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Sample records for low-density lipoprotein receptor

  1. Endotoxin suppresses rat hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor expression.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, W; Rudling, M; Angelin, B

    1996-01-01

    Endotoxin induces hyperlipidaemia in experimental animals. In the current study, we investigated whether endotoxin alters hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in rats. Endotoxin treatment suppressed hepatic LDL receptor expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Eighteen hours after intraperitoneal injection of increasing amounts of endotoxin, LDL receptor and its mRNA levels were determined by ligand blot and solution hybridization respectively. LDL receptor expression was inhibited by about 70% at a dose of 500 micrograms/100 g body weight. However, LDL receptor mRNA levels were markedly increased in all endotoxin-treated groups at this time point (by 83-136%; P < 0.001). Time-course experiments showed that LDL receptor expression was already reduced by 48% 4 h after endotoxin injection and was maximally reduced (by 63-65%) between 8 and 18 h. Changes in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA showed a different pattern. By 4 h after endotoxin injection, LDL receptor mRNA had decreased by 78% (P < 0.001). However, by 8 h after endotoxin injection, LDL receptor mRNA had returned to levels similar to controls, and 18 and 24 h after endotoxin injection, they were increased by about 60% (P < 0.05). Separation of plasma lipoproteins by FPLC demonstrated that endotoxin-induced changes in plasma triacylglycerols and cholesterol were due to accumulation of plasma apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins among very-low-density lipoprotein, intermediate-density lipoprotein and LDL. It is concluded that endotoxin suppresses hepatic LDL receptor expression in vivo in rats. PMID:8611169

  2. Dot-blot assay for the low density lipoprotein receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, F.M.; Catapano, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a new method for detecting the interaction of low density lipoprotein with its receptor using unmodified nitrocellulose as support for membrane protein. The method is specific and sensitive down to 3 micrograms of membrane protein. Unlabeled LDL, but not HDL, competes with /sup 125/I-labeled LDL for binding, and binding is abolished by pretreatment of the membranes with pronase and is dependent upon the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, modification of arginine or lysine residues on LDL abolishes the lipoprotein interaction with the receptor protein supported on the nitrocellulose. When the membranes are solubilized with octyl glucoside, purification steps of the receptor can be directly followed with no interference of the detergent, therefore eliminating the need for its removal. The increased expression of LDL receptors on liver membranes from estradiol-treated rats was also demonstrated. We suggest, therefore, that this method can be used to detect the presence of LDL receptors on minute amounts of membrane protein.

  3. Catabolism of low density lipoproteins by perfused rabbit livers: cholestyramine promotes receptor-dependent hepatic catabolism of low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chao, Y S; Yamin, T T; Alberts, A W

    1982-07-01

    Rabbits fed a wheat starch/casein diet develop a marked hypercholesterolemia accompanied by a decrease in the number of EDTA-sensitive binding sites on plasma membrane fractions of the liver for low density lipoproteins (LDL) and beta-migrating very low density lipoproteins [Chao, Y.-S., Yamin, T.-T. & Alberts, A. W. (1982) J. Biol. Chem., in press]. Inclusion of 1% cholestyramine resin in this diet prevents the increase in plasma cholesterol, increases the removal of LDL from plasma, and increases the number of hepatic plasma membrane LDL-binding sites. To determine the functional role of hepatic LDL-binding sites in the catabolism of LDL, we studied the catabolism of (125)I-labeled LDL ((125)I-LDL) by in situ perfused rabbit livers in a recirculating system. The rate of catabolism was measured from the increment of nonprotein-bound radioiodine in the perfusate. The receptor-dependent catabolism of LDL by the liver was calculated from the difference of hepatic catabolism of (125)I-LDL and catabolism of (125)I-labeled cyclohexanedione-modified LDL, which does not bind to LDL receptors. The data show that about 74% of LDL catabolized by perfused livers from chow-fed rabbits is through the receptor-dependent pathway and 26% is through the receptor-independent pathway. In rabbits fed a cholesterol diet, the hepatic catabolism of (125)I-LDL is reduced, and the receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL is abolished. In rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet, the receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL is reduced by 40% when compared with hepatic catabolism in chow-fed rabbits. Perfused livers from rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet supplemented with 1% cholestyramine show a 5,4-fold increase of receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL when compared with that of livers from rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet alone. Thus, these studies demonstrate that the change in the number of rabbit hepatic membrane LDL receptors induced by dietary manipulation

  4. Apolipoprotein A-V interaction with members of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Lookene, Aivar; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Gliemann, Jørgen; Ryan, Robert O; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2007-03-27

    Apolipoprotein A-V is a potent modulator of plasma triacylglycerol levels. To investigate the molecular basis for this phenomenon we explored the ability of apolipoprotein A-V, in most experiments complexed to disks of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, to interact with two members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family, the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and the mosaic type-1 receptor, SorLA. Experiments using surface plasmon resonance showed specific binding of both free and lipid-bound apolipoprotein A-V to both receptors. The binding was calcium dependent and was inhibited by the receptor associated protein, a known ligand for members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. Preincubation with heparin decreased the receptor binding of apolipoprotein A-V, indicating that overlap exists between the recognition sites for these receptors and for heparin. A double mutant, apolipoprotein A-V (Arg210Glu/Lys211Gln), showed decreased binding to heparin and decreased ability to bind the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Association of apolipoprotein A-V with the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein or SorLA resulted in enhanced binding of human chylomicrons to receptor-covered sensor chips. Our results indicate that apolipoprotein A-V may influence plasma lipid homeostasis by enhancing receptor-mediated endocytosis of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. PMID:17326667

  5. Suppression of diet-induced atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice overexpressing lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, M; Ishibashi, S; Inaba, T; Yagyu, H; Harada, K; Osuga, J I; Ohashi, K; Yazaki, Y; Yamada, N

    1996-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key enzyme in the hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Conflicting results have been reported concerning its role in atherogenesis. To determine the effects of the overexpressed LPL on diet-induced atherosclerosis, we have generated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) knockout mice that overexpressed human LPL transgene (LPL/LDLRKO) and compared their plasma lipoproteins and atherosclerosis with those in nonexpressing LDLR-knockout mice (LDLRKO). On a normal chow diet, LPL/LDLRKO mice showed marked suppression of mean plasma triglyceride levels (32 versus 236 mg/dl) and modest decrease in mean cholesterol levels (300 versus 386 mg/dl) as compared with LDLRKO mice. Larger lipoprotein particles of intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL)/LDL were selectively reduced in LPL/LDLRKO mice. On an atherogenic diet, both mice exhibited severe hypercholesterolemia. But, mean plasma cholesterol levels in LPL/ LDLRKO mice were still suppressed as compared with that in LDLRKO mice (1357 versus 2187 mg/dl). Marked reduction in a larger subfraction of IDL/LDL, which conceivably corresponds to remnant lipoproteins, was observed in the LPL/LDLRKO mice. LDLRKO mice developed severe fatty streak lesions in the aortic sinus after feeding with the atherogenic diet for 8 weeks. In contrast, mean lesion area in the LPL/LDLRKO mice was 18-fold smaller than that in LDLRKO mice. We suggest that the altered lipoprotein profile, in particular the reduced level of remnant lipoproteins, is mainly responsible for the protection by LPL against atherosclerosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8692976

  6. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  7. Membrane receptors for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) inhibitor of lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, P.I.; Beck, G.; Zucker, S.

    1981-06-01

    Physiologic concentrations of human plasma very low density lipoproteins inhibit the DNA synthesis of lymphocytes stimulated by allogeneic cells or lectins. In this report reachers have compared the effects of isolated lipoproteins (very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), and high density lipoproteins (HDL)) and lipoprotein-depleted plasma (LDP) on DNA synthesis by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes. The relative potency for the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation was VLDL greater than LDL greater than HDL greater than LDP. Fifty percent inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed at a VLDL protein concentration of 1.5--2.0 microgram/ml. Researchers have further demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for VLDL on human lymphocytes. Native VLDL was more effective than LDL in competing for 125I-VLDL binding sites. Subsequent to binding to lymphocytes, 125I-VLDL was internalized and degraded to acid-soluble products. Based on a Scatchard analysis of VLDL binding at 4 degrees C, the number of VLDL receptors per lymphocyte was estimated at 28,000 +/- 1300. Based on an estimated mean binding affinity for the VLDL receptor complex at half saturation of approximately 8.8 X 10(7) liter/mole, it is estimated that 91% of lymphocyte VLDL receptors are occupied at physiologic VLDL concentrations in blood. Although the immune regulatory role of plasma lipoproteins is uncertain, researchers suggest tha VLDL and LDL-In may maintain circulating blood lymphocytes in a nonproliferative state via their respective cell receptor mechanisms.

  8. Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 variant interacts with saturated fatty acids in Puerto Ricans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density lipoprotein related receptor protein 1 (LRP1) is a multi-functional endocytic receptor that is highly expressed in adipocytes and the hypothalamus. Animal models and in vitro studies support a role for LRP1 in adipocyte metabolism and leptin signaling, but genetic polymorphisms have not ...

  9. [Low density lipoprotein apheresis].

    PubMed

    Zaliūnas, Remigijus; Slapikas, Rimvydas; Gustiene, Olivija; Siurkus, Jonas; Vaitkus, Eduardas

    2003-01-01

    Increased blood cholesterol concentration is one of the main factors in ischemic heart disease, development of which is determined by atherosclerotic changes in coronary vessels. Diet and treatment with 3-hydroxi-3-metilglutaril coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors helps to reduce low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-Ch) blood concentration up to recommended level of 3.0 mmol/l in most patients but in some patients particularly with familial dyslipidemias cholesterol concentration remains increased even after treatment with maximal doses of lipid-regulating agents or their combinations. The most frequently used mechanical methods of cholesterol removal from blood include the procedures of extracorporeal apheresis. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis not only significantly reduces the blood concentrations of total cholesterol (TCh), and LDL-Ch, lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a) and fibrinogen but also stops the progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vessels. PMID:14704503

  10. Imaging of hepatic low density lipoprotein receptors by radionuclide scintiscanning in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huettinger, M; Corbett, J R; Schneider, W J; Willerson, J T; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1984-12-01

    The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mediates the cellular uptake of plasma lipoproteins that are derived from very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). Most of the functional LDL receptors in the body are located in the liver. Here, we describe a radionuclide scintiscanning technique that permits the measurement of LDL receptors in the livers of intact rabbits. 123I-labeled VLDL were administered intravenously, and scintigraphic images of the liver and heart were obtained at intervals thereafter. In seven normal rabbits, radioactivity in the liver increased progressively between 1 and 20 min after injection, while radioactivity in the heart (reflecting that in plasma) decreased concomitantly. In Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, which lack LDL receptors on a genetic basis, there was little uptake of 123I-labeled VLDL into the liver and little decrease in cardiac radioactivity during this interval. These findings demonstrate that the LDL receptor is necessary for the hepatic uptake of VLDL-derived lipoproteins in the rabbit. Two conditions that diminish hepatic LDL receptor activity, cholesterol-feeding and prolonged fasting, also reduced the uptake of 123I-labeled VLDL in the liver as measured by scintiscanning. The data suggest that radionuclide scintiscanning can be used as a noninvasive method to quantify the number of LDL receptors expressed in the liver in vivo. PMID:6594702

  11. Apolipoprotein E on Hepatitis C Virion Facilitates Infection through Interaction with Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Owen, David M.; Huang, Hua; Ye, Jin; Gale, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease. HCV associates with host apolipoproteins and enters hepatocytes through complex processes involving some combination of CD81, claudin-I, occludin, and scavenger receptor BI. Here we show that infectious HCV resembles very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and that entry involves co-receptor function of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R). Blocking experiments demonstrate that β-VLDL itself or anti-apolipoprotein E (apoE) antibody can block HCV entry. Knockdown of the LDL-R by treatment with 25-hydroxycholesterol or siRNA ablated ligand uptake and reduced HCV infection of cells, whereas infection was rescued upon cell ectopic LDL-R expression. Analyses of gradient-fractionated HCV demonstrate that apoE is associated with HCV virions exhibiting peak infectivity and dependence upon the LDL-R for cell entry. Our results define the LDL-R as a cooperative HCV co-receptor that supports viral entry and infectivity through interaction with apoE ligand present in an infectious HCV/lipoprotein complex comprising the virion. Disruption of HCV/LDL-R interactions by altering lipoprotein metabolism may therefore represent a focus for future therapy. PMID:19751943

  12. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low density lipoprotein receptor gene in hypercholesterolaemia mice.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hailong; Zhang, Qinghai; Zeng, Jia

    2016-06-01

    The defect of low density lipoprotein receptor disturbs cholesterol metabolism and causes familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). In this study, we directly delivered exogenous Ldlr gene into the liver of FH model mice (Ldlr(-/-)) by lentiviral gene transfer system. The results showed that the Ldlr gene controlled by hepatocyte-specific human thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) promoter successfully and exclusively expressed in livers.We found that, although, the content of high density lipoprotein in serum was not significantly affected by the Ldlr gene expression, the serum low density lipoprotein level was reduced by 46%, associated with a 30% and 28% decrease in triglyceride and total cholesterol, respectively, compared to uninjected Ldlr(-/-) mice. Moreover, the TBG directed expression of Ldlr significantly decreased the lipid accumulation in liver and reduced plaque burden in aorta (32%). Our results indicated that the hepatocyte-specific expression of Ldlr gene strikingly lowered serum lipid levels and resulted in amelioration of hypercholesterolaemia. PMID:27350674

  13. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 1 and its function in lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Wujak, L; Markart, P; Wygrecka, M

    2016-07-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 1 is a ubiquitously expressed, versatile cell surface transmembrane receptor involved in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. LRP1 binds and endocytoses a broad spectrum of over 40 ligands identified thus far, including lipoproteins, extracellular matrix proteins, proteases and protease/inhibitor complexes and growth factors. Interactions with other membrane receptors and intracellular adaptors/scaffolding proteins allow LRP1 to modulate cell migration, survival, proliferation and (trans) differentiation. Because LRP1 displays a wide-range of interactions and activities, its expression and function is temporally and spatially tightly controlled. It is not, therefore, surprising that deregulation of LRP1 production and/or activity is observed in several diseases. In this review, we will systematically examine the evidence for the role of LRP1 in human pathologies placing special emphasis on LRP1-mediated pathogenesis of the lung. PMID:26926950

  14. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  15. Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis increase hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Zhao, Z; Lopez, D

    1996-01-15

    Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis are believed to lower serum cholesterol levels by enhancing the removal of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by increasing hepatic LDL receptor function. Thus, the effects of several different inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis were examined for their effects on the expression of the hepatic LDL receptor in rats. We found that administration of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase such as lovastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, and rivastatin resulted in increased hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Surprisingly, these agents failed to increase levels of immunoreactive LDL receptor protein in rat liver even when the dose and length of treatment were increased. Treatment of rats with zaragozic acid A, an inhibitor of squalene synthase, caused even greater increases in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels, but did not increase levels of immunoreactive protein. Further investigation revealed that the rate of degradation of the hepatic LDL receptor was increased in rats given inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The greatest increase in the rate of degradation was seen in animals treated with zaragozic acid A which caused the largest increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. In contrast, hepatic LDL receptor protein was stabilized in cholesterol-fed rats. It appears that increased potential for LDL receptor protein synthesis, reflected in increased mRNA levels, is offset by a corresponding increase in the rate of receptor protein degradation resulting in constant steady-state levels of hepatic LDL receptor protein. These findings are suggestive of increased cycling of the hepatic LDL receptor. This postulated mechanism can provide for enhanced hepatic uptake of lipoproteins without increasing steady-state levels of LDL receptor protein. PMID:8561503

  16. Autoantibodies to the low density lipoprotein receptor in a subject affected by severe hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed Central

    Corsini, A; Roma, P; Sommariva, D; Fumagalli, R; Catapano, A L

    1986-01-01

    We studied a 32-yr-old man with a benign paraproteinemia (IgA) affected by severe nonfamilial hypercholesterolemia. In vitro experiments demonstrated that lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS) from the patient inhibited the binding of low density lipoprotein (LDL) to human skin fibroblasts cultured in vitro (up to 70%) whereas LPDS from controls had no effect. Removal of IgA from the patient's serum by immunoprecipitation with mono-specific antisera abolished the inhibition of LDL binding. IgA isolated from the serum of the patient by affinity chromatography inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the binding of LDL to human skin fibroblasts in vitro, thus showing an IgA-mediated effect. Ligand-blotting experiments demonstrated that the paraprotein directly interacts with the LDL receptor, thus inhibiting the binding of the lipoprotein. Treatment of the receptor protein with reducing agents blocked the interaction of the antibody with the LDL receptor. From these data we speculate that this autoantibody may be responsible for the severe nonfamilial hypercholesterolemia of the patient. Images PMID:3760193

  17. Content of low density lipoprotein receptors in breast cancer tissue related to survival of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Rudling, M J; Ståhle, L; Peterson, C O; Skoog, L

    1986-01-01

    The content of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in tissue from primary breast cancers was determined and its prognostic information compared with that of variables of established prognostic importance. Frozen tumour specimens were selected, and tissue from 72 patients (32 of whom had died) were studied. The LDL receptor content showed an inverse correlation with the survival time. Analysis by a multivariate statistical method showed that the presence of axillary metastasis, content of receptors for oestrogen and LDL, diameter of the tumour, and DNA pattern were all of prognostic value with regard to patient survival. Improved methods of predicting survival time in patients with breast cancer may be of value in the choice of treatment for individual patients. PMID:3081176

  18. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  19. Dietary saturated triacylglycerols suppress hepatic low density lipoprotein receptor activity in the hamster.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Dietschy, J M

    1985-01-01

    The liver plays a key role in the regulation of circulating levels of low density lipoproteins (LDL) because it is both the site for the production of and the major organ for the degradation of this class of lipoproteins. In this study, the effects of feeding polyunsaturated or saturated triacylglycerols on receptor-dependent and receptor-independent hepatic LDL uptake were measured in vivo in the hamster. In control animals, receptor-dependent LDL transport manifested an apparent Km value of 85 mg/dl (plasma LDL-cholesterol concentration) and reached a maximum transport velocity of 131 micrograms of LDL-cholesterol/hr per g, whereas receptor-independent uptake increased as a linear function of plasma LDL levels. Thus, at normal plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations, the hepatic clearance rate of LDL equaled 120 and 9 microliter/hr per g by receptor-dependent and receptor-independent mechanisms, respectively. As the plasma LDL-cholesterol was increased, the receptor-dependent (but not the receptor-independent) component declined. When cholesterol (0.12%) alone or in combination with polyunsaturated triacylglycerols was fed for 30 days, receptor-dependent clearance was reduced to 36-42 microliter/hr per g, whereas feeding of cholesterol plus saturated triacylglycerols essentially abolished receptor-dependent LDL uptake (5 microliter/hr per g). When compared to the appropriate kinetic curves, these findings indicated that receptor-mediated LDL transport was suppressed approximately equal to 30% by cholesterol feeding alone and this was unaffected by the addition of polyunsaturated triacylglycerols to the diet. In contrast, receptor-dependent uptake was suppressed approximately equal to 90% by the intake of saturated triacylglycerols. As compared to polyunsaturated triacylglycerols, the intake of saturated lipids was also associated with significantly higher plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations and lower levels of cholesteryl esters in the liver. Images PMID:2989830

  20. Evidence for low-density lipoprotein receptor-mediated uptake of benzoporphyrin derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, B. A.; Pritchard, P. H.; Levy, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins, such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL), have been proposed to enhance the delivery of hydrophobic photosensitisers to malignant tissue since tumour cells have been shown to have increased numbers of LDL receptors. We have investigated the role of this receptor in the cellular accumulation of the photosensitiser benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD). We observed that: (1) [14C]BPD-LDL accumulation by LDL receptor-negative fibroblast cell lines was insignificant compared with normal cell lines; (2) there was no evidence that BPD dissociated from LDL during incubation with the cells; and (3) chemical acetylation of LDL markedly decreased the uptake of [14C]BPD-LDL. We conclude, therefore, that virtually all of the photosensitiser accumulated by the cells was due to specific binding and internalisation via the LDL receptor. Subsequent in vivo studies in M-1 (methylcholanthrene-induced rhabdomyosarcoma) tumour-bearing DBA/2J mice showed that tumour accumulation of BPD associated with native LDL was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced over that of acetyl-LDL-associated BPD. These results indicate that the LDL receptor is responsible for the accumulation of LDL-associated BPD both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, utilisation of this delivery system may provide for improvements in photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. PMID:8180011

  1. Lipoprotein binding and endosomal itinerary of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, H; Takahashi, K; Hamilton, R L; Havel, R J

    1989-01-01

    The high affinity of 45Ca binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and the LDL-R-related protein (LRP) was utilized to study the subcellular distribution of these two proteins in rat liver. Like the LDL-R, LRP was manyfold enriched in rat liver endosomal membranes with a relative distribution in early and late endosomal compartments consistent with recycling between endosomes and the cell surface. The high concentration of LRP in hepatic endosomal membranes greatly facilitated demonstration of Ca-dependent binding of apolipoprotein E- and B-containing lipoproteins in ligand blots. LRP was severalfold more abundant than the LDL-R in hepatic parenchymal cells, showed extensive degradation in hepatic endosomes, and was found in high concentrations in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest a high rate of synthesis of LRP that appeared to be unaffected by treatment of rats with estradiol. The repeating cysteine-rich A-motif found in the ligand-binding domain of LRP appeared to be responsible for Ca binding by LRP, LDL-R, and complement factor C9 and accounted for immunological cross-reactivity among these proteins. Weaker ligand-blotting properties and an extraordinary susceptibility to proteolysis most likely contribute to the difficulty of detecting LRP in conventional assays for lipoprotein receptors. Our data suggest an extensive proteolytic processing of this protein and are consistent with a functional role of LRP in lipoprotein metabolism. Images PMID:2594771

  2. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Related Proteins as Regulators of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Lila M.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a highly organised structure. Many signalling systems work in concert to ensure that neural stem cells are appropriately directed to generate progenitor cells, which in turn mature into functional cell types including projection neurons, interneurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Herein we explore the role of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family, in particular family members LRP1 and LRP2, in regulating the behaviour of neural stem and progenitor cells during development and adulthood. The ability of LRP1 and LRP2 to bind a diverse and extensive range of ligands, regulate ligand endocytosis, recruit nonreceptor tyrosine kinases for direct signal transduction and signal in conjunction with other receptors, enables them to modulate many crucial neural cell functions. PMID:26949399

  3. Novel mutations of low-density lipoprotein receptor gene in China patients with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liang-liang; Lin, Min-jie; Chen, Ya-qin; Huang, Hao; Peng, Dao-quan; Xia, Kun; Zhao, Shui-ping; Xiang, Rong

    2015-05-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, associated with elevated level of serum low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), which can lead to premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). Mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) have been identified to be the underlying cause of this disease. Genetic research of FH has already been extensively studied all over the world. However, reports of FH mutations in the Chinese population are still limited. In this paper, 20 unrelated FH families were enrolled to detect the candidate gene variants in Chinese FH population by DNA direct sequencing. We identified 12 LDLR variants in 13 FH probands. Importantly, we first reported two unique mutations (c.2000_2000 delG/p.C667LfsX6 and c.605T>C/p.F202S) in LDLR gene. Our discoveries expand the spectrum of LDLR mutations and contribute to the genetic diagnosis and counseling for FH patients. PMID:25846081

  4. Molecular studies of pH dependent ligand interactions with the low-density lipoprotein receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Taichi; Chen, Hsuan-Chih; Guigard, Emmanuel; Kay, Cyril M.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2009-01-01

    Ligand release from the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) has been postulated to involve a “histidine switch” induced intra-molecular rearrangement that discharges bound ligand. A recombinant soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor (sLDLR) was employed in ligand binding experiments with a fluorescent-tagged variant apolipoprotein E-N-terminal domain (apoE-NT). Binding was monitored as a function of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from excited Trp residues in sLDLR to an extrinsic fluorophore covalently attached to Trp null apoE3-NT. In binding experiments with wild type (WT) sLDLR, FRET-dependent AEDANS fluorescence decreased as the pH was lowered. To investigate the role of His190, His562 and His586 in sLDLR on pH dependent ligand binding and discharge, site directed mutagenesis studies were performed. Compared to WT sLDLR, triple His→Ala mutant sLDLR displayed attenuated pH-dependent ligand binding and decreased ligand release as a function of low pH. When these His residues were substituted for Lys, whose positively charged side chain does not ionize over this pH range, ligand binding was nearly abolished at all pH values. When sequential His to Lys mutants were examined, evidence obtained suggested that His562 and His586 function cooperatively. Whereas the sedimentation coefficient for WT sLDLR increased upon lowering the pH from 7 to 5, no such change occurred in the case of the triple Lys mutant receptor or a His562Lys / His586Lys double mutant receptor. The data support the existence of a cryptic, histidine side chain ionization-dependent alternative ligand that modulates ligand discharge via conformational reorganization. PMID:18847225

  5. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  6. Hypercholesterolemia, low density lipoprotein receptor and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-type 9

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hong-mei; Zhang, Da-wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. Plasma levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are positively correlated with the risk of atherosclerosis. High plasma LDL concentrations in patients with hypercholesterolemia lead to build-up of LDL in the inner walls of the arteries, which becomes oxidized and promotes the formation of foam cells, consequently initiating atherosclerosis. Plasma LDL is mainly cleared through the LDL receptor (LDLR) pathway. Mutations in the LDLR cause familiar hypercholesterolemia and increase the risk of premature coronary heart disease. The expression of LDLR is regulated at the transcriptional level via the sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) and at the posttranslational levels mainly through proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin-type 9 (PCSK9) and inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL). In this review, we summarize the latest advances in the studies of PCSK9. PMID:26445568

  7. Compartmentation and turnover of the low density lipoprotein receptor in skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hare, J F

    1990-12-15

    The low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) was immunoprecipitated from [35S]methionine-labeled skin fibroblasts derivatized at 4 or 18 degrees C with an impermeant biotinylating reagent. Separation of derivatized and underivatized receptor from immunoprecipitates by selective binding to streptavidin-agarose allowed assessment of receptor protein cellular compartmentation and rates of intercompartmental transfer. At both 4 and 18 degrees C the amount of LDLR that is derivatized in cells labeled to near steady state saturates after 1-2 h of reaction at, respectively, 47 and 70% of total immunoprecipitable receptor protein. On the basis of temperature titration experiments, protein exposed only to the cell surface reacts at 4 degrees C; raising the temperature of biotinylation to 18 degrees C provides access to an additional pool of receptor protein. Remaining LDLR is derivatized at 37 degrees C. LDLR unreactive at 18 degrees C largely resides in membrane compartment(s) devoid of plasma membrane on the basis of its fractionation on Percoll gradients. While total cellular LDLR and 4 degrees C-derivatized LDLR labeled to steady state turn over in a first order manner (t1/2 = 12-13 h), the specific activity of pulse-labeled, 4 degrees C-accessible protein peaks after 1-2 h of chase and reaches a reduced level by 3 h of chase. These latter results show that the newly synthesized LDLR is transiently enriched at the cell surface prior to achieving equilibrium distribution between the cell surface and intracellular pools. PMID:2254328

  8. Colloidal gold--low density lipoprotein conjugates as membrane receptor probes.

    PubMed Central

    Handley, D A; Arbeeny, C M; Witte, L D; Chien, S

    1981-01-01

    We have developed a method for conjugating low density lipoproteins (LDL) with colloidal gold. Conjugation, complete after 1 min, occurs by electrostatic adsorption of the LDL to the negatively charged gold particle. Each conjugate consists of approximately eight biologically active LDL molecules clustered around a central 19-nm gold granule. Acidic (pH 4), alkaline (pH 9), or high ionic (600 milliosmolar NaCl) environments do not dissociate the conjugate. Colloidal gold is an electron-dense, nondegradable marker that is easily identified within the cell and serves as a valuable probe for studying receptor binding and endocytosis. By using a modified method of ruthenium red staining, the LDL molecules of the conjugate can be directly visualized when they are bound to the cell surface receptor. Receptor binding (4 degrees C) of the conjugate by cultured human fibroblasts reveals that the gold granule is positioned 18-21 nm from the coated pit region of the membrane. This distance, similar to the diameter of LDL, suggests concomitant internalization of the receptor during vesicular endocytosis and early lysosomal incorporation (10 min at 37 degrees C). Continued internalization (30-60 min at 37 degrees C) results in the formation of free pools of gold within the lysosome. Images PMID:6264440

  9. Purification and Characterization of a Bovine Acetyl Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Reddy, Pranhitha; Kishimoto, Chiharu; Krieger, Monty

    1988-12-01

    The acetyl low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is expressed on macrophages and some endothelial cells and mediates macrophage--foam cell formation in culture. A 220-kDa acetyl LDL binding protein was partially purified from bovine liver membranes and was used to make a specific monoclonal antibody. The 220-kDa protein immunoprecipitated by this antibody retained binding activity, and the antibody was used to detect this protein in cells lining bovine liver sinusoids and on the surface of cultured bovine alveolar macrophages. In the human monocytic cell line THP-1, the expression of both acetyl LDL receptor activity and a 220-kDa acetyl LDL binding protein were dramatically induced in parallel after differentiation to a macrophage-like state induced by phorbol ester. The ligand specificity, tissue and cell-type specificity, and coinduction data indicated that this 220-kDa cell-surface binding protein is probably a receptor that mediates acetyl LDL endocytosis. The 220-kDa protein, which was purified 238,000-fold from bovine lung membranes to near homogeneity using monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography, is a trimer of 77-kDa subunits that contain asparagine-linked carbohydrate chains.

  10. Nucleolin Acts as a Scavenger Receptor for Acetylated Low-Density Lipoprotein on Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuichi; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Ohminato, Yukari; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Although macrophage phagocytoses modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL), excessive accumulation of modified LDL induces macrophage foam cell formation, which is a feature of atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, the identification of scavenger receptor for modified LDL will provide better understanding of an atherosclerotic event. We recently showed that nucleolin expressed on macrophages acts as a scavenger receptor for various endogenous discarded products. Here, we investigated whether or not nucleolin is involved in the uptake of acetylated LDL (AcLDL). In contrast to normal LDL, AcLDL directly bound to immobilized nucleolin. AcLDL exhibited a higher affinity for macrophages than normal LDL. This binding of AcLDL was inhibited by anti-nucleolin antibody and antineoplastic guanine-rich oligonucleotide (AGRO), a nucleolin-specific oligonucleotide aptamer. In addition, AcLDL exhibited a higher affinity for HEK cells transfected with nucleolin than those without. Further, intracellular accumulation of AcLDL was also inhibited by anti-nucleolin antibody. The results of this study suggest that nucleolin expressed on macrophages is a receptor for AcLDL. PMID:26328500

  11. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  12. Lipopolysaccharide Is Cleared from the Circulation by Hepatocytes via the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Elena; Cirstea, Mihai; Kong, HyeJin Julia; Boyd, John H.; Wang, Yingjin; Russell, James A.; Walley, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. While decreased Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) function improves clinical outcomes in murine and human sepsis, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, is cleared from the circulation by hepatocyte Low Density Lipoprotein Receptors (LDLR)—receptors downregulated by PCSK9. We directly visualized LPS uptake and found that LPS is rapidly taken up by hepatocytes into the cell periphery. Over the course of 4 hours LPS is transported towards the cell center. We next found that clearance of injected LPS from the blood was reduced substantially in Ldlr knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice compared to wild type controls and, simultaneously, hepatic uptake of LPS was also reduced in Ldlr-/- mice. Specifically examining the role of hepatocytes, we further found that primary hepatocytes isolated from Ldlr-/- mice had greatly decreased LPS uptake. In the HepG2 immortalized human hepatocyte cell line, LDLR silencing similarly resulted in decreased LPS uptake. PCSK9 treatment reduces LDLR density on hepatocytes and, therefore, was another independent strategy to test our hypothesis. Incubation with PCSK9 reduced LPS uptake by hepatocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hepatocytes clear LPS from the circulation via the LDLR and PCSK9 regulates LPS clearance from the circulation during sepsis by downregulation of hepatic LDLR. PMID:27171436

  13. Acceleration of atherogenesis by COX-1-dependent prostanoid formation in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Tillmann, C; Zhang, Z B; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2001-03-13

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) product, prostacyclin (PGI(2)), inhibits platelet activation and vascular smooth-muscle cell migration and proliferation. Biochemically selective inhibition of COX-2 reduces PGI(2) biosynthesis substantially in humans. Because deletion of the PGI(2) receptor accelerates atherogenesis in the fat-fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mouse, we wished to determine whether selective inhibition of COX-2 would accelerate atherogenesis in this model. To address this hypothesis, we used dosing with nimesulide, which inhibited COX-2 ex vivo, depressed urinary 2,3 dinor 6-keto PGF(1alpha) by approximately 60% but had no effect on thromboxane formation by platelets, which only express COX-1. By contrast, the isoform nonspecific inhibitor, indomethacin, suppressed platelet function and thromboxane formation ex vivo and in vivo, coincident with effects on PGI(2) biosynthesis indistinguishable from nimesulide. Indomethacin reduced the extent of atherosclerosis by 55 +/- 4%, whereas nimesulide failed to increase the rate of atherogenesis. Despite their divergent effects on atherogenesis, both drugs depressed two indices of systemic inflammation, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 to a similar but incomplete degree. Neither drug altered serum lipids and the marked increase in vascular expression of COX-2 during atherogenesis. Accelerated progression of atherosclerosis is unlikely during chronic intake of specific COX-2 inhibitors. Furthermore, evidence that COX-1-derived prostanoids contribute to atherogenesis suggests that controlled evaluation of the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or aspirin on plaque progression in humans is timely. PMID:11248083

  14. Involvement of second messengers in regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Auwerx, J H; Chait, A; Wolfbauer, G; Deeb, S S

    1989-01-01

    Transcription of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene in the human monocytic leukemic cell line THP-1 and in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line Hep-G2 is regulated by second messengers of the diacylglycerol-protein kinase C (DAG-PKC), inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-Ca2+, and cyclic AMP pathways. Exogenous phospholipase C (which releases DAG and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate), PKC activators (phorbol esters and DAG), Ca2+ ionophores, and a cyclic AMP analog all transiently induced accumulation of LDL-R mRNA. The effects of these three signal-transducing pathways were to a large extent additive. Furthermore, PKC stimulation effected an increase in LDL binding, which suggested that the increase in LDL-R mRNA resulted in an increase in functional cell surface receptor activity. These results suggest that uptake of cholesterol by these cells is under control of both intracellular cholesterol levels and external signals. Images PMID:2548077

  15. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential. PMID:26578342

  16. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential. PMID:26578342

  17. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  18. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Class A Repeats Are O-Glycosylated in Linker Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Wang, Shengjun; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Yang, Zhang; Halim, Adnan; Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Madsen, Thomas Daugbjerg; Seidah, Nabil G.; Bennett, Eric Paul; Levery, Steven B.; Clausen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) is crucial for cholesterol homeostasis and deficiency in LDLR functions cause hypercholesterolemia. LDLR is a type I transmembrane protein that requires O-glycosylation for stable expression at the cell surface. It has previously been suggested that LDLR O-glycosylation is found N-terminal to the juxtamembrane region. Recently we identified O-glycosylation sites in the linker regions between the characteristic LDLR class A repeats in several LDLR-related receptors using the “SimpleCell” O-glycoproteome shotgun strategy. Herein, we have systematically characterized O-glycosylation sites on recombinant LDLR shed from HEK293 SimpleCells and CHO wild-type cells. We find that the short linker regions between LDLR class A repeats contain an evolutionarily conserved O-glycosylation site at position −1 of the first cysteine residue of most repeats, which in wild-type CHO cells is glycosylated with the typical sialylated core 1 structure. The glycosites in linker regions of LDLR class A repeats are conserved in LDLR from man to Xenopus and found in other homologous receptors. O-Glycosylation is controlled by a large family of polypeptide GalNAc transferases. Probing into which isoform(s) contributed to glycosylation of the linker regions of the LDLR class A repeats by in vitro enzyme assays suggested a major role of GalNAc-T11. This was supported by expression of LDLR in HEK293 cells, where knock-out of the GalNAc-T11 isoform resulted in the loss of glycosylation of three of four linker regions. PMID:24798328

  19. Automated detection and tracking of individual and clustered cell surface low density lipoprotein receptor molecules.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, R N; Webb, W W

    1994-05-01

    We have developed a technique to detect, recognize, and track each individual low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) molecule and small receptor clusters on the surface of human skin fibroblasts. Molecular recognition and high precision (30 nm) simultaneous automatic tracking of all of the individual receptors in the cell surface population utilize quantitative time-lapse low light level digital video fluorescence microscopy analyzed by purpose-designed algorithms executed on an image processing work station. The LDL-Rs are labeled with the biologically active, fluorescent LDL derivative dil-LDL. Individual LDL-Rs and unresolved small clusters are identified by measuring the fluorescence power radiated by the sub-resolution fluorescent spots in the image; identification of single particles is ascertained by four independent techniques. An automated tracking routine was developed to track simultaneously, and without user intervention, a multitude of fluorescent particles through a sequence of hundreds of time-lapse image frames. The limitations on tracking precision were found to depend on the signal-to-noise ratio of the tracked particle image and mechanical drift of the microscope system. We describe the methods involved in (i) time-lapse acquisition of the low-light level images, (ii) simultaneous automated tracking of the fluorescent diffraction limited punctate images, (iii) localizing particles with high precision and limitations, and (iv) detecting and identifying single and clustered LDL-Rs. These methods are generally applicable and provide a powerful tool to visualize and measure dynamics and interactions of individual integral membrane proteins on living cell surfaces. PMID:8061186

  20. Automated detection and tracking of individual and clustered cell surface low density lipoprotein receptor molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, R N; Webb, W W

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a technique to detect, recognize, and track each individual low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) molecule and small receptor clusters on the surface of human skin fibroblasts. Molecular recognition and high precision (30 nm) simultaneous automatic tracking of all of the individual receptors in the cell surface population utilize quantitative time-lapse low light level digital video fluorescence microscopy analyzed by purpose-designed algorithms executed on an image processing work station. The LDL-Rs are labeled with the biologically active, fluorescent LDL derivative dil-LDL. Individual LDL-Rs and unresolved small clusters are identified by measuring the fluorescence power radiated by the sub-resolution fluorescent spots in the image; identification of single particles is ascertained by four independent techniques. An automated tracking routine was developed to track simultaneously, and without user intervention, a multitude of fluorescent particles through a sequence of hundreds of time-lapse image frames. The limitations on tracking precision were found to depend on the signal-to-noise ratio of the tracked particle image and mechanical drift of the microscope system. We describe the methods involved in (i) time-lapse acquisition of the low-light level images, (ii) simultaneous automated tracking of the fluorescent diffraction limited punctate images, (iii) localizing particles with high precision and limitations, and (iv) detecting and identifying single and clustered LDL-Rs. These methods are generally applicable and provide a powerful tool to visualize and measure dynamics and interactions of individual integral membrane proteins on living cell surfaces. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:8061186

  1. Endogenous Androgen Deficiency Enhances Diet-Induced Hypercholesterolemia and Atherosclerosis in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Nicholas W.; Srodulski, Sarah J.; Chan, Huei-Wei; Zhang, Xuan; Tannock, Lisa R.; King, Victoria L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite numerous clinical and animal studies, the role of sex steroid hormones on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis remain controversial. Objective We sought to determine the effects of endogenous estrogen and testosterone on lipoprotein levels and atherosclerosis using mice fed a low-fat diet with no added cholesterol. Methods Male and female low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice were fed an open stock low-fat diet (10% of kcals from fat) for 2, 4, or 17 weeks. Ovariectomy, orchidectomy, or sham surgeries were performed to evaluate the effects of the presence or absence of endogenous hormones on lipid levels, lipoprotein distribution, and atherosclerosis development. Results Female mice fed the study diet for 17 weeks had a marked increase in levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein-B containing lipoproteins, and atherosclerosis compared with male mice. Surprisingly, ovariectomy in female mice had no effect on any of these parameters. In contrast, castration of male mice markedly increased total cholesterol concentrations, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, and atherosclerotic lesion formation compared with male and female mice. Conclusions These data suggest that endogenous androgens protect against diet-induced increases in cholesterol concentrations, formation of proatherogenic lipoproteins, and atherosclerotic lesions formation. Conversely orchidectomy, which decreases androgen concentrations, promotes increases in cholesterol concentrations, proatherogenic lipoprotein formation, and atherosclerotic lesion formation in lowdensity lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice in response to a low-fat diet. PMID:22981166

  2. Lipoprotein(a) Catabolism Is Regulated by Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 through the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Romagnuolo, Rocco; Scipione, Corey A.; Boffa, Michael B.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Seidah, Nabil G.; Koschinsky, Marlys L.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) have been identified as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Plasma Lp(a) levels are reduced by monoclonal antibodies targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). However, the mechanism of Lp(a) catabolism in vivo and the role of PCSK9 in this process are unknown. We report that Lp(a) internalization by hepatic HepG2 cells and primary human fibroblasts was effectively reduced by PCSK9. Overexpression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) in HepG2 cells dramatically increased the internalization of Lp(a). Internalization of Lp(a) was markedly reduced following treatment of HepG2 cells with a function-blocking monoclonal antibody against the LDLR or the use of primary human fibroblasts from an individual with familial hypercholesterolemia; in both cases, Lp(a) internalization was not affected by PCSK9. Optimal Lp(a) internalization in both hepatic and primary human fibroblasts was dependent on the LDL rather than the apolipoprotein(a) component of Lp(a). Lp(a) internalization was also dependent on clathrin-coated pits, and Lp(a) was targeted for lysosomal and not proteasomal degradation. Our data provide strong evidence that the LDLR plays a role in Lp(a) catabolism and that this process can be modulated by PCSK9. These results provide a direct mechanism underlying the therapeutic potential of PCSK9 in effectively lowering Lp(a) levels. PMID:25778403

  3. Molecular hydrogen stabilizes atherosclerotic plaque in low-density lipoprotein receptor-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Guohua; Zong, Chuanlong; Zhang, Zhaoqiang; Yu, Yang; Yao, Shutong; Jiao, Peng; Tian, Hua; Zhai, Lei; Zhao, Hui; Tian, Shuyan; Zhang, Xiangjian; Wu, Yun; Sun, Xuejun; Qin, Shucun

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen (H(2)) attenuates the development of atherosclerosis in mouse models. We aimed to examine the effects of H(2) on atherosclerotic plaque stability. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-knockout (LDLR(-/-)) mice fed an atherogenic diet were dosed daily with H(2) and/or simvastatin. In vitro studies were carried out in an oxidized-LDL (ox-LDL)-stimulated macrophage-derived foam cell model treated with or without H(2). H(2) or simvastatin significantly enhanced plaque stability by increasing levels of collagen, as well as reducing macrophage and lipid levels in plaques. The decreased numbers of dendritic cells and increased numbers of regulatory T cells in plaques further supported the stabilizing effect of H(2) or simvastatin. Moreover, H(2) treatment decreased serum ox-LDL level and apoptosis in plaques with concomitant inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in the aorta. In vitro, like the ERS inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid, H(2) inhibited ox-LDL- or tunicamycin (an ERS inducer)-induced ERS response and cell apoptosis. In addition, like the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine, H(2) inhibited ox-LDL- or Cu(2+) (an ROS inducer)-induced reduction in cell viability and increase in cellular ROS. Also, H(2) increased Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor-2, an important factor in antioxidant signaling) activation and Nrf2 small interfering RNA abolished the protective effect of H(2) on ox-LDL-induced cellular ROS production. The inhibitory effects of H(2) on the apoptosis of macrophage-derived foam cells, which take effect by suppressing the activation of the ERS pathway and by activating the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway, might lead to an improvement in atherosclerotic plaque stability. PMID:26117323

  4. Complement C1q Reduces Early Atherosclerosis in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Vinay K.; Yun, Sheng; Leung, Viola; Grimsditch, David C.; Benson, G. Martin; Botto, Marina B.; Boyle, Joseph J.; Haskard, Dorian O.

