of subduction have not previously considered how fracture zones may influence the melt and fluid distribution above slabs. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that enhanced production of slab-derived fluids and mantle wedge melts concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in significant along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes.

  1. Tracking the Martian Mantle Signature in Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions of Basaltic Shergottites Yamato 980459 and Tissint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, T. J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Usui, T.; Moriwaki, R.; Economos, R.; Schmitt, A.; McKeegan, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Martian shergottite meteorites are basaltic to lherzolitic igneous rocks that represent a period of relatively young mantle melting and volcanism, approximately 600-150 Ma (e.g. [1,2]). Their isotopic and elemental composition has provided important constraints on the accretion, evolution, structure and bulk composition of Mars. Measurements of the radiogenic isotope and trace element concentrations of the shergottite meteorite suite have identified two end-members; (1) incompatible trace element enriched, with radiogenic Sr and negative epsilon Nd-143, and (2) incompatible traceelement depleted, with non-radiogenic Sr and positive epsilon 143-Nd(e.g. [3-5]). The depleted component represents the shergottite martian mantle. The identity of the enriched component is subject to debate, and has been proposed to be either assimilated ancient martian crust [3] or from enriched domains in the martian mantle that may represent a late-stage magma ocean crystallization residue [4,5]. Olivine-phyric shergottites typically have the highest Mg# of the shergottite group and represent near-primitive melts having experienced minimal fractional crystallization or crystal accumulation [6]. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) in these shergottites represent the most chemically primitive components available to understand the nature of their source(s), melting processes in the martian mantle, and origin of enriched components. We present trace element compositions of olivine hosted melt inclusions in two depleted olivinephyric shergottites, Yamato 980459 (Y98) and Tissint (Fig. 1), and the mesostasis glass of Y98, using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). We discuss our data in the context of understanding the nature and origin of the depleted martian mantle and the emergence of the enriched component.

  2. Application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo Method to Mantle Melting: An Example from REE Abundances in Abyssal Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, B.; Liang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation is a powerful statistical method in solving inverse problems that arise from a wide range of applications, such as nuclear physics, computational biology, financial engineering, among others. In Earth sciences applications of MCMC are primarily in the field of geophysics [1]. The purpose of this study is to introduce MCMC to geochemical inverse problems related to trace element fractionation during concurrent melting, melt transport and melt-rock reaction in the mantle. MCMC method has several advantages over linearized least squares methods in inverting trace element patterns in basalts and mantle rocks. First, MCMC can handle equations that have no explicit analytical solutions which are required by linearized least squares methods for gradient calculation. Second, MCMC converges to global minimum while linearized least squares methods may be stuck at a local minimum or converge slowly due to nonlinearity. Furthermore, MCMC can provide insight into uncertainties of model parameters with non-normal trade-off. We use MCMC to invert for extent of melting, amount of trapped melt, and extent of chemical disequilibrium between the melt and residual solid from REE data in abyssal peridotites from Central Indian Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In the first step, we conduct forward calculation of REE evolution with melting models in a reasonable model space. We then build up a chain of melting models according to Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to represent the probability of specific model. We show that chemical disequilibrium is likely to play an important role in fractionating LREE in residual peridotites. In the future, MCMC will be applied to more realistic but also more complicated melting models in which partition coefficients, diffusion coefficients, as well as melting and melt suction rates vary as functions of temperature, pressure and mineral compositions. [1]. Sambridge & Mosegarrd [2002] Rev. Geophys.

  3. A Mantle Genesis for Andesitic Melts of the Shisheisky Complex, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinsk, G.; Bryant, J.; Churikova, T.

    2008-12-01

    Primitive andesites from the Shisheisky Complex, a field of Quaternary-age, monogenetic cones located in the Aleutian-Kamchatka junction, north of Shiveluch Volcano (Portnyagin et al., 2007 Geoph. Monograph 172), are similar to primitive andesites from Mt. Shasta, Piip Volcano, and Setouchi, Japan. They have Mg numbers of 0.66-0.73 at intermediate SiO2 (54-58 wt%), low CaO/Al2O3 (<0.54), and high Ni (184-243 ppm) and Cr (418-880 ppm). Olivine phenocryst core compositions of Fo90 appear to be in equilibrium with whole-rock "melts", consistent with the aphyric to sparsely phyric nature of the lavas. Compared to the Shisheisky andesites, primitive basalts from the region (Alaid, Tolbachik, Kharchinsky) have higher CaO/Al2O3 (0.69-0.86) and lower whole-rock Ni/MgO (10-17) at similar Mg numbers (0.66-.70). Olivine phenocrysts in the basalts have high CaO, low Ni, and low Ni/MgO at Fo88 compared to the andesites. The absence of plagioclase phenocrysts from the primitive andesites strongly contrasts petrographic observations of the plagioclase-phyric basalts, indicating relatively high pre-eruptive water contents for the andesites compared to the basalts. Estimated temperature and water contents range from 984° - 1143° C and 4-7 wt% H2O for andesites and 1149° -1227° C and 2 wt% H2O for basalts. Petrographic and mineral composition data suggest that the primitive andesites were liquids in equilibrium with mantle peridotite, and were not produced by mixing between basalts and rhyolites, contamination of xenocrystic olivine, or crystal fractionation of basalt. Instead, the key features of the Shisheisky primitive andesites appear to have been acquired by interactions between eclogite melts of the torn Pacific plate edge and mantle peridotite. Mixing between these reacted melts and primitive basalts at sub-moho depths produces the range of compositions observed in the Shisheisky lavas.

  4. Partitioning of Ni between olivine and siliceous eclogite partial melt: experimental constraints on the mantle source of Hawaiian basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengrong; Gaetani, Glenn A.

    2008-05-01

    Olivine is abundant in Earth’s upper mantle and ubiquitous in basaltic lavas, but rarely occurs in eclogite. Partial melts of eclogite are, therefore, not in equilibrium with olivine, and will react with peridotite as they migrate through the upper mantle. If such melts erupt at Earth’s surface, their compositions will be highly modified and they may be olivine-saturated. We investigated experimentally the reaction between olivine and siliceous eclogite partial melt, and determined element partitioning between olivine and the melt produced by this reaction. Our results demonstrate that mixing of reacted eclogite partial melt with primitive basalt is capable of producing the positive correlation between melt SiO2 content and olivine Ni content observed in some Hawaiian lavas. Experiments were carried out by equilibrating eclogite partial melt or basalt with San Carlos olivine at 1 bar and 1,201 1,350°C. Our results show that eclogite partial melts equilibrated with mantle olivine retain their high SiO2, low FeO and MgO characteristics. Further, olivine-melt partition coefficients for Ni measured in these experiments are significantly larger than for basalt. Mixing of these melts with primitive Hawaiian tholeiitic lavas results in crystallization of high-Ni olivines similar to those in Makapuu-stage Koolau lavas, even though the mixed magmas have only moderate Ni contents. This results from a hyperbolic increase of the Ni partition coefficient with increasing polymerization of the mixed melt. Note that while eclogite partial melt in contact with peridotite will equilibrate with pyroxene as well as olivine, this will have the effect of buffering the activity of SiO2 in the reacted melt at a higher level. Therefore, an eclogite partial melt equilibrated with harzburgite will have higher SiO2 than one equilibrated with dunite, enhancing the effects observed in our experiments. Our results demonstrate that an olivine-free “hybrid” pyroxenite source is not

  5. Experimental phase and melting relations of metapelite in the upper mantle: implications for the petrogenesis of intraplate magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandler, Carl; Yaxley, Greg; Green, David H.; Scott, Dean

    2010-10-01

    We performed a series of piston-cylinder experiments on a synthetic pelite starting material over a pressure and temperature range of 3.0-5.0 GPa and 1,100-1,600°C, respectively, to examine the melting behaviour and phase relations of sedimentary rocks at upper mantle conditions. The anhydrous pelite solidus is between 1,150 and 1,200°C at 3.0 GPa and close to 1,250°C at 5.0 GPa, whereas the liquidus is likely to be at 1,600°C or higher at all investigated pressures, giving a large melting interval of over 400°C. The subsolidus paragenesis consists of quartz/coesite, feldspar, garnet, kyanite, rutile, ±clinopyroxene ±apatite. Feldspar, rutile and apatite are rapidly melted out above the solidus, whereas garnet and kyanite are stable to high melt fractions (>70%). Clinopyroxene stability increases with increasing pressure, and quartz/coesite is the sole liquidus phase at all pressures. Feldspars are relatively Na-rich [K/(K + Na) = 0.4-0.5] at 3.0 GPa, but are nearly pure K-feldspar at 5.0 GPa. Clinopyroxenes are jadeite and Ca-eskolaite rich, with jadeite contents increasing with pressure. All supersolidus experiments produced alkaline dacitic melts with relatively constant SiO2 and Al2O3 contents. At 3.0 GPa, initial melting is controlled almost exclusively by feldspar and quartz, giving melts with K2O/Na2O ~1. At 4.0 and 5.0 GPa, low-fraction melting is controlled by jadeite-rich clinopyroxene and K-rich feldspar, which leads to compatible behaviour of Na and melts with K2O/Na2O ≫ 1. Our results indicate that sedimentary protoliths entrained in upwelling heterogeneous mantle domains may undergo melting at greater depths than mafic lithologies to produce ultrapotassic dacitic melts. Such melts are expected to react with and metasomatise the surrounding peridotite, which may subsequently undergo melting at shallower levels to produce compositionally distinct magma types. This scenario may account for many of the distinctive geochemical characteristics of

  6. The Effect of Large Melt Fraction on the Deformation Behavior of Peridotite: Implications for the Rheology of Io' Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, T.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    One key constraint needed for refinement of the interior geochemical and geodynamic models of Io is the viscosity of the convecting partially- molten silicate mantle. To date, laboratory studies of partially molten mantle rocks have reached melt fractions up to approx.0.12, a value much smaller than thought to be appropriate for the asthenosphere of Io where the degree of partial melting may be 0.15 0.40 or higher. Therefore, we have performed a series of high temperature, triaxial compressive creep experiments on dry synthetic peridotites in a gas medium apparatus at a confining pressure of 300 MPa and temperatures from 1473 to 1573 K in order to understand the influence of large amounts of melt (0.15 < phi < 0.40) on the rheological behavior of partially molten rocks.

  7. Kinetics of Peridotite and Pyroxenite-derived Melts Interaction: Implications for the Style and Extent of Melt-rock Reaction in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Cascio, M.; Liang, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Distinct geochemical and petrologic features of ocean floor basalts and mantle peridotites suggest that the upper mantle is lithologically heterogeneous, consisting predominantly of peridotite and a small amount of eclogite [1]. An important issue of this marble cake mantle, is the nature of the peridotite and pyroxenite interface during mantle melting. It has been suggested that during mantle melting eclogite and peridotite develop a reactive boundary layer composed of a second generation eclogite and a layer of orthopyroxenite [2]. The existence of such a boundary layer has also been used to explain the observation that oceanic basalts are extracted with only limited interaction with the surrounding peridotite [3]. In spite of recent progresses, the kinetics of peridotite and pyroxenite-derived melts reaction is still not well understood. It is likely that there are two regimes of peridotite-pyroxenite melt interaction: a high T/low P regime where both the peridotite and pyroxenite are partially molten; and a low T/high P regime where only pyroxenite is partially molten. In this study we explored the kinetics of such interactions in both regimes by conducting lherzolite dissolution experiments using a pyroxenite-derived melt at 1300°C and 1-2 GPa. Dissolution couples were formed by juxtaposing pre-synthesized rods of a basaltic andesite (54.6% SiO2, Mg# 0.42), whose composition is similar to pyroxenite derived liquid at 1300°C and 2 GPa [1,4], and a lherzolite (ol+opx+cpx) in a Pt and graphite lined Mo capsule. The lherzolite solidus is below 1300°C at 1 GPa [5], but above 1300°C at 2 GPa. Lherzolite hardly dissolves (~35 μm in 6 hours) into the melt at 2 GPa and a thin opx layer (<10 μm thick) decorated with a few garnet crystals is observed at the lherzolite-melt interface. From the concentration profiles of Al2O3 and MgO in the melt, we estimated the effective binary diffusion coefficient at 10^{-12}m2/s. Assuming an average mantle upwelling rate of ~50

  8. Lithosphere and Asthenosphere Properties beneath Oceans and Continents and their Relationship with Domains of Partial Melt Stability in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.

    2014-12-01

    The depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) and the change in properties across the lithosphere, asthenosphere, and LAB in various tectonic settings are captured in a variety of geophysical data, including seismic velocities and electrical conductivity. A sharp drop in shear wave velocity and increase in electrical conductivity can potentially be caused by the appearance of partial melt at or below the LAB but the chemical and dynamic stability of partial melt across lithosphere and at LAB remain debated. Here I apply the recent models of mantle melting in the presence of water and carbon [1, 2] to evaluate the domains of stability of partial melt both beneath continents and oceans. The model allows prediction of the possible presence, the fraction, and composition of partial melt as a function of depth, bulk C and H2O content, and fO2 [3] in various geologic/tectonic settings. The results show that while a hydrous, carbonated melt is stable only beneath LAB and in the asthenospheric mantle beneath oceans, continental mantle can contain a carbonate-rich melt within the lithosphere. For geotherms corresponding to surface heat flux (SHF) of 40-50 mW m-2, which also match P-T estimates beneath cratons based on thermo-barometry of peridotite xenoliths [4], the solidus of fertile peridotite with trace amount of CO2 and H2O is crossed at depths as shallow as 80-120 km [5]. If elevated geotherms of the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains are applied, carbonatitic melt becomes stable somewhat shallower. These depths are similar to those argued for a mid-lithospheric discontinuity (MLD) where a negative velocity gradient has been detected much shallower than the proposed depth of LAB in many places. With a drop in oxygen fugacity with depth, a freezing of carbonatitic melt may be expected at intermediate depths (~150-200 km). At 200-250 km a hydrous, carbonated silicate melt may reappear owing to the interplay of fO2 and freezing point depression effect of CO

  9. Probing the atomic structure of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1): Insights from high-resolution solid-state NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Probing the structural disorder in multi-component silicate glasses and melts with varying composition is essential to reveal the change of macroscopic properties in natural silicate melts. While a number of NMR studies for the structure of multi-component silicate glasses and melts including basaltic and andesitic glasses have been reported (e.g., Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2012, 80, 125; Park and Lee, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2014, 26, 42), many challenges still remain. The composition of multi-component basaltic melts vary with temperature, pressure, and melt fraction (Kushiro, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci., 2001, 71, 107). Especially, the eutectic point (the composition of first melt) of nepheline-forsterite-quartz (the simplest model of basaltic melts) moves with pressure from silica-saturated to highly undersaturated and alkaline melts. The composition of basaltic melts generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1, the xenolith from Kilbourne Hole) also vary with pressure. In this study we report experimental results for the effects of composition on the atomic structure of Na2O-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NMAS) glasses in nepheline (NaAlSiO4)-forsterite (Mg2SiO4)-quartz (SiO2) eutectic composition and basaltic glasses generated by partial melting of upper mantle peridotite (KLB-1) using high-resolution multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The Al-27 3QMAS (triple quantum magic angle spinning) NMR spectra of NMAS glasses in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition show only [4]Al. The Al-27 3QMAS NMR spectra of KLB-1 basaltic glasses show mostly [4]Al and a non-negligible fraction of [5]Al. The fraction of [5]Al, the degree of configurational disorder, increases from 0 at XMgO [MgO/(MgO+Al2O3)]=0.55 to ~3% at XMgO=0.79 in KLB-1 basaltic glasses while only [4]Al are observed in nepheline-forsterite-quartz eutectic composition. The current experimental results provide that the fraction of [5]Al abruptly increases by the effect of

  10. Enriched continental flood basalts from depleted mantle melts: modeling the lithospheric contamination of Karoo lavas from Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Jussi S.; Luttinen, Arto V.; Bohrson, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    Continental flood basalts (CFBs) represent large-scale melting events in the Earth's upper mantle and show considerable geochemical heterogeneity that is typically linked to substantial contribution from underlying continental lithosphere. Large-scale partial melting of the cold subcontinental lithospheric mantle and the large amounts of crustal contamination suggested by traditional binary mixing or assimilation-fractional crystallization models are difficult to reconcile with the thermal and compositional characteristics of continental lithosphere, however. The well-exposed CFBs of Vestfjella, western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, belong to the Jurassic Karoo large igneous province and provide a prime locality to quantify mass contributions of lithospheric and sublithospheric sources for two reasons: (1) recently discovered CFB dikes show isotopic characteristics akin to mid-ocean ridge basalts, and thus help to constrain asthenospheric parental melt compositions and (2) the well-exposed basaltic lavas have been divided into four different geochemical magma types that exhibit considerable trace element and radiogenic isotope heterogeneity (e.g., initial ɛ Nd from -16 to +2 at 180 Ma). We simulate the geochemical evolution of Vestfjella CFBs using (1) energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallization equations that account for heating and partial melting of crustal wall rock and (2) assimilation-fractional crystallization equations for lithospheric mantle contamination by using highly alkaline continental volcanic rocks (i.e., partial melts of mantle lithosphere) as contaminants. Calculations indicate that the different magma types can be produced by just minor (1-15 wt%) contamination of asthenospheric parental magmas by melts from variable lithospheric reservoirs. Our models imply that the role of continental lithosphere as a CFB source component or contaminant may have been overestimated in many cases. Thus, CFBs may represent major juvenile crustal

  11. Atomistic Origins of Densification in Oxide Melts in Earth's Mantle: Insights from Synchrotron X-ray Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Mao, H.; Eng, P.; Shu, J.; Lin, J.

    2008-12-01

    Whereas the structure of oxide melts at high pressure is essential for understanding chemical evolution of the Earth system in the magma ocean in the mantle, little is known about their liquid structures and the densification mechanism due to the inherent structural disorder and the lack of suitable experimental probes at high pressures. We have recently shown that x-ray Raman scattering combined with diamond anvil cell technique, can yield a new opportunity to study the bonding changes in amorphous systems at high pressure (e.g. Lee SK et al.. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2007, 98, 105502; Lee SK et al. Proc. Nat. Aca. Sci. 2008, 105, 7925). Here, we explore the pressure-induced structural changes in model oxide melt phases in mantle, such as borates, germanates, Na- and Mg- silicates up to 50 GPa using x-ray Raman scattering. The O-Kedge spectra for model oxide melts elucidate the marked difference in densification behavior with varying composition but all the oxide glasses studied here presents the first experimental evidence for the formation of the triply coordinate oxygen above 20 GPa. The increase in the fraction of the triply coordinated oxygen results in a reduced free volume needed to host elements that are more incompatible, leading to an increase in the crystal-melt partitioning coefficient of elements, such as radioactive nuclides thereby significantly affecting the process of the chemical differentiation in the Hadean magma oceans. Its formation can be an efficient densification mechanism in the oxide melt in Earth's mantle and explain the atomistic origin of the high-density Mg-silicate melts at the core-mantle boundary.

  12. Melting of carbonated pelites at 8-13 GPa: generating K-rich carbonatites for mantle metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Daniele; Schmidt, Max W.

    2011-07-01

    The melting behaviour of three carbonated pelites containing 0-1 wt% water was studied at 8 and 13 GPa, 900-1,850°C to define conditions of melting, melt compositions and melting reactions. At 8 GPa, the fluid-absent and dry carbonated pelite solidi locate at 950 and 1,075°C, respectively; >100°C lower than in carbonated basalts and 150-300°C lower than the mantle adiabat. From 8 to 13 GPa, the fluid-present and dry solidi temperatures then increase to 1,150 and 1,325°C for the 1.1 wt% H2O and the dry composition, respectively. The melting behaviour in the 1.1 wt% H2O composition changes from fluid-absent at 8 GPa to fluid-present at 13 GPa with the pressure breakdown of phengite and the absence of other hydrous minerals. Melting reactions are controlled by carbonates, and the potassium and hydrous phases present in the subsolidus. The first melts, which composition has been determined by reverse sandwich experiments, are potassium-rich Ca-Fe-Mg-carbonatites, with extreme K2O/Na2O wt ratios of up to 42 at 8 GPa. Na is compatible in clinopyroxene with D_{{Na}}^{{{{cpx}}/{{carbonatite}}}} = 10{-}18 at the solidus at 8 GPa. The melt K2O/Na2O slightly decreases with increasing temperature and degree of melting but strongly decreases from 8 to 13 GPa when K-hollandite extends its stability field to 200°C above the solidus. The compositional array of the sediment-derived carbonatites is congruent with alkali- and CO2-rich melt or fluid inclusions found in diamonds. The fluid-absent melting of carbonated pelites at 8 GPa contrasts that at ≤5 GPa where silicate melts form at lower temperatures than carbonatites. Comparison of our melting temperatures with typical subduction and mantle geotherms shows that melting of carbonated pelites to 400-km depth is only feasible for extremely hot subduction. Nevertheless, melting may occur when subduction slows down or stops and thermal relaxation sets in. Our experiments show that CO2-metasomatism originating from subducted

  13. Geochronology and geochemistry of Eocene-aged volcanic rocks around the Bafra (Samsun, N Turkey) area: Constraints for the interaction of lithospheric mantle and crustal melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temizel, İrfan; Arslan, Mehmet; Yücel, Cem; Abdioğlu, Emel; Ruffet, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    modelling suggests that the parental magma(s) of the volcanic rocks represent mixtures of melts derived by low-degree (~ 5-10%) partial melting of spinel-lherzolite (40-85%) and garnet-lherzolite (15-60%) mantle sources. Sr-Nd isotopic modelling also suggests that a 25-35% lower crustal component was added in the parental magmas; AFC modelling additionally indicates minor upper crustal contamination during the evolution of the volcanic rocks. In conclusion, integration of the geochemical, petrologic, and isotopic data with regional geology suggests that the analcime-bearing and -free volcanic rocks evolved from parental magma(s) derived from melts of a subcontinental lithospheric mantle and lower crustal sources.

  14. Kawai-type apparatus equipped with sintered diamond and its application to melting of mantle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Kubo, A.; Katsura, T.; Walter, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    Kawai-type (the 6-8 type) of multi-anvil apparatus has been widely used in the mineral physics because of its versatile abilities such as large volume and pressure environment of high hydrostacity. However, it has been realized for last two decades that the maximum attainable pressure is limited to ca. 27 GPa when using tungsten carbide (WC) as anvil material. We have tried to extend capability of Kawai-type apparatus by adopting sintered diamond (SD) cubes of 14 mm edge length with 1.5 or 2.0 mm truncations together with an octahedral magnesia pressure medium. Recently generated pressures of 54 GPa and 40 GPa were confirmed for 1.5 and 2.0 mm truncations, respectively, at room temperature based on the MgO pressure scale. Following above technical innovation, we have carried out melting experiments on peridotite and CI model mantle material up to 35 GPa to examine the hypothesis for crystal fractionation in deep magma ocean in early stage of the Earth's history. Powdered starting material was put directly into a small cylindrical Re heater, which was set in the octahedron with a LaCrO3 sleeve. The sample was heated to ca. 2500° C for 2-3 min at the prescribed load. The quenched products were made to polished sections, which were examined by electron microscopy and then analyzed by the electron probe micro analyzer. In peridotite, ferropericlase (Fp) is the liquidus phase up to about 30 GPa. Both Fp and Mg-perovskite (Mg-Pv), however, coexist on the liquidus at 31 GPa, indicating multiple saturation of these phases. At higher than 32 GPa the front of Fp grains moves back from the liquidus to the slightly lower temperature region and Mg-Pv becomes the liquidus phase. Ca-perovskite (Ca-Pv) crystallizes at a fairly lower temperature than Fp and Mg-Pv at pressures up to ca. 29 GPa. However the crystallization temperatures of Fp and Ca-Pv become closer with increasing pressure, and the former might be only a few degrees higher than the latter at 33 GPa. In CI mantle, on

  15. Melting in the FeOsbnd SiO2 system to deep lower-mantle pressures: Implications for subducted Banded Iron Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Chie; Hirose, Kei; Nomura, Ryuichi; Ballmer, Maxim D.; Miyake, Akira; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-04-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs), consisting of layers of iron oxide and silica, are far denser than normal mantle material and should have been subducted and sunk into the deep lower mantle. We performed melting experiments on Fe2SiO4 from 26 to 131 GPa in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). The textural and chemical characterization of a sample recovered from the DAC revealed that SiO2 is the liquidus phase for the whole pressure range examined in this study. The chemical compositions of partial melts are very rich in FeO, indicating that the eutectic melt compositions in the FeOsbnd SiO2 binary system are very close to the FeO end-member. The eutectic temperature is estimated to be 3540 ± 150 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), which is likely to be lower than the temperature at the top of the core at least in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic eons, suggesting that subducted BIFs underwent partial melting in a thermal boundary layer above the CMB. The FeO-rich melts formed by partial melting of the BIFs were exceedingly dense and therefore migrated downward. We infer that such partial melts have caused iron enrichment in the bottom part of the mantle, which may have contributed to the formation of ultralow velocity zones (ULVZs) observed today. On the other hand, solid residues left after the segregation of the FeO-rich partial melts have been almost pure SiO2, and therefore buoyant in the deep lower mantle to be entrained in mantle upwellings. They have likely been stretched and folded repeatedly by mantle flow, forming SiO2 streaks within the mantle "marble cake". Mantle packages enhanced by SiO2 streaks may be the origin of seismic scatterers in the mid-lower mantle.

  16. The uppermost mantle beneath the Kenya dome and relation to melting, rifting and uplift in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul M.; Slack, Philip D.

    2002-04-01

    We compare new results on S-wave delays and P wave tomography to characterize the rising limb and melt zone of an inferred mantle convection cell beneath the Kenya dome. These results are extended to the Nyiragongo and Ethiopia domes using long wavelength gravity and topography. We suggest that the east African rift results from separation of deeper mantle upwelling into three currents that impinge on and erode the base of the lithosphere. Their thermal buoyancy drives the domal uplift, whereas brittle failure of the upper lithosphere forms the rift grabens.

  17. Superplasticity in hydrous melt-bearing dunite: Implications for shear localization in Earth’s upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchi, Tomohiro; Nishihara, Yu; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Spengler, Dirk; Shiraishi, Rei; Suzuki, Akio; Kikegawa, Takumi; Ohtani, Eiji

    2012-06-01

    Deformation experiments on hydrous melt-bearing dunite (olivine+4 vol% orthopyroxene+4 vol% clinopyroxene with less than 2.5 vol% of the melt phase) were conducted at pressures of 1.3-5.7 GPa and temperatures of 1270-1490 K in order to explore the effect of intergranular fluids on the plastic flow of olivine in Earth's upper mantle. The strain rate was proportional to steady-state creep strength to the 2.1 power, and the creep strength markedly increased with increase in grain size. Developments of the crystallographic preferred orientation of olivine and flattening of olivine grains were hardly observed even after 33-55% shortening of the samples. These observations show that grain boundary sliding (GBS) dominated the deformation of olivine (i.e., superplasticity). The creep strength of hydrous melt-bearing dunite was 2-5 times lower than that of melt-free dunite. The dependence of creep rate on melt fraction is known to be expressed empirically as ɛ˙(ϕ)=ɛ˙(0)exp(αϕ), where α is a constant and ϕ is the melt fraction. The experimentally obtained value of α was in the range of 150-230, corresponding to 5-7 times the reported values for the olivine-basalt system at 0.3 GPa (i.e., creep strength of dunite was efficiently reduced by the hydrous melt). Superplasticity is the dominant creep mechanism of olivine in fluid-bearing fine-grained peridotites under low-temperature and high-stress conditions (i.e., peridotite shear zones in the upper mantle). Superplasticity induced by geological fluids would play an important role in the shear localization (and thus initiation of subduction) in the upper mantle.

  18. Melting of phase D in the lower mantle and implications for recycling and storage of H2O in the deep mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sujoy; Schmidt, Max W.

    2014-11-01

    We determined the melting phase relations and conditions of the dense hydrous magnesium silicate phase D (nominally MgSi2O4(OH)2) on composition in MgO-SiO2-H2O (MSH), MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O (MASH), and FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O (FMASH), and on a mixture of phase D + olivine + enstatite (MSH) at 22-32 GPa and 1000-1800 °C. Contrasting to previous studies, we performed H2O-undersaturated experiments. Bulk compositions were synthetic mixtures of brucite + silica or brucite + olivine + enstatite on the silica-rich side of the tie-line perovskite-H2O. At 22-24 GPa, the maximum thermal stability of phase D is between 1350 and 1400 °C in MSH and FMASH, but 1600 °C at 24 GPa in the Fe-free, Al-bearing bulk composition (MASH). Apparently, addition of Al2O3 increases the stability field of phase D by 200 °C, an effect that is counter balanced by addition of FeO. At 32 GPa, the stability of phase D (MSH and FMASH) is between 1350 and 1400 °C. At 22 GPa, phase D melts to a Mg-rich melt coexisting with MgSi-ilmenite + stishovite, whereas at 24-32 GPa melt coexists with perovskite and stishovite. Even melts from bulk compositions in the silica-rich part of the MSH system (molar bulk Mg/Si < 0.5) are magnesian-rich (Mg/Si molar ratio of 2-5) and are distinct from aqueous fluids and hydrous melts at lower pressures. The temperature stabilities determined in this study indicate that slabs that thermally relax when stagnating on top of the 660-km discontinuity or penetrating into the lower mantle will have their last dense hydrous magnesium silicate phase, i.e., phase D, melting and producing a magnesian and hydrous melt that will rise through the transition zone. Such a melt could be responsible for observed low velocity zones, and may be neutrally buoyant at the 410-km discontinuity and will affect the structure and dynamics of the mantle.

  19. Electrical Conductivity of H2O-CO2 rich-Melt at mantle conditions: interpretation of the LAB using petrology-based 1D conductivity profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifre, D.; Gaillard, F.; Hashim, L.; Massuyeau, M.; Gardés, E.; Hier-Majumder, S.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic data images mantle regions more conductive than that of dry olivine. There is no doubt that melt is thermodynamically stable and present in the LAB, but how they can impact on mantle electrical conductivity remains debated. In addition, gravitational segregation and fast melt upwelling, being expected if melt fraction exceeds 2 vol. %, is thought to seriously restrict the role of partial melting at the level of the LAB. Petrological studies realized some 30 years ago have shown that peridotites exposed at the P-T-fO2 conditions of the LAB produced H2O and CO2 rich-melts. The segregation of such melts is not expected since they constitute only about 0.5 vol. % of the peridotite, but electrical conductivities of these melts are poorly known. Therefore, electrical conductivity experiments have been performed in piston cylinder on H2O-CO2 rich melts. Different melt compositions have been explored, from carbonated melts to basalts. The effects of chemical compositions and volatiles on these melts have been determined. The electrical conductivity measurements have shown that hydrous carbonated melts are very conductive, and the incorporation of basalt decreases the conductivity. With these new data, a semi-empirical law predicting the conductivity as a function of H2O and CO2 contents has been produced. Based on this law and the electrical conductivity of olivine, 1D conductivity profiles were constructed. With these profiles, the effect of volatiles content (partitioned between the melt and in the solids), melt fractions (mixing law and interconnection of the melt) and different temperature regimes on conductivity are discussed. These calculations are conducted on oceanic and continental settings with different ages. The electrical conductivities of the mantle is thus a powerful tool to track the fundamental process of mantle incipient melting, which is in turn narrowly associated to the cycling of H2O and CO2 in the upper mantle.

  20. Prolonged Mantle Melting Revealed in the Curaçao Lava Formation: Implications for the Origin of the Caribbean Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawl, K.; Duncan, R. A.; Kent, A. J.; Loewen, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Curaçao Lava Formation (CLF), a ~5 km thick section of submarine-erupted lava flows, hyaloclastites, dikes and sills, provides a ~30 Ma record of the magmatic processes involved in the formation of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). The CLF presents ol-tholeiitic and picritic compositions, exposed along the southern transform margin of the CLIP, that are typical of other in situ and tectonized pieces of this ocean plateau. The wide range of recently acquired 40Ar-39Ar ages (62 to 93 Ma) obtained for the Curaçao lavas contradicts previous proposals that the CLF formed over a relatively short period (1-2 million years), but is similar to extended volcanic histories recorded in Haiti (Dumisseau Fm) and at the Beata Ridge. Petrochemical modeling using MELTS indicates that the CLF rock compositions could have formed by fractional crystallization of high-MgO parental magmas with broadly similar major element contents, generated during multiple melting events over this prolonged period. The persistently flat rare earth element patterns in rocks spanning the full age range of the CLF can be reproduced by 10-30% partial melting of a predominantly depleted mantle source with a minor enriched component. The geochemical and age data and modeling results are consistent with a mantle dynamic model for the CLIP in which lateral displacement of mantle plume head material beneath the Caribbean plateau results from subduction-driven mantle flow, which allows for the generation of magmas from a continuously replenished mantle source over approximately 30 million years. While no subduction influence is seen in CLF compositions, the island does record intrusive, arc-related rocks.

  1. The Fate of Wet Mantle Melts: Fractionation Crystallization Processes Preserved in Magmatic Inclusions, Mt. Shasta CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, M. J.; Grove, T. L.; Medard, E.; Barr, J. A.; Till, C. B.; Behrens, H.

    2006-12-01

    Experiments have been carried out on primitive magnesian andesite (PMA) and basaltic andesite (BA) lavas erupted at flank vents of Mt Shasta in order to characterize crustal-level fractionation processes. Experiments have been conducted between 0.1 and 800 MPa at H2O-saturated conditions at fO2 from NNO to NNO+3 extending the phase relations of Grove et al. (2003, CMP: 145, 515) and quantify the formation conditions of amphibole in the magmas. A unique suite of quenched magmatic inclusions preserve petrologic and melt compositional evidence of these fractionation processes. These quenched mafic magmatic inclusions have been erupted in several andesite and dacite flows on the Mt. Shasta edifice. These enclaves represent intermediate magmatic compositions formed during the fractionation, mixing, and ascent of primitive mantle-derived melts similar to the flank BA and PMA lavas. The inclusions span the composition range between Mt. Shasta andesites and dacites and the primitive flank eruptions around Shasta (Baker et al., 1994, CMP: 118, 111) and define a preserved liquid line of descent (LLOD). Major and trace element compositions have been determined on a suite of 40 inclusions from 3 different flows. XRF analyses of the enclaves show that many are compositionally similar to liquids produced in the BA and PMA experiments. They preserve a LLOD that parallels the one determined in the 200 MPa H2O- saturated experiments and represent liquids of differing degrees of fractional crystallization between the primitive melts and their andesite and dacite hosts. Several of the mafic enclaves show evidence for higher pressure (>200 MPa) differentiation at higher H2O contents. Amphibole is present as an early crystallizing phase and its composition can be used to infer pre-eruptive H2O content and pressure of crystallization for these magmas. Natural amphiboles with Mg#'s in excess of 80 and olivine remnant cores are evidence for this deep and water- rich (>10 wt % H2O

  2. Seismic Evidence of Localized Distribution of Fluids or Melts in the Mantle Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, F.; Nakagawa, T.

    2009-04-01

    waveforms did not show such anomaly. The waveform modeling was carried out up to 1 Hz using a finite difference code. Results indicate that a highly localized LVA zone (about -10% anomaly) is responsible for broadening the P waveforms. The LVA zones may indicate fluids dehydrated from hydrous mineral compositions or melts through the phase transformation at the bottom of the MTZ. A number of studies propose that a certain amount of water can be transported through the subduction process, and stored in the MTZ as the lower mantle minerals may not include much water (e.g., Ohtani et al., 2004). However, the distribution or fate of "water" dehydrated from minerals which are descending further into the lower mantle has been known little. On the other hand a recent study suggests that the MTZ may be dry based on the electrical conductivity modeling (Yoshino et al., 2008). We suggest that if the distribution of transported water is very localized in the MTZ, then the debates do not have to be contradictory to each other.

  3. Melting depths and mantle heterogeneity beneath Hawaii and the East Pacific Rise: Constraints from Na/Ti and rare earth element ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Putirka, K.

    1999-02-01

    Mantle melting calculations are presented that place constraints on the mineralogy of the basalt source region and partial melting depths for oceanic basalts. Melting depths are obtained from pressure-sensitive mineral-melt partition coefficients for Na, Ti, Hf, and the rare earth elements (REE). Melting depths are estimated by comparing model aggregate melt compositions to natural basalts from Hawaii and the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Variations in melting depths in a peridotite mantle are sufficient to yield observed differences in Na/Ti, Lu/Hf, and Sm/Yb between Hawaii and the EPR. Initial melting depths of 95{endash}120 km are calculated for EPR basalts, while melting depths of 200{endash}400 km are calculated for Hawaii, indicating a mantle that is 300&hthinsp;{degree}C hotter at Hawaii. Some isotope ratios at Hawaii are correlated with Na/Ti, indicating vertical stratification to isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle; similar comparisons involving EPR lavas support a layered mantle model. Abundances of Na, Ti, and REE indicate that garnet pyroxenite and eclogite are unlikely source components at Hawaii and may be unnecessary at the EPR. The result that some geochemical features of oceanic lavas appear to require only minor variations in mantle mineral proportions (2{percent} or less) may have important implications regarding the efficiency of mantle mixing. Heterogeneity required by isotopic studies might be accompanied by only subtle differences in bulk composition, and material that is recycled at subduction zones might not persist as mineralogically distinct mantle components. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  4. Geochemistry of rare high-Nb basalt lavas: Are they derived from a mantle wedge metasomatised by slab melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Alan R.; Mitchell, Simon F.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Minifie, Matthew J.; Millar, Ian L.