    2007-01-01

    We explored the role of the classic complement pathway in atherogenesis by intercrossing C1q-deficient mice (C1qa−/−) with low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice (Ldlr−/−). Mice were fed a normal rodent diet until 22 weeks of age. Aortic root lesions were threefold larger in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/− mice compared with Ldlr−/− mice (3.72 ± 1.0% aortic root versus 1.1 ± 0.4%; mean ± SEM, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the cellular composition of lesions in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/− was more complex, with an increase in vascular smooth muscle cells. The greater aortic root lesion size in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/− mice occurred despite a significant reduction in C5b-9 deposition per lesion unit area, suggesting the critical importance of proximal pathway activity. Apoptotic cells were readily detectable by cleaved caspase-3 staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and electron microscopy in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/−, whereas apoptotic cells were not detected in Ldlr−/− mice. This is the first direct demonstration of a role for the classic complement pathway in atherogenesis. The greater lesion size in C1qa−/−/Ldlr−/− mice is consistent with the emerging homeostatic role for C1q in the disposal of dying cells. This study suggests the importance of effective apoptotic cell removal for containing the size and complexity of early lesions in atherosclerosis. PMID:17200212

  5. Interaction of the apolipoprotein E receptors low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and sorLA/LR11.

    PubMed

    Spoelgen, R; Adams, K W; Koker, M; Thomas, A V; Andersen, O M; Hallett, P J; Bercury, K K; Joyner, D F; Deng, M; Stoothoff, W H; Strickland, D K; Willnow, T E; Hyman, B T

    2009-02-18

    In this study, we examined protein-protein interactions between two neuronal receptors, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and sorLA/LR11, and found that these receptors interact, as indicated by three independent lines of evidence: co-immunoprecipitation experiments on mouse brain extracts and mouse neuronal cells, surface plasmon resonance analysis with purified human LRP and sorLA, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) on rat primary cortical neurons. Immunocytochemistry experiments revealed widespread co-localization of LRP and sorLA within perinuclear compartments of rat primary neurons, while FLIM analysis showed that LRP-sorLA interactions take place within a subset of these compartments. PMID:19047013

  6. The two-receptor model of lipoprotein clearance: tests of the hypothesis in "knockout" mice lacking the low density lipoprotein receptor, apolipoprotein E, or both proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, S; Herz, J; Maeda, N; Goldstein, J L; Brown, M S

    1994-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is hypothesized to mediate lipoprotein clearance by binding to two receptors: (i) the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and (ii) a chylomicron remnant receptor. To test this hypothesis, we have compared plasma lipoproteins in mice that are homozygous for targeted disruptions of the genes for apoE [apoE(-/-)], the LDLR [LDLR(-/-)], and both molecules [poE(-/-); LDLR(-/-)]. On a normal chow diet, apoE(-/-) mice had higher mean plasma cholesterol levels than LDLR(-/-) mice (579 vs. 268 mg/dl). Cholesterol levels in the apoE(-/-); LDLR(-/-) mice were not significantly different from those in the apoE(-/-) mice. LDLR(-/-) mice had a relatively isolated elevation in plasma LDL, whereas apoE(-/-) mice had a marked increase in larger lipoproteins corresponding to very low density lipoproteins and chylomicron remnants. The lipoprotein pattern in apoE(-/-); LDLR(-/-) mice resembled that of apoE(-/-) mice. The LDLR(-/-) mice had a marked elevation in apoB-100 and a modest increase in apoB-48. In contrast, the apoE(-/-) mice had a marked elevation in apoB-48 but not in apoB-100. The LDLR(-/-); apoE(-/-) double homozygotes had marked elevations of both apolipoproteins. The observation that apoB-48 increases more dramatically with apoE deficiency than with LDLR deficiency supports the notion that apoE binds to a second receptor in addition to the LDLR. This conclusion is also supported by the observation that superimposition of a LDLR deficiency onto an apoE deficiency [apoE(-/-); LDLR(-/-) double homozygotes] does not increase hypercholesterolemia beyond the level observed with apoE deficiency alone. Images PMID:8183926

  7. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 Protects Against Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yinyuan; Xian, Xunde; Holland, William L; Tsai, Shirling; Herz, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) is a multifunctional uptake receptor for chylomicron remnants in the liver. In vascular smooth muscle cells LRP1 controls reverse cholesterol transport through platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFR-β) trafficking and tyrosine kinase activity. Here we show that LRP1 regulates hepatic energy homeostasis by integrating insulin signaling with lipid uptake and secretion. Somatic inactivation of LRP1 in the liver (hLRP1KO) predisposes to diet-induced insulin resistance with dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis. On a high-fat diet, hLRP1KO mice develop a severe Metabolic Syndrome secondary to hepatic insulin resistance, reduced expression of insulin receptors on the hepatocyte surface and decreased glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) translocation. While LRP1 is also required for efficient cell surface insulin receptor expression in the absence of exogenous lipids, this latent state of insulin resistance is unmasked by exposure to fatty acids. This further impairs insulin receptor trafficking and results in increased hepatic lipogenesis, impaired fatty acid oxidation and reduced very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglyceride secretion. PMID:27322467

  8. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  9. Modeling of Corticosteroid Effects on Hepatic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors and Plasma Lipid Dynamics in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Anasuya; Pyszczynski, Nancy A.; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examines methylprednisolone (MPL) effects on the dynamics of hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mRNA and plasma lipids associated with increased risks for atherosclerosis. Materials and methods Normal male Wistar rats were given 50 mg/kg MPL intramuscularly (IM) and sacrificed at various times. Measurements included plasma MPL and CST, hepatic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA, cytosolic GR density and hepatic LDLR mRNA, and plasma total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), and triglycerides (TG). Results MPL showed bi-exponential disposition with two first-order absorption components. Hepatic GR and LDLR mRNA exhibited circadian patterns which were disrupted by MPL. Down-regulation in GR mRNA (40–50%) was followed by a delayed rebound phase. LDLR mRNA exhibited transient down-regulation (60–70%). Cytosolic GR density was significantly suppressed but returned to baseline by 72 h. Plasma TC and LDLC showed increases (55 and 142%) at 12 h. A mechanistic receptor/gene pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed to describe CS effects on hepatic LDLR mRNA and plasma cholesterols. Conclusions Our PK/PD model was able to satisfactorily capture the MPL effects on hepatic LDLR, its relationship to various plasma cholesterols, and builds the foundation to explore this area in the future. PMID:17674160

  10. N-Succinyl-chitosan nanoparticles coupled with low-density lipoprotein for targeted osthole-loaded delivery to low-density lipoprotein receptor-rich tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-ge; Zhu, Qiao-ling; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Yang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yuan, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Shu-di; Zhou, Xiao-feng; Zhu, Ai-jun; Zhang, Xue-nong; Jin, Yong

    2014-01-01

    N-Succinyl-chitosan (NSC) was synthesized and NSC nanoparticles (NPs) with loaded osthole (Ost) (Ost/NSC-NPs) were prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion. Subsequently, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-mediated NSC-NPs with loaded Ost (Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs) were obtained by coupling LDL with Ost/NSC-NPs through amide linkage. The average particle size of Ost/NSC-NPs was approximately 145 nm, the entrapment efficiency was 78.28%±2.06%, and the drug-loading amount was 18.09%±0.17%. The release of Ost from Ost/NSC-NPs in vitro showed a more evident sustained effect than the native material. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs was only 16.23% that of the free Ost at 24 hours in HepG2 cells. Ost inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation by arresting cells in the synthesis phase of the cell cycle and by triggering apoptosis. Cellular uptake and subcellular localization in vitro and near-infrared fluorescence real-time imaging in vivo showed that Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs had high targeting efficacy. Therefore, LDL-NSC-NPs are a promising system for targeted Ost delivery to liver tumor. PMID:24966673

  11. N-Succinyl-chitosan nanoparticles coupled with low-density lipoprotein for targeted osthole-loaded delivery to low-density lipoprotein receptor-rich tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-ge; Zhu, Qiao-ling; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Yang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yuan, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Shu-di; Zhou, Xiao-feng; Zhu, Ai-jun; Zhang, Xue-nong; Jin, Yong

    2014-01-01

    N-Succinyl-chitosan (NSC) was synthesized and NSC nanoparticles (NPs) with loaded osthole (Ost) (Ost/NSC-NPs) were prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion. Subsequently, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-mediated NSC-NPs with loaded Ost (Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs) were obtained by coupling LDL with Ost/NSC-NPs through amide linkage. The average particle size of Ost/NSC-NPs was approximately 145 nm, the entrapment efficiency was 78.28%±2.06%, and the drug-loading amount was 18.09%±0.17%. The release of Ost from Ost/NSC-NPs in vitro showed a more evident sustained effect than the native material. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs was only 16.23% that of the free Ost at 24 hours in HepG2 cells. Ost inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation by arresting cells in the synthesis phase of the cell cycle and by triggering apoptosis. Cellular uptake and subcellular localization in vitro and near-infrared fluorescence real-time imaging in vivo showed that Ost/LDL-NSC-NPs had high targeting efficacy. Therefore, LDL-NSC-NPs are a promising system for targeted Ost delivery to liver tumor. PMID:24966673

  12. Low-Density Lipoprotein Apheresis

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the effectiveness and safety of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis performed with the heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL precipitation (HELP) system for the treatment of patients with refractory homozygous (HMZ) and heterozygous (HTZ) familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Background on Familial Hypercholesterolemia Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic autosomal dominant disorder that is caused by several mutations in the LDL-receptor gene. The reduced number or absence of functional LDL receptors results in impaired hepatic clearance of circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) particles, which results in extremely high levels of LDL-C in the bloodstream. Familial hypercholesterolemia is characterized by excess LDL-C deposits in tendons and arterial walls, early onset of atherosclerotic disease, and premature cardiac death. Familial hypercholesterolemia occurs in both HTZ and HMZ forms. Heterozygous FH is one of the most common monogenic metabolic disorders in the general population, occurring in approximately 1 in 500 individuals1. Nevertheless, HTZ FH is largely undiagnosed and an accurate diagnosis occurs in only about 15% of affected patients in Canada. Thus, it is estimated that there are approximately 3,800 diagnosed and 21,680 undiagnosed cases of HTZ FH in Ontario. In HTZ FH patients, half of the LDL receptors do not work properly or are absent, resulting in plasma LDL-C levels 2- to 3-fold higher than normal (range 7-15mmol/L or 300-500mg/dL). Most HTZ FH patients are not diagnosed until middle age when either they or one of their siblings present with symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). Without lipid-lowering treatment, 50% of males die before the age of 50 and 25% of females die before the age of 60, from myocardial infarction or sudden death. In contrast to the HTZ form, HMZ FH is rare (occurring in 1 case per million persons) and more severe, with a 6- to 8-fold elevation in plasma LDL

  13. A G protein-coupled receptor with low density lipoprotein-binding motifs suggests a role for lipoproteins in G-linked signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Tensen, C P; Van Kesteren, E R; Planta, R J; Cox, K J; Burke, J F; van Heerikhuizen, H; Vreugdenhil, E

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated and analyzed a cDNA from the central nervous system of the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis encoding a putative receptor, which might be a natural hybrid between two different classes of receptor proteins. Preceded by a signal peptide, two types of repeated sequences are present in the N-terminal part of the protein. The first repeat displays a high sequence similarity to the extracellular binding domains of the low density lipoprotein receptor, which binds and internalizes cholesterol-containing apolipoproteins. The second repeat and the C-terminal part of the Lymnaea receptor are very similar to regions of a specific class of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors, the mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptors. The mRNA encoding the receptor is predominantly expressed in a small number of neurons within the central nervous system and to a lesser extent in the heart. Images PMID:8197140

  14. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  15. mRNA for low density lipoprotein receptor in brain and spinal cord of immature and mature rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, S.L.; Russell, D.W.; Goldstein, J.L.; Brown, M.S.

    1987-09-01

    Hybridization studies with (/sup 32/P)cDNA probes revealed detectable amounts of mRNA for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in the central nervous system (CNS) of rabbits. mRNA levels were highest in the medulla/pons and spinal cord, which were the most heavily myelinated regions that were studied. Lower, but detectable levels were present in cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, and cerebellum. In the medulla/pons and spinal cord, the levels of receptor mRNA were in a range comparable to that detected in the liver. The levels of receptor mRNA in whole brain were constant from 3 days of age to adulthood and, thus, did not vary in proportion to the rate of myelin synthesis. LDL receptor mRNA in the CNS was produced by the same gene that produced the liver and adrenal mRNA as revealed by the demonstration of a deletion in the neural mRNA of Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits identical to the deletion in the LDL receptor gene of these mutant animals. Using antibodies directed against the bovine LDL receptor, the authors showed that LDL receptor protein is present in the medulla/pons of adult cows. The cell types that express LDL receptors in the CNS and the functions of these receptors are unknown.

  16. Initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is unaffected but endocytosis is delayed in mice lacking the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Herz, J; Qiu, S Q; Oesterle, A; DeSilva, H V; Shafi, S; Havel, R J

    1995-01-01

    Two endocytic receptors, the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein (LRP), are thought to act in concert in the hepatic uptake of partially metabolized dietary lipoproteins, the chylomicron remnants. We have evaluated the role of these two receptors in the hepatic metabolism of chylomicron remnants in normal mice and in LDLR-deficient [LDLR (-/-)] mice. The rate of chylomicron remnant removal by the liver was normal up to 30 min after intravenous injection of chylomicrons into LDLR (-/-) mice and was unaffected by receptor-associated protein (RAP), a potent inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP. In contrast, endocytosis of the remnants by the hepatocytes, measured by their accumulation in the endosomal fraction and by the rate of hydrolysis of component cholesteryl esters, was dramatically reduced in the absence of the LDLR. Coadministration of RAP prevented the continuing hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants in LDL (-/-) mice after 30 min, consistent with blockade of the slow endocytosis by a RAP-sensitive process. Taken together with previous studies, our results are consistent with a model in which the initial hepatic removal of chylomicron remnants is primarily mediated by mechanisms that do not include LDLR or LRP, possibly involving glycosaminoglycan-bound hepatic lipase and apolipoprotein E. After the remnants bind to these alternative sites on the hepatocyte surface, endocytosis is predominantly mediated by the LDLR and also by a slower and less efficient backup process that is RAP sensitive and therefore most likely involves LRP. PMID:7753850

  17. Antagonism of Secreted PCSK9 Increases Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression in HepG2 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, Markey C.; Kwon, Hyock Joo; Chen, Chiyuan; Chen, Justin R.; Horton, Jay D.; Lagace, Thomas A.

    2009-07-10

    PCSK9 is a secreted protein that degrades low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) in liver by binding to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain of the LDLR. It is not known whether PCSK9 causes degradation of LDLRs within the secretory pathway or following secretion and reuptake via endocytosis. Here we show that a mutation in the LDLR EGF-A domain associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, H306Y, results in increased sensitivity to exogenous PCSK9-mediated cellular degradation because of enhanced PCSK9 binding affinity. The crystal structure of the PCSK9-EGF-A(H306Y) complex shows that Tyr-306 forms a hydrogen bond with Asp-374 in PCSK9 at neutral pH, which strengthens the interaction with PCSK9. To block secreted PCSK9 activity, LDLR (H306Y) subfragments were added to the medium of HepG2 cells stably overexpressing wild-type PCSK9 or gain-of-function PCSK9 mutants associated with hypercholesterolemia (D374Y or S127R). These subfragments blocked secreted PCSK9 binding to cell surface LDLRs and resulted in the recovery of LDLR levels to those of control cells. We conclude that PCSK9 acts primarily as a secreted factor to cause LDLR degradation. These studies support the concept that pharmacological inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR interaction extracellularly will increase hepatic LDLR expression and lower plasma low density lipoprotein levels.

  18. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and amyloid-β clearance in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Bu, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain trigger the development of progressive neurodegeneration and dementia associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Perturbation in Aβ clearance, rather than Aβ production, is likely the cause of sporadic, late-onset AD, which accounts for the majority of AD cases. Since cellular uptake and subsequent degradation constitute a major Aβ clearance pathway, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of Aβ has been intensely investigated. Among Aβ receptors, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is one of the most studied receptors. LRP1 is a large endocytic receptor for more than 40 ligands, including apolipoprotein E, α2-macroglobulin and Aβ. Emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that LRP1 is critically involved in brain Aβ clearance. LRP1 is highly expressed in a variety of cell types in the brain including neurons, vascular cells and glial cells, where LRP1 functions to maintain brain homeostasis and control Aβ metabolism. LRP1-mediated endocytosis regulates cellular Aβ uptake by binding to Aβ either directly or indirectly through its co-receptors or ligands. Furthermore, LRP1 regulates several signaling pathways, which also likely influences Aβ endocytic pathways. In this review, we discuss how LRP1 regulates the brain Aβ clearance and how this unique endocytic receptor participates in AD pathogenesis. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying LRP1-mediated Aβ clearance should enable the rational design of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for AD. PMID:24904407

  19. Expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4) gene in the mouse germ cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yasuka L; Tanaka, Satomi S; Kasa, Miyuki; Yasuda, Kunio; Tam, Patrick P L; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2006-08-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 gene (Lrp4) was identified by subtractive screening of cDNAs of the migratory primordial germ cells (PGCs) of E8.5-9.5 embryo and E3.5 blastocysts. Lrp4 is expressed in PGCs in the hindgut and the dorsal mesentery of E9.5 embryos, and in germ cells in the genital ridges of male and female E10.5-13.5 embryos. Lrp4 is also expressed in spermatogonia of the neonatal and adult testes and in the immature oocytes and follicular cells of the adult ovary. The absence of Lrp4 expression in the blastocyst, embryonic stem cells and embryonic germ cells suggests the Lrp4 is a molecular marker that distinguishes the germ cells from embryo-derived pluripotent stem cells. PMID:16434236

  20. beta-Hydroxyaspartic acid or beta-hydroxyasparagine in bovine low density lipoprotein receptor and in bovine thrombomodulin.

    PubMed

    Stenflo, J; Ohlin, A K; Owen, W G; Schneider, W J

    1988-01-01

    All of the vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins with domains that are homologous to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) precursor have 1 hydroxylated aspartic acid residue in the NH2-terminal EGF-homology region. In addition, protein S has 1 hydroxylated asparagine residue in each of the three COOH-terminal EGF-homology regions. All of these proteins have been found to have the amino acid sequence, CX(D or N)XXXX(F or Y)XCXC (corresponding to residues 20 to 33 in EGF), where the Asp or Asn residue is hydroxylated. This sequence also appears in two of the three EGF-homology regions of the human low density lipoprotein receptor and in two of the six EGF-homology regions of bovine thrombomodulin so far identified, suggesting that they may have the modified amino acid. We have now identified beta-hydroxyaspartic acid in acid hydrolysates of both these proteins. PMID:2826439

  1. Low density lipoprotein receptor-independent hepatic uptake of a synthetic, cholesterol-scavenging lipoprotein: implications for the treatment of receptor-deficient atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Rahman, I.U.; Donnelly, T.M.; Parker, T.S.; Weinrauch, M.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The metabolism of infused /sup 111/In-labeled phospholipid liposomes was examined in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, which lack low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and in normal control rabbits. The half-times (t/sub 1/2/) for clearance of /sup 111/In and excess phospholipid from plasma were 20.8 +/- 0.9 hr and 20.3 +/- 4.6 hr in WHHL and 20.0 +/- 0.8 hr and 19.6 +/- 2.2 hr in the normal rabbits. By 6 hr postinfusion, the plasma concentration of unesterified cholesterol increased by 2.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter in WHHL and 2.1 +/- 0.04 mmol/liter in normal rabbits, presumably reflecting mobilization of tissue sores. Disappearance of excess plasma cholesterol was > 90% complete in both groups of rabbits by 70 hr postinfusion. By quantitative ..gamma.. camera imaging, hepatic trapping of /sup 111/In-labeled liposomes over time was indistinguishable between the two groups. At autopsy, the liver was the major organ of clearance. Aortic uptake of /sup 111/In was < 0.02%. Thus, mobilization of cholesterol and hepatic uptake of phospholipid liposomes do not require LDL receptors. Because phospholipid infusions produce rapid substantial regression of atherosclerosis in genetically normal animals, the results suggest that phospholipid liposomes or triglyceride phospholipid emulsions (e.g., Intralipid) might reduce atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and in humans with familial hypercholesterolemia.

  2. Selective uptake of a toxic lipophilic anthracycline derivative by the low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway in cultured fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vitols, S.G.; Masquelier, M.; Peterson, C.O.

    1985-04-01

    N-(N-Retinoyl)-L-leucyldoxorubicin 14-linoleate (r11-DOX), a new lipophilic derivative of doxorubicin, was synthesized and incorporated into low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The drug-LDL complex contained 100- 200 drug molecules/LDL particle. When cultured normal human fibroblasts were incubated with /sup 125/I-LDL-incorporated drug, there was a perfect correlation between the cellular uptake plus degradation of /sup 125/I-LDL and the cellular drug accumulation. The presence of excess native LDL inhibited the cellular uptake and degradation of /sup 125/I-LDL and the drug accumulation to the same extent. In contrast, methylated LDL, which does not bind to the LDL receptor, did not alter the cellular uptake and degradation of /sup 125/I-LDL nor did it alter the drug accumulation. When LDL receptor negative fibroblasts from a patient with the homozygous form of familial hypercholesterolemia were incubated with the drug-/sup 125/I-LDL complex, cellular drug accumulation was very low. The drug-LDL complex inhibited the growth of cultured normal human fibroblasts. The drug incorporated into methylated LDL was much less toxic. These findings suggest that r11-DOX incorporated into LDL is delivered to cells selectively by the LDL receptor pathway. This might be of value in the treatment of leukemia, since it has been previously found that leukemic cells exhibit higher LDL receptor activity than white blood cells and bone marrow cells from healthy subjects.

  3. Adipose tissue deficiency results in severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in the low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengyu; Gao, Mingming; Liao, Jiawei; Qi, Yanfei; Du, Ximing; Wang, Yuhui; Li, Ling; Liu, George; Yang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    Adipose tissue can store over 50% of whole-body cholesterol; however, the physiological role of adipose tissue in cholesterol metabolism and atherogenesis has not been directly assessed. Here, we examined lipoprotein metabolism and atherogenesis in a unique mouse model of severe lipodystrophy: the Seipin(-/-) mice, and also in mice deficient in both low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) and Seipin: the Ldlr(-/-)Seipin(-/-) mice. Plasma cholesterol was moderately increased in the Seipin(-/-) mice when fed an atherogenic diet. Strikingly, plasma cholesterol reached ~6000 mg/dl in the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice on an atherogenic diet, as compared to ~1000 mg/dl in the Ldlr(-/-) mice on the same diet. The Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice also developed spontaneous atherosclerosis on chow diet and severe atherosclerosis on an atherogenic diet. Rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the hypercholesterolemia of the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice, and also alleviated the severity of atherosclerosis. Our results provide direct evidence, for the first time, that the adipose tissue plays a critical role in the clearance of plasma cholesterol. Our results also reveal a previously unappreciated strong link between adipose tissue and LDLR in plasma cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26921684

  4. Piperine Induces Hepatic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression through Proteolytic Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Ayasa; Miyata, Shingo; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR) uptakes plasma lipoproteins and lowers plasma LDL cholesterol, the activation of LDLR is a promising drug target for atherosclerosis. In the present study, we identified the naturally occurring alkaloid piperine, as an inducer of LDLR gene expression by screening the effectors of human LDLR promoter. The treatment of HepG2 cells with piperine increased LDLR expression at mRNA and protein levels and stimulated LDL uptake. Subsequent luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the mutation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-binding element abolished the piperine-mediated induction of LDLR promoter activity. Further, piperine treatments increased mRNA levels of several SREBP targets and mature forms of SREBPs. However, the piperine-mediated induction of the mature forms of SREBPs was not observed in SRD–15 cells, which lack insulin-induced gene–1 (Insig–1) and Insig–2. Finally, the knockdown of SREBPs completely abolished the piperine-meditated induction of LDLR gene expression in HepG2 cells, indicating that piperine stimulates the proteolytic activation of SREBP and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity. PMID:26431033

  5. Low density lipoprotein receptor-independent hepatic uptake of a synthetic, cholesterol-scavenging lipoprotein: implications for the treatment of receptor-deficient atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K J; Vallabhajosula, S; Rahman, I U; Donnelly, T M; Parker, T S; Weinrauch, M; Goldsmith, S J

    1988-01-01

    The metabolism of infused 111In-labeled phospholipid liposomes was examined in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits, which lack low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and in normal control rabbits. The half-times (t1/2) for clearance of 111In and excess phospholipid from plasma were 20.8 +/- 0.9 hr and 20.3 +/- 4.6 hr in WHHL and 20.0 +/- 0.8 hr and 19.6 +/- 2.2 hr in the normal rabbits (means +/- SEM; n = 4). By 6 hr postinfusion, the plasma concentration of unesterified cholesterol increased by 2.2 +/- 0.23 mmol/liter in WHHL and 2.1 +/- 0.04 mmol/liter in normal rabbits, presumably reflecting mobilization of tissue stores. Disappearance of excess plasma cholesterol was greater than 90% complete in both groups of rabbits by 70 hr postinfusion. By quantitative gamma camera imaging, hepatic trapping of 111In-labeled liposomes over time was indistinguishable between the two groups. At autopsy, the liver was the major organ of clearance, acquiring 22.0% +/- 1.7% (WHHL) and 16.8% +/- 1.0% (normal of total 111In. Aortic uptake of 111In was less than 0.02%. Thus, mobilization of cholesterol and hepatic uptake of phospholipid liposomes do not require LDL receptors. Because phospholipid infusions produce rapid substantial regression of atherosclerosis in genetically normal animals, our results suggest that phospholipid liposomes or triglyceride phospholipid emulsions (e.g., Intralipid) might reduce atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and in humans with familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:3422421

  6. Clinical expression in heterozygotes of two frequent low density lipoprotein receptor gene mutations in the French Canadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, M.; Minnich, A.; Davignon, J.

    1994-09-01

    Five mutations in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (R) gene account for approximately 83% of cases of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (hFH) in French Canadians in Quebec. The two most prevalent mutations are a >10kb deletion (10kb) of the promoter region resulting in a null allele (60.5% of cases) and a trp{sub 66}{r_arrow}gly missense mutation in exon 3 (ex3) resulting in a binding-defective R (11.7%). We have compared the phenotypic expression of these two mutations in 427 10kb hFH patients, 239 women (age 37.5 {plus_minus} 14.2 years) and 188 men (33.7 {plus_minus} 11.7) and 69 ex3 hFH patients, 42 women (40.6 {plus_minus} 14.3) and 27 men (36.8 {plus_minus}13.2). All data were analyzed separately for women and men. Tendon xanthomas were more prevalent in the 10kb (women 63%, men 68%) than in the ex3 patients (48%,48%). Total and LDL cholesterol were significantly higher in the 10kb patients with than without xanthomas but similar in ex3 patients. There were no significant differences in plasma lipoprotein concentrations between 10kb and ex3 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) or between 10kb and ex3 patients without CAD. Among men with CAD, those with 10kb were significantly younger than those with ex3 (39.6 {plus_minus} 9.8, n=93 and 46.4 {plus_minus} 7.0, n=9, respectively). In both sexes, high plasma lipoprotein concentrations conferred an increased risk of CAD in 10kb but not in ex3 patients. Thus, as in homozygotes (previous study), the >10kb deletion is associated with more severe expression of FH than is the exon 3 mutation, although the plasma lipoprotein concentrations are not significantly different between the 10kb and ex3 heterozygotes. Since in homozygotes plasma cholesterol levels in 10kb are 60% higher than in ex3 patients, these observations suggest that the expression of the normal LDL-R allele compensates for the lack of a second allele in 10kb heterozygotes.

  7. Losartan attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury by suppression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wang; Deng, Yue; Deng, Jia; Wang, Dao-Xin; Zhang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recent study has shown that renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI) with high level of angiotensin II (AngII) generated form AngI catalyzed by angiotensin-converting enzyme. AngII plays a major effect mainly through AT1 receptor. Therefore, we speculate inhibition of AT1 receptor may possibly attenuate the lung injury. Losartan, an antagonist of AT1 receptor for angiotensin II, attenuated lung injury by alleviation of the inflammation response in ALI, but the mechanism of losartan in ALI still remains unclear. Methods: Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Control group, ALI group (LPS), and Losartan group (LPS + Losartan). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were obtained for analysis. The expressions of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and caspase-3 were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. Results: In ALI group, TNF-α and protein level in BALF, MPO activity in lung tissue, pulmonary edema and lung injury were significantly increased. Losartan significantly reduced LPS-induced increase in TNF-α and protein level in BALF, MPO activity, pulmonary edema and lung injury in LPS-induced lung injury. The mRNA and protein expression levels of LOX-1 were significantly decreased with the administration of losartan in LPS-induced lung injury. Also, losartan blocked the protein levels of caspase-3 and ICAM-1 mediated by LOX-1 in LPS-induced lung injury. Conclusions: Losartan attenuated lung injury by alleviation of the inflammation and cell apoptosis by inhibition of LOX-1 in LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:26884836

  8. Low pH-Triggered Beta-Propeller Switch of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Assists Rhinovirus Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Konecsni, Tuende; Berka, Ursula; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Bilek, Gerhard; Khan, Abdul Ghafoor; Gajdzig, Leszek; Fuchs, Renate; Blaas, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Minor group human rhinoviruses (HRVs) bind three members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family: LDLR proper, very-LDLR (VLDLR) and LDLR-related protein (LRP). Whereas ICAM-1, the receptor of major group HRVs actively contributes to viral uncoating, LDLRs are rather considered passive vehicles for cargo delivery to the low-pH environment of endosomes. Since the Tyr-Trp-Thr-Asp β-propeller domain of LDLR has been shown to be involved in the dissociation of bound LDL via intramolecular competition at low pH, we studied whether it also plays a role in HRV infection. Human cell lines deficient in LDLR family proteins are not available. Therefore, we used CHO-ldla7 cells that lack endogenous LDLR. These were stably transfected to express either wild-type (wt) human LDLR or a mutant with a deletion of the β-propeller. When HRV2 was attached to the propeller-negative LDLR, a lower pH was required for conversion to subviral particles than when attached to wt LDLR. This indicates that high-avidity receptor binding maintains the virus in its native conformation. HRV2 internalization directed the mutant LDLR but not wt LDLR to lysosomes, resulting in reduced plasma membrane expression of propeller-negative LDLR. Infection assays using a CHO-adapted HRV2 variant showed a delay in intracellular viral conversion and de novo viral synthesis in cells expressing the truncated LDLR. Our data indicate that the β-propeller attenuates the virus-stabilizing effect of LDLR binding and thereby facilitates RNA release from endosomes, resulting in the enhancement of infection. This is a nice example of a virus exploiting high-avidity multimodule receptor binding with an intrinsic release mechanism. PMID:19706701

  9. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Proteins in a Novel Mechanism of Axon Guidance and Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Landowski, Lila M; Pavez, Macarena; Brown, Lachlan S; Gasperini, Robert; Taylor, Bruce V; West, Adrian K; Foa, Lisa

    2016-01-15

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein receptors 1 and 2 (LRP1 and LRP2) are emerging as important cell signaling mediators in modulating neuronal growth and repair. We examined whether LRP1 and LRP2 are able to mediate a specific aspect of neuronal growth: axon guidance. We sought to identify LRP1 and LRP2 ligands that could induce axonal chemoattraction, which might have therapeutic potential. Using embryonic sensory neurons (rat dorsal root ganglia) in a growth cone turning assay, we tested a range of LRP1 and LRP2 ligands for the ability to guide growth cone navigation. Three ligands were chemorepulsive: α-2-macroglobulin, tissue plasminogen activator, and metallothionein III. Conversely, only one LRP ligand, metallothionein II, was found to be chemoattractive. Chemoattraction toward a gradient of metallothionein II was calcium-dependent, required the expression of both LRP1 and LRP2, and likely involves further co-receptors such as the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor. The potential for LRP-mediated chemoattraction to mediate axonal regeneration was examined in vivo in a model of chemical denervation in adult rats. In these in vivo studies, metallothionein II was shown to enhance epidermal nerve fiber regeneration so that it was complete within 7 days compared with 14 days in saline-treated animals. Our data demonstrate that both LRP1 and LRP2 are necessary for metallothionein II-mediated chemotactic signal transduction and that they may form part of a signaling complex. Furthermore, the data suggest that LRP-mediated chemoattraction represents a novel, non-classical signaling system that has therapeutic potential as a disease-modifying agent for the injured peripheral nervous system. PMID:26598525

  10. LRP6 Protein Regulates Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor-mediated LDL Uptake*

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhi-jia; Go, Gwang-Woong; Singh, Rajvir; Liu, Wenzhong; Keramati, Ali Reza; Mani, Arya

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variations in LRP6 gene are associated with high serum LDL cholesterol levels. We have previously shown that LDL clearance in peripheral B-lymphocytes of the LRP6R611C mutation carriers is significantly impaired. In this study we have examined the role of wild type LRP6 (LRP6WT) and LRP6R611C in LDL receptor (LDLR)-mediated LDL uptake. LDL binding and uptake were increased when LRP6WT was overexpressed and modestly reduced when it was knocked down in LDLR-deficient CHO (ldlA7) cells. These findings implicated LRP6 in LDLR-independent cellular LDL binding and uptake. However, LRP6 knockdown in wild type CHO cells resulted in a much greater decline in LDL binding and uptake compared with CHO-ldlA7 cells, suggesting impaired function of the LDLR. LDLR internalization was severely diminished when LRP6 was knocked down and was restored after LRP6 was reintroduced. Further analysis revealed that LRP6WT forms a complex with LDLR, clathrin, and ARH and undergoes a clathrin-mediated internalization after stimulation with LDL. LDLR and LRP6 internalizations as well as LDL uptake were all impaired in CHO-k1 cells expressing LRP6R611C. These studies identify LRP6 as a critical modulator of receptor-mediated LDL endocytosis and introduce a mechanism by which variation in LRP6 may contribute to high serum LDL levels. PMID:22128165

  11. Pharmaceutical stabilization of mast cells attenuates experimental atherogenesis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Sjöberg, Sara; Tia, Viviane; Secco, Blandine; Chen, Han; Yang, Min; Sukhova, Galina K.; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) contribute to atherogenesis by releasing pro-inflammatory mediators to activate vascular cells and other inflammatory cells. This study examined whether MC activation or stabilization affects diet-induced atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr−/−) mice. When Ldlr−/− mice consumed an atherogenic diet for 3 or 6 months, MC activation with compound 48/80 (C48/80) increased aortic arch intima and total lesion areas, and plasma total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride levels, whereas MC stabilization with cromolyn reduced these parameters. There were significant differences in arch intima and total lesion areas, and plasma total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride levels between C48/80-treated and cromolyn-treated mice. To examine a therapeutic application of cromolyn in atherosclerosis, we fed Ldlr−/− mice an atherogenic diet for 3 months followed by giving mice cromolyn for additional 3 months. Cromolyn did not affect aortic arch intima area, but significantly reduced lipid deposition in the thoracic-abdominal aortas. In aortic arches, however, cromolyn treatment significantly reduced lesion contents of Mac-3+ macrophages, CD4+ T cells, activated MCs, and lesion cell proliferation. While plasma total cholesterol and LDL levels increased and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels decreased from 3 months to 6 months of an atherogenic diet, cromolyn treatment decreased significantly plasma total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride levels and increased HDL levels above those of 3-month time point. These observations demonstrate that MC stabilization reduces lesion inflammation, ameliorates plasma lipid profiles, and may serve as a potential therapy for this cardiovascular disease. PMID:23880180

  12. Ethanol extract of propolis protects endothelial cells from oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced injury by inhibiting lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yongqi; Li, Jinguo; Ding, Mingde; Xu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jiajun; Jiao, Peng; Han, Ping; Wang, Jiafu; Yao, Shutong

    2014-12-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), as the primary oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) receptor on endothelial cells, plays a crucial role in endothelial injury, which is a driving force in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Our previous studies have shown that ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion development. However, the protective effects of EEP against ox-LDL-induced injury in endothelial cells and the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that EEP attenuates ox-LDL-induced endothelial oxidative injury via modulation of LOX-1-mediated oxidative stress. Our results showed that exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to ox-LDL (100 mg/L) led to the decrease in cell viability and increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptosis, whereas pretreatment with EEP (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/L) protected against such damages in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, EEP mitigated ox-LDL uptake by HUVECs and attenuated ox-LDL-upregulated LOX-1 expression both at the mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, EEP suppressed the ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress as assessed by decreased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) generation as well as increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Similar results were observed in the anti-LOX-1 antibody or diphenyleneiodonium (DPI)-pretreated HUVECs. These data indicate that EEP may protect HUVECs from ox-LDL-induced injury and that the mechanism at least partially involves its ability to inhibit endothelial LOX-1 upregulation and subsequent oxidative stress. PMID:24962173

  13. Dysregulation of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Pathway Is Involved in Lipid Disorder-Mediated Organ Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Ma, Kun Ling; Ruan, Xiong Zhong; Liu, Bi Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is a negative feedback system that plays important roles in the regulation of plasma and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. To maintain a cholesterol homeostasis, LDLR expression is tightly regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) and SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) in transcriptional level and by proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in posttranscriptional level. The dysregulation of LDLR expression results in abnormal lipid accumulation in cells and tissues, such as vascular smooth muscle cells, hepatic cells, renal mesangial cells, renal tubular cells and podocytes. It has been demonstrated that inflammation, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation, and hyperglycemia induce the disruption of LDLR pathway, which might contribute to lipid disorder-mediated organ injury (atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, kidney fibrosis, etc). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a critical mediator in the disruption of LDLR pathway caused by pathogenic factors. The mTOR complex1 activation upregulates LDLR expression at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, consequently resulting in lipid deposition. This paper mainly reviews the mechanisms for the dysregulation of LDLR pathway and its roles in lipid disorder-mediated organ injury under various pathogenic conditions. Understanding these mechanisms leading to the abnormality of LDLR expression contributes to find potential new drug targets in lipid disorder-mediated diseases. PMID:27019638

  14. Human prostate cancer cells lack feedback regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and its regulator, SREBP2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Hughes-Fulford, M

    2001-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway provides cells with essential fatty acids for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. Regulation of LDLR expression by LDL was compared between the human normal and cancer prostate cells using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and LDL uptake assays. LDLR mRNA expression and LDL uptake by LDLR were down-regulated in the presence of exogenous LDL or whole serum in the normal prostate cells, but not in the prostate cancer cells. Addition of exogenous cholesterol down-regulated both LDLR and a potent regulator of the ldlr promoter, sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP2), in normal cells but not in cancer cells. PGE2 synthesis in prostate cancer cells was significantly increased in response to LDL. Our study suggests that over-production of LDLR is an important mechanism in cancer cells for obtaining more essential fatty acids through LDLR endocytosis, allowing increased synthesis of prostaglandins, which subsequently stimulate cell growth. The data also suggest that the sterol regulatory element and SREBP2 play a role in the loss of sterol feedback regulation in cancer cells. PMID:11149418

  15. Mutations in the very low-density lipoprotein receptor VLDLR cause cerebellar hypoplasia and quadrupedal locomotion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Tayfun; Akarsu, Nurten; Uz, Elif; Caglayan, Safak; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Onat, Onur Emre; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner

    2008-01-01

    Quadrupedal gait in humans, also known as Unertan syndrome, is a rare phenotype associated with dysarthric speech, mental retardation, and varying degrees of cerebrocerebellar hypoplasia. Four large consanguineous kindreds from Turkey manifest this phenotype. In two families (A and D), shared homozygosity among affected relatives mapped the trait to a 1.3-Mb region of chromosome 9p24. This genomic region includes the VLDLR gene, which encodes the very low-density lipoprotein receptor, a component of the reelin signaling pathway involved in neuroblast migration in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Sequence analysis of VLDLR revealed nonsense mutation R257X in family A and single-nucleotide deletion c2339delT in family D. Both these mutations are predicted to lead to truncated proteins lacking transmembrane and signaling domains. In two other families (B and C), the phenotype is not linked to chromosome 9p. Our data indicate that mutations in VLDLR impair cerebrocerebellar function, conferring in these families a dramatic influence on gait, and that hereditary disorders associated with quadrupedal gait in humans are genetically heterogeneous. PMID:18326629

  16. Impairment of Nitrergic System and Delayed Gastric Emptying in Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) Deficient Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gangula, Pandu R.; Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; Hale, Ashley B.; Mukhopadhyay, Sutapa; Channon, Keith M.; Ravella, Kalpana

    2011-01-01

    Background In the current study, we have investigated whether low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice (LDLR-KO), moderate oxidative stress model and cholesteremia burden display gastroparesis and if so whether nitrergic system is involved in this setting. In addition, we have investigated if sepiapterin (SEP) supplementation attenuated impaired nitrergic system and delayed gastric emptying. Methods Gastric emptying and nitrergic relaxation were measured in overnight fasting mice. nNOSα dimerization, anti-oxidant markers such as Nrf2, GCLM, GCLC, HO-1, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD1) were measured using standard methods. Biopterin levels and intestinal transit time were measured using HPLC and dye migration assay, respectively. Wild type (WT) and LDLR-KO were supplemented with SEP. Key Results In LDLR null stomachs, 1) significant reduction in rate of gastric emptying, gastric pyloric and fundus nitrergic relaxation & nNOSα dimerization, 2) elevated oxidized biopterins and reduced ratio of BH4/BH2+B, 3) reduced Nrf2 and GCLC protein expression & no change in GCLM, HO-1, Cat, Sod1 and 4) accelerated small intestinal motility were noticed. Supplementation of SEP restored delayed gastric emptying, impaired pyloric and fundus nitrergic relaxation with restoration of nNOS dimerization and nNOS expression. Conclusions and Inferences This novel data suggests that hyperlipidemia and/or suppression of selective antioxidants may be a potential cause of developing gastroparesis in diabetic patients. PMID:21414103

  17. Kaempferol stimulates gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor through activation of Sp1 in cultured hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Ayasa; Miyata, Shingo; Iwase, Masamori; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2016-01-01

    A high level of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR) is essential for clearing plasma LDL cholesterol, activation of LDLR is a promising therapeutic target for patients with atherosclerotic disease. Here we demonstrated how the flavonoid kaempferol stimulated the gene expression and activity of LDLR in HepG2 cells. The kaempferol-mediated stimulation of LDLR gene expression was completely inhibited by knockdown of Sp1 gene expression. Treatment of HepG2 cells with kaempferol stimulated the recruitment of Sp1 to the promoter region of the LDLR gene, as well as the phosphorylation of Sp1 on Thr-453 and Thr-739. Moreover, these kaempferol-mediated processes were inhibited in the presence of U0126, an ERK pathway inhibitor. These results suggest that kaempferol may increase the activity of Sp1 through stimulation of Sp1 phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity. PMID:27109240

  18. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction improves the low density lipoprotein receptor gene expression in HepG{sub 2} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Dongping; Li Xiaoyu; Sun, Ping; Tang Yibo; Chen Xiuying; Chen Qi; Fan Leming . E-mail: lmfan@njmu.edu.cn; Zang Bin; Shao Lizheng; Li Xiaorong

    2006-05-05

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction had been employed in gene delivery and promised great potential. Liver has unique features that make it attractive for gene therapy. However, it poses formidable obstacles to hepatocyte-specific gene delivery. This study was designed to test the efficiency of therapeutic gene transfer and expression mediated by ultrasound/microbubble strategy in HepG{sub 2} cell line. Air-filled albumin microbubbles were prepared and mixed with plasmid DNA encoding low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and green fluorescent protein. The mixture of the DNA and microbubbles was administer to cultured HepG{sub 2} cells under variable ultrasound conditions. Transfection rate of the transferred gene and cell viability were assessed by FACS analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy, Western blot analysis and Trypan blue staining. The result demonstrated that microbubbles with ultrasound irradiation can significantly elevate exogenous LDLR gene expression and the expressed LDLRs were functional and active to uptake their ligands. We conclude that ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction has the potential to promote safe and efficient LDLR gene transfer into hepatocytes. With further refinement, it may represent an effective nonviral avenue of gene therapy for liver-involved genetic diseases.