    2011-09-01

    Compositionally, high-Nb basalts are similar to HIMU (high U/Pb) ocean island basalts, continental alkaline basalts and alkaline lavas formed above slab windows. Tertiary alkaline basaltic lavas from eastern Jamaica, West Indies, known as the Halberstadt Volcanic Formation have compositions similar to high-Nb basalts (Nb > 20 ppm). The Halberstadt high-Nb basalts are divided into two compositional sub-groups where Group 1 lavas have more enriched incompatible element concentrations relative to Group 2. Both groups are derived from isotopically different spinel peridotite mantle source regions, which both require garnet and amphibole as metasomatic residual phases. The Halberstadt geochemistry demonstrates that the lavas cannot be derived by partial melting of lower crustal ultramafic complexes, metasomatised mantle lithosphere, subducting slabs, continental crust, mantle plume source regions or an upper mantle source region composed of enriched and depleted components. Instead, their composition, particularly the negative Ce anomalies, the high Th/Nb ratios and the similar isotopic ratios to nearby adakite lavas, suggests that the Halberstadt magmas are derived from a compositionally variable spinel peridotite source region(s) metasomatised by slab melts that precipitated garnet, amphibole, apatite and zircon. It is suggested that high-Nb basalts may be classified as a distinct rock type with Nb > 20 ppm, intraplate alkaline basalt compositions, but that are generated in subduction zones by magmatic processes distinct from those that generate other intraplate lavas.

  5. Partial melting and refertilization of mantle peridotites in the Xigaze ophiolite: constraints from whole-rock and mineral geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wu, Fu-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Ophiolites along the E-W trending Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture (YTS), which separates the Indian plate from the Eurasian plate, have been regarded as relics of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. The Xigaze ophiolite in the central YTS has been extensively studied. One of the most intact crust-mantle sequences is preserved in the Luqu (or Beimarang) ophiolite. Mantle peridotites of the Luqu ophiolite are dominated by harzburgites, with 55-65% olivine, 30-40% orthopyroxene, 1-5% clinopyroxene and 1-3% spinel. Minor lherzolites and dunites are also outcropped, and the mode contents of clinopyroxene in lherzolite can be locally up to 10%. This contribution presented whole-rock major element and mineral chemistry including EMPA (Electronic MicroProbe Analysis) and clinopyroxene in situ trace elements. Whole rock Al2O3 (0.23-2.05%) and CaO (0.41-1.7%) contents are very low but show obviously inverse correlation with MgO (39.7-47.0%), indicating that the Luqu peridotites are residues of variable degrees of partial melting. This is supported by the Cr# (=molar Cr/(Cr+Al)) values of spinels which vary from 0.36 to 0.69. Meanwhile, the high Cr# values of spinels and homogenously high Mg# (= molar Mg/(Mg+Fe2+)) values of olivines, clustering at 0.91, indicate high degrees of partial melting. The low REE (rare earth elements) concentrations and chondrite-normalized distribution partterns of clinopyroxenes reflect ultra-depleted natures, with most showing LREE (light REEs) and MREE (medium REEs) depleted patterns and strong fractionations between MREEs and HREE (heavy REEs) ((Sm/Yb)N: 0.021-0.184). Based on the observations and analyses, a model of two-stage melting process was proposed that the primitive mantle underwent 2-8% melting in garnet stability field which was followed by 10-15% melting in spinel stability field. The clinopyroxenes in some peridotites exhibit obvious enrichment of somestrongly incompatible elements (such as sodium and LREE) that reveal later refertilization process for

  6. Carbonatite melt-peridotite interaction at 5.5-7.0 GPa: Implications for metasomatism in lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Alexander G.; Kruk, Alexey N.; Chebotarev, Dimity A.; Palyanov, Yury N.

    2016-04-01

    Interaction between carbonatite melt and peridotite is studied experimentally by melting samples of interlayered peridotite-carbonatite-peridotite in graphite containers at 1200-1350 °C and 5.5-7.0 GPa in a split-sphere multianvil apparatus. Starting compositions are lherzolite and harzburgite, as well as carbonatite which may form in the upper part of a slab or in a plume-related source. Most experimental runs were of 150 h duration in order for equilibrium to be achieved. The interaction produced carbonatitic melts with low SiO2 (≤ 7 wt.%) and high alkalis. At 1200 °C, melt-peridotite interaction occurs through Mg-Ca exchange, resulting in elimination of orthopyroxene and crystallization of magnesite and clinopyroxene. At 1350 °C hybridization of the carbonatite and magnesite-bearing peridotite melts occurred with consumption of clinopyroxene and magnesite, and crystallization of orthopyroxene at MgO/CaO ≥ 4.3. The resulting peridotite-saturated melt has Ca# (37-50) depending on primary carbonatite composition. Compositions of silicate phases are similar to those of high-temperature peridotite but are different from megacrysts in kimberlites. CaO and Cr2O3 changes in garnet produced from the melt-harzburgite interaction at 1200 and 1350 °C perfectly match the observed trend in garnet from metasomatized peridotite of the Siberian subcontinental lithospheric mantle. K-rich carbonatite melts equilibrated with peridotite at 5.5-7.0 GPa and 1200-1350 °C correspond to high-Mg inclusions in fibrous diamond. Carbonatite melt is a weak solvent of entrained xenoliths and therefore cannot produce kimberlitic magma if temperatures are ~ 1350 °C on separation from the lithospheric peridotite source and ~ 1000 °C on eruption.

  7. Nyerereite from carbonatite rocks at Vulture volcano: implications for mantle metasomatism and petrogenesis of alkali carbonate melts Research Article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, Francesco; Jones, Adrian P.; Sharygin, Victor V.

    2009-06-01

    Vulture volcano displays a wide range of mafic to alkaline, carbonate-, and/or CaO-rich volcanic rocks, with subvolcanic and plutonic rocks together with mantle xenoliths in pyroclastic ejecta. The roles of magmatic volatiles such as CO2, S, and Cl have been determined from compositions and trapping temperatures of inclusions in phenocrysts, which include the Na-K-Ca-carbonate nyerereite within melilite. We surmise that this alkali carbonate crystallised from an appropriate carbonatitic melt at relatively high temperature. Carbonatitic metasomatic features are traceable throughout many of the mantle xenoliths, and various carbonatitic components are found in the late stage extrusive suite. There is no evidence that alkali carbonatite developed as a separate magma, but it may have been an important evolutionary stage. We compare the rare occurrence of nyerereite at Vulture with other carbonatites and with an unaltered kimberlite from the Udachnaya pipe. We review the evidence at Vulture for associated carbonatitic metasomatism in the mantle, and we suggest that low viscosity alkali carbonatitic melts may have a primary and much deeper origin than previously considered.

  8. Melt-rock interaction in supra-subduction mantle: evidences from veined peridotites from the Avacha volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, Bénard; Dmitri A., Ionov

    2010-05-01

    Peridotite xenoliths in calc-alkaline volcanic rocks are direct samples of the sub-arc mantle. They are generally thought to have reacted with slab-derived fluids, yet many show no or minor whole-rock enrichments in incompatible elements [1]. Metasomatic veins that may cut these samples are crystallisation products of fluids and melts and give then direct informations on these latter. New major and trace element data were obtained on eleven veined harzburgite xenoliths from the active Avacha volcano in southern Kamchatka peninsula, Russia. Two of the three vein types of mantle origin previously identified in these samples [2] are compared to late stage ones. Type 1 veins are thin, quenched with fine-grained subhedral opx, accessory cpx, amphibole, glass and sulfides. Wall-rock olivine cut by these veins show no reaction whereas coarse opx is partly transformed to produce metasomatic cpx and amph by local fluid release. Cr2O3 (< 0.1% in opx), Na2O and TiO2 poor vein minerals (respectively < 1.5% and ˜0.2% in am), low HREE in opx, HFSE negative anomalies, and LILE enrichment attest for an hybrid mantle source. REE enrichment in cross-cut coarse opx and LREE and LILE in isolated host rock parts (metasomatic pockets) by vein-derived fluids is identified. Type 2 veins and veinlets are made of thin opx and empty cavities with accessory cpx and amphibole. They derive from a liquid similar to Type 1 but constantly re-equilibrating (Cr-Al enrichment trends in opx and Na and HFSE relative enrichment in am) with host minerals while fracturing them. They attest of (fluid-assisted) dissolution-precipitation reactions at rims (Fe enrichment in residual host olivine) and massive fluid-melt extraction through branching paths (LREE enrichment but low U/Th in vein-derived melt pockets and extreme veinlets-host rock interaction end-products). Late stage quenched veins made of subhedral am (TiO2 ˜1% and Na2O ≥ 2%) with fine opx rims are related to andesitic melt. They can also

  9. Viscosity structure of Earth's mantle inferred from rotational variations due to GIA process and recent melting events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Masao; Okuno, Jun'ichi; Lambeck, Kurt; Purcell, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    We examine the geodetically derived rotational variations for the rate of change of degree-two harmonics of Earth's geopotential, skew5dot J_2, and true polar wander, combining a recent melting model of glaciers and the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets taken from the IPCC 2013 Report (AR5) with two representative GIA ice models describing the last deglaciation, ICE5G and the ANU model developed at the Australian National University. Geodetically derived observations of skew4dot J_2 are characterized by temporal changes of -(3.7 ± 0.1) × 10-11 yr-1 for the period 1976-1990 and -(0.3 ± 0.1) × 10-11 yr-1 after ˜2000. The AR5 results make it possible to evaluate the recent melting of the major ice sheets and glaciers for three periods, 1900-1990, 1991-2001 and after 2002. The observed skew4dot J_2 and the component of skew4dot J_2 due to recent melting for different periods indicate a long-term change in skew4dot J_2-attributed to the Earth's response to the last glacial cycle-of -(6.0-6.5) × 10-11 yr-1, significantly different from the values adopted to infer the viscosity structure of the mantle in most previous studies. This is a main conclusion of this study. We next compare this estimate with the values of skew4dot J_2 predicted by GIA ice models to infer the viscosity structure of the mantle, and consequently obtain two permissible solutions for the lower mantle viscosity (ηlm), ˜1022 and (5-10) × 1022 Pa s, for both adopted ice models. These two solutions are largely insensitive to the lithospheric thickness and upper mantle viscosity as indicated by previous studies and relatively insensitive to the viscosity structure of the D″ layer. The ESL contributions from the Antarctic ice sheet since the last glacial maximum (LGM) for ICE5G and ANU are about 20 and 30 m, respectively, but glaciological reconstructions of the Antarctic LGM ice sheet have suggested that its ESL contribution may have been less than ˜10 m. The GIA-induced skew4dot J_2 for GIA

  10. Chloride-bearing liquids and partial melting of mantle eclogites: experimental study and application to the diamond-forming processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Oleg

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies prove that the partial melting in some eclogite xenoliths in kimberlites is closely related to formation of diamonds in these rocks at 4-6 GPa and 1150-12500C [e.g. 1, 2]. Along with specific mineral assemblages, the products of the eclogite partial melting commonly include relics of potassium-rich silicic melts (45-65 wt. % of SiO2, 4-14 wt. % of K2O and K2O/Na2O > 1.0) [1, 2]. Available experimental data, however, demonstrate that such melts can not be produced by 'dry' or hydrous melting of a common eclogite. It implies that partial melting and conjugate diamond formation in mantle eclogites was triggered by infiltration of potassic fluids/melts. Assemblages of Cl-bearing phases and carbonates in eclogite xenoliths [1], and eclogitic diamonds [3-6] suggest that these agents were chloride-carbonate-H2O melts or/and chloride-H2O-CO2 fluids. In order to characterize interaction of both types of liquids with eclogites and their minerals, experiments in the eclogite-related systems with participation of CaCO3-Na2CO3-KCl-H2O or H2O-CO2-KCl are reviewed. Melting relations in the system eclogite-CaCO3-Na2CO3-KCl-H2O follow the general scheme proposed earlier for chloride-carbonate-silicate systems [7]. Below 12000C, Grt, Cpx and phlogopite (Phl) coexist with LCC only. Formation of Phl and Ca-rich Grt after Cpx indicate active reactions of Cpx with LCC accompanied by CO2 degassing and depletion of the clinopyroxene in jadeite. Subsequent dissolution of silicates in LCC at >1200OC results in formation of potassic silica-undersaturated carbonate and Cl-bearing melt (LCS) (37-40 wt. % of SiO2, 10-12 wt. % of K2O, ~3.5 wt. % of Cl) immiscible with the LCC. Compositional feature of this melt is very comparable to those of low-Mg carbonate-silicate melt inclusions in diamonds [6]. However, it is not relevant to the melt relics preserved in the partially molten eclogite xenoliths. Melting of eclogites with participation of the H2O-CO2-KCl fluid at 5 GPa at 1200

  11. Experimental investigation of the electrical behavior of olivine during partial melting under pressure and application to the lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Leinenweber, K.; Tasaka, M.

    2015-09-01

    ), and provide a melt conductivity value of 78 (±8) S/m for all Fo77 samples and 45 (±5) S/m for the Fo90 sample. Comparison of our results with electromagnetic sounding data of the deep interior of the Moon supports the hypothesis of the presence of interconnected melt at the base of the lunar mantle. Our results underline that electrical conductivity can be used to investigate in situ melt nucleation and migration in the interior of terrestrial planets.

  12. Carbonatite melt-CO 2 fluid inclusions in mantle xenoliths from Tenerife, Canary Islands: a story of trapping, immiscibility and fluid-rock interaction in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria Luce; Andersen, Tom; Neumann, Else-Ragnhild; Simonsen, Siri Lene

    2002-10-01

    Three types of fluid inclusions have been identified in olivine porphyroclasts in the spinel harzburgite and lherzolite xenoliths from Tenerife: pure CO 2 (Type A); carbonate-rich CO 2-SO 2 mixtures (Type B); and polyphase inclusions dominated by silicate glass±fluid±sp±silicate±sulfide±carbonate (Type C). Type A inclusions commonly exhibit a "coating" (a few microns thick) consisting of an aggregate of a platy, hydrous Mg-Fe-Si phase, most likely talc, together with very small amounts of halite, dolomite and other phases. Larger crystals (e.g. (Na,K)Cl, dolomite, spinel, sulfide and phlogopite) may be found on either side of the "coating", towards the wall of the host mineral or towards the inclusion center. These different fluids were formed through the immiscible separations and fluid-wall-rock reactions from a common, volatile-rich, siliceous, alkaline carbonatite melt infiltrating the upper mantle beneath the Tenerife. First, the original siliceous carbonatite melt is separated from a mixed CO 2-H 2O-NaCl fluid and a silicate/silicocarbonatite melt (preserved in Type A inclusions). The reaction of the carbonaceous silicate melt with the wall-rock minerals gave rise to large poikilitic orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene grains, and smaller neoblasts. During the metasomatic processes, the consumption of the silicate part of the melt produced carbonate-enriched Type B CO 2-SO 2 fluids which were trapped in exsolved orthopyroxene porphyroclasts. At the later stages, the interstitial silicate/silicocarbonatite fluids were trapped as Type C inclusions. At a temperature above 650 °C, the mixed CO 2-H 2O-NaCl fluid inside the Type A inclusions were separated into CO 2-rich fluid and H 2O-NaCl brine. At T<650 °C, the residual silicate melt reacted with the host olivine, forming a reaction rim or "coating" along the inclusion walls consisting of talc (or possibly serpentine) together with minute crystals of NaCl, KCl, carbonates and sulfides, leaving a residual CO 2

  13. Eclogite-associated potassic silicate melts and chloride-rich fluids in the mantle: a possible connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, O.; Butvina, V.

    2009-04-01

    Relics of potassium-rich (4-14 wt. % of K2O and K2O/Na2O > 1.0) melts are a specific features of some partially molten diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths in kimberlites worldwide [1, 2]. In addition, potassic silicic melt inclusions with up to 16 wt. % of K2O are associated with eclogite phases in kimberlitic diamonds (O. Navon, pers. comm.). According to available experimental data, no such potassium contents can be reached by "dry" and hydrous melting of eclogite. These data point to close connection between infiltration of essentially potassic fluids, partial melting and diamond formation in mantle eclogites [2]. Among specific components of these fluids, alkali chlorides, apparently, play an important role. This conclusion follows from assemblages of the melt relics with chlorine-bearing phases in eclogite xenoliths [1], findings of KCl-rich inclusions in diamonds from the xenoliths [3], and concentration of Cl up to 0.5-1.5 wt. % in the melt inclusions in diamonds. In this presentation, we review our experimental data on reactions of KCl melts and KCl-bearing fluids with model and natural eclogite-related minerals and assemblages. Experiments in the model system jadeite(±diopside)-KCl(±H2O) at 4-7 GPa showed that, being immiscible, chloride liquids provoke a strong K-Na exchange with silicates (jadeite). As a result, low-temperature ultrapotassic chlorine-bearing (up to 3 wt. % of Cl) aluminosilicate melts form. These melts is able to produce sanidine, which is characteristic phase in some partially molten eclogites. In addition, in presence of water Si-rich Cl-bearing mica (Al-celadonite-phlogopite) crystallizes in equilibrium with sanidine and/or potassic melt and immiscible chloride liquid. This mica is similar to that observed in some eclogitic diamonds bearing chloride-rich fluid inclusions [4], as well as in diamonds in partially molten eclogites [2]. Interaction of KCl melt with pyrope garnet also produce potassic aluminosilicate melt because of high

  14. Chemical and Isotopic Heterogeneities in the Deep Earth:Importance of Lower Mantle Carbonate-rich Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collerson, K. D.; Williams, Q.; Murphy, D.

    2007-12-01

    Evolution of mantle chemical heterogeneity reflects a spectrum of processes. Nature of reservoirs has been inferred from radiogenic isotope and trace element systematics of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and ocean island basalts (OIB) [1]. Carbonatites, kimberlites and lamproites [2-4] also sample depleted and enriched reservoirs, however, their origin remains equivocal. Secular decrease in Th/U ratio in MORB mantle (DMM), homogeneity of Th/U inferred from Pb-isotopic data, and systematic variation in Nb/Th and Nb/U ratios in MORBs [5], show that recycled components in DMM are well mixed. Thus isotopically hererogeneous domains in DMM must be transient features and are unlikely to yield HIMU and EM chemistries. Explanations for HIMU and EM OIB chemistries include involvement of: (1) subcontinental lithospheric mantle; (2) subducted oceanic lithosphere; (3) subducted sediment; or (4) an enigmatic lower mantle (LM) "plume component". Elevated 3He/4He in OIBs and kimberlites [6] and excess 129Xe and high 40Ar/39Ar [e.g., 7-8] and solar 20Ne/22Ne [9] in carbonatites indicate that they were derived from a primitive, isolated, and less degassed source than MORB. Primordial compositions show that this reservoir escaped atmospheric contamination by Ar, Xe, and Ne and pollution by 4He-rich material (from recycled 238U) during subduction. This primitive reservoir likely exists below the depth subducted slabs obviously penetrate (ca. 1700 km) e.g., [10]. That kimberlites are deeply sourced is also shown by lower mantle inclusions in diamond, e.g., [11]. Importantly, Gp. 1 and 2 kimberlites are isotopically similar to HIMU and EM-1 OIBs [4]. We interpret Gp 1 kimberlites as mixtures of HIMU and EM sources, while Gp. 2 kimberlites (close to EM-1) are interpreted as melts of a Ca perovskite-rich reservoir, possibly from slabs in the LM. We model melting of LM phases to simulate evolution of EM1 and HIMU 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 176Hf/177Hf, 207Pb/204Pb, 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204

  15. Tracking the Depleted Mantle Signature in Melt Inclusions and Residual Glass of Basaltic Martian Shergottites using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Timothy J.; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.; Usui, Tomohiro; Economos, Rita C.; Schmitt, Axel K.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Trace element abundances of depleted shergottite magmas recorded by olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and interstitial mesostasis glass were measured using the Cameca ims-1270 ion microprobe. Two meteorites: Tissint, an olivine-­phyric basaltic shergottite which fell over Morocco July 18th 2001; and the Antarctic meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y98), an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite with abundant glassy mesostasis have been studied. Chondrite-­normalized REE patterns for MI in Tissint and Y98 are characteristically LREE depleted and, within analytical uncertainty, parallel those of their respective whole rock composition; supporting each meteorite to represent a melt composition that has experienced closed-­system crystallization. REE profiles for mesostasis glass in Y98 lie about an order of magnitude higher than those from the MI; with REE profiles for Tissint MI falling in between. Y98 MI have the highest average Sm/Nd and Y/Ce ratios, reflecting their LREE depletion and further supporting Y98 as one of our best samples to probe the depleted shergotitte mantle. In general, Zr/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 and Tissint MI, Ce/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 MI and mesostasis glass, and Sm/Nd ratios overlap between Y98 mesostasis glass and Tissint MI. These features support similar sources for both, but with subtle geochemical differences that may reflect different melting conditions or fractionation paths during ascent from the mantle. Interestingly, the REE patterns for both Y98 bulk and MI analyses display a flattening of the LREE that suggests a crustal contribution to the Y98 parent melt. This observation has important implications for the origins of depleted and enriched shergottites.

  16. Thermal structure and melting conditions in the mantle beneath the Basin and Range province from seismology and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Forsyth, D. W.

    2016-04-01

    To better constrain the temperature structure in the upper mantle, we jointly invert seismic surface wave velocities and basalt thermobarometry. New measurements of the water concentration (1.0-3.5 wt %) and oxygen fugacity (FMQ + 0.5 to + 1.5) of basalts from seven recently active volcanic fields in the Basin and Range province (Cima, Pisgah, Amboy, Big Pine, Black Rock, Snow Canyon, W. Grand Canyon) enable more accurate equilibration pressure (P) and temperature (T) estimates of the mantle melts. We developed a revised thermobarometer that more precisely predicts the results of laboratory experiments on melts equilibrated with olivine and orthopyroxene and accounts for the effects of water and CO2. Applying these methods to basalts from the Basin and Range we find that most equilibrated near the dry solidus in P-T space and at depths in the vicinity of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) inferred from receiver function analysis and Rayleigh surface wave tomography. The wet basalts should have begun melting well below the dry solidus, so the depths of equilibration probably reflect ponding of rising melts beneath the nominally dry lithosphere. A two-parameter thermal model is sufficient to simultaneously satisfy both the seismological and petrological constraints. In the model, the depth to the dry solidus defines the bottom boundary of the conductive lid, while the potential temperature (Tp) controls the asthenosphere and LAB thermal structure. The optimum estimates of Tp range from <1300 to >1500°C, and depths to the LAB range from ˜55 to 75 km, with uncertainties on the order of ±50°C and ±10 km. In contrast to standard tomographic images or basalt thermobarometry, the output of the joint inversion is a geotherm that can be tested quantitatively against other observations.

  17. Density and seismic velocity of hydrous melts under crustal and upper mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Kenta; Iwamori, Hikaru

    2016-05-01

    We present a new model for calculating the density of hydrous silicate melts as a function of P, T, H2O concentration, and melt composition. We optimize VPr,Tr, ∂V/∂T, ∂V/∂P, ∂V2/∂T∂P, and K' of H2O end-member components in hydrous silicate melts, as well as K' of anhydrous silicate melts, using previously reported experimental results. The parameter set for H2O end-member component in silicate melt optimized in this study is internally consistent with the parameter values for the properties of anhydrous silicate melt reported by Lange and Carmichael (1987, 1990). The model calculation developed in this study reproduces the experimentally determined densities of various hydrous melts, and can be used to calculate the relationships between pressures, temperatures, and H2O concentrations of various hydrous melts from ultramafic to felsic compositions at pressures of 0-4.29 GPa. Using the new parameter set, we investigate the effects of H2O content on the seismic velocity of hydrous melts, as well as seismic velocities in partially molten regions of subduction zones. The results show that water content in silicate melt plays a key role in determining seismic velocity structure, and therefore must be taken into account when interpreting seismic tomography.

  18. Alteration of Mantle Sulfides: the Effects of Oxidation and Melt Infiltration in a Kilbourne Hole Harzburgite Xenolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, T. J.; Harvey, J.; Warren, J. M.; Klein, F.; Walshaw, R.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfides, while commonly present in volumetrically minor amounts (< 0.1 modal %; e.g.[1]) in the mantle, impart a strong control over many of the highly siderophile and strongly chalcophile elements. The mass balance of some elements, such as Os, are almost completely controlled by heterogeneously distributed sulfide grains[2][3]. Hence, processes that re-distribute sulfides and / or alter their composition can have profound effects on the information preserved within them regarding primary mantle processes. Different generations of interstitial sulfide may partly or completely re-equilibrate with one another or may be exposed to open-system processes that mobilize and / or precipitate sulfides[4]. In mantle xenoliths in particular, supergene weathering at the Earth's surface can oxidize sulfide to soluble sulfate, and its removal affects highly siderophile and strongly chalcophile element abundances [6]. Here we present the initial results from a study of interstitial mantle sulfides (n = 24) recovered from a single harzburgitic xenolith from Kilbourne Hole, NM. Large compositional differences are observed in the sulfides even at the scale of a single xenolith. Mono-sulfide solid solution has exsolved into two Fe-Ni-rich phases, one with a significantly larger Ni content for a given Fe abundance. Occurrences of Cu-rich sulfides are rare, but where present Cu can account for up to 22 weight % of the sulfide. Critically, no fresh, unaltered sulfides were recovered and in all of the sulfides there is evidence for at least two secondary processes. EDS mapping of the sulfides reveals pervasive, but incomplete, oxidation in all of the grains; Raman spectroscopy reveals this oxide to be goethite. In addition, there is also evidence for the interaction of many of the sulfides with a volatile-rich silicate melt. Silicate melt veins cross-cut the original sulfide mineralogy in some areas of the sulfide grain, while leaving other areas virtually untouched. The degree of

  19. Ca. 2.7 Ga ferropicritic magmatism: A record of Fe-rich heterogeneities during Neoarchean global mantle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milidragovic, Dejan; Francis, Don

    2016-07-01

    Although terrestrial picritic magmas with FeOTOT ⩾13 wt.% are rare in the geological record, they were relatively common ca. 2.7 Ga during the Neoarchean episode of enhanced global growth of continental crust. Recent evidence that ferropicritic underplating played an important role in the ca. 2.74-2.70 Ga reworking of the Ungava craton provides the impetus for a comparison of ca. 2.7 Ga ferropicrite occurrences in the global Neoarchean magmatic record. In addition to the Fe-rich plutons of the Ungava craton, volumetrically minor ferropicritic flows, pyroclastic deposits, and intrusive rocks form parts of the Neoarchean greenstone belt stratigraphy of the Abitibi, Wawa, Wabigoon and Vermillion domains of the southern and western Superior Province. Neoarchean ferropicritic rocks also occur on five other Archean cratons: West Churchill, Slave, Yilgarn, Kaapvaal, and Karelia; suggesting that ca. 2.7 Ga Fe-rich magmatism was globally widespread. Neoarchean ferropicrites form two distinct groups in terms of their trace element geochemistry. Alkaline ferropicrites have fractionated REE profiles and show no systematic HFSE anomalies, broadly resembling the trace element character of modern-day ocean island basalt (OIB) magmas. Magmas parental to ca. 2.7 Ga alkaline ferropicrites also had high Nb/YPM (>2), low Al2O3/TiO2 (<8) and Sc/Fe (⩽3 × 10-4) ratios, and were enriched in Ni relative to primary pyrolite mantle-derived melts. The high Ni contents of the alkaline ferropicrites coupled with the low Sc/Fe ratios are consistent with derivation from olivine-free garnet-pyroxenite sources. The second ferropicrite group is characterized by decisively non-alkaline primary trace element profiles that range from flat to LREE-depleted, resembling Archean tholeiitic basalts and komatiites. In contrast to the alkaline ferropicrites, the magmas parental to the subalkaline ferropicrites had flat HREE, lower Nb/YPM (<2), higher Al2O3/TiO2 (8-25) and Sc/Fe (⩾4 × 10-4) ratios, and

  20. Evidence for the formation of boninitic melt in the base of the Salahi mantle section, the northern Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Y.; Takazawa, E.

    2013-12-01

    The boninites in the Oman ophiolite occur as lavas and dikes of the Alley volcanic sequence (Ishikawa et al., 2002). Moreover, Yamazaki and Miyashita (2008) reported about boninitic dike swarms in the Fizh crustal section. The boninitic melt generation requires hydrous melting of refractory mantle peridotite under an extremely high temperature and low pressure condition. This condition is generally explained by the addition of slab-derived fluids into a hot young oceanic lithosphere, which previously experienced MORB melt extraction. In this study, we report an ultramafic complex mainly composed of dunite which is in equilibrium with chemical composition of boninites in the southwestern part of the Salahi mantle section in the northern Oman ophiolite. Based on the study by Nomoto and Takazawa (2013) the complex consists mainly of massive dunite associated with minor amounts of harzburgite, pyroxenites and wehrlite. We use spinel Cr# (=Cr/[Cr+Al] atomic ratio) as an indicator of extent of melt extraction in harzburgites. For dunites spinel Cr# varies as a function of extent of reaction and of melt composition (Dick and Bullen, 1984; Arai, 1994; Ozawa, 2008). The spinels in the dunites from the complex have Cr# greater than 0.7 indicating highly refractory signature. The range of spinel Cr# is similar to those of spinels in boninites reported worldwide (Umino, 1986; van der Laan et al., 1992; Sobolev and Danyushevsky, 1994; Ishikawa et al., 2002). The complex might be a section of dunite channel that formed by flux melting of harzburgites as a result of infiltration of a voluminous fluid from the basal thrust. We determined the abundances of rare earth elements (REE) in the peridotite clinopyroxenes (cpxs) by LA-ICP-MS to estimate the compositions of the melts in equilibrium with these clinopyroxenes. The chondrite-normalized patterns for clinopyroxenes in the dunites are characterized by enrichments in light REE (LREE) relative to those of the harzburgite

  1. Temporal variations in the mantle potential temperatures along the Northwest Hawaiian Ridge using olivine-liquid equilibria: Implications for Hawaiian plume melt flux variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tree, J. P.; Garcia, M. O.; Putirka, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Northwest Hawaiian Ridge extends 2800 km and comprises 47% of the total length of the Hawaiian-Emperor (H-E) Chain. The Ridge contains at least 52 volcanoes whose shape, volume, and distance from neighboring volcanoes vary markedly. The temporal melt flux variation of the H-E has been estimated with various geophysical methods involving fluid dynamics and lithospheric modeling. These models show a dramatic increase (up to 300%) in melt flux over the last 30 Myr. A potential explanation for the increase in melt flux is a temporal increase in the temperature of melting. Olivine thermometry offers the best method for evaluating mantle source temperature variations along the Ridge. An olivine-liquid equilibration temperature estimate can then be recast into a mantle potential temperature after accounting for the heat of fusion during mantle melting and decompression of the mantle as it follows an adiabat to the surface. New whole-rock XRF and olivine analyzes for 18 tholeiitic, three transitional tholeiites, and two picro-basalts from 11 volcanoes spanning the entire length of the Ridge from Middle Bank to Yuryaku (just south of the Bend) were made. These data were used to obtain a temperature estimate of the mantle during shield formation of each volcano. After screening samples for those in chemical equilibrium using a Rhodes diagram and assuming a Kdol-liq(Fe-Mg)=0.345 ×0.03, data from six volcanoes were input into the thermometers of Beattie (1993; Contrib. Mineral. Petr., 118, 103-111) and Putirka et al., (2007; Chemical Geology, 241, 177-206). The results were averaged to estimate mantle potential temperatures. These calculations yield mantle potential temperature estimates that vary positively with volcano volume (e.g., 1460oC at Yuryaku vs 1608-1630oC at Gardner Pinnacles, the largest volume seamount in the Ridge). These results suggest that temperature variations may be playing a significant role in modulating the melt flux of the Ridge. Seven more

  2. Geochemical and Isotopic Evidence for Melting and Erosion of Wyoming Craton Mantle Lithosphere Prior to 48 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, G. I.; Carlson, R. W.; Frost, C. D.

    2010-12-01

    Trace-element geochemistry of Cretaceous-Tertiary Great Plains igneous rocks supports isotopic data that reveal a sequence of digestion of lithospheric mantle followed by intrusion of dominantly asthenospheric magmas. Multiple Archean, Proterozoic, and Phanerozoic subduction events beneath the Wyoming craton concentrated Ba and K within the underlying mantle lithosphere, resulting in earliest Cretaceous-Tertiary lithospheric melts with fingerprints of high K, high Ba/Nb and negative epsilon-Nd, but low U, Th, total REE, and less extreme values of LREE/HREE. Youngest (Eocene-Oligocene) magmas were kimberlite and carbonatite, with high U, Th, LREE, extremely high LREE/HREE, and positive epsilon-Nd, but with high-T xenoliths from depths of only 150 km (Carlson et al., 1999). Importantly, in the entire Wyoming craton, the Homestead kimberlite is the only one of K-T age that has transported a diamond—a single micro-diamond discovered. The shallow low-T to high-T xenolith transition, lack of diamonds, and changing magma geochemistry, suggest that a significant portion of the mantle lithosphere beneath the Wyoming Archean craton must have been consumed prior to the ≤48 Ma kimberlite eruptions. In contrast, the earliest phase of Cretaceous magmatism in Arkansas was explosive diamond-containing lamproite (~102 Ma) with a Proterozoic lithospheric isotopic signature (Lambert et al., 1995). In Arkansas, there was no earlier subalkalic magmatism, and no evidence of slow digestion of the mantle lithosphere, although later magmatism trended toward higher positive epsilon-Nd values (i.e. larger asthenospheric component). Removal by melting of a significant portion of the Wyoming mantle lithosphere during late Cretaceous-early Tertiary magmatism, along with heating, may have helped promote lithospheric “relaxation” related to extension further west between 53 Ma and 49 Ma, followed by more facile penetration by asthenospheric magmas, an idea proposed to explain the time

  3. A melt-focusing zone in the lithospheric mantle preserved in the Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, Pilar; Gazel, Esteban; Denyer, Percy; Smith, Ian; Jicha, Brian; Flores, Kennet E.; Coleman, Drew; Snow, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    The Santa Elena Ophiolite in Costa Rica is composed of a well-preserved fragment of the lithospheric mantle that formed along a paleo-spreading center. Within its exposed architecture, this ophiolite records a deep section of the melt transport system of a slow/ultra-slow spreading environment, featuring a well-developed melt-focusing system of coalescent diabase dikes that intrude the peridotite in a sub-vertical and sub-parallel arrangement. Here we present an integrated analysis of new structural data, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, major and trace element geochemistry and radiogenic isotope data from the diabase dikes in order to elucidate the tectonic setting of the Santa Elena Ophiolite. The dikes are basaltic and tholeiitic in composition. Petrological models of fractional crystallization suggest deep pressures of crystallization of > 0.4 GPa for most of the samples, which is in good agreement with similar calculations from slow/ultra-slow spreading ridges and require a relatively hydrated (~ 0.5 wt.% H2O) MORB-like source composition. The diabase dikes share geochemical and isotope signatures with both slow/ultra-slow spreading ridges and back-arc basins and indicate mixing of a DMM source and an enriched mantle end-member like EMII. The 40Ar/39Ar geochronology yielded an age of ~ 131 Ma for a previous pegmatitic gabbroic magmatic event that intruded the peridotite when it was hot and plastic and an age of ~ 121 Ma for the diabase intrusions, constraining the cooling from near asthenospheric conditions to lithospheric mantle conditions to ~ 10 Ma. Our findings suggest a complex interplay between oceanic basin and back-arc extension environments during the Santa Elena Ophiolite formation. We propose an alternative hypothesis for the origin of Santa Elena as an obducted fragment of an oceanic core complex (OCC).

  4. Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Mantle from Pigeonite/Melt Partitioning of Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Jnes, J. H.; Shearer, C.

    2004-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing effort to calibrate the pyroxene/melt REE oxybarometer for conditions relevant to the martian meteorites. These efforts have been motivated by reports of redox variations among the shergottites . We have conducted experiments on martian composition pigeonite/melt rare earth element partitioning as a function of fO2.

  5. Melt-Rock Reactions in the Uppermost Sub-Arc Mantle Beneath Kamchatka: Evidence from Peridotite Xenoliths from Shiveluch Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, J.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Churikova, T. G.

    2005-12-01

    Ultramafic xenoliths from Shiveluch Volcano are predominantly spinel harzburgites with 55-90 modal percent olivine and 7-45 percent orthopyroxene (OPX). Abundant kink-banded olivine and textures that vary from protogranular to porphyroclastic, and granuloblastic, are consistent with a history of plastic deformation under conditions of mantle flow. Metasomatic OPX, phlogopite, clinopyroxene and amphibole, crosscut the xenoliths in mm-scale veins and form irregular patches that appear to replace the olivine-dominant primary mineralogy. Textural features suggest that high modal OPX in the harzburgites was produced by melt-rock reactions involving the replacement of olivine by OPX (e.g., OPX occurs mostly along grain boundaries between coarse olivine crystals). Primary mineral compositions are refractory, with olivine from FO89-94 and Cr# (Cr*100/Al+Cr) in spinel from 40-80. Equilibration temperatures and pressures, calculated using two-pyroxene thermometry and Ca-in-olivine barometry, are between 800-1000°C and 10-25kb. Our best estimate for the temperature and pressure of equilibration of the xenoliths, based on results from samples that have well developed two-pyroxene + olivine mineral assemblages, is approximately 900°C and 12-14kb. Oxygen barometry shows that the xenoliths are strongly oxidized (log (fO2)FMQ from 2.5-4.5) compared to abyssal and continental peridotites. This high fO2 may also reflect a history of melt-rock interaction beneath Shiveluch (e.g., Parkinson and Arculus, Chem. Geol., 1999). These results suggest that melt-rock reactions may play a strong role in creating and modifying the uppermost mantle and deepest crust beneath active subduction-related volcanic arcs.

  6. Low-Velocity Zone of the Earth's Mantle: Incipient Melting Caused by Water.

    PubMed

    Lambert, I B; Wyllie, P J

    1970-08-21

    Experimental phase diagrams for the systems gabbro-water and peridotite-water indicate that, if there is any water in the upper mantle, then traces of hydrous interstitial silicate magma will be produced at depths corresponding to the beginning of the low-velocity zone. This explanation for the zone is more satisfactory than others proposed. PMID:17820306

  7. Experimentally-determined carbon isotope fractionation in and between methane-bearing melt and fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of melts and fluids is at the core of understanding formation and evolution of the Earth. To advance our understanding of their role, high-pressure/-temperature experiments were employed to determine melt and fluid structure together with carbon isotope partitioning within and between (CH4 +H2O +H2)-saturated aluminosilicate melts and (CH4 +H2O +H2)-fluids. The samples were characterized with vibrational spectroscopy while at temperatures and pressures from 475° to 850 °C and 92 to 1158 MPa, respectively. The solution equilibrium is 2CH4 +Qn = 2 CH3- +H2O +Q n + 1 where the superscript, n, in the Qn-notation describes silicate species where n denotes the number of bridging oxygen. The solution equilibrium affects the carbon isotope fractionation factor between melt and fluid, αmelt/fluid. Moreover, it is significantly temperature-dependent. The αmelt/fluid < 1 with temperatures less than about 1050 °C, and is greater than 1 at higher temperature. Methane-bearing melts can exist in the upper mantle at fO2 ≤fO2 (MW) (Mysen et al., 2011). Reduced (Csbnd H)-species in present-day upper mantle magma, therefore, are likely. During melting and crystallization in this environment, the δ13C of melts increases with temperature at a rate of ∼ 0.6 ‰ /°C. From the simple-system data presented here, at T ≤ 1050°C, melt in equilibrium with a peridotite-(CH4 +H2O +H2)-bearing mantle source will be isotopically lighter than fluid. At higher temperatures, melts will be isotopically heavier. Degassing at T ≤ 1050°C will shift δ13C of degassed magma to more positive values, whereas degassing at T ≥ 1050°C, will reduce the δ13C of the degassed magma.

  8. A discontinuity in mantle composition beneath the southwest Indian ridge.

    PubMed

    Meyzen, Christine M; Toplis, Michael J; Humler, Eric; Ludden, John N; Mével, Catherine

    2003-02-13

    The composition of mid-ocean-ridge basalt is known to correlate with attributes such as ridge topography and seismic velocity in the underlying mantle, and these correlations have been interpreted to reflect variations in the average extent and mean pressures of melting during mantle upwelling. In this respect, the eastern extremity of the southwest Indian ridge is of special interest, as its mean depth of 4.7 km (ref. 4), high upper-mantle seismic wave velocities and thin oceanic crust of 4-5 km (ref. 6) suggest the presence of unusually cold mantle beneath the region. Here we show that basaltic glasses dredged in this zone, when compared to other sections of the global mid-ocean-ridge system, have higher Na(8.0), Sr and Al2O3 compositions, very low CaO/Al2O3 ratios relative to TiO2 and depleted heavy rare-earth element distributions. This signature cannot simply be ascribed to low-degree melting of a typical mid-ocean-ridge source mantle, as different geochemical indicators of the extent of melting are mutually inconsistent. Instead, we propose that the mantle beneath approximately 1,000 km of the southwest Indian ridge axis has a complex history involving extensive earlier melting events and interaction with partial melts of a more fertile source. PMID:12610622

  9. Platinum Group Elements (PGE) geochemistry of komatiites and boninites from Dharwar Craton, India: Implications for mantle melting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Manikyamba, C.; Santosh, M.; Ganguly, Sohini; Khelen, Arubam C.; Subramanyam, K. S. V.

    2015-06-01

    , Os and Ru concentrations range from 0.6 to 2.2 ppb, 0.2 to 0.6 ppb and 1.4 to 2.6 ppb respectively in IPGE. The PGE abundances in Bababudan komatiites were controlled by olivine fractionation whereas that in Gadwal boninites were influenced by fractionation of chromite and sulphides. The Al-undepleted Bababudan komatiites are characterized by low CaO/Al2O3, (Gd/Yb)N, (La/Yb)N, with positive Zr, Hf, Ti anomalies and high Cu/Pd, Pd/Ir ratios at low Pd concentrations suggesting the derivation of parent magma by high degrees (>30%) partial melting of mantle under anhydrous conditions at shallow depth with garnet as a residual phase in the mantle restite. The komatiites are geochemically analogous to Al-undepleted Munro type komatiites and their PGE compositions are consistent with Alexo and Gorgona komatiites. The S-undersaturated character of Bababudan komatiites is attributed to decompression and assimilation of lower crustal materials during magma ascent and emplacement. In contrast, the higher Al2O3/TiO2, lower (Gd/Yb)N, for Gadwal boninites in combination with negative Nb, Zr, Hf, Ti anomalies and lower Cu/Pd at relatively higher Pd/Ir and Pd concentrations reflect high degree melting of refractory mantle wedge under hydrous conditions in an intraoceanic subduction zone setting. Higher Pd/Ir ratios and S-undersaturation of these boninites conform to influx of fluids derived by dehydration of subducted slab resulting into high fluid pressure and metasomatism of mantle wedge.

  10. Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM): A simplified model for oxide and silicate melts at mantle pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Aaron S.; Asimow, Paul D.; Stevenson, David J.

    2015-08-01

    We develop a new model to understand and predict the behavior of oxide and silicate melts at extreme temperatures and pressures, including deep mantle conditions like those in the early Earth magma ocean. The Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM) is based on an extension of the hard sphere mixture model, accounting for the range of coordination states available to each cation in the liquid. By utilizing approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, this method is capable of predicting complex liquid structure and thermodynamics while remaining computationally efficient, requiring only minutes of calculation time on standard desktop computers. This modeling framework is applied to the MgO system, where model parameters are trained on a collection of crystal polymorphs, producing realistic predictions of coordination evolution and the equation of state of MgO melt over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. We find that the typical coordination number of the Mg cation evolves continuously upward from 5.25 at 0 GPa to 8.5 at 250 GPa. The results produced by CHaSM are evaluated by comparison with predictions from published first-principles molecular dynamics calculations, indicating that CHaSM is accurately capturing the dominant physics controlling the behavior of oxide melts at high pressure. Finally, we present a simple quantitative model to explain the universality of the increasing Grüneisen parameter trend for liquids, which directly reflects their progressive evolution toward more compact solid-like structures upon compression. This general behavior is opposite that of solid materials, and produces steep adiabatic thermal profiles for silicate melts, thus playing a crucial role in magma ocean evolution.

  11. Trace element partitioning between majoritic garnet and silicate melt at 10-17 GPa: Implications for deep mantle processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corgne, Alexandre; Armstrong, Lora S.; Keshav, Shantanu; Fei, Yingwei; McDonough, William F.; Minarik, William G.; Moreno, Karen

    2012-09-01

    Melting experiments were performed on a silica-rich peridotite composition at 10-17 GPa to determine majoritic garnet-melt partition coefficients (D) for major and trace elements. Our results show that D for many elements, including Na, Sc, Y and rare earth elements (REE), varies significantly with increasing pressure or proportion of majorite component. Lu and Sc become incompatible at 17 GPa, with D decreasing from 1.5 at 10 GPa to 0.9 at 17 GPa. As predicted from lattice strain, log D for isovalent cations entering the large site of majoritic garnet exhibits a near-parabolic dependence on ionic radius. Our data are used to refine a previously published predictive model for garnet-melt partitioning of trivalent cations, which suffered from a lack of calibration in the 10-20 GPa range. Our results suggest that Archean Al-depleted komatiites from Barberton (South Africa) may have been generated by partial melting of dry peridotite at depths between 200 and 400 km. We also speculate that transition zone diamonds from Kankan (Guinea), which contain inclusions of majoritic garnet, may have formed from the partial reduction of CO2-rich magmas that subsequently transported them to the surface. This hypothesis would provide an explanation for the REE patterns of majoritic garnet trapped within these diamonds, including Eu anomalies. Finally, we show that segregation of majoritic garnet-bearing cumulates during crystallisation of a deep Martian magma ocean could lead to a variety of Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd ratios depending on pressure, leading to a range of ɛ143Nd and ɛ176Hf isotope signatures for potential mantle sources of Martian rocks.

  12. Melt inclusion evidence for CO2-rich melts beneath the western branch of the East African Rift: implications for long-term storage of volatiles in the deep lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, T. R.; Mukasa, S. B.; Simon, A. C.; Moore, G.; Barifaijo, E.

    2015-05-01

    We present new major element, trace element, and volatile (H2O, CO2, S, F, and Cl) concentrations of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from five high-K, low-silica basanites from the western branch of the East African Rift System and use these data to investigate the generation of H2O- and CO2-rich melts at up to ~150 km depth. Measured H2O and CO2 concentrations reach ~2.5 and ~1 wt%, respectively, representing some of the highest CO2 concentrations measured in a melt inclusion to date. These measurements represent direct evidence of the high CO2 and H2O concentrations required to generate high-K alkaline lavas, and the CO2 that has been previously inferred to be necessary for the low mantle potential temperatures in the area. Ratios of CO2/Nb, CO2/Ba, and CO2/Cl are used to estimate an initial melt CO2 concentration of 5-12 wt%. The measured CO2 concentrations are consistent with CO2 solubilities determined by molecular dynamics calculations and high-pressure experiments for melt generation at 3-6 GPa; the depth of melting suggested by previous studies in the area. These melt inclusions measurements represent direct evidence for the presence of H2O- and CO2-rich melts in the deep upper mantle that have been proposed based on experimental and seismic evidence. Primitive-mantle normalized trace element patterns more closely resemble those found in subduction settings rather than ocean island basalt, and ratios of slab fluid tracers such as Li/Dy and B/Be indicate that the measured volatile abundances may be related to Neoproterozoic subduction during the assembly of Gondwana, implying the storage of volatiles in the mantle by subduction-related metasomatism.

  13. Volcanic arc magmas: implications of a melting-mixing model for element recycling in the crust-upper mantle system

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, R.W.

    1980-09-01

    In a model tested by mass balance calculations, residual periodotite (partly depleted in a basalt fraction) in a subducted lithospheric plate thermally equilibrates with the surrounding hotter mantle at depth beneath island arcs, and being less dense, rises as kilometer size diapires. The diapirs are modified by addiion of small proportions of melt or saline suprcritical fluid from the denser oceanic basalt (eclogite) and sediment. The diapire serves as a source for arc basalts. Mass balance calculations show that large proportions of the K, Rb, Pb, Ba and to a lesser extent Sr and light REE in island arc tholeiites are recycled continental crust material. Proportions are less for high-alumina basalts and shoshonites. High La/Sm basalts from volcanic arcs may be quite similar to their oceanic and intraplate counterparts. High La/Sm basalts are distinctly different. The model does not apply to magmas tha have been chemically modified during migration through the crust (e.g., some Andean andesites). Mass and element recycling rates can be calculated from the volcanic arc model, which gives the relative contributions of the melting components, and the magmatic production rates of arcs. Mantle-derived magmatism is forming new continental crust at arcs at a rate exceeding subduction of crustally-derived sediment at arcs. Thus, the crust appears to be growing, but at a rate that is perhaps half of the mean past rate. The K content of newly added continental crust, when corrected for recycling, is very much lower than the mean K content of the crust. Thus the dominant present mechanisms of crustal formation appears to yield a very different composition than past mechanisms which were responsible for formation of the bulk of the crust.

  14. A new melting model for variably metasomatized mantle and its implications for the generation of intraplate basalts in Oregon's High Lava Plains and the Modoc Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, C. B.; Grove, T. L.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    We develop a new model that simulates melting of variably metasomatized mantle peridotite and explore the effects of variations in pressure, temperature, and mantle composition on melt composition. This new model combines the approaches of Kinzler and Grove (1992a; b) and Kinzler (1997) to predict the temperature and major element composition of a broad spectrum of primary basalt types produced under anhydrous conditions at upper mantle pressures. The model can also be used to calculate the temperature and pressure at which primary magmas were produced in the mantle, as well as to model both near-fractional adiabatic decompression and batch melting. Our experimental compilation definitively locates the pressure interval of the plagioclase to spinel transition on the solidus at 1.1 GPa and shows that it is narrow (~0.1 GPa) for melting of natural peridotite compositions. A comparison of our melting models to other mantle thermometers reveals that the choice of fractionated phase assemblage(s) used to correct primitive liquids back to primary magmas has a significant effect on the calculated source temperature (>200°C). Our model is applied to young (<10.5 Ma) primitive intraplate basaltic lavas from Oregon's High Lava Plains (HLP) and the Modoc Plateau. We find the minimum depth of melting in the HLP decreases towards the west, with melting occurring at ~45 km below Jordan Valley volcanic center, ~30 km below Newberry volcano, and ~25 km below Crater Lake volcano on the Cascades arc axis. To the south, the minimum depth of melting also decreases towards the west, from ~ 40 km below the Modoc Plateau to 33 km below Medicine Lake and Mt. Shasta volcanoes. All basalts originated at 1250-1320°C and the calculated minimum depths of asthenospheric melting are very close to the depth of the Moho as determined from a number of regional geophysical studies. These observations point to the hot nature of the mantle immediately below the Moho and suggest the Moho and the

  15. Origin of water and mantle-crust interactions on Mars inferred from hydrogen isotopes and volatile element abundances of olivine-hosted melt inclusions of primitive shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Wang, Jianhua; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile elements have influenced the differentiation and eruptive behavior of Martian magmas and played an important role in the evolution of Martian climate and near-surface environments. However, the abundances of volatiles, and in particular the amount of water in the Martian interior, are disputed. A record of volatile reservoirs is contained in primitive Martian basalts (shergottites). Olivine-hosted melt inclusions from a geochemically depleted shergottite (Yamato 980459, representing a very primitive Martian melt) possess undegassed water with a chondritic and Earth-like D/H ratio (δD≤275‰). Based on volatile measurements in these inclusions, the water content of the depleted shergottite mantle is calculated to be 15-47 ppm, which is consistent with the dry mantle hypothesis. In contrast to D/H in the depleted shergottite, melt from an enriched shergottite (Larkman Nunatak 06319), which either formed by melting of an enriched mantle or by assimilation of crust, exhibits an extreme δD of ˜5000‰, indicative of a surface reservoir (e.g., the Martian atmosphere or crustal hydrosphere). These data provide strong evidence that the Martian mantle had retained the primordial low-δD component until at least the time of shergottite formation, and that young Martian basalts assimilated old Martian crust.

  16. A Coupled Geochemical and Geodynamical Approach for Mantle Melting Beneath Hawaii.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambart, S.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of the Hawaiian plume is manifested by the Hawaiian swell [1] and voluminous eruption of Ni-rich lavas [2] with enriched isotopic compositions [3]. Here we estimate the conditions of melt generation needed to reproduce both features. We used thermodynamic treatment for fractional melting [4] and melting parameterizations for pyroxenites [5] and peridotite [6] to determine pyroxenite contribution in magmas Xpx as functions of potential temperature TP, pyroxenite abundance in the source P, radius of the melting zone R and distance to the plume axis. The final pressure of melting is set to correspond with the base of the lithosphere (3 GPa) at the plume axis and increases with the distance from the axis [7]. The Hawaiian plume axis is thought to be currently between Loihi (L), Kilauea (K) and Mauna Loa (ML), which are 25 km, 32 km and 44 km radially away from the plume axis, respectively [3]. To determine Xpx, we assumed that magmas are accumulated melts produced on a circular sampling zone of 50 km diameter centered beneath each volcano [8]. Preliminary calculations show that for TP = 1525°C, P = 0.07 and R = 55 km, XpxML = 0.59, XpxK = 0.49 and XpxL = 0.45. XpxML and XpxK are similar to values suggested by [2]. Computed liquidus temperatures at 3 GPa are consistent with those of Hawaiian parental melts (1500-1520°C; [9]). XpxL is higher than suggested by [2] (XpxL = 0.09) but their estimate is based on only one glass analysis. Our model is also consistent with isotopic compositions: K and L have similar ɛNd, while ML is more enriched [3]. Finally, we can compute the density deficit using parameterization of [1] and relate it to the volume flux volume flux [10]: we obtain 3.2 km3/Yr, a value similar to the estimations based on the Hawaiian swell model [1]. 1-Ribe & Christensen EPSL 1999; 2-Sobolev et al. Nature 2005; 3-DePaulo et al. GGG 2001; 4-Phipps Morgan GGG 2001; 5-Lambart et al. in prep; 6-Katz et al. GGG 2003; 7-Ito & Mahoney EPSL 2005; 8-De

  17. Two magma bodies beneath the summit of Kīlauea Volcano unveiled by isotopically distinct melt deliveries from the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietruszka, Aaron J.; Heaton, Daniel E.; Marske, Jared P.; Garcia, Michael O.

    2015-03-01

    The summit magma storage reservoir of Kīlauea Volcano is one of the most important components of the magmatic plumbing system of this frequently active basaltic shield-building volcano. Here we use new high-precision Pb isotopic analyses of Kīlauea summit lavas-from 1959 to the active Halema'uma'u lava lake-to infer the number, size, and interconnectedness of magma bodies within the volcano's summit reservoir. From 1971 to 1982, the 206Pb/204Pb ratios of the lavas define two separate magma mixing trends that correlate with differences in vent location and/or pre-eruptive magma temperature. These relationships, which contrast with a single magma mixing trend for lavas from 1959 to 1968, indicate that Kīlauea summit eruptions since at least 1971 were supplied from two distinct magma bodies. The locations of these magma bodies are inferred to coincide with two major deformation centers identified by geodetic monitoring of the volcano's summit region: (1) the main locus of the summit reservoir ∼2-4 km below the southern rim of Kīlauea Caldera and (2) a shallower magma body <2 km below the eastern rim of Halema'uma'u pit crater. Residence time modeling suggests that the total volume of magma within Kīlauea's summit reservoir during the late 20th century (1959-1982) was exceedingly small (∼0.1-0.5 km3). Voluminous Kīlauea eruptions, such as the ongoing, 32-yr old Pu'u 'Ō'ō rift eruption (>4 km3 of lava erupted), must therefore be sustained by a nearly continuous supply of new melt from the mantle. The model results show that a minimum of four compositionally distinct, mantle-derived magma batches were delivered to the volcano (at least three directly to the summit reservoir) since 1959. These melt inputs correlate with the initiation of energetic (1959 Kīlauea Iki) and/or sustained (1969-1974 Mauna Ulu, 1983-present Pu'u 'Ō'ō and 2008-present Halema'uma'u) eruptions. Thus, Kīlauea's eruptive behavior is partly tied to the delivery of new magma batches

  18. Mantle peridotite xenoliths in andesite lava at El Peñon, central Mexican Volcanic Belt: Isotopic and trace element evidence for melting and metasomatism in the mantle wedge beneath an active arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Samuel B.; Blatter, Dawnika L.; Andronikov, Alexandre V.

    2007-08-01

    Peridotites in the mantle wedge and components added to them from the subducting slab are thought to be the source of most arc magmas. However, direct sampling of these materials, which provides a glimpse into the upper mantle beneath an active margin, is exceedingly rare. In the few arc localities where found, peridotite xenoliths are usually brought to the surface by basaltic magmas. Remarkably, the hornblende-bearing ultramafic xenoliths and clinopyroxene megaxenocrysts from El Peñon in the central Mexican Volcanic Belt were brought to the surface by a Quaternary high-Mg siliceous andesite, a rock type usually considered too evolved to be a direct product of mantle melting. The xenoliths and megaxenocrysts from El Peñon represent lithospheric mantle affected by significant subduction of oceanic lithosphere since as early as the Permian. Trace element and radiogenic isotope data we report here on these materials suggest a history of depletion by melt extraction, metasomatism involving a fluid phase, and finally, limited reaction between the ultramafic materials and the host andesite, probably during transport. They also show that high-Mg siliceous andesite can be a direct product of 1-5% melting of H 2O-bearing spinel lherzolite.

  19. Oxo-amphiboles in mantle xenoliths: evidence for H2O-rich melt interacting with the lithospheric mantle of Harrow Peaks (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentili, S.; Bonadiman, C.; Biagioni, C.; Comodi, P.; Coltorti, M.; Zucchini, A.; Ottolini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Amphiboles are the most widespread hydrous metasomatic phases in spinel-bearing mantle peridotites from Harrow Peaks (HP), Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica). They occur both in veinlets and disseminated in the peridotite matrix (preferentially associated with clinopyroxene and spinel grains). Four amphibole crystals were investigated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SC-XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and micro-Mössbauer spectroscopy; these crystal-chemical data allow to constrain upper mantle conditions during growth of these amphiboles and the role of volatile circulation during metasomatic processes in the Antarctic region. The HP amphiboles have low Mg# values (69.3-84.1), high TiO2 (2.74-5.30 wt%) and FeOtot contents (3.40 to 6.90 wt%). The Fe3+/Fetot ratios are significantly high (0.53-0.66). The W-site is mainly occupied by O2- (0.984-1.187 apfu) plus OH (H2O: 0.70-1.01 wt%) and minor F (0.04-0.24 wt%) and Cl (0.03-0.08 wt%). Consequently, HP amphiboles are actually characterized by a significant oxo component. The aH2O values were calculated at 1.5 GPa by dehydration equilibrium equations written as H2O-buffering equilibria among end-member components of amphibole and coexisting peridotite phases. Three out of four HP amphibole-bearing peridotites have values of aH2O ranging from 0.122 to 0.335; whereas one sample has aH2O remarkably higher (0.782) approaching an ideal H2O basalt solubility. The HP fO2 values, determined by the olivine-spinel-orthopyroxene oxygeobarometer (ΔQFM = -1.77 : +0.01), are remarkably different from those calculated on the basis of the amphibole dehydration equilibrium and the application of the dissociation reaction (ΔQFM = -2.60 : +6.8). The high aH2O and the extremely high fO2 values, determined by the oxy-amphibole equilibrium with respect to the redox conditions recorded by the co-existing anhydrous minerals (close to QFM buffer), revealed that: i) the amphibole

  20. Mixing in mantle convection models with self-consistent plate tectonics and melting and crustal production: Application to mixing in the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul

    2016-04-01

    It is generally thought that the early Earth's mantle was hotter than today, which using conventional convective scalings should have led to vigorous convection and mixing. Geochemical observations, however, suggest that mixing was not as rapid as would be expected, leading to the suggestion that early Earth had stagnant lid convection (Debaille et al., EPSL 2013). Additionally, the mantle's thermal evolution is difficult to explain using conventional scalings because early heat loss would have been too rapid, which has led to the hypothesis that plate tectonics convection does not follow the conventional convective scalings (Korenaga, GRL 2003). One physical process that could be important in this context is partial melting leading to crustal production, which has been shown to have the major effects of buffering mantle temperature and carrying a significant fraction of the heat from hot mantle (Nakagawa and Tackley, EPSL 2012), making plate tectonics easier (Lourenco et al., submitted), and causing compositional differentiation of the mantle that can buffer core heat loss (Nakagawa and Tackley, GCubed 2010). Here, the influence of this process on mantle mixing is examined, using secular thermo-chemical models that simulate Earth's evolution over 4.5 billion years. Mixing is quantified both in terms of how rapidly stretching occurs, and in terms of dispersion: how rapidly initially close heterogeneities are dispersed horizontally and vertically through the mantle. These measures are quantified as a function of time through Earth's evolution. The results will then be related to geochemically-inferred mixing rates.

  1. 3D analytical investigation of melting at lower mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiei, F.; Cantoni, M.; Badro, J.; Dorfman, S. M.; Gaal, R.; Piet, H.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    The diamond anvil cell is a unique tool to study materials under static pressures up to several hundreds of GPa. It is possible to generate temperatures as high as several thousand degrees in the diamond anvil cell by laser heating. This allows us to achieve deep mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC). The small heated volume is surrounded by thermally conductive diamond anvils results in high temperature gradients which affect phase transformation and chemical distribution in the LH-DAC. Analytical characterization of samples in three dimensions is essential to fully understand phase assemblages and equilibrium in LHDAC. In this study we used San Carlos olivine as a starting material as a simple proxy to deep mantle composition. Three samples were melted at ~3000 K and at ~45 GPa for three different durations ranging from 1 to 6 minutes; two other samples were melted at 30 GPa and 70 GPa. All samples were then sliced by focused ion beam (FIB). From each slice, an electron image and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) map were acquired by scanning electron microscope (SEM) in the dual beam FIB instrument. These slices were collected on one half of the heated area in each sample, from which we obtained 3D elemental and phase distribution. The other half of the heated area was used to extract a 100 nm thick section for subsequent analysis by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to obtain diffraction patterns and high resolution EDX maps. 3D reconstruction of SEM EDX results shows at least four differentiated regions in the heated area for all samples. The exact Fe and Mg compositions mentioned below are an example of the sample melted at 45 GPa for 6 minutes. The bulk of the heated are is surrounded by ferropericlase (Mg0.92, Fe0.08)O shell (Fp). Inside this shell we find a thick region of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite-structured bridgmanite (Brg) coexisting with Fp. In the center lies a Fe-rich core which is surrounded by magnesiow

  2. Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Mantle from Pigeonite/Melt Partitioning of Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, S.; Jones, J. H.; Shearer, C.

    2004-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing effort to calibrate the pyroxene/melt Eu oxybarometer for conditions relevant to the martian meteorites. There is fairly good agreement between a determinations using equilibria between Fe-Ti oxides and the estimates from Eu anomalies in shergottite augites in tenns of which meteorites are more or less oxidized. The Eu calibration was for angrite composition pyroxenes which are rather extreme. However, application of a calibration for martian composition augites 113 does not significantly reduce the discrepancy between the two methods. One possible reason for this discrepancy is that augites are non-liquidus. The use of pigeonite rather than augite as the oxy-barometer phase is considered. We have conducted experiments on martian composition pigeonite/melt REE partitioning as a function of fO2.

  3. Oxygen Fugacity of the Martian Mantle From Pyroxene/Melt Partitioning of REE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Jones, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing effort to calibrate the pyroxene/melt REE oxybarometer for conditions relevant to the martian meteorites. Redox variations have been reported among the shergottites. Wadhwa used the Eu and Gd augite/melt partitioning experiments of McKay, designed for the LEW86010 angrite, to infer a range of fo2 for the shergottites. Others inferred fo2 using equilibria between Fe-Ti oxides. There is fairly good agreement between the Fe-Ti oxide determinations and the estimates from Eu anomalies in terms of which meteorites are more or less oxidized. The Eu anomaly technique and the Fe-Ti oxide technique both essentially show the same trend, with Shergotty and Zagami being the most oxidized and QUE94201 and DaG 476 being the most reduced. Thus, the variation in fo2 appears to be both real and substantive. However, although the redox trends indicated by the two techniques are similar, there is as much as two log unit offset between the results of three researchers. One explanation for this offset is that the Eu calibration used for the shergottites was actually designed for the LEW86010 angrite, a silica-undersaturated basalt whose pyroxene (diopside) compositions are rather extreme. To correct this, experiments have been conducted on the redox relationship of Eu partitioning relative to Sm and Gd for pyroxene/melt compositions more relevant to Martian meteorites. We report here preliminary results for experiments on pigeonite/melt partitioning as a function of fO2.

  4. Element partitioning during carbonated pelite melting at 8, 13 and 22 GPa and the sediment signature in the EM mantle components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Daniele; Schmidt, Max W.; Günther, Detlef

    2012-04-01

    Within the subducting oceanic crust, carbonated eclogitic pelites are the lithology with the lowest melting temperature at > 5 GPa, i.e. at depths beyond major subarc dehydration. 200-400 °C below the oceanic mantle geotherm, carbonated pelites generate alkali-rich Ca-carbonate melts that constitute efficient metasomatic agents of the mantle. Partition coefficients between residual minerals and such melts were experimentally determined at 8, 13, and 22 GPa at 1100-1500 °C. Compared to previous studies, clinopyroxenes have higher jadeite contents (57-82 mol%) resulting in a larger compatibility for LILE. In garnet, the compatibility of REE increases from incompatible LREE (DLa ~ 0.005 at 8-22 GPa) to slightly compatible Lu (DLu = 0.96 to 3.5 at 8-22 GPa), DHFSE's increase with pressure from slightly incompatible at 8 GPa to highly compatible at 22 GPa, always with DHf > DZr. K-hollandite/carbonate melt partition coefficients at 13 GPa are all < 0.3 except for K itself. At 22 GPa, Rb, Sr, Ba, and Pb also become compatible in K-hollandite. Also at 22 GPa, FeTi-perovskites appear and have high D-values for HFSEs (DHFSE 28-88), similar to other Ti-rich minerals. In the CAS phase, also occurring at 22 GPa, Ti, Sr, La to Gd, and Pb, Th and U are compatible (DPb > DTh > DU > 1.7 with a DPb/DU of 12 to 26) leading to a strong fractionation of these elements during melting just above the 660 km discontinuity. Calculated bulk residue/carbonate melt partition coefficients increase with pressure for almost all elements. At 22 GPa, i.e. for carbonated sediment melting in the transition zone, element fractionation strongly effects the Pb isotopic evolution. Carbonate melt trace element compositions normalized to primitive mantle show strong enrichments in incompatible elements including LILE and LREE and relative negative anomalies for Ti at 8 and 13 GPa and for Hf, Zr and Ti at 22 GPa at which pressure absolute values are close to mantle concentrations. Primitive mantle

  5. Temperature and melt fraction distributions in a mantle wedge determined from the electrical conductivity structure: Application to one nonvolcanic and two volcanic regions in the Kyushu subduction zone, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Maki; Uyeshima, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new method for estimating the temperatures and melt fractions of the upper mantle. Our method is based on connecting the electrical conductivity structure from geophysical observations with laboratory-determined relationships between the electrical conductivity and temperature of four nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and garnet) and basaltic melt. The temperatures are expressed as the upper limit temperatures using the Hashin-Shtrikman lower bound in solid phases and using the Hashin-Shtrikman upper bound in solid-liquid mixed phases. We apply the method to a nonvolcanic and two volcanic regions in the Kyushu subduction zone, southwest Japan. Our results suggest that the temperatures of the upper mantle are 1100-1450°C for dry mantle and 900-1350°C for wet mantle and that the melt fractions of the upper mantle are <20% beneath the two volcanic regions and <5% beneath the nonvolcanic region for both dry and wet mantle.

  6. Melting enthalpies of mantle peridotite: calorimetric determinations in the system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 and application to magma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojitani, Hiroshi; Akaogi, Masaki

    1997-12-01

    High-temperature drop calorimetry in the temperature range of 1398-1785 K was performed for the samples of mixtures of synthetic anorthite (An), diopside (Di), enstatite (En) and forsterite (Fo) with the same compositions as those of primary melts generated at 1.1, 3 and 4 GPa at most 10° above the solidus of anhydrous mantle peridotite in the CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 system. From the differences between the heat contents ( H T-H 298) of liquid and that of crystal mixture at the liquidus temperature, melting enthalpies of the samples of 1.1, 3 and 4 GPa-primary melt compositions were determined at 1 atm to be 531 ± 39 J · g -1 at 1583 K, 604 ± 21 J · g -1 at 1703 K, 646 ± 21 J · g -1 at 1753 K, respectively. These heat of fusion values suggest that mixing enthalpy of the melt in the An-Di-En-Fo system is approximately zero within the experimental errors when we use the heat of fusion of Fo by Richet et al. (P. Richet, F. Leclerc, L. Benoist, Melting of forsterite and spinel, with implications for the glass transition of Mg 2SiO 4 liquid, Geophys. Res. Lett. 20 (1993) 1675-1678). The measured enthalpies of melting at 1 atm were converted into those for melting reactions which occur under high pressures by correcting enthalpy changes associated with solid-state mineral reactions. Correcting the effects of pressure, temperature and FeO and Na 2O components on the melting enthalpies at 1 atm, heat of fusion values of a representative mantle peridotite just above the solidus under high pressure were estimated to be 590 J at 1.1 GPa and 1523 K, 692 J at 3 GPa and 1773 K, and 807 J at 4 GPa and 1923 K for melting reactions producing liquid of 1 g, with uncertainties of 50 J. By applying these melting enthalpies to a mantle diapir model which generates present MORBs, a potential mantle temperature of 1533 K has been estimated, assuming an eruption temperature of magma of 1473 K.

  7. Subduction of Fracture Zones control mantle melting and geochemical signature above slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Leeman, William; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi

    2014-05-01

    The geochemistry of arc volcanics proximal to oceanic fracture zones (FZs) is consistent with higher than normal fluid inputs to arc magma sources. Here, enrichment of boron (B/Zr) in volcanic arc lavas is used to evaluate relative along-strike inputs of slab-derived fluids in the Aleutian, Andean, Cascades, and Trans-Mexican arcs. Significant B/Zr spikes coincide with subduction of prominent FZs in the relatively cool Aleutian and Andean subduction zones, but not in the relatively warm Cascadia and Mexican subduction zones, suggesting that FZ subduction locally enhances fluid introduction beneath volcanic arcs, and retention of fluids to sub-arc depths diminishes with subduction zone thermal gradient. Geodynamic treatments of lateral inhomogeneities in subducting plates have not previously considered how FZs may influence the melt and fluid distribution above the slab. Using high-resolution three-dimensional coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, concentrate in areas where fracture zones are subducted, resulting in along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes.

  8. An Ultra-Depleted Mantle Component in the Ontong Java Plateau Revealed by Major, Trace and Volatile Element Abundances in Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. G.; Cabral, R. A.; Rose-Koga, E. F.; Koga, K. T.; Price, A. A.; Hauri, E. H.; Michael, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) represents the most voluminous large igneous province (LIP) preserved in the geologic record. The most voluminous volcanic stages of the OJP—the Kroenke and Kwaimbaita stages, which dominate the accessible portions of the plateau—have relatively flat primitive mantle normalized rare earth element (REE) patterns, or spidergrams. With the exception of relatively small volumes of late-stage melts—referred to as the Singgalo stage—that are characterized by slightly enriched REE spidergrams, the volcanic stages that dominated the eruptive history of the OJP exhibit remarkably homogeneous, flat REE patterns. Here we isolate, for the first time, olivine-hosted melt inclusions from OJP. We show that the melt inclusions have two clear populations defined by having distinct trace element characteristics. The first population has relatively flat trace element patterns that are similar to that observed in whole rock lavas from the most voluminous volcanic stages (Kroenke and Kwaimbaita stages) recorded in the OJP. In contrast, a second group of melt inclusions, referred to as UDM (ultra-depleted melt) inclusions, exhibit strikingly depleted REE spidergrams; these trace element patterns are far more depleted than any previously reported lava from OJP. The UDM have unique trace element signatures that preclude an origin by assimilation of hydrothermally-altered oceanic crust or re-melting the depleted mantle source left over after melt extraction during construction of the OJP. We interpret the new UDM compositions to be the result of melting of a previously unrecognized ultra-depleted component hosted in the OJP mantle source.

  9. Melting of plagioclase + spinel lherzolite at low pressures (0.5 GPa): An experimental approach to the evolution of basaltic melt during mantle refertilisation at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Falloon, Trevor J.; Green, David H.; Hibberson, William O.

    2013-07-01

    The presence of plagioclase + spinel lherzolites among ocean floor samples and in some ophiolite complexes invites speculation on their origin and relationships to processes of magmatism and lithosphere refertilisation beneath mid-ocean ridges. In an experimental approach to their petrogenesis, we have determined the compositions of liquids and co-existing minerals in the six phase assemblage [liquid + olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + plagioclase + spinel] at 0.5 GPa and 1100 °C to 1200 °C. In our experimental approach we maintained the olivine Mg# [Mg / (Mg + Fe)] close to 90 (i.e., 88.8-95.5) but varied plagioclase from anorthite to albite. The major variations in liquid compositions are related to plagioclase composition. Liquids have much lower MgO and FeO and higher SiO2 and Al2O3 than liquids in the 6-phase plagioclase + spinel lherzolite at 0.75 GPa and 1 GPa. Liquids are quartz-normative (silica-oversaturated) for plagioclase that are more calcic than An40 but nepheline-normative (critically silica-undersaturated) for plagioclase that are more sodic than An25. Liquid compositions are quite unlike natural MORB glasses with similar Mg# (i.e., compatible with parental magmas from lherzolitic mantle with Mg# ≈ 90). Our study provides no support for models of MORB petrogenesis which suggest extraction of near-solidus melts from plagioclase lherzolite at low pressure. Similarly, referring to numerical models of melting volumes beneath mid-ocean ridges (Langmuir et al., 1992; McKenzie and Bickle, 1988) in which melt increments are calculated for different sites and these increments pooled to form MORB, our data argue that melts equilibrated with plagioclase ± spinel lherzolite at < 1 GPa cannot be significant components of such ‘pooled melt’ focussed from within the melting volume. The compositions of minerals from plagioclase ± spinel lherzolite at Lanzo (northern Italy; Piccardo et al., 2007) are compared with our experimental assemblages at 0

  10. Depleted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and its tholeiitic melt metasomatism beneath NE termination of the Eger Rift (Europe): the case study of the Steinberg (Upper Lusatia, SE Germany) xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukuła, Anna; Puziewicz, Jacek; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Büchner, Jörg; Tietz, Olaf

    2015-12-01

    The ca. 30 Ma Steinberg basanite occurs at the NE termination of the Eger (Ohře) Rift in the NW Bohemian Massif, Central Europe, and belongs to the Cenozoic alkaline Central European Volcanic Province. The basanite hosts a suite of mantle xenoliths, most of which are harzburgites containing relatively magnesian olivine (Fo 90.5-91.6) and Al-poor (0.04-0.13 a pfu) orthopyroxene (mg# 0.90-0.92). Some of these harzburgites also contain volumetrically minor clinopyroxene (mg# 0.92-0.95, Al 0.03-0.13 a pfu) and have U-shaped LREE-enriched REE patterns. The Steinberg harzburgites are typical for the Lower Silesian - Upper Lusatian domain of the European subcontinental lithospheric mantle. They represent residual mantle that has undergone extensive partial melting and was subsequently affected by mantle metasomatism by mixed carbonatite-silicate melts. The Steinberg xenolith suite comprises also dunitic xenoliths affected by metasomatism by melt similar to the host basanite, which lowered the Fo content in olivine to 87.6 %. This metasomatism happened shortly before xenolith entrainment in the erupting lava. One of the xenoliths is a wehrlite (olivine Fo 73 %, clinopyroxene mg# 0.83-0.85, subordinate orthopyroxene mg# 0.76-0.77). Its clinopyroxene REE pattern is flat and slightly LREE-depleted. This wehrlite is considered to be a tholeiitic cumulate. One of the studied harzburgites contains clinopyroxene with similar trace element contents to those in wehrlite. This type of clinopyroxene records percolation of tholeiitic melt through harzburgite. The tholeiitic melt might be similar to Cenozoic continental tholeiites occurring in the Central European Volcanic Province (e.g., Vogelsberg, Germany).