  19. Very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) expression is a determinant factor in adipose tissue inflammation and adipocyte-macrophage interaction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew; Tao, Huan; Metrione, Michael; Hajri, Tahar

    2014-01-17

    Obesity is associated with adipose tissue remodeling, characterized by adipocyte hypertrophy and macrophage infiltration. Previously, we have shown that very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is virtually absent in preadipocytes but is strongly induced during adipogenesis and actively participates in adipocyte hypertrophy. In this study, we investigated the role of VLDLR in adipose tissue inflammation and adipocyte-macrophage interactions in wild type and VLDLR-deficient mice fed a high fat diet. The results show that VLDLR deficiency reduced high fat diet-induced inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in adipose tissue in conjunction with reduced macrophage infiltration, especially those expressing pro-inflammatory markers. In adipocyte culture, VLDLR deficiency prevented adipocyte hypertrophy and strongly reduced VLDL-induced ER stress and inflammation. Likewise, cultures of primary peritoneal macrophages show that VLDLR deficiency reduced lipid accumulation and inflammation but did not alter chemotactic response of macrophages to adipocyte signals. Moreover, VLDLR deficiency tempered the synergistic inflammatory interactions between adipocytes and macrophages in a co-culture system. Collectively, these results show that VLDLR contributes to adipose tissue inflammation and mediates VLDL-induced lipid accumulation and induction of inflammation and ER stress in adipocytes and macrophages. PMID:24293365

  20. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates inflammatory cytokine secretion in smooth muscle cells induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Zhang, Xiao Jie; Cao, Li Juan; Liu, Xin He; Liu, Zhu Hui; Wang, Xiao Qun; Chen, Qiu Jin; Lu, Lin; Shen, Wei Feng; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-regulated secretion of inflammatory cytokines in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is regarded as an important step in the progression of atherosclerosis; however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in oxLDL-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in SMCs both in vivo and in vitro. We found that the levels of TLR4, interleukin 1-β (IL1-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression were increased in the SMCs of atherosclerotic plaques in patients with femoral artery stenosis. In cultured primary arterial SMCs from wild type mice, oxLDL caused dose- and time-dependent increase in the expression levels of TLR4 and cytokines. These effects were significantly weakened in arterial SMCs derived from TLR4 knockout mice (TLR4-/-). Moreover, the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was blocked by TLR4-specific antibodies in primary SMCs. Ox-LDL induced activation of p38 and NFκB was also inhibited in TLR4-/- primary SMCs or when treated with TLR4-specific antibodies. These results demonstrated that TLR4 is a crucial mediator in oxLDL-induced inflammatory cytokine expression and secretion, and p38 and NFκB activation. PMID:24755612

  1. Chronic Aerobic Exercise Decreases Lectin-Like Low Density Lipoprotein (LOX-1) Receptor Expression in Heart of Diabetic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Simin; Mohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Sobhani, Vahid; Ababzadeh, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Background: Overexpression of lectin-like low density lipoprotein (LOX-1) receptor plays an important role in hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications such as atherosclerosis. Based on the beneficial effects of exercise on preventing cardiovascular complications of diabetes, we aimed to examine the protective effects of aerobic exercise on expression of LOX-1 receptor and production of free radicals in the heart of diabetic rats. Methods: Four groups of rats were used: (n = 5 per group): sedentary normal, trained normal, sedentary diabetes and trained diabetes. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). The exercise protocol was consisted of swimming 30 min/day, 5 days/week for eight weeks. Plasma glucose was evaluated at initiation, weeks 4 and 8 of experiment. At the end of experiment, rats were sacrificed and the heart was removed for determination of nitrate, malondialdehyde, and LOX-1 gene expression. Results: In normal non-diabetic rats, the blood glucose level was <150 mg/dl; however, the induction of diabetes resulted in levels more than >400 mg/dl. Gene expression of LOX-1 was increased in the heart of diabetic rats. Exercise reduced the gene expression of this protein in diabetic states without reducing the blood glucose. Finally, swimming exercise decreased the malondialdehyde and nitrate levels in heart tissue both in control and diabetic rats. Conclusion: Swimming exercise reduces heart expression of the LOX-1 receptor in accompany with reduction of free radicals production. Since these parameters are important in generation of diabetic complications, swimming exercise is a good candidate for reducing these complications. PMID:26432573

  2. FcgammaRIIB inhibits the development of atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Wigren, Maria; Dunér, Pontus; Kolbus, Daniel; Olofsson, Katarina E; Björkbacka, Harry; Nilsson, Jan; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin

    2010-03-01

    The immune processes associated with atherogenesis have received considerable attention during recent years. IgG FcRs (FcgammaR) are involved in activating the immune system and in maintaining peripheral tolerance. However, the role of the inhibitory IgG receptor FcgammaRIIB in atherosclerosis has not been defined. Bone marrow cells from FcgammaRIIB-deficient mice and C57BL/6 control mice were transplanted to low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice. Atherosclerosis was induced by feeding the recipient mice a high-fat diet for 8 wk and evaluated using Oil Red O staining of the descending aorta at sacrifice. The molecular mechanisms triggering atherosclerosis was studied by examining splenic B and T cells, as well as Th1 and Th2 immune responses using flow cytometry and ELISA. The atherosclerotic lesion area in the descending aorta was ~5-fold larger in mice lacking FcgammaRIIB than in control mice (2.75 +/- 2.57 versus 0.44 +/- 0.42%; p < 0.01). Moreover, the FcgammaRIIB deficiency resulted in an amplified splenocyte proliferative response to Con A stimulation (proliferation index 30.26 +/- 8.81 versus 2.96 +/- 0.81%, p < 0.0001) and an enhanced expression of MHC class II on the B cells (6.65 +/- 0.64 versus 2.33 +/- 0.25%; p < 0.001). In accordance, an enlarged amount of CD25-positive CD4 T cells was found in the spleen (42.74 +/- 4.05 versus 2.45 +/- 0.31%; p < 0.0001). The plasma Ab and cytokine pattern suggested increased Th1 and Th2 immune responses, respectively. These results show that FcgammaRIIB inhibits the development of atherosclerosis in mice. In addition, they indicate that absence of the inhibiting IgG receptor cause disease, depending on an imbalance of activating and inhibiting immune cells. PMID:20097865

  3. Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection on post-transcriptional regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease is suggested to increase the risk of atherothrombotic disease by inducing dyslipidemia. Recently, we demonstrated that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), which is known to play a critical role in the regulation of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, is elevated in periodontitis patients. However, the underlying mechanisms of elevation of PCSK9 in periodontitis patients are largely unknown. Here, we explored whether Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative periodontopathic bacterium, -induced inflammatory response regulates serum PCSK9 and cholesterol levels using animal models. Methods We infected C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally with Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative strain of periodontopathic bacteria, and evaluated serum PCSK9 levels and the serum lipid profile. PCSK9 and LDL receptor (LDLR) gene and protein expression, as well as liver X receptors (Lxrs), inducible degrader of the LDLR (Idol), and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor (Srebf)2 gene expression, were examined in the liver. Results P. gingivalis infection induced a significant elevation of serum PCSK9 levels and a concomitant elevation of total and LDL cholesterol compared with sham-infected mice. The LDL cholesterol levels were significantly correlated with PCSK9 levels. Expression of the Pcsk9, Ldlr, and Srebf2 genes was upregulated in the livers of the P. gingivalis-infected mice compared with the sham-infected mice. Although Pcsk9 gene expression is known to be positively regulated by sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)2 (human homologue of Srebf2), whereas Srebf2 is negatively regulated by cholesterol, the elevated expression of Srebf2 found in the infected mice is thought to be mediated by P. gingivalis infection. Conclusions P. gingivalis infection upregulates PCSK9 production via upregulation of Srebf2, independent of cholesterol levels. Further studies are required to

  4. Expression of the very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r), an apolipoprotein-E receptor, in the central nervous system and in Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, R.H.; Chung, Haeyong; Rebeck, G.W.; Hyman, B.T.

    1996-04-01

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r) is a cell-surface molecule specialized for the internalization of multiple diverse ligands, including apolipoprotein E (apoE)-containing lipoprotein particles, via clathrin-coated pits. Its structure is similar to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-r), although the two have substantially different systemic distributions and regulatory pathways. The present work examines the distribution of VLDL-r in the central nervous system (CNS) and in relation to senile plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD). VLDL-r is present on resting and activated microglia, particularly those associated with senile plaques (SPs). VLDL-r immunoreactivity is also found in cortical neurons. Two exons of VLDL-r mRNA are differentially spliced in the mature receptor mRNA. One set of splice forms gives rise to receptors containing (or lacking) an extracellular O-linked glycosylation domain near the transmembrane portion of the molecule. The other set of splice forms appears to be brain-specific, and is responsible for the presence or absence of one of the cysteine-rich repeat regions in the binding region of the molecule. Ratios of the receptor variants generated from these splice forms do not differ substantially across different cortical areas or in AD. We hypothesize that VLDL-r might contribute to metabolism of apoE and apoE/A{beta} complexes in the brain. Further characterization of apoE receptors in Alzheimer brain may help lay the groundwork for understanding the role of apoE in the CNS and in the pathophysiology of AD. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Deletion in the first cysteine-rich repeat of low density lipoprotein receptor impairs its transport but not lipoprotein binding in fibroblasts from a subject with familial hypercholesterolemia

    SciTech Connect

    Leitersdorf, E.; Hobbs, H.H.; Fourie, A.M.; Jacobs, M.; Van Der Westhuyzen, D.R.; Coetzee, G.A. )

    1988-11-01

    The ligand-binding domain of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is composed of seven cysteine-rich repeats, each {approx} 40 amino acids long. Previous studies showed that if the first repeat of the ligand-binding domain (encoded by exon 2) is deleted, the receptor fails to bind an anti-LDL receptor monoclonal antibody (IgG-C7) but continues to bind LDL with high affinity. Cultured fibroblasts from a Black South African Xhosa patient (TT) with the clinical syndrome of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia demonstrated high-affinity cell-surface binding of {sup 125}I-labeled LDL but not {sup 125}I-labeled IgG-C7. previous haplotype analysis, using 10 restriction fragment length polymorphic sites, suggested that the patient inherited two identical LDL receptor alleles. The polymerase chain reaction technique was used to selectively amplify exon 2 of the LDL receptor gene from this patient. Sequence analysis of the amplified fragment disclosed a deletion of six base pairs that removes two amino acids, aspartic acid and glycine, from the first cysteine-rich ligand binding repeat. The mutation creates a new Pst I restriction site that can be used to detect the deletion. The existence of this mutant allele confirms that the epitope of IgG-C7 is located in the first cysteine-rich repeat and that this repeat is not necessary for LDL binding. The mutant gene produced a normally sized 120-kilodalton LDL receptor precursor protein that matured to the 160-kilodalton form at less than one-fourth the normal rate.

  6. Association between soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 levels and coronary slow flow phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Caglar, Ilker Murat; Ozde, Cem; Caglar, Fatma Nihan Turhan; Akturk, Ibrahim Faruk; Ugurlucan, Murat; Karakaya, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The coronary slow flow phenomenon (CSFP) has been associated with myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, life-threatening arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and increased cardiovascular mortality similar to coronary artery disease (CAD). Possible underlying mechanisms of CSFP are endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation, microvascular dysfunction and diffuse atherosclerosis. Soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (sLOX-1) seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that sLOX-1 might be associated with CSFP, and aimed to research the relationship between sLOX-1 and CSFP. Material and methods Forty patients with angiographically proven CSFP and 43 patients with a normal coronary flow pattern (NCFP) were included in this study. Coronary blood flow was measured according to the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) frame count method. sLOX-1 levels were measured in all study subjects. Results Serum levels of sLOX-1 were significantly higher in the CSFP group than the NCFP group (1061.80 ±422.20 ng/ml vs. 500.043 ±282.97 ng/ml, p < 0.001, respectively). Multivariate logistic regression analysis including sLOX-1, MPV, GGT and uric acid levels revealed a significant association between sLOX-1 levels and CSFP (Exp (B)/OR: 1.006, 95% CI: 1.002–1.010, p = 0.001). Conclusions The present study demonstrated that serum sLOX-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with CSFP and there was a strong association between high sLOX-1 levels and CSFP. High serum sLOX-1 levels may have an important role in the pathogenesis of CSFP. Future studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:26925116

  7. Restoration of Physiologically Responsive Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis in Genetically Deficient Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Venkat M; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Tien, Kevin T; McKinley, Thomas R; Bocard, Braden R; Maijub, John G; Burchell, Patrick O; Williams, Stuart K; Morris, Marvin E; Hoying, James B; Wade-Martins, Richard; West, Franklin D; Boyd, Nolan L

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring sufficient amounts of high-quality cells remains an impediment to cell-based therapies. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) may be an unparalleled source, but autologous iPSC likely retain deficiencies requiring correction. We present a strategy for restoring physiological function in genetically deficient iPSC utilizing the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficiency Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) as our model. FH fibroblasts were reprogrammed into iPSC using synthetic modified mRNA. FH-iPSC exhibited pluripotency and differentiated toward a hepatic lineage. To restore LDLR endocytosis, FH-iPSC were transfected with a 31 kb plasmid (pEHZ-LDLR-LDLR) containing a wild-type LDLR (FH-iPSC-LDLR) controlled by 10 kb of upstream genomic DNA as well as Epstein-Barr sequences (EBNA1 and oriP) for episomal retention and replication. After six months of selective culture, pEHZ-LDLR-LDLR was recovered from FH-iPSC-LDLR and transfected into Ldlr-deficient CHO-a7 cells, which then exhibited feedback-controlled LDLR-mediated endocytosis. To quantify endocytosis, FH-iPSC ± LDLR were differentiated into mesenchymal cells (MC), pretreated with excess free sterols, Lovastatin, or ethanol (control), and exposed to DiI-LDL. FH-MC-LDLR demonstrated a physiological response, with virtually no DiI-LDL internalization with excess sterols and an ~2-fold increase in DiI-LDL internalization by Lovastatin compared to FH-MC. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of functionalizing genetically deficient iPSC using episomal plasmids to deliver physiologically responsive transgenes. PMID:26307169

  8. Minimally modified low-density lipoprotein induces macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress via toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shutong; Yang, Nana; Song, Guohua; Sang, Hui; Tian, Hua; Miao, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Qin, Shucun

    2012-07-01

    Minimally modified low-density lipoprotein (mm-LDL) induces intimal foam cell formation, which is promoted by endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), a cross-point to link cellular processes with multiple risk factors that exist in all stages of atherosclerosis. However, it remains unclear whether mm-LDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages involves ERS and its underlying mechanisms. We showed that mm-LDL induced the accumulation of lipid droplets in RAW264.7 macrophages with increased free cholesterol in the endoplasmic reticulum, which was markedly attenuated by pretreatment with an antibody against toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Additionally, mm-LDL stimulated the transport of Cy3-labeled activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), a key sensor to the unfolded protein response (UPR), from cytoplasm into nucleus. The expression of phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (p-IRE1), another sensor to the UPR, and its two downstream molecules, X box binding protein 1 and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), were significantly upregulated by mm-LDL. The alterations induced by mm-LDL were all significantly inhibited by antibodies against TLR4 or CD36. In addition, the upregulation of p-IRE1 and GRP78 and the nuclear translocation of ATF6 induced by mm-LDL were significantly attenuated by TLR4 siRNA. These results suggest that mm-LDL may induce free cholesterol accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum and subsequently stimulate ERS and activate the UPR signaling pathway mediated by ATF6 and IRE1 in macrophages, a process that is potentially mediated by TLR4. PMID:22480542

  9. Restoration of Physiologically Responsive Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis in Genetically Deficient Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Venkat M.; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Tien, Kevin T.; McKinley, Thomas R.; Bocard, Braden R.; Maijub, John G.; Burchell, Patrick O.; Williams, Stuart K.; Morris, Marvin E.; Hoying, James B.; Wade-Martins, Richard; West, Franklin D.; Boyd, Nolan L.

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring sufficient amounts of high-quality cells remains an impediment to cell-based therapies. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) may be an unparalleled source, but autologous iPSC likely retain deficiencies requiring correction. We present a strategy for restoring physiological function in genetically deficient iPSC utilizing the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficiency Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) as our model. FH fibroblasts were reprogrammed into iPSC using synthetic modified mRNA. FH-iPSC exhibited pluripotency and differentiated toward a hepatic lineage. To restore LDLR endocytosis, FH-iPSC were transfected with a 31 kb plasmid (pEHZ-LDLR-LDLR) containing a wild-type LDLR (FH-iPSC-LDLR) controlled by 10 kb of upstream genomic DNA as well as Epstein-Barr sequences (EBNA1 and oriP) for episomal retention and replication. After six months of selective culture, pEHZ-LDLR-LDLR was recovered from FH-iPSC-LDLR and transfected into Ldlr-deficient CHO-a7 cells, which then exhibited feedback-controlled LDLR-mediated endocytosis. To quantify endocytosis, FH-iPSC ± LDLR were differentiated into mesenchymal cells (MC), pretreated with excess free sterols, Lovastatin, or ethanol (control), and exposed to DiI-LDL. FH-MC-LDLR demonstrated a physiological response, with virtually no DiI-LDL internalization with excess sterols and an ~2-fold increase in DiI-LDL internalization by Lovastatin compared to FH-MC. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of functionalizing genetically deficient iPSC using episomal plasmids to deliver physiologically responsive transgenes. PMID:26307169

  10. Expression of very low density lipoprotein receptor in the vascular wall. Analysis of human tissues by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Multhaupt, H. A.; Gåfvels, M. E.; Kariko, K.; Jin, H.; Arenas-Elliot, C.; Goldman, B. I.; Strauss, J. F.; Angelin, B.; Warhol, M. J.; McCrae, K. R.

    1996-01-01

    The recently cloned very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor binds triglyceride-rich, apolipoprotein-E-containing lipoproteins with high affinity. The observation that VLDL receptor mRNA is abundantly expressed in extracts of tissues such as skeletal muscle and heart, but not liver, has led to the hypothesis that this receptor may facilitate the peripheral uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. However, little information is available concerning the types of cells that express this receptor in vivo. As expression of the VLDL receptor in the vascular wall might have important implications for the uptake and transport of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and perhaps facilitate the development of atherosclerosis in hypertriglyceridemic individuals, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to determine whether VLDL receptor mRNA and protein was expressed in human vascular tissue. We observed expression of the receptor by both endothelial and smooth muscle cells within normal arteries and veins, as well as within atherosclerotic plaques. In the latter, the VLDL receptor was also expressed by macrophage-derived foam cells. The widespread distribution of the VLDL receptor in vascular tissue suggests a potentially important role for this receptor in normal and pathophysiological vascular processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8669483

  11. Low-density lipoprotein receptor genetic polymorphism in chronic hepatitis C virus Egyptian patients affects treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Mazen; Amin, Mona; Algendy, Dina; Elbadry, Ahmed; Fawzi, May; Foda, Ayman; Esmat, Serag; Sabry, Dina; Rashed, Laila; Gabal, Samia; Kamal, Manal

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To correlate a genetic polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor with antiviral responses in Egyptian chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS: Our study included 657 HCV-infected patients with genotype 4 who received interferon-based combination therapy. Patients were divided into two groups based on their response to therapy: 356 were responders, and 301 were non-responders. Patients were compared to 160 healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent a thorough physical examination, measurement of body mass index (BMI) and the following laboratory tests: serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, prothrombin time, prothrombin concentration, INR, complete blood count, serum creatinine, fasting blood sugar, HCV antibody, and hepatitis B surface antigen. All HCV patients were further subjected to the following laboratory tests: HCV-RNA using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), antinuclear antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone, an LDL receptor (LDLR) genotype study of LDLR exon8c.1171G>A and exon10c.1413G>A using real-time PCR-based assays, abdominal ultrasonography, ultrasonographic-guided liver biopsy, and histopathological examination of liver biopsies. Correlations of LDL receptor polymorphisms with HAI, METAVIR score, presence of steatosis, and BMI were performed in all cases. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in response rates between the different types of interferon used or LDLR exon10c.1413G>A. However, there was a significant difference in the frequency of the LDL receptor exon8c.1171G>A genotype between cases (AA: 25.9%, GA: 22.2%, GG: 51.9%) and controls (AA: 3.8%, GA: 53.1% and GG: 43.1%) (P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of the LDLR exon 8C:1171 G>A polymorphism between responders (AA: 3.6%, GA: 15.2%, GG: 81.2%) and non-responders (AA: 52.2%, GA: 30

  12. Identification of a common low density lipoprotein receptor mutation (C163Y) in the west of Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W K; Haddad, L; Macleod, M J; Dorrance, A M; Wilson, D J; Gaffney, D; Dominiczak, M H; Packard, C J; Day, I N; Humphries, S E; Dominiczak, A F

    1998-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is an autosomal codominant disorder characterised by high levels of LDL cholesterol and a high incidence of coronary artery disease. Our aims were to track the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene in individual families with phenotypic FH and to identify and characterise any mutations of the LDLR gene that may be common in the west of Scotland FH population using single strand conformational polymorphism analysis (SSCP). Patient samples consisted of 80 heterozygous probands with FH, 200 subjects who were related to the probands, and a further 50 normal, unrelated control subjects. Tracking of the LDLR gene was accomplished by amplification of a 19 allele tetranucleotide microsatellite that is tightly linked to the LDLR gene locus. Primers specific for exon 4 of the LDLR gene were used to amplify genomic DNA and used for SSCP analysis. Any PCR products with different migration patterns as assessed by SSCP were then sequenced directly. In addition to identifying probands with a common mutation, family members were screened using a forced restriction site assay and analysed using microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis (MADGE). Microsatellite D19S394 analysis was informative in 20 of 23 families studied. In these families there was no inconsistency with segregation of the FH phenotype with the LDLR locus. Of the FH probands, 15/80 had a mutant allele as assessed by SSCP using three pairs of primers covering the whole of exon 4 of the LDLR gene. Direct DNA sequencing showed that 7/15 of the probands had a C163Y mutation. Using a PCR induced restriction site assay for the enzyme RsaI and MADGE, it was determined that the C163Y mutation cosegregated with the FH phenotype in family members of the FH probands. This mutant allele was not present in any of the control subjects. Microsatellite analysis has proven useful in tracking the LDLR gene and could be used in conjunction with LDL cholesterol levels to diagnose FH

  13. Stimulation of rat hepatic low density lipoprotein receptors by glucagon. Evidence of a novel regulatory mechanism in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rudling, M; Angelin, B

    1993-01-01

    We studied the influence of glucagon on hepatic LDL receptors and plasma lipoproteins in rats. A dose-dependent (maximum, threefold) increase in LDL-receptor binding was evident already at a dose of 2 x 4 micrograms, and detectable 3 h after injection; concomitantly, cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) B and apoE within LDL and large HDL decreased in plasma. LDL receptor mRNA levels were however unaltered or reduced. Hepatic microsomal cholesterol was increased and the enzymatic activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase in hepatic microsomes were reduced. Insulin alone increased receptor binding and receptor mRNA levels twofold, but plasma cholesterol was unchanged and plasma apoE and apoB increased. Administration of insulin to glucagon-treated animals reduced the LDL-receptor binding to control levels and apoB appeared in LDL particles. Estrogen treatment increased LDL-receptor binding and mRNA levels five- and eightfold, respectively. Combined treatment with glucagon and estrogen reduced the stimulation of LDL-receptor mRNA levels by 80% although LDL-receptor binding was unchanged. Immunoblot analysis showed that glucagon increased the number of hepatic LDL receptors. We conclude that glucagon induces the number of hepatic LDL receptors by a mechanism not related to increased mRNA levels, suggesting the presence of a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism present in the liver in vivo. Images PMID:8514887

  14. The Relaxin Receptor (RXFP1) Utilizes Hydrophobic Moieties on a Signaling Surface of Its N-terminal Low Density Lipoprotein Class A Module to Mediate Receptor Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Roy C. K.; Petrie, Emma J.; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Ling, Jason; Lee, Jeremy C. Y.; Gooley, Paul R.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2013-01-01

    The peptide hormone relaxin is showing potential as a treatment for acute heart failure. Although it is known that relaxin mediates its actions through the G protein-coupled receptor relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which relaxin binding results in receptor activation. Previous studies have highlighted that the unique N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module of RXFP1 is essential for receptor activation, and it has been hypothesized that this module is the true “ligand” of the receptor that directs the conformational changes necessary for G protein coupling. In this study, we confirmed that an RXFP1 receptor lacking the LDLa module binds ligand normally but cannot signal through any characterized G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, we comprehensively examined the contributions of amino acids in the LDLa module to RXFP1 activity using both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutational analysis together with NMR structural analysis of recombinant LDLa modules. Gain-of-function studies with an inactive RXFP1 chimera containing the LDLa module of the human LDL receptor (LB2) demonstrated two key N-terminal regions of the module that were able to rescue receptor signaling. Loss-of-function mutations of residues in these regions demonstrated that Leu-7, Tyr-9, and Lys-17 all contributed to the ability of the LDLa module to drive receptor activation, and judicious amino acid substitutions suggested this involves hydrophobic interactions. Our results demonstrate that these key residues contribute to interactions driving the active receptor conformation, providing further evidence of a unique mode of G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:23926099

  15. The relaxin receptor (RXFP1) utilizes hydrophobic moieties on a signaling surface of its N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A module to mediate receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Roy C K; Petrie, Emma J; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Ling, Jason; Lee, Jeremy C Y; Gooley, Paul R; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2013-09-27

    The peptide hormone relaxin is showing potential as a treatment for acute heart failure. Although it is known that relaxin mediates its actions through the G protein-coupled receptor relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which relaxin binding results in receptor activation. Previous studies have highlighted that the unique N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module of RXFP1 is essential for receptor activation, and it has been hypothesized that this module is the true "ligand" of the receptor that directs the conformational changes necessary for G protein coupling. In this study, we confirmed that an RXFP1 receptor lacking the LDLa module binds ligand normally but cannot signal through any characterized G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway. Furthermore, we comprehensively examined the contributions of amino acids in the LDLa module to RXFP1 activity using both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutational analysis together with NMR structural analysis of recombinant LDLa modules. Gain-of-function studies with an inactive RXFP1 chimera containing the LDLa module of the human LDL receptor (LB2) demonstrated two key N-terminal regions of the module that were able to rescue receptor signaling. Loss-of-function mutations of residues in these regions demonstrated that Leu-7, Tyr-9, and Lys-17 all contributed to the ability of the LDLa module to drive receptor activation, and judicious amino acid substitutions suggested this involves hydrophobic interactions. Our results demonstrate that these key residues contribute to interactions driving the active receptor conformation, providing further evidence of a unique mode of G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:23926099

  16. Regulation of macrophage alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    LaMarre, J; Wolf, B B; Kittler, E L; Quesenberry, P J; Gonias, S L

    1993-01-01

    alpha 2-Macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (alpha 2M-R/LRP) is a broad specificity receptor that may function in lipoprotein metabolism, proteinase regulation, and growth factor regulation. In this study, we demonstrated that alpha 2M-R/LRP expression in macrophages can be markedly decreased by LPS and by IFN-gamma. Regulation of alpha 2M-R/LRP in RAW 264.7 cells was demonstrated at the mRNA, antigen, and receptor-function levels. In receptor-function studies, the decrease in alpha 2M-R/LRP expression was detected as a 90% decrease in the Bmax or maximum receptor binding capacity for activated alpha 2M after treatment with LPS or IFN-gamma. Western blot analysis of whole cell lysates demonstrated significant loss of alpha 2M-R/LRP heavy-chain. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA revealed a marked decrease in alpha 2M-R/LRP mRNA after treatment with LPS (79% decrease) or IFN-gamma (70% decrease). Other cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta-1, and interleukin-6 did not regulate alpha 2M-R/LRP. The ability of LPS and IFN-gamma to regulate alpha 2M-R/LRP was confirmed in experiments with primary cultures of murine bone marrow macrophages. These studies demonstrate that macrophage alpha 2M-R/LRP is subject to significant downregulation by physiologically significant cytokines and signaling macromolecules. Images PMID:7680664

  17. Endocytosis of apolipoprotein A-V by members of the low density lipoprotein receptor and the VPS10p domain receptor families.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Christensen, Stine; Raarup, Merete K; Ryan, Robert O; Nielsen, Morten S; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2008-09-19

    Apolipoprotein A-V (apoA-V) is present in low amounts in plasma and has been found to modulate triacylglycerol levels in humans and in animal models. ApoA-V displays affinity for members of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene family, known as the classical lipoprotein receptors, including LRP1 and SorLA/LR11. In addition to LDL-A binding repeats, the mosaic receptor SorLA/LR11 also possesses a Vps10p domain. Here we show that apoA-V also binds to sortilin, a receptor from the Vsp10p domain gene family that lacks LDL-A repeats. Binding of apoA-V to sortilin was competed by neurotensin, a ligand that binds specifically to the Vps10p domain. To investigate the biological fate of receptor-bound apoA-V, binding experiments were conducted with cultured human embryonic kidney cells transfected with either SorLA/LR11 or sortilin. Compared with nontransfected cells, apoA-V binding to SorLA/LR11- and sortilin-expressing cells was markedly enhanced. Internalization experiments, live imaging studies, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses demonstrated that labeled apoA-V was rapidly internalized, co-localized with receptors in early endosomes, and followed the receptors through endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. The observed decrease of fluorescence signal intensity as a function of time during live imaging experiments suggested ligand uncoupling in endosomes with subsequent delivery to lysosomes for degradation. This interpretation was supported by experiments with (125)I-labeled apoA-V, demonstrating clear differences in degradation between transfected and nontransfected cells. We conclude that apoA-V binds to receptors possessing LDL-A repeats and Vsp10p domains and that apoA-V is internalized into cells via these receptors. This could be a mechanism by which apoA-V modulates lipoprotein metabolism in vivo. PMID:18603531

  18. Localization and regulation of the human very low density lipoprotein/apolipoprotein-E receptor: trophoblast expression predicts a role for the receptor in placental lipid transport.

    PubMed

    Wittmaack, F M; Gåfvels, M E; Bronner, M; Matsuo, H; McCrae, K R; Tomaszewski, J E; Robinson, S L; Strickland, D K; Strauss, J F

    1995-01-01

    The very low density lipoprotein/apolipoprotein-E receptor (VLDLR) is the newest member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family. Very little is known about VLDLR localization and regulation. Immunohistochemical analysis of human placenta with a specific polyclonal antibody detected VLDLR in syncytiotrophoblast and intermediate trophoblast cells. VLDLR transcripts were also localized in these cells by in situ hybridization histochemistry. In addition, VLDLR messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected in villous core endothelial cells and cells appearing to be Hofbauer cells. Northern blot analysis of placenta revealed a 2.6-fold increase in VLDLR mRNA at term compared to that in the first trimester. The regulation of VLDLR expression was studied in JEG-3 and BeWo choriocarcinoma cells, two trophoblast-derived cell lines. Treatment of these cells with 8-bromo-cAMP caused a profound suppression of VLDLR message, whereas LDLR transcripts were increased. Incubation of JEG-3 cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol did not lead to sterol negative feedback on VLDLR gene expression, unlike LDLR mRNA, which declined markedly. Insulin (200 mg/L) up-regulated VLDLR message in JEG-3 cells 2-fold, as did the fibrate hypolipidemic drug, clofibric acid. We conclude that 1) VLDLR is expressed in human placental trophoblast cells in a pattern consistent with a role in placental lipid transport; 2) VLDLR expression is high at term relative to that in the first trimester; and 3) the trophoblast VLDLR is subject to down-regulation by cAMP and up-regulation by insulin and fibrate hypolipidemic drugs. PMID:7828550

  19. Modified Low Density Lipoprotein Stimulates Complement C3 Expression and Secretion via Liver X Receptor and Toll-like Receptor 4 Activation in Human Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Mogilenko, Denis A.; Kudriavtsev, Igor V.; Trulioff, Andrey S.; Shavva, Vladimir S.; Dizhe, Ella B.; Missyul, Boris V.; Zhakhov, Alexander V.; Ischenko, Alexander M.; Perevozchikov, Andrej P.; Orlov, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 is a pivotal component of three cascades of complement activation. C3 is expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions and is involved in atherogenesis. However, the mechanism of C3 accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions is not well elucidated. We show that acetylated low density lipoprotein and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) increase C3 gene expression and protein secretion by human macrophages. Modified LDL (mLDL)-mediated activation of C3 expression mainly depends on liver X receptor (LXR) and partly on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), whereas C3 secretion is increased due to TLR4 activation by mLDL. LXR agonist TO901317 stimulates C3 gene expression in human monocyte-macrophage cells but not in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. We find LXR-responsive element inside of the promoter region of the human C3 gene, which binds to LXRβ in macrophages but not in HepG2 cells. We show that C3 expression and secretion is decreased in IL-4-treated (M2) and increased in IFNγ/LPS-stimulated (M1) human macrophages as compared with resting macrophages. LXR agonist TO901317 potentiates LPS-induced C3 gene expression and protein secretion in macrophages, whereas oxLDL differently modulates LPS-mediated regulation of C3 in M1 or M2 macrophages. Treatment of human macrophages with anaphylatoxin C3a results in stimulation of C3 transcription and secretion as well as increased oxLDL accumulation and augmented oxLDL-mediated up-regulation of the C3 gene. These data provide a novel mechanism of C3 gene regulation in macrophages and suggest new aspects of cross-talk between mLDL, C3, C3a, and TLR4 during development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:22194611

  20. Effect of low density lipoprotein receptor deficiency on the metabolism of apolipoprotein B-100 in blood plasma. Kinetic studies in normal and Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, N; Shames, D M; Havel, R J

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 in particles containing apo E (B,E particles) or lacking apo E (B particles) were studied in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits deficient in low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and compared with those of normal rabbits after injection of radioiodinated very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL), and LDL. In both groups results of kinetic modeling were consistent with the hypothesis that all apo B enters the plasma in VLDL, mainly as B,E particles, followed by delipidation and partial conversion to IDL and LDL, with concomitant conversion of some B,E particles to B particles. In WHHL rabbits, production of VLDL apo B was reduced by 40%, but LDL production was increased threefold. Defective removal of B,E and B particles in all three lipoprotein classes, coupled with preserved processes of delipidation, can account for the observed increases in the concentration of apo B (threefold in VLDL, fivefold in IDL, and twenty-twofold in LDL) in WHHL rabbits. PMID:3611356

  1. Low density lipoprotein receptor-binding activity in human tissues: quantitative importance of hepatic receptors and evidence for regulation of their expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rudling, M J; Reihnér, E; Einarsson, K; Ewerth, S; Angelin, B

    1990-01-01

    The heparin-sensitive binding of 125I-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to homogenates from 18 different normal human tissues and some solid tumors was determined. The binding to adrenal and liver homogenates fulfilled criteria established for the binding of LDL to its receptor--namely, (i) saturability, (ii) sensitivity to proteolytic destruction, (iii) inhibition by EDTA, and (iv) heat sensitivity. When the binding of 125I-labeled LDL was assayed at a constant concentration (50 micrograms/ml), the adrenal gland and the ovary had the highest binding of normal tissues. The highest binding per g of tissue overall was obtained in homogenates of a gastric carcinoma and a parotid adenoma. When the weights of the parenchymatous organs were considered, the major amount of LDL receptors was contained in the liver. To study the possible regulation of hepatic LDL-receptor expression, 11 patients were pretreated with cholestyramine (8 g twice a day for 3 weeks). Increased binding activity (+105%, P less than 0.001) was obtained in homogenates from liver biopsies from the cholestyramine-treated patients as compared with 12 untreated controls. It is concluded that the liver is the most important organ for LDL catabolism in humans and that the receptor activity in this organ can be regulated upon pharmacologic intervention. Further studies are needed to confirm the possibility that certain solid tumors can exhibit high numbers of LDL receptors. PMID:2110363

  2. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6) Is a Novel Nutritional Therapeutic Target for Hyperlipidemia, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Go, Gwang-woong

    2015-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and has a unique structure, which facilitates its multiple functions as a co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and as a ligand receptor for endocytosis. The role LRP6 plays in metabolic regulation, specifically in the nutrient-sensing pathway, has recently garnered considerable interest. Patients carrying an LRP6 mutation exhibit elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose, which cooperatively constitute the risk factors of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Since the discovery of this mutation, the general role of LRP6 in lipid homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and atherosclerosis has been thoroughly researched. These studies have demonstrated that LRP6 plays a role in LDL receptor-mediated LDL uptake. In addition, when the LRP6 mutant impaired Wnt-LRP6 signaling, hyperlipidemia, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis developed. LRP6 regulates lipid homeostasis and body fat mass via the nutrient-sensing mechanistic target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Furthermore, the mutant LRP6 triggers atherosclerosis by activating platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-dependent vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. This review highlights the exceptional opportunities to study the pathophysiologic contributions of LRP6 to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, which implicate LRP6 as a latent regulator of lipid metabolism and a novel therapeutic target for nutritional intervention. PMID:26046396

  3. Low-density lipoprotein apheresis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bambauer, Rolf; Schiel, Ralf; Latza, Reinhard

    2003-08-01

    Atherosclerosis with myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral cellular disease still maintains its position at the top of morbidity and mortality statistics in industrialized nations. Established risk factors widely accepted are smoking, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and central obesity. Furthermore, there is a strong correlation between hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. The prognosis of patients suffering from severe hyperlipidemia, sometimes combined with elevated lipoprotein (a) (Lpa) levels, and coronary heart disease (CHD) refractory to diet and lipid-lowering drugs is poor. For such patients, regular treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis is the therapeutic option. Today, there are four different LDL apheresis systems available: immunoadsorption, heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL/fibrinogen precipitation, dextran sulfate LDL adsorption and LDL hemoperfusion. Regarding the different LDL apheresis systems used, there is no significant difference with respect to the clinical outcome or concerning total cholesterol, LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or triglyceride concentrations. With respect to elevated Lpa levels, however, the immunoadsorption method seems to be the most effective. In 45 patients (25 women, 20 men) suffering from familial hypercholesterolemia resistant to diet and lipid lowering drugs, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis was performed over 95.6 +/- 44.7 months. Four different systems (Liposorber, 32 of 45, Kaneka, Osaka, Japan; Therasorb, 6 of 45, Baxter, Munich, Germany; Lipopak, 2 of 45, Pocard, Moscow, Russia; and Dali, 5 of 45, Fresenius, St. Wendel, Germany) were used. With all methods, average reductions of 57% for total cholesterol, 55.9% for LDL, 75.8% for lipoprotein a (Lpa), and 45.9% for triglycerides, and an average increase of 14.3% for HDL were reached. Severe side-effects such as shock or allergic reactions were very rare (0.3%) in all methods. In the course of treatment, an improvement

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the ligand-binding domain of human lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigaki, Tomoko; Ohki, Izuru; Oyama, Takuji; Machida, Sachiko; Morikawa, Kousuke; Tate, Shin-ichi

    2005-05-01

    Two different fragments of the ligand-binding domain of LOX-1, the major receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on endothelial cells, have been crystallized in different forms. Two different fragments of the ligand-binding domain of LOX-1, the major receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on endothelial cells, have been crystallized in different forms. One crystal form contains the disulfide-linked dimer, which is the form of the molecule present on the cell surface; the other contains a monomeric form of the receptor that lacks the cysteine residue necessary to form disulfide-linked homodimers. The crystal of the monomeric ligand-binding domain belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.79, b = 67.57, c = 79.02 Å. The crystal of the dimeric form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.86, b = 49.56, c = 76.73 Å, β = 98.59°. Data for the dimeric form of the LOX-1 ligand-binding domain have been collected to 2.4 Å. For the monomeric form of the ligand-binding domain, native, heavy-atom derivative and SeMet-derivative crystals have been obtained; their diffraction data have been measured to 3.0, 2.4 and 1.8 Å resolution, respectively.