  11. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO₃ glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO₃ melt in Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q.; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J.; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y.; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2015-02-09

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; [3]O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  12. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO₃ glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO₃ melt in Earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2008-06-13

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO{sub 3}-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO{sub 3} glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; {sup [3]}O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO{sub 3} melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO{sub 3} melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle.

  13. The low-degree shape of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Mark E.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Phillips, Roger J.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Kahan, Daniel S.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Hauck, Steven A.; Peale, Stanton J.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Mazarico, Erwan; Johnson, Catherine L.; Gaskell, Robert W.; Roberts, James H.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Oberst, Juergen

    2015-09-01

    The shape of Mercury, particularly when combined with its geoid, provides clues to the planet's internal structure, thermal evolution, and rotational history. Elevation measurements of the northern hemisphere acquired by the Mercury Laser Altimeter on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft, combined with 378 occultations of radio signals from the spacecraft in the planet's southern hemisphere, reveal the low-degree shape of Mercury. Mercury's mean radius is 2439.36 ± 0.02 km, and there is a 0.14 km offset between the planet's centers of mass and figure. Mercury is oblate, with a polar radius 1.65 km less than the mean equatorial radius. The difference between the semimajor and semiminor equatorial axes is 1.25 km, with the long axis oriented 15° west of Mercury's dynamically defined principal axis. Mercury's geoid is also oblate and elongated, but it deviates from a sphere by a factor of 10 less than Mercury's shape, implying compensation of elevation variations on a global scale.

  14. Volatiles in melt inclusions and osmium isotopes from Hawaiian lavas: investigating the relationship between CO2 and H2O contents with mantle source lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marske, J. P.; Hauri, E. H.; Garcia, M. O.; Pietruszka, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Variations in radiogenic isotopes (Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf, He, etc.) and magmatic volatiles (CO2 or H2O) in Hawaiian volcanoes reveal a range of important processes that occur from the source to surface (mantle source heterogeneity, extents of melting, magma transportation, mixing, and storage, and eruption style). Hawaiian lavas are thought to originate from partial melting of a heterogeneous plume source containing a mixture of peridotite and ancient recycled oceanic crust (pyroxenite or eclogite). These lavas display a considerable range in volatile abundances (e.g. <1 to >1000 ppm for Kilauea) that is generally attributed to magmatic degassing or mixing during ascent. However, the source region for Hawaiian volcanoes may also be heterogeneous with respect to volatile concentrations. The effect of shallow degassing makes it difficult to determine if there is a relationship between mantle source composition, lithology, and the volatile budget. We will present Os isotopic ratios and volatile contents for over 25 samples from six Hawaiian volcanoes (Koolau, Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kilauea, and Loihi) to determine if pre-eruptive volatiles in shield-stage magmas correlate with the different Hawaiian components (i.e. 'Kea' or 'Loa') and lithologies (i.e. peridotite or pyroxenite) identified by radiogenic isotopes. Rapidly-cooled submarine glasses and tephras will be analyzed, as subaerial lavas cool too slowly to prevent diffusive loss of H2O from melt inclusions. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions or groundmass glasses from each eruption will be analyzed for a range of volatiles (CO2, H2O, S, Cl, F). Additionally, olivine separates from each of these samples will be analyzed for Os isotopes. This study assesses the role of mantle heterogeneity, degree of partial melting, magma transportation, and degassing, in controlling the primary melt volatile concentrations. Although volatile abundances in parental magmas are likely to be modified by variable extents of exsolution

  15. Transition from ultra-enriched to ultra-depleted primary MORB melts in a single volcanic suite (Macquarie Island, SW Pacific): Implications for mantle source, melting process and plumbing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husen, Anika; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Everard, John L.; Kamenetsky, Maya B.

    2016-07-01

    Compositional diversity of basalts forming the oceanic floor is attributed to a variety of factors such as mantle heterogeneities, melting conditions, mixing of individual melt batches, as well as fractionation and assimilation processes during magma ascent and emplacement. In this study the compositional range and origin of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) is approached by petrological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of the Miocene Macquarie Island ophiolite, an uplifted part of the Macquarie Ridge at the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates. In this study, earlier results on the enriched to ultra-enriched (La/Sm 1.4-7.9), isotopically homogeneous basaltic glasses are complemented by the compositions of olivine-phyric rocks, principal phenocrystic minerals and Cr-spinel hosted melt inclusions. Studied olivine, clinopyroxene and Cr-spinel phenocrysts are among the most primitive known for MORB (85-91 mol% forsterite in olivine, 81-91 Mg# in clinopyroxene, and 66-77 Mg# and 34-60 Cr# in spinel) and represent primary and near-primary compositions of their parental melts. Geochemical characteristics of the liquids parental to clinopyroxene (La/Sm 0.8-6.3) and Cr-spinel (La/Sm 0.4-5) partly overlap with those of the basaltic glasses, but also strongly advocate the role of depleted to ultra-depleted primary melts in the origin of the Macquarie Island porphyritic rocks. The trace element composition of olivine phenocrysts and the systematics of rare-earth elements in glasses, melt inclusions, and clinopyroxene provide evidence for a peridotitic composition of the source mantle. Our data supports the mechanism of fractional "dynamic" melting of a single mantle peridotite producing individual partial melt batches with continuously changing compositions from ultra-enriched towards ultra-depleted. The incipient enriched melt batches, represented by basaltic glasses in this study, may erupt without significant modification, whereas consecutively derived

  16. Heterogeneous mantle sources of potassium-rich magmas in central-southern Italy: Melt inclusion evidence from Roccamonfina and Ernici (Mid Latina Valley)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikogosian, Igor K.; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2010-11-01

    We present a comprehensive set of data on compositions of melt inclusions and earliest crystallized mineral phases from mafic lavas of Roccamonfina and Ernici, situated in a central sector of the string of Pliocene-Quaternary potassic volcanic centres along the Tyrrhenian border of peninsular Italy. Studied samples of mafic lavas (4.4-7 wt.% MgO) cover a wide spectrum of potassium levels, and represent magmas considered to be parental to the ultrapotassic leucite-bearing high-K series (HKS, 4-8 wt.% K 2O) and to shoshonitic (1.5-5%) and subalkaline (< 1.5%) series, here collectively referred to as medium-low potassic series (M-LKS). Highly variable compositions of melt inclusions in olivine hosts (Fo = 89-91.5) from single lava samples indicate that all parental magmas are composed of diverse collections of primary melts, consistent with extraction from heterogeneous vein-type mantle lithologies. Major and trace-element systematics provide evidence that primitive HKS and M-LKS magmas originated from separate domains and not through changes in the proportion of vein and wall-rock peridotite during progressive melting of a common source. We infer that parental HKS magmas are largely derived from the vein portion of a heterogeneous phlogopite (± amphibole ± apatite) wehrlitic mantle. Contrasting major element, volatile and trace-element signatures of melt inclusions from medium-K lavas point to an amphibole-bearing wehrlitic source for shoshonitic magmas, probably with a subordinate role of phlogopite. Finally, a population of silica-undersaturated potassium-poor melt inclusions with extreme CaO/Al 2O 3 ratios (> 1.2) and fluid-depleted signatures suggests that subalkaline magmas originate either from the same source following the exhaustion of amphibole, or from a separate wehrlitic-pyroxenitic (± apatite ± carbonate?) assemblage. Our melt inclusion data are consistent with a mixed metasomatic imprint by siliceous potassium-rich and carbonate-rich (carbonatitic

  17. Mantle flow, volatiles, slab-surface temperatures and melting dynamics in the north Tonga Arc - Lau Backarc Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S.; Caulfield, J.; Arculus, R. J.; Dale, C. W.; Jenner, F. E.; Pearce, J. A.; Macpherson, C.; Handley, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Fonualei Spreading Centre affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate geochemical changes with increasing depth to the slab in the Lau Backarc Basin. We present H2O and CO2 concentrations and Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf and U-Th-Ra isotope data for selected glasses as well as Hf isotope data from boninites and seamounts to the north of the Tonga Arc. The Pb and Hf isotope data are used to show that mantle flow is oriented to the southwest and that the tear in the northern end of the slab may not extend east as far as the boninite locality. Along the Fonualei Spreading Centre, key geochemical parameters change smoothly with increasing distance from the arc front and increasing slab surface temperatures. The latter may range from 720 to 865 C, based on decreasing H2O/Ce ratios. Consistent with experimental data, the geochemical trends are interpreted to reflect changes in the amount and composition of wet pelite melts or super-critical fluids and aqueous fluids derived from the slab. With one exception, all of the lavas preserve both 238U excesses and 226Ra excesses. We suggest that lavas from the Fonualei Spreading Centre and Valu Fa Ridge are dominated by fluid-fluxed melting whereas those from the East and Central Lau Spreading Centres, where slab surface temperatures exceed ~ 850-900 C, are largely derived through decompression. A similar observation is found for the Manus and East Scotia backarc basins and may reflect the expiry of a key phase such as lawsonite in the subducted basaltic crust.

  18. Melting of carbonated pelites at 2.5-5.0 GPa, silicate-carbonatite liquid immiscibility, and potassium-carbon metasomatism of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Tonny B.; Schmidt, Max W.

    2008-03-01

    Melting experiments on a Fe-rich carbonate-saturated pelite were performed at 850-1300 °C and 2.5-5.0 GPa to define melting relations, melt compositions, and the conditions under which carbonates remain residual. In the selected fertile bulk composition, 30 wt.% potassic granite (2.5 GPa) or phonolite (5.0 GPa) melt is generated at the fluid-absent solidus. The temperature of the latter increases from 900 °C at 2.4 GPa to 1070 °C at 5.0 GPa. Phengite + quartz/coesite control initial silicate melting and melt productivity through the reaction phengite + quartz/coesite +clinopyroxene + calcite = silicate melt + kyanite + garnet, which leaves most of the Fe-Mg-calcite in the residue. Na remains compatible in clinopyroxene (DNacpx/melt = 3.1 to 7.3 at the fluid-absent solidus), resulting in silicate melts with K2O/Na2O wt-ratios of 5.8-8.6. Such highly potassic carbonated silicate melts represent ideal metasomatic agents for the source mantle of group II kimberlites. From 3.7 to 5.0 GPa, Fe-Mg-calcite disappears only through the formation of Ca-carbonatite at 1100 °C. The experiments provide a possible source for Ca-carbonatites in combination with alkaline granitic to phonolitic melts at temperatures unlikely to be achieved during ongoing subduction. Large scale carbonate transfer to the subarc mantle can thus only be achieved when burying rates slow considerably down or subducted crust becomes incorporated into the mantle. Consequently, it is likely that carbonates will not be extensively mobilized in a typical subarc region, thus extending and confirming earlier results from subsolidus studies (Connolly, J.A.D., 2005. Computation of phase equilibria by linear programming: a tool for geodynamic modelling and its application to subduction zone decarbonation. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 236, 524-541.), that > 70-80% of the subducted carbonate will bypass the volcanic arc region and get buried to larger depths.

  19. First in-situ monitoring of CO2 delivery to the mantle followed by compression melting, using synchrotron generated X-ray diffraction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouda, Tahar; Chantel, Julien; Manthilake, Geeth; Guignard, Jérémy; Crichton, Wilson; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2014-05-01

    Melting of peridotite + CO2 upon compression has been directly monitored in situ, for the first time. We have combined high pressure experiments in the multianvil apparatus with synchrotron-generated X-ray diffraction, in order to monitor sample decarbonation upon heating, followed by melting upon compression. Experiments were performed in the model system CaO-MgO-SiO2+CO2, using dolomite and silicates contained in graphite capsules as starting material. Save Al, starting composition was aimed at reproducing peridotitic system. The sample was first compressed at room temperature, then heated. Decarbonation was observed at 2.2 GPa and 1100°C. After further heating to 1300°C, pressure was increased. Melting was observed at 2.7 GPa, while temperature was kept at 1300°C. All transformations were followed using X-ray diffraction. Starting with silicate + carbonate mixtures, we were thus able to keep CO2 fluid in the experimental sample at high P and T, up to the solidus. Concerning carbon recycling at subduction zones, it is known that CO2 is a non-wetting fluid in silicate aggregates. Therefore, any CO2 resulting from carbonate breakdown likely remains trapped at grain corners either in the subducted lithosphere or in the mantle wedge before eventually being trapped in mantle minerals as fluid inclusions, due to dynamic recrystallization. In this way, CO2 released from the slab may be spread laterally due to mantle convection. Entrainment to further depths by deep subduction or in convection cells induces CO2 introduction to depth wherein the solidus can be crossed, due to pressure increase. The solidus corresponds to the so-called carbonate ledge, beyond which carbonatitic melts are produced. Therefore, compression melting of CO2-bearing lithologies is a way to produce carbonatitic melts at depths corresponding to about 80 km. This mechanism is a viable explanation for the observed geophysical anomalies, such as those revealed by electrical conductivity

  20. Comparing the nature of the western and eastern Azores mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genske, Felix S.; Beier, Christoph; Stracke, Andreas; Turner, Simon P.; Pearson, Norman J.; Hauff, Folkmar; Schaefer, Bruce F.; Haase, Karsten M.

    2016-01-01

    The Azores islands in the central North-Atlantic originate from a regional melting anomaly, probably created by melting hot, unusually hydrous and geochemically enriched mantle. Here, we present Hf, Pb and Os isotopic data in geochemically well-characterised primitive lavas from the islands Flores and Corvo that are located west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), as well as submarine samples from a subsided island west of Flores and from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) holes drilled in the western part of the Azores platform and beyond. These are compared to existing data from the Azores islands east of the MAR. The geodynamic origin of the two islands west of the ridge axis and furthest from the inferred plume centre in the central part of the plateau is enigmatic. The new data constrain the source compositions of the Flores and Corvo lavas and show that the western and eastern Azores mantle is isotopically similar, with the exception of an enriched component found exclusively on eastern São Miguel. Trace element ratios involving high field strength elements (HFSE) are distinctly different in the western islands (e.g. twofold higher Nb/Zr) compared to any of the islands east of the MAR. A similar signature is observed in MAR basalts to the south of the Azores platform and inferred to originate from (auto-) metasomatic enrichment of the sub-ridge mantle (Gale et al., 2011, 2013). In a similar fashion, low degree melts from an enriched source component may metasomatise the ambient plume mantle underneath the western Azores islands. Melting such a modified plume mantle can explain the chemical differences between lavas from the western and eastern Azores islands without the need for additional plume components. Recent re-enrichment and intra melting column modification of the upwelling mantle can cause local to regional scale geochemical differences in mantle-derived melts.

  1. Seismic velocity anisotropy and heterogeneity beneath the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography Experiment (MELT) region of the East Pacific Rise from analysis of P and S body waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, W.C.; Toomey, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    We use teleseismic P and S delay times and shear wave splitting measurements to constrain isotropic and anisotropic heterogeneity in the mantle beneath the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR). The data comprise 462 P and S delay times and 18 shear wave splitting observations recorded during the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment. We estimate the mantle melt content (F) and temperature (T) variation from the isotropic velocity variation. Our results indicate that the maximum variation in F beneath our array is between zero and ???1.2%, and maximum variation in T is between zero and ???100 K. We favor an explanation having partial contributions from both T and F. We approximate the seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle with hexagonal symmetry, consistent with the assumption of two dimensionality of mantle flow. Our new tomographic technique uses a nonlinear inversion of P and slow S polarization delay times to simultaneously solve for coupled VP and VS heterogeneity throughout the model and for the magnitude of anisotropy within discrete domains. The domain dimensions and the dip of the anisotropy are fixed for each inversion but are varied in a grid search, obtaining the misfit of the models to the body wave delay data and to split times of vertically propagating S waves. The data misfit and the isotropic heterogeneity are sensitive to domain dimensions and dip of anisotropy. In a region centered beneath the SEPR the best average dip of the hexagonal symmetry axis is horizontal or dipping shallowly (<30??) west. Given the resolution of our data, a subaxial region characterized by vertically aligned symmetry axes may exist but is limited to be <80 km deep. We infer that the mantle flow beneath the SEPR is consistent with shallow asthenospheric return flow from the direction of the South Pacific superswell.

  2. Trace element mineral/melt partitioning for basaltic and basaltic andesitic melts: An experimental and laser ICP-MS study with application to the oxidation state of mantle source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubier, Muriel; Grove, Timothy L.; Langmuir, Charles H.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding magmatic processes such as crystallization and melting recorded in natural samples requires calibration of mineral-melt trace element partition coefficients (D) and their dependence on temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity (fO2) and chemical composition. However, few experimental studies have focused on measuring trace element partition coefficients for a large number of trace elements, in the various minerals present in basaltic rocks, and under diverse conditions, particularly of variable fO2. Twenty-seven 0.1 MPa experiments provide partition coefficients for major elements and Sc, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Ni, Ga, Sr, Y, Nb, Ba, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd, and Yb for the mineral phases olivine, plagioclase, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene. The experimental conditions range from 1150 to 1190 °C with oxygen fugacities from QFM to NNO+2. Run products were analyzed by laser-ablation ICP-MS. The new partition coefficients, combined with previously published data, can be used to model crystallization processes at low pressure. Partitioning of multivalent cations V, Fe and Eu varies as a function of the redox conditions, consistent with previous work, and can be used to constrain oxidation states of magmatic source regions. The V/Yb ratio is shown to be a useful proxy for oxidation state. The V/Yb ratio varies during mantle melting as a function of oxidation state of the mantle source, and it is not modified during fractional crystallization of olivine ± plag ± cpx. V/Yb increases from MORB, BABB to arc lavas, suggesting a progressive increase of fO2 from QFM to NNO+2. Apparent fO2 of arc lavas, however, is quite variable. These results demonstrate that sub-arc mantle displays a larger range of redox conditions toward a more oxidized mantle than the MORB mantle.

  3. Fluid-present melting of sulfide-bearing ocean-crust: Experimental constraints on the transport of sulfur from subducting slab to mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jégo, Sébastien; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2013-06-01

    To constrain the sulfur enrichment of arc magma source-regions and the agent of sulfur transport from subducting slab to mantle wedge, here we report experimental measurements of sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS) of slab-derived hydrous partial melts at 2.0 and 3.0 GPa and from 800 to 1050 °C, using Ni-NiO (NNO) and Co-CoO (CCO) external oxygen fugacity (fO2) buffers. A synthetic H2O-saturated MORB with 1 wt.% S (added as pyrite) was used as starting material. All experiments produced pyrrhotite- and fluid-saturated assemblages of silicate glass, clinopyroxene, garnet, quartz, and rutile (plus amphibole at 2 GPa/800 °C and phengite at 3 GPa/850 °C). The silicate partial melt composition evolves from rhyolitic to rhyodacitic compositions with increasing temperature and melting degree in equilibrium with an eclogitic residue, showing substantial decrease in SiO2 and Mg# and increase in FeOT, TiO2 and Na2O. At all temperatures melt sulfur concentrations are very low, with an average of 110 ± 50 ppm S, similar to previous measurements at lower pressures. Melt SCSS appears to be mainly controlled by the melt composition, the activity of water, aH2O and the sulfur fugacity, fS2 (calculated from the composition of pyrrhotite). Mass-balance calculations show that the proportion of bulk sulfur dissolved in the silicate melt is negligible (<0.005 wt.% of the bulk sulfur). In contrast, diminishing proportion of pyrrhotite with increasing temperature suggests that the fluid phase at equilibrium may contain as much as 10-15 wt.% S at ⩾1050 °C, and more than 40 wt.% of the bulk sulfur initially present in the slab may be transferred to the aqueous fluid. Our data also suggest that fluid/melt sulfur partitioning increases with increasing temperature, from ˜300 at 900 °C to ˜1200 at 1050 °C, whereas pressure appears to have less of an effect. With respect to fO2, no real difference of fluid/melt S partitioning, within data uncertainties, between NNO and CCO at

  4. Effect of subduction components on production of basalts from Tateshina volcano, central Japan: geochemical calculation of dehydration of subducting oceanic crust and partial melting of overlying sediments, and subsequent fluid-mantle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Masayasu; Shuto, Kenji

    Effect of subduction components on production of basalts from Tateshina volcano, central Japan: geochemical calculation of dehydration of subducting oceanic crust and partial melting of overlying sediments, and subsequent fluid-mantle interaction

  5. Frozen melt-rock reaction in a peridotite xenolith from sub-arc mantle recorded by diffusion of trace elements and water in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollan, P. M. E.; O'Neill, H. St. C.; Hermann, J.; Benedictus, A.; Arculus, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    Inferring the ambient state of the lithospheric mantle from xenoliths may be misleading if the magmatic activity responsible for the exhumation has modified the xenolith. Changes due to melt-xenolith interactions during exhumation are usually identifiable because of the short timescales involved, but changes due to earlier pulses of magma passing through the lithosphere may be more insidious because the longer timescales allow extensive overprinting of the ambient petrography. Here we describe an intermediate stage of melt-rock reaction recorded in a porphyroclastic peridotite xenolith from the upper mantle wedge adjacent to the West Bismarck Island Arc. The texture and chemistry, frozen during rapid exhumation, reflects the progressive change from harzburgite to clinopyroxene-bearing dunite caused by the infiltration of hydrous basaltic melt into the xenolith. The unusually low equilibration temperature of the xenolith (∼650 °C) prior to this event is reflected in very low concentrations of incompatible elements in the olivine, enhancing the diffusion profiles of these elements into the olivine from the interaction with the melt. The Ca concentration profiles correspond to a timescale of approximately three months, which we interpret as the time between the first infiltration of melt into the lithospheric mantle at this locality and the subsequent exhumation of the xenolith by a second pulse of magma. The diffusion profiles of other trace elements (Li, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Y) and major elements (Fe-Mg) confirm that all these elements diffuse through olivine at rates that differ from each other by less than one order of magnitude. Infrared spectroscopy reveals OH- ("water") contents and incorporation mechanisms typical of other arc mantle peridotites in the olivine cores. Water contents increase towards the crystal rims, similarly to the profiles of other measured trace elements. The increase in water concentration is accompanied by subtle changes in

  6. OH solubility in olivine in the peridotite-COH system under reducing conditions and implications for water storage and hydrous melting in the reducing upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaozhi

    2015-12-01

    Experimental studies of OH solubility in peridotite minerals are of crucial importance for understanding some key geochemical, geophysical and geodynamical properties of the upper mantle. In reducing depths of the upper mantle, C-O-H fluids are dominated by CH4 and H2O. However, available experimental H-annealing of olivine concerning water storage capacity in the reducing upper mantle has been exclusively carried out by equilibrating olivine with H2O only. In this study, OH solubility in olivine has been investigated by annealing natural olivine crystals under peridotite-bearing and CH4-H2O-present conditions with piston cylinder and multi-anvil apparatus. Experiments were performed at 1-7 GPa and 1100-1350 °C and with oxygen fugacity controlled by Fe-FeO buffer, and OH solubilities were measured from polarized infrared spectra. The olivines show no change in chemical composition during the experiments. The infrared spectra of all the annealed olivines show OH bands in the range 3650-3000 cm-1, at both high (>3450 cm-1) and low (<3450 cm-1) frequency, and the bands at ˜3400-3300 cm-1 are greatly enhanced above ˜3 GPa and 1300 °C. The determined H2O solubility is ˜90-385 ppm for the olivine coexisting with H2O (1-7 GPa and 1100 °C), and is ˜40-380 ppm for the olivine coexisting with CH4-H2O (1-7 GPa and 1100-1350 °C). When CH4 is present in the equilibrium fluid, the H2O solubility is reduced by a factor of ˜2.3 under otherwise identical conditions, indicating a strong effect of CH4 on the partitioning of water between olivine and coexisting fluid. The storage capacity of water in the reducing upper mantle is, modeled with the measured solubility of olivine and available partition coefficients of water between coexisting minerals, up to ˜2 orders of magnitude lower than some previous estimates. Considering the temperature along the geotherm in the reducing oceanic upper mantle, the required H2O concentration to trigger hydrous melting is 250 and 535 ppm

  7. Beryllium Isotope and Combined Be and U-series Isotope Studies of Volcanic Arcs: Implications for Fluid and Melt Transport Through the Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. D.; Ryan, J. G.

    2004-12-01

    Beryllium isotope and combined studies of 10Be/9Be and U-series isotopes in volcanic arcs can 1) map transport of demonstrably slab derived elements through the mantle wedge; 2) certify the relationship of U series isotopes to slab derivation; 3) identify multiple stages in subduction modification of the mantle and constrain their timescales; and 4) speak to element partitioning into fluids and melts from the slab. In the Kurile, Aleutian and Bismarck arcs, 10Be/9Be ratios for lavas from behind the volcanic front are often comparable to, and sometimes greater than, those at the volcanic front, despite the longer path to rear-arc locations, along which 10Be is decaying in transit. Be/Zr ratios show a similar pattern of across-arc increase, without increases in enrichments of Mo and Sn, species which would be mobilized with Be if F-bearing fluids were present. The simplest interpretation is that sediment melting, and its contribution to the mantle wedge, is greater behind the front than at the volcanic front. Despite evidence for an increasing sediment melt contribution behind the front, volcanoes from the Kuriles contain progressively less B, Pb, As and Sb with increasing depth to the slab, indicating that fluid processes updip of about 180 km (beginning in the shallow forearc) strip these elements nearly quantitatively from the sedimentary portion of the downgoing slab. For studies published to date (Aleutians, Central America, S. Chile, Bismarck, Mariana) 10Be/9Be ratios are generally highest for samples plotting furthest from the 238U-230Th equiline (i.e. highest 238U/232Th, 230Th/232Th, or both). In lavas from the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of S. Chile (Sigmarsson et al., EPSL 2002), U excess (Uxs), Ra excess (Raxs) and 10Be/9Be are strongly correlated (r2=0.81-0.94). This argues that U enrichment and in some cases Ra enrichment in arc lavas is related to slab processes that are capable of mobilizing 10Be out of the sediment column, rather than reflecting only

  8. Primitive Subduction Zone Magmatism at Mt. Shasta, California: Geochemical and Petrologic Characteristics of Hydrous Mantle Derived Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, J. A.; Grove, T. L.; Carlson, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    peridotite to the dacite will lower its Os isotopic composition and raise its Os content to values similar to the PMA. However, this very small amount of peridotite has negligible effect on the major element content of the mixture. Hence, contamination with basement peridotite cannot simultaneously explain the high-Mg character and Os isotope characteristics of the andesite. Thus, the geochemical and petrologic evidence preclude the derivation of PMA magma from being mixtures of other Mt. Shasta lavas and ultramafic materials. Therefore, the PMA lavas can provide clues to the geochemical signature, HFSE and isotopic, of subduction zone fluids and primitive mantle melts. Overall, the difference in major elemental compositions of the flow and vent PMA samples is so little that the experimental results from previous studies of the Grove et al. (2003), on PMA sample 85-41c of Mt. Shasta, are applicable to the conditions of hydrous mantle melting that produced the PMA magma, and the PMA flow samples provide the most uncontaminated look at the primitive inputs into Mt. Shasta.

  9. H2O storage capacity of olivine at 5-8 GPa and consequences for dehydration partial melting of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardia, P.; Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Tenner, T. J.

    2012-09-01

    The H2O storage capacities of peridotitic minerals place crucial constraints on the onset of hydrous partial melting in the mantle. The storage capacities of minerals in equilibrium with a peridotite mineral assemblage (“peridotite-saturated” minerals) are lower than when the minerals coexist only with fluid because hydrous partial melt is stabilized at a lower activity of H2O. Here, we determine peridotite-saturated olivine H2O storage capacities from 5 to 8 GPa and 1400-1500 °C in layered experiments designed to grow large (∼100-150 μm) olivine crystals in equilibrium with the full hydrous peridotite assemblage (melt+ol+opx+gar+cpx). The peridotite-saturated H2O storage capacity of olivine at 1450 °C rises from 57±26 ppm (by wt.) at 5 GPa to 254±60 ppm at 8 GPa. Combining these with results of a parallel study at 10-13 GPa (Tenner et al., 2011, CMP) yields a linear relation applicable from 5 to 13 GPa for peridotite-saturated H2O storage capacity of olivine at 1450 °C, CH2Oolivine(ppm)=57.6(±16)×P(GPa)-169(±18). Storage capacity diminishes with increasing temperature, but is unaffected by variable total H2O concentration between 0.47 and 1.0 wt%. Both of these are as predicted for the condition in which the water activity in the melt is governed principally by the cryoscopic requirement of melt stability for a given temperature below the dry solidus. Measured olivine storage capacities are in agreement or slightly greater than those predicted by a model that combines data from experimental freezing point depression and olivine/melt partition coefficients of H2O (Hirschmann et al., 2009). Considering the temperature along the mantle geotherm, as well as available constraints on garnet/olivine and pyroxene/olivine partitioning of H2O (DH2Ogar/ol,DH2Opx/ol), we estimate the peridotite H2O storage capacity in the low velocity zone. The CH2O required to initiate melting between 150 and 250 km depth is between 270 and 855 ppm. We conclude that hydrous

  10. Slab melting as a barrier to deep carbon subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Andrew R.; Walter, Michael J.; Kohn, Simon C.; Brooker, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between crustal and mantle reservoirs dominate the surface inventory of volatile elements over geological time, moderating atmospheric composition and maintaining a life-supporting planet. While volcanoes expel volatile components into surface reservoirs, subduction of oceanic crust is responsible for replenishment of mantle reservoirs. Many natural, ‘superdeep’ diamonds originating in the deep upper mantle and transition zone host mineral inclusions, indicating an affinity to subducted oceanic crust. Here we show that the majority of slab geotherms will intersect a deep depression along the melting curve of carbonated oceanic crust at depths of approximately 300 to 700 kilometres, creating a barrier to direct carbonate recycling into the deep mantle. Low-degree partial melts are alkaline carbonatites that are highly reactive with reduced ambient mantle, producing diamond. Many inclusions in superdeep diamonds are best explained by carbonate melt-peridotite reaction. A deep carbon barrier may dominate the recycling of carbon in the mantle and contribute to chemical and isotopic heterogeneity of the mantle reservoir.

  11. Slab melting as a barrier to deep carbon subduction.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Andrew R; Walter, Michael J; Kohn, Simon C; Brooker, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between crustal and mantle reservoirs dominate the surface inventory of volatile elements over geological time, moderating atmospheric composition and maintaining a life-supporting planet. While volcanoes expel volatile components into surface reservoirs, subduction of oceanic crust is responsible for replenishment of mantle reservoirs. Many natural, 'superdeep' diamonds originating in the deep upper mantle and transition zone host mineral inclusions, indicating an affinity to subducted oceanic crust. Here we show that the majority of slab geotherms will intersect a deep depression along the melting curve of carbonated oceanic crust at depths of approximately 300 to 700 kilometres, creating a barrier to direct carbonate recycling into the deep mantle. Low-degree partial melts are alkaline carbonatites that are highly reactive with reduced ambient mantle, producing diamond. Many inclusions in superdeep diamonds are best explained by carbonate melt-peridotite reaction. A deep carbon barrier may dominate the recycling of carbon in the mantle and contribute to chemical and isotopic heterogeneity of the mantle reservoir. PMID:26738593

  12. Physiognomy and timing of metasomatism in the southern Vourinos ultramafic suite, NW Greece: a chronicle of consecutive episodes of melt extraction and stagnation in the Neotethyan lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapsiotis, Argyrios N.

    2016-04-01

    The southern Vourinos massif, located in the Hellenides orogenic belt, forms part of the mantle section of the homonymous Neotethyan ophiolite complex in the NW Greek mainland. The southern domain of the massif is comprised voluminous and strained peridotite outcrops with variable pyroxene and olivine modal abundances, ranging from harzburgite (sensu stricto) to olivine-rich harzburgite and fine- to coarse-grained dunite. These peridotites are intruded by a complex network of undeformed websterite to olivine-rich websterite dykes. The peridotite lithologies are characterized by high Cr# [=Cr/(Cr + Al)] values in Cr-spinel (0.54-0.80), elevated Mg# [=Mg/(Mg + Fe2+)] ratios in olivine (0.91-0.94), poor Al2O3 content in clinopyroxene (up to 1.85 wt%) and very low bulk-rock abundances of Al2O3 (up to 0.66 wt%), CaO (up to 0.84 wt%), V (up to 45 ppm), Sc (up to 11 ppm) and REE, which are suggestive of their strongly depleted nature. They also display a wide range of fO2 values that vary between the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ-2) and FMQ+1 buffers, signifying their genesis under anoxic to oxidizing conditions. Simple batch and fractional melting models cannot satisfactorily explain their ultradepleted composition, whereas whole-rock Ni/Yb versus Yb systematics can be simulated by up to 27 % closed-system, non-modal, dynamic melting of a primitive mantle source, implying their multifarious origin in a progressively changing, in space and time, geotectonic setting. Chromian spinel chemistry (Cr# vs. TiO2) provides evidence for two consecutive melt-peridotite interaction events pertaining to patent metasomatism. The first incident is related to the release of IAT melts from the deep parts of the southern Vourinos mantle segment, which reacted with harzburgites transforming them into olivine-rich harzburgites and replacive dunites, whereas mixing of different pulses of IAT melts with distinct SiO2 activities generated heterogeneously deformed, cumulitic dunites. The

  13. Melting Phase Relations and "Stishovite Paradox" in Lower-Mantle System MgO - FeO - SiO2 at 24 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Spivak, Anna; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2014-05-01

    Stishovite is missed in model composition of the ultrabasic lower mantle (Akaogi, 2007; Stixrude, Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2007). It is due to the fact that mineralogy of the lower mantle is estimated by experimental study of phase relation of the pyrolite composition up to 50 GPa. It was found that ultrabasic assemblage magnesiowustite+Mg-perovskite+Ca-perovskite is stable at PT-conditions of the lower mantle. However, stishovite is a representative phase in basic assemblage stishovite+Ca-perovskite+Mg-perovskite+Al-bearing resulted in similar experiments with basaltic compositions. But in this case stishovite should be subducted into the lower mantle. Meanwhile, paradoxal intergrowths of stishovite with magnesiowustite, indicatory mineral of the ultrabasic lower mantle, were found out as inclusions in 'super-deep' diamonds (Kaminsky, 2011, for review). Physicochemical reasons for in situ formation of stishovite and assemblage of stishovite and magnesiowustite ('stishovite paradox') at the primitive lower mantle were earlier discussed (Litvin et al, 2014). The discussion was based on preliminary data for melting phase relations of the lower mantle system MgO - FeO - SiO2 - Ca-perovskite. The goal of this work is experimental investigation of phase relations on the ternary MgO - FeO - SiO2 join of the lower mantle system MgO - FeO - SiO2 - CaO at pressure of 24 GPa. The sections (MgO)70(FeO)30-(SiO2)70(FeO)30 and (MgO)30(FeO)70-(SiO2)30(FeO)70of the ternary join were studied and melting phase diagrams for them constructed. Melting relations of the MgO - FeO - SiO2 join are characterized by formation of invariant peritectic point (Mg,Fe)-perovskite+(Mg,Fe)O+stishovite+L(liquid) and monovariant cotectic curve (Mg,Fe)O+stishovite+ L at compositions richer in FeO. Thus, peritectic reaction of (Mg,Fe)-perovskite and Fe-richer liquid is responsible for magnesiowustite (Mg,Fe)O + stishovite SiO2paragenesis. Origin of model primary ultrabasic magma is under control of

  14. Distinguishing Mantle Components by Sr and Nd Isotope Analysis of Single Melt Inclusions: Case Study on Italian Potassium-rich Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koornneef, J.; Nikogosian, I.; van Bergen, M.; Smeets, R.; Bouman, C.; Schwieters, J. B.; Davies, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Melt inclusions record more extreme isotopic variability than their bulk host lavas and offer the potential to better constrain mantle components that contribute to magmatism. Isotopic analyses of melt inclusions are, however, challenging because of their limited size. To date, Sr and Pb isotope data have been obtained for oceanic islands by application of in situ analysis techniques, either by SIMS or LA-(MC)-ICPMS. Comprehensive studies of inclusions from other settings have yet to be performed. Here, we report the first combined Sr and Nd isotope data on individual melt inclusions from Pliocene-Quaternary K-rich lavas from mainland Italy, obtained using wet chemistry techniques and TIMS analysis. We use newly developed 1013 Ohm resistors mounted in the feedback loop of Faraday cup amplifiers. Compared to default 1011 Ohm resistors, use of 1013 Ohm resistors results in a 10-fold improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio and more precise data when analysing small ion beams (< 20 mV). Twenty-one olivine hosted (85 - 92 mol % Fo) melt inclusions from seven volcanic centres along the Italian peninsula were analysed. Inclusions were homogenised and analysed for trace elements prior to isotopic analysis. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the melt inclusions range from 0.70508 to 0.71543; 143Nd/144Nd ratios from 0.51175 to 0.51268. Significant differences in 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd were found between melt inclusions and host lavas indicating distinct evolution paths for the lava groundmasses and the primitive melts that were trapped in the phenocrysts. The isotopic variability is interpreted to be the result of (1) mixing of melts derived from a heterogeneous mantle modified by subduction-related metasomatism, (2) mingling of distinct batches of olivine-bearing magma within a plumbing system, and (3) local assimilation of crustal material. These preliminary data suggest that combined analysis of individual melt inclusions for trace elements and Sr-Nd isotope ratios is a promising

  15. Infiltration of Refractory Melts into the Sub-Oceanic Mantle: Evidence from Major and Minor Element Compositions of Minerals from the 53° E Amagmatic Segment Abyssal Peridotites at the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, C.; Dick, H. J.; Zhou, H.; Liu, Y.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated sodium and titanium in pyroxene and spinel with high TiO2 (> 0.2 wt%) are suggested as the geochemical characteristic for the MORB-like melt infiltration of peridotites. The petrological and geochemical results of melt infiltrating in mantle peridotites are controlled by not only the melt composition but also the melt/rock ratio. Large discordant dunite bodies in the mantle transition zone are the direct observation of large volume melt (high melt/rock ratio) infiltrating by channeled porous flow in the shallow mantle (1). In addition to dunites, melt infiltrating results in a large variety of vein lithologies in mantle, and the occurrence of plagioclases are considered as a petrological signal of melt-reaction at shallow depth (2, 3) with a medium melt/rock ratio. Because the lacking of obviously petrological and geochemical variation of peridotites, melt infiltration of peridotites with a low melt/rock ratio are rarely reported. Peridotites in this study are from the 53° E amagmatic segment at the Southwest Indian Ridge. These peridotites are suggested as highly depleted buoyant mantle drawn up from the asthenosphere beneath southern Africa during the breakup of Gondwanaland (4) and are residues of multi-stage melt extracting in both spinel and garnet field. We present a detailed analysis of mineral compositions by both the EMPA and LA-ICPMS. Mineral phases in 53°E peridotites have mantle major element compositions, although minerals show variations with the crystal size and the location from cores to rims (Fig.1). In conjunction with the profile analysis of large clinopyroxene crystals, our results document the melt infiltration occurred at the ultraslow-spreading environment. At least two kinds of percolation melts are distinguished. They are normally MORB-like melt and ultra-depleted melt. Reference1.P. B. Kelemen, H. J. B. Dick, Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth 100, 423 (Jan, 1995). 2.J. M. Warren, N. Shimizu, Journal of Petrology 51

  16. Melting of a subduction-modified mantle source: A case study from the Archean Marda Volcanic Complex, central Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Kirkland, C. L.

    2014-03-01

    Subduction processes on early earth are controversial, with some suggestions that tectonics did not operate until the earth cooled to a sufficient point around the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. One way of addressing this issue is to examine well-preserved successions of Archean supracrustal rocks. Here we discuss petrography, whole-rock chemical and isotopic data combined with zircon Hf isotopes from andesites, high-magnesium andesites (HMA), dacites, high-magnesium dacites (HMD), rhyolites and coeval felsic intrusive rocks of the c. 2730 Ma Marda Volcanic Complex (MVC) in the central Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia. We demonstrate that these rocks result from melting of a metasomatized mantle source, followed by fractional crystallization in a crustal magma chamber. Contamination of komatiite by Archean crust, to produce the Marda Volcanic Complex andesites, is not feasible, as most of these crustal sources are too radiogenic to act as viable contaminants. The ɛNd(2730) of MVC andesites can be produced by mixing 10% Narryer semi-pelite with komatiite, consistent with modelling using Hf isotopes, but to achieve the required trace element concentrations, the mixture needs to be melted by about 25%. The most likely scenario is the modification of a mantle wedge above a subducting plate, coeval with partial melting, producing volcanic rocks with subduction signatures and variable Mg, Cr and Ni contents. Subsequent fractionation of cognate phases can account for the chemistry of dacites and rhyolites.

  17. Mantle migration of K-LILE-enriched melts/fluids in supra-subduction settings: evidence from the Finero Complex (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Southern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, A.; Mazzucchelli, M.; Giovanardi, T.; Tiepolo, M.; Vannucci, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Finero Complex is located in the northern sector of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone (Southern Alps). It is placed in contact with the Austro-Alpine terrains of the Sesia-Lanzo Zone by the Insubric line and consists of a dunitic-harzburgitic mantle unit, surrounded by a layered mafic-ultramafic intrusion. Unlike the central and southern sectors of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone, recent geochronological data suggest that metasomatic events of the Finero mantle unit, as well as the emplacement of the layered intrusion, occurred over a time span covering Middle Triassic to Lower Jurassic. A number of different geodynamic scenarios, among which aborted rifting processes and/or mantle plume activity, have been proposed to account for Lower Mesozoic melt-related events. However, the trace element and isotopic evidence points to the occurrence of large amount of crustal component in melts migrating through the mantle unit, which, consistently with regional structural features, has been proposed to be related to the development of roll-back subduction(s) during the early Mesozoic. New field, petrochemical and geochronological work has allowed to place further constraints on the geochemical affinity and evolution of the metasomatic melts/fluids affecting the mantle unit. Particular emphasis has been placed on the reconstruction of different migration stages recorded by decameter-wide dunites. In these bodies, an early migration stage produced dm-wide chromitite layers formed by chromite and orthopyroxene (Opx), with subordinate clinopyroxene (Cpx) and accessory amounts of amphibole (Amph), zircon and zirconolite. Successive migration events produced a lithologic series formed by, in order of crystallization: i) straight, cm-large websterites formed by Cpx-Opx-Amph-Phlogopite (Phl); ii) cm- to dm-wide bands with curved strike, characterized by segregation of Cpx-Phl-Amph-Opx; iii) dm-scale pockets filled by pegmatoidal Amph and Phlog; iv) finally, mm-thick veins with random strike and

  18. Stochastic melting of the marble cake mantle: evidence from local study of the East Pacific Rise at 12°50'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinzhofer, Alain; Lewin, Eric; Allègre, C. J.

    1989-03-01

    Isotopes (Nd, Sr and Pb) and trace elements (REE, Ba, Sr, Rb) have been measured on a set of basaltic glasses from a restricted area (40 × 10 km) at 12°50'N on the East Pacific Rise. The huge variation of incompatible element concentrations (factor 70 for Ba concentrations), and the variable degrees of correlation between element concentrations cannot be explained by usual models of melting and fractional crystallization. A rough correlation between the Ce/Yb ratio and the isotopic ratios favors a "source effect" for the genesis of the glasses. We have developed a model including both partial melting process acting on a heterogeneous mantle source with two components (peridotites and pyroxenites; "marble cake mantle" of Allègre and Turcotte) and fractional crystallization. The purpose of this model is not to obtain values of the four parameters involved (degree of melting in the peridotites, in the pyroxenites, proportion of pyroxenites involved in the melting, degree of fractional crystallization) for each analyzed glass, but to model the whole set of glasses by stochastic genesis and sampling of liquids. We have used the stochastic procedure for the four controlled parameters, currently generating 10, 000 "samples". Our preferred model for this portion of the East Pacific Ridge is obtained with a degree of melting in the peridotites and in the pyroxenites varying uniformly from 6 to 20%, and from 6 to 50% respectively. The degree of mixing between liquids issued from the two sources varies from 0 to 100%, and the degree of fractional crystallization remains small, without noticeable effect on the concentrations, varying from 0 to 6%.

  19. 186Os/188Os Isotopic Compositions of Peridotites: Constraints on Melt Depletion and Pt/Os Evolution of the Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, R. N.; Lassiter, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Global correlations between Al2O3 and Pt/Os in mantle peridotites suggest that Pt behaves incompatibly relative to Os during partial melting [c.f., 1]. Because 190Pt decays to 186Os (t1/2 = 468 Ga), correlations between 186Os/188Os and peridotite fertility can be used to constrain the long-term Pt/Os evolution of the depleted mantle and the initial Pt/Os ratio of the primitive upper mantle (PUM). We examined 186Os/188Os in mantle peridotites from continental (Rio Grande Rift/Colorado Plateau) and oceanic (Lena Trough, Hawaiian Islands) settings that span a wide range in fertility (Al2O3 ~0.67-4.42 %) and 187Os/188Os ratios (0.1138-0.1305). The new data define a narrow range in 186Os/188Os (0.1198338 to 0.1198393, 2 SD~24 ppm), placing constraints on long-term Pt/Os variability in the DMM. 186Os/188Os is broadly correlated with indices of melt depletion including spinel Cr#, clinopyroxene Cr#, and clinopyroxene Yb content, consistent with the inferred relative compatibility of Pt and Os during partial melting. Extrapolation of the alumina-186Os/188Os trend to PUM alumina content (~4.5 wt% Al2O3; [2]) suggests a PUM 186Os/188Os of ~0.1198380±15, similar to the 186Os/188Os of H chondrites (~0.1198398±16; [3]). This 186Os/188Os value is consistent with a PUM Pt/Os of 1.8±0.3, similar to Pt/Os values measured in several classes of chondrites (Carbonaceous ~1.9±0.2, Ordinary ~2.0±0.3 and Enstatite ~1.9±0.2; [3]). Whereas ~84% of peridotites worldwide [excluding low-[Os] samples (<1 ppb Os) that may have been compromised by melt-rock reaction and/or weathering and alteration] with measured Pt/Os ratios have Pt/Os between 0.3 and 3.1 (the range permissible from 186Os/188Os variations for melt extraction from PUM at ~1.5 Ga), only ~36% fall between 1.3 and 2.2 (a narrower range consistent with an older ~4.5 Ga melt depletion age). This suggests that much of the observed Pt/Os variability in mantle peridotites is relatively recent. Close agreement between our inferred

  20. Melt-rock reaction in the asthenospheric mantle: Perspectives from high-order accurate numerical simulations in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirupathi, S.; Schiemenz, A. R.; Liang, Y.; Parmentier, E.; Hesthaven, J.

    2013-12-01

    The style and mode of melt migration in the mantle are important to the interpretation of basalts erupted on the surface. Both grain-scale diffuse porous flow and channelized melt migration have been proposed. To better understand the mechanisms and consequences of melt migration in a heterogeneous mantle, we have undertaken a numerical study of reactive dissolution in an upwelling and viscously deformable mantle where solubility of pyroxene increases upwards. Our setup is similar to that described in [1], except we use a larger domain size in 2D and 3D and a new numerical method. To enable efficient simulations in 3D through parallel computing, we developed a high-order accurate numerical method for the magma dynamics problem using discontinuous Galerkin methods and constructed the problem using the numerical library deal.II [2]. Linear stability analyses of the reactive dissolution problem reveal three dynamically distinct regimes [3] and the simulations reported in this study were run in the stable regime and the unstable wave regime where small perturbations in porosity grows periodically. The wave regime is more relevant to melt migration beneath the mid-ocean ridges but computationally more challenging. Extending the 2D simulations in the stable regime in [1] to 3D using various combinations of sustained perturbations in porosity at the base of the upwelling column (which may result from a viened mantle), we show the geometry and distribution of dunite channel and high-porosity melt channels are highly correlated with inflow perturbation through superposition. Strong nonlinear interactions among compaction, dissolution, and upwelling give rise to porosity waves and high-porosity melt channels in the wave regime. These compaction-dissolution waves have well organized but time-dependent structures in the lower part of the simulation domain. High-porosity melt channels nucleate along nodal lines of the porosity waves, growing downwards. The wavelength scales

  1. Redox controls on tungsten and uranium crystal/silicate melt partitioning and implications for the U/W and Th/W ratio of the lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Mallmann, Guilherme; Sprung, Peter; Sommer, Johanna E.; Heuser, Alexander; Speelmanns, Iris M.; Blanchard, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    The timing of core formation is essential for understanding the early differentiation history of the Earth and the Moon. Because Hf is lithophile and W is siderophile during metal-silicate segregation, the decay of 182Hf to 182W (half-life of 9 Ma) has proven to be a useful chronometer of core-mantle differentiation events. A key parameter for the interpretation of 182Hf/182W data is the Hf/W ratio of the primitive (i.e. undepleted) mantle. Since W is incompatible during mantle melting, its ratio relative to U and other similarly incompatible elements in basalts (e.g. Th, La) may be used as proxies for their mantle sources. However, the assumption that W and U are equally incompatible may be flawed for petrological systems that equilibrated over a large range of oxygen fugacity (fO2). Although W is typically perceived as being homovalent, evidence suggests that U is heterovalent over the range of fO2 inferred for the silicate mantles of the Earth and the Moon. Here we report new partitioning data for W, U, high-field-strength elements (HFSE), and Th between clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, olivine, plagioclase and silicate melt. In agreement with previous studies, we show that these elements behave as homovalent elements at fO2 characteristic of Earth's upper mantle. However, both W and U become more compatible at low fO2, indicating a change in their redox state, with W becoming more compatible at progressively lower fO2. This result for W is particularly unexpected, because this element was thought to be hexavalent even at very low fO2. The much higher compatibility of W4+ (the species inferred here at low fO2) relative to W6+ means that even a small fraction of W4+ will have a significant effect on the overall compatibility of W. Our results imply that over the range of reducing conditions in which lunar differentiation is thought to have taken place (i.e. ∼IW-2 to IW-0.5), W is likely to become fractionated from U. When our partitioning data are applied to model

  2. Melt inclusions in scoria and associated mantle xenoliths of Puy Beaunit Volcano, Chaîne des Puys, Massif Central, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannot, Séverine; Schiano, Pierre; Boivin, Pierre

    2005-07-01

    In order to characterize the composition of the parental melts of intracontinental alkali-basalts, we have undertaken a study of melt and fluid inclusions in olivine crystals in basaltic scoria and associated upper mantle nodules from Puy Beaunit, a volcano from the Chaîne des Puys volcanic province of the French Massif Central (West-European Rift system). Certain melt inclusions were experimentally homogenised by heating-stage experiments and analysed to obtain major- and trace-element compositions. In basaltic scoria, olivine-hosted melt inclusions occur as primary isolated inclusions formed during growth of the host phase. Some melt inclusions contain both glass and daughter minerals that formed during closed-system crystallisation of the inclusion and consist mainly of clinopyroxene, plagioclase and rhönite crystals. Experimentally rehomogenised and naturally quenched, glassy inclusions have alkali-basalt compositions (with SiO2 content as low as 42 wt%, MgO>6 wt%, Na2O+K2O>5 wt%, Cl~1,000 3,000 ppm and S~400 2,000 ppm), which are consistent with those expected for the parental magmas of the Chaîne des Puys magmatic suites. Their trace-element signature is characterized by high concentration(s) of LILE and high LREE/HREE ratios, implying an enriched source likely to have incorporated small amounts of recycled sediments. In olivine porphyroclasts of the spinel peridotite nodules, silicate melt inclusions are secondary in nature and form trails along fracture planes. They are generally associated with secondary CO2 fluid inclusions containing coexisting vapour and liquid phases in the same trail. This observation and the existence of multiphase inclusions consisting of silicate glass and CO2-rich fluid suggest the former existence of a CO2-rich silicate melt phase. Unheated glass inclusions have silicic major-element compositions, with normative nepheline and olivine components, ~58 wt% SiO2, ~9 wt% total alkali oxides, <3 wt% FeO and MgO. They also have high

  3. Melting and Metasomatism in the Mantle Lithosphere beneath the Pribilof Islands: Petrology and ICP-MS Analyses of Spinel Peridotite Xenoliths from St. George Island, Bering Sea, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, T. C.; Ulianov, A.; Underwood, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    A suite of protogranular spinel lherzolite xenoliths from an alkali basalt lava flow on St. George Island, Alaska, have been analyzed by for their bulk compositions by XRF and ICP-MS and for mineral compositions by electron microprobe and laser ablation ICP-MS. Bulk compositions of the peridotites range from relatively fertile (15-19% modal diopside) to depleted (10-8% modal diopside) and are consistent with variable degrees of melt extraction (7-18%) from a primitive mantle source. No hydrous minerals (e.g., mica or amphibole) were observed in any of the studied xenoliths. However, all xenoliths show melt-reaction textures characterized by glass-bearing, sieved textured rims on clinopyroxene and spinel. In several samples, complete clinopyroxene grains show sieve texture and are associated with melt pockets composed of coexisting silicic glass (Na- ± K-rich) and quench-textured olivine, spinel, clinopyroxene, and feldspar. In general, clinopyroxene and whole-rock chondrite-normalized REE patterns are similar, indicating that the whole-rock compositions reliably record the pre-entrainment REE patterns of the xenoliths. Whole-rock and clinopyroxene REE patterns show a considerable range from LREE-depleted to LREE-enriched, with most samples having flat to MREE-enriched patterns. The REE systematics suggest that most St. George lherzolites experienced little metasomatic overprinting of highly incompatible trace elements following melt extraction. In this regard, only the most refractory sample studied shows clear compositional evidence for metasomatism, as reflected in high whole-rock and clinopyroxene LREE/HREE ratios and abundances of other highly incompatible trace elements (e.g., Th, Ta, Nb, Rb, Sr). Based on the pervasive homogenization of this metasomatic signature, it is likely that it does not reflect a recent event related to the magmatism that brought the xenoliths to the surface. In spite of this evidence, the melt-reaction textures clearly demonstrate

  4. Composition of the Southeast Mariana Forearc Rift pillow lavas : interaction between adiabatic decompression mantle melting and ultra-shallow slab-derived fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. M.; Stern, R. J.; Kelley, K. A.; Ishizuka, O.; Ren, M.; Ohara, Y.; Reagan, M. K.; Bloomer, S.; Anthony, E.

    2009-12-01

    The Mariana intraoceanic arc system is related to the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the Philippine Sea plate. A northward-propagating forearc rift extending from the southernmost backarc basin spreading ridge to the trench, called the SE Mariana Forearc Rift (SEMFR), has been inferred by regional HMR-1 bathymetric and backscatter mapping south of Guam (see Martinez & Stern abstract). SEMFR formed by lateral stretching as a result of slab rollback and collision of the Caroline ridge with the IBM arc. This forearc rift provides an unusual opportunity to study melts generated very shallow (~ 40 km deep) above a subduction zone. Forearc rifts are extensional zones occurring in subduction settings providing the opportunity to sample rocks produced by adiabatic asthenosphere decompression and fluid-metasomatized mantle melting. During YK08-08 in July 2008, manned submersible Shinkai 6500 Dive 1096 dived in SEMFR and sampled a 663 m thick section of fresh tholeiitic pillow lavas. These lavas are composed of upper primitive basalts (Mg# = 61 - 67) and lower basaltic andesites (Mg# = 49 - 51). The upper series phenocrysts are olivine (Fo85-87), diopside, and plagioclase (An80-83) with scattered olivine xenocrysts (3 mm, Fo92) hosting Cr-spinel (Cr# = 68 - 69). Lower series lavas contain phenocrysts of olivine (Fo76-79), augite and two plagioclases (An66-71 and An80-86), perhaps indicating magma mixing. Flat REE patterns, and high Mg# ( > 60) of the upper basalts indicate generation by fractional melting of spinel peridotite. LA-ICP-MS analysis show that lower series clinopyroxenes formed in equilibrium with more REE-enriched melts than their host rock, also supporting an interpretation of magma mixing. Discrimination diagrams using Th-Ba-Nb-Yb systematics (Pearce, 2008, Lithos, v. 100; Pearce and Stern, 2006, Geophysical Monograph Series 166, AGU) show that both series lavas have composition similar to that of Mariana backarc basin but with higher Ba/Nb content

  5. Petrogenesis of adakite and high-Nb basalt association in the SW of Sabzevar Zone, NE of Iran: Evidence for slab melt-mantle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhari, Seyed Ali

    2016-04-01

    Adakitic rocks appear in close association with high Nb basaltic (HNB) rocks in the SW of Sabzevar ophiolitic belt. Adakites are calc-alkaline and include trachy-andesite, teachy-dacite and dacite. These rocks are rich in Na2O, Al2O3 and Sr and show depletion in MgO, Y and Yb. Adakitic samples are defined by high Sr/Y (88-128) and La/Yb (20-45) ratios; as well as a lack of Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.92-0.99) in REE patterns. Geochemical composition indicates that adakites were generated from slab melting in a high pressure-high heat flow subducting setting. Different adakitic rocks have been formed by various slab partial melting degrees and reaction of adakitic magma with heterogeneous mantle wedge rocks. HNB rocks are alkaline, nepheline normative and sodic (Na2O/K2O = 2.7-3.4) with high concentration of Al2O3, TiO2, MgO, P2O5, LILE and HFSE, especially Nb (30-56 ppm). These basalts show fractionated REE patterns with elevated LREE/HREE (LaN/YbN = 20-25) and trace elements contents suggest their generation by low partial melting degrees (<2%) from garnet-peridotite origin which have already metasomatized by adakitic melts.

  6. Petrology, geochemistry and modelling of the granulitic-ultramafic rocks in Beni Bousera (Rif, Morocco): implications for direct crust-mantle interactions and melt-extraction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthei, C. D.; Álvarez-Valero, A.; Jagoutz, O. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Beni Bousera (N. Morocco) and Ronda (S. Spain) ultramafic massifs of the Betic-Rif orogenic belt are two of the most pristine exposures of upper-mantle/lower crustal material on Earth's surface. Unlike other samples of the mantle, they are relatively unaltered and preserve a record of ultra-high pressure conditions, within the diamond-stability field (e.g. Slodkevich, 1980; Pearson et al., 1989). The process of removing of the massifs from the diamond-stability field, and the ensuing emplacement into the continental crust, is an ongoing area of research in regional tectonics. Here, we focus specifically on Beni Bousera, and note that the up-risen material is of higher density than its host, prompting the development of models that use melt-induced buoyancy forces as the primary driver of exhumation (Jagoutz et al., 2006; Gerya and Burg, 2007). We find evidence for discrete reaction zones in the ultramafic rocks that were formed by pervasive infiltration of melt, which may have channelized, lowered the integrated bulk density of the massif (e.g., Jagoutz et al., 2006), and driven exhumation. Since key questions concerning the emplacement mechanisms are still unanswered, complementary studies of the surrounding crustal material -granulitic rocks, which are mostly metapelitic with local intercalation of mafic composition-, assist in deepening our understanding crust-mantle processes. We will discuss our ongoing research at Beni Bousera, focusing on: (1) the petrological, structural, geochronological and physical relationships between mantle and crust by combining field petrology, petrography and phase diagram modeling, geochemistry, zircons/monazite dating, and numerical modeling; (2) the emplacement mechanisms of ultramafic and granulitic rocks by proposing a new hypothesis of very rapid exhumation of the mantle material. This rapid ascent is currently being constrained/tested by combining geobarometric calculations and high precision U-Pb zircon geochronology on

  7. Thermodynamic properties of the CaCO3 component in mixed alkali carbonate liquids: new measurements and importance to thermodynamic models of mantle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, M.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate in the mantle is an important reservoir of carbon, which is released to the atmosphere as CO2 through volcanism, and thus contributes to the carbon cycle. Carbonate liquids are often the first melts to form during upwelling of carbonated mantle, and they are efficient agents of mantle metasomatism because of their high reactivity, high mobility, and high concentrations of incompatible trace elements. They are also important repositories for economically important Rb, rare earth elements, fluorite and phosphate. Therefore, it is of considerable interest to extend thermodynamic models of partial melting in the mantle at elevated pressures to carbonate-bearing lithologies. In order to achieve this, thermodynamic data on carbonate liquids are needed, including their heat capacity, enthalpy, density, and compressibility. In order to obtain information on the CaCO3 and MgCO3 liquid components, which are the most important carbonate components in the mantle, we have employed a strategy where the alkaline earth carbonates are mixed with the alkali carbonates in order to lower the liquidus temperatures of various sample liquids to values below the decomposition of carbonate liquids at one bar (~1300 K). This permits thermodynamic property measurements of the multi-component liquids to be made at one bar and to test whether they mix ideally with respect to composition, which allows the partial molar thermodynamic properties of the CaCO3 and MgCO3 liquid components to be derived. In a previous study (Liu et al., 2003), the volume and thermal expansion of mixed K2CO3-Na2CO3-Li2CO3-CaCO3 liquids were reported and shown to behave ideally with respect to composition. In this study, we show that the compressibility and heat capacity of K2CO3-Na2CO3-Li2CO3-CaCO3 liquids also mix ideally with respect to composition at one bar. Our compressibility results are based on sound speed measurements made with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer at one bar between 800 and

  8. Asteroids and Archaean crustal evolution: Tests of possible genetic links between major mantle/crust melting events and clustered extraterrestrial bombardments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glikson, A. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Since the oldest intact terrestrial rocks of ca. 4.0 Ga and oldest zircon xenocrysts of ca. 4.3 Ga measured to date overlap with the lunar late heavy bombardment, the early Precambrian record requires close reexamination vis a vis the effects of megaimpacts. The identification of microtektite-bearing horizons containing spinals of chondritic chemistry and Ir anomalies in 3.5-3.4-Ga greenstone belts provides the first direct evidence for large-scale Archaean impacts. The Archaean crustal record contains evidence for several major greenstone-granite-forming episodes where deep upwelling and adiabatic fusion of the mantle was accompanied by contemporaneous crustal anatexis. Isotopic age studies suggest evidence for principal age clusters about 3.5, 3.0, and 2.7 (+/- 0.8) Ga, relics of a ca. 3.8-Ga event, and several less well defined episodes. These peak events were accompanied and followed by protracted thermal fluctuations in intracrustal high-grade metamorphic zones. Interpretations of these events in terms of internal dynamics of the Earth are difficult to reconcile with the thermal behavior of silicate rheologies in a continuously convecting mantle regime. A triggering of these episodes by mantle rebound response to intermittent extraterrestrial asteroid impacts is supported by (1) identification of major Archaean impacts from microtektite and distal ejecta horizons marked by Ir anomalies; (2) geochemical and experimental evidence for mantle upwelling, possibly from levels as deep as the transition zone; and (3) catastrophic adiabatic melting required to generate peridotitic komatites. Episodic differentiation/accretion growth of sial consequent on these events is capable of resolving the volume problem that arises from comparisons between modern continental crust and the estimated sial produced by continuous two-stage mantle melting processes. The volume problem is exacerbated by projected high accretion rates under Archaean geotherms. It is suggested that

  9. Evidence from Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions that the Martian Mantle has a Chondritic D/H Ratio and that Some Young Basalts have Assimilated Old Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Magmatic degassing of volatile elements affects the climate and near-surface environment of Mars. Telescopic and meteorite studies have revealed that the Martian atmosphere and near-surface materials have D/H ratios 5-6 times terrestrial values [e.g., 1, 2]. Such high D/H ratios are interpreted to result from the preferential loss of H relative to heavier D from the Martian atmosphere, assuming that the original Martian water inventory had a D/H ratio similar to terrestrial values and to H in primitive meteorites [e.g., 1, 3]. However, the primordial Martian D/H ratio has, until now, not been well constrained. The uncertainty over the Martian primordial D/H ratio has arisen both from the scarcity of primitive Martian meteorites and as a result of contamination by terrestrial and, perhaps, Martian surface waters that obscure the signature of the Martian mantle. This study reports a comprehensive dataset of magmatic volatiles and D/H ratios in Martian primary magmas based on low-contamination, in situ ion microprobe analyses of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from both depleted [Yamato 980459 (Y98)] and enriched [Larkman Nunatak 06319 (LAR06)] Martian basaltic meteorites. Analyses of these primitive melts provide definitive evidence that the Martian mantle has retained a primordial D/H ratio and that young Martian basalts have assimilated old Martian crust.

  10. Melting relations of multicomponent carbonate MgCO3-FeCO3-CaCO3-Na2CO3 system at 12-26 GPa: application to deeper mantle diamond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, Anna; Solopova, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Litvin, Yuriy

    2015-11-01

    Carbonatic components of parental melts of the deeper mantle diamonds are inferred from their primary inclusions of (Mg, Fe, Ca, Na)-carbonate minerals trapped at PT conditions of the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle. PT phase diagrams of MgCO3-FeCO3-CaCO3-Na2CO3 system and its ternary MgCO3-FeCO3-Na2CO3 boundary join were studied at pressures between 12 and 24 GPa and high temperatures. Experimental data point to eutectic solidus phase relations and indicate liquidus boundaries for completely miscible (Mg, Fe, Ca, Na)- and (Mg, Fe, Ca)-carbonate melts. PT fields for partial carbonate melts associated with (Mg, Fe)-, (Ca, Fe, Na)-, and (Na2Ca, Na2Fe)-carbonate solid solution phases are determined. Effective nucleation and mass crystallization of deeper mantle diamonds are realized in multicomponent (Mg, Fe, Ca, Na)-carbonatite-carbon melts at 18 and 26 GPa. The multicomponent carbonate systems were melted at temperatures that are lower than the geothermal ones. This gives an evidence for generation of diamond-parental carbonatite melts and formation of diamonds at the PT conditions of transition zone and lower mantle.

  11. Melting relations in the MgO-MgSiO3 system under the lower mantle conditions using a double-sided CO2 laser heated diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, S.; Kuwayama, Y.; Inoue, T.

    2015-12-01

    Seismological observations of the ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) suggest the presence of partial melts above the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Knowledge of the melting relations in the lower mantle is a key to understanding the chemical differentiation at the base of the mantle. While melting relations of mantle materials at relatively low pressures (below 30 GPa) have been extensively studied using a multi-anvil apparatus (e.g. Ito et al., 2004 Phy. Earth Planet. Inter.), melting experiments at higher pressures are still limited. Only a few model compositions, such as peridotite and mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB), were studied under the CMB conditions using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) (e.g. Fiquet et al., 2010 Science, Andrault et al., 2014 Science). Since chemical heterogeneity of both major elements (Mg, Si, Fe, Al...) and minor ones (e.g. alkalis and volatiles) should have a large effect on the melting behavior, the melting phase diagrams as a function of composition are fundamental to understand the nature of the ULVZs. For melting relations in a binary system MgO-MgSiO3, which is a major component in the lower mantle, previous experiments were performed up to only 26 GPa (Liebske and Frost, 2012 Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.). Further studies at higher pressures corresponding to the deep lower mantle conditions are required. In this study, we have determined the melting relations in the MgO-MgSiO3 system above 30 GPa using a LHDAC. Glasses of several different compositions in the MgO-MgSiO3 system (from 37 to 45 mol% SiO2) were used as starting materials. A double-sided CO2 laser heating system was used to heat the sample directly. The recovered samples were polished and analyzed by a dualbeam focused ion beam (FIB) and a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), respectively. The eutectic compositions and the liquidus phases were determined on the basis of chemical and textural analysis of the quenched samples. Our results show that the

  12. A potential link between magmatic volatiles and mantle source lithology in the Hawaiian Plume: a view from olivine-hosted melt inclusions and osmium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marske, J. P.; Hauri, E. H.; Garcia, M. O.; Pietruszka, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Variations in radiogenic isotope ratios and magmatic volatile abundances (e.g., CO2 or H2O) in lavas from Hawaiian volcanoes reveal important magmatic processes (e.g., melting of a heterogeneous source and magma degassing). Based on variations in ratios of highly incompatible trace elements (e.g., Nb/La) and radiogenic isotopes (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb), shield-stage Hawaiian lavas likely originate from a plume source containing peridotite and ancient recycled oceanic crust (pyroxenite). The source region may also be heterogeneous with respect to volatile concentrations. However, shallow magma degassing makes it difficult to determine if there is a link between mantle source composition and the volatile budget. We analyzed osmium isotopic ratios and volatile contents in olivines and glasses for 34 samples from Koolau, Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kilauea, and Loihi to determine if volatiles in magmas correlate with geochemical tracers of source lithology. For a given volcano, most 187Os/188Os values of olivines (0.127-0.134) are similar to the whole-rock values, yet some Mauna Loa and Loihi olivines display the lower ratios (0.116-0.118) that may reflect partial melts of ancient recycled mantle lithosphere. SIMS analyses of Hawaiian glasses reveal a range in abundances of CO2 (10-250 ppm), H2O (0.2-1.2 wt.%), S (38-2960 ppm), and Cl (39-2960 ppm). However, most samples have low CO2 contents (<100 ppm) indicating that the lavas are degassed. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the same Hawaiian samples display a wider range of volatile abundances (i.e. 10-760 ppm CO2) than matrix glasses that may reflect mixing of undegassed to moderately degassed magmas. The average CO2 and H2O/CO2 contents in the least degassed olivine-hosted melt inclusions (with >200 ppm CO2) display a broad correlation with the osmium isotopic compositions of the olivines. This indicates a potential link between pre-eruptive volatile budgets and mantle sources lithology may exist within the

  13. Numerical modeling of convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction in big mantle wedge: Implications for the destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lijuan

    2014-04-01

    The deep subduction of the Pacific Plate underneath East Asia is thought to have played a key role in the destruction of the North China Craton (NCC). To test this hypothesis, this paper presents a new 2-D model that includes an initial stable equilibrated craton, the formation of a big mantle wedge (BMW), and erosion by vigorous mantle convection. The model shows that subduction alone cannot thin the cold solid craton, but it can form a low-viscosity BMW. The amount of convective erosion is directly proportional to viscosity within the BMW (η0bmw), and the rheological boundary layer thins linearly with decreasing log10(η0bmw), thereby contributing to an increase in heat flow at the lithospheric base. This model also differs from previous modeling in that the increase in heat flow decays linearly with t1/2, meaning that the overall thinning closely follows a natural log relationship over time. Nevertheless, convection alone can only cause a limited thinning due to a minor increase in basal heat flow. The lowering of melting temperature by peridotite-melt interaction can accelerate thinning during the early stages of this convection. The two combined actions can thin the craton significantly over tens of Myr. This modeling, combined with magmatism and heat flow data, indicates that the NCC evolution has involved four distinct stages: modification in the Jurassic by Pacific Plate subduction and BMW formation, destruction during the Early Cretaceous under combined convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction, extension in the Late Cretaceous, and cooling since the late Cenozoic.

  14. Geochemical diversity of late-Archaean Mg-K-rich mafic magmas (sanukitoids) and its implication for metasomatic processes between silicate melts and mantle peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Oscar; Martin, Hervé; Moyen, Jean-François; Doucelance, Régis

    2013-04-01

    The oldest high-Mg and high-K mafic magmas identified on Earth are the so-called sanukitoids that emplaced during the late-Archaean (3.0-2.5 Ga) in almost all cratonic domains worldwide. A compilation of >200 mafic to intermediate sanukitoid samples (mostly monzodiorites, quartz-diorites and quartz-monzonites with SiO2 = 45-62 wt.%), reveals that they clearly define two groups on the basis of their geochemistry: (1) low-Ti sanukitoids display moderate Ti, Fe as well as HFSE and REE contents, but high Mg# (0.55-0.70) and elevated concentrations in transition elements (Ni, Cr); (2) high-Ti sanukitoids, by contrast, are much richer in Ti, Fe, HFSE and LREE, but show significantly lower Mg# (0.45-0.55) as well as Ni and Cr contents. We investigated the origin of both series using geochemical modeling based on Monte-Carlo numerical simulations. As pointed out by previous work on experimental and natural systems [e.g. 1-2], our modeling indicates that both low- and high-Ti sanukitoids derive from the interactions, at mantle levels, between peridotite and a silicate melt. On the other hand, we demonstrated that (1) critical differences between low- and high-Ti sanukitoids (e.g. Ni, Cr, HFSE, REE contents) primarily results from two distinct mechanisms of melt-peridotite interactions; while (2) the nature of the metasomatic agent (either derived from metabasalts or metasediments in the models) only accounts for second-order variations within each group (e.g. K contents, Ba/Sr, La/Yb ratios and Eu anomaly). Specifically, the composition of low-Ti sanukitoids is best explained by a "one-step" hybridation of silicate melt with mantle peridotite, and is in equilibrium with a residual solid made up of garnet, clino- and orthopyroxene. By contrast, high-Ti sanukitoids likely derive from a "two-step" process: firstly, the silicate melt is fully consumed by interactions with peridotite, giving rise to a metasomatic, orthopyroxene-, amphibole- and phlogopite-rich assemblage. In

  15. Anomalous density and elastic properties of basalt at high pressure: Reevaluating of the effect of melt fraction on seismic velocity in the Earth's crust and upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alisha N.; Lesher, Charles E.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Wang, Yanbin

    2016-06-01

    Independent measurements of the volumetric and elastic properties of Columbia River basalt glass were made up to 5.5 GPa by high-pressure X-ray microtomography and GHz-ultrasonic interferometry, respectively. The Columbia River basalt displays P and S wave velocity minima at 4.5 and 5 GPa, respectively, violating Birch's law. These data constrain the pressure dependence of the density and elastic moduli at high pressure, which cannot be modeled through usual equations of state nor determined by stepwise integrating the bulk sound velocity as is common practice. We propose a systematic variation in compression behavior of silicate glasses that is dependent on the degree of polymerization and arises from the flexibility of the aluminosilicate network. This behavior likely persists into the liquid state for basaltic melts resulting in weak pressure dependence for P wave velocities perhaps to depths of the transition zone. Modeling the effect of partial melt on P wave velocity reductions suggests that melt fraction determined by seismic velocity variations may be significantly overestimated in the crust and upper mantle.

  16. Unravelling the effects of melt depletion and secondary infiltration on mantle Re-Os isotopes beneath the French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J.; Gannoun, A.; Burton, K. W.; Schiano, P.; Rogers, N. W.; Alard, O.