  5. Lectin-like Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor (LOX-1): A Chameleon Receptor for Oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Zeya, Bushra; Arjuman, Albina; Chandra, Nimai Chand

    2016-08-16

    LOX-1, one of the main receptors for oxLDL, is found mainly on the surface of endothelial cells. It is a multifacet 52 kDa type II transmembrane protein that structurally belongs to the C-type lectin family. It exists with short intracellular N-terminal and long extracellular C-terminal hydrophilic domains separated by a hydrophobic domain of 26 amino acids. LOX-1 acts like a bifunctional receptor either showing pro-atherogenicity by activating the NFκB-mediated down signaling cascade for gene activation of pro-inflammatory molecules or playing an atheroprotective agent by receptor-mediated uptake of oxLDL in the presence of an anti-inflammatory molecule like IL-10. Mildly, moderately, and highly oxidized LDL show their characteristic features upon LOX-1 activation and its ligand binding indenture. The polymorphic LOX-1 genes are intensively associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial diseases. The splicing variant LOX IN dimerizes with the native form of LOX-1 and protects cells from damage by oxidized LDL. In the developing field of regenerating medicine, LOX-1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27419271

  6. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Willecke, Florian; Yuan, Chujun; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Hu, Yunying; Barnhart, Shelley; Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD) containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/-) mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR). After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD), showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states. PMID:26046657

  7. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor regulates cell surface plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J C; Sakthivel, R; Kniss, D; Graham, C H; Strickland, D K; McCrae, K R

    1998-11-27

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor (LRP/alpha2MR) mediates the internalization of numerous ligands, including prourokinase (pro-UK) and complexes between two-chain urokinase (tc-u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1). It has been suggested that through its ability to internalize these ligands, LRP/alpha2MR may regulate the expression of plasminogen activator activity on cell surfaces; this hypothesis, however, has not been experimentally confirmed. To address this issue, we assessed the ability of LRP/alpha2MR to regulate plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells, which express both LRP/alpha2MR and the urokinase receptor (uPAR). Trophoblasts internalized and degraded exogenous 125I-pro-UK (primarily following its conversion to tc-u-PA and incorporation into tc-u-PA.PAI complexes) in an LRP/alpha2MR-dependent manner, which was inhibited by the LRP/alpha2MR receptor-associated protein. Receptor-associated protein also caused a approximately 50% reduction in cell surface plasminogen activator activity and delayed the regeneration of unoccupied uPAR by cells on which uPAR were initially saturated with pro-UK. Identical effects were caused by anti-LRP/alpha2MR antibodies. These results demonstrate that LRP/alpha2MR promotes the expression of cell surface plasminogen activator activity on trophoblasts by facilitating the clearance of tc-u-PA.PAI complexes and regeneration of unoccupied cell surface uPAR. PMID:9822706

  8. Essential oil of Pinus koraiensis leaves exerts antihyperlipidemic effects via up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and inhibition of acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-09-01

    Hyperlipidemia is an important factor to induce metabolic syndrome such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, some antihyperlipidemic agents from herbal medicines have been in the spotlight in the medical science field. Thus, the present study evaluated the antihyperlipidemic activities of the essential oil from the leaves of Pinus koraiensis SIEB (EOPK) that has been used as a folk remedy for heart disease. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that EOPK up-regulated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) at the mRNA level as well as negatively suppressed the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c, SREBP-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) involved in lipid metabolism in HepG2 cells. Also, western blotting showed that EOPK activated LDLR and attenuated the expression of FAS at the protein level in the cells. Consistently, EOPK significantly inhibited the level of human acylcoenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (hACAT)1 and 2 and reduced the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation activity. Furthermore, chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis showed that EOPK, an essential oil mixture, contained camphene (21.11%), d-limonene (21.01%), α-pinene (16.74%) and borneol (11.52%). Overall, the findings suggest that EOPK can be a potent pharmaceutical agent for the prevention and treatment of hyperlipidemia. PMID:22275303

  9. The antigenic similarity of human low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    LEVINE, L; KAUFFMAN, D L; BROWN, R K

    1955-08-01

    THE FOLLOWING HUMAN LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS WERE PREPARED: beta-lipoproteins of densities greater than 1.040 (A, B,C) a beta-lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 5 (D), a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 19 (E), and a lipoprotein of -S(1.063) = 70 (F). Data are presented which show the immunochemical homogeneity of the D lipoprotein rabbit-anti-D lipoprotein system. Cross-reactions between antibody to A and D lipoproteins and the above lipoproteins have been demonstrated by quantitative precipitation, quanitative complement fixation, and single and double diffusion in agar. The antigenic similarities appear to be associated with the protein portions of the molecule. The antisera produced did not differentiate the low density lipoprotein classes. PMID:13242737

  10. Low-density lipoprotein receptor gene therapy using helper-dependent adenovirus produces long-term protection against atherosclerosis in a mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Nomura, S; Merched, A; Nour, E; Dieker, C; Oka, K; Chan, L

    2004-10-01

    We tested the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) therapy using helper-dependent adenovirus (HD-Ad), comparing it with that of very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), an LDLR homolog. We treated high cholesterol diet fed LDLR-/- mice with a single intravenous injection of HD-Ad expressing monkey LDLR (1.5 x 10(13) or 5 x 10(12) VP/kg) or VLDLR. Throughout the 24-week experiment, plasma cholesterol of LDLR-treated mice was lower than that of VLDLR-treated mice, which was in turn lower than that of PBS-treated mice. Anti-LDLR antibodies developed in 2/10 mice treated with high-dose HD-Ad-LDLR but in none (0/14) of the other treatment groups. HD-Ad-treated mice displayed significant retardation of atherosclerotic lesion progression. We next tested the long-term efficacy of low-dose HD-Ad-LDLR injected into 12-week-old LDLR-/- mice. After 60 weeks, atherosclerosis lesions covered approximately 50% of the surface of aortas of control mice, whereas aortas of treated mice were essentially lesion-free. The lipid lowering effect of HD-Ad-LDLR lasted at least 108 weeks (>2 years) when all control mice had died. In addition to retarding lesion progression, treatment caused lesion remodeling from a vulnerable-looking to a more stable-appearing phenotype. In conclusion, HD-Ad-mediated LDLR gene therapy is effective in conferring long-term protection against atherosclerosis in a mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:15269711

  11. Six DNA polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor gene: their genetic relationship and an example of their use for identifying affected relatives of patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, S; King-Underwood, L; Gudnason, V; Seed, M; Delattre, S; Clavey, V; Fruchart, J C

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the relative allele frequency and estimated linkage disequilibrium between six DNA polymorphisms of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene. Polymorphisms were detected using the enzymes SfaNI, TaqI, StuI, HincII, AvaII, and NcoI after DNA amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Strong linkage disequilibrium was detected between many of the pair wise comparisons in a sample of 60 patients heterozygous for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). Using the enzymes HincII, NcoI, and SfaNI, 85% of patients were heterozygous for at least one polymorphism and thus potentially informative for cosegregation studies. The polymorphisms were used to follow the inheritance of the defective allele of the LDL receptor gene in the relatives of a patient with FH. Assays of LDL receptor activity on lymphoblastoid cell lines from two members of the family was used to confirm that the proband, but not the hypercholesterolaemic brother, had a defect in the LDL receptor. In the family, none of the children had inherited the allele of the LDL receptor gene inferred to be defective. The problems associated with this cosegregation approach to identify relatives of patients with a clinical diagnosis of FH are discussed. PMID:8098067

  12. Detection of a single base deletion in codon 424 of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene in a Danish family with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Nissen, H; Hansen, A B; Guldberg, P; Petersen, N E; Larsen, M L; Haghfelt, T; Kristiansen, K; Hørder, M

    1994-12-01

    We performed a screening of exon 9 of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene in 14 Danish families with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique. In one of the probands from these families an abnormal band pattern in the gradient gel was detected. Subsequent DGGE analysis of the family of this index patient revealed that the DGGE pattern cosegregated with the disease in this family. Sequencing of the exon showed a deletion of a C in codon 424 of the LDLR gene resulting in a frame shift with the introduction of a stop codon 5 codons further downstream. The mutation is referred to as FH-Odense. The predicted truncated receptor protein consists of the 428 amino terminal amino acids. Consequently, the cytosolic and membrane spanning parts of the mature LDL receptor, which normally secure the receptor in the plasma membrane, are missing. The FH-Odense mutation results in severe premature coronary atherosclerosis as shown by the clinical expression in 5 generations of the affected family. PMID:7718023

  13. Low-Density Lipoprotein Sensor Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymer.

    PubMed

    Chunta, Suticha; Suedee, Roongnapa; Lieberzeit, Peter A

    2016-01-19

    Increased level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) strongly correlates with incidence of coronary heart disease. We synthesized novel molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) as biomimetic specific receptors to establish rapid analysis of LDL levels. For that purpose the ratios of monomers acrylic acid (AA), methacrylic acid (MAA), and N-vinylpyrrolidone (VP), respectively, were screened on 10 MHz dual-electrode quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Mixing MAA and VP in the ratio 3:2 (m/m) revealed linear sensor characteristic to LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) from 4 to 400 mg/dL or 0.10-10.34 mmol/L in 100 mM phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) without significant interference: high-density lipoprotein (HDL) yields 4-6% of the LDL signal, very-low-density-lipoprotein (VLDL) yields 1-3%, and human serum albumin (HSA) yields 0-2%. The LDL-MIP sensor reveals analytical accuracy of 95-96% at the 95% confidence interval with precision at 6-15%, respectively. Human serum diluted 1:2 with PBS buffer was analyzed by LDL-MIP sensors to demonstrate applicability to real-life samples. The sensor responses are excellently correlated to the results of the standard technique, namely, a homogeneous enzymatic assay (R(2) = 0.97). This demonstrates that the system can be successfully applied to human serum samples for determining LDL concentrations. PMID:26643785

  14. Human serum amyloid A3 (SAA3) protein, expressed as a fusion protein with SAA2, binds the oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Takeshi; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Maru, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Serum amyloid A3 (SAA3) possesses characteristics distinct from the other serum amyloid A isoforms, SAA1, SAA2, and SAA4. High density lipoprotein contains the latter three isoforms, but not SAA3. The expression of mouse SAA3 (mSAA3) is known to be up-regulated extrahepatically in inflammatory responses, and acts as an endogenous ligand for the toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. We previously reported that mSAA3 plays an important role in facilitating tumor metastasis by attracting circulating tumor cells and enhancing hyperpermeability in the lungs. On the other hand, human SAA3 (hSAA3) has long been regarded as a pseudogene, which is in contrast to the abundant expression levels of the other isoforms. Although the nucleotide sequence of hSAA3 is very similar to that of the other SAAs, a single oligonucleotide insertion in exon 2 causes a frame-shift to generate a unique amino acid sequence. In the present study, we identified that hSAA3 was transcribed in the hSAA2-SAA3 fusion transcripts of several human cell lines. In the fusion transcript, hSAA2 exon 3 was connected to hSAA3 exon 1 or hSAA3 exon 2, located approximately 130kb downstream from hSAA2 exon 3 in the genome, which suggested that it is produced by alternative splicing. Furthermore, we succeeded in detecting and isolating hSAA3 protein for the first time by an immunoprecipitation-enzyme linked immune assay system using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies that recognize the hSAA3 unique amino acid sequence. We also demonstrated that hSAA3 bound oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor (oxLDL receptor, LOX-1) and elevated the phosphorylation of ERK, the intracellular MAP-kinase signaling protein. PMID:25738827

  15. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 is a novel modulator of radial glia stem cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Safina, Dina; Schlitt, Frederik; Romeo, Ramona; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Pietrzik, Claus U; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Edenhofer, Frank; Faissner, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The LDL family of receptors and its member low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) have classically been associated with a modulation of lipoprotein metabolism. Current studies, however, indicate diverse functions for this receptor in various aspects of cellular activities, including cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. LRP1 is essential for normal neuronal function in the adult CNS, whereas the role of LRP1 in development remained unclear. Previously, we have observed an upregulation of LewisX (LeX) glycosylated LRP1 in the stem cells of the developing cortex and demonstrated its importance for oligodendrocyte differentiation. In the current study, we show that LeX-glycosylated LRP1 is also expressed in the stem cell compartment of the developing spinal cord and has broader functions in the developing CNS. We have investigated the basic properties of LRP1 conditional knockout on the neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) from the cortex and the spinal cord, created by means of Cre-loxp-mediated recombination in vitro. The functional status of LRP1-deficient cells has been studied using proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis assays. LRP1 deficient NSPCs from both CNS regions demonstrated altered differentiation profiles. Their differentiation capacity toward oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), mature oligodendrocytes and neurons was reduced. In contrast, astrocyte differentiation was promoted. Moreover, LRP1 deletion had a negative effect on NSPCs proliferation and survival. Our observations suggest that LRP1 facilitates NSPCs differentiation via interaction with apolipoprotein E (ApoE). Upon ApoE4 stimulation wild type NSPCs generated more oligodendrocytes, but LRP1 knockout cells showed no response. The effect of ApoE seems to be independent of cholesterol uptake, but is rather mediated by downstream MAPK and Akt activation. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2016;64:1363-1380. PMID:27258849

  16. Human Serum Amyloid A3 (SAA3) Protein, Expressed as a Fusion Protein with SAA2, Binds the Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Takeshi; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Maru, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Serum amyloid A3 (SAA3) possesses characteristics distinct from the other serum amyloid A isoforms, SAA1, SAA2, and SAA4. High density lipoprotein contains the latter three isoforms, but not SAA3. The expression of mouse SAA3 (mSAA3) is known to be up-regulated extrahepatically in inflammatory responses, and acts as an endogenous ligand for the toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. We previously reported that mSAA3 plays an important role in facilitating tumor metastasis by attracting circulating tumor cells and enhancing hyperpermeability in the lungs. On the other hand, human SAA3 (hSAA3) has long been regarded as a pseudogene, which is in contrast to the abundant expression levels of the other isoforms. Although the nucleotide sequence of hSAA3 is very similar to that of the other SAAs, a single oligonucleotide insertion in exon 2 causes a frame-shift to generate a unique amino acid sequence. In the present study, we identified that hSAA3 was transcribed in the hSAA2-SAA3 fusion transcripts of several human cell lines. In the fusion transcript, hSAA2 exon 3 was connected to hSAA3 exon 1 or hSAA3 exon 2, located approximately 130kb downstream from hSAA2 exon 3 in the genome, which suggested that it is produced by alternative splicing. Furthermore, we succeeded in detecting and isolating hSAA3 protein for the first time by an immunoprecipitation-enzyme linked immune assay system using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies that recognize the hSAA3 unique amino acid sequence. We also demonstrated that hSAA3 bound oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor (oxLDL receptor, LOX-1) and elevated the phosphorylation of ERK, the intracellular MAP-kinase signaling protein. PMID:25738827

  17. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 : a serial clearance homeostatic mechanism controlling Alzheimer's amyloid β-peptide elimination from the brain

    PubMed Central

    Zlokovic, Berislav V.; Deane, Rashid; Sagare, Abhay P.; Bell, Robert D.; Winkler, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), a member of the LDL receptor family, has major roles in the cellular transport of cholesterol, endocytosis of forty structurally diverse ligands, transcytosis of ligands across the blood-brain barrier, and transmembrane and nuclear signaling. Recent evidence indicates that LRP1 regulates brain and systemic clearance of Alzheimer's disease (AD) amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). According to the two hit vascular hypothesis for AD, vascular damage precedes cerebrovascular and brain Aβ accumulation (hit 1) which then further amplifies neurovascular dysfunction (hit 2) preceding neurodegeneration. In this study, we discuss the roles of LRP1 during the hit 1 and hit 2 stage of AD pathogenesis and describe a three-level serial LRP1-dependent homeostatic control of Aβ clearance including (i) cell-surface LRP1 at the BBB and cerebrovascular cells mediating brain-to-blood Aβ clearance (ii) circulating LRP1 providing a key endogenous peripheral ‘sink’ activity for plasma Aβ which prevents free Aβ access to the brain, and (iii) LRP1 in the liver mediating systemic Aβ clearance. Pitfalls in experimental Aβ brain clearance measurements with the concurrent use of peptides/proteins such as receptor-associated protein and aprotinin are also discussed. We suggest that LRP1 has a critical role in AD pathogenesis and is an important therapeutic target in AD. PMID:20854368

  18. Low Density Lipoprotein-Receptor Related Protein 1 Is Differentially Expressed by Neuronal and Glial Populations in the Developing and Mature Mouse Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Auderset, Loic; Cullen, Carlie L.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein-receptor related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic cell surface receptor that is known to interact with a variety of ligands, intracellular adaptor proteins and other cell surface receptors to regulate cellular behaviours ranging from proliferation to cell fate specification, migration, axon guidance, and lipid metabolism. A number of studies have demonstrated that LRP1 is expressed in the brain, yet it is unclear which central nervous system cell types express LRP1 during development and in adulthood. Herein we undertake a detailed study of LRP1 expression within the mouse brain and spinal cord, examining a number of developmental stages ranging from embryonic day 13.5 to postnatal day 60. We report that LRP1 expression in the brain peaks during postnatal development. On a cellular level, LRP1 is expressed by radial glia, neuroblasts, microglia, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), astrocytes and neurons, with the exception of parvalbumin+ interneurons in the cortex. Most cell populations exhibit stable expression of LRP1 throughout development; however, the proportion of OPCs that express LRP1 increases significantly from ~69% at E15.5 to ~99% in adulthood. We also report that LRP1 expression is rapidly lost as OPCs differentiate, and is absent from all oligodendrocytes, including newborn oligodendrocytes. While LRP1 function has been primarily examined in mature neurons, these expression data suggest it plays a more critical role in glial cell regulation–where expression levels are much higher. PMID:27280679

  19. Low Density Lipoprotein-Receptor Related Protein 1 Is Differentially Expressed by Neuronal and Glial Populations in the Developing and Mature Mouse Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Auderset, Loic; Cullen, Carlie L; Young, Kaylene M

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein-receptor related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic cell surface receptor that is known to interact with a variety of ligands, intracellular adaptor proteins and other cell surface receptors to regulate cellular behaviours ranging from proliferation to cell fate specification, migration, axon guidance, and lipid metabolism. A number of studies have demonstrated that LRP1 is expressed in the brain, yet it is unclear which central nervous system cell types express LRP1 during development and in adulthood. Herein we undertake a detailed study of LRP1 expression within the mouse brain and spinal cord, examining a number of developmental stages ranging from embryonic day 13.5 to postnatal day 60. We report that LRP1 expression in the brain peaks during postnatal development. On a cellular level, LRP1 is expressed by radial glia, neuroblasts, microglia, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), astrocytes and neurons, with the exception of parvalbumin+ interneurons in the cortex. Most cell populations exhibit stable expression of LRP1 throughout development; however, the proportion of OPCs that express LRP1 increases significantly from ~69% at E15.5 to ~99% in adulthood. We also report that LRP1 expression is rapidly lost as OPCs differentiate, and is absent from all oligodendrocytes, including newborn oligodendrocytes. While LRP1 function has been primarily examined in mature neurons, these expression data suggest it plays a more critical role in glial cell regulation-where expression levels are much higher. PMID:27280679

  20. Neuronal low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) enhances the anti-apoptotic effect of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lok, Ker Zhing; Manzanero, Silvia; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2016-08-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a multifunctional and multi-ligand endocytic receptor abundantly expressed in neurons. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is a purified preparation of plasma-derived human immunoglobulin used for the treatment of several neurological inflammatory disorders, and proposed for the treatment of stroke for its potent neuroprotective effects. LRP1 has been shown to be involved in the transcytosis of IVIg, and IVIg-LRP1 interaction leads to LRP1 tyrosine phosphorylation, which may contribute to the anti-inflammatory effects of IVIg. However, the question remains whether IVIg could induce its neuroprotective effects via LRP1 in neurons under ischemic stroke conditions. In cultured neurons and in a transient ischemic mouse model, ischemia decrease LRP1 levels and phosphorylation, and IVIg blocks these effects. In ischemic neurons, LRP1 antagonism by receptor associated protein (RAP) enhances the activation of pro-death signaling pathways such as nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and caspase-3, and IVIg reduces these effects. When applied to ischemic neuronal cultures, RAP induces a dramatic drop in Akt activation, and IVIg reverses this effect, as it does with the decrease in Bcl-2 levels caused by ischemic injury in the presence of RAP. Altogether, these results show evidence of LRP1 expression and activity modulation by IVIg, and support the role of LRP1 as a partner of IVIg in the execution of its neuroprotective effects. PMID:27181517

  1. Acceleration of Lung Regeneration by Platelet-Rich Plasma Extract through the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 5-Tie2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Chen, Zhao; Jiang, Amanda; Jiang, Elisabeth; Ingber, Donald E; Mammoto, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, plays a key role in organ development, homeostasis, and regeneration. The cooperation of multiple angiogenic factors, rather than a single factor, is required for physiological angiogenesis. Recently, we have reported that soluble platelet-rich plasma (PRP) extract, which contains abundant angiopoietin-1 and multiple other angiogenic factors, stimulates angiogenesis and maintains vascular integrity in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we have demonstrated that mouse PRP extract increases phosphorylation levels of the Wnt coreceptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and thereby activates angiogenic factor receptor Tie2 in endothelial cells (ECs) and accelerates EC sprouting and lung epithelial cell budding in vitro. PRP extract also increases phosphorylation levels of Tie2 in the mouse lungs and accelerates compensatory lung growth and recovery of exercise capacity after unilateral pneumonectomy in mice, whereas soluble Tie2 receptor or Lrp5 knockdown attenuates the effects of PRP extract. Because human PRP extract is generated from autologous peripheral blood and can be stored at -80°C, our findings may lead to the development of novel therapeutic interventions for various angiogenesis-related lung diseases and to the improvement of strategies for lung regeneration. PMID:26091161

  2. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL Induces the Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Family Members VLDLR and ApoER2*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cynthia; Duit, Sarah; Jalonen, Pilvi; Out, Ruud; Scheer, Lilith; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Boyadjian, Rima; Rodenburg, Kees W.; Foley, Edan; Korhonen, Laura; Lindholm, Dan; Nimpf, Johannes; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Tontonoz, Peter; Zelcer, Noam

    2010-01-01

    We have previously identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase-inducible degrader of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) (Idol) as a post-translational modulator of LDLR levels. Idol is a direct target for regulation by liver X receptors (LXRs), and its expression is responsive to cellular sterol status independent of the sterol-response element-binding proteins. Here we demonstrate that Idol also targets two closely related LDLR family members, VLDLR and ApoE receptor 2 (ApoER2), proteins implicated in both neuronal development and lipid metabolism. Idol triggers ubiquitination of the VLDLR and ApoER2 on their cytoplasmic tails, leading to their degradation. We further show that the level of endogenous VLDLR is sensitive to cellular sterol content, Idol expression, and activation of the LXR pathway. Pharmacological activation of the LXR pathway in mice leads to increased Idol expression and to decreased Vldlr levels in vivo. Finally, we establish an unexpected functional link between LXR and Reelin signaling. We demonstrate that LXR activation results in decreased Reelin binding to VLDLR and reduced Dab1 phosphorylation. The identification of VLDLR and ApoER2 as Idol targets suggests potential roles for this LXR-inducible E3 ligase in the central nervous system in addition to lipid metabolism. PMID:20427281

  3. Molecular cloning, expression profile and transcriptional modulation of two splice variants of very low density lipoprotein receptor during ovarian follicle development in geese (Anser cygnoide).

    PubMed

    Hu, Shenqiang; Liu, Hehe; Pan, Zhixiong; Xia, Lu; Dong, Xia; Li, Liang; Xu, Feng; He, Hua; Wang, Jiwen

    2014-10-01

    Very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR)-mediated endocytosis of plasma lipoproteins into the ovary is essential for ovarian follicle development. Two splice variants of VLDLR have been identified in several species, yet little is known about their distinctive roles in ovarian developing follicles. In the present study, the full-length cDNAs of two splice isoforms of VLDLR were obtained from geese (Anser cygnoide) ovaries using the RACE method. The longer isoform (TypeI VLDLR) is 3141bp and contains five conserved structural domains, while the other (TypeII VLDLR) lacks 90bp encoding for the O-linked sugar domain. TypeII VLDLR was predominantly expressed in the ovary, with greater amounts of mRNA in theca and granulosa cells from early stages of follicle development but decreased during vitellogenesis. However, there was minimal expression of the TypeI VLDLR gene in theca cells and expression was almost undetectable in granulosa cells throughout follicle development. Yolk VLDL concentrations decreased as stage of development advanced while yolk triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations increased in a follicular size-dependent manner. The significant correlations between transcripts of TypeII VLDLR and yolk lipids supported its important role on yolk lipid deposition. In addition, in vitro experiments suggested that exogenous cholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevinolin (a highly potent competitive inhibitor of HMG-CoA) treatment could significantly alter TypeII VLDLR gene expression in granulosa cells from both pre-hierarchical and pre-ovulatory follicles. Collectively, data from the present study indicate that TypeII VLDLR is more important for the transport of plasma lipoproteins into developing follicles than TypeI VLDLR, and provide new evidence about the influence of steroids in modulating VLDLR gene expression in ovarian cells. PMID:25018046

  4. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as low-density lipoprotein and platelet-activating factor-stimulated human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Julie M; Croft, Kevin D; Puddey, Ian B; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2003-06-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemotactic agent for monocytes and other cells and is thought to be involved in atherosclerosis, recruiting monocytes to the subendothelial space or to the site of inflammation. Angiotensin II has been demonstrated, at least in animal models, to stimulate MCP-1 expression. We investigated the effect of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists irbesartan and losartan on MCP-1 production by freshly isolated human monocytes. Irbesartan and losartan inhibited basal MCP-1 production in a dose-dependent manner. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) stimulated MCP-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, with 200 microg/ml LDL protein giving a 2-fold increase in MCP-1. Irbesartan and losartan dose dependently blocked LDL-stimulated MCP-1. An angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonist, S-(+)-1-([4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]methyl)-5-(diphenylacetyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (PD123319), had no significant effect on basal MCP-1 levels or LDL-stimulated MCP-1. After noting homology between the AT1 receptor and the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, we showed that irbesartan inhibited both [3H]PAF binding to human monocytes and carbamyl-PAF stimulation of MCP-1. However, irbesartan affinity for the PAF receptor was 700 times less than PAF, suggesting that there may be another mechanism for irbesartan inhibition of PAF-stimulated MCP-1. This is the first report showing that AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as LDL- and PAF-stimulated MCP-1 production in freshly isolated human monocytes. PMID:12626661

  5. Genetic deletion of low density lipoprotein receptor impairs sterol-induced mouse macrophage ABCA1 expression. A new SREBP1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoye; He, Wei; Huang, Zhiping; Gotto, Antonio M; Hajjar, David P; Han, Jihong

    2008-01-25

    Low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mutations cause familial hypercholesterolemia and early atherosclerosis. ABCA1 facilitates free cholesterol efflux from peripheral tissues. We investigated the effects of LDLR deletion (LDLR(-/-)) on ABCA1 expression. LDLR(-/-) macrophages had reduced basal levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux. A high fat diet increased cholesterol in LDLR(-/-) macrophages but not wild type cells. A liver X receptor (LXR) agonist induced expression of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux in both LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages, whereas expression of LXRalpha or LXRbeta was similar. Interestingly, oxidized LDL induced more ABCA1 in wild type macrophages than LDLR(-/-) cells. LDL induced ABCA1 expression in wild type cells but inhibited it in LDLR(-/-) macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. However, lipoproteins regulated ABCG1 expression similarly in LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages. Cholesterol or oxysterols induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but had little or inhibitory effects on ABCA1 expression in LDLR(-/-) macrophages. Active sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1a (SREBP1a) inhibited ABCA1 promoter activity in an LXRE-dependent manner and decreased both macrophage ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. Expression of ABCA1 in animal tissues was inversely correlated to active SREBP1. Oxysterols inactivated SREBP1 in wild type macrophages but not in LDLR(-/-) cells. Oxysterol synergized with nonsteroid LXR ligand induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but blocked induction in LDLR(-/-) cells. Taken together, our studies suggest that LDLR is critical in the regulation of cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 expression in macrophage. Lack of the LDLR impairs sterol-induced macrophage ABCA1 expression by a sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1-dependent mechanism that can result in reduced cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in macrophages under hypercholesterolemic conditions

  6. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein...

  11. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  12. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 mediates endocytic clearance of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 and promotes its cytokine-like activities.

    PubMed

    Thevenard, Jessica; Verzeaux, Laurie; Devy, Jerôme; Etique, Nicolas; Jeanne, Albin; Schneider, Christophe; Hachet, Cathy; Ferracci, Géraldine; David, Marion; Martiny, Laurent; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Rivera, Santiago; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) regulates the extracellular matrix turnover by inhibiting the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). TIMP-1 also displays MMP-independent activities that influence the behavior of various cell types including neuronal plasticity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain mostly unknown. The trans-membrane receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) consists of a large extracellular chain with distinct ligand-binding domains that interact with numerous ligands including TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 and a short transmembrane chain with intracellular motifs that allow endocytosis and confer signaling properties to LRP-1. We addressed TIMP-1 interaction with recombinant ligand-binding domains of LRP-1 expressed by CHO cells for endocytosis study, or linked onto sensor chips for surface plasmon resonance analysis. Primary cortical neurons bound and internalized endogenous TIMP-1 through a mechanism mediated by LRP-1. This resulted in inhibition of neurite outgrowth and increased growth cone volume. Using a mutated inactive TIMP-1 variant we showed that TIMP-1 effect on neurone morphology was independent of its MMP inhibitory activity. We conclude that TIMP-1 is a new ligand of LRP-1 and we highlight a new example of its MMP-independent, cytokine-like functions. PMID:25075518

  13. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 Mediates Endocytic Clearance of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases-1 and Promotes Its Cytokine-Like Activities

    PubMed Central

    Devy, Jerôme; Etique, Nicolas; Jeanne, Albin; Schneider, Christophe; Hachet, Cathy; Ferracci, Géraldine; David, Marion; Martiny, Laurent; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Rivera, Santiago; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) regulates the extracellular matrix turnover by inhibiting the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). TIMP-1 also displays MMP-independent activities that influence the behavior of various cell types including neuronal plasticity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain mostly unknown. The trans-membrane receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) consists of a large extracellular chain with distinct ligand-binding domains that interact with numerous ligands including TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 and a short transmembrane chain with intracellular motifs that allow endocytosis and confer signaling properties to LRP-1. We addressed TIMP-1 interaction with recombinant ligand-binding domains of LRP-1 expressed by CHO cells for endocytosis study, or linked onto sensor chips for surface plasmon resonance analysis. Primary cortical neurons bound and internalized endogenous TIMP-1 through a mechanism mediated by LRP-1. This resulted in inhibition of neurite outgrowth and increased growth cone volume. Using a mutated inactive TIMP-1 variant we showed that TIMP-1 effect on neurone morphology was independent of its MMP inhibitory activity. We conclude that TIMP-1 is a new ligand of LRP-1 and we highlight a new example of its MMP-independent, cytokine-like functions. PMID:25075518

  14. The role of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) in Alzheimer's A beta generation: development of a cell-based model system.

    PubMed

    Goto, Joy J; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2002-01-01

    The clearance and degradation of extracellular A beta is critical for regulating beta-amyloid deposition, a major hallmark of brains of patients with A beta in Alzheimer's Disease. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein, LRP1, is a large endocytic receptor that significantly contributes to the balance between degradation and production of A beta. An extracellular portion of the LRP, known as the cluster II region can bind to the secreted form of APP (sAPP-KPI). We show here that a GST fusion protein containing the cluster II region of LRP can be used as a 'mini-receptor' that specifically binds to sAPP-KPI from conditioned cultured medium. The binding between the GST-LRP-cluster II fusion protein and sAPP-KPI can be inhibited with the strong binding ligand of LRP1, called receptor-associated protein (RAP). Furthermore, a cell-based in vitro assay system has been developed to monitor the production of total A beta and A beta(1-42) in the presence and absence of RAP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines both deficient in LRP and expressing LRP. A 3-day treatment of the L2 (CHO cells deficient in LRP and overexpressing APP751) and L3 (CHO cells expressing LRP and overexpressing APP751) cell lines with RAP showed a decrease in total A beta and, interestingly, also a decrease in the ratio of A beta42/A beta(total). This cell-based model system and LRP-cluster II mini-receptor will be very useful for screening novel compounds that can reduce A beta accumulation by inhibiting binding of APP-KPI to LRP1. PMID:12212791

  15. Chimeric RXFP1 and RXFP2 Receptors Highlight the Similar Mechanism of Activation Utilizing Their N-Terminal Low-Density Lipoprotein Class A Modules.

    PubMed

    Bruell, Shoni; Kong, Roy C K; Petrie, Emma J; Hoare, Brad; Wade, John D; Scott, Daniel J; Gooley, Paul R; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2013-01-01

    Relaxin family peptide (RXFP) receptors 1 and 2 are unique G-protein coupled receptors in that they contain an N-terminal low-density lipoprotein type A (LDLa) module which is necessary for receptor activation. The current hypothesis suggests that upon ligand binding the LDLa module interacts with the transmembrane (TM) domain of a homodimer partner receptor to induce the active receptor conformations. We recently demonstrated that three residues in the N-terminus of the RXFP1 LDLa module are potentially involved in hydrophobic interactions with the receptor to drive activation. RXFP2 shares two out of three of the residues implicated, suggesting that the two LDLa modules could be interchanged without adversely affecting activity. However, in 2007 it was shown that a chimera consisting of the RXFP1 receptor with its LDLa swapped for that of RXFP2 did not signal. We noticed this construct also contained the RXFP2 region linking the LDLa to the leucine-rich repeats. We therefore constructed chimeric RXFP1 and RXFP2 receptors with their LDLa modules swapped immediately C-terminally to the final cysteine residue of the module, retaining the native linker. In addition, we exchanged the TM domains of the chimeras to explore if matching the LDLa module with the TM domain of its native receptor altered activity. All of the chimeras were expressed at the surface of HEK293T cells with ligand binding profiles similar to the wild-type receptors. Importantly, as predicted, ligand binding was able to induce cAMP-based signaling. Chimeras of RXFP1 with the LDLa of RXFP2 demonstrated reduced H2 relaxin potency with the pairing of the RXFP2 TM with the RXFP2 LDLa necessary for full ligand efficacy. In contrast the ligand-mediated potencies and efficacies on the RXFP2 chimeras were similar suggesting the RXFP1 LDLa module has similar efficacy on the RXFP2 TM domain. Our studies demonstrate the LDLa modules of RXFP1 and RXFP2 modulate receptor activation via a similar mechanism. PMID

  16. Chimeric RXFP1 and RXFP2 Receptors Highlight the Similar Mechanism of Activation Utilizing Their N-Terminal Low-Density Lipoprotein Class A Modules

    PubMed Central

    Bruell, Shoni; Kong, Roy C. K.; Petrie, Emma J.; Hoare, Brad; Wade, John D.; Scott, Daniel J.; Gooley, Paul R.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Relaxin family peptide (RXFP) receptors 1 and 2 are unique G-protein coupled receptors in that they contain an N-terminal low-density lipoprotein type A (LDLa) module which is necessary for receptor activation. The current hypothesis suggests that upon ligand binding the LDLa module interacts with the transmembrane (TM) domain of a homodimer partner receptor to induce the active receptor conformations. We recently demonstrated that three residues in the N-terminus of the RXFP1 LDLa module are potentially involved in hydrophobic interactions with the receptor to drive activation. RXFP2 shares two out of three of the residues implicated, suggesting that the two LDLa modules could be interchanged without adversely affecting activity. However, in 2007 it was shown that a chimera consisting of the RXFP1 receptor with its LDLa swapped for that of RXFP2 did not signal. We noticed this construct also contained the RXFP2 region linking the LDLa to the leucine-rich repeats. We therefore constructed chimeric RXFP1 and RXFP2 receptors with their LDLa modules swapped immediately C-terminally to the final cysteine residue of the module, retaining the native linker. In addition, we exchanged the TM domains of the chimeras to explore if matching the LDLa module with the TM domain of its native receptor altered activity. All of the chimeras were expressed at the surface of HEK293T cells with ligand binding profiles similar to the wild-type receptors. Importantly, as predicted, ligand binding was able to induce cAMP-based signaling. Chimeras of RXFP1 with the LDLa of RXFP2 demonstrated reduced H2 relaxin potency with the pairing of the RXFP2 TM with the RXFP2 LDLa necessary for full ligand efficacy. In contrast the ligand-mediated potencies and efficacies on the RXFP2 chimeras were similar suggesting the RXFP1 LDLa module has similar efficacy on the RXFP2 TM domain. Our studies demonstrate the LDLa modules of RXFP1 and RXFP2 modulate receptor activation via a similar mechanism. PMID

  17. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced foam cell formation is mediated by formyl peptide receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ha Young; Oh, Eunseo; Kim, Sang Doo; Seo, Jeong Kon; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2014-01-17

    The increased level of LDL and its modification into oxLDL has been regarded as an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Although some scavenger receptors including CD36 and RAGE have been considered as target receptors for oxLDL, involvement of other receptors should be investigated for oxLDL-induced pathological responses. In this study, we found that oxLDL-induced foam cell formation was inhibited by formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) antagonist WRW(4). oxLDL also stimulated calcium signaling and chemotactic migration in FPR2-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not in vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. Moreover, oxLDL stimulated TNF-α production, which was also almost completely inhibited by FPR2 antagonist. Our findings therefore suggest that oxLDL stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration, TNF-α production, and foam cell formation via FPR2 signaling, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis. PMID:24361884

  18. Identification of a Small Peptide That Inhibits PCSK9 Protein Binding to the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingnan; Eigenbrot, Charles; Zhou, Lijuan; Shia, Steven; Li, Wei; Quan, Clifford; Tom, Jeffrey; Moran, Paul; Di Lello, Paola; Skelton, Nicholas J.; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Peterson, Andrew; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) is a negative regulator of the hepatic LDL receptor, and clinical studies with PCSK9-inhibiting antibodies have demonstrated strong LDL-c-lowering effects. Here we screened phage-displayed peptide libraries and identified the 13-amino acid linear peptide Pep2-8 as the smallest PCSK9 inhibitor with a clearly defined mechanism of inhibition that has been described. Pep2-8 bound to PCSK9 with a KD of 0.7 μm but did not bind to other proprotein convertases. It fully restored LDL receptor surface levels and LDL particle uptake in PCSK9-treated HepG2 cells. The crystal structure of Pep2-8 bound to C-terminally truncated PCSK9 at 1.85 Å resolution showed that the peptide adopted a strand-turn-helix conformation, which is remarkably similar to its solution structure determined by NMR. Consistent with the functional binding site identified by an Ala scan of PCSK9, the structural Pep2-8 contact region of about 400 Å2 largely overlapped with that contacted by the EGF(A) domain of the LDL receptor, suggesting a competitive inhibition mechanism. Consistent with this, Pep2-8 inhibited LDL receptor and EGF(A) domain binding to PCSK9 with IC50 values of 0.8 and 0.4 μm, respectively. Remarkably, Pep2-8 mimicked secondary structural elements of the EGF(A) domain that interact with PCSK9, notably the β-strand and a discontinuous short α-helix, and it engaged in the same β-sheet hydrogen bonds as EGF(A) does. Although Pep2-8 itself may not be amenable to therapeutic applications, this study demonstrates the feasibility of developing peptidic inhibitors to functionally relevant sites on PCSK9. PMID:24225950

  19. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-mediated delivery of a lipophilic daunorubicin derivative to B16 tumours in mice using apolipoprotein E-enriched liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Versluis, A. J.; Rensen, P. C.; Rump, E. T.; Van Berkel, T. J.; Bijsterbosch, M. K.

    1998-01-01

    Many tumours express relatively high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors on their membranes. The LDL receptor is, therefore, an attractive target for the selective delivery of antineoplastic drugs to tumour cells. We reported previously on the synthesis of small apolipoprotein E (apoE)-containing liposomes that behave in vivo in a very similar way to native LDL. In this study, we examined the interaction of this liposomal carrier with cultured B16 melanoma cells. Binding of apoE liposomes to the cells is saturable, with a maximum binding of approximately 90000 particles per cell. Cross-competition studies indicated that apoE liposomes are bound by the LDL receptor. Association of apoE liposomes to B16 cells is strictly Ca2+ dependent, which forms additional evidence for a role of the LDL receptor. The affinity of apoE liposomes for the LDL receptor on B16 cells is 15-fold higher than that of LDL (0.77 vs 11.5 nM respectively). ApoE is essential for the LDL receptor recognition because liposomes lacking apoE were, in competition studies, 20- to 50-fold less effective than apoE-containing liposomes. We examined in B16 tumour-bearing mice the tumour-localizing properties of apoE liposomes and the disposition of an incorporated lipophilic derivative of daunorubicin (LAD). Tissue distribution studies showed that LAD-loaded apoE liposomes were taken up and processed by the major LDL receptor-expressing organs (i.e. adrenals, liver and spleen). Of all other tissues, the tumour showed the highest uptake. The distribution patterns of LAD-loaded apoE liposomes and native LDL in the tumour-bearing mice were very similar, which supports the role of the LDL receptor in the disposition of the prodrug-loaded particles. The disposition of LAD followed the pattern of the liposomal carrier. We conclude that apoE liposomes enable LDL receptor-mediated specific delivery of antineoplastic (pro)drugs to tumours, and, therefore, constitute an attractive novel option for

  20. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Calmodulin antagonists increase the amount of mRNA for the low-density-lipoprotein receptor in skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, H; Filipovic, I; Hasilik, A; Buddecke, E

    1988-01-01

    The effects of calmodulin antagonists on the amount of LDL receptor (LDL-R) mRNA in cultured human fibroblasts was examined by hybridization with a fragment of LDL-R cDNA. In a 'Northern' blot the fragment hybridized to a 5.3-kilobase RNA, as expected for LDL-R mRNA. The concentration of this RNA was increased in preparations from cells that were treated with trifluoperazine or W-7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloronaphthalene-1-sulphonamide]. The selectivity of the increase was established by using a probe for beta-actin mRNA. In dot-blot hybridization it was observed that the calmodulin antagonists cause 2-4-fold relative increase in the amount of LDL-R mRNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3421929

  2. The low density lipoprotein receptor modulates the effects of hypogonadism on diet-induced obesity and related metabolic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Caterina; Mpatsoulis, Diogenis; Natsos, Anastasios; Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Zvintzou, Evangelia; Traish, Abdulmaged M.; Voshol, Peter J.; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Kypreos, Kyriakos E.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we investigated how LDL receptor deficiency (Ldlr−/−) modulates the effects of testosterone on obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions. Though sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice fed Western-type diet for 12 weeks became obese and showed disturbed plasma glucose metabolism and plasma cholesterol and TG profiles, castrated mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity and had improved glucose metabolism and reduced plasma TG levels, despite a further deterioration in their plasma cholesterol profile. The effect of hypogonadism on diet-induced weight gain of Ldlr−/− mice was independent of ApoE and Lrp1. Indirect calorimetry analysis indicated that hypogonadism in Ldlr−/− mice was associated with increased metabolic rate. Indeed, mitochondrial cytochrome c and uncoupling protein 1 expression were elevated, primarily in white adipose tissue, confirming increased mitochondrial metabolic activity due to thermogenesis. Testosterone replacement in castrated Ldlr−/− mice for a period of 8 weeks promoted diet-induced obesity, indicating a direct role of testosterone in the observed phenotype. Treatment of sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane for 8 weeks showed that the obesity of castrated Ldlr−/− mice is independent of estrogens. Overall, our data reveal a novel role of Ldlr as functional modulator of metabolic alterations associated with hypogonadism. PMID:24837748

  3. Inhibition of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 reduces cardiac fibroblast proliferation by suppressing GATA Binding Protein 4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Ning-Ning; Liu, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Shuang-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Zhi; Li, Ai-Qun; Liu, Shi-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and GATA Binding Protein 4 (GATA4) are important for the growth of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). When deregulated, LOX-1 and GATA4 can cause cardiac remodeling. In the present study, we found novel evidence that GATA4 was required for the LOX-1 regulation of CF proliferation. The inhibition of LOX-1 by RNA interference LOX-1 lentivirus resulted in the loss of PI3K/Akt activation and GATA4 protein expression. The overexpression of LOX-1 by lentivirus rescued CF proliferation, PI3K/Akt activation, and GATA4 protein expression. Moreover, GATA4 overexpression enhanced CF proliferation with LOX-1 inhibition. We also found that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activation by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, reduced cell proliferation and protein level of GATA4. In summary, GATA4 may play an important role in the LOX-1 and PI3K/Akt regulation of CF proliferation. PMID:27216460

  4. Serum response element-like sequences of the human low density lipoprotein receptor promoter: possible regulation sites for sterol-independent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Pak, Y K

    1996-02-01

    Serum factors stimulate low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene expression in HepG2 cells through sterol-independent pathways. Promoter element other than sterol regulatory element-1 (SRE-1) seems to be necessary. Protein binding activity of the human LDLR promoter fragment (550bp) beyond the SRE-1 was determined by DNase I footprint assay. Five different promoter regions were protected from DNase I digestion; -226 to -258, -291 to -304, -324 to -336, -360 to -373, and -521 to -528. The regions of -324 to -336 and -521 to -528 showed serum response element (SRE)-like consensus sequence of CC(A/T)6GG. Serum incubation affected the protection degree of the SRE-like elements, but 25-hydroxycholesterol did not. It is proposed, therefore, that the promoter region of -324 to -336 and/or -521 to -528 showed serum response elements, but 25-hydroxycholesterol did not. It is proposed, therefore, that the promoter region of -324 to -336 and/or -521 to -528 in human LDLR gene may be responsible for the rapid activation of the gene transcription by serum factor in a sterol-independent manner. PMID:8932516

  5. The association of very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) haplotypes with egg production indicates VLDLR is a candidate gene for modulating egg production.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZhePeng; Meng, GuoHua; Li, Na; Yu, MingFen; Liang, XiaoWei; Min, YuNa; Liu, FuZhu; Gao, YuPeng

    2016-01-01

    The very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) transports egg yolk precursors into oocytes. However, our knowledge of the distribution patterns of VLDLR variants among breeds and their relationship to egg production is still incomplete. In this study, eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that account for 87% of all VLDLR variants were genotyped in Nick Chick (NC, n=91), Lohmann Brown (LohB, n=50) and Lueyang (LY, n=381) chickens, the latter being an Chinese indigenous breed. Egg production by NC and LY chickens was recorded from 17 to 50 weeks. Only four similar haplotypes were found in NC and LohB, of which two accounted for 100% of all NC haplotypes and 92.5% of LohB haplotypes. In contrast, there was considerable haplotypic diversity in LY. Comparison of egg production in LY showed that hens with NC-like haplotypes had a significantly higher production (p < 0.05) than those without the haplotypes. However, VLDLR expression was not significantly different between the haplotypes. These findings indicate a divergence in the distribution of VLDLR haplotypes between selected and non-selected breeds and suggest that the near fixation of VLDLR variants in NC and LohB is compatible with signature of selection. These data also support VLDLR as a candidate gene for modulating egg production. PMID:27560838

  6. A novel class of antihyperlipidemic agents with low density lipoprotein receptor up-regulation via the adaptor protein autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shigehiro; Ban, Hitoshi; Tsuboya, Norie; Uno, Shinsaku; Kino, Kouichi; Ioriya, Katsuhisa; Kitano, Masafumi; Ueno, Yoshihide

    2010-04-22

    We have previously reported compound 2 as a inhibitor of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol O-acyltransferase (ACAT) and up-regulator of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) expression. In this study we focused on compound 2, a unique LDL-R up-regulator, and describe the discovery of a novel class of up-regulators of LDL-R. Replacement the methylene urea linker in compound 2 with an acylsulfonamide linker kept a potent LDL-R up-regulatory activity, and subsequent optimization work gave compound 39 as a highly potent LDL-R up-regulator (39; EC(25) = 0.047 microM). Compound 39 showed no ACAT inhibitory activity even at 1 microM. The sodium salts of compound 39 reduced plasma total and LDL cholesterol levels in a dose-dependent manner in an experimental animal model of hyperlipidemia. Moreover, we revealed in this study using RNA interference that autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH), an adaptor protein of LDL-R, is essential for compound 39 up-regulation of LDL-R expression. PMID:20356098

  7. Berberine metabolites could induce low density lipoprotein receptor up-regulation to exert lipid-lowering effects in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Cao, Shijie; Wang, Ying; Xu, Peixiang; Yan, Jiankun; Bin, Wen; Qiu, Feng; Kang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from several Chinese herbal medicines, such as Coptis chinensis, Berberis aristata, and Coptis japonica. It exhibits a lipid-lowering effect by up-regulating the hepatic low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) expression. However, the plasma concentration of BBR is very low after oral administration for the reason that BBR is poorly absorbed and rapidly metabolized. Therefore, it is hard to explain the pharmacological effects of BBR in vivo. Here, RT-PCR, Western blotting and Oil Red O staining were used to investigate the effects of four BBR metabolites on LDLR expression and lipid accumulation in human hepatoma Hep G2 cells. Our results suggested that BBR increased the LDLR mRNA and protein levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Four metabolites of BBR, jatrorrhizine, columbamine, berberrubine and demethyleneberberine, were found to be able to up-regulate LDLR mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, almost all the metabolites had potent effects on inhibiting cellular lipid accumulation. These results suggest that both BBR and its metabolites exhibit lipid-lowering effects by up-regulating LDLR expression, and BBR and its metabolites might be the in vivo active forms of BBR produced after oral administration. This study provides information to help us understand the mechanisms underlying the hypolipidemic effects of BBR in vivo. PMID:24321576

  8. The Hypocholesterolemic Effect of Germinated Brown Rice Involves the Upregulation of the Apolipoprotein A1 and Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Maznah; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Ithnin, Hairuszah

    2013-01-01

    Germinated brown rice (GBR) is rich in bioactive compounds, which confer GBR with many functional properties. Evidence of its hypocholesterolemic effects is emerging, but the exact mechanisms of action and bioactive compounds involved have not been fully documented. Using type 2 diabetic rats, we studied the effects of white rice, GBR, and brown rice (BR) on lipid profile and on the regulation of selected genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Our results showed that the upregulation of apolipoprotein A1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor genes was involved in the hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR. Additionally, in vitro studies using HEPG2 cells showed that acylated steryl glycoside, gamma amino butyric acid, and oryzanol and phenolic extracts of GBR contribute to the nutrigenomic regulation of these genes. Transcriptional and nontranscriptional mechanisms are likely involved in the overall hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR suggesting that it may have an impact on the prevention and/or management of hypercholesterolemia due to a wide variety of metabolic perturbations. However, there is need to conduct long-term clinical trials to determine the clinical relevance of the hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR determined through animal studies. PMID:23671850

  9. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, M.E.; Chung, A.E.; Wewer, U.M.

    1995-03-20

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from {lambda} genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF-like repeats and the single thyroglobulin-type repeat are each encoded by separate exons. The carboxyl-terminal half of entactin displays sequence homology to the growth factor-like region of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, and in both genes this region is encoded by eight exons. The positions of four introns are also conserved in the homologous region of the two genes. These observations suggest that the entactin gene has evolved via exon shuffling. Finally, several sequence polymorphisms useful for gene linkage analysis were found in the 3{prime} noncoding region of the last exon. 52 refs., 8 figs.

  10. The association of very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) haplotypes with egg production indicates VLDLR is a candidate gene for modulating egg production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ZhePeng; Meng, GuoHua; Li, Na; Yu, MingFen; Liang, XiaoWei; Min, YuNa; Liu, FuZhu; Gao, YuPeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) transports egg yolk precursors into oocytes. However, our knowledge of the distribution patterns of VLDLR variants among breeds and their relationship to egg production is still incomplete. In this study, eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that account for 87% of all VLDLR variants were genotyped in Nick Chick (NC, n=91), Lohmann Brown (LohB, n=50) and Lueyang (LY, n=381) chickens, the latter being an Chinese indigenous breed. Egg production by NC and LY chickens was recorded from 17 to 50 weeks. Only four similar haplotypes were found in NC and LohB, of which two accounted for 100% of all NC haplotypes and 92.5% of LohB haplotypes. In contrast, there was considerable haplotypic diversity in LY. Comparison of egg production in LY showed that hens with NC-like haplotypes had a significantly higher production (p < 0.05) than those without the haplotypes. However, VLDLR expression was not significantly different between the haplotypes. These findings indicate a divergence in the distribution of VLDLR haplotypes between selected and non-selected breeds and suggest that the near fixation of VLDLR variants in NC and LohB is compatible with signature of selection. These data also support VLDLR as a candidate gene for modulating egg production. PMID:27560838

  11. Constitutive receptor-independent low density lipoprotein uptake and cholesterol accumulation by macrophages differentiated from human monocytes with macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Li, Yifu; Buono, Chiara; Waldo, Stephen W; Jones, Nancy L; Mori, Masahiro; Kruth, Howard S

    2006-06-01

    Recently, we have shown that macrophage uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and cholesterol accumulation can occur by nonreceptor mediated fluid-phase macropinocytosis when macrophages are differentiated from human monocytes in human serum and the macrophages are activated by stimulation of protein kinase C (Kruth, H. S., Jones, N. L., Huang, W., Zhao, B., Ishii, I., Chang, J., Combs, C. A., Malide, D., and Zhang, W. Y. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 2352-2360). Differentiation of human monocytes in human serum produces a distinct macrophage phenotype. In this study, we examined the effect on LDL uptake of an alternative macrophage differentiation phenotype. Differentiation of macrophages from human monocytes in fetal bovine serum with macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) produced a macrophage phenotype demonstrating constitutive fluid-phase uptake of native LDL leading to macrophage cholesterol accumulation. Fluid-phase endocytosis of LDL by M-CSF human macrophages showed non-saturable uptake of LDL that did not down-regulate over 48 h. LDL uptake was mediated by continuous actin-dependent macropinocytosis of LDL by these M-CSF-differentiated macrophages. M-CSF is a cytokine present within atherosclerotic lesions. Thus, macropinocytosis of LDL by macrophages differentiated from monocytes under the influence of M-CSF is a plausible mechanism to account for macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerotic lesions. This mechanism of macrophage foam cell formation does not depend on LDL modification or macrophage receptors. PMID:16606620

  12. Lupin Peptides Modulate the Protein-Protein Interaction of PCSK9 with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Carmen; Zanoni, Chiara; Aiello, Gilda; Arnoldi, Anna; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has been recently identified as a new useful target for hypercholesterolemia treatment. This work demonstrates that natural peptides, deriving from the hydrolysis of lupin protein and absorbable at intestinal level, are able to inhibit the protein-protein interaction between PCSK9 and the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). In order to sort out the best potential inhibitors among these peptides, a refined in silico model of the PCSK9/LDLR interaction was developed. Docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and peptide binding energy estimations, by MM-GBSA approach, permitted to select the two best candidates among tested peptides that were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity. The most active was P5 that induced a concentration dependent inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR binding, with an IC50 value equal to 1.6 ± 0.33 μM. Tested at a 10 μM concentration, this peptide increased by 66 ± 21.4% the ability of HepG2 cells to take up LDL from the extracellular environment. PMID:27424515

  13. Lupin Peptides Modulate the Protein-Protein Interaction of PCSK9 with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lammi, Carmen; Zanoni, Chiara; Aiello, Gilda; Arnoldi, Anna; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has been recently identified as a new useful target for hypercholesterolemia treatment. This work demonstrates that natural peptides, deriving from the hydrolysis of lupin protein and absorbable at intestinal level, are able to inhibit the protein-protein interaction between PCSK9 and the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). In order to sort out the best potential inhibitors among these peptides, a refined in silico model of the PCSK9/LDLR interaction was developed. Docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and peptide binding energy estimations, by MM-GBSA approach, permitted to select the two best candidates among tested peptides that were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity. The most active was P5 that induced a concentration dependent inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR binding, with an IC50 value equal to 1.6 ± 0.33 μM. Tested at a 10 μM concentration, this peptide increased by 66 ± 21.4% the ability of HepG2 cells to take up LDL from the extracellular environment. PMID:27424515

  14. Lupin Peptides Modulate the Protein-Protein Interaction of PCSK9 with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor in HepG2 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Carmen; Zanoni, Chiara; Aiello, Gilda; Arnoldi, Anna; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has been recently identified as a new useful target for hypercholesterolemia treatment. This work demonstrates that natural peptides, deriving from the hydrolysis of lupin protein and absorbable at intestinal level, are able to inhibit the protein-protein interaction between PCSK9 and the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). In order to sort out the best potential inhibitors among these peptides, a refined in silico model of the PCSK9/LDLR interaction was developed. Docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and peptide binding energy estimations, by MM-GBSA approach, permitted to select the two best candidates among tested peptides that were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity. The most active was P5 that induced a concentration dependent inhibition of the PCSK9-LDLR binding, with an IC50 value equal to 1.6 ± 0.33 μM. Tested at a 10 μM concentration, this peptide increased by 66 ± 21.4% the ability of HepG2 cells to take up LDL from the extracellular environment.

  15. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 abrogation causes resistance to inflammatory bone destruction in mice, despite promoting osteoclastogenesis in the steady state.

    PubMed

    Nakayachi, Mai; Ito, Junta; Hayashida, Chiyomi; Ohyama, Yoko; Kakino, Akemi; Okayasu, Mari; Sato, Takuya; Ogasawara, Toru; Kaneda, Toshio; Suda, Naoto; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Hakeda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Inflammatory bone diseases have been attributed to increased bone resorption by augmented and activated bone-resorbing osteoclasts in response to inflammation. Although the production of diverse proinflammatory cytokines is induced at the inflamed sites, the inflammation also generates reactive oxygen species that modify many biological compounds, including lipids. Among the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), which is a key molecule in the pathogenesis of multifactorial inflammatory atherosclerosis, was downregulated with osteoclast differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that LOX-1 negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation by basically suppressing the cell-cell fusion of preosteoclasts. The LOX-1-deleted (LOX-1(-/-)) mice consistently decreased the trabecular bone mass because of elevated bone resorption during the growing phase. In contrast, when the calvaria was inflamed by a local lipopolysaccharide-injection, the inflammation-induced bone destruction accompanied by the elevated expression of osteoclastogenesis-related genes was reduced by LOX-1 deficiency. Moreover, the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), a trigger molecule for osteoclast differentiation, evoked by the inflammation was also abrogated in the LOX-1(-/-) mice. Osteoblasts, the major producers of RANKL, also expressed LOX-1 in response to proinflammatory agents, interleukin-1β and prostaglandin E2. In the co-culture of LOX-1(-/-) osteoblasts and wild-type osteoclast precursors, the osteoclastogenesis induced by interleukin-1β and prostaglandin E2 decreased; this process occurred in parallel with the downregulation of osteoblastic RANKL expression. Collectively, LOX-1 abrogation results in resistance to inflammatory bone destruction, despite promoting osteoclastogenesis in the steady state. Our findings indicate the novel involvement of LOX-1 in physiological bone homeostasis and inflammatory bone diseases

  16. Monocytic expression of osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is induced in atherosclerotic mice and regulated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sinningen, Kathrin; Rauner, Martina; Goettsch, Claudia; Al-Fakhri, Nadia; Schoppet, Michael; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2013-07-26

    The osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR), primarily described as a co-stimulatory regulator of osteoclast differentiation, represents a potential link between bone metabolism and vascular biology. Previously, we identified OSCAR as an endothelial cell-derived target of the proatherogenic factor oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Since monocytes play an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis, we assessed whether atherogenic stimuli also regulate the expression of OSCAR on monocytes. Four-week-old male wild-type (WT), apolipoprotein e knockout (apoe KO), and LDL receptor knockout (ldlr KO) mice were fed a high-fat diet or normal chow for 6weeks. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from the spleen were stained with antibodies against CD14 and OSCAR for subsequent flow cytometric analysis. OSCAR surface expression on CD14-positive monocytes increased 2-fold in PBMCs from apoe KO mice compared to WT mice. Feeding a high-fat diet further increased OSCAR surface expression 1.5-fold in apoe KO mice compared to normal diet. Moreover, OSCAR-positive macrophages were detected in atherosclerotic plaques of apoe KO mice. Interestingly, monocytic OSCAR expression was not altered in ldlr KO mice. In the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, TNFα and oxLDL induced OSCAR mRNA expression by 2-fold and 5-fold (p<0.01), respectively. Blocking the oxLDL receptor LOX-1 and inhibiting the NF-κB pathway prevented OSCAR induction. In conclusion, OSCAR expression in monocytic cells is regulated by proatherogenic stimuli further pointing towards a role in vascular inflammation or plaque vulnerability during atherosclerosis. PMID:23817038

  17. Impact of Concanavalin-A-Mediated Cytoskeleton Disruption on Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-1 Internalization and Cell Surface Expression in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Samuel Burke; Pratt, Jonathan; Beauchemin, David; Haidara, Khadidja; Annabi, Borhane

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) is a multiligand endocytic receptor, which plays a pivotal role in controlling cytoskeleton dynamics during cancer cell migration. Its rapid endocytosis further allows efficient clearance of extracellular ligands. Concanavalin-A (ConA) is a lectin used to trigger in vitro physiological cellular processes, including cytokines secretion, nitric oxide production, and T-lymphocytes activation. Given that ConA exerts part of its effects through cytoskeleton remodeling, we questioned whether it affected LRP-1 expression, intracellular trafficking, and cell surface function in grade IV U87 glioblastoma cells. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we found that loss of the cell surface 600-kDa mature form of LRP-1 occurs upon ConA treatment. Consequently, internalization of the physiological α2-macroglobulin and the synthetic angiopep-2 ligands of LRP-1 was also decreased. Silencing of known mediators of ConA, such as the membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase, and the Toll-like receptors (TLR)-2 and TLR-6 was unable to rescue ConA-mediated LRP-1 expression decrease, implying that the loss of LRP-1 was independent of cell surface relayed signaling. The ConA-mediated reduction in LRP-1 expression was emulated by the actin cytoskeleton-disrupting agent cytochalasin-D, but not by the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole, and required both lysosomal- and ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation. Our study implies that actin cytoskeleton integrity is required for proper LRP-1 cell surface functions and that impaired trafficking leads to specialized compartmentation and degradation. Our data also strengthen the biomarker role of cell surface LRP-1 functions in the vectorized transport of therapeutic angiopep bioconjugates into brain cancer cells. PMID:27226736

  18. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. ); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  19. Receptor-mediated uptake of low-density lipoprotein by B16 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Versluis, A. J.; van Geel, P. J.; Oppelaar, H.; van Berkel, T. J.; Bijsterbosch, M. K.

    1996-01-01

    Selective delivery of cytotoxic anti-neoplastic drugs can diminish the severe side-effects associated with these drugs. Many malignant tumours express high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors on their membranes. Therefore, LDL may be used as a carrier to obtain selective delivery of anti-neoplastic drugs to tumours. The present study was performed to investigate the feasibility of the murine B16 tumour/mouse model for the evaluation of LDL-mediated tumour therapy. LDL binds with high affinity to LDL receptors on cultured B16 cells (Kd, 5.9 +/- 2.3 micrograms ml-1; Bmax 206 +/- 23 ng LDL mg-1 cell protein). After binding and internalisation, LDL was very efficiently degraded: 724 +/- 19 ng LDL mg-1 cell protein h-1. Chloroquine and ammonium chloride completely inhibited the degradation of LDL by the B16 cells, indicating involvement of lysosomes. LDL receptors were down-regulated by 70% after preincubation of B16 cells with 300 micrograms ml-1 LDL, indicating that their expression is regulated by intracellular cholesterol. To evaluate the uptake of LDL by the B16 tumour in vivo, tissue distribution studies were performed in C57/B1 mice inoculated with B16 tumours. For these experiments, LDL was radiolabelled with tyramine cellobiose, a non-degradable label, which is retained in cells after uptake. At 24 h after injection of LDL, the liver, adrenals and the spleen were found to be the major organs involved in LDL uptake, with tissue-serum (T/S) ratios of 0.82 +/- 0.08, 1.17 +/- 0.20 and 0.69 +/- 0.08 respectively. Of all the other tissues, the tumour showed the highest uptake of LDL (T/S ratio of 0.40 +/- 0.07). A large part of the LDL uptake was receptor mediated, as the uptake of methylated LDL was much lower. Although the LDL uptake by the liver, spleen and adrenals is higher than that by the tumour, the LDL receptor-mediated uptake by these organs may be selectively down-regulated by methods that do not affect the expression of LDL receptors on

  20. Oxidized low density lipoprotein induces bone morphogenetic protein-2 in coronary artery endothelial cells via Toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Ao, Lihua; Shi, Yi; Johnson, Thomas R; Fullerton, David A; Meng, Xianzhong

    2011-04-01

    Vascular calcification is a common complication in atherosclerosis. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) plays an important role in atherosclerotic vascular calcification. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on BMP-2 protein expression in human coronary artery endothelial cells (CAECs), the roles of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 in oxLDL-induced BMP-2 expression, and the signaling pathways involved. Human CAECs were stimulated with oxLDL. The roles of TLR2 and TLR4 in oxLDL-induced BMP-2 expression were determined by pretreatment with neutralizing antibody, siRNA, and overexpression. Stimulation with oxLDL increased cellular BMP-2 protein levels in a dose-dependent manner (40-160 μg/ml). Pretreatment with neutralizing antibodies against TLR2 and TLR4 or silencing of these two receptors reduced oxLDL-induced BMP-2 expression. Overexpression of TLR2 and TLR4 enhanced the cellular BMP-2 response to oxLDL. Furthermore, oxLDL was co-localized with TLR2 and TLR4. BMP-2 expression was associated with activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Inhibition of NF-κB and ERK1/2 reduced BMP-2 expression whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In conclusion, oxLDL induces BMP-2 expression through TLR2 and TLR4 in human CAECs. The NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in the signaling mechanism. These findings underscore an important role for TLR2 and TLR4 in mediating the BMP-2 response to oxLDL in human CAECs and indicate that these two immunoreceptors contribute to the mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic vascular calcification. PMID:21325271

  1. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor Deficiency Causes Impaired Osteoclastogenesis and Increased Bone Mass in Mice because of Defect in Osteoclastic Cell-Cell Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Okayasu, Mari; Nakayachi, Mai; Hayashida, Chiyomi; Ito, Junta; Kaneda, Toshio; Masuhara, Masaaki; Suda, Naoto; Sato, Takuya; Hakeda, Yoshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with both atherosclerosis and vascular calcification attributed to hyperlipidemia. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms explaining the parallel progression of these diseases remain unclear. Here, we used low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR−/−) mice to elucidate the role of LDLR in regulating the differentiation of osteoclasts, which are responsible for bone resorption. Culturing wild-type osteoclast precursors in medium containing LDL-depleted serum decreased receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation, and this defect was additively rescued by simultaneous treatment with native and oxidized LDLs. Osteoclast precursors constitutively expressed LDLR in a RANKL-independent manner. Osteoclast formation from LDLR−/− osteoclast precursors was delayed, and the multinucleated cells formed in culture were smaller and contained fewer nuclei than wild-type cells, implying impaired cell-cell fusion. Despite these findings, RANK signaling, including the activation of Erk and Akt, was normal in LDLR−/− preosteoclasts, and RANKL-induced expression of NFATc1 (a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis), cathepsin K, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase was equivalent in LDLR-null and wild-type cells. In contrast, the amounts of the osteoclast fusion-related proteins v-ATPase V0 subunit d2 and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein in LDLR−/− plasma membranes were reduced when compared with the wild type, suggesting a correlation with impaired cell-cell fusion, which occurs on the plasma membrane. LDLR−/− mice consistently exhibited increased bone mass in vivo. This change was accompanied by decreases in bone resorption parameters, with no changes in bone formation parameters. These findings provide a novel mechanism for osteoclast differentiation and improve the understanding of the correlation between osteoclast formation and lipids. PMID:22500026

  2. A novel functional interaction between the Sp1-like protein KLF13 and SREBP-Sp1 activation complex underlies regulation of low density lipoprotein receptor promoter function.

    PubMed

    Natesampillai, Sekar; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Urrutia, Raul; Veldhuis, Johannes D

    2006-02-10

    Cholesterol homeostasis is regulated by a family of transcription factors designated sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). Precise control of SREBP-targeted genes requires additional interactions with co-regulatory transcription factors. In the case of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), SREBP cooperates with the specificity protein Sp1 to activate the promoter. In this report, we describe a novel pathway in LDLR transcriptional regulation distinct from the SREBP-Sp1 activation complex involving the Sp1-like protein Krueppel-like factor 13 (KLF13). Using a combination of RNA interference, electrophoretic mobility shift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and reporter assays, deletion, and site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that KLF13 mediates repression in a DNA context-selective manner. KLF13 repression of LDLR promoter activity appears to be needed to keep the receptor silent, a state that can be antagonized by Sp1, SREBP, and inhibitors of histone deacetylase activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that KLF13 binds proximal LDLR DNA sequences in vivo and that exogenous oxysterol up-regulates such binding. Together these studies identify a novel regulatory pathway in which gene repression by KLF13 must be overcome by the Sp1-SREBP complex to activate the LDLR promoter. Therefore, these data should replace a pre-existent and more simple paradigm that takes into consideration only the induction of the activator proteins Sp1-SREBP as necessary for LDLR promoter drive without including default repression, such as that by KLF13, of the LDLR gene. PMID:16303770

  3. Aortic cholesterol accumulation correlates with systemic inflammation but not hepatic and gonadal adipose tissue inflammation in low-density lipoprotein receptor null mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Miller, Bradley; Matthan, Nirupa R; Goktas, Zeynep; Wu, Dayong; Reed, Debra B; Yin, Xiangling; Grammas, Paula; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Shen, Chwan-Li; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2013-12-01

    Inflammation is a major contributor to the development of atherosclerotic plaque, yet the involvement of liver and visceral adipose tissue inflammatory status in atherosclerotic lesion development has yet to be fully elucidated. We hypothesized that an atherogenic diet would increase inflammatory response and lipid accumulation in the liver and gonadal adipose tissue (GAT) and would correlate with systemic inflammation and aortic lesion formation in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor null (LDLr-/-) mice. For 32 weeks, LDLr-/- mice (n = 10/group) were fed either an atherogenic (high saturated fat and cholesterol) or control (low fat and cholesterol) diet. Hepatic and GAT lipid content and expression of inflammatory factors were measured using standard procedures. Compared with the control diet, the atherogenic diet significantly increased hepatic triglyceride and total cholesterol (TC), primarily esterified cholesterol, and GAT triglyceride content. These changes were accompanied by increased expression of acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 5, CD36, ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 and scavenger receptor B class 1, and they decreased the expression of cytochrome P450, family 7 and subfamily a, polypeptide 1 in GAT. Aortic TC content was positively associated with hepatic TC, triglyceride, and GAT triglyceride contents as well as plasma interleukin 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 concentrations. Although when compared with the control diet, the atherogenic diet increased hepatic tumor necrosis factor α production, they were not associated with aortic TC content. These data suggest that the LDLr-/- mice responded to the atherogenic diet by increasing lipid accumulation in the liver and GAT, which may have increased inflammatory response. Aortic TC content was positively associated with systemic inflammation but not hepatic and GAT inflammatory status. PMID:24267047

  4. Low density lipoprotein receptor gene Ava II polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several common genetic polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene have associated with modifications of serum total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, but the results are not consistent in different populations. Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of LDL-R gene Ava Ⅱ polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 1024 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 792 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the LDL-R gene Ava Ⅱ polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-C, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and the ratio of ApoA1 to ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.01 for all). The frequency of A- and A+ alleles was 65.5% and 34.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 80.7% and 19.3% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. The frequency of A-A-, A-A+ and A+A+ genotypes was 42.6%, 45.9% and 11.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 64.9%, 31.6% and 3.5% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. There was also significant difference in the genotypic frequencies between males and females in Bai Ku Yao (P <0.05), and in the genotypic and allelic frequencies between normal LDL-C (≤ 3.20 mmol/L) and high LDL-C (>3.20 mmol/L) subgroups in Bai Ku Yao (P < 0.05 for each) and between males and females in Han (P < 0.05 for each). The levels of LDL-C in males and TC and HDL-C in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05 for all) in Bai Ku Yao, whereas the levels of HDL-C in males and HDL-C and ApoA1 in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05-0.001) in Han. The subjects with A+A+ genotype had

  5. Immunization with malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) reduces atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice challenged with Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Turunen, S Pauliina; Kummu, Outi; Wang, Chunguang; Harila, Kirsi; Mattila, Riikka; Sahlman, Marjo; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2015-05-01

    Periodontal infections increase the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease via partly unresolved mechanisms. Of the natural IgM Abs that recognize molecular mimicry on bacterial epitopes and modified lipid and protein structures, IgM directed against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is associated with atheroprotective properties. Here, the effect of natural immune responses to malondialdehyde-modified LDL (MDA-LDL) in conferring protection against atherosclerosis, which was accelerated by the major periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, was investigated. LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice were immunized with mouse MDA-LDL without adjuvant before topical application challenge with live P. gingivalis. Atherosclerosis was analyzed after a high-fat diet, and plasma IgG and IgM Ab levels were measured throughout the study, and the secretion of IL-5, IL-10 and IFN-γ in splenocytes stimulated with MDA-LDL was determined. LDLR(-/-) mice immunized with MDA-LDL had elevated IgM and IgG levels to MDA-LDL compared with saline-treated controls. MDA-LDL immunization diminished aortic lipid depositions after challenge with P. gingivalis compared with mice receiving only P. gingivalis challenge. Immunization of LDLR(-/-) mice with homologous MDA-LDL stimulated the production of IL-5, implicating general activation of B-1 cells. Immune responses to MDA-LDL protected from the P. gingivalis-accelerated atherosclerosis. Thus, the linkage between bacterial infectious burden and atherogenesis is suggested to be modulated via natural IgM directed against cross-reactive epitopes on bacteria and modified LDL. PMID:25134521

  6. Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 (PCSK9) Single Domain Antibodies Are Potent Inhibitors of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Degradation.

    PubMed

    Weider, Elodie; Susan-Resiga, Delia; Essalmani, Rachid; Hamelin, Josée; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Nimesh, Surendra; Ashraf, Yahya; Wycoff, Keith L; Zhang, Jianbing; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G

    2016-08-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) correspond to the antigen-binding domains of camelid antibodies. They have the same antigen-binding properties and specificity as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) but are easier and cheaper to produce. We report here the development of sdAbs targeting human PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) as an alternative to anti-PCSK9 mAbs. After immunizing a llama with human PCSK9, we selected four sdAbs that bind PCSK9 with a high affinity and produced them as fusion proteins with a mouse Fc. All four sdAb-Fcs recognize the C-terminal Cys-His-rich domain of PCSK9. We performed multiple cellular assays and demonstrated that the selected sdAbs efficiently blocked PCSK9-mediated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) degradation in cell lines, in human hepatocytes, and in mouse primary hepatocytes. We further showed that the sdAb-Fcs do not affect binding of PCSK9 to the LDLR but rather block its induced cellular LDLR degradation. Pcsk9 knock-out mice expressing a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgene were generated, resulting in plasma levels of ∼300 ng/ml human PCSK9. Mice were singly or doubly injected with the best sdAb-Fc and analyzed at day 4 or 11, respectively. After 4 days, mice exhibited a 32 and 44% decrease in the levels of total cholesterol and apolipoprotein B and ∼1.8-fold higher liver LDLR protein levels. At 11 days, the equivalent values were 24 and 46% and ∼2.3-fold higher LDLR proteins. These data constitute a proof-of-principle for the future usage of sdAbs as PCSK9-targeting drugs that can efficiently reduce LDL-cholesterol, and as tools to study the Cys-His-rich domain-dependent sorting the PCSK9-LDLR complex to lysosomes. PMID:27284008

  7. Antiatherosclerotic Effects of 1-Methylnicotinamide in Apolipoprotein E/Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Deficient Mice: A Comparison with Nicotinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Mateuszuk, Lukasz; Jasztal, Agnieszka; Maslak, Edyta; Gasior-Glogowska, Marlena; Baranska, Malgorzata; Sitek, Barbara; Kostogrys, Renata; Zakrzewska, Agnieszka; Kij, Agnieszka; Walczak, Maria; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    1-Methylnicotinamide (MNA), the major endogenous metabolite of nicotinic acid (NicA), may partially contribute to the vasoprotective properties of NicA. Here we compared the antiatherosclerotic effects of MNA and NicA in apolipoprotein E (ApoE)/low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice. ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice were treated with MNA or NicA (100 mg/kg). Plaque size, macrophages, and cholesterol content in the brachiocephalic artery, endothelial function in the aorta, systemic inflammation, platelet activation, as well as the concentration of MNA and its metabolites in plasma and urine were measured. MNA and NicA reduced atherosclerotic plaque area, plaque inflammation, and cholesterol content in the brachiocephalic artery. The antiatherosclerotic actions of MNA and NicA were associated with improved endothelial function, as evidenced by a higher concentration of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 α and nitrite/nitrate in the aortic ring effluent, inhibition of platelets (blunted thromboxane B2 generation), and inhibition of systemic inflammation (lower plasma concentration of serum amyloid P, haptoglobin). NicA treatment resulted in an approximately 2-fold higher concentration of MNA and its metabolites in urine and a 4-fold higher nicotinamide/MNA ratio in plasma, compared with MNA treatment. In summary; MNA displays pronounced antiatherosclerotic action in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice, an effect associated with an improvement in prostacyclin- and nitric oxide-dependent endothelial function, inhibition of platelet activation, inhibition of inflammatory burden in plaques, and diminished systemic inflammation. Despite substantially higher MNA availability after NicA treatment, compared with an equivalent dose of MNA, the antiatherosclerotic effect of NicA was not stronger. We suggest that detrimental effects of NicA or its metabolites other than MNA may limit beneficial effects of NicA-derived MNA. PMID:26631491

  8. miR-30e reciprocally regulates the differentiation of adipocytes and osteoblasts by directly targeting low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Guan, X; Guo, F; Zhou, J; Chang, A; Sun, B; Cai, Y; Ma, Z; Dai, C; Li, X; Wang, B

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocal relationship usually exists between osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis, with factors stimulating one of these processes at the same time inhibiting the other. In the present study, miR-30e was found to be involved in the reciprocal regulation of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Our data indicated that miR-30e was induced in primarily cultured mouse bone marrow stromal cell, mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 and preadipocyte 3T3-L1 after adipogenic treatment. Conversely, it was reduced in mouse stromal line ST2 and preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 after osteogenic treatment. Enforced expression of miR-30e in 3T3-L1 significantly suppressed the growth of the cells and induced the preadipocytes to differentiate into mature adipocytes, along with increased expression of adipocyte-specific transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) and C/EBPβ, and the marker gene aP2. In contrast, inhibition of the endogenous miR-30e enhanced the cell growth and repressed preadipocytes to differentiate. Conversely, supplementing miR-30e activity blocked, whereas knocking down miR-30e enforced the preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 to fully differentiate. Furthermore, miR-30e overexpression stimulated adipocyte formation and inhibited osteoblast differentiation from marrow stromal cells. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), one of the critical coreceptor for Wnts, was shown to be a direct target of miR-30e by using the luciferase assay. Knockdown of LRP6 in 3T3-L1 cells downregulated β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity and dramatically potentiated the differentiation of the cells into mature adipocytes. Taken together, the present work suggests that the expression of miR-30e is indispensable for maintaining the balance of adipocytes and osteoblasts by targeting the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24113179

  9. Increased {beta}-amyloid levels in the choroid plexus following lead exposure and the involvement of low-density lipoprotein receptor protein-1

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, Mamta; Zhang Yanshu; Monnot, Andrew D.; Jiang, Wendy; Zheng Wei

    2009-10-15

    The choroid plexus, a barrier between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is known to accumulate lead (Pb) and also possibly function to maintain brain's homeostasis of A{beta}, an important peptide in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. This study was designed to investigate if Pb exposure altered A{beta} levels at the blood-CSF barrier in the choroid plexus. Rats received ip injection of 27 mg Pb/kg. Twenty-four hours later, a FAM-labeled A{beta} (200 pmol) was infused into the lateral ventricle and the plexus tissues were removed to quantify A{beta} accumulation. Results revealed a significant increase in intracellular A{beta} accumulation in the Pb-exposed animals compared to controls (p < 0.001). When choroidal epithelial Z310 cells were treated with 10 {mu}M Pb for 24 h and 48 h, A{beta} (2 {mu}M in culture medium) accumulation was significantly increased by 1.5 fold (p < 0.05) and 1.8 fold (p < 0.05), respectively. To explore the mechanism, we examined the effect of Pb on low-density lipoprotein receptor protein-1 (LRP1), an intracellular A{beta} transport protein. Following acute Pb exposure with the aforementioned dose regimen, levels of LRP1 mRNA and proteins in the choroid plexus were decreased by 35% (p < 0.05) and 31.8% (p < 0.05), respectively, in comparison to those of controls. In Z310 cells exposed to 10 {mu}M Pb for 24 h and 48 h, a 33.1% and 33.4% decrease in the protein expression of LRP1 was observed (p < 0.05), respectively. Knocking down LRP1 resulted in even more substantial increases of cellular accumulation of A{beta}, from 31% in cells without knockdown to 72% in cells with LRP1 knockdown (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that the acute exposure to Pb results in an increased accumulation of intracellular A{beta} in the choroid plexus; the effect appears to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of LRP1 production following Pb exposure.