    2010-01-01

    Spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Mont Briançon, French Massif Central, retain evidence for multiple episodes of melt depletion and melt/fluid infiltration (metasomatism). Evidence for primary melt depletion is still preserved in the co-variation of bulk-rock major elements (MgO 38.7-46.1 wt.%; CaO 0.9-3.6 wt.%), and many samples yield unradiogenic bulk-rock Os isotope ratios ( 187Os/ 188Os = 0.11541-0.12626). However, many individual xenoliths contain interstitial glasses and melt inclusions that are not in equilibrium with the major primary minerals. Incompatible trace element mass balance calculations demonstrate that metasomatic components comprise a significant proportion of the bulk-rock budget for these elements in some rocks, ranging to as much as 25% of Nd and 40% of Sr Critically, for Re-Os geochronology, melt/fluid infiltration is accompanied by the mobilisation of sulfide. Consequently, bulk-rock isotope measurements, whether using lithophile (e.g. Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd) or siderophile (Re-Os) based isotope systems, may only yield a perturbed and/or homogenised average of these multiple events. Osmium mass balance calculations demonstrate that bulk-rock Os in peridotite is dominated by contributions from two populations of sulfide grain: (i) interstitial, metasomatic sulfide with low [Os] and radiogenic 187Os/ 188Os, and (ii) primary sulfides with high [Os] and unradiogenic 187Os/ 188Os, which have been preserved within host silicate grains and shielded from interaction with transient melts and fluid. The latter can account for >97% of bulk-rock Os and preserve geochronological information of the melt from which they originally precipitated as an immiscible liquid. The Re-depletion model ages of individual primary sulfide grains preserve evidence for melt depletion beneath the Massif Central from at least 1.8 Gyr ago despite the more recent metasomatic event(s).

  17. Multiple sulfur isotope composition of oxidized Samoan melts and the implications of a sulfur isotope 'mantle array' in chemical geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, J.; Cartigny, P.; Jackson, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    To better address how subducted protoliths drive the Earth's mantle sulfur isotope heterogeneity, we report new data for sulfur (S) and copper (Cu) abundances, S speciation and multiple S isotopic compositions (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) in 15 fresh submarine basaltic glasses from the Samoan archipelago, which defines the enriched-mantle-2 (EM2) endmember. Bulk S abundances vary between 835 and 2279 ppm. About 17 ± 11% of sulfur is oxidized (S6+) but displays no consistent trend with bulk S abundance or any other geochemical tracer. The S isotope composition of both dissolved sulfide and sulfate yield homogeneous Δ33S and Δ36S values, within error of Canyon Diablo Troilite (CDT). In contrast, δ34S values are variable, ranging between +0.11 and +2.79‰ (±0.12‰ 1σ) for reduced sulfur, whereas oxidized sulfur values vary between +4.19 and +9.71‰ (±0.80‰, 1σ). Importantly, δ34S of the reduced S pool correlates with the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the glasses, in a manner similar to that previously reported for South-Atlantic MORB, extending the trend to δ34S values up to + 2.79 ± 0.04 ‰, the highest value reported for undegassed oceanic basalts. As for EM-1 basalts from the South Atlantic ridge, the linear δ34S-87Sr/86Sr trend requires the EM-2 endmember to be relatively S-rich, and only sediments can account for these isotopic characteristics. While many authors argue that both the EM-1 and EM-2 mantle components record subduction of various protoliths (e.g. upper or lower continental crust, lithospheric mantle versus intra-metasomatized mantle, or others), it is proposed here that they primarily reflect sediment recycling. Their distinct Pb isotope variation can be accounted for by varying the proportion of S-poor recycled oceanic crust in the source of mantle plumes.

  18. Crustal melting during subduction at mantle depth: anatomy of near-UHP nanogranites (Orlica-Śnieżnik Dome, Bohemian Massif)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Silvio; Ziemann, Martin; Walczak, Katarzyna; Wunder, Bernd; O'Brien, Patrick J.; Hecht, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    Small volumes (≤ 50µm) of hydrous melt were trapped as primary inclusions in peritectic garnets during partial melting of metagranitoids from the Orlica-Śnieżnik Dome (Bohemian Massif) at mantle depth [1]. Detailed microstructural/microchemical investigation confirmed the occurrence of a granitic assemblage (biotite+feldspars+quartz) in every investigated inclusion, i.e they are nanogranites [2]. MicroRaman mapping of unexposed inclusions showed the occurrence of residual, H2O-rich glass in interstitial position. Despite the oddity of this finding within a classic regional HP/HT terrain, an incomplete crystallization of the melt inclusions (MI) is consistent with the (relatively) rapid exhumation of the Orlica-Śnieżnik Dome proposed by some authors [e.g. 3]. Moreover glassy and partially crystallized MI have been already reported in lower-P (<1 GPa) migmatites [4]. MicroRaman investigation also showed the possible presence of kumdykolite, a high-temperature polymorph of albite reported in UHP rocks from the Kokchetav Massif as well as the Bohemian massif ([5] and references therein). Experimental re-homogenization of nanogranites was achieved using a piston cylinder apparatus at 2.7 GPa and 875°C under dry conditions, in order to investigate melt composition and H2O content with in situ techniques. The trapped melt is granitic, hydrous (6 wt% H2O) and metaluminous (ASI=1.03), and it is similar to those produced experimentally from crustal lithologies at mantle conditions. Re-homogenization conditions are consistent with the results of geothermobarometric calculations on the host rock, suggesting that no H2O loss occurred during exhumation - this would have caused a shift of the inclusion melting T toward higher values. Coupled with the absence of H2O-loss microstructural evidence, e.g. decrepitation cracks and/or vesciculation [4] in re-homogenized nanogranites, this evidence suggests that the nanogranites still preserves the original H2O content of the

  19. Origin of enriched ocean ridge basalts and implications for mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Kathleen E.; Goldstein, Steven L.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Spiegelman, Marc

    2004-10-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Kane Fracture Zone at ˜23°N (the MARK area) is distant from hot spots and a type area for "normal" mid-ocean ridge basalt (N-MORB) depleted in highly incompatible elements. High-density sampling reveals that a small proportion of basalt are enriched in incompatible elements (enriched mid-ocean ridge basalts, E-MORB) from the MARK area. It is apparent that enriched magma sources, not associated with hot spots, are widespread in the upper mantle and are a common occurrence on both fast- and slow-spreading ridges. Evaluation of the trace-element systematics shows that E-MORB generation requires two stages. Low-degree melts metasomatise the upper mantle to create an enriched source, which later undergoes large extents of melting. A significant time lapse between the two events is required by differences in radiogenic isotope ratios. Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian ocean ridges that are far from hot spots show "mantle isochron" ages of ˜300 Ma for the Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and 238U- 206Pb systems after corrections for melting, but these ages need not be indicative of a specific event. Instead, they can result from continuous processes of formation and destruction of enriched mantle sources by melting and convective mixing. A two-box model describing these processes illuminates relationships between mantle isochron ages and upper mantle dynamics. If formation-destruction of enriched mantle is at steady state, constant "mantle isochron" ages are maintained and depend on the residence time of enriched mantle sources, the half-life of the radioactive system, and the daughter element behavior during mantle melting. The common ages of the Sr, Nd, and Pb systems reflects their long half-lives and similar melting behavior. In contrast, 207Pb/ 204Pb- 206Pb/ 204Pb ages are approximately twice as old due to the short half-life of 235U relative to the age of the Earth. For the long-lived systems, the mantle isochron ages approximate the residence

  20. Understanding magma formation and mantle conditions in the Lassen segment of the Cascade Arc: Insights from volatile contents of olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walowski, K. J.; Rasmussen, D. J.; Wallace, P. J.; Clynne, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascade Arc is associated with subduction of some of the youngest and consequently warmest oceanic crust on Earth. In the southernmost portion of the arc, from Mt. Shasta to Lassen Peak, volcanism is a result of the oblique subduction of the deformed Gorda plate, and the magmas produced are some of the most compositionally diverse of the entire arc. This compositional variability along with an abundance of primitive mafic magmas make it an ideal location to investigate the influences of a young subducting slab and mantle heterogeneities on arc volcanism. Previous geochemical studies of cinder cones in the Lassen region have shown that calc-alkaline mafic lavas in the forearc generally show evidence for a greater amount of a subducted slab component (e.g., higher Sr/P and Ba/Nb), whereas lavas in the region behind the axis of the arc show much less of a slab component (Borg et al., 1997, Can. Min.). These data suggest a change in fluid input across the arc and also indicate a change in mantle source composition from MORB-source-like peridotite beneath the forearc to OIB-source-like peridotite in the rear arc. We have analyzed volatile, major and trace elements in olivine-hosted melt inclusions (Fo84-90) from the tephra of six cinder cones that span a range of Sr/P values. The maximum volatile contents for inclusions from each cone (1.2 - 3.6 wt% H2O, ≤1500 wt% CO2, 100-650 ppm Cl, and 900-1800 ppm S) are similar to those found in melt inclusions from the central Oregon segment of the Cascades (Ruscitto et al., 2010, EPSL). The values overlap with data for other arcs worldwide but are lower, on average, than most other arcs, consistent with the young subducted plate age, which likely results in substantial dehydration beneath the forearc region. Key ratios such as H2O/Ce and Cl/Nb correlate positively with Sr/P, indicating coupling between volatile and trace element enrichment related to slab dehydration beneath the arc. Slab surface temperatures have also been

  1. Porosity of the melting zone and variations in the solid mantle upwelling rate beneath Hawaii: Inferences from {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th-{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}U-{sup 231}Pa disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, K.W.W.; DePaolo, D.J.; Murrell, M.T.; Baldridge, W.S.; Goldstein, S.; Clague, D.; Jull, M.

    1999-12-01

    Measurements of {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th-{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}U-{sup 231}Pa disequilibria in a suite of tholeiitic-to-basanitic lavas provide estimates of porosity, solid mantle upwelling rate and melt transport times beneath Hawaii. The observation that ({sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U) {gt} 1 indicates that garnet is required as a residual phase in the magma sources for all of the lavas. Both chromatographic porous flow and dynamic melting of a garnet peridotite source can adequately explain the combined U-Th-Ra and U-Pa data for these Hawaiian basalts. For chromatographic porous flow, the calculated maximum porosity in the melting zone ranges from 0.3--3% for tholeiites and 0.1--1% for alkali basalts and basanites, and solid mantle upwelling rates range from 40 to 100 cm/yr for tholeiites and from 1 to 3 cm/yr for basanites. For dynamic melting, the escape or threshold porosity is 0.5--2% for tholeiites and 0.1--0.8% for alkali basalts and basanites, and solid mantle upwelling rates range from 10 to 30 cm/yr for tholeiites and from 0.1 to 1 cm/yr for basanites. Assuming a constant melt productivity, calculated total melt fractions range from 15% for the tholeiitic basalts to 3% for alkali basalts and basanites.

  2. Perovskite inclusions in deep mantle diamonds and the fate of subducted lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Michael; Armstrong, Lora

    2010-05-01

    Sublithospheric diamonds are typically Type II, frequently exhibit complex zoning, and sometimes contain mineral inclusions that can potentially reveal deep mantle lithologies and petrologic processes. A considerable number of these diamonds contain inclusions with elemental stoichiometries consistent with transition zone (e.g. majoritic garnet, Ca-perovskite) and lower mantle phases (e.g. Mg-perovskite, Ca-perovskite, (Mg,Fe)-periclase) [1]. Ca-rich perovskites, some containing considerable CaTiO3 component, almost invariably have very low Mg contents, unlike what would be expected in solid lower mantle peridotitic or basaltic lithologies, but have elevated incompatible elements abundances that almost certainly indicate crystallization from a low-degree Ca-rich partial melt [2,3]. High-Ca majoritic garnets also have both major and trace element characteristics indicating the role of low-degree, Ca-rich partial melts [3,4], and in some cases calculated melts likely formed in subducted oceanic crust or lithosphere [3]. Given that diamond crystallized syngenetically with the inclusions, crystallization from carbonated melts is implicated. The reducing conditions expected in the ambient transition zone and lower mantle [5] could promote reduction of the carbonate component in slab-derived, carbonated (oxidized), partial melts. Reduction can lead to diamond and perovskite crystallization from the melt, possibly with H2O as a by-product through a reaction such as: CaCO3 (melt) + SiO2(melt-solid) + CH4(fluid-melt)= CaSiO3(melt-solid)) + 2H2O(melt) + 2Cdiamond Mg-perovskite could crystallize via a similar reaction involving the MgCO3 component of the melt. We speculate that when subducted slabs stall at the base of the transition zone, they may heat up and release low-degree carbonated melts [6]. Such melts may migrate, crystallize and metasomatize the ambient mantle. Trace element abundances in some kimberlites are remarkably similar to liquids that could have coexisted

  3. The basalt-high magnesium andesite association formed by multi-stage partial melting of a heterogeneous source mantle: Evidence from Hirado-Seto, Northwest Kyushu, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashima, Hidehisa

    2009-10-01

    An association of basalts and high magnesium andesites (HMAs), erupted at 7 Ma after the opening of the Sea of Japan, exposed at Hirado-Seto in northwest Kyushu, southwest Japan. The rocks are aphyric and are characterized by enrichments in incompatible trace elements similar to those seen for oceanic island basalts, although the HMAs show a weak negative Nb anomaly. High MgO, Ni and low FeO*/MgO indicate that the Hirado-Seto rocks were originally primitive magmas. They do not show a positive correlation between K 2O/La and SiO 2, or between Pb/La and SiO 2, indicating that hydrous components derived from a subducting slab did not play a significant role in the genesis of the Hirado-Seto basalt-HMA magmas. Alternatively, the normative olivine-quartz-[Jd + CaTs] compositions indicate that the Hirado-Seto basalt-HMA magmas were formed by multi-stage partial melting of the source mantle at pressures ranging from 1 to 0.5 GPa along the 1300 °C mantle adiabat, assuming anhydrous conditions. Basalt magmas separated from the source mantle at 1 GPa. HMA magmas separated at 0.5 GPa. A weak negative anomaly for Nb in HMAs can be explained by precipitation of Ti-P oxides during their ascent under high fO 2 condition. Thinning of the Hirado-Seto lithosphere caused by transtensional strain during the opening of the Sea of Japan would have enabled separation of HMA magmas at unusually low pressures.

  4. Theoretical studies of {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th-{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}U-{sup 231}Pa disequilibria in young lavas produced by mantle melting

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, H.; Zindler, A.

    2000-05-01

    This paper provides ready-to-use equations to describe variations in uranium-series (U-series) disequilibrium as a function of elemental distribution coefficients, melting porosity, melting rate, and melting time. The effects of these melting parameters on U-series disequilibria are quantitatively evaluated in both an absolute and relative sense. The importance of net elemental fractionation and ingrowth of daughter nuclides are also described and compared in terms of their relative contributions to total U-series disequilibrium. In addition, the authors compare the production of U-series disequilibrium during mantle melting to trace element fractionations produced by melting in a similar context. Trace element fractionations depend externally on the degree to which a source is melted, whereas U-series disequilibrium depends upon both the degree and rate of melting. In contrast to previous models, their approach to modeling U-series disequilibrium during dynamic melting collapses simply to a description of trace element behavior during dynamic melting when the appropriate decay terms are omitted. Their formulation shows that extremely small degrees of melting, sometimes called upon to explain observed extents of U-series disequilibrium, are not always required.

  5. Geochemistry of volcanic glasses from the Louisville Seamount Trail (IODP Expedition 330): Implications for eruption environments and mantle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Beier, Christoph; Brandl, Philipp A.; Buchs, David M.; Krumm, Stefan H.

    2014-05-01

    glasses recovered from four guyots during drilling along the Louisville Seamount Trail, southwest Pacific, have been analyzed for major, trace, and volatile elements (H2O, CO2, S, and Cl), and oxygen isotopes. Compared to other oceanic island settings, they are geochemically homogeneous, providing no evidence of the tholeiitic stage that characterizes Hawai'i. The degrees and depth of partial melting remained constant over 1-3 Ma represented by the drill holes, and along-chain over several million years. The only exception is Hadar Guyot with compositions that suggest small degree preferential melting of an enriched source, possibly because it erupted on the oldest and thickest lithosphere. Incompatible element enriched glass from late-stage volcaniclastics implies lower degrees of melting as the volcanoes moved off the melting anomaly. Volcaniclastic glasses from throughout the igneous basement are degassed suggesting generation during shallow submarine eruptions (<20 mbsl) or as subaerial flows entered the sea. Drill depths may no longer reflect relative age due to postquench downslope movement. Higher volatile contents in late-stage volcaniclastics indicate submarine eruptions at 118-258 mbsl and subsidence of the edifices below sea level by the time they erupted, or generation in flank eruptions. Glass from intrusion margins suggests emplacement ˜100 m below the surface. The required uplift to achieve these paleo-quench depths and the subsequent subsidence to reach their current depths exceeds that expected for normal oceanic lithosphere, consistent with the Louisville melting anomaly being <100°C hotter than normal asthenosphere at 50-70 Ma when the guyots were erupted.

  6. 87Sr/86Sr in spinel peridotites from Borée, Massif Central, France: melt depletion and metasomatism in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Caroline; Harvey, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Radiogenic isotopes and elemental concentrations in peridotite xenoliths may be used to model the timing and degree of partial melting in the upper mantle, but this primary melt depletion signature may be overwritten by subsequent episodes of melt or fluid infiltration. Spinel peridotites from the Maar de Borée, Massif Central, France have mainly poikilitic protogranular textures and clear petrographic evidence of a melt phase apparently unrelated to host basalt infiltration. Bulk rock major and compatible trace element concentrations are consistent with varying degrees of partial melting but incompatible trace element concentrations indicate cryptic metasomatism in some samples. Lithophile trace element mass balance cannot always be reconciled by the inclusion of the chemically characterized melt phase and suggest a contribution from a trace abundance grain boundary phase1. 87Sr/86Sr values for unleached bulk rocks and clinopyroxene mineral separates are higher than those for their leached equivalents, consistent with the removal of a radiogenic grain boundary phase. While unleached bulk rock 87Sr/86Sr is sometimes indistinguishable (within error) from its constituent unleached clinopyroxene, in two samples they show distinct patterns, as do the REE trends in these two xenoliths. BO01-01 bulk-rock is LREE-enriched (La/YbN = 3.6)2, and constituent clinopyroxene shows a similar relative enrichment trend. Bulk-rock 87Sr/86Sr is 0.70342±1 while that of clinopyroxene is lower at 0.70332±2. Clinopyroxene modal abundance is 11%. BO01-03 bulk-rock is only slightly LREE-enriched (La/YbN = 1.2) and both bulk-rock and clinopyroxene show a generally flatter profile. Bulk-rock 87Sr/86Sr is 0.70285±1 while that of clinopyroxene is in this case higher at 0.70296±2. Clinopyroxene modal abundance is also higher at 15%, consistent with a greater contribution by clinopyroxene to the bulk-rock Sr-isotope budget. The results appear to be inconsistent with a simple model of single

  7. Present day versus Temporal Heterogeneity of the Subridge Mantle in the Central Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, M.; Bonatti, E.; Brunelli, D.; Cipriani, A.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of MORB and of MORP (Mid Ocean Ridge Peridotite) show that the oceanic upper mantle is heterogeneous. Long and short wavelength chemical variability has been reported from the Mid Atlantic Ridge. The subridge mantle degree of melting, estimated from MORP mineral chemistry of mantle equilibrated spinel, opx and cpx, as well as from MORB glasses, decreases from the Azores swell at ~40ο N to the equator, in parallel to the decrease of crustal thickness inferred from the near zero-age Mantle Bouguer anomaly. The temporal evolution of this portion of a slow-spreading mid ocean ridge can be studied along seafloor spreading flowlines normal to ridge segments. A lithospheric section exposed between 10ο and 11ο N, south of the Vema Fracture Zone is giving us the opportunity to study how generation of lithosphere at a 80-km long ridge segment evolved since 25 Ma. Gravity data, and MORP-MORB chemistry correlations suggest a steady increase in crustal thickness and in mantle degree of melting from 20 Ma to Present, with superimposed 3-4 Ma oscillations. Variations of degree of melting, peridotite temperature of equilibration and crustal thickness are not proportional to spreading rate, suggesting variations in mantle source composition and a non-purely passive lithosphere formation at ridge axis. The combination of the zero-age axial ridge trend with the 20 Ma to Present trend could be explained by a subaxial hot/fertile mantle flow from the Azores swell toward an equatorial “cold” belt. The equatorial belt, characterized by long offset transforms, is magma starved and nearly free of basaltic crust. Small quantities of basalt, generated mostly in the garnet stability region by low degrees of partial melting, could not be expelled from the mantle, and froze to form a “constipated”, crust free lithosphere. Numerical calculations show a strong decrease of crustal production as a ridge approaches a transform, proportional to slip rate and offset length. When the

  8. Mantle cryptology

    SciTech Connect

    Zindler, A.; Jagoutz, E.

    1988-02-01

    A group of anhydrous peridotites from Peridot Mesa, Arizona, document isotopic and trace element heterogeneity in the source mantle. LREE enrichments in two spinel periodotites may have occurred immediately prior to entrainment through interaction with a melt similar to the hose basanite. Detailed characterization of inclusion-free peridotite phases, and washed and unwahsed whole-rock samples, verifies the presence of a ubiquitous secondary contaminant which derives from interaction of the peridotites with local ground waters and host magma. Once the veil of this contamination is removed, coexisting phases are found to be in isotopic equilibrium. Further, a comparison of washed whole rocks and calculated clean-bulk compositions documents the occurrence of an important intragranular fluid-hosted trace element component. For the very incompatible elements (K, Rb, Cs, and Ba, and probably U, Th, Pb and gaseous components as well) this component dominates the nodule budget for two of the three samples studied in detail. Production of basaltic magmas from fertile but incompatible-element-depleted peridotite requires the action of melting processes such as those recently proposed by McKenzie (1985) and O'Hara (1985). The distinctive feature of these models is that they call on effectively larger source volumes for more incompatible elements. In this context, depletions of incompatible trace elements in MORB source mantle will be more extreme than has heretofore been suspected. This would essentially preclude the long-term total isolation of a MORB source mantle above the 670 km seismic discontinuity.

  9. Experimental petrology of the ultramafic lavas remotely sensed on the surface of Mercury: Constraints on melting and differentiation of Mercury's mantle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, T. L.; Charlier, B.; Zuber, M. T.; Brown, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    The orbiting MESSENGER spacecraft has measured major element ratios using x-ray fluorescence spectra. These ratios can be used to calculate absolute abundances of the major oxide components in the lavas exposed on the surface of Mercury. The first compositional data reported by Nittler (2011, Science 333, 1847-50) represented large areas of mixed high-reflectance volcanic plains and low-reflectance materials and did not include the northern volcanic plains. These large area measurements reveal high MgO, high SiO2 and low FeO lavas that are most similar to terrestrial volcanic rocks known as basaltic komatiites. Two compositional groups are distinguished by the presence or absence of a clinopyroxene component. Continued measurement of smaller areas on the surface (Weider et al., 2012, JGR 117, E00L05) confirms the existence of two groups. Melting experiments at one atmosphere on the average compositions of each of the two groups were performed to provide constraints on melting and crystallization processes. The two compositional groups cannot be related to each other by any fractional crystallization process at any pressure within the silicate interior of Mercury. This result suggests that the silicate interior of Mercury contains differentiated source regions. One possibility for development of distinctive source regions is early multi-stage differentiation and remelting processes in Mercury's interior. Magma ocean crystallization followed by adiabatic decompression of the differentiated cumulate layers during post magma ocean overturn and/or convection could lead to conditions that would be adequate to cause melting and volcanism that is preserved in the surface lavas. High-pressure phase equilibria on compositional systems similar to the Mercury lavas supports partial melting at pressures > 1 GPa if the Na detected by gamma ray spectroscopy is assumed to be included in the surface lavas. This depth corresponds to equilibration of the melts close to the crust-mantle

  10. Metasomatic Enrichment of Oceanic Lithospheric Mantle Documented by Petit-Spot Xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilet, S.; Abe, N.; Rochat, L.; Hirano, N.; Machida, S.; Kaczmarek, M. A.; Muntener, O.

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic lithosphere is generally interpreted as mantle residue after MORB extraction. It has been proposed, however, that metasomatism could take place at the interface between the low-velocity zone and the cooling and thickening oceanic lithosphere or by the percolation of low-degree melts produced in periphery of Mid Ocean Ridges. This later process is observed in slow spreading ridges and ophiolites where shallow oceanic lithospheric mantle could be metasomatized/refertilized during incomplete MORB melt extraction. Nevertheless, direct evidence for metasomatic refertilization of the deep part of the oceanic lithospheric mantle is still missing. Xenoliths and xenocrysts sampled by petit-spot volcanoes interpreted as low-degree melts extracted from the base of the lithosphere in response to plate flexure, provide important new information about the nature and the processes associated with the evolution of oceanic lithospheric mantle. Here, we report, first, the presence of a garnet xenocryst in petit-spot lavas from Japan characterized by low-Cr, low-Ti content and mostly flat MREE-HREE pattern. This garnet is interpreted as formed during subsolidus cooling of pyroxenitic or gabbroic cumulates formed at ~1 GPa during the incomplete melt extraction at the periphery of the Pacific mid-ocean ridge. It is the first time that such processes are documented in fast spreading context. Second, we report petit-spot mantle xenoliths with cpx trace element "signatures" characterized by high U, Th, relative depletion in Nb, Pb, Ti and high but variable LREE/HREE ratio suggesting equilibration depth closed to the Gt/Sp transition zone. Such "signatures" are unknown from oceanic settings and show unexpected similarity to melt-metasomatized gt-peridotites sampled by kimberlites. This similarity suggests that metasomatic processes are not restricted to continental setting, but could correspond to a global mechanism at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. As plate flexure

  11. Volatile cycling of H2O, CO2, F, and Cl in the HIMU mantle: A new window provided by melt inclusions from oceanic hot spot lavas at Mangaia, Cook Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Rita A.; Jackson, Matthew G.; Koga, Kenneth T.; Rose-Koga, Estelle F.; Hauri, Erik H.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Price, Allison A.; Day, James M. D.; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Kelley, Katherine A.

    2014-11-01

    hosts the most radiogenic Pb-isotopic compositions observed in ocean island basalts and represents the HIMU (high µ = 238U/204Pb) mantle end-member, thought to result from recycled oceanic crust. Complete geochemical characterization of the HIMU mantle end-member has been inhibited due to a lack of deep submarine glass samples from HIMU localities. We homogenized olivine-hosted melt inclusions separated from Mangaia lavas and the resulting glassy inclusions made possible the first volatile abundances to be obtained from the HIMU mantle end-member. We also report major and trace element abundances and Pb-isotopic ratios on the inclusions, which have HIMU isotopic fingerprints. We evaluate the samples for processes that could modify the volatile and trace element abundances postmantle melting, including diffusive Fe and H2O loss, degassing, and assimilation. H2O/Ce ratios vary from 119 to 245 in the most pristine Mangaia inclusions; excluding an inclusion that shows evidence for assimilation, the primary magmatic H2O/Ce ratios vary up to ˜200, and are consistent with significant dehydration of oceanic crust during subduction and long-term storage in the mantle. CO2 concentrations range up to 2346 ppm CO2 in the inclusions. Relatively high CO2 in the inclusions, combined with previous observations of carbonate blebs in other Mangaia melt inclusions, highlight the importance of CO2 for the generation of the HIMU mantle. F/Nd ratios in the inclusions (30 ± 9; 2σ standard deviation) are higher than the canonical ratio observed in oceanic lavas, and Cl/K ratios (0.079 ± 0.028) fall in the range of pristine mantle (0.02-0.08).

  12. Experience melting through the Earth's lower mantle via LH-DAC experiments on MgO-SiO2 and CaO-MgO-SiO2 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Marzena A.; Lord, Oliver T.; Walter, Michael J.; Trønnes, Reidar G.

    2015-04-01

    The large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) and ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) of the lowermost mantle [1] are likely characterized by distinct chemical compositions, combined with temperature anomalies. The heterogeneities may have originated by fractional crystallization of the magma ocean during the earliest history of the Earth [2,3] and/or the continued accretion at the CMB of subducted basaltic oceanic crust [4,5]. These structures and their properties control the distribution and magnitude of the heat flow at the CMB and therefore the convective dynamics and evolution of the whole Earth. To determine the properties of these structures and thus interpret the seismic results, a good understanding of the melting phase relations of relevant basaltic and peridotitic compositions are required throughout the mantle pressure range. The melting phase relations of lower mantle materials are only crudely known. Recent experiments on various natural peridotitic and basaltic compositions [6-8] have given wide ranges of solidus and liquidus temperatures at lower mantle pressures. The melting relations for MgO, MgSiO3 and compositions along the MgO-SiO2 join from ab initio theory [e.g. 9,10] is broadly consistent with a thermodynamic model for eutectic melt compositions through the lower mantle based on melting experiments in the MgO-SiO2 system at 16-26 GPa [3]. We have performed a systematic study of the melting phase relations of analogues for peridotitic mantle and subducted basaltic crust in simple binary and ternary systems that capture the major mineralogy of Earth's lower mantle, using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) technique at 25-100 GPa. We determined the eutectic melting temperatures involving the following liquidus mineral assemblages: 1. bridgmanite (bm) + periclase (pc) and bm + silica in the system MgO-SiO2 (MS), corresponding to model peridotite and basalt compositions 2. bm + pc + Ca-perovskite (cpv) and bm + silica + cpv in the

  13. A combined basalt and peridotite perspective on 14 million years of melt generation at the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge: Evidence for temporal changes in mantle dynamics?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coogan, L.A.; Thompson, G.M.; MacLeod, C.J.; Dick, H.J.B.; Edwards, S.J.; Hosford, Scheirer A.; Barry, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about temporal variations in melt generation and extraction at midocean ridges largely due to the paucity of sampling along flow lines. Here we present new whole-rock major and trace element data, and mineral and glass major element data, for 71 basaltic samples (lavas and dykes) and 23 peridotites from the same ridge segment (the Atlantis Bank segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge). These samples span an age range of almost 14 My and, in combination with the large amount of published data from this area, allow temporal variations in melting processes to be investigated. Basalts show systematic changes in incompatible trace element ratios with the older samples (from ???8-14 Ma) having more depleted incompatible trace element ratios than the younger ones. There is, however, no corresponding change in peridotite compositions. Peridotites come from the top of the melting column, where the extent of melting is highest, suggesting that the maximum degree of melting did not change over this interval of time. New and published Nd isotopic ratios of basalts, dykes and gabbros from this segment suggest that the average source composition has been approximately constant over this time interval. These data are most readily explained by a model in which the average source composition and temperature have not changed over the last 14 My, but the dynamics of mantle flow (active-to-passive) or melt extraction (less-to-more efficient extraction from the 'wings' of the melting column) has changed significantly. This hypothesised change in mantle dynamics occurs at roughly the same time as a change from a period of detachment faulting to 'normal' crustal accretion. We speculate that active mantle flow may impart sufficient shear stress on the base of the lithosphere to rotate the regional stress field and promote the formation of low angle normal faults. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Timing of Precambrian melt depletion and Phanerozoic refertilization events in the lithospheric mantle of the Wyoming Craton and adjacent Central Plains Orogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, R.W.; Irving, A.J.; Schulze, D.J.; Hearn, B.C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Garnet peridotite xenoliths from the Sloan kimberlite (Colorado) are variably depleted in their major magmaphile (Ca, Al) element compositions with whole rock Re-depletion model ages generally consistent with this depletion occurring in the mid-Proterozoic. Unlike many lithospheric peridotites, the Sloan samples are also depleted in incompatible trace elements, as shown by the composition of separated garnet and clinopyroxene. Most of the Sloan peridotites have intermineral Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isotope systematics consistent with this depletion occurring in the mid-Proterozoic, though the precise age of this event is poorly defined. Thus, when sampled by the Devonian Sloan kimberlite, the compositional characteristics of the lithospheric mantle in this area primarily reflected the initial melt extraction event that presumably is associated with crust formation in the Proterozoic-a relatively simple history that may also explain the cold geotherm measured for the Sloan xenoliths. The Williams and Homestead kimberlites erupted through the Wyoming Craton in the Eocene, near the end of the Laramide Orogeny, the major tectonomagmatic event responsible for the formation of the Rocky Mountains in the late Cretaceous-early Tertiary. Rhenium-depletion model ages for the Homestead peridotites are mostly Archean, consistent with their origin in the Archean lithospheric mantle of the Wyoming Craton. Both the Williams and Homestead peridotites, however, clearly show the consequences of metasomatism by incompatible-element-rich melts. Intermineral isotope systematics in both the Homestead and Williams peridotites are highly disturbed with the Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of the minerals being dominated by the metasomatic component. Some Homestead samples preserve an incompatible element depleted signature in their radiogenic Hf isotopic compositions. Sm-Nd tie lines for garnet and clinopyroxene separates from most Homestead samples provide Mesozoic or younger "ages" suggesting

  15. Magnesian andesite and dacite lavas from Mt. Shasta, northern California: products of fractional crystallization of H2O-rich mantle melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Timothy L.; Baker, Michael B.; Price, Richard C.; Parman, Stephen W.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Müntener, Othmar

    2005-01-01

    Mt. Shasta andesite and dacite lavas contain high MgO (3.5 5 wt.%), very low FeO*/MgO (1 1.5) and 60 66 wt.% SiO2. The range of major and trace element compositions of the Shasta lavas can be explained through fractional crystallization (~50 60 wt.%) with subsequent magma mixing of a parent magma that had the major element composition of an H2O-rich primitive magnesian andesite (PMA). Isotopic and trace element characteristics of the Mt. Shasta stratocone lavas are highly variable and span the same range of compositions that is found in the parental basaltic andesite and PMA lavas. This variability is inherited from compositional variations in the input contributed from melting of mantle wedge peridotite that was fluxed by a slab-derived, fluid-rich component. Evidence preserved in phenocryst assemblages indicates mixing of magmas that experienced variable amounts of fractional crystallization over a range of crustal depths from ~25 to ~4 km beneath Mt. Shasta. Major and trace element evidence is also consistent with magma mixing. Pre-eruptive crystallization extended from shallow crustal levels under degassed conditions (~4 wt.% H2O) to lower crustal depths with magmatic H2O contents of ~10 15 wt.%. Oxygen fugacity varied over 2 log units from one above to one below the Nickel-Nickel Oxide buffer. The input of buoyant H2O-rich magmas containing 10 15 wt.% H2O may have triggered magma mixing and facilitated eruption. Alternatively, vesiculation of oversaturated H2O-rich melts could also play an important role in mixing and eruption.

  16. Mantle flow, volatiles, slab-surface temperatures and melting dynamics in the north Tonga arc-Lau back-arc basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Turner, Simon; Arculus, Richard; Dale, Chris; Jenner, Frances; Pearce, Julian; MacPherson, Colin; Handley, Heather

    2012-11-01

    The Fonualei Spreading Center affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate geochemical changes with increasing depth to the slab in the Lau back-arc basin. We present H2O and CO2concentrations and Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf and U-Th-Ra isotope data for selected glasses as well as new Hf isotope data from boninites and seamounts to the north of the Tonga arc. The Pb and Hf isotope data are used to show that mantle flow is oriented to the southwest and that the tear in the northern end of the slab may not extend east as far as the boninite locality. Along the Fonualei Spreading Center, key geochemical parameters change smoothly with increasing distance from the arc front and increasing slab surface temperatures. The latter may range from 720 to 866°C, based on decreasing H2O/Ce ratios. Consistent with experimental data, the geochemical trends are interpreted to reflect changes in the amount and composition of wet pelite melts or super-critical fluids and aqueous fluids derived from the slab. With one exception, all of the lavas preserve both238U excesses and 226Ra excesses. We suggest that lavas from the Fonualei Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge are dominated by fluid-fluxed melting whereas those from the East and Central Lau Spreading Centers, where slab surface temperatures exceed ˜850-900°C, are largely derived through decompression. A similar observation is found for the Manus and East Scotia back-arc basins and may reflect the expiry of a key phase such as lawsonite in the subducted basaltic crust.

  17. 3D mapping of chemical distribution from melting at lower mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Nabiei, F.; Cantoni, M.; Badro, J.; Gaal, R.; Gillet, P.

    2014-12-01

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is a unique tool for subjecting materials to pressures over few hundreds of GPa and temperatures of thousands of Kelvins which enables us to experimentally simulate the inaccessible interiors of planets. However, small sample size, laser profile and thermally conductive diamonds cause temperature gradients of 1000s K over a few microns which also affects chemical and structural distribution of phases in the sample. We have examined samples of San Carlos olivine (Mg,Fe)2SiO3 powder melted in the diamond anvil cell by double-sided and single-sided laser heating for 3-6 minutes to ~3000 K at 35-37 GPa. Moreover, MgO is used as an insulating media in one of the sample. Recovered samples were analyzed by a combination of focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector. Images and chemical maps were acquired for ~300 slices with ~70 nm depth from each sample, comprising about half of the heated zone. Detailed chemical and structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of lamellas prepared from the remaining section of the samples will also be presented. In all samples the heated zone included (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite-structured bridgmanite (PV) phase and two (Mg, Fe)O phases, one of which, magnesiowüstite (MW), is richer in iron than the other one, ferropericlase (FP). In double-side heated samples we observe a Fe-rich quenched melt core surrounded by MW phase. Our results show that with increasing heating time, Fe migrates to the molten center of the sample. In the single-side heated sample, the Fe-rich MW phase is concentrated in the center of heated zone. In all samples a FP crust was observed around the heated zone. This crust, however, is broken in the upper part (colder part) of the single-side heated sample due the high asymmetrical temperature gradient within the sample. The results confirm the importance of double-side heating and insulating media

  18. Rapid Ascent of Aphyric Mantle Melts through the Overriding Crust in Subduction Zones: Evidence from Variable Uranium-Series Disequilibria, Amorphous Hydrous Alteration Microtextures in Crystal Rims, and Two-Pyroxene Pseudo-Decompression Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmer, G. F.; Freymuth, H.; Hsieh, H. H.; Hwang, S. L.; Iizuka, Y.; Miller, C. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Sakamoto, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic hazard mitigation at subduction zones critically depends on knowledge of magma generation and ascent processes and timescales. Two diametrically opposite scenarios are presently debated: One paradigm is the generation of low-silica (basaltic) melts in the mantle wedge, followed by protracted sub-liquidus magma ascent and evolution through crystal growth and fractionation in crustal reservoirs, which are tapped during volcanic eruptions. In contrast, a diametrically opposite model favours the generation of higher silica melts in the mantle or in a lower crustal hot zone, followed by rapid decompression to the surface under super-liquidus conditions. In the latter case, crystals are picked up during magma ascent, and are in the process of dissolving. We present multiple lines of evidence that point to crystal uptake as the principal processes by which arc melts acquire their crystal cargo: (i) variable 234U-238U disequilibria in mineral separates; (ii) hydrous mineral rims with amorphous alteration textures; and (iii) two-pyroxene pseudo-decompression paths; cf. Zellmer et al. (2014a,b,c), doi: 10.1144/SP385.3 and 10.1144/SP385.9 and 10.1144/SP410.1. These observations point to a scarcity of true phenocrysts in many arc magmas, and thus to decompression of aphyric melts that take up their crystal cargo during ascent. The data imply that many hydrous wedge melts are more silica-rich than basalts and achieve super-liquidus conditions during rapid ascent from great depth.