  10. Detection of early stage atherosclerotic plaques using PET and CT fusion imaging targeting P-selectin in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ikuko; Hasegawa, Koki; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hirase, Tetsuaki; Node, Koichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► P-selectin regulates leukocyte recruitment as an early stage event of atherogenesis. ► We developed an antibody-based molecular imaging probe targeting P-selectin for PET. ► This is the first report on successful PET imaging for delineation of P-selectin. ► P-selectin is a candidate target for atherosclerotic plaque imaging by clinical PET. -- Abstract: Background: Sensitive detection and qualitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques are in high demand in cardiovascular clinical settings. The leukocyte–endothelial interaction mediated by an adhesion molecule P-selectin participates in arterial wall inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and results: A {sup 64}Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid conjugated anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody ({sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb) probe was prepared by conjugating an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody with DOTA followed by {sup 64}Cu labeling. Thirty-six hours prior to PET and CT fusion imaging, 3 MBq of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb was intravenously injected into low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient Ldlr-/- mice. After a 180 min PET scan, autoradiography and biodistribution of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody was examined using excised aortas. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet for promotion of atherosclerotic plaque development, PET and CT fusion imaging revealed selective and prominent accumulation of the probe in the aortic root. Autoradiography of aortas that demonstrated probe uptake into atherosclerotic plaques was confirmed by Oil red O staining for lipid droplets. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a chow diet to develop mild atherosclerotic plaques, probe accumulation was barely detectable in the aortic root on PET and CT fusion imaging. Probe biodistribution in aortas was 6.6-fold higher in Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet than in those fed with a normal chow diet. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin m

  11. Lipoprotein Lipase releases esterified oxylipins from Very Low Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Gregory C.; Newman, John W.

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the distribution of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in lipoprotein particles. If these oxidation products are released by lipoprotein lipase (LpL), then their delivery to peripheral tissues with bulk lipids could influence cellular function. Using 26 week old normolipidemic and hyperlipidemic Zucker rats, we measured PUFA alcohols, epoxides, diols, ketones and triols (i.e. oxylipins) in esterified and non-esterified fractions of whole plasma, VLDL, and LpL-generated VLDL-lipolysates. Whole plasma, VLDL, and lipolysate oxylipin profiles were distinct and altered by hyperlipidemia. While >90% of the whole plasma oxylipins were esterified, the fraction of each oxylipin class in the VLDL varied: 46% of alcohols, 30% of epoxides, 19% of diols, <10% of ketones, <1% triols. Whole plasma was dominated by arachidonate alcohols, while the linoleate alcohols, epoxides and ketones showed an increased prevalence in VLDL. LpL-mediated VLDL lipolysis of PUFA alcohols, diols and ketones was detected and the relative abundance of oxygenated linoleates was enhanced in the lipolysates, relative to their corresponding VLDL. In summary esterified oxylipins were seen to be LpL substrates with heterogeneous distributions among lipoprotein classes. Moreover, oxylipin distributions are changes within the context of obesity-associated dyslipidemia. These results support the notion that the VLDL-LpL axis may facilitate the delivery of plasma oxylipins to the periphery. The physiological implication of these findings are yet to be elucidated, however these molecules are plausible indicators of systemic oxidative stress, and could report this status to the peripheral tissues. PMID:19042114

  12. Punicalagin Induces Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Influx to Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Atrahimovich, Dana; Khatib, Soliman; Sela, Shifra; Vaya, Jacob; Samson, Abraham O

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a primary initiating event in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the antiatherogenic effect of polyphenols has been shown to be exerted via a mechanism unrelated to their antioxidant capacity and to stem from their interaction with specific intracellular or plasma proteins. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the main polyphenol in pomegranate, punicalagin, with apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB100) that surrounds LDL. Punicalagin bound to ApoB100 at low concentrations (0.25-4 μM). Upon binding, it induced LDL influx to macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 2.5-fold. In contrast, another polyphenol which binds to ApoB100, glabridin, did not affect LDL influx. We further showed that LDL influx occurs specifically through the LDL receptor, with LDL then accumulating in the cell cytoplasm. Taken together with the findings of Aviram et al., 2000, that pomegranate juice and punicalagin induce plasma LDL removal and inhibit macrophage cholesterol synthesis and accumulation, our results suggest that, upon binding, punicalagin stimulates LDL influx to macrophages, thus reducing circulating cholesterol levels. PMID:27516832

  13. Novel Therapies for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Reduction.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter P

    2016-09-15

    Although many clinical trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated that lower serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are associated with proportionately greater reductions in the risk of cardiovascular disease events, not all patients with hypercholesterolemia are able to attain risk-stratified LDL-C goals with statin monotherapy. Elucidation of the pathophysiology of genetic disorders of lipid metabolism (e.g., familial hypercholesterolemia) has led to the development of several novel lipid-lowering strategies, including blocking the degradation of hepatic LDL-C receptors that are important in LDL-C clearance, or the inhibition of apoprotein synthesis and lipidation. Mipomersen and lomitapide are highly efficacious new agents available for the treatment of patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. The recent introduction of PCSK9 inhibitors (alirocumab and evolocumab) have made it possible for many patients to achieve very low LDL-C concentrations (e.g., <40 mg/dl) that are usually not attainable with statin monotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are examining the impact of very low LDL-C levels on cardiovascular disease event rates and the long-term safety of this approach. PMID:27620356

  14. Punicalagin Induces Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Influx to Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Atrahimovich, Dana; Khatib, Soliman; Sela, Shifra; Vaya, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are a primary initiating event in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the antiatherogenic effect of polyphenols has been shown to be exerted via a mechanism unrelated to their antioxidant capacity and to stem from their interaction with specific intracellular or plasma proteins. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the main polyphenol in pomegranate, punicalagin, with apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB100) that surrounds LDL. Punicalagin bound to ApoB100 at low concentrations (0.25–4 μM). Upon binding, it induced LDL influx to macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner, up to 2.5-fold. In contrast, another polyphenol which binds to ApoB100, glabridin, did not affect LDL influx. We further showed that LDL influx occurs specifically through the LDL receptor, with LDL then accumulating in the cell cytoplasm. Taken together with the findings of Aviram et al., 2000, that pomegranate juice and punicalagin induce plasma LDL removal and inhibit macrophage cholesterol synthesis and accumulation, our results suggest that, upon binding, punicalagin stimulates LDL influx to macrophages, thus reducing circulating cholesterol levels. PMID:27516832

  15. Echium oil reduces plasma triglycerides by increasing intravascular lipolysis in apoB100-only low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lolita M; Lough, Christopher M; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y; Gebre, Abraham K; Smith, Thomas L; Colvin, Perry L; Parks, John S

    2013-07-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  16. Echium Oil Reduces Plasma Triglycerides by Increasing Intravascular Lipolysis in apoB100-Only Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Lough, Christopher M.; Chung, Soonkyu; Boudyguina, Elena Y.; Gebre, Abraham K.; Smith, Thomas L.; Colvin, Perry L.; Parks, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Echium oil (EO), which is enriched in SDA (18:4 n-3), reduces plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations in humans and mice. We compared mechanisms by which EO and fish oil (FO) reduce plasma TG concentrations in mildly hypertriglyceridemic male apoB100-only LDLrKO mice. Mice were fed one of three atherogenic diets containing 0.2% cholesterol and palm oil (PO; 20%), EO (10% EO + 10% PO), or FO (10% FO + 10% PO). Livers from PO- and EO-fed mice had similar TG and cholesteryl ester (CE) content, which was significantly higher than in FO-fed mice. Plasma TG secretion was reduced in FO vs. EO-fed mice. Plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size was ordered: PO (63 ± 4 nm) > EO (55 ± 3 nm) > FO (40 ± 2 nm). Post-heparin lipolytic activity was similar among groups, but TG hydrolysis by purified lipoprotein lipase was significantly greater for EO and FO VLDL compared to PO VLDL. Removal of VLDL tracer from plasma was marginally faster in EO vs. PO fed mice. Our results suggest that EO reduces plasma TG primarily through increased intravascular lipolysis of TG and VLDL clearance. Finally, EO may substitute for FO to reduce plasma TG concentrations, but not hepatic steatosis in this mouse model. PMID:23857172

  17. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). Evidence for integrated co-receptor function betwenn LRP and the PDGF.

    PubMed

    Loukinova, Elena; Ranganathan, Sripriya; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Gorlatova, Natalia; Migliorini, Mary M; Loukinov, Dmitri; Ulery, Paula G; Mikhailenko, Irina; Lawrence, Daniel A; Strickland, Dudley K

    2002-05-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) functions in the catabolism of numerous ligands including proteinases, proteinase inhibitor complexes, and lipoproteins. In the current study we provide evidence indicating an expanded role for LRP in modulating cellular signaling events. Our results show that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) BB induces a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of the LRP cytoplasmic domain in a process dependent on PDGF receptor activation and c-Src family kinase activity. Other growth factors, including basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, were unable to mediate tyrosine phosphorylation of LRP. The basis for this selectivity may result from the ability of LRP to bind PDGFBB, because surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that only PDGF, and not basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, or insulin-like growth factor-1, bound to purified LRP immobilized on a sensor chip. The use of LRP mini-receptor mutants as well as in vitro phosphorylation studies demonstrated that the tyrosine located within the second NPXY motif found in the LRP cytoplasmic domain is the primary site of tyrosine phosphorylation by Src and Src family kinases. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that PDGF-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of LRPs cytoplasmic domain results in increased association of the adaptor protein Shc with LRP and that Shc recognizes the second NPXY motif within LRPs cytoplasmic domain. In the accompanying paper, Boucher et al. (Boucher, P., Liu, P. V., Gotthardt, M., Hiesberger, T., Anderson, R. G. W., and Herz, J. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 15507-15513) reveal that LRP is found in caveolae along with the PDGF receptor. Together, these studies suggest that LRP functions as a co-receptor that modulates signal transduction pathways initiated by the PDGF receptor. PMID:11854294

  18. Recycling of vitamin E in human low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kagan, V E; Serbinova, E A; Forte, T; Scita, G; Packer, L

    1992-03-01

    Oxidative modification of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and their unrestricted scavenger receptor-dependent uptake is believed to account for cholesterol deposition in macrophage-derived foam cells. It has been suggested that vitamin E that is transported by LDL plays a critical role in protecting against LDL oxidation. We hypothesize that the maintenance of sufficiently high vitamin E concentrations in LDL can be achieved by reducing its chromanoxyl radicals, i.e., by vitamin E recycling. In this study we demonstrate that: i) chromanoxyl radicals of endogenous vitamin E and of exogenously added alpha-tocotrienol, alpha-tocopherol or its synthetic homologue with a 6-carbon side-chain, chromanol-alpha-C6, can be directly generated in human LDL by ultraviolet (UV) light, or by interaction with peroxyl radicals produced either by an enzymic oxidation system (lipoxygenase + linolenic acid) or by an azo-initiator, 2,2'-azo-bis(2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (AMVN; ii) ascorbate can recycle endogenous vitamin E and exogenously added chromanols by direct reduction of chromanoxyl radicals in LDL; iii) dihydrolipoic acid is not efficient in direct reduction of chromanoxyl radicals but recycles vitamin E by synergistically interacting with ascorbate (reduces dehydroascorbate thus maintaining the steady-state concentration of ascorbate); and iv) beta-carotene is not active in vitamin E recycling but may itself be protected against oxidative destruction by the reductants of chromanoxyl radicals. We suggest that the recycling of vitamin E and other phenolic antioxidants by plasma reductants may be an important mechanism for the enhanced antioxidant protection of LDL. PMID:1314881

  19. Comparative studies of vertebrate lipoprotein lipase: a key enzyme of very low density lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Vandeberg, John L; Cox, Laura A

    2011-06-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LIPL or LPL; E.C.3.1.1.34) serves a dual function as a triglyceride lipase of circulating chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and facilitates receptor-mediated lipoprotein uptake into heart, muscle and adipose tissue. Comparative LPL amino acid sequences and protein structures and LPL gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Mammalian LPL genes usually contained 9 coding exons on the positive strand. Vertebrate LPL sequences shared 58-99% identity as compared with 33-49% sequence identities with other vascular triglyceride lipases, hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL). Two human LPL N-glycosylation sites were conserved among seven predicted sites for the vertebrate LPL sequences examined. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues and conserved predicted secondary and tertiary structures were also studied. A CpG island was identified within the 5'-untranslated region of the human LPL gene which may contribute to the higher than average (×4.5 times) level of expression reported. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of vertebrate lipase genes, LPL, LIPG (encoding EL) and LIPC (encoding HL) which suggested that these have been derived from gene duplication events of an ancestral neutral lipase gene, prior to the appearance of fish during vertebrate evolution. Comparative divergence rates for these vertebrate sequences indicated that LPL is evolving more slowly (2-3 times) than for LIPC and LIPG genes and proteins. PMID:21561822

  20. Effects of hypothyroidism and high-fat feeding on mRNA concentrations for the low-density-lipoprotein receptor and on acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activities in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Salter, A M; Hayashi, R; al-Seeni, M; Brown, N F; Bruce, J; Sorensen, O; Atkinson, E A; Middleton, B; Bleackley, R C; Brindley, D N

    1991-01-01

    1. Induction of hypothyroidism in rats by feeding propylthiouracil (PTU) significantly increased serum cholesterol concentrations, and the effect was more pronounced for cholesterol in low-density lipoproteins (LDL) rather than high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The concentrations of serum triacylglycerol were decreased in hypothyroidism. These effects on serum lipids were also seen when the normal rats were pair-fed with the PTU-treated group. 2. Feeding a diet rich in saturated fat and cholesterol further increased cholesterol concentrations in LDL and also elevated that in very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) of hypothyroid rats. In euthyroid rats such a diet resulted in a relatively small increase in VLDL cholesterol, whereas LDL cholesterol was decreased. 3. Steady-state concentrations of mRNA for the hepatic LDL receptor were significantly decreased in the livers of hypothyroid rats, but were not significantly changed by high-fat feeding in euthyroid or hypothyroid rats. 4. The expression of the LDL receptor in hepatocytes cultured from hypothyroid rats was decreased relative to the euthyroid controls. 5. Whereas the esterification of cholesterol with oleate in hepatocytes cultured from hypothyroid rats was decreased, the activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) in the livers of these animals was not changed. 6. High-fat feeding increased the hepatic ACAT activity in normal and hypothyroid rats. 7. Incubation of rat hepatocytes with 10 nM-tri-iodothyronine for 4 h increased the relative concentration of the mRNA for the LDL receptor by 25%. 8. It is therefore concluded that thyroid hormones stimulate the synthesis and expression of the hepatic LDL receptor. Elevated cholesterol concentrations in LDL in hypothyroidism probably result from a primary defect in the expression of the hepatic receptor, rather than indirectly via changes in ACAT activity. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2064617

  1. Analysis of the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus receptor: the 40-residue, cysteine-rich, low-density lipoprotein receptor repeat motif of Tva is sufficient to mediate viral entry.

    PubMed

    Rong, L; Bates, P

    1995-08-01

    The genes encoding the receptor for subgroup A Rous sarcoma viruses (tva) were recently cloned from both chicken and quail cells (P. Bates, J. A. T. Young, and H. E. Varmus, Cell 74:1043-1051, 1993; J. A. T. Young, P. Bates, and H. E. Varmus, J. Virol. 67:1811-1816, 1993). Previous work suggested that only the extracellular domain of Tva interacts with the virus (P. Bates, J. A. T. Young, and H. E. Varmus, Cell 74:1043-1051, 1993). Tva is a small membrane-associated protein containing in its extracellular domain a 40-amino-acid region which is closely related to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) repeat motif. To determine the region of the Tva extracellular domain responsible for viral receptor function, we created chimeric proteins containing various regions of the Tva extracellular domain fused with a murine CD8 membrane anchor. Analysis of these proteins demonstrates that any chimera containing the Tva LDLR repeat motif can specifically bind the envelope protein of subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses. Furthermore, NIH 3T3 cell lines expressing these chimeric proteins were efficiently infected by subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus vectors. Our results demonstrate that the 40-residue-long LDLR repeat motif of Tva is responsible for viral receptor function. PMID:7609052

  2. Metabolism of apoprotein B of plasma very low density lipoproteins in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Faergeman, O; Sata, T; Kane, J P; Havel, R J

    1975-01-01

    As an extension of metabolic studies of the cholesteryl ester component of rat very low density lipoproteins, we have studied the metabolism of the B apoprotein component labeled by intravenous injection of [3H]lysine. The B apoprotein separated from other apoproteins by delipidation and selective precipitation with tetramethylurea could not be distinguished from B apoprotein prepared by the conventional gel filtration technique. After injection of [3H]lysine, specific activity of B apoprotein was maximal in very low density and low density lipoproteins 1 and 11/2-h later, respectively, in a manner consistent with a precursor-product relationship. When protein-labeled very low density lipoproteins were injected into rats, the relationships of specific activity again indicated that B apoprotein of very low density lipoproteins may be the sole precursor of that of low density lipoproteins. However, less than 10% of the B apoprotein that disappeared from very low density lipoproteins appeared in density lipoproteins. To evaluate the sites of removal of B aproprotein of very low density lipoproteins from plasma, protein-labeled very low density lipoproteins were incubated with unlabeled high density lipoproteins to reduce radioactivity in non-B apoproteins selectively by molecular exchange. Most of the B apoprotein was rapidly removed by the liver. The extensive hepatic uptake of both the cholesteryl ester and B apoprotein components of rat very low density lipoproteins may explain the characteristically low concentrations of plasma low density lipoproteins in the rat. PMID:172530

  3. The role of a conserved acidic residue in calcium-dependent protein folding for a low density lipoprotein (LDL)-A module: implications in structure and function for the LDL receptor superfamily.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Yu, Xuemei; Rihani, Kayla; Wang, Qing-Yin; Rong, Lijun

    2004-04-16

    One common feature of the more than 1,000 complement-type repeats (or low density lipoprotein (LDL)-A modules) found in LDL receptor and the other members of the LDL receptor superfamily is a cluster of five highly conserved acidic residues in the C-terminal region, DXXXDXXDXXDE. However, the role of the third conserved aspartate of these LDL-A modules in protein folding and ligand recognition has not been elucidated. In this report, using a model LDL-A module and several experimental approaches, we demonstrate that this acidic residue, like the other four conserved acidic residues, is involved in calcium-dependent protein folding. These results suggest an alternative calcium coordination conformation for the LDL-A modules. The proposed model provides a plausible explanation for the conservation of this acidic residue among the LDL-A modules. Furthermore, the model can explain why mutations of this residue in human LDL receptor cause familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:14749324

  4. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  5. Expression of type I and type II bovine scavenger receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells: Lipid droplet accumulation and nonreciprocal cross competition by acetylated and oxidized low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston ); Ekkel, Y.; Rohrer, L.; Penman, M.; Freedman, N.J.; Krieger, M. ); Chisolm, G.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Type I and type II scavenger receptors, which have been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis and other macrophage-associated functions, differ only by the presence in the type I receptor of an extracellular cysteine-rich C-terminal domain. Stable Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell transfectants expressing high levels of either the type I or type II bovine scavenger receptors have been generated. Type I and type II receptors in these cells mediated high-affinity saturable endocytosis of both {sup 125}I-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein (LDL) and {sup 125}I-labeled oxidized LDL with the distinctive broad ligand specificity characteristic of scavenger receptors. After incubation for 2 days with acetylated LDL, the transfected cells accumulated oil red O-staining lipid droplets reminiscent of those in macrophage foam cells, whereas untransfected CHO cells did not. Thus, macrophage-specific gene products other than the scavenger receptor are not required for modified-LDL-induced intracellular lipid accumulation. In transfected cells, acetylated LDL efficiently competed for both its own endocytosis and that of oxidized LDL. This nonreciprocal cross competition suggests that these ligands may bind to nonidentical but interacting sites on a single receptor. Results were similar for transfectants expressing either type I or type II scavenger receptors. The nonreciprocal cross competition seen in the transfected CHO cells differs from that previously observed with cultured macrophages.

  6. Low density lipoprotein uptake by an endothelial-smooth muscle cell bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.J.; Miguel, R.; Graham, D. )

    1991-03-01

    To study the interaction of endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and the means by which such interaction may affect lipid permeability of the arterial wall, cell bilayers were established by use of a transwell culture system. After confluent growth of both cell types had been achieved, iodine 125 bound to low-density lipoprotein (10 ng protein/ml) was added to the media of the upper well. After a 3-hour incubation period, the iodine 125-bound low-density lipoprotein content of the upper and lower media demonstrated an impedance to lipoprotein movement across the endothelial cell monolayer as compared to the bare porous polycarbonate filter of the transwell (p less than 10(-6)). The presence of smooth muscle cells in the bottom well significantly enhanced the permeability of the endothelial cell layer (p less than 10(-60)). This effect remained unchanged over a 9-day time course. Membrane binding and cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells was not altered by smooth muscle cells, indicating that this change in permeability could not be easily attributed to changes in receptor-mediated transport or transcytosis. Membrane binding (p less than 0.02) and cellular uptake (p less than 10(-6)) of low-density lipoprotein by smooth muscle cells in the bilayer, when adjusted for counts available in the smooth muscle cell media, were both reduced in the early incubation period as compared to isolated smooth muscle cells. The disproportionate reduction in uptake as compared to binding would suggest that this was not entirely a receptor-dependent process.

  7. Cryoelectron microscopy of low density lipoprotein in vitreous ice.

    PubMed Central

    Spin, J M; Atkinson, D

    1995-01-01

    In this report, images of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in vitreous ice at approximately 30 A resolution are presented. These images show that LDL is a quasi-spherical particle, approximately 220-240 A in diameter, with a region of low density (lipid) surrounded by a ring (in projection) of high density believed to represent apolipoprotein B-100. This ring is seen to be composed of four or five (depending on view) large regions of high density material that may represent protein superdomains. Analysis of LDL images obtained at slightly higher magnification reveals that areas of somewhat lower density connect these regions, in some cases crossing the projectional interiors of the LDL particles. Preliminary image analysis of LDL covalently labeled at Cys3734 and Cys4190 with 1.4-nm Nanogold clusters demonstrates that this methodology will provide an important site-specific marker in studies designed to map the organization of apoB at the surface of LDL. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:7612855

  8. Thermal stability of human plasma electronegative low-density lipoprotein: A paradoxical behavior of low-density lipoprotein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rull, Anna; Jayaraman, Shobini; Gantz, Donald L; Rivas-Urbina, Andrea; Pérez-Cuellar, Montserrat; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Sánchez-Quesada, Jose Luis; Gursky, Olga

    2016-09-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) aggregation is central in triggering atherogenesis. A minor fraction of electronegative plasma LDL, termed LDL(-), plays a special role in atherogenesis. To better understand this role, we analyzed the kinetics of aggregation, fusion and disintegration of human LDL and its fractions, LDL(+) and LDL(-). Thermal denaturation of LDL was monitored by spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Initially, LDL(-) aggregated and fused faster than LDL(+), but later the order reversed. Most LDL(+) disintegrated and precipitated upon prolonged heating. In contrast, LDL(-) partially retained lipoprotein morphology and formed soluble aggregates. Biochemical analysis of all fractions showed no significant degradation of major lipids, mild phospholipid oxidation, and an increase in non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) upon thermal denaturation. The main baseline difference between LDL subfractions was higher content of NEFA in LDL(-). Since NEFA promote lipoprotein fusion, increased NEFA content can explain rapid initial aggregation and fusion of LDL(-) but not its resistance to extensive disintegration. Partial hydrolysis of apoB upon heating was similar in LDL subfractions, suggesting that minor proteins importantly modulate LDL disintegration. Unlike LDL(+), LDL(-) contains small amounts of apoA-I and apoJ. Addition of exogenous apoA-I to LDL(+) hampered lipoprotein aggregation, fusion and precipitation, while depletion of endogenous apoJ had an opposite effect. Therefore, the initial rapid aggregation of LDL(-) is apparently counterbalanced by the stabilizing effects of minor proteins such as apoA-I and apoJ. These results help identify key determinants for LDL aggregation, fusion and coalescence into lipid droplets in vivo. PMID:27233433

  9. Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism enhance low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, V; Hanna, A N; Koneru, L; Newman, H A; Falko, J M

    1997-10-01

    Hypothyroidism is frequently associated with hypercholesterolemia and an increased risk for atherosclerosis, whereas hyperthyroidism is known to precipitate angina or myocardial infarction in patients with underlying coronary heart disease. We have shown previously that L-T4 functions as an antioxidant in vitro and inhibits low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in a dose-dependent fashion. The present study was designed to evaluate the changes in LDL oxidation in subjects with hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. Fasting blood samples for LDL oxidation analyses, lipoprotein determinations, and thyroid function tests were collected at baseline and after the patients were rendered euthyroid. The lag phase (mean +/- SEM hours) of the Cu+2-catalyzed LDL oxidation in the hypothyroid state and the subsequent euthyroid states were 4 +/- 0.0.65 and 14 +/- 0.68 h, respectively (P < 0.05). The lag phase during the hyperthyroid phase was 6 +/- 0.55 h, and that during the euthyroid phase was 12 +/- 0.66 h (P < 0.05). The total and LDL cholesterol levels were higher in hypothyroidism than in euthyroidism and were lower in hyperthyroidism than in the euthyroid state. We conclude that LDL has more susceptibility to oxidation in both the hypothyroid and hyperthyroid states. Thus, the enhanced LDL oxidation may play a role in the cardiac disease process in both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. PMID:9329379

  10. Regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase expression by Zingiber officinale in the liver of high-fat diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nammi, Srinivas; Kim, Moon S; Gavande, Navnath S; Li, George Q; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2010-05-01

    Zingiber officinale has been used to control lipid disorders and reported to possess remarkable cholesterol-lowering activity in experimental hyperlipidaemia. In the present study, the effect of a characterized and standardized extract of Zingiber officinale on the hepatic lipid levels as well as on the hepatic mRNA and protein expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase was investigated in a high-fat diet-fed rat model. Rats were treated with an ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale (400 mg/kg) extract along with a high-fat diet for 6 weeks. The extract of Zingiber officinale significantly decreased hepatic triglyceride and tended to decrease hepatic cholesterol levels when administered over 6 weeks to the rats fed a high-fat diet. We found that in parallel, the extract up-regulated both LDL receptor mRNA and protein level and down-regulated HMG-CoA reductase protein expression in the liver of these rats. The metabolic control of body lipid homeostasis is in part due to enhanced cholesterol biosynthesis and reduced expression of LDL receptor sites following long-term consumption of high-fat diets. The present results show restoration of transcriptional and post-transcriptional changes in low-density lipoprotein and HMG CoA reductase by Zingiber officinale administration with a high-fat diet and provide a rational explanation for the effect of ginger in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia. PMID:20002065

  11. [THE EFFECT OF SATINS: ACTIVATION OF LIPOLYSIS AND ABSORPTION BY INSULIN-DEPENDED CELLS LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY, INCREASING OF BIO-AVAILABILITY OF POLYENOIC FATTY ACIDS AND DECREASING OF CHOLESTEROL OF LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Malyshev, P P; Amelyushkina, V A; Aripovsky, A V; Smirnov, G P; Polevaya, T Yu; Kabo, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-10-01

    The Russian cardiologic R&D production complex of Minzdrav of Russia, 121552 Moscow, Russia The statins are synthetic xenobiotics alien to animal cells. They are unlikely capable to manifest pleiotropic effect. It is feasible to evaluate effect of statins by stages: a) initially a specific inhibition of synthesis of cholesterol alcohol; b) further indirect activation of hydrolysis of triglycerides in lipoproteins of very low density; c) nonspecific activation of cells' receptor absorption of palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density and then d) linoleic and linolenic lipoproteins of low density with all polyenoic fatty acids. On balance, statins activate absorption ofpolyenoic fatty acids by cells. Just they manifest physiological, specific pleiotropic effect. The statins inhibit synthesis of pool of cholesterol alcohol-lipoproteins of very low density condensed between phosphatidylcholines in polar mono-layer phosphatidylcholines+cholesterol alcohol on surface oftriglycerides. The low permeability of mono-layer separates substrate-triglycerides in lipoproteins of very low density and post-heparin lipoprotein lipase in hydrophilic blood plasma. The higher is ratio cholesterol alcohol/phosphatidylcholines in mono-layer of lipoproteins of very low density the slower is lipolysis, formation of ligand lipoproteins of very low density and their absorption by cells under apoB-100-endocytosis. The statins normalize hyperlipemia by force of a) activation of absorption oflipoproteins of very low density by insulin-depended cells and b) activation of absorption of lipoproteins of low density by all cells, increasing of bio-availability of polyenoic fatty acids, activation of apoB-100-endocytosis. The limitation in food of content of palmitic saturated fatty acid and increasing of content of ω-3 polyenoic fatty acids improve "bio-availability" of polyenoic fatty acids and their absorption by cells and also decreases cholesterol alcohol/phosphatidylcholines and

  12. Hypertriglyceridemic very low density lipoproteins induce triglyceride synthesis and accumulation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gianturco, S H; Bradley, W A; Gotto, A M; Morrisett, J D; Peavy, D L

    1982-07-01

    Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins may be responsible for the lipid accumulation in macrophages that can occur in hypertriglyceridemia. Chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, total and with flotation constant [S(f)] 100-400) from fasting hypertriglyceridemic subjects induced a massive accumulation of oil red O-positive inclusions in unstimulated peritoneal macrophages. Cell viability was not affected. The predominant lipid that accumulated in cells exposed to hypertriglyceridemic VLDL was triglyceride. Hypertriglyceridemic VLDL stimulated the incorporation of [(14)C]oleate into cellular triglyceride up to ninefold in 16 h, but not into cholesteryl esters. Mass increase in cellular triglyceride was 38-fold. The stimulation of cellular triglyceride formation was dependent on time, temperature, and concentration of hypertriglyceridemic VLDL. By contrast, VLDL, low density, and high density lipoproteins from fasting normolipemic subjects had no significant effect on oleate incorporation into neutral lipids or on visible lipid accumulation.(125)I-Hypertriglyceridemic VLDL (S(f) 100-400) were degraded by macrophages in a dose-dependent manner, with 50 and 100% saturation observed at 3 and 24 mug protein/ml (2.5 and 20 nM), respectively. Hypertriglyceridemic VLDL inhibited the internalization and degradation of (125)I-hypertriglyceridemic VLDL (4 nM) by 50% at 3 nM. Cholesteryl ester-rich VLDL from cholesterol-fed rabbits gave 50% inhibition at 5 nM. Low density lipoproteins (LDL) inhibited by 10% at 5 nM and 40% at 47 nM. Acetyl LDL at 130 nM had no effect. We conclude that the massive triglyceride accumulation produced in macrophages by hypertriglyceridemic VLDL is a direct consequence of uptake via specific receptors that also recognize cholesteryl ester-rich VLDL and LDL but are distinct from the acetyl LDL receptor. Uptake of these triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by monocyte-macrophages in vivo may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of

  13. The regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity, cholesterol esterification and the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors in cultured monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, B L; Patel, D D; Soutar, A K

    1983-01-01

    Human blood monocytes cultured in medium containing 20% whole serum showed the greatest activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and [14C]acetate incorporation into non-saponifiable lipids around the 7th day after seeding, the period of greatest growth. Although there was enough low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the medium to saturate the LDL receptors that were expressed by normal cells at that time, HMG-CoA reductase activity and acetate incorporation were as high in normal cells as in cells from familial-hypercholesterolaemic (FH) patients. Both the addition of extra LDL, which interacted with the cells by non-saturable processes, and receptor-mediated uptake of acetylated LDL significantly reduced reductase activity and increased incorporation of [14C]oleate into cholesteryl esters in normal cells and cells from FH patients ('FH cells'), and reduced the expression of LDL receptors in normal cells. Pre-incubation for 20h in lipoprotein-deficient medium apparently increased the number of LDL receptors expressed by normal cells but reduced the activity of HMG-CoA reductase in both normal and FH cells. During subsequent incubations the same rate of degradation of acetylated LDL and of non-saturable degradation of LDL by FH cells was associated with the same reduction in HMG-CoA reductase activity, although LDL produced a much smaller stimulation of oleate incorporation into cholesteryl esters. In normal cells pre-incubated without lipoproteins, receptor-mediated uptake of LDL could abolish reductase activity and the expression of LDL receptors. The results suggested that in these cells, receptor-mediated uptake of LDL might have a greater effect on reductase activity and LDL receptors than the equivalent uptake of acetylated LDL. It is proposed that endogenous synthesis is an important source of cholesterol for growth of normal cells, and that the site at which cholesterol is deposited in the cells may determine the nature and extent of the

  14. Cholesterol transfer from normal and atherogenic low density lipoproteins to Mycoplasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mitschelen, J.J.; St. Clair, R.W.; Hester, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the free cholesterol of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein from cholesterol-fed nonhuman primates has a greater potential for surface transfer to cell membranes than does the free cholesterol of normal low density lipoprotein. The low density lipoproteins were isolated from normal and hypercholesterolemic rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys, incubated with membranes from Acholeplasma laidlawii, a mycoplasma species devoid of cholesterol in its membranes, and the mass transfer of free cholesterol determined by measuring membrane cholesterol content. Since these membranes neither synthesize nor esterify cholesterol, nor degrade the protein or cholesterol ester moieties of low density lipoprotein, they are an ideal model with which to study differences in the cholesterol transfer potential of low density lipoprotein independent of the uptake of the intact low density lipoprotein particle. These studies indicate that, even though there are marked differences in the cholesterol composition of normal and hypercholesterolemic low density lipoproteins, this does not result in a greater chemical potential for surface transfer of free cholesterol. Consequently, if a difference in the surface transfer of free cholesterol is responsible for the enhanced ability of hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein to promote cellular cholesterol accumulation and, perhaps, also atherosclerosis, it must be the result of differences in the interaction to the hypercholesterolemic low density lipoprotein with the more complicated mammalian cell membranes, rather than differences in the chemical potential for cholesterol transfer.

  15. Heterogeneity of serum low density lipoproteins in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M.M.S.; Krauss, R.M.; Lindgren, F.T.; Forte, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    Equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation of serum low density lipoprotein (LDL) from twelve healthy human subjects was used to separate six subfractions with mean dinsity ranging from 1.0268 to 1.0597 g/ml. Mean corrected peak flotation rate (S/sup o//sub f/) measured by analytic ultracentrifugation, and mean particle diameter determined by negative staining electron microscopy, both declined significantly with increasing density of the subfractions. Major differences in chemical composition of the subfractions were noted, including a singnificantly lower triglyceride content and higher ratio of cholesteryl ester to triglyceride in the middle fractions compared with those of highest and lowest density. Concentration of fraction 2 correlated positively with HDL (P < 0.01) and negatively with VLDL (P < 0.001); concentration of fraction 4 correlated negatively with HDL (P < 0.05) and positively with VLDL (P < 0.001) and IDL (P < 0.01). LDL may thus include subspecies of differing structure and composition which might also have different metabolic and atherogenic roles.

  16. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    SONG, JIAN; PING, LING-YAN; DUONG, DUC M.; GAO, XIAO-YAN; HE, CHUN-YAN; WEI, LEI; WU, JUN-ZHU

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native-LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL-stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label-free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native-LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native-LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation. PMID:26781977

  17. Alcohol alters low density lipoprotein composition and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hoinacki, J.; Brown, J.; Dawson, M.; Deschenes, R.; Mulligan, J. )

    1991-03-11

    Two separate studies were conducted to examine the effect of ethanol (EtOH) dose on atherogenic low density lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions and LDL metabolism in vivo. In the first study, male, atherosclerosis-susceptible squirrel monkeys were divided in three treatments: controls fed liquid diet, and low and high alcohol groups given liquid diet with vodka substituted for carbohydrate at 12% and 24% of calories, respectively. After 6 months, LDL subclasses (LDL{sub 1a}, LDL{sub 1b} and LDL{sub 2}) were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, and their lipid and protein composition was determined. Low dose EtOH had no effect on LDL subfraction distribution while 24% EtOH resulted in an increase in the larger (LDL{sub 1a} and LDL{sub 1b}), buoyant subspecies without affecting the level of the more atherogenic, smaller, denser LDL{sub 2} particles. In the second study, {sup 125}I-LDL apolipoprotein B (apo B) was injected intravenously into Control and High EtOH monkeys and kinetic analyses were performed. Although the absolute catabolic rate (LDL production) was not altered, High EtOH primates showed a reduction in the fractional catabolic rate and a longer LDL apoB residence time.

  18. Modified low-density lipoproteins and high-density lipoproteins. From investigation tools to real in vivo players.

    PubMed

    Koller, Elisabeth; Volf, Ivo; Gurvitz, Aner; Koller, Franz

    2006-01-01

    It has long been known that the oxidative state of the various plasma lipoproteins modulates platelet aggregability, thereby contributing to atherogenesis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), occurring in vivo both in the native and oxidised forms, interacts directly with platelets, by binding to specific receptors. While the identity of the receptors for native LDL and some subfractions of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) remains disputed, apoE-containing HDL(2) binds to LRP8. The nature of these interactions as well as the distinction between candidate receptor proteins was elucidated using covalently modified apolipoproteins, which pointed to the participation of apolipoproteins in high affinity binding. However, the platelet effects initiated by binding of native lipoproteins remain controversial. Some of this ambiguity can be traced to the fact that native LDL inevitably undergoes substantial oxidisation upon modification, including by radiolabelling. The platelet-activating effects provoked by oxidised LDL are irrefutable, but many details remain unknown. The role of CD36 in platelet binding by oxidised LDL is well established, although additional receptors may exist. Much less is known about the interaction of oxidised HDL with platelets, since platelet activation was observed in some, but not all studies. Various frequently applied in vitro oxidation methods produce modified lipoprotein species that may not be relevant in vivo. Based on the reported modifications obtained by in vitro oxidation of LDL, early investigations focused mainly on the formation and the eventual effects of oxidised lipids. More recently, alterations to lipoproteins performed using hypochloric acid and myeloperoxidase redirected the attention to the role of modified apoproteins in triggering platelet responses. PMID:16877881

  19. Low density lipoprotein subclasses in Asian and Caucasian adolescent boys.

    PubMed

    Raschke, Verena; Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Bermingham, Margaret A; Steinbeck, Kate

    2006-01-01

    South Asian adults are known to have very high rates of Coronary heart disease (CHD) and insulin resistance and, even as adolescents, may show higher risk factors for CHD. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of small, dense low density lipoprotein (sdLDL) subclasses in a cohort of adolescent boys. The specific objective was to investigate the relationship between measures of fatness, ethnicity and LDL diameter in this cohort. Preformed native (non-denaturing) polyacrylamide 3-13% gradient gels and a multipurpose vertical electrophoresis system were used for the separation of LDL sub-fractions in a single school year cohort of boys aged 15-16 years (n=135). Latex beads and thyroglobulin standards were used to construct a calibration curve in order to calculate LDL particle diameters by regression (Total Lab Software v1.11). ANOVA was used to compare LDL size among different ethnic groups (SPSS and Stat View). The study sample was comprised of 45.2% Caucasians, 41.5% East Asians and 13.3% from the Indian subcontinent (South Asians). There was a non-significant trend for South Asians to have a lower LDL diameter than either Caucasians or East Asian boys which was independent of % total body fat (%TBF) and body mass index (BMI). This is the first adolescent cohort to examine sdLDL which included Caucasians, East and South Asians. It appears that the higher risk profile for CHD and diabetes noted in South Asian adults may be evident even during adolescence. PMID:17077065

  20. Low Density Lipoprotein transport in the normal human aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Soulis, JV; Dimitrakopoulou, M; Giannoglou, GD

    2014-01-01

    Background: To understand the genesis and progression of atherosclerosis is essential to elucidate the blood flow and the transport of molecules in the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this computational study is to elucidate the relationship between low wall shear stress (WSS) - high site concentration of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and atherosclerotic sites in the normal human aortic arch under physiological flow and mass transport conditions. Methods: The numerical simulation couples the flow equations with the transport equation applying realistic boundary conditions at the wall in terms of blood-side concentration. The blood is considered to be non-Newtonian fluid obeying to the power law. Suitable mass transport conditions are specified at the wall. Results: Aortic arch walls are exposed to cholesterolemic environment although the applied mass and flow conditions refer to normal human geometry and normal mass-flow conditions. The luminal surface LDL concentration varies inversely with the WSS. Regions of high LDL luminal surface concentration do not necessarily co-locate to the sites of lowest WSS. Concave sides of the aortic arch exhibit, relatively to the convex sides, elevated concentration of the LDL. The area averaged normalized LDL concentration over the entire normal aortic arch is 1.267. The daughter aortic arch vessels exhibit, relatively to the main aorta, elevated LDL concentrations. Conclusions: The near wall paths of the velocities might be the most important factor for the elevated LDL concentration at areas located either at the vicinity of bifurcations regions or at high curvature regions. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (3): 221-225. PMID:25694755

  1. Lipid composition of circulating multiple-modified low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zakiev, E R; Sukhorukov, V N; Melnichenko, A A; Sobenin, I A; Ivanova, E A; Orekhov, A N

    2016-01-01

    Atherogenic modified low- density lipoprotein (LDL) induces pronounced accumulation of cholesterol and lipids in the arterial wall, while native LDL seems to lack such capability. Therefore, modified LDL appears to be a major causative agent in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Possible modifications of LDL particles include changes in size and density, desialylation, oxidation and acquisition of negative charge. Total LDL isolated from pooled plasma of patients with coronary atherosclerosis, as well as from healthy subjects contains two distinct subfractions: normally sialylated LDL and desialylated LDL, which can be isolated by binding to a lectin affinity column. We called the desialylated LDL subfraction circulating modified LDL (cmLDL). In this study, we focused on lipid composition of LDL particles, analysing the total LDL preparation and two LDL subfractions: cmLDL and native LDL. The composition of LDL was studied using thin-layer chromatography. We found that cmLDL subfraction had decreased levels of free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids (except for lysophosphatidylcholine) and sphingomyelin in comparison to native LDL. On the other hand, levels of mono-, and diglycerides, lysophosphatidylcholine and free fatty acids were higher in cmLDL than in native LDL. Our study demonstrated that lipid composition of cmLDL from atherosclerotic patients was altered in comparison to healthy subjects. In particular, phospholipid content was decreased, and free fatty acids levels were increased in cmLDL. This strengthens the hypothesis of multiple modification of LDL particles in the bloodstream and underscores the clinical importance of desialylated LDL as a possible marker of atherosclerosis progression. PMID:27558696

  2. The hypocholesterolemic activity of açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) is mediated by the enhanced expression of the ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G transporters 5 and 8 and low-density lipoprotein receptor genes in the rat.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Melina Oliveira; Souza E Silva, Lorena; de Brito Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes; de Figueiredo, Bianca Barros; Costa, Daniela Caldeira; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the ingestion of açaí pulp can improve serum lipid profile in various animal models; therefore, we hypothesized that açaí pulp (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) may modulate the expression of the genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the liver and increase fecal excretion, thus reducing serum cholesterol. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the expression of 7α-hydroxylase and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G transporters (ABCG5 and ABCG8), which are genes involved with the secretion of cholesterol in the rat. We also evaluated the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R), and apolipoprotein B100, which are involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Female Fischer rats were divided into 4 groups: the C group, which was fed a standard AIN-93 M diet; the CA group, which was fed a standard diet supplemented with 2% açaí pulp; the H group, which was fed a hypercholesterolemic diet (25% soy oil and 1% cholesterol); and the HA group, which was fed a hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with 2% açaí pulp. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were euthanized, and their blood and livers were collected. The HA group exhibited a significant decrease in serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and atherogenic index and also had increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and cholesterol excretion in feces compared with the H group. In addition, the expression of the LDL-R, ABCG5, and ABCG8 genes was significantly increased by the presence of açaí pulp. These results suggest that açaí pulp promotes a hypocholesterolemic effect in a rat model of dietary-induced hypercholesterolemia through an increase in the expression of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G transporters, and LDL-R genes. PMID:23244543

  3. Minimally modified low density lipoprotein stimulates monocyte endothelial interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Berliner, J A; Territo, M C; Sevanian, A; Ramin, S; Kim, J A; Bamshad, B; Esterson, M; Fogelman, A M

    1990-01-01

    The effect of minimally modified LDL (MM-LDL) on the ability of large vessel endothelial cells (EC) to interact with monocytes and neutrophils was examined. These LDL preparations, obtained by storage or by mild iron oxidation, were indistinguishable from native LDL to the LDL receptor and were not recognized by the scavenger receptor. Treatment of EC with as little as 0.12 micrograms/ml MM-LDL caused a significant increase in the production of chemotactic factor for monocytes (sevenfold) and increased monocyte binding (three- to fivefold). Monocyte binding was maximal after 4 h of EC exposure to MM-LDL, persisted for 48 h, and was inhibited by cycloheximide. In contrast, neutrophil binding was not increased after 1-24 h of exposure. Activity in the MM-LDL preparations was found primarily in the polar lipid fraction. MM-LDL was toxic for EC from one rabbit but not toxic for the cells from another rabbit or any human umbilical vein EC. The resistant cells became sensitive when incubated with lipoprotein in the presence of cycloheximide, whereas the sensitive strain became resistant when preincubated with sublethal concentrations of MM-LDL. We conclude that exposure of EC to sublethal levels of MM-LDL enhances monocyte endothelial interactions and induces resistance to the toxic effects of MM-LDL. Images PMID:2318980

  4. Six new loci associated with blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and blood triglycerides reflect key metabolic processes including sensitivity to insulin. Blood lipoprotein and lipid concentrations are heritable. To date, the identification o...

  5. Reliability of Calculated Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W; Snozek, Christine L; Baumann, Nikola A; Jaffe, Allan S; Saenger, Amy K

    2015-08-15

    Aggressive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering strategies are recommended for prevention of cardiovascular events in high-risk populations. Guidelines recommend a 30% to 50% reduction in at-risk patients even when LDL-C concentrations are between 70 and 130 mg/dl (1.8 to 3.4 mmol/L). However, calculation of LDL-C by the Friedewald equation is the primary laboratory method for routine LDL-C measurement. We compared the accuracy and reproducibility of calculated LDL-C <130 mg/dl (3.4 mmol/L) to LDL-C measured by β quantification (considered the gold standard method) in 15,917 patients with fasting triglyceride concentrations <400 mg/dl (4.5 mmol/L). Both variation and bias of calculated LDL-C increased at lower values of measured LDL-C. The 95% confidence intervals for a calculated LDL-C of 70 mg/dl (1.8 mmol/L) and 30 mg/dl (0.8 mmol/L) were 60 to 86 mg/dl (1.6 to 2.2 mmol/L) and 24 to 60 mg/dl (0.6 to 1.6 mmol/L), respectively. Previous recommendations have emphasized the requirement for a fasting sample with triglycerides <400 mg/dl (4.5 mmol/L) to calculate LDL-C by the Friedewald equation. However, no recommendations have addressed the appropriate lower reportable limit for calculated LDL-C. In conclusion, calculated LDL-C <30 mg/dl (0.8 mmol/L) should not be reported because of significant deviation from the gold standard measured LDL-C results, and caution is advised when using calculated LDL-CF values <70 mg/dl (1.8 mmol/L) to make treatment decisions. PMID:26059865

  6. Diffusion of nitric oxide into low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Denicola, Ana; Batthyány, Carlos; Lissi, Eduardo; Freeman, Bruce A; Rubbo, Homero; Radi, Rafael

    2002-01-11

    A key early event in the development of atherosclerosis is the oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) via different mechanisms including free radical reactions with both protein and lipid components. Nitric oxide (( small middle dot)NO) is capable of inhibiting LDL oxidation by scavenging radical species involved in oxidative chain propagation reactions. Herein, the diffusion of ( small middle dot)NO into LDL is studied by fluorescence quenching of pyrene derivatives. Selected probes 1-(pyrenyl)methyltrimethylammonium (PMTMA) and 1-(pyrenyl)-methyl-3-(9-octadecenoyloxy)-22,23-bisnor-5-cholenate (PMChO) were chosen so that they could be incorporated at different depths of the LDL particle. Indeed, PMTMA and PMChO were located in the surface and core of LDL, respectively, as indicated by changes in fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quenching studies with water-soluble quenchers and the lifetime values (tau(o)) of the excited probes. The apparent second order rate quenching constants of ( small middle dot)NO (k(NO)) for both probes were 2.6-3.8 x 10(10) m(-1) s(-1) and 1.2 x 10(10) m(-1) s(-1) in solution and native LDL, respectively, indicating that there is no significant barrier to the diffusion of ( small middle dot)NO to the surface and core of LDL. Nitric oxide was also capable of diffusing through oxidized LDL. Considering the preferential partitioning of ( small middle dot)NO in apolar milieu (6-8 for n-octanol:water) and therefore a larger ( small middle dot)NO concentration in LDL with respect to the aqueous phase, a corrected k(NO) value of approximately 0.2 x 10(10) m(-1) s(-1) can be determined, which still is sufficiently large and consistent with a facile diffusion of ( small middle dot)NO through LDL. Applying the Einstein-Smoluchowsky treatment, the apparent diffusion coefficient (D(')NO) of ( small middle dot)NO in native LDL is on average 2 x 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1), six times larger than that previously reported for erythrocyte plasma membrane

  7. Furin-cleaved Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 (PCSK9) Is Active and Modulates Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor and Serum Cholesterol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lipari, Michael T.; Li, Wei; Moran, Paul; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Sai, Tao; Lai, Joyce; Lin, S. Jack; Kolumam, Ganesh; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Arnott, David; Wang, Jianyong; Peterson, Andrew S.; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) regulates plasma LDL cholesterol levels by regulating the degradation of LDL receptors. Another proprotein convertase, furin, cleaves PCSK9 at Arg218-Gln219 in the surface-exposed “218 loop.” This cleaved form circulates in blood along with the intact form, albeit at lower concentrations. To gain a better understanding of how cleavage affects PCSK9 function, we produced recombinant furin-cleaved PCSK9 using antibody Ab-3D5, which binds the intact but not the cleaved 218 loop. Using Ab-3D5, we also produced highly purified hepsin-cleaved PCSK9. Hepsin cleaves PCSK9 at Arg218-Gln219 more efficiently than furin but also cleaves at Arg215-Phe216. Further analysis by size exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry indicated that furin and hepsin produced an internal cleavage in the 218 loop without the loss of the N-terminal segment (Ser153–Arg218), which remained attached to the catalytic domain. Both furin- and hepsin-cleaved PCSK9 bound to LDL receptor with only 2-fold reduced affinity compared with intact PCSK9. Moreover, they reduced LDL receptor levels in HepG2 cells and in mouse liver with only moderately lower activity than intact PCSK9, consistent with the binding data. Single injection into mice of furin-cleaved PCSK9 resulted in significantly increased serum cholesterol levels, approaching the increase by intact PCSK9. These findings indicate that circulating furin-cleaved PCSK9 is able to regulate LDL receptor and serum cholesterol levels, although somewhat less efficiently than intact PCSK9. Therapeutic anti-PCSK9 approaches that neutralize both forms should be the most effective in preserving LDL receptors and in lowering plasma LDL cholesterol. PMID:23135270

  8. microRNA-513c suppresses the proliferation of human glioblastoma cells by repressing low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiajun; Sun, Tao; Hu, Xuebing

    2015-09-01

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is frequently observed in glioblastoma (GBM) cells. Therefore, it was hypothesized that low‑density lipoprotein receptor‑related protein 6 (LRP6) may be involved in activating the Wnt/β‑catenin pathway in the progression of GBM. The present study reported that the expression of microRNA (miR)‑513c was markedly downregulated in GBM cells and GBM tissues compared with that in normal human astrocytes and normal brain tissues. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR‑513c is critical in a variety of biological processes in various human cancer cells. The role of this miR in GBM cells was therefore investigated in the present study. Ectopic expression of miR‑513c reduced the proliferation and anchorage‑independent growth of GBM cells, whereas inhibition of miR‑513c promoted this effect. Bioinformatic analysis further identified LRP6, a putative tumor suppressor, as a potential target of miR‑513c. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that miR‑513c directly bound to the 3'‑untranslated region of LRP6 mRNA and repressed the expression at the transcriptional as well as the translational level. In functional assays, miR‑513c suppressed GBM cell proliferation, which was reversed by an inhibitor of miR‑513c. In conclusion, the present study provided compelling evidence that miR‑513c functions as a tumor suppressor miRNA, which may be important in the inhibition of cell proliferation in GBM. In addition, the tumor suppressive effects were mediated predominantly through the direct suppression of the expression of LRP6. PMID:26063413

  9. [THE LIPOLYSIS IN PHYLOGENETICALLY EARLY LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY AND MORE LATER LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY: FUNCTION AND DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF APOE AND APOC-III].

    PubMed

    Rozhkova, T A; Titov, V N; Amelyushkina, V A; Kaba, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-12-01

    According to phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the function of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) in them under the effect of hepatic glycerol hydrolase apoC-III (HGH) developed at much earlier stages of phylogenesis than functioning of insulin-dependent phylogenetically late very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). For millions ofyears, lipolysis and HGH+apoC-III have activated transfer of polyenic fatty acids (FA) in the form of cholesteryl polyesters (CLE) from high density lipoproteins (HDL) to linoleic and linolenic LDL under the effect of cholesteryl ester transfer protein. It is reasonable to suggest that hepatocytes physiologically secrete oleic and palmitic VLDL and linoleic and linolenic LDL. Cells uptake ligand oleic and palmitic VLVL by apoE/B-100 receptor-mediated endocytosis. Physiologically, VLDL are not converted to LDL. If hepatocytes secrete palmitic VLDL in greater amounts than oleic VLDL upon slow hydrolysis ofpalmitic TG and under the effect of postheparinic lipoprotein lipase+apoC-II, only some proportion of palmitic TG is uptaken by cells as VLDL, and the rest is converted in ligand-free palmitic LDL These LDL increase plasma contents of TG and LDL-cholesterol and form small dense palmitic LDL. Expression of HGH+apoC-III synthesis compensates TG hydrolysis in nonphysiological palmitic LDL. In vivo, apoC-III is neither physiological no pathological inhibitor of lipolysis. Increase in plasma apoC-III content is an indicator of accumulation of non-physiological palmitic LDL and atherosclerosis-atheromatosis risk factor ApoE content ofpalmitic LDL increases together with apoC-III, i.e., apoE in ligand VLDL is not internalized via apoE/B-100 endocytosis. An increase in apoC-III and apoE contents are reliable in vivo tests for the rise inpalmitic FA, palmitic TG and excessive secretion of palmitic VLDL by hepatocytes. ApoC-III and apoE contents in LDL are additional tests to evaluate the efficiency of

  10. The removal of partially metabolized very-low-density lipoproteins by the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Suri, B S; Targ, M E; Robinson, D S

    1981-01-01

    1. Donor perfused rat livers were used to prepare VLD (very-low-density) lipoproteins, labelled in their triacylglycerol and protein components with [1-14C]oleic acid and L-[4,5-3H]leucine respectively. Partially metabolized VLD lipoproteins, similarly labelled, were obtained from supradiaphragmatic rats injected with the parent VLD lipoproteins. 2. The triacylglycerol and protein components of the partially metabolized VLD lipoproteins were removed by recipient perfused rat livers at rates much higher than those of the parent VLD lipoproteins. No degradation of the partially metabolized VLD lipoproteins to LD (low-density) lipoproteins occurred during the perfusions. 3. Removal of hepatic lipase from the livers did not significantly affect the rate of removal of the partially metabolized VLD lipoproteins. PMID:7317016

  11. Transthyretin participates in beta-amyloid transport from the brain to the liver- involvement of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1?

    PubMed Central

    Alemi, Mobina; Gaiteiro, Cristiana; Ribeiro, Carlos Alexandre; Santos, Luís Miguel; Gomes, João Rodrigues; Oliveira, Sandra Marisa; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Saraiva, Maria João; Cardoso, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) binds Aβ peptide, preventing its deposition and toxicity. TTR is decreased in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Additionally, AD transgenic mice with only one copy of the TTR gene show increased brain and plasma Aβ levels when compared to AD mice with both copies of the gene, suggesting TTR involvement in brain Aβ efflux and/or peripheral clearance. Here we showed that TTR promotes Aβ internalization and efflux in a human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line, hCMEC/D3. TTR also stimulated brain-to-blood but not blood-to-brain Aβ permeability in hCMEC/D3, suggesting that TTR interacts directly with Aβ at the blood-brain-barrier. We also observed that TTR crosses the monolayer of cells only in the brain-to-blood direction, as confirmed by in vivo studies, suggesting that TTR can transport Aβ from, but not into the brain. Furthermore, TTR increased Aβ internalization by SAHep cells and by primary hepatocytes from TTR+/+ mice when compared to TTR−/− animals. We propose that TTR-mediated Aβ clearance is through LRP1, as lower receptor expression was found in brains and livers of TTR−/− mice and in cells incubated without TTR. Our results suggest that TTR acts as a carrier of Aβ at the blood-brain-barrier and liver, using LRP1. PMID:26837706

  12. Targeting PCSK9 as a promising new mechanism for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Della Badia, Laura A; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-08-01

    Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs have dominated the market for many years for achievement of recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, a substantial number of high-risk patients are unable to achieve the LDL-C goal. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) has recently emerged as a new, promising key therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PCSK9 is a protease involved in chaperoning the low-density lipoprotein receptor to the process of degradation. PCSK9 inhibitors and statins effectively lower LDL-C. The PCSK9 inhibitors decrease the degradation of the LDL receptors, whereas statins mainly interfere with the synthetic machinery of cholesterol by inhibiting the key rate limiting enzyme, the HMG CoA reductase. PCSK9 inhibitors are currently being developed as monoclonal antibodies for their primary use in lowering LDL-C. They may be especially useful for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, who at present receive minimal benefit from traditional statin therapy. The monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors, recently granted FDA approval, show the most promising safety and efficacy profile compared to other, newer LDL-C lowering therapies. This review will primarily focus on the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors in comparison to statins. The review will also address new, alternative PCSK9 targeting drug classes such as small molecules, gene silencing agents, apolipoprotein B antisense oligonucleotides, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors. PMID:27133571

  13. The Citrus Flavonoids Hesperetin and Nobiletin Differentially Regulate Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Transcription in HepG2 Liver Cells1-3

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Brian; Nichols, LaNita A.; Zalasky, Katherine M.; Davis, J. Wade; Manthey, John A.; Holland, Lené J.

    2008-01-01

    Reduction of plasma cholesterol by citrus flavonoids is associated with effects on specific liver functions related to lipid handling. In previous in vivo studies, polymethoxylated flavones (PMF) reduced plasma cholesterol levels at lower doses than required for flavanones. To delineate hepatic mechanisms that underlie this differential potency, we used HepG2 cells to quantitate effects on expression of the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene. A dose-response analysis showed that 200 μmol/L hesperetin, a flavanone present as a disaccharide in oranges, increased LDLR mRNA levels 3.6- to 4.7-fold of the untreated control. In contrast, nobiletin, a PMF found at the highest concentration in oranges and tangerines, achieved maximal stimulation of 1.5- to 1.6-fold of control at only 5 μmol/L. Transcriptional regulation of the LDLR gene by citrus flavonoids has been implicated but, to our knowledge, not directly demonstrated. Here, using transfection vector constructs containing the upstream region of the LDLR gene, we show differences in both potency and efficacy in the induction of transcription, with peak stimulation of 5.3- to 7.5-fold of control at 150-160 μmol/L hesperetin and 3- to 3.8-fold of control at 10-20 μmol/L nobiletin. Hesperetin sustains induction, whereas nobiletin is inhibitory at high doses, resulting in an inverted-U dose response. The sterol regulatory element (SRE) in the LDLR gene upstream region plays a crucial role, because mutation of this site strongly attenuated induction in response to hesperetin or nobiletin. Thus, citrus flavonoids are likely to act through the SRE-binding proteins, with PMF initially activating these mechanisms at considerably lower concentrations than flavanones. PMID:18567747

  14. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association. PMID:26555266

  15. Softness of atherogenic lipoproteins: a comparison of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS).

    PubMed

    Mikl, Christian; Peters, Judith; Trapp, Marcus; Kornmueller, Karin; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Prassl, Ruth

    2011-08-31

    Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100)-containing plasma lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL) supply tissues and cells with cholesterol and fat. During lipolytic conversion from VLDL to LDL the size and chemical composition of the particles change, but the apoB100 molecule remains bound to the lipids and regulates the receptor mediated uptake. The molecular physical parameters which control lipoprotein remodeling and enable particle stabilization by apoB100 are largely unknown. Here, we have compared the molecular dynamics and elasticities of VLDL and LDL derived by elastic neutron scattering temperature scans. We have determined thermal motions, dynamical transitions, and molecular fluctuations, which reflect the temperature-dependent motional coupling between lipid and protein. Our results revealed that lipoprotein particles are extremely soft and flexible. We found substantial differences in the molecular resiliences of lipoproteins, especially at higher temperatures. These discrepancies not only can be explained in terms of lipid composition and mobility but also suggest that apoB100 displays different dynamics dependent on the lipoprotein it is bound to. Hence, we suppose that the inherent conformational flexibility of apoB100 permits particle stabilization upon lipid exchange, whereas the dynamic coupling between protein and lipids might be a key determinant for lipoprotein conversion and atherogenicity. PMID:21790144

  16. [THE BECOMING IN PHYLOGENESIS OF TRANSFER IN INTERCELLULAR MEDIUM AND ACTIVE ABSORPTION OF POLYENOIC FATTY ACIDS BY CELLS SEQUENTIALLY OF HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS, LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS AND HIGH DENSITY APOE-LIPOPROTEINS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2015-06-01

    After more than half-century of different conceptions, the theory of general pathology was used to substantiate that all lipoproteins are bi-layer:lipid by their structure. The main function of high density lipoproteins as of all lipoproteins is transfer of fatty acids to cells and only in second turn taking away of spirit cholesterol from cells. At the stages of phylogenesis high density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins and very low density lipoproteins began to function in a subsequent way. The fatty acids were transferred by low density lipoproteins in polar lipids at passive absorption by cells. Later on, lipoproteins transfer fatty acids in non-polar ethers with spirits glycerin and spirit cholesterol. The cells absorb them by receptor endocytosis. The hepatocytes secret in blood palmitic, oleic, linoleic and linoleic very low density lipoproteins. The palmitic and oleic very low density lipoproteins absorb physiologically insulin-dependent cells apoE/B-100 = endocytosis. The linoleic and linoleic very low density lipoproteins after transition of polyethers cholesterol from high density lipoproteins turn into low density lipoproteins. The cells absorb them by apoB-100 = endocytosis. The formation of chylomicrons occurs in blood and hepatocytes absorb them by the way of apoB/E-48 = endocytosis. The absorption of poly-unsaturated fatty acids by cells with apoB-100 = endocytosis form sensitivity of animals to exogenous hyper spirit cholesterol and absorption of poly-unsaturated fatty acids by apoE/A-I = receptors form corresponding resistance. The ApoE in lipoproteins form cooperative ligands--apoE/B-48 for chylomicrons, apoE/B-100 for very low density lipoproteins and apoE/A-I for high density lipoproteins. The chylomicrons in blood form apoB-48 from complexes of triglycerides secreted by enterocytes. These views change conceptions of pathogenesis and prevention of atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome and resistance to insulin whose pathogenesis is unified

  17. Low density lipoprotein bionanoparticles: From cholesterol transport to delivery of anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Harisa, Gamaleldin I.; Alanazi, Fars K.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, we highlight the importance of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its implications in the field of drug delivery to cancer cells. LDL is naturally occurring bionanoparticles (BNP) with a size of 18–25 nm. These BNPs specifically transport cholesterol to cells expressing the LDL receptors (LDLRs). Several tumors overexpress LDLRs, presumably to provide cholesterol for sustaining a high rate of membrane synthesis. LDL BNPs are biocompatible and biodegradable, favorably bind hydrophobic and amphiphilic drugs, are taken up by a receptor-mediated mechanism, have a half-life of 2–4 days, and can be rerouted. Drugs can be loaded onto LDL BNPs by surface loading, core loading, and apoprotein interaction. LDL may be used as a drug carrier for treatment of atherosclerosis, cancer, and in photodynamic therapies. PMID:25561862

  18. Low-density lipoprotein-mimicking nanoparticles for tumor-targeted theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yu; Kim, Jin-Ho; Bae, Ki Hyun; Oh, Mi Hwa; Kim, Youngwook; Kim, Jee Seon; Park, Tae Gwan; Park, Keunchil; Lee, Jung Hee; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2015-01-14

    This study introduces multifunctional lipid nanoparticles (LNPs), mimicking the structure and compositions of low-density lipoproteins, for the tumor-targeted co-delivery of anti-cancer drugs and superparamagnetic nanocrystals. Paclitaxel (4.7 wt%) and iron oxide nanocrystals (6.8 wt%, 11 nm in diameter) are co-encapsulated within folate-functionalized LNPs, which contain a cluster of nanocrystals with an overall diameter of about 170 nm and a zeta potential of about -40 mV. The folate-functionalized LNPs enable the targeted detection of MCF-7, human breast adenocarcinoma expressing folate receptors, in T2 -weighted magnetic resonance images as well as the efficient intracellular delivery of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel-free LNPs show no significant cytotoxicity up to 0.2 mg mL(-1) , indicating the excellent biocompatibility of the LNPs for intracellular drug delivery applications. The targeted anti-tumor activities of the LNPs in a mouse tumor model suggest that the low-density lipoprotein-mimetic LNPs can be an effective theranostic platform with excellent biocompatibility for the tumor-targeted co-delivery of various anti-cancer agents. PMID:25137631

  19. Long term hemodialysis aggravates lipolytic activity reduction and very low density, low density lipoproteins composition in chronic renal failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Mekki, Khedidja; Prost, Josiane; Remaoun, Mustapha; Belleville, Jacques; Bouchenak, Malika

    2009-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia, particularly hypertriglyceridemia is common in uremia, and represents an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. Methods To investigate the effects of hemodialysis (HD) duration on very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) compositions and lipopolytic activities, 20 patients on 5 to 7 years hemodialysis were followed-up during 9 years. Blood samples were drawn at T0 (beginning of the study), T1 (3 years after initiating study), T2 (6 years after initiating study) and T3 (9 years after initiating study). T0 was taken as reference. Results Triacylglycerols (TG) values were correlated with HD duration (r = 0.70, P < 0.05). An increase of total cholesterol was noted at T2 and T3. Lowered activity was observed for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) (-44%) at T3 and hepatic lipase (HL) (-29%) at T1, (-64%) at T2 and (-73%) at T3. Inverse relationships were found between HD duration and LPL activity (r = -0.63, P < 0.05), and HL activity (r = -0.71, P < 0.01). At T1, T2 and T3, high VLDL-amounts and VLDL-TG and decreased VLDL-phospholipids values were noted. Increased LDL-cholesteryl esters values were noted at T1 and T2 and in LDL-unesterified cholesterol at T2 and T3. Conclusion Despite hemodialysis duration, VLDL-LDL metabolism alterations are aggravated submitting patients to a greater risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:19709414

  20. Low-Density Lipoprotein Modified by Myeloperoxidase in Inflammatory Pathways and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, Luc; Roumeguère, Thierry; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has a key role in atherogenesis. Among the different models of oxidation that have been studied, the one using myeloperoxidase (MPO) is thought to be more physiopathologically relevant. Apolipoprotein B-100 is the unique protein of LDL and is the major target of MPO. Furthermore, MPO rapidly adsorbs at the surface of LDL, promoting oxidation of amino acid residues and formation of oxidized lipoproteins that are commonly named Mox-LDL. The latter is not recognized by the LDL receptor and is accumulated by macrophages. In the context of atherogenesis, Mox-LDL accumulates in macrophages leading to foam cell formation. Furthermore, Mox-LDL seems to have specific effects and triggers inflammation. Indeed, those oxidized lipoproteins activate endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages and induce proinflammatory molecules such as TNFα and IL-8. Mox-LDL may also inhibit fibrinolysis mediated via endothelial cells and consecutively increase the risk of thrombus formation. Finally, Mox-LDL has been involved in the physiopathology of several diseases linked to atherosclerosis such as kidney failure and consequent hemodialysis therapy, erectile dysfunction, and sleep restriction. All these issues show that the investigations of MPO-dependent LDL oxidation are of importance to better understand the inflammatory context of atherosclerosis. PMID:23983406

  1. Utilities for high throughput use of the single strand conformational polymorphism method: screening of 791 patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia for mutations in exon 3 of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Whittall, R; Gudnason, V; Weavind, G P; Day, L B; Humphries, S E; Day, I N

    1995-01-01

    We have modified several aspects of the single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) method to increase the speed with which the technique can be used for mutation detection. The methods attain high resolution of small mobility differences using long (30 cm) gels and use a modified polymerase reaction to maximise detection sensitivity using a minimised quantity of 32P. By using custom cut "sharktooth" combs (4.5 mm between teeth) as the slot formers, commercially available multichannel pipettes (9 mm tip to tip) can be used to load eight or 12 samples at a time from standard microtitre plates. PCR products that have been prepared and radiolabelled using simplified protocols are loaded on to the gel, and after a precalculated time of electrophoresis another set of samples can be loaded, either with combs moved across 2.25 mm or onto the same gel tracks. The run conditions are calculated so that there is no overlap between the bands produced by the two loadings, thus doubling the amount of information that can be gained from one gel. A computer program has been developed to solve equations to determine suitable timings for repetitive loadings. Finally, a modification of the gel pouring system is described so that two gels can be poured between three standard glass plates, with both gels run simultaneously. Of the order of 1000 PCR reactions can be prepared and analysed in 24 man hours using five 40 cm x 30 cm gel tanks. The application of these techniques is described to detect SSCPs in exon 3 of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene in 791 patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). Eight different SSCP patterns were seen, one of which was caused by the previously described E80K mutation, which was present in 11 patients (1.4%). In total, 32 patients (4%) were identified with exon 3 mutations. Images PMID:7562961

  2. The clathrin adaptor proteins ARH, Dab2, and numb play distinct roles in Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 versus low density lipoprotein receptor-mediated cholesterol uptake.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jian; Fu, Zhen-Yan; Li, Pei-Shan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Ma, Yi-Tong; Song, Bao-Liang

    2014-11-28

    The uptake of circulating low density lipoproteins (LDL) is mediated by LDL receptor (LDLR) through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. At the early stage of this process, adaptor proteins ARH and Dab2 specifically bind the endocytic signal motif in LDLR and recruit clathrin/AP2 to initiate internalization. On the other hand, intestinal cholesterol is absorbed by Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Another adaptor protein, Numb recognizes the endocytic motif in NPC1L1 C terminus and couples NPC1L1 to endocytic machinery. The ARH, Dab2, and Numb proteins contain a homogeneous phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that directly binds endocytic motifs. Because ARH, Dab2, and Numb are all PTB domain family members, the emerging mystery is whether these adaptors act complementally in LDLR and NPC1L1 endocytosis. Here, we found that ARH and Dab2 did not bind NPC1L1 and were not required for NPC1L1 internalization. Similarly, Numb lacked the ability to interact with the LDLR C terminus and was dispensable for LDL uptake. Only the Numb isoforms with shorter PTB domain could facilitate NPC1L1 endocytosis. Besides the reported function in intestinal cholesterol absorption, Numb also mediated cholesterol reabsorption from bile in liver. We further identified a Numb variant with G595D substitution in humans of low blood LDL-cholesterol. The G595D substitution impaired NPC1L1 internalization and cholesterol reabsorption, due to attenuating affinity of Numb to clathrin/AP2. These results demonstrate that Numb specifically regulates NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol absorption both in human intestine and liver, distinct from ARH and Dab2, which selectively participate in LDLR-mediated LDL uptake. PMID:25331956

  3. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in regulating low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated β-amyloid protein internalization in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai-Ge; Lv, Jia; Hu, Xiao-Dan; Shi, Li-Li; Chang, Ke-Wei; Chen, Xin-Lin; Qian, Yi-Hua; Yang, Wei-Na; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that intracellular β-amyloid protein (Aβ) alone plays a pivotal role in the progression of AD. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway and proteins that control Aβ internalization may provide new insight for regulating Aβ levels. In the present study, the regulation of Aβ internalization by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) was analyzed in vivo. The data derived from this investigation revealed that Aβ1-42 were internalized by neurons and astrocytes in mouse brain, and were largely deposited in mitochondria and lysosomes, with some also being found in the endoplasmic reticulum. Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex was formed during Aβ1-42 internalization, and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway was activated by Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were co- localized in the cells of parietal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the level of LRP1-mRNA and LRP1 protein involved in Aβ1-42 internalization in mouse brain. The results of this investigation demonstrated that Aβ1-42 induced an LRP1-dependent pathway that related to the activation of p38 MAPK resulting in internalization of Aβ1-42. These results provide evidence supporting a key role for the p38 MAPK signaling pathway which is involved in the regulation of Aβ1-42 internalization in the parietal cortex and hippocampus of mouse through LRP1 in vivo. PMID:27163530

  4. Reduction of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) in hippocampal neurons does not proportionately reduce, or otherwise alter, amyloid deposition in APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) and its family members have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Multiple susceptibility factors converge to metabolic pathways that involve LRP1, including modulation of the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the clearance of Aβ peptide. Methods We used the Cre-lox system to lower LRP1 levels in hippocampal neurons of mice that develop Alzheimer-type amyloid by crosses between mice that express Cre recombinase under the transcriptional control of the GFAP promoter, mice that harbor loxp sites in the LRP1 gene, and the APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic model. We compared amyloid plaque numbers in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice lacking LRP1 expression in hippocampus (n = 13) to mice with normal levels of LRP1 (n = 12). Student t-test was used to test whether there were significant differences in plaque numbers and amyloid levels between the groups. A regression model was used to fit two regression lines for these groups, and to compare the rates of Aβ accumulation. Results Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated efficient elimination of LRP1 expression in the CA fields and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Within hippocampus, we observed no effect on the severity of amyloid deposition, the rate of Aβ40/42 accumulation, or the architecture of amyloid plaques when LRP1 levels were reduced. Conclusions Expression of LRP1 by neurons in proximity to senile amyloid plaques does not appear to play a major role in modulating the formation of these proximal deposits or in the appearance of the associated neuritic pathology. PMID:22537779

  5. Inhibition of Macrophage CD36 Expression and Cellular Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (oxLDL) Accumulation by Tamoxifen: A PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR (PPAR)γ-DEPENDENT MECHANISM.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Jiang, Meixiu; Chen, Yuanli; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Wenwen; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Xiaoju; Li, Yan; Duan, Shengzhong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2016-08-12

    Macrophage CD36 binds and internalizes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) to facilitate foam cell formation. CD36 expression is activated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Tamoxifen, an anti-breast cancer medicine, has demonstrated pleiotropic functions including cardioprotection with unfully elucidated mechanisms. In this study, we determined that treatment of ApoE-deficient mice with tamoxifen reduced atherosclerosis, which was associated with decreased CD36 and PPARγ expression in lesion areas. At the cellular level, we observed that tamoxifen inhibited CD36 protein expression in human THP-1 monocytes, THP-1/PMA macrophages, and human blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Associated with decreased CD36 protein expression, tamoxifen reduced cellular oxLDL accumulation in a CD36-dependent manner. At the transcriptional level, tamoxifen decreased CD36 mRNA expression, promoter activity, and the binding of the PPARγ response element in CD36 promoter to PPARγ protein. Tamoxifen blocked ligand-induced PPARγ nuclear translocation and CD36 expression, but it increased PPARγ phosphorylation, which was due to that tamoxifen-activated ERK1/2. Furthermore, deficiency of PPARγ expression in macrophages abolished the inhibitory effect of tamoxifen on CD36 expression or cellular oxLDL accumulation both in vitro and in vivo Taken together, our study demonstrates that tamoxifen inhibits CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL accumulation by inactivating the PPARγ signaling pathway, and the inhibition of macrophage CD36 expression can be attributed to the anti-atherogenic properties of tamoxifen. PMID:27358406

  6. Regulation of T-lymphocyte motility, adhesion and de-adhesion by a cell surface mechanism directed by low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and endogenous thrombospondin-1

    PubMed Central

    Talme, Toomas; Bergdahl, Eva; Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocytes are highly motile and constantly reposition themselves between a free-floating vascular state, transient adhesion and migration in tissues. The regulation behind this unique dynamic behaviour remains unclear. Here we show that T cells have a cell surface mechanism for integrated regulation of motility and adhesion and that integrin ligands and CXCL12/SDF-1 influence motility and adhesion through this mechanism. Targeting cell surface-expressed low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) with an antibody, or blocking transport of LRP1 to the cell surface, perturbed the cell surface distribution of endogenous thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) while inhibiting motility and potentiating cytoplasmic spreading on intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and fibronectin. Integrin ligands and CXCL12 stimulated motility and enhanced cell surface expression of LRP1, intact TSP-1 and a 130 000 MW TSP-1 fragment while preventing formation of a de-adhesion-coupled 110 000 MW TSP-1 fragment. The appearance of the 130 000 MW TSP-1 fragment was inhibited by the antibody that targeted LRP1 expression, inhibited motility and enhanced spreading. The TSP-1 binding site in the LRP1-associated protein, calreticulin, stimulated adhesion to ICAM-1 through intact TSP-1 and CD47. Shear flow enhanced cell surface expression of intact TSP-1. Hence, chemokines and integrin ligands up-regulate a dominant motogenic pathway through LRP1 and TSP-1 cleavage and activate an associated adhesion pathway through the LRP1–calreticulin complex, intact TSP-1 and CD47. This regulation of T-cell motility and adhesion makes pro-adhesive stimuli favour motile responses, which may explain why T cells prioritize movement before permanent adhesion. PMID:24877199

  7. K Domain CR9 of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Is Critical for Aggregated LDL-induced Foam Cell Formation from Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Costales, Paula; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Castellano, Jose; Revuelta-Lopez, Elena; Corral-Rodríguez, Maria Ángeles; Nasarre, Laura; Badimon, Lina; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta

    2015-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) mediates the internalization of aggregated LDL (AgLDL), which in turn increases the expression of LRP1 in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). This positive feedback mechanism is thus highly efficient to promote the formation of hVSMC foam cells, a crucial vascular component determining the susceptibility of atherosclerotic plaque to rupture. Here we have determined the LRP1 domains involved in AgLDL recognition with the aim of specifically blocking AgLDL internalization in hVSMCs. The capacity of fluorescently labeled AgLDL to bind to functional LRP1 clusters was tested in a receptor-ligand fluorometric assay made by immobilizing soluble LRP1 “minireceptors” (sLRP1-II, sLRP1-III, and sLRP1-IV) recombinantly expressed in CHO cells. This assay showed that AgLDL binds to cluster II. We predicted three well exposed and potentially immunogenic peptides in the CR7–CR9 domains of this cluster (termed P1 (Cys1051–Glu1066), P2 (Asp1090–Cys1104), and P3 (Gly1127–Cys1140)). AgLDL, but not native LDL, bound specifically and tightly to P3-coated wells. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against P3 prevented AgLDL uptake by hVSMCs and were almost twice as effective as anti-P1 and anti-P2 Abs in reducing intracellular cholesteryl ester accumulation. Moreover, anti-P3 Abs efficiently prevented AgLDL-induced LRP1 up-regulation and counteracted the down-regulatory effect of AgLDL on hVSMC migration. In conclusion, domain CR9 appears to be critical for LRP1-mediated AgLDL binding and internalization in hVSMCs. Our results open new avenues for an innovative anti-VSMC foam cell-based strategy for the treatment of vascular lipid deposition in atherosclerosis. PMID:25918169

  8. Glucagon, cyclic AMP and adrenaline stimulate the degradation of low-density lipoprotein by cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, N F; Salter, A M; Fears, R; Brindley, D N

    1989-01-01

    Rat hepatocytes were preincubated for 16 h with hormones or drugs and then for a further 8 h with 125I-human low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Glucagon (via cyclic AMP) and adrenaline (via cyclic AMP and alpha-effects) increased the binding of 125I-LDL to the LDL receptor, and the degradation of LDL to [125I]iodotyrosine. The effects on degradation were antagonized by dexamethasone, and the action of cyclic AMP on binding and degradation was inhibited by actinomycin D. The results are discussed in relation to the control of lipoprotein metabolism in diabetes. PMID:2552996

  9. Intact human ceruloplasmin oxidatively modifies low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenwald, E; Chisolm, G M; Fox, P L

    1994-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin is a plasma protein that carries most of the copper found in the blood. Although its elevation after inflammation and trauma has led to its classification as an acute phase protein, its physiological role is uncertain. A frequently reported activity of ceruloplasmin is its ability to suppress oxidation of lipids. In light of the intense recent interest in the oxidation of plasma LDL, we investigated the effects of ceruloplasmin on the oxidation of this lipoprotein. In contrast to our expectations, highly purified, undegraded human ceruloplasmin enhanced rather than suppressed copper ion-mediated oxidation of LDL. Ceruloplasmin increased the oxidative modification of LDL as measured by thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances by at least 25-fold in 20 h, and increased electrophoretic mobility, conjugated dienes, and total lipid peroxides. In contrast, ceruloplasmin that was degraded to a complex containing 115- and 19-kD fragments inhibited cupric ion oxidation of LDL, as did commercial preparations, which were also degraded. However, the antioxidant capability of degraded ceruloplasmin in this system was similar to that of other proteins, including albumin. The copper in ceruloplasmin responsible for oxidant activity was not removed by ultrafiltration, indicating a tight association. Treatment of ceruloplasmin with Chelex-100 removed one of seven copper atoms per molecule and completely blocked oxidant activity. Restoration of the copper to ceruloplasmin also restored oxidant activity. These data indicate that ceruloplasmin, depending on the integrity of its structure and its bound copper, can exert a potent oxidant rather than antioxidant action on LDL. Our results invite speculation that ceruloplasmin may be in part responsible for oxidation of LDL in blood or in the arterial wall and may thus have a physiological role that is quite distinct from what is commonly believed. Images PMID:8163654