  19. Experimental determination of C, F, and H partitioning between mantle minerals and carbonated basalt, CO2/Ba and CO2/Nb systematics of partial melting, and the CO2 contents of basaltic source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, A.; Hauri, E. H.; Hirschmann, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    To determine partitioning of C between upper mantle silicate minerals and basaltic melts, we executed 26 experiments between 0.8 and 3 GPa and 1250-1500 °C which yielded 37 mineral/glass pairs suitable for C analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). To enhance detection limits, experiments were conducted with 13C-enriched bulk compositions. Independent measurements of 13C and 12C in coexisting phases produced two C partition coefficients for each mineral pair and allowed assessment of the approach to equilibrium during each experiment. Concentrations of C in olivine (ol), orthopyroxene (opx), clinopyroxene (cpx) and garnet (gt) range from 0.2 to 3.5 ppm, and resulting C partition coefficients for ol/melt, opx/melt, cpx/melt and gt/melt are, respectively, 0.0007 ± 0.0004 (n = 2), 0.0003 ± 0.0002 (n = 45), 0.0005 ± 0.0004 (n = 17) and 0.0001 ± 0.00007 (n = 5). The effective partition coefficient of C during partial melting of peridotite is 0.00055 ± 0.00025, and therefore C is significantly more incompatible than Nb, slightly more compatible than Ba, and, among refractory trace elements, most similar in behavior to U or Th. Experiments also yielded partition coefficients for F and H between minerals and melts. Combining new and previous values of DFmineral/melt yields bulk DFperidotite/melt = 0.011 ± 0.002, which suggests that F behaves similarly to La during partial melting of peridotite. Values of DHpyx/melt correlate with tetrahedral Al along a trend consistent with previously published determinations. Small-degree partial melting of the mantle results in considerable CO2/Nb fractionation, which is likely the cause of high CO2/Nb evident in some Nb-rich oceanic basalts. CO2/Ba is much less easily fractionated, with incompatible-element-enriched partial melts having lower CO2/Ba than less enriched basalts. Comparison of calculated behavior of CO2, Nb, and Ba to systematics of oceanic basalts suggests that depleted (DMM-like) sources have 75 ± 25

  20. Cumulates, Dykes and Pressure Solution in the Ice-Salt Mantle of Europa: Geological Consequences of Pressure Dependent Liquid Compositions and Volume Changes During Ice-Salt Melting Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S.; Asphaug, E.; Bruesch, L.

    2002-12-01

    Water-salt analogue experiments used to investigate cumulate processes in silicate magmas, along with observations of sea ice and ice shelf behaviour, indicate that crystal-melt separation in water-salt systems is a rapid and efficient process even on scales of millimetres and minutes. Squeezing-out of residual melts by matrix compaction is also predicted to be rapid on geological timescales. We predict that the ice-salt mantle of Europa is likely to be strongly stratified, with a layered structure predictable from density and phase relationships between ice polymorphs, aqueous saline solutions and crystalline salts such as hydrated magnesium sulphates (determined experimentally by, inter alia, Hogenboom et al). A surface layer of water ice flotation cumulate will be separated from denser salt cumulates by a cotectic horizon. This cotectic horizon will be both the site of subsequent lowest-temperature melting and a level of neutral buoyancy for the saline melts produced. Initial melting will be in a narrow depth range owing to increasing melting temperature with decreasing pressure: the phase relations argue against direct melt-though to the surface unless vesiculation occurs. Overpressuring of dense melts due to volume expansion on cotectic melting is predicted to lead to lateral dyke emplacement and extension above the dyke tips. Once the liquid leaves the cotectic, melting of water ice will involve negative volume change. Impact-generated melts will drain downwards through the fractured zones beneath crater floors. A feature in the complex crater Mannan'an, with elliptical ring fractures around a conical depression with a central pit, bears a close resemblance to Icelandic glacier collapse cauldrons produced by subglacial eruptions. Other structures resembling Icelandic cauldrons occur along Europan banded structures, while resurgence of ice rubble within collapse structures may produce certain types of chaos region. More general contraction of the ice mantle

  1. Geologic Map and Eruptive History of Veniaminof Volcano Record Aleutian Arc Processing of Mantle-Derived Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Sisson, T. W.; Calvert, A. T.; Nye, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Mount Veniaminof, one of the largest volcanoes in the Aleutian arc, has a basal diameter of ~40 km, a volume of ~350 km3, an 8-km-diameter ice-filled caldera, and an active intracaldera cone. The geology of this tholeiitic basalt-to-dacite volcano has been mapped at 1:50,000 scale. Over 100 Quaternary volcanic map units are characterized by 600 chemical analyses of rocks and nearly 100 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Throughout its history, lava flows from Veniaminof recorded alternately ice/melt-water chilling or ice-free conditions that are consistent with independent paleoclimatic records. Exposures from deep glacial valleys to the caldera rim reveal a long history dominated by basalt and basaltic andesite from ≥260 ka to 150 ka that includes compositions as primitive as 9.4% MgO and 130 ppm Ni at 50% SiO2. Basaltic andesite, common throughout Veniaminof's history, has low compatible-element contents that indicate an origin by fractionation of basaltic magma. Repeated eruption of more differentiated melts from a shallow intrusive complex, represented by granodiorite (crystallized dacitic magma) and cumulate gabbro and diorite xenoliths in pyroclastic deposits, has featured virtually aphyric andesite since 150 ka and dacite (to 69.5% SiO2) beginning ~110 ka. These variably differentiated liquids segregated from crystal mush, possibly by gas-driven filter pressing, and commonly vented but also solidified at depth. A large composite cone was present at least as early as 200 ka. Although asymmetric edifice morphology hints at early sector collapse to the southeast, coeval vents on northwest and southeast flanks and the distribution of extensive lava units indicate that a large cone (again) was present by 120 ka. Flank eruption of a wide variety of Veniaminof magmas was common from plate-convergence-parallel northwest-trending fissures from at least as early as ca. 80 ka. At 56 ka and at 46 ka, voluminous dacite lava erupted on both northwest and southeast flanks. A

  2. Temporal distribution of mantle-derived potassic rocks and carbonatites linked to stabilization of mantle lithosphere and redox states during subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle-derived potassic igneous rocks and carbonatites first appear in the geological record in the late Archean, coinciding with major crust-forming events on most continents. The compositions of potassic rocks require sources including discrete ultramafic rocks with phlogopite and pyroxenes, whereas carbonatites and ultramafic lamprophyres (carbonate-rich potassic rocks) require oxidizing conditions in which carbonate is stable. The presence of these source rocks from this time is probably related to the stabilization of mantle lithosphere. If mantle lithosphere had not been stable for considerable periods of time, then melting would be restricted to peridotite, which is not a viable option for strongly potassic rocks. The phlogopite-rich source-rock assemblages that are necessary precursors for potassic melts could be introduced into the lithosphere by either subduction processes or by multiple stages of low-degree melting. Many modern examples involve subducted sedimentary material, which concentrates potassium by the stabilization of micas in subduction metamorphism. Subduction involves a great variety of redox states, but the bulk effect is the return of oxidized material from the surface into the mantle. However, we cannot apply uniformitarianism unthinkingly, because subduction processes at and before 2.7 Ga may have had different redox states. Before the Great Oxidation Event the distribution and abundances of geological formations such as banded iron formations, red beds, and uraninites indicate that geological reservoirs became gradually oxidized, preventing an earlier increase in atmospheric oxygen. This means that the function of the subduction process to oxidize the upper mantle by the return of oxidized rocks from the surface was much weaker in the early Earth. Early continental mantle lithosphere was, therefore, likely to accumulate carbon in reduced form, which would be more easily remobilized in melts through low-temperature redox melting much

  3. Quartz diorite veins in a peridotite xenolith from Tallante, Spain: implications for reaction and survival of slab-derived SiO2-oversaturated melt in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, S.; Shimizu, Y.; Gervilla, F.

    We found quartz diorite veins (up to 5 mm thick), composed mainly of plagioclase and quartz, in a plagioclase-bearing spinel lherzolite xenolith in alkali basalt from Tallante, Southern Spain. The quartz diorite veins are coarse-grained, the average grain size being 0.5 mm, and have thin orthopyroxenite rim along olivine wall. Thinner veins free of quartz and composed solely of plagioclase with orthopyroxene selvage are much more common in other xenoliths from Tallante. The involved melt was strongly reactive with olivine to form orthopyroxene, which can protect against further reaction. This suggests how the silica-oversaturated melts, after supplied from downgoing slabs, can move through peridotite and reach the shallow mantle with preserving the silica-oversaturated character. The armor of orthopyroxenite is of vital importance for the melt to keep its silica-oversaturated character within peridotite. Precipitation of orthopyroxene combined with olivine consumption somewhat controls the general chemical trend of adakite. Orthopyroxenite vein network at the expense of olivine is expected to be common as fossil conduits within the mantle wedge. This kind of orthopyroxenite has contributed to Si-enrichment of the mantle wedge.

  4. Primitive basalts and andesites from the Mt. Shasta region, N. California: products of varying melt fraction and water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael B.; Grove, Timothy L.; Price, Richard

    1994-06-01

    Quaternary volcanism in the Mt. Shasta region has produced primitive magmas [Mg/(Mg+Fe*)>0.7, MgO>8 wt% and Ni>150 ppm] ranging in composition from high-alumina basalt to andesite and these record variable extents ofmelting in their mantle source. Trace and major element chemical variations, petrologic evidence and the results of phase equilibrium studies are consistent with variations in H2O content in the mantle source as the primary control on the differences in extent of melting. High-SiO2, high-MgO (SiO2=52% and MgO=11 wt%) basaltic andesites resemble hydrous melts (H2O=3 to 5 wt%) in equilibrium with a depleted harzburgite residue. These magmas represent depletion of the mantle source by 20 to 30 wt% melting. High-SiO2, high-MgO (SiO2=58% and MgO=9 wt%) andesites are produced by higher degrees of melting and contain evidence for higher H2O contents (H2O=6 wt%). High-alumina basalts (SiO2=48.5% and Al2O3=17 wt%) represent nearly anhydrous low degree partial melts (from 6 to 10% depletion) of a mantle source that has been only slightly enriched by a fluid component derived from the subducted slab. The temperatures and pressures of last equilibration with upper mantle are 1200°C and 1300°C for the basaltic andesite and basaltic magmas, respectively. A model is developed that satisfies the petrologic temperature constraints and involves magma generation whereby a heterogeneous distribution of H2O in the mantle results in the production of a spectrum of mantle melts ranging from wet (calc-alkaline) to dry (tholeiitic).

  5. A melt inclusion study in primitive olivines from the adventive cones of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Réunion Island : Implications for the nature of the Réunion mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valer, Marina; Schiano, Pierre; Bachèlery, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    According to Courtillot et al. (2003), the mantle plume that forms the Réunion hot spot originates from the deepest part of the lower mantle. Based on the isotopic compositions of the lavas, this long-lived plume appears relatively homogeneous during the last 65 My (e.g Fisk et al., 1988), and is believed to correspond to an ubiquitous mantle component common to ocean island basalts (e.g Bosch et al., 2008). Here, we give additional information on the nature of the Réunion mantle plume by studying the chemical composition of silicate melt inclusions trapped within early-formed, primitive olivine crystals (Fo>85%) from the adventive cones of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. These cones have emitted distinct magmas from the historical lavas. In particular, we focus on very incompatible trace element ratios, which reflect the long-term characteristics of the basalt sources and do not depend on the age of the source. The results indicate that the trapped melts have primitive compositions (up to 10.55 wt.% MgO) relative to the lavas. They also suggest that the magmas found in the adventive cones originate from a common chemical source, corresponding to either (1) a homogeneous mixed source between different mantle components (HIMU, EM 1, EM 2 and DMM), or (2) a near-primitive less-differentiated mantle source. Some very incompatible trace element ratios (e.g Th/La, Nb/La) display values similar to the primitive mantle ones, giving thus further support for hypothesis (2), as also inferred by Vlastélic et al. (2006) and Schiano et al. (2012). If based on Ce/Pb and Nb/U systematics, Hofmann et al. (1986) argued that the sources of all oceanic basalts (MORB and OIB) have undergone continental crust extraction, we propose an intermediate origin for the Réunion plume, between a primitive-like mantle domain and a depleted one, almost not affected by the recycling processes.

  6. A Melt Inclusion Study in Primitive Olivines from the Adventive Cones of the Piton de la Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion Island : Implications for the Nature of the Réunion Mantle Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valer, M.; Schiano, P.; Bachelery, P.

    2015-12-01

    According to Courtillot et al. (2003), the mantle plume that forms the Réunion hot spot originates from the deepest part of the lower mantle. Based on the isotopic compositions of the lavas, this long-lived plume appears relatively homogeneous during the last 65 My (e.g Fisk et al., 1988), and is believed to correspond to an ubiquitous mantle component common to ocean island basalts (e.g Bosch et al., 2008). Here, we give additional information on the nature of the Réunion mantle plume by studying the chemical composition of silicate melt inclusions trapped within early-formed, primitive olivine crystals (Fo>85%) from the adventive cones of the Piton de la Fournaise Volcano. These cones have emitted distinct magmas from the historical lavas. In particular, we focus on very incompatible trace element ratios, which reflect the long-term characteristics of the basalt sources and do not depend on the age of the source. The results indicate that the trapped melts have very primitive compositions (up to 11.93 wt% MgO) relative to the lavas. They also suggest that the magmas found in the adventive cones originate from a common chemical source, corresponding to either (1) a homogeneous mixed source between different mantle components (HIMU, EM 1, EM 2 and DMM), or (2) a near-primitive less-differentiated mantle source. Some very incompatible trace element ratios (e.g Th/La, Nb/La) display values similar to the primitive mantle ones, giving thus further support for hypothesis (2), as also inferred by Vlastélic et al. (2006) and Schiano et al. (2012). If based on Ce/Pb and Nb/U systematics, Hofmann et al. (1986) argued that the sources of all oceanic basalts (MORB and OIB) have undergone continental crust extraction, we propose an intermediate origin for the Réunion plume, between a primitive-like mantle domain and a depleted one, almost not affected by the recycling processes.

  7. Effect of chlorine on near-liquidus crystallization of olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 6234 at 1 GPa: Implication for volatile-induced melting of the Martian mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farcy, Benjamin J.; Gross, Juliane; Carpenter, Paul; Hicks, Jacob; Filiberto, Justin

    2016-05-01

    Martian magmas are thought to be rich in chlorine compared with their terrestrial counterparts. Here, we experimentally investigate the effect of chlorine on liquidus depression and near-liquidus crystallization of olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 6234 and compare these results with previous experimental results on the effect of chlorine on near-liquidus crystallization of the surface basalts Humphrey and Fastball. Previous experimental results showed that the change in liquidus temperature is dependent on the bulk composition of the basalt. The effect of chlorine on liquidus depression is greater for lower SiO2 and higher Al2O3 magmas than for higher SiO2 and lower Al2O3 magmas. The bulk composition for this study has lower Al2O3 and higher FeO contents than previous work; therefore, we provide additional constraints on the effect of the bulk composition on the influence of chlorine on near-liquidus crystallization. High pressure and temperature crystallization experiments were performed at 1 GPa on a synthetic basalt, of the bulk composition of NWA 6234, with 0-4 wt% Cl added to the sample as AgCl. The results are consistent with previous notions that with increasing wt% Cl in the melt, the crystallization temperature decreases. Importantly, our results have a liquidus depression ∆T (°C) from added chlorine that is consistent with the difference in bulk composition and suggest a dependence on both the bulk Al2O3 and FeO content. Our results suggest that the addition of chlorine to the Martian mantle may lower magma genesis temperatures and potentially aid in the petrogenesis of Martian magmas.

  8. Chemical stratification of the mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    A possible scenario for the chemical stratification of the earth's mantle is presented. Differentiation of the mantle by either the production of basaltic magmas or partial melting by the upper mantle is proposed to lead to a thick basalt layer, the lower part of which is converted to eclogite as the earth cools. Density estimates indicate that the eclogite formed would not be able to sink to below 670 km. The eclogite layer is thus demonstrated to be trapped as a result of whole-mantle convection and possible irreversible differentiation of the mantle into eclogite and overlying residual peridotite layers.

  9. On the relevance of alternative low degree archeomagnetic field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, A.; Hulot, G.; Gallet, Y.; Thebault, E.

    2011-12-01

    Much effort has been spent over the past decade to collect quality archeomagnetic, lava and sediment data and enrich the now substantial database of ancient indirect geomagnetic field data. These efforts have been a strong incentive for field modelers and have led to an impressive series of archeomagnetic field models, in particular the extensively used CALSxk series. These now extend over more than three millennia back in time and aim at reaching temporal and spatial resolution closer to that of historical field models. Not all authors however agree that such a resolution can be achieved and some have argued that despite its size, and because of its still limited geographical coverage, the current database does not make it possible to recover much more than the past dipole field behavior. To investigate the relevance of such claims we decided to rely on a different strategy to that used in the CALSxk series of models. We searched for alternative low degree spherical harmonic and low temporal resolution spline representations of the field over the past three millennia. These models were optimized so as to recover as much spatio-temporal resolution as allowed by the data without resorting to highly damped, and therefore essentially unresolved, high degree spherical harmonics and temporal frequencies. As we will show, such alternative models, and the various tests we carried out in the process of building them, provide an interesting different insight to that provided by the CALSxk series of models.

  10. Optimal Masks for Low-Degree Solar Acoustic Modes.

    PubMed

    Toutain; Kosovichev

    2000-05-10

    We suggest a solution to an important problem in observational helioseismology of the separation of lines of solar acoustic (p) modes of low angular degree in oscillation power spectra by constructing optimal masks for Doppler images of the Sun. Accurate measurements of oscillation frequencies of low-degree modes are essential for the determination of the structure and rotation of the solar core. However, these measurements for a particular mode are often affected by leakage of other p-modes arising when the Doppler images are projected on to spherical harmonic masks. The leakage results in overlapping peaks corresponding to different oscillation modes in the power spectra. In this Letter, we present a method for calculating optimal masks for a given (target) mode by minimizing the signals of other modes appearing in its vicinity. We apply this method to time series of 2 yr obtained from the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory space mission and demonstrate its ability to reduce efficiently the mode leakage. PMID:10813685

  11. Melting Relations in the MgO-SiO2 and CaO-MgO-SiO2 Systems at the Earth's Lower Mantle Conditions: New Methodological Approach and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, M. A.; Lord, O. T.; Walter, M. J.; Tronnes, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Melting and crystallization of magma ocean(s) during the evolution of the early Earth may have led to extensive chemical differentiation. Some of the resulting mantle heterogeneities might have survived convective mixing and remained chemically distinctive, possibly residing today at the base of the lower mantle. To gain insights into the origin, composition and properties of these possible lower mantle heterogeneities, we are investigating melting phase relations on compositions in the binary MgO-SiO2 (MS) and ternary CaO-MgO-SiO2(CMS) systems at lower mantle pressures, using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) technique. An important objective of this study is to determine the effect of pressure on invariant melt compositions involving the following liquidus mineral assemblages, corresponding to peridotitic and basaltic model compositions: 1. Mg-perovskite (mgpv) + periclase (pc) and mgpv + silica in the MS-system. 2. Mgpv + pc + Ca-perovskite (capv) and mgpv + capv + silica in the CMS-system. Two methodologies were developed in order to explore melting relations under high pressure conditions. Firstly, exploratory experiments were performed to investigate invariant melting temperatures (Tm) using postulated near-eutectic compositions. Secondly, in order to greatly reduce temperature gradients compared to conventional LH-DAC experiments, a novel technique for micro-fabrication of metal-encapsulated samples has been developed. The selected near-eutectic compositions show an expected positive P-Tm correlation, with lower Tm for the CMS-system. Our preliminary results indicate that the dTm/dP slope for the pv-silica eutectic is lower than for the pv-pc eutectic in the MS-system. Overall, there is good agreement between our results and the results of simulations based on density functional theory(1) and thermodynamic extrapolations of experimental data at lower pressures(2). References: (1)de Koker et al. (2013), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 361, 58-63. (2

  12. Carbon Speciation and Solubility in Graphite-Saturated Reduced Silicate Melt: Implications for the Degassing of Martian Mantle and Carbon in Martian Magma Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Dasgupta, R.; Tsuno, K.

    2014-11-01

    Experiments were performed to study carbon solubility and speciation in graphite-saturated basaltic melt as a function of melt water content and oxygen fugacity. Results show that a considerable CH4 may have been dissolved in martian basalts.

  13. The effects of sulfur, silicon, water, and oxygen fugacity on carbon solubility and partitioning in Fe-rich alloy and silicate melt systems at 3 GPa and 1600 °C: Implications for core-mantle differentiation and degassing of magma oceans and reduced planetary mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei

    2015-04-01

    The partition coefficient of carbon between Fe-rich alloy melt and silicate melt, D C metal /silicate and solubility of C-O-H volatiles in reduced silicate melts are key parameters that need to be quantified in order to constrain the budget and origin of carbon in different planetary reservoirs and subsequent evolution of volatiles in magma oceans (MO) and silicate mantles. In this study, three sets of graphite-saturated experiments have been performed at 3 GPa and 1600 °C to investigate the effects of oxygen fugacity (fO2), sulfur, silicon, and water on the dissolution and partitioning of carbon between Fe-rich alloy melt and silicate melt. The results show that the presence of 0-5 wt% sulfur in alloy melt does not have considerable effect on carbon solubility (∼5.6 wt%) in alloy melt, determined by electron microprobe, whereas the presence of 0-10 wt% silicon decreases the carbon solubility from ∼5.6 wt% to 1.8 wt%. Carbon solubility (11-192 ppm) in silicate melt, determined by SIMS, is strongly controlled by fO2 and the bulk water content. Decreasing log ⁡ fO2 from IW-0.6 to IW-4.7 or increasing bulk water content from 0.07 to 0.55 wt% results in significant increase of carbon solubility in silicate melt. Raman and FTIR spectroscopic analyses of silicate glasses show that the carbon species is mostly methane, which is further confirmed by the strong, positive correlation between the non-carbonate carbon and non-hydroxyl hydrogen in silicate melt. The D C metal /silicate ranging from 180 to 4600 decreases with decreasing fO2 or increasing bulk water in silicate melt. In addition, increasing Si in alloy melt also decreases D C metal /silicate . Our results demonstrate that fO2 and bulk water contents in silicate melt play an important role in determining the fractionation of carbon in planetary MO. A reduced, hydrous MO may have led to a considerable fraction of carbon retained in the silicate mantle, whereas an

  14. The effect of f[subscript O2] on the partitioning and valence of V and Cr in garnet/melt pairs and the relation to terrestrial mantle V and Cr content

    SciTech Connect

    Righter, K.; Sutton, S.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Schmidt, G.; Yang, H.; Berthet, S.; Newville, M.; Choi, Y.; Downs, R.T.; Malavergne, V.

    2011-09-16

    Chromium and vanadium are stable in multiple valence states in natural systems, and their distribution between garnet and silicate melt is not well understood. Here, the partitioning and valence state of V and Cr in experimental garnet/melt pairs have been studied at 1.8-3.0 GPa, with variable oxygen fugacity between IW-1.66 and the Ru-RuO{sub 2} (IW+9.36) buffer. In addition, the valence state of V and Cr has been measured in several high-pressure (majoritic garnet up to 20 GPa) experimental garnets, some natural megacrystic garnets from the western United States, and a suite of mantle garnets from South Africa. The results show that Cr remains in trivalent in garnet across a wide range of oxygen fugacities. Vanadium, on the other hand, exhibits variable valence state from 2.5 to 3.7 in the garnets and from 3.0 to 4.0 in the glasses. The valence state of V is always greater in the glass than in the garnet. Moreover, the garnet/melt partition coefficient, D(V), is highest when V is trivalent, at the most reduced conditions investigated (IW-1.66 to FMQ). The V{sup 2.5+} measured in high P-T experimental garnets is consistent with the reduced nature of those metal-bearing systems. The low V valence state measured in natural megacrystic garnets is consistent with f{sub O{sub 2}} close to the IW buffer, overlapping the range of f{sub O{sub 2}} measured independently by Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} techniques on similar samples. However, the valence state of V measured in a suite of mantle garnets from South Africa is constant across a 3 log f{sub O{sub 2}} unit range (FMQ-1.8 to FMQ-4.5), suggesting that the valence state of V is controlled by the crystal chemistry of the garnets rather than f{sub O{sub 2}} variations. The compatibility of V and Cr in garnets and other deep mantle silicates indicates that the depletion of these elements in the Earth's primitive upper mantle could be due to partitioning into lower mantle phases as well as into metal.

  15. Wüstite stability in the presence of a CO2-fluid and a carbonate-silicate melt: Implications for the graphite/diamond formation and generation of Fe-rich mantle metasomatic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataleva, Yuliya V.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Sokol, Alexander G.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Bayukov, Oleg A.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental simulation of the interaction of wüstite with a CO2-rich fluid and a carbonate-silicate melt was performed using a multianvil high-pressure split-sphere apparatus in the FeO-MgO-CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-CO2 system at a pressure of 6.3 GPa and temperatures in the range of 1150 °C-1650 °C and with run time of 20 h. At relatively low temperatures, decarbonation reactions occur in the system to form iron-rich garnet (Alm75Prp17Grs8), magnesiowüstite (Mg# ≤ 0.13), and CO2-rich fluid. Under these conditions, magnesiowüstite was found to be capable of partial reducing CO2 to C0 that leads to the formation of Fe3+-bearing magnesiowüstite, crystallization of magnetite and metastable graphite, and initial growth of diamond seeds. At T ≥ 1450 °C, an iron-rich carbonate-silicate melt (FeO ~ 56 wt.%, SiO2 ~ 12 wt.%) forms in the system. Interaction between (Fe,Mg)O, SiO2, fluid and melt leads to oxidation of magnesiowüstite and crystallization of fayalite-magnetite spinel solid solution (1450 °C) as well as to complete dissolution of magnesiowüstite in the carbonate-silicate melt (1550 °C-1650 °C). In the presence of both carbonate-silicate melt and CO2-rich fluid, dissolution (oxidation) of diamond and metastable graphite was found to occur. The study results demonstrate that under pressures of the lithospheric mantle in the presence of a CO2-rich fluid, wüstite/magnesiowüstite is stable only at relatively low temperatures when it is in the absolute excess relative to CO2-rich fluid. In this case, the redox reactions, which produce metastable graphite and diamond with concomitant partial oxidation of wüstite to magnetite, occur. Wüstite is unstable under high concentrations of a CO2-rich fluid as well as in the presence of a carbonate-silicate melt: it is either completely oxidized or dissolves in the melt or fluid phase, leading to the formation of Fe2 +- and Fe3 +-enriched carbonate-silicate melts, which are potential metasomatic agents in the

  16. Neogene magmatism northeast of the Aegir and Kolbeinsey ridges, NE Atlantic: Spreading ridge-mantle plume interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, AsbjøRn Johan; Faleide, Jan Inge; Mjelde, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    According to mantle plume theory the Earth's interior cools partly by localized large vertical mass transport, causing extensive decompression melting. The Iceland melt anomaly is regarded as a typical example of a mantle plume. However, there are centers of Miocene to recent magmatism in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea not easily explained by the plume theory. Here we present new data to document diffuse late Miocene magmatic underplating of older oceanic crust located mostly north of the Aegir Ridge, an extinct seafloor spreading axis in the Norway Basin. There is also a region with similar magmatism northeast of the presently spreading Kolbeinsey Ridge north of Iceland. Intraplate magmatism in these locations is not easily explained by local plume models, edge-driven convection, or by asthenosphere flow-lithosphere thickness interaction. On the basis of correlation between the magmatism and the active or extinct spreading ridges, we propose the mid-ocean ridge basalt-capture model, in which this magmatism can be understood through plume-spreading ridge interaction: The asthenosphere flow out from Iceland captures deeper, low-degree partially molten asthenospheric regions from underneath the spreading ridges and carry these across the terminating fracture zones, to subsequently underplate oceanic crust or to intrude and build seamounts. This model is similar to lithospheric cracking models for intraplate magmatism in requiring that low-degree partial melt can be retained in the asthenosphere over time but differ in that the magma is extracted by internal magma movement processes and not by external tectonic forces.

  17. Time-Variable Gravity from Satellite Laser-Ranging: The Low-Degree Components and Their Connections with Geophysical/Climatic Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Cox, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite laser-ranging (SLR) has been observing the tiny variations in Earth s global gravity for over 2 decades. The oblateness of the Earth's gravity field, J2, has been observed to undergo a secular decrease of J2 due mainly to the post-glacial rebound of the mantle. Sometime around 1998 this trend reversed quite suddenly. This reversal persisted until 2001, at which point the atmosphere-corrected time series appears to have reversed yet again towards normal. This anomaly signifies a large interannual change in global mass distribution. A number of possible causes have been considered, with oceanic mass redistribution as the leading candidate although other effects, such as glacial melting and core effects may be contributing. In fact, a strong correlation has been found between the J2 variability and the Pacific decadal oscillation. It is relatively more difficult to solve for corresponding signals in the shorter wavelength harmonics from the existing SLR-derived time variable gravity results, although it appears that geophysical fluid mass transport is being observed. For example, the recovered J3 time series shows remarkable agreement with NCEP-derived estimates of atmospheric gravity variations. Likewise, some of the non-zonal harmonic components have significant interannual signal that appears to be related to mass transport related to climatic effects such as El Nino Southern Oscillation. We will present recent updates on the J2 evolution, as well as a monthly time sequence of low-degree component map of the time-variable gravity complete through degree 4, and examine possible geophysical/climatic causes.

  18. Pressure-induced elastic and structural changes in hydrous basalt glasses: The effect of H2O on the gravitational stability of basalt melts at the base of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lei; Yang, De-Bin; Xie, Hong-Sen; Li, Fang-Fei; Hu, Bo; Yu, Yang; Xu, Wen-Liang; Gao, Chun-Xiao

    2014-11-01

    To understand the effect of hydration on the elastic properties of silicate melts, we conducted in situ high-pressure Brillouin scattering measurements on two hydrous basalt glasses with different water contents in diamond anvil cells. Second-order phase transitions were observed in the hydrous basalt glasses and are due to the topological rearrangement of the silicate network to a high [Si, Al]-O coordination. Up to a pressure of 10 GPa at 300 K, the extra 2.23 wt% H2O lowers the elastic moduli of FX-2 basalt glass (2.69 wt% H2O) by 10%-18%, but does not affect the pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli, compared with FX-1 (0.46 wt% H2O) basalt glass. The phase transition takes place at a higher pressure in FX-2 compared with FX-1, possibly because of the depolymerization of water to silicate glass. Water interacts with network-forming cations and creates Si-OH and Al-OH groups, and prohibits nonbridging oxygen ions from being connected to other nearby framework cations (i.e., [5,6](Si, Al)), resulting in the hysteresis of the second-order phase transition. The density contrasts of our hydrous basalt melts with previous mid-ocean ridge basalt and preliminary reference Earth model data indicate that basalt melts may need very low water content (<0.46 wt% H2O) to maintain gravitational stability at the base of the upper mantle. Our results show that the elastic properties of hydrous silicate melts may have important implications for the dynamic evolution and chemical differentiation of the mantle.

  19. Mantle source variations beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and the nature of subduction components in the Lau basin-Tonga arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escrig, S.; BéZos, A.; Goldstein, S. L.; Langmuir, C. H.; Michael, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    New high-density sampling of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center provides constraints on the processes that affect the mantle wedge beneath a back-arc environment, including the effect of the subduction input on basalt petrogenesis and the change in subduction input with distance from the Tonga arc. We obtained trace element and Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of 64 samples distributed between 20.2°S and 22.3°S with an average spacing of ˜3.6 km. The trace element and isotope variations do not vary simply with distance from the arc and reflect variations in the mantle wedge composition and the presence of multiple components in the subduction input. The mantle wedge composition varies form north to south, owing to the southward migration of Indian-like mantle, progressively replacing the initially Pacific-like mantle wedge. The mantle wedge compositions also require an enriched mid-ocean ridge basalt-like trace element enrichment that has little effect on isotope ratios, suggesting recent low-degree melt enrichment events. The composition of the subduction input added to the mantle wedge is geographically variable and mirrors the changes observed in the Tonga arc island lavas. The combination of the back-arc and arc data allows identification of several components contributing to the subduction input. These are a fluid derived from the altered oceanic crust with a possible sedimentary contribution, a pelagic sediment partial melt, and, in the southern Lau basin, a volcaniclastic sediment partial melt. While on a regional scale, there is a rough decrease in subduction influence with the distance from the arc, on smaller scales, the distribution of the subduction input reflects different mechanisms of the addition of the subduction input to a variable mantle wedge.

  20. 187Os/188Os in Spinel Peridotites from Borée, Massif Central, France: Seeing through the Effects of Melt Infiltration in the Sub-continental Lithospheric Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, C. J.; Harvey, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Re-Os isotope system can be used to model the timing of melt extraction in peridotites, although secondary metasomatic processes can obscure primary melt depletion signatures, implying that bulk-rock Os model ages should be treated with caution.1Spinel peridotites from the volcanic Maar de Borée (French Massif Central) have equigranular to protogranular and occasionally poikilitic textures. Their bulk-rock chemistry are consistent with moderate degrees of partial melting, but elevated incompatible trace element ratios (e.g. La/YbN) are indicative of subsequent secondary processes. Petrographic observation reveals no infiltration of host basalt, but melt infiltration unrelated to the host basalt has occurred, most likely within the sub-continental lithospheric mantle prior to entrainment as xenoliths. The peridotites have a mean [Os] concentration of 2.35 ng g-1 and 187Os/188Os values from 0.12081 ± 16 to 0.12639 ± 14 (cf. PUM = 0.1296 ± 00082), with rhenium depletion model ages (TRD) ranging from 0.48 to 1.30 Ga. Silicate melt contains up to 2 orders of magnitude less Os than peridotites3 but the 187Os/188Os of melt infiltrated peridotite can be skewed by the precipitation of immiscible sulfide when an infiltrating melt reaches S-saturation4. The Borée peridotites retain an unradiogenic Os-isotope signature despite silicate melt infiltration; this may be due to primary base metal sulfides enclosed in silicate minerals and therefore protected from interaction with infiltrating melts. TRD of enclosed sulphides should therefore be able to 'see through' any secondary metasomatic events and reveal melt depletion ages significantly older than those obtained from bulk-rock analyses (cf. 4). 1. Rudnick & Walker (2009) Lithos 112S, 1083-1095. 2. Meisel et al. (2001) Geochim Cosmochim Ac 65, 1311-1323. 3. Day, J.M.D. (2013) Chem Geol 341, 50-74. 4. Harvey et al. (2010) Geochim Cosmochim Acta 74, 293-320.

  1. Importance of the Small-Scale Processes Melting, Plate Boundary Formation and Mineralogy on the Large-Scale, Long-Term Thermo-Chemical Evolution of Earth's Mantle-Plate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic observations of the deep Earth reveal the presence of two large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that are typically inferred to be dense chemically-distinct material, as well as discontinuities that are typically linked to the post-perovskite (pPv) phase transition. Several possible origins of chemically-dense material have been proposed, including recycling of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), primordial differentiation events, crystallisation of a basal magma ocean, or some combination of these creating a basal melange (BAM; Tackley 2012 Earth Sci. Rev.). Each of these possibilities would result in a different composition hence different mineralogy. In order to constrain this we have been running calculations of thermo-chemical mantle evolution over 4.5 billion years that include melting-induced differentiation, plate tectonics induced by strongly temperature-dependent viscosity and plastic yielding, core cooling and compressibility with reasonable assumptions about the pressure-dependence of other material properties. Some of our simulations start from a magma ocean state so initial layering is developed self-consistently. Already-published results (Nakagawa et al., 2009 GCubed, 2010 PEPI, 2012 GCubed) already indicate the importance of exact MORB composition on the amount of MORB segregating above the CMB, which in turn influences mantle thermal structure and the evolution of the core and geodynamo. In more recent results we have been additionally including primordial material. We find that melting-induced differentiation has several first-order effects on the dynamics, including (i) making plate tectonics easier (through stresses associated with lateral variations in crustal thickness) and (ii) reducing heat flux through the CMB (due to the build-up of dense material above the CMB); also (iii) tectonic mode (continuous plate tectonics, episodic lid or stagnant lid) also makes a first-order difference to mantle structure and dynamics. This emphasises

  2. Os-Nd-Sr isotopes in Miocene ultrapotassic rocks of southern Tibet: Partial melting of a pyroxenite-bearing lithospheric mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feng; Chen, Jian-Lin; Xu, Ji-Feng; Wang, Bao-Di; Li, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Miocene post-collisional ultrapotassic rocks in the southern and central parts of the Lhasa Terrane of southern Tibet provide an opportunity to explore the deep processes and lithospheric evolution of the Tibetan Plateau. The magmatic source of the ultrapotassic rocks is still debated. However, the source can be identified using the Re-Os isotopic system. In this paper, we provide comprehensive data on the Re-Os isotopic compositions of ultrapotassic rocks from Mibale and Maiga areas in southern Tibet, and we refine the age of the Mibale ultrapotassic rocks to 12.5 Ma. The Os isotopic data demonstrate that crustal assimilation affected the Os isotopic compositions of some ultrapotassic rocks with low Os contents, but samples with high Os contents have little or no evidence of crustal contamination. The initial 187Os/188Os ratios of the least-contaminated ultrapotassic rocks are higher than those of primitive upper mantle (PUM). The ultrapotassic rocks show a weak correlation between initial 187Os/188Os ratios and Mg# values, a negative correlation between εNd(t) and Mg# values, and high Ni contents and FeO/MnO ratios. These observations indicate that the ultrapotassic rocks were derived from a pyroxenite-bearing lithospheric mantle. Simple calculations indicate <20% pyroxenite in the lithospheric mantle, which is consistent with the pyroxenite xenoliths found in the ultrapotassic rocks of southern Tibet. The Os model ages for the ultrapotassic rocks in the south Lhasa Terrane range from 75 to 541 Ma, indicating that the lithospheric mantle beneath southern Tibet underwent multiple magmatic events. We conclude, therefore, that convective removal of a pyroxenite-bearing lithospheric mantle or break-off of the Indian continental lithospheric mantle could have resulted in the generation of the ultrapotassic rocks in southern Tibet.

  3. Petrogenesis of Cretaceous mafic intrusive rocks in the Fosdick Mountains, Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica: melting of metasomatized sub-continental arc mantle along the active plate margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Brown, M.; Korhonen, F. J.; Mcfadden, R. R.; Siddoway, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    A diorite pluton and widely distributed mafic dykes occur in the Fosdick migmatite-granite complex, which is interpreted to represent middle-to-lower crustal rocks of the paleo-Pacific active continental margin of Gondwana. The mafic dykes exhibit a variety of relationships with host rocks in the field ranging from undeformed dykes with sharp contacts with host gneisses to dismembered dykes with comingled textures and numerous back-veins of leucosome intruded from host migmatitic gneisses suggestive of significant interaction with crustal rocks. U-Pb ages for magmatic zircon in these rocks yields Cretaceous crystallization ages ranging from ca. 113 Ma to ca. 98 Ma for the mafic dykes and ca. 100 Ma for the diorite pluton. These mafic intrusive rocks, which contain abundant hydrous minerals, are medium- to high-K-series calc-alkaline rocks with basic-intermediate compositions (47-59 wt % SiO2 for mafic dykes and 52-56 wt % SiO2 for the diorite pluton). They have trace element patterns characterized by LILE enrichments and negative Nb anomalies indicating an origin from a hydrous mantle source metasomatized by slab-derived components. The samples without evidence of interaction with crustal rocks, which are likely to better reflect the mantle source composition, have positive ɛSr(100Ma) values (+8.1 to +14.5) and negative to slightly positive ɛNd(100Ma) values (-1.6 to +2.5) consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. These samples may be divided into two groups either characterized by higher LILE/HFSE ratios, less radiogenic ɛSr(100Ma) values and more radiogenic ɛNd(100Ma) values, or characterized by relatively lower LILE/ HFSE ratios, more radiogenic ɛSr(100Ma) values and less radiogenic ɛNd(100Ma) values suggesting differences in the mantle source. The results of this study are consistent with melting of a variably metasomatized sub-arc mantle source during a transition from a wrench to a transtensional tectonic setting, but are inconsistent

  4. Petrogenesis of nephelinites from the Tarim Large Igneous Province, NW China: Implications for mantle source characteristics and plume-lithosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhiguo; Zhang, Zhaochong; Hou, Tong; Santosh, M.; Zhang, Dongyang; Ke, Shan

    2015-04-01

    The nephelinite exposed in the Wajilitage area in the northwestern margin of the Tarim large igneous province (TLIP), Xinjiang, NW China display porphyritic textures with clinopyroxene, nepheline and olivine as the major phenocryst phases, together with minor apatite, sodalite and alkali feldspar. The groundmass typically has cryptocrystalline texture and is composed of crystallites of clinopyroxene, nepheline, Fe-Ti oxides, sodalite, apatite, rutile, biotite, amphibole and alkali feldspar. We report rutile SIMS U-Pb age of 268 ± 30 Ma suggesting that the nephelinite may represent the last phase of the TLIP magmatism, which is also confirmed by the field relation. The nephelinite shows depleted Sr-Nd isotopic compositions with age-corrected 87Sr/86Sr and εNd(t) values of 0.70348-0.70371 and + 3.28 to + 3.88 respectively indicating asthenospheric mantle source. Based on the reconstructed primary melt composition, the depth of magma generation is estimated as 115-140 km and the temperatures of mantle melting as 1540-1575 °C. The hotter than normal asthenospheric mantle temperature suggests the involvement of mantle thermal plume. The Mg isotope values display a limited range of δ26Mg from - 0.35 to - 0.55‰, which are lower than the mantle values (- 0.25‰). The Mg isotopic compositions, combined with the Sr-Nd isotopes and major and trace element data suggest that the Wajilitage nephelinite was most likely generated by low-degree partial melting of the hybridized carbonated peridotite/eclogite source, which we correlate with metasomatism by subducted carbonates within the early-middle Paleozoic convergent regime. A plume-lithosphere model is proposed with slight thinning of the lithosphere and variable depth and degree of melting of the carbonated mantle during the plume-lithosphere interaction. This model also accounts for the variation in lithology of the TLIP.

  5. Silurian/Ordovician asymmetrical sill-like bodies from La Codosera syncline, W Spain: A case of tholeiitic partial melts emplaced in a single magma pulse and derived from a metasomatized mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Moro, F. J.; Murciego, A.; López-Plaza, M.

    2007-07-01

    between the country rock and the magma itself. The compositional characteristics of chilled margins enable them to be ruled out as primary melts in equilibrium with mantle olivine (Fo 91), a certain amount of olivine fractionation being required, which might have occurred in magma conduits en route to shallow emplacement levels in the crust. Spinel lherzolitic xenoliths from the European Cenozoic alkaline magmatism appear to be unsuitable protoliths to account for the chilled margin compositions. Instead, a hybrid mantle source consisting of a small amount of OIB-mantle component (5 wt.%) and a depleted end-member mantle component seems to be a plausible protolith, resulting in a good fit with the fractionation-corrected chilled margin trends for 10% of partial melting.

  6. Mantle to surface degassing of alkalic magmas at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Clive; Moretti, Roberto; Kyle, Philip R.; Eschenbacher, Al; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Hervig, Richard L.; Dunbar, Nelia W.

    2011-06-01

    Continental intraplate volcanoes, such as Erebus volcano, Antarctica, are associated with extensional tectonics, mantle upwelling and high heat flow. Typically, erupted magmas are alkaline and rich in volatiles (especially CO 2), inherited from low degrees of partial melting of mantle sources. We examine the degassing of the magmatic system at Erebus volcano using melt inclusion data and high temporal resolution open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements of gas emissions from the active lava lake. Remarkably different gas signatures are associated with passive and explosive gas emissions, representative of volatile contents and redox conditions that reveal contrasting shallow and deep degassing sources. We show that this unexpected degassing signature provides a unique probe for magma differentiation and transfer of CO 2-rich oxidised fluids from the mantle to the surface, and evaluate how these processes operate in time and space. Extensive crystallisation driven by CO 2 fluxing is responsible for isobaric fractionation of parental basanite magmas close to their source depth. Magma deeper than 4 kbar equilibrates under vapour-buffered conditions. At shallower depths, CO 2-rich fluids accumulate and are then released either via convection-driven, open-system gas loss or as closed-system slugs that ascend and result in Strombolian eruptions in the lava lake. The open-system gases have a reduced state (below the QFM buffer) whereas the closed-system gases preserve their deep oxidised signatures (close to the NNO buffer).

  7. Mantle to surface degassing of alkalic magmas at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oppenheimer, C.; Moretti, R.; Kyle, P.R.; Eschenbacher, A.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Hervig, R.L.; Dunbar, N.W.

    2011-01-01

    Continental intraplate volcanoes, such as Erebus volcano, Antarctica, are associated with extensional tectonics, mantle upwelling and high heat flow. Typically, erupted magmas are alkaline and rich in volatiles (especially CO2), inherited from low degrees of partial melting of mantle sources. We examine the degassing of the magmatic system at Erebus volcano using melt inclusion data and high temporal resolution open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic measurements of gas emissions from the active lava lake. Remarkably different gas signatures are associated with passive and explosive gas emissions, representative of volatile contents and redox conditions that reveal contrasting shallow and deep degassing sources. We show that this unexpected degassing signature provides a unique probe for magma differentiation and transfer of CO2-rich oxidised fluids from the mantle to the surface, and evaluate how these processes operate in time and space. Extensive crystallisation driven by CO2 fluxing is responsible for isobaric fractionation of parental basanite magmas close to their source depth. Magma deeper than 4kbar equilibrates under vapour-buffered conditions. At shallower depths, CO2-rich fluids accumulate and are then released either via convection-driven, open-system gas loss or as closed-system slugs that ascend and result in Strombolian eruptions in the lava lake. The open-system gases have a reduced state (below the QFM buffer) whereas the closed-system gases preserve their deep oxidised signatures (close to the NNO buffer). ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Breakdown of orthopyroxene contributing to melt pockets in mantle peridotite xenoliths from the Western Qinling, central China: constraints from in situ LA-ICP-MS mineral analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ben-Xun; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Yang, Yue-Heng; Sakyi, Patrick Asamoah; Ying, Ji-Feng; Tang, Yan-Jie

    2012-03-01

    Major and trace element compositions of constituent minerals, partly decomposed rims of orthopyroxenes (DRO), `closed' melt pockets (CMP) and open melt pockets (OMP) in some Western Qinling peridotite xenoliths were obtained by LA-ICP-MS. Systematic core-to-rim compositional variations of garnet, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene demonstrate that these minerals underwent variable degrees of subsolidus breakdown or partial melting. Both DROs and CMPs consist of similar mineral assemblages and are characterized by high TiO2, CaO + Na2O and low MgO contents; they are enriched in LREE and LILE compositions, have positive anomalies in Pb, Sr and particularly Ti, negative Th and U, and variable Zr and Hf anomalies. These chemical features are distinct and reflect reactions involving the orthopyroxenes. Compared to the CMPs, the OMPs, which are composed of a complex assemblage of minerals, display lower FeO and MgO contents, larger ranges in SiO2 and Na2O, higher TiO2, Al2O3, CaO and trace element concentrations, slightly negative Zr and Hf anomalies, and apparently negative Ti anomalies. Modeling calculations of partial fusion of orthopyroxenes and clinopyroxenes suggest that the CMPs most likely originated from the breakdown of orthopyroxenes with variably minor contribution of external melts from the melting of clinopyroxenes, whereas the OMPs were probably formed from the modification of the CMPs through the interaction with large amount of external melts.

  9. Wet inside and out? Constraints on water in the Martian mantle and on outgassed water, based on melt inclusions in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.; Harvey, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Constraints on the volatile inventory and outgassing history of Mars are critical to understanding the origin of ancient valley systems and paleoclimates. Planetary accretion models for Mars allow either a volatile-rich or volatile-poor mantle, depending on whether the accreted materials were fully oxidized or whether accretion was homogeneous so that water was lost through reaction with metallic iron. The amount of water that has been outgassed from the interior is likewise a contentious subject, and estimates of globally distributed water based on various geochemical and geological measurements vary from a few meters to more than a thousand meters. New data on SNC meteorites, which are thought to be Martian igneous rocks, provide constraints on both mantle and outgassed water.

  10. Time-Variable Gravity from Satellite-Laser-Ranging and Doppler Measurements: An Update on the Low-degree components as well as the connections with Geophysical/Climatic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Christopher M.; Chao, Benjamin F.; Au, Andrew Y.; Boy, J.-P.

    2003-01-01

    The oblateness of the Earth's gravity field, 52, has long been observed to undergo a slight decrease due to post-glacial rebound of the mantle. Sometime around 1998 this trend reversed quite suddenly. This reversal persisted until 2001, at which point the atmosphere-corrected time series appears to have reversed yet again. Presently, the time series appears to be returning to the value that would nominally have been reached had the anomaly not occurred. This anomaly signifies a large interannual change in global mass distribution whose J2 effect overshadows that of the post-glacial rebound over such timescales. A number of possible causes have been considered, with oceanic mass redistribution as the leading candidate although other effects, such as glacial melting and core effects may be contributing. The amount by which J2 returns to it's nominal value provides a valuable constraint on the separation of the causes, and will be considered. We will present our latest Satellite Laser Ranging and DORIS Doppler derived time series for J2, and various other low-degree harmonic terms, as well as our investigations into the causes. In addition, we will show the comparison of the J2 results with those derived from CHAMP, as computed at NASA GSFC, and the recently released GRACE gravity model.

  11. Syn-collision Pliocene-Quaternary volcanism in NE Iran: mantle melting on the periphery of the Turkish-Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheirkhah, Monireh; Neill, Iain; Allen, Mark

    2014-05-01

    NE Iran is part of the Turkish-Iranian Plateau, but lies up to 1000 km from the Zagros suture zone. The Plateau formed during the Late Cenozoic, as part of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. Collision began at ~30 Ma, and is still active. There has probably been break-off of the Tethyan oceanic slab under the Plateau at some stage, but the constraints are not precise. Many recent mafic, mantle-derived volcanic centres in NW Iran, E Turkey and Armenia post-date the initial collision and are derived from subduction-modified lithospheric mantle sources. These centres can be attributed individually to slab break-off, lithospheric thickening, and small-scale lithospheric delamination close to the suture. The few studies of mafic magmatism in E and NE Iran indicate largely ocean island basalt (OIB)-like sources. Volcanic rocks from the Faruj area within the Binaloud Range fall into two distinct categories: Pliocene-Quaternary mafic alkaline rocks and more felsic samples with adakite-like affinities of uncertain age. We present new major, trace element and radiogenic isotope results focussing in particular on the mafic rocks from Faruj as a guide to the nature of the upper mantle beneath the region and its relationship to Mesozoic-Cenozoic collision processes. The mafic rocks are trachybasalts with ~48 wt.% SiO2, moderate MgO (Mg# = 54-59), high Ni (

  12. The molecular structure of melts along the carbonatite-kimberlite-basalt compositional joint: CO2 and polymerisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, Yves; Florian, Pierre; Corradini, Dario; Morizet, Yann; Sator, Nicolas; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Guillot, Bertrand; Iacono-Marziano, Giada; Schmidt, Burkhard C.; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Transitional melts, intermediate in composition between silicate and carbonate melts, form by low degree partial melting of mantle peridotite and might be the most abundant type of melt in the asthenosphere. Their role in the transport of volatile elements and in metasomatic processes at the planetary scale might be significant yet they have remained largely unstudied. Their molecular structure has remained elusive in part because these melts are difficult to quench to glass. Here we use FTIR, Raman, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy together with First Principle Molecular Dynamic (FPMD) simulations to investigate the molecular structure of transitional melts and in particular to assess the effect of CO2 on their structure. We found that carbon in these glasses forms free ionic carbonate groups attracting cations away from their usual 'depolymerising' role in breaking up the covalent silicate network. Solution of CO2 in these melts strongly modifies their structure resulting in a significant polymerisation of the aluminosilicate network with a decrease in NBO/Si of about 0.2 for every 5 mol% CO2 dissolved. This polymerisation effect is expected to influence the physical and transport properties of transitional melts. An increase in viscosity is expected with increasing CO2 content, potentially leading to melt ponding at certain levels in the mantle such as at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Conversely an ascending and degassing transitional melt such as a kimberlite would become increasingly fluid during ascent hence potentially accelerate. Carbon-rich transitional melts are effectively composed of two sub-networks: a carbonate and a silicate one leading to peculiar physical and transport properties.

  13. Metal saturation in the upper mantle.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, Arno; Ballhaus, Chris; Golla-Schindler, Ute; Ulmer, Peter; Kamenetsky, Vadim S; Kuzmin, Dmitry V

    2007-09-27

    The oxygen fugacity f(O2)of the Earth's mantle is one of the fundamental variables in mantle petrology. Through ferric-ferrous iron and carbon-hydrogen-oxygen equilibria, f(O2) influences the pressure-temperature positions of mantle solidi and compositions of small-degree mantle melts. Among other parameters, f(O2) affects the water storage capacity and rheology of the mantle. The uppermost mantle, as represented by samples and partial melts, is sufficiently oxidized to sustain volatiles, such as H2O and CO2, as well as carbonatitic melts, but it is not known whether the shallow mantle is representative of the entire upper mantle. Using high-pressure experiments, we show here that large parts of the asthenosphere are likely to be metal-saturated. We found that pyroxene and garnet synthesized at >7 GPa in equilibrium with metallic Fe can incorporate sufficient ferric iron that the mantle at >250 km depth is so reduced that an (Fe,Ni)-metal phase may be stable. Our results indicate that the oxidized nature of the upper mantle can no longer be regarded as being representative for the Earth's upper mantle as a whole and instead that oxidation is a shallow phenomenon restricted to an upper veneer only about 250 km in thickness. PMID:17898766

  14. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  15. Mantle dynamics and seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, T; Lay, T

    2000-11-01

    Three-dimensional imaging of the Earth's interior, called seismic tomography, has achieved breakthrough advances in the last two decades, revealing fundamental geodynamical processes throughout the Earth's mantle and core. Convective circulation of the entire mantle is taking place, with subducted oceanic lithosphere sinking into the lower mantle, overcoming the resistance to penetration provided by the phase boundary near 650-km depth that separates the upper and lower mantle. The boundary layer at the base of the mantle has been revealed to have complex structure, involving local stratification, extensive structural anisotropy, and massive regions of partial melt. The Earth's high Rayleigh number convective regime now is recognized to be much more interesting and complex than suggested by textbook cartoons, and continued advances in seismic tomography, geodynamical modeling, and high-pressure-high-temperature mineral physics will be needed to fully quantify the complex dynamics of our planet's interior. PMID:11035784

  16. Ensembles of low degree archeomagnetic field models for the past three millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, Alexis; Hulot, Gauthier; Gallet, Yves; Thébault, Erwan

    2013-11-01

    We introduce ensembles of time-varying archeomagnetic field models, consisting of a reference model, a mean model and a thousand individual models. We present a set of three such ensembles, built from archeomagnetic, volcanic and sedimentary data sets, that cover the past three millennia. These ensembles can be used to describe the field at any location from the core surface to the magnetosphere, and assess the way uncertainties due to the limited distribution and quality of the data affect any of its component or parameter, such as individual Gauss coefficients. They provide alternative - and, we argue, more complete - descriptions of the archeomagnetic field to those provided by previously published archeomagnetic field models, being better suited to existing and emerging needs, such as those of geomagnetic data assimilation. We present the data sets we rely on - essentially the same as those used by other recent archeomagnetic field models - and describe how errors affecting the data, and errors due to non-modelled small spatial scales of the field, are taken into account. We next explain our modeling strategy and motivation for building low degree spherical harmonic degree ensembles of models. We carry on a number of end-to-end simulations to both illustrate the usefulness of such ensembles and point at the type of errors one should expect. Practical illustrations of what can be done with these three ensembles of models, with examples of geomagnetic inferences, are also described. Northern high-latitude flux patches, for instance, appear to be the most robust features of all. These patches tend to fluctuate, but clearly have some favored locations, resulting in the same clear signature with three tongues (over Northern America, Europe and Asia) in the time-averaged field at the core-mantle boundary, similar to what had been found in earlier models. Inferences about the field behavior in the Southern hemisphere are more difficult to draw. Still, some suggestions

  17. The statistical upper mantle assemblage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Anders; Anderson, Don L.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in modern mantle geochemistry is to link geochemical data with geological and geophysical observations. Most of the early geochemical models involved a layered mantle and the concept of geochemical reservoirs. Indeed, the two layer mantle model has been implicit in almost all geochemical literature and the provenance of oceanic island basalt (OIB) and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) [van Keken et al., Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 30 (2002) 493-525]. Large-scale regions in the mantle, such as the 'convective' (i.e. well-stirred, homogeneous) upper mantle, sub-continental lithosphere, and the lower mantle were treated as distinct and accessible geochemical reservoirs. Here we discuss evidence for a ubiquitous distribution of small- to moderate-scale (i.e. 10 2-10 5 m) heterogeneity in the upper mantle, which we refer to as the statistical upper mantle assemblage (SUMA). This heterogeneity forms as the result of long-term plate tectonic recycling of sedimentary and crustal components. The SUMA model does not require a convectively homogenized MORB mantle reservoir, which has become a frequently used concept in geochemistry. Recently, Kellogg et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 204 (2002) 183-202] modeled MORB and OIB Sr and Nd isotopic compositions as local mantle averages of random distributions of depleted residues and recycled continental crustal material. In this model, homogenization of the MORB source region is achieved by convective stirring and mixing. In contrast, in the SUMA model, the isotopic compositions of MORB and OIB are the outcome of homogenization during sampling, by partial melting and magma mixing (e.g. [Helffrich and Wood, Nature 412 (2001) 501-507]), of a distribution of small- to moderate-scale upper mantle heterogeneity, as predicted by the central limit theorem. Thus, the 'SUMA' acronym also captures what we consider the primary homogenization process: sampling upon melting and averaging. SUMA does not require the

  18. Mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Menzies, M.; Hawkesworth, C.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of metasomatism and its role in the geochemical enrichment and depletion processes in upper mantle rocks remains contentious. This volume makes a comprehensive contribution to the study of metasomatic and enrichment processes: origin and importance in determining trace element and isotopic heterogeneity in the lithospheric mantle. It begins with a theoretical thermodynamic and experimental justification for metasomatism and proceeds to present evidence for this process from the study of mantle xenoliths. Finally the importance of metasomatism in relation to basaltic volcanism is assessed. The contents are as follows: Dynamics of Translithospheric Migration of Metasomatic Fluid and Alkaline Magma. Solubility of Major and Trace Elements in Mantle Metasomatic Fluids: Experimental Constraints. Mineralogic and Geochemical Evidence for Differing Styles of Metasomatism in Spinel Lherzolite Xenoliths: Enriched Mantle Source Regions of Basalts. Characterization of Mantle Metasomatic Fluids in Spinel Lherzolites and Alkali Clinophyroyxenites from the West Eifel and South-West Uganda. Metasomatised Harzburgites in Kimberlite and Alkaline Magmas: Enriched Resites and ''Flushed'' Lherzolites. Metasomatic and Enrichment Phenomena in Garnet-Peridotite Facies Mantle Xenoliths from the Matsoku Kimberlite Pipe Lesotho. Evidence for Mantle Metasomatism in Periodite Nodules from the Kimberley Pipes South Africa. Metasomatic and Enrichment Processes in Lithospheric Peridotites, an Effective of Asthenosphere-Lithosphere Interaction. Isotope Variations in Recent Volcanics: A Trace Element Perspective. Source Regions of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts: Evidence for Enrichment Processes. The Mantle Source for the Hawaiian Islands: Constraints from the Lavas and Ultramafic Inclusions.

  19. UHP gneisses of the Kockhetav complex are sources for proto-shoshonite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Aleksandr; Campbell, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Collision belts often contain potassium-rich igneous rock, which can occur as both intrusions and volcanic sequences (shoshonitic series) that are characterized by high of trace element contents (most commonly LREE, Th and U) and strong crustal isotopic signatures (Nd, Sr, Pb). The formation of shoshonite melts in collisional setting is commonly attributed to low degree partial melting of mantle that had previously been metasomatized by fluids/melts derived from subducted crust. However this model has been recently challenged. The ultrapotassic shoshonite series in Eastern Tibet (China) range in composition from felsic dacites to ultramafic rocks. Campbell et al. (2014) explained the felsic members of this series by high degree partial melting of crustal rocks at high-temperature and pressure, and the mafic-ultramafic members by reaction of these felsic melts with mantle peridotite. The Kokchetav UHP complex in Kazakhstan is famous for its occurrence of rocks that have experienced metamorphism within diamond stability field at a pressure over 45 kbar and a temperature of 950-1000°C. The most widespread lithology in the Kokchetav is metasedimentary garnet-biotite gneisses. The gneisses are characterized by strong depletion in LREE, Th and U, loss of K2O, compatible behaviour of HREE, Ti, Fe and Mg and large fractionation of both Nb and Ta. The trace element characteristics of the melt inclusions from gneisses demonstrate that these features are due to high degree partial melting and extraction of granitic melts with high abundances of LREE, Th and U. The residual assemblage contained garnet, coesite, ±phengite, ±clinopyroxene but not monazite, which dissolved into the partial melts. The depletion patterns of the Kokchetav UHP gneisses are complementary to the enrichment patterns in shoshonites. Furthermore the compositions of melt inclusions in the gneisses are remarkable similar to those of the felsic members of shoshonite suite studied by Campbell et al. (2014

  20. Volatiles and trace elements in melt inclusions from Siberian Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, S.; Edmonds, M.; Maclennan, J.; Svensen, H.

    2014-12-01

    The eruption of the Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province (LIP) was synchronous with the largest known mass extinction, at the Permo-Triassic boundary. Understanding the volatile budget of the eruptions and hence their potential effects on climate is of critical importance. The volcanism spanned an enormous territory (5 million km2) over 0.8 Ma and the magmas feeding the eruptions were heterogeneous in their chemistry in space and time. In terms of volatiles in pre-eruptive magmas, there are multiple possible sources: the mantle (including metasomatized lithosphere) and crustal rocks and sediments. Discriminating between these sources requires not only microanalysis of volatiles in melt inclusions, but also analysis of trace elements. Crucially, the magmas sampled for this study did not intersect and assimilate evaporite deposits or brines prior to emplacement as sills or eruption as lavas, in contrast to previous studies, which might allow mantle-derived volatile heterogeneity to be preserved in the melts. We present a new dataset of clinopyroxene-hosted melt inclusion geochemistry. Crystalline inclusions in clinopyroxene with Mg# from 69.2 to 82.6 were homogenized at temperatures of 1190°C and fO2 of FMQ-1 in a high temperature gas mixing furnace. We show that, for this particular suite of lavas, considerable variability exists in trace and volatile element ratios (e.g. La/Yb, Nb/Y, Ba/La, F/Nd, Cl/K) that may be explained entirely by mantle heterogeneity. The most depleted melts (e.g. low La/Yb) have the highest range and values of S/Dy, Cl/K and F/Nd ratios; and the most "enriched" melts (highest La/Yb) exhibit low volatile/trace element ratios. These trends are consistent with mixing between end member sources: low degrees of melting of a volatile-poor source and high degrees of melting of a volatile-rich component with a depleted trace element signature (which might be consistent with minimally devolatilised recycled oceanic crust). There is no clear

  1. On the Viability of Slab Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.; Magni, V.; Maunder, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Melting subducted mafic crust is commonly assumed to be the main process leading to silicic melts with an adakitic signature, which may form Archaean granitoids and generate early continental crust. Alternatively, melting of the overriding lower mafic crust and near-Moho depth fractional crystallisation of mantle melts can form differentiated magmas with an adakitic signature. Previous work shows how only very young slabs melt through dehydration melting, or depict melting of dry eclogites via water addition from deeper slab dehydration. Alternatively, underplated subducted material via delamination and diapirism may be important in the generation of felsic continental crust. We quantify subduction dehydration and melting reactions in a warm subduction system using a thermo-mechanical subduction model with a thermodynamic database. We find that even young (hot) slabs dehydrate before reaching their solidus, which suppresses any slab dehydration melting and creates significant amounts of mantle wedge melting irrespective of slab age. Significant slab crust melting is only achieved in young slabs via water present melting if metamorphic fluids from the subducted mantle flux through the dry eclogites. These slab melts, however, interfere with massive mantle wedge melting and unlikely to participate in the overriding plate felsic magmatism, unlike the shallower, primitive mantle wedge melts. We also explore the conditions for delaminating the mafic subducted crust. For a wide range of ages, the uppermost part of the subducted slab might delaminate to form compositionally buoyant plumes that rise through the mantle wedge. Thick crust on young slabs (as perhaps representative for a hotter, early Earth) may delaminate entirely and reside in the mantle wedge. Under such conditions, this ponded crust might melts subsequently, forming "adakitic" felsic melts contributing to a significant amount of the overriding plate crustal volumes.

  2. Nature of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Arabian Shield and genesis of Al-spinel micropods: Evidence from the mantle xenoliths of Harrat Kishb, Western Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ahmed H.; Moghazi, Abdel Kader M.; Moufti, Mohamed R.; Dawood, Yehia H.; Ali, Kamal A.

    2016-01-01

    The Harrat Kishb area of western Saudi Arabia is part of the Cenozoic volcanic fields in the western margin of the Arabian Shield. Numerous fresh ultramafic xenoliths are entrained in the basanite lava of Harrat Kishb, providing an opportunity to study the nature and petrogenetic processes involved in the evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Arabian Shield. Based on the petrological characteristics and mineralogical compositions, the majority of the mantle xenoliths (~ 92%) are peridotites (lherzolites and pyroxene-bearing harzburgites); the remaining xenoliths (~ 8%) are unusual spinel-rich wehrlites containing black Al-spinel micropods. The two types of mantle xenoliths display magmatic protogranular texture. The peridotite xenoliths have high bulk-rock Mg#, high forsterite (Fo90-Fo92) and NiO (0.24-0.46 wt.%) contents of olivine, high clinopyroxene Mg# (0.91-0.93), variable spinel Cr# (0.10-0.49, atomic ratio), and approximately flat chondrite-normalized REE patterns. These features indicate that the peridotite xenoliths represent residues after variable degrees of melt extraction from fertile mantle. The estimated P (9-16 kbar) and T (877-1227 °C) as well as the oxidation state (∆logfO2 = - 3.38 to - 0.22) under which these peridotite xenoliths originated are consistent with formation conditions similar to most sub-arc abyssal-type peridotites worldwide. The spinel-rich wehrlite xenoliths have an unusual amount (~ 30 vol.%) of Al-spinel as peculiar micropods with very minor Cr2O3 content (< 1 wt.%). Olivines of the spinel-rich wehrlites have low-average Fo (Fo81) and NiO (0.18 wt.%) contents, low-average cpx Mg# (0.79), high average cpx Al2O3 content (8.46 wt.%), and very low-average spinel Cr# (0.01). These features characterize early mantle cumulates from a picritic melt fraction produced by low degrees of partial melting of a garnet-bearing mantle source. The relatively high Na2O and Al2O3 contents of cpx suggest that the spinel-rich wehrlites

  3. Crystal chemical control of clinopyroxene-melt partitioning in the Di-Ab-An system: implications for elemental fractionations in the depleted mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, C. C.; Shaw, H. F.; Ryerson, F. J.; Williams, Q.; Gill, J.

    1998-08-01

    The partitioning of fifteen trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd, Yb, Hf, Ta, Pb and Th) between clinopyroxene and synthetic melt has been studied in two compositions along an isotherm in the diopside-albite-anorthite ternary at 1 bar pressure. The two compositions correspond to ~ Di65An35 and ~ Di55Ab45 and produce clinopyroxenes distinct in chemistry while melt compositions range from 49 wt % SiO2 to 61 wt. % SiO2. The partition coefficients of high field strength elements (HFSE) increase by factors of 2 to 8 in Di-An experiments relative to Di-Ab experiments while other elements show very little change (+/- 20%) between compositions. The change in HFSE partitioning correlates with increases in tetrahedral Al2O3 (IVAl) content of clinopyroxenes in the anorthite-bearing experiments. Changes in DTa/DNb also correlate with IVA1 based on a survey of previously published determinations.

  4. Where is mantle's carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganov, A. R.; Ono, S.; Ma, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Due to the strongly reducing conditions (the presence of metallic iron was suggested both by experiments [1] and theory [2]), diamond was believed to be the main host of carbon through most of the lower mantle [3]. We showed [4] that cementite Fe3C is another good candidate to be the main host of "reduced" carbon in the mantle, reinforcing an earlier hypothesis [5]. The fate of "oxidised" carbon (in subducted slabs) is of particular importance - if carbonates decompose producing fluid CO2, this would have important implications for the chemistry and rheology of the mantle. Knowledge of crystal structures and phase diagrams of carbonates is crucial here. The high-pressure structures of CaCO3 were predicted [6] and subsequently verified by experiments. For MgCO3, Isshiki et al. [7] found a new phase above 110 GPa, and several attempts were made to solve it [8,9]. Here [4], using an evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction [10], we show that there are two post-magnesite phases at mantle-relevant pressure range, one stable at 82-138 GPa, and the other from 138 GPa to ~160 GPa. Both are based on threefold rings of CO4-tetrahedra and are more favourable than all previously proposed structures. We show that through most of the P-T conditions of the mantle, MgCO3 is the major host of oxidized carbon in the Earth. We predict the possibility of CO2 release at the very bottom of the mantle (in SiO2-rich basaltic part of subducted slabs), which could enhance partial melting of rocks and be related to the geodynamical differences between the Earth and Venus. 1.Frost D.J., Liebske C., Langenhorst F., McCammon C.A., Tronnes R.G., Rubie D.C. (2004). Experimental evidence for the existence of iron-rich metal in the Earth's lower mantle. Nature 428, 409-412. 2.Zhang F., Oganov A.R. (2006). Valence and spin states of iron impurities in mantle-forming silicates. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 249, 436-443. 3.Luth R.W. (1999). Carbon and carbonates in the mantle. In: Mantle

  5. Melting of peridotite to 140 gigapascals.

    PubMed

    Fiquet, G; Auzende, A L; Siebert, J; Corgne, A; Bureau, H; Ozawa, H; Garbarino, G

    2010-09-17

    Interrogating physical processes that occur within the lowermost mantle is a key to understanding Earth's evolution and present-day inner composition. Among such processes, partial melting has been proposed to explain mantle regions with ultralow seismic velocities near the core-mantle boundary, but experimental validation at the appropriate temperature and pressure regimes remains challenging. Using laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we constructed the solidus curve of a natural fertile peridotite between 36 and 140 gigapascals. Melting at core-mantle boundary pressures occurs at 4180 ± 150 kelvin, which is a value that matches estimated mantle geotherms. Molten regions may therefore exist at the base of the present-day mantle. Melting phase relations and element partitioning data also show that these liquids could host many incompatible elements at the base of the mantle. PMID:20847269

  6. The system Na2CO3-CaCO3-MgCO3 at 6 GPa and 900-1250°C and its relation to the partial melting of carbonated mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatskiy, Anton; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Sharygin, Igor S.; Egonin, Ilya A.; Mironov, Aleksandr M.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Ohtani, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    In order to constrain the Na2CO3-CaCO3-MgCO3 T-X diagram at 6 GPa in addition to the binary and pseudo-binary systems we conducted experiments along the Na2CO3-Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3 join. At 900-1000°C, melting does not occur and isothermal sections are presented by one-, two- and three-phase regions containing Ca-bearing magnesite, aragonite, Na2CO3 (Na2) and Na2(Ca1-0.9Mg0-0.1)3-4(CO3)4-5 (Na2Ca3-4), Na4(Ca1-0.6Mg0-0.4)(CO3)3 (Na4Ca), Na2(Ca0-0.08Mg1-0.92)(CO3)2 (Na2Mg) phases with intermediate compositions. The minimum melting point locates between 1000°C and 1100°C. This point would resemble that of three eutectics: Mgs-Na2Ca3-Na2Mg, Na2Mg-Na2Ca3-Na4Ca or Na2Mg-Na4Ca-Na2, in the compositional interval of [45Na2CO3.55(Ca0.6Mg0.4)CO3]-[60Na2CO3.40Ca0.6Mg0.4CO3]. The liquidus projection has seven primary solidification phase regions for Mgs, Dol, Arg, Na2Ca3, Na4Ca, Na2 and Na2Mg. The results suggest that extraction of Na and Ca from silicate to carbonate components has to decrease minimum melting temperature of carbonated mantle rocks to 1000-1100°C at 6 GPa and yields Na-rich dolomitic melt with a Na# (Na2O/(Na2O + CaO + MgO)) ≥ 28 mol%.

  7. Dynamical geochemistry of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. F.

    2011-09-01

    The reconciliation of mantle chemistry with the structure of the mantle inferred from geophysics and dynamical modelling has been a long-standing problem. This paper reviews three main aspects. First, extensions and refinements of dynamical modelling and theory of mantle processing over the past decade. Second, a recent reconsideration of the implications of mantle heterogeneity for melting, melt migration, mantle differentiation and mantle segregation. Third, a recent proposed shift in the primitive chemical baseline of the mantle inferred from observations of non-chondritic 142Nd in the Earth. It seems most issues can now be resolved, except the level of heating required to maintain the mantle's thermal evolution. A reconciliation of refractory trace elements and their isotopes with the dynamical mantle, proposed and given preliminary quantification by Hofmann, White and Christensen, has been strengthened by work over the past decade. The apparent age of lead isotopes and the broad refractory-element differences among and between ocean island basalts (OIBs) and mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) can now be quantitatively accounted for with some assurance. The association of the least radiogenic helium with relatively depleted sources and their location in the mantle have been enigmatic. The least radiogenic helium samples have recently been recognised as matching the proposed non-chondritic primitive mantle. It has also been proposed recently that noble gases reside in a so-called hybrid pyroxenite assemblage that is the result of melt from fusible pods re