  10. Overexpression of LOXIN Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Veas, Carlos; Jara, Casandra; Willis, Naomi D; Pérez-Contreras, Karen; Gutierrez, Nicolas; Toledo, Jorge; Fernandez, Paulina; Radojkovic, Claudia; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escudero, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) are adult stem cells located in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Studies have indicated that hEPC play an important role in the recovery and repair of injured endothelium, however, their quantity and functional capacity is reduced in several diseases including hypercholesterolemia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that hEPC express lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and its activation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induces cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate whether overexpression of LOXIN, a truncated isoform of LOX-1 that acts as a dominant negative, plays a protective role against ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in hEPC. Human endothelial progenitor cells exposed to ox-LDL showed a significant increase in LOX-1 expression, and apoptosis began at ox-LDL concentrations above 50 μg/mL. All hEPC apoptosed at 200 μg/mL ox-LDL. High LOXIN expression was generated using adenoviral systems in hEPC and SiHa cells transduced with 100 colony-forming units per cell. Transduced LOXIN localized to the plasma membrane and blocked ox-LDL uptake mediated by LOX-1. Overexpression of LOXIN protected hEPC from ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, and therefore maybe a novel way of improving hEPC function and quantity. These results suggest that adenoviral vectors of LOXIN may provide a possible treatment for diseases related to ox-LDL and vascular endothelium dysfunction, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26771151

  11. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway. PMID:26559024

  12. Impaired stimulation of glucose transport in cardiac myocytes exposed to very low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, I; Viglino, C; Brulhart-Meynet, M-C; James, R W; Lerch, R; Montessuit, C

    2016-07-01

    We recently observed that free fatty acids impair the stimulation of glucose transport into cardiomyocytes in response to either insulin or metabolic stress. In vivo, fatty acids for the myocardium are mostly obtained from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and Very Low-Density Lipoproteins). We therefore determined whether exposure of cardiac myocytes to VLDL resulted in impaired basal and stimulated glucose transport. Primary adult rat cardiac myocytes were chronically exposed to VLDL before glucose uptake was measured in response to insulin or metabolic stress, provoked by the mitochondrial ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin. Exposure of cardiac myocytes to VLDL reduced both insulin-and oligomycin-stimulated glucose uptake. The reduction of glucose uptake was associated with a moderately reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. No reduction of the phosphorylation of the downstream effectors of insulin signaling Akt and AS160 was however observed. Similarly only a modest reduction of the activating phosphorylation of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) was observed in response to oligomycin. Similar to our previous observations with free fatty acids, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation restored oligomycin-stimulated glucose uptake. In conclusions, VLDL-derived fatty acids impair stimulated glucose transport in cardiac myocytes by a mechanism that seems to be mediated by a fatty acid oxidation intermediate. Thus, in the clinical context of the metabolic syndrome high VLDL may contribute to enhancement of ischemic injury by reduction of metabolic stress-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:27052924

  13. Human very low density lipoproteins and chylomicrons can protect against endotoxin-induced death in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, H W; Grunfeld, C; Feingold, K R; Rapp, J H

    1990-01-01

    Endotoxemia stimulates many physiologic responses including disturbances in lipid metabolism. We hypothesized that this lipemia may be part of a defensive mechanism by which the body combats the toxic effects of circulating endotoxin. We tested the effects of mixtures of endotoxin, lipoproteins, and lipoprotein-free plasma and determined the ability of varying concentrations of human very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons, as well as low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL), and of the synthetic lipid emulsion SOYACAL to prevent endotoxin-induced death in mice. This study demonstrates that the triglyceride-rich VLDL and chylomicrons, as well as cholesterol-rich LDL and HDL, and cholesterol-free SOYACAL can protect against endotoxin-induced death. Protection required small amounts of lipoprotein-free plasma, and depended on the incubation time and the concentration of lipoprotein lipid. Despite stringent techniques to prevent exogenous endotoxin contamination eight of ten duplicate VLDL preparations contained endotoxin (5,755 +/- 3,514 ng endotoxin/mg triglyceride, mean +/- SEM) making the isolation of endotoxin-free VLDL difficult. In contrast, simultaneous preparations of LDL and HDL were relatively free of endotoxin contamination (3 +/- 3 and 320 +/- 319 ng/mg total cholesterol, respectively), suggesting that the contamination of VLDL occurs in vivo and not during the isolation procedure. These observations suggest a possible role for increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the host's defense against endotoxemia and infection. Images PMID:2394827

  14. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Modulates N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor-dependent Intracellular Signaling and NMDA-induced Regulation of Postsynaptic Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Chikako; Kulik, Akos; Frotscher, Michael; Herz, Joachim; Schäfer, Michael; Bock, Hans H.; May, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The lipoprotein receptor LRP1 is essential in neurons of the central nervous system, as was revealed by the analysis of conditional Lrp1-deficient mouse models. The molecular basis of its neuronal functions, however, is still incompletely understood. Here we show by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and postsynaptic density preparation that LRP1 is located postsynaptically. Basal and NMDA-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) as well as NMDA target gene transcription are reduced in LRP1-deficient neurons. In control neurons, NMDA promotes γ-secretase-dependent release of the LRP1 intracellular domain (LRP1-ICD). However, pull-down and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed no direct interaction between the LRP1-ICD and either CREB or target gene promoters. On the other hand, NMDA-induced degradation of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 was impaired in the absence of LRP1, whereas its ubiquitination was increased, indicating that LRP1 influences the composition of postsynaptic protein complexes. Accordingly, NMDA-induced internalization of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 was impaired in LRP1-deficient neurons. These results show a role of LRP1 in the regulation and turnover of synaptic proteins, which may contribute to the reduced dendritic branching and to the neurological phenotype observed in the absence of LRP1. PMID:23760271

  15. Effect of lifibrol on the metabolism of low density lipoproteins and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Vega, G L; von Bergmann, K; Grundy, S M; Blumenschein, S; Carter, N B; Laeis, P; Lindenthal, B; von Bergmann, J; Simatupang, A; Lutjohann, D; Adams-Huet, B

    1999-07-01

    Lifibrol is a powerful cholesterol-lowering drug of unknown mechanism of action. This investigation was carried out to determine whether the major action of lifibrol is to enhance clearance of low density lipoproteins (LDL) through the LDL-receptor pathway, and if so, whether the drug exerts its action by altering the excretion of bile acids (acidic steroids), the absorption of cholesterol, or the synthesis of cholesterol. In a first study, in two patients with complete absence of LDL receptors, lifibrol therapy had essentially no effect on plasma LDL concentrations; in two others who had a marked reduction in LDL-receptor activity, response to the drug was attenuated. These findings suggest that lifibrol requires an intact LDL-receptor pathway to exert its action. In a second study, in patients with primary moderate hypercholesterolemia, isotope kinetic studies showed that lifibrol enhanced the fractional catabolic rate of LDL-apolipoprotein B (apo B), but had no effect on transport rates of LDL; these observations likewise support the probability that lifibrol acts mainly to increase the activity of the LDL-receptor pathway. However, in a third study in hypercholesterolemic patients, lifibrol therapy failed to increase acidic steroid excretion, inhibit cholesterol absorption, or reduce net cholesterol balance. Furthermore, lifibrol treatment did not significantly reduce urinary excretion of mevalonic acid. In contrast, in a parallel study, simvastatin therapy, which is known to inhibit cholesterol synthesis, gave the expected decrease in net cholesterol balance and reduction in urinary excretion of mevalonic acid. Thus, lifibrol, like statins, appears to increase the activity of LDL receptors; but in contrast to findings with statins, it was not possible to detect a significant decreased synthesis of cholesterol, either from balance studies or from urinary excretion of mevalonic acid. This finding raises the possibility that lifibrol activates the LDL-receptor

  16. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, A D; Logan, R L; Thomson, M; Elton, R A; Oliver, M F; Riemersma, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and in measures of other risk factors for coronary heart disease and to assess their importance for the development of coronary heart disease in Scottish men. DESIGN--Longitudinal study entailing follow up in 1988-9 of men investigated during a study in 1976. SETTING--Edinburgh, Scotland. SUBJECTS--107 men from Edinburgh who had taken part in a comparative study of risk factors for heart disease with Swedish men in 1976 when aged 40. INTERVENTION--The men were invited to attend a follow up clinic in 1988-9 for measurement of cholesterol concentrations and other risk factor measurements. Eighty three attended and 24 refused to or could not attend. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, body weight, weight to height index, prevalence of smoking, and alcohol intake; number of coronary artery disease events. RESULTS--Mean serum total cholesterol concentration increased over the 12 years mainly due to an increase in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (from 3.53 (SD 0.09) to 4.56 (0.11) mmol/l) despite a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Body weight and weight to height index increased. Fewer men smoked more than 15 cigarettes/day in 1988-9 than in 1976. Blood pressure remained stable and fasting triglyceride concentrations did not change. The frequency of corneal arcus doubled. Alcohol consumption decreased significantly. Eleven men developed clinical coronary heart disease. High low density lipoprotein and low high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in 1976, but not total cholesterol concentration, significantly predicted coronary heart disease (p = 0.05). Almost all of the men who developed coronary heart disease were smokers (91% v 53%, p less than

  17. LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE RELEASES ESTERIFIED OXYLIPINS FROM VERY LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the lipoprotein distribution of oxidized PUFAs, and we speculate that lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is a determinant in the release of VLDL-associated oxylipins. Here, using 12 wk old normolipidemic (lean) and hyperlipidemic (obese) Zucker-rats, we measured PUFA al...

  18. Effect of proteolysis of low-density serum lipoproteins on their interaction with macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Karmanskii, I.M.; Kovaleva, G.G.; Viktorova, L.N.; Shpikiter, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously postulated, on the basis of changes observed in the structural stability of low-density lipoproteins during treatment with pepsin or aortic cathepsin, that enzymatic modifications may lead to potentiation of the atherogenic properties of the lipoproteins. They also reported that treatment of lipoproteins with trypsin causes an increase in their binding with aortic glycosaminoglycans and to increased degradation by fibroblasts of patients with hereditary hypercholesterolemia. Limited proteolysis of lipoproteins with pepsin facilitated their binding with fibronectin. In this paper the authors investigate the uptake and degradation of low-density lipoproteins by macrophages after their limited hydrolysis by pepsin, an analog of tissue cathepsin D. The lipoproteins were isolated from the serum of healthy blood donors by ultracentrifugation. Iodination of the proteins with I 125 was carried out by the iodine monochloride method. Uptake and retention of the labelled lipoprotein were measured with a gamma counter. The increased uptake of the proteins, partially hydrolized by pepsin, was accompanied by their more intense degradation by macrophages.

  19. Clinical relevance of the biochemical, metabolic, and genetic factors that influence low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Kwiterovich, Peter O

    2002-10-17

    Traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) predict about 50% of the risk of developing CAD. The Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III has defined emerging risk factors for CAD, including small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Small, dense LDL is often accompanied by increased triglycerides (TGs) and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL). An increased number of small, dense LDL particles is often missed when the LDL cholesterol level is normal or borderline elevated. Small, dense LDL particles are present in families with premature CAD and hyperapobetalipoproteinemia, familial combined hyperlipidemia, LDL subclass pattern B, familial dyslipidemic hypertension, and syndrome X. The metabolic syndrome, as defined by ATP III, incorporates a number of the components of these syndromes, including insulin resistance and intra-abdominal fat. Subclinical inflammation and elevated procoagulants also appear to be part of this atherogenic syndrome. Overproduction of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) by the liver and increased secretion of large, apolipoprotein (apo) B-100-containing VLDL is the primary metabolic characteristic of most of these patients. The TG in VLDL is hydrolyzed by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) which produces intermediate-density lipoprotein. The TG in intermediate-density lipoprotein is hydrolyzed further, resulting in the generation of LDL. The cholesterol esters in LDL are exchanged for TG in VLDL by the cholesterol ester tranfer proteins, followed by hydrolysis of TG in LDL by hepatic lipase which produces small, dense LDL. Cholesterol ester transfer protein mediates a similar lipid exchange between VLDL and HDL, producing a cholesterol ester-poor HDL. In adipocytes, reduced fatty acid trapping and retention by adipose tissue may result from a primary defect in the incorporation of free fatty acids into TGs. Alternatively, insulin resistance may promote reduced retention of free fatty acids by adipocytes. Both these abnormalities lead to

  20. Glycated albumin and direct low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. We evaluated the ut...

  1. Direct Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Glycated Albumin Levels in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) have been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. The aim in this st...

  2. Antibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 induce myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chengyong; Lu, Yisheng; Zhang, Bin; Figueiredo, Dwight; Bean, Jonathan; Jung, Jiung; Wu, Haitao; Barik, Arnab; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most common disorder affecting the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). MG is frequently caused by autoantibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and a kinase critical for NMJ formation, MuSK; however, a proportion of MG patients are double-negative for anti-AChR and anti-MuSK antibodies. Recent studies in these subjects have identified autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 4 (LRP4), an agrin receptor also critical for NMJ formation. LRP4 autoantibodies have not previously been implicated in MG pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that mice immunized with the extracellular domain of LRP4 generated anti-LRP4 antibodies and exhibited MG-associated symptoms, including muscle weakness, reduced compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs), and compromised neuromuscular transmission. Additionally, fragmented and distorted NMJs were evident at both the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. We found that anti-LRP4 sera decreased cell surface LRP4 levels, inhibited agrin-induced MuSK activation and AChR clustering, and activated complements, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms. To further confirm the pathogenicity of LRP4 antibodies, we transferred IgGs purified from LRP4-immunized rabbits into naive mice and found that they exhibited MG-like symptoms, including reduced CMAP and impaired neuromuscular transmission. Together, these data demonstrate that LRP4 autoantibodies induce MG and that LRP4 contributes to NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:24200689

  3. Rutaecarpine Reverses the Altered Connexin Expression Pattern Induced by Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein in Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Fu, Yan-Qi; Peng, Wei-Jie; Yu, Yan-Rong; Wu, Yu-Si; Yan, Hang; Huang, Qi-Ren; He, Ming; Luo, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to the vascular endothelium is crucial in atherosclerosis development. Connexins (Cxs) which form hemichannels or gap junctions, modulate monocyte-endothelium interaction. We previously found that rutaecarpine, an active ingredient of the Chinese herbal medicine Evodia, reversed the altered Cx expression induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and consequently decreases the adhesive properties of endothelial cells to monocytes. This study further investigated the effect of rutaecarpine on Cx expression in monocytes exposed to ox-LDL. In cultured human monocytic cell line THP-1, ox-LDL rapidly reduced the level of atheroprotective Cx37 but enhanced that of atherogenic Cx43, thereby inhibiting adenosine triphosphate release through hemichannels. Pretreatment with rutaecarpine recovered the expression of Cx37 but inhibited the upregulation of Cx43 induced by ox-LDL, thereby improving adenosine triphosphate-dependent hemichannel activity and preventing monocyte adhesion. These effects of rutaecarpine were attenuated by capsazepine, an antagonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1. The antiadhesive effects of rutaecarpine were also attenuated by hemichannel blocker 18α-GA. This study provides additional evidence that rutaecarpine can modulate Cx expression through transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 activation in monocytes, which contributes to the antiadhesive properties of rutaecarpine. PMID:26859198

  4. Low-density lipoprotein peptide-combined DNA nanocomplex as an efficient anticancer drug delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Tao, Jun; Hua, Haiying; Sun, Pengchao; Zhao, Yongxing

    2015-08-01

    DNA is a type of potential biomaterials for drug delivery due to its nanoscale geometry, loading capacity of therapeutics, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Unfortunately, DNA is easily degraded by DNases in the body circulation and has low intracellular uptake. In the present study, we selected three cationic polymers polyethylenimine (PEI), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor targeted peptide (RLT), to modify DNA and improve the issues. A potent anti-tumor anthracycline-doxorubicin (DOX) was intercalated into DNA non-covalently and the DOX/DNA was then combined with PEI, CTAB, and RLT, respectively. Compact nanocomplexes were formed by electrostatic interaction and could potentially protect DNA from DNases. More importantly, RLT had the potential to enhance intracellular uptake by LDL receptor mediated endocytosis. In a series of in vitro experiments, RLT complexed DNA enhanced intracellular delivery of DOX, increased tumor cell death and intracellular ROS production, and reduced intracellular elimination of DOX. All results suggested that the easily prepared and targeted RLT/DNA nanocomplexes had great potential to be developed into a formulation for doxorubicin with enhanced anti-tumor activity. PMID:25960329

  5. Effect of insulin on low-density-lipoprotein metabolism in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, S; Warty, V; Virji, M; Sanghvi, A

    1986-01-01

    The metabolism of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) in vitro in the presence of insulin was studied in freshly isolated human peripheral-blood lymphocytes. Insulin appeared to decrease the binding affinity of 125I-LDL to its cell-surface receptor, without any change in apparent Vmax or in the number of LDL receptors. As a consequence, the absolute amounts of 125I-LDL internalized and degraded were lower in the presence of insulin than in its abscence, although the fraction of internalized 125I-LDL degraded in either instance was quite similar. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity, and hence cholesterol synthesis, were stimulated by insulin. This effect of insulin was independent of the inhibitory effect of LDL on cholesterol synthesis. At the same time, acid cholesterol esterase and acyl-CoA: cholesterol O-acetyltransferase activities were lower in cells incubated with insulin than in controls. The net effect of these metabolic alterations seems to be that cells accumulate greater quantities of free and esterified cholesterol when treated with insulin. PMID:3513764

  6. A Leap above Friedewald Formula for Calculation of Low-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Reema; Chakraborty, Montosh; Singh, Navpreet

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to compare the different calculated methods of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) estimation and to determine which of them correlate best with the direct method. Materials and Methods: The records of 480 samples for lipid profile were analyzed. Apart from the direct method, LDL-C was calculated by Friedewald low-density lipoprotein cholesterol method (F-LDL-C), modified Friedewald low-density lipoprotein cholesterol method (MF-LDL-C), and Anandaraja low-density lipoprotein cholesterol method (A-LDL-C). Paired t-test and Pearson correlation were evaluated between the different methods. Degree of agreement between the calculated methods and direct method was detected by Bland–Altman graphical plots. Results: A strong correlation was found between all calculated LDL-C methods and direct low-density lipoprotein cholesterol method (D-LDL-C) assay, that is, F-LDL-C versus D-LDL-C = 0.94; A-LDL-C versus D-LDL-C = 0.93 and MF-LDL-C versus D-LDL-C = 0.95. No statistically significant difference was found between D-LDL-C and MF-LDL-C. Bland–Altman plot for MF-LDL-C showed minimal negative bias. Conclusions: The study pointed out that MF-LDL-C correlated maximally with D-LDL-C estimation at all levels of triglycerides and MF-LDL-C can be used in place of D-LDL-C when the direct method cannot be afforded. PMID:25949053

  7. Lipolytic degradation of human very low density lipoproteins by human milk lipoprotein lipase: the identification of lipoprotein B as the main lipoprotein degradation product.

    PubMed

    Alaupovic, P; Wang, C S; McConathy, W J; Weiser, D; Downs, D

    1986-01-01

    Although the direct conversion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) into low density (LDL) and high density (HDL) lipoproteins only requires lipoprotein lipase (LPL) as a catalyst and albumin as the fatty acid acceptor, the in vitro-formed LDL and HDL differ chemically from their native counterparts. To investigate the reason(s) for these differences, VLDL were treated with human milk LPL in the presence of albumin, and the LPL-generated LDL1-, LDL2-, and HDL-like particles were characterized by lipid and apolipoprotein composition. Results showed that the removal of apolipoproteins B, C, and E from VLDL was proportional to the degree of triglyceride hydrolysis with LDL2 particles as the major and LDL1 and HDL + VHDL particles as the minor products of a complete in vitro lipolysis of VLDL. In comparison with native counterparts, the in vitro-formed LDL2 and HDL + VHDL were characterized by lower levels of triglyceride and cholesterol ester and higher levels of free cholesterol and lipid phosphorus. The characterization of lipoprotein particles present in the in vitro-produced LDL2 showed that, as in plasma LDL2, lipoprotein B (LP-B) was the major apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein accounting for over 90% of the total apolipoprotein B. Other, minor species of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins included LP-B:C-I:E and LP-B:C-I:C-II:C-III. The lipid composition of in vitro-formed LP-B closely resembled that of plasma LP-B. The major parts of apolipoproteins C and E present in VLDL were released to HDL + VHDL as simple, cholesterol/phospholipid-rich lipoproteins including LP-C-I, LP-C-II, LP-C-III, and LP-E. However, some of these same simple lipoprotein particles were present after ultracentrifugation in the LDL2 density segment because of their hydrated density and/or because they formed, in the absence of naturally occurring acceptors (LP-A-I:A-II), weak associations with LP-B. Thus, the presence of varying amounts of these cholesterol

  8. Polar phospholipids from bovine endogenously oxidized low density lipoprotein interfere with follicular thecal function.

    PubMed

    Löhrke, B; Viergutz, T; Krüger, B

    2005-12-01

    The role of endogenously oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in follicular steroidogenic regulation is unknown. Information may be important in order to elucidate ovulatory dysregulation in disordered lipid metabolism. To obtain specific data, we studied the effect of polar phospholipids (PL) isolated from oxLDL with different endogenous levels of lipohydroperoxides (LHP) on the thecal expression of mRNA encoding steroidogenic enzymes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and on the thecal production of superoxide and progesterone. Large (preovulatory) bovine follicles were used and analyses of thecal fragments from single follicles were performed by radioimmunoassays, chemiluminescence assays and quantitative RT-PCR. Basal concentration of mRNA for several lipoprotein receptors exceeded by about 10-times the basal level of mRNA encoding steroidogenic enzymes, suggesting that preovulatory theca receptors may favour uptake of oxLDL. PL (5-11 pmol phosphorus/ml) decreased (up to 0.5-times the control) progesterone synthesis, production of superoxide and levels of P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage (P450 scc), 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and COX-2 mRNA. Abundance of COX-2 transcripts in thecal tissue incubated with forskolin depended on the progesterone/17beta-oestradiol ratio of the follicle fluid, i.e. the previous microenvironment in vivo. PL effects were mimicked by the platelet-activating factor (PAF). WEB 2086, a PAF receptor blocker, did not always abolish these responses, suggesting that the effects were not mediated solely by this receptor. PAF interfered dose-dependently with LH-induced responses, indicating interference with LH signalling. PL from mildly oxidized LDL (0.5 nmol/ml LHP) tended to exert greater effects than PL from oxLDL containing 1.5 nmol/ml LHP. In consideration of the known physiologic role of progesterone, COX-2 and possibly superoxide, these results provide evidence for a potential of PL from oxLDL to induce ovulatory dysregulation

  9. Clinical efficacy and safety of evolocumab for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction.

    PubMed

    Henry, Courtney A; Lyon, Ronald A; Ling, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multiple categories of medications have been developed to manage lipid profiles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with heart disease. However, currently marketed medications have not solved the problems associated with preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases completely. A substantial population of patients cannot take advantage of statin therapy due to statin intolerance, heart failure, or kidney hemodialysis, suggesting a need for additional effective agents to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) was discovered in 2003 and subsequently emerged as a novel target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. Evolocumab is a fully human monoclonal immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) directed against human PCSK9. By inactivating PCSK9, evolocumab upregulates LDL receptors causing increased catabolism of LDL-C and the consequent reduction of LDL-C levels in blood. Overall, evolocumab has had notable efficacy, with LDL-C reduction ranging from 53% to 75% in monotherapy and combination therapies, and is associated with minor adverse effects. However, studies regarding the ability of evolocumab to reduce mortality as well as long-term safety concerns are limited. The fact that the drug was introduced at a cost much higher than the existing medications and shows a low incremental mortality benefit suggests that many payers will consider evolocumab to have an unfavorable cost-benefit ratio. PMID:27143910

  10. N-acetylcysteine inhibits in vivo oxidation of native low-density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuqi; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A.; Liu, Lingjuan; Zhang, Qingbin; Liu, Patrick Z.; Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Zhang, Jia; Hao, Hong; Xie, Xiaoyun; He, Guanglong; Cui, Lianqun; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Liu, Zhenguo

    2015-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is non-atherogenic, while oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) is critical to atherosclerosis. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has anti-atherosclerotic effect with largely unknown mechanisms. The present study aimed to determine if NAC could attenuate in vivo LDL oxidation and inhibit atherosclerosis. A single dose of human native LDL was injected intravenously into male C57BL/6 mice with and without NAC treatment. Serum human ox-LDL was detected 30 min after injection, reached the peak in 3 hours, and became undetectable in 12 hours. NAC treatment significantly reduced serum ox-LDL level without detectable serum ox-LDL 6 hours after LDL injection. No difference in ox-LDL clearance was observed in NAC-treated animals. NAC treatment also significantly decreased serum ox-LDL level in patients with coronary artery diseases and hyperlipidemia without effect on LDL level. Intracellular and extracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production was significantly increased in the animals treated with native LDL, or ox-LDL and in hyperlipidemic LDL receptor knockout (LDLR−/−) mice that was effectively prevented with NAC treatment. NAC also significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation in hyperlipidemic LDLR−/− mice. NAC attenuated in vivo oxidation of native LDL and ROS formation from ox-LDL associated with decreased atherosclerotic plaque formation in hyperlipidemia. PMID:26536834

  11. Clinical efficacy and safety of evolocumab for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Courtney A; Lyon, Ronald A; Ling, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multiple categories of medications have been developed to manage lipid profiles and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with heart disease. However, currently marketed medications have not solved the problems associated with preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases completely. A substantial population of patients cannot take advantage of statin therapy due to statin intolerance, heart failure, or kidney hemodialysis, suggesting a need for additional effective agents to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) was discovered in 2003 and subsequently emerged as a novel target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. Evolocumab is a fully human monoclonal immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) directed against human PCSK9. By inactivating PCSK9, evolocumab upregulates LDL receptors causing increased catabolism of LDL-C and the consequent reduction of LDL-C levels in blood. Overall, evolocumab has had notable efficacy, with LDL-C reduction ranging from 53% to 75% in monotherapy and combination therapies, and is associated with minor adverse effects. However, studies regarding the ability of evolocumab to reduce mortality as well as long-term safety concerns are limited. The fact that the drug was introduced at a cost much higher than the existing medications and shows a low incremental mortality benefit suggests that many payers will consider evolocumab to have an unfavorable cost–benefit ratio. PMID:27143910

  12. Oxidation-labile subfraction of human plasma low density lipoprotein isolated by ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shimano, H; Yamada, N; Ishibashi, S; Mokuno, H; Mori, N; Gotoda, T; Harada, K; Akanuma, Y; Murase, T; Yazaki, Y

    1991-05-01

    We isolated subfractions of human plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) using ion-exchange chromatography. Plasma LDL from normolipidemic subjects were applied to a DEAE Sepharose 6B column. After elution of the bulk of LDL at 150 mM NaCl (the major fraction), the residual LDL was eluted at 500 mM NaCl and designated as the minor fraction. The minor fraction, only less than 1% of total LDL, tended to be somewhat similar in certain properties to oxidized LDL, e.g., an increased negative charge, higher protein/cholesterol ratio, and a higher flotation density than native LDL. These results were consistent with data reported by Avogaro et al. (1988. Arteriosclerosis. 8: 79-87). However, assays of 125I-labeled LDL binding activity for LDL receptors equal to that of the major fraction. Incorporation of [14C]oleate into cholesteryl ester [acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity] in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with the minor fraction was only slightly greater than that with the major fraction. Incubation of the minor fraction with 0.5 microM Cu2+ caused a remarkable stimulation of ACAT activity, while stimulation by the major fraction required incubation with 5 microM Cu2+, suggesting that the minor fraction was relatively labile to oxidation. The minor but definite presence of a plasma LDL subfraction more negative and susceptible to oxidation implicates the possibility of its association with atherogenesis. PMID:2072039

  13. Terminalia bellirica Extract Inhibits Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Miori; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Taguchi, Chie; Iida, Kaoruko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The deciduous tree Terminalia bellirica found in Southeast Asia is extensively used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of hypertension, rheumatism, and diabetes. The anti-atherogenic effect of Terminalia bellirica fruit has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of Terminalia bellirica extract (TBE) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and inflammation in macrophages. TBE showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (EC50: 7.2 ± 1.2 μg/mL) and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. TBE also significantly inhibited free radical-induced LDL oxidation compared to the solvent control in vitro. In THP-1 macrophages, TBE treatment resulted in significant decreases of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). TBE also reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in THP-1 macrophages. These results show that TBE has the inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation and macrophage inflammatory response in vitro, suggesting that its in vivo use might inhibit atherosclerosis plaque progression. PMID:27314393

  14. Terminalia bellirica Extract Inhibits Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miori; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Taguchi, Chie; Iida, Kaoruko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The deciduous tree Terminalia bellirica found in Southeast Asia is extensively used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of hypertension, rheumatism, and diabetes. The anti-atherogenic effect of Terminalia bellirica fruit has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of Terminalia bellirica extract (TBE) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and inflammation in macrophages. TBE showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (EC50: 7.2 ± 1.2 μg/mL) and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. TBE also significantly inhibited free radical-induced LDL oxidation compared to the solvent control in vitro. In THP-1 macrophages, TBE treatment resulted in significant decreases of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). TBE also reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in THP-1 macrophages. These results show that TBE has the inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation and macrophage inflammatory response in vitro, suggesting that its in vivo use might inhibit atherosclerosis plaque progression. PMID:27314393

  15. How Do PCSK9 Inhibitors Stack Up to Statins for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Control?

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Marj P

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in the approach toward treating hypercholesterolemia and widespread access to statin medications, not all people are able to reach target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce their cardiovascular risk. Some of the reasons include the inability to tolerate statin therapy, LDL-C levels that remain high even in the presence of statin therapy, and a familial disorder that is characterized by extremely high levels of LDL-C. A new therapeutic class, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, represents a novel and promising approach to reducing LDL-C levels using a mechanism at the LDL receptor level. The recent approval of the first 2 PCSK9 inhibitors and the anticipated approval of the third agent in this class within approximately 1 year may provide clinicians powerful new weapons to lower LDL-C levels in patients who are not satisfactorily managed with statins. However, the results of long-term studies of the ability of these new medications to influence cardiovascular outcomes will not be known for several years. PMID:26702335

  16. How Do PCSK9 Inhibitors Stack Up to Statins for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Control?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Marj P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the approach toward treating hypercholesterolemia and widespread access to statin medications, not all people are able to reach target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce their cardiovascular risk. Some of the reasons include the inability to tolerate statin therapy, LDL-C levels that remain high even in the presence of statin therapy, and a familial disorder that is characterized by extremely high levels of LDL-C. A new therapeutic class, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, represents a novel and promising approach to reducing LDL-C levels using a mechanism at the LDL receptor level. The recent approval of the first 2 PCSK9 inhibitors and the anticipated approval of the third agent in this class within approximately 1 year may provide clinicians powerful new weapons to lower LDL-C levels in patients who are not satisfactorily managed with statins. However, the results of long-term studies of the ability of these new medications to influence cardiovascular outcomes will not be known for several years. PMID:26702335

  17. Stimulated arachidonate metabolism during foam cell transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yokode, M; Kita, T; Kikawa, Y; Ogorochi, T; Narumiya, S; Kawai, C

    1988-01-01

    Changes in arachidonate metabolism were examined in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with various types of lipoproteins. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) was incorporated by macrophages and stimulated macrophage prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene C4 syntheses, respectively, 10.8- and 10.7-fold higher than by the control. Production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin, was also stimulated. No stimulation was found with native LDL, which was minimally incorporated by the cells. Acetylated LDL and beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), though incorporated more efficiently than oxidized LDL, also had no stimulatory effect. When oxidized LDL was separated into the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex and free lipid peroxides, most of the stimulatory activity was found in the former fraction, indicating that stimulation of arachidonate metabolism in the cell is associated with uptake of the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex. These results suggest that peroxidative modification of LDL could contribute to the progression of atheroma by stimulating arachidonate metabolism during incorporation into macrophages. Images PMID:3125226

  18. Enzymatic modification of plasma low density lipoproteins in rabbits: a potential treatment for hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed Central

    Labeque, R; Mullon, C J; Ferreira, J P; Lees, R S; Langer, R

    1993-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (EC 3.1.1.4) hydrolyzes certain phospholipids of low density lipoprotein (LDL). Plasma clearance of phospholipase A2-modified human LDL is up to 17 times faster than that of native human LDL in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Modification of blood lipoproteins of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was performed by using an extracorporeal circuit containing immobilized phospholipase A2. After 90-min treatments, nearly 30% decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations were observed. Erythrocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts showed no net change after treatment. This technique does not require any fluid replacement or sorbent regeneration and offers a potential approach for lowering serum cholesterol and LDL levels. PMID:8475095

  19. Enzymatic Modification of Plasma Low Density Lipoproteins in Rabbits: A Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeque, Regine; Mullon, Claudy J. P.; Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.; Lees, Robert S.; Langer, Robert

    1993-04-01

    Phospholipase A_2 (EC 3.1.1.4) hydrolyzes certain phospholipids of low density lipoprotein (LDL). Plasma clearance of phospholipase A_2-modified human LDL is up to 17 times faster than that of native human LDL in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Modification of blood lipoproteins of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was performed by using an extracorporeal circuit containing immobilized phospholipase A_2. After 90-min treatments, nearly 30% decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations were observed. Erythrocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts showed no net change after treatment. This technique does not require any fluid replacement or sorbent regeneration and offers a potential approach for lowering serum cholesterol and LDL levels.

  20. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and statin use among Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Qualls, Laura G; Hammill, Bradley G; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Curtis, Lesley H; Jones, W Schuyler

    2016-05-01

    At the time of this study, guidelines recommended a primary goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level less than 100 mg/dL for all patients, an optional goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol less than 70 mg/dL for patients with overt cardiovascular disease and statins for patients with diabetes and overt cardiovascular disease and patients 40 years and older with diabetes and at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study examined statin use and achievement of lipid goals among 111,730 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years and older in 2011. Three-quarters of patients met the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal of less than 100 mg/dL. Patients with cardiovascular disease were more likely to meet the goal than those without, not controlling for other differences. Patients on a statin were more likely to meet the goal. There is considerable opportunity for improvement in cholesterol management in high-risk patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26802221

  1. KIF6, LPA, TAS2R50, and VAMP8 genetic variation, low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering response to pravastatin, and heart disease risk reduction in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the KIF6 (kinesin like protein 6, rs20455 or 719Arg), LPA (lipoprotein(a), rs3798220), TAS2R50 (taste receptor type 2, member 50, rs1376251) and VAMP8 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 8, rs1010) have previously been associated with low density lipoprotei...

  2. CD36 Binds Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) in a Mechanism Dependent upon Fatty Acid Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Anthony G.; Chen, Alexander N.; Paz, Miguel A.; Hung, Justin P.; Hamilton, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25555908

  3. Lipoprotein lipase- and hepatic triglyceride lipase-promoted very low density lipoprotein degradation proceeds via an apolipoprotein E-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Medh, Jheem D.; Fry, Glenna L.; Bowen, Susan L.; Ruben, Stacie; Wong, Howard; Chappell, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is the primary recognition signal on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins responsible for interacting with low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors and LDL receptor-related protein (LRP). It has been shown that lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL) promote receptor-mediated uptake and degradation of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and remnant particles, possibly by directly binding to lipoprotein receptors. In this study we have investigated the requirement for apoE in lipase-stimulated VLDL degradation. We compared binding and degradation of normal and apoE-depleted human VLDL and apoE knockout mouse VLDL in human foreskin fibroblasts. Surface binding at 37°C of apoE knockout VLDL was greater than that of normal VLDL by 3-and 40-fold, respectively, in the presence of LPL and HTGL. In spite of the greater stimulation of surface binding, lipase-stimulated degradation of apoE knockout mouse VLDL was significantly lower than that of normal VLDL (30, 30, and 80%, respectively, for control, LPL, and HTGL treatments). In the presence of LPL and HTGL, surface binding of apoE-depleted human VLDL was, respectively, 40 and 200% of normal VLDL whereas degradation was, respectively, 25 and 50% of normal VLDL. LPL and HTGL stimulated degradation of normal VLDL in a dose-dependent manner and by a LDL receptor-mediated pathway. Maximum stimulation (4-fold) was seen in the presence LPL (1 µg/ml) or HTGL (3 µg/ml) in lovastatin-treated cells. On the other hand, degradation of apoE-depleted VLDL was not significantly increased by the presence of lipases even in lovastatin-treated cells. Surface binding of apoE-depleted VLDL to metabolically inactive cells at 4°C was higher in control and HTGL-treated cells, but unchanged in the presence of LPL. Degradation of prebound apoE-depleted VLDL was only 35% as efficient as that of normal VLDL. Surface binding of apoE knockout or apoE-depleted VLDL was to heparin sulfate proteoglycans

  4. Practical technique to quantify small, dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol using dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trirongjitmoah, Suchin; Iinaga, Kazuya; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Chiba, Hitoshi; Sriyudthsak, Mana; Shimizu, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of small, dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) cholesterol is clinically significant. We propose a practical technique to estimate the amount of sdLDL cholesterol using dynamic light scattering (DLS). An analytical solution in a closed form has newly been obtained to estimate the weight fraction of one species of scatterers in the DLS measurement of two species of scatterers. Using this solution, we can quantify the sdLDL cholesterol amount from the amounts of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, which are commonly obtained through clinical tests. The accuracy of the proposed technique was confirmed experimentally using latex spheres with known size distributions. The applicability of the proposed technique was examined using samples of human blood serum. The possibility of estimating the sdLDL amount using the HDL data was demonstrated. These results suggest that the quantitative estimation of sdLDL amounts using DLS is feasible for point-of-care testing in clinical practice.

  5. High Affinity Binding of the Receptor-associated Protein D1D2 Domains with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Involves Bivalent Complex Formation: CRITICAL ROLES OF LYSINES 60 AND 191.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Young, Patricia A; Strickland, Dudley K

    2016-08-26

    The LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that binds and mediates the endocytosis of numerous structurally diverse ligands. Currently, the basis for ligand recognition by LRP1 is not well understood. LRP1 requires a molecular chaperone, termed the receptor-associated protein (RAP), to escort the newly synthesized receptor from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. RAP is a three-domain protein that contains the following two high affinity binding sites for LRP1: one is located within domains 1 and 2, and one is located in its third domain. Studies on the interaction of the RAP third domain with LRP1 reveal critical contributions by lysine 256 and lysine 270 for this interaction. From these studies, a model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors has been proposed. Here, we employed surface plasmon resonance to investigate the binding of RAP D1D2 to LRP1. Our results reveal that the high affinity of D1D2 for LRP1 results from avidity effects mediated by the simultaneous interactions of lysine 60 in D1 and lysine 191 in D2 with sites on LRP1 to form a bivalent D1D2-LRP1 complex. When lysine 60 and 191 are both mutated to alanine, the binding of D1D2 to LRP1 is ablated. Our data also reveal that D1D2 is able to bind to a second distinct site on LRP1 to form a monovalent complex. The studies confirm the canonical model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors, which is initiated by pairs of lysine residues that dock into acidic pockets on the receptor. PMID:27402839

  6. Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein enhances the ability of high-density lipoprotein to inhibit low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hine, David; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Mike

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutic strategies to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to treat or prevent vascular disease include the use of cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors. Here, we show, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, that addition of CETP to HDL enhances the ability of HDL to inhibit low-density lipoprotein oxidation by ∼ 30% for total HDL and HDL(2) (both P < 0.05) and 75% for HDL(3) (P < 0.01). Therefore, CETP inhibition may be detrimental to the antiatherosclerotic properties of HDL, and these findings may partly explain the failure of the CETP inhibitor, torcetrapib, treatment to retard vascular disease despite large increases in HDL, in addition to its "off target" toxicity, a property which appears not to be shared by other members of this class of CETP inhibitor currently under clinical trial. Further, detailed studies are urgently required. PMID:21815241

  7. Hepatic metabolism of colloidal gold-low-density lipoprotein complexes in the rat: evidence for bulk excretion of lysosomal contents into bile

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, G.; Hamilton, R.L.; Havel, R.J.

    1989-03-01

    Rats were treated with 17 alpha-ethinyl estradiol to induce high levels of low-density lipoprotein receptors in hepatocytes. When these rats were given intravenous injections of low-density lipoprotein-colloidal gold complexes, most of the gold (labeled with /sup 195/Au) appeared to be taken up by Kupffer cells, as were complexes of colloidal gold with albumin or polyvinylpyrrolidone. However, when these rats were also administered gadolinium chloride, which blocks Kupffer cell activity, most of the low-density lipoprotein-gold (but not gold complexed with albumin or polyvinylpyrrolidone) was taken up into hepatocytes by receptor-mediated endocytosis and concentrated in peribiliary lysosomes, as determined by electron microscopy. Colloidal gold taken up as a complex with low-density lipoprotein was excreted into the feces via the common bile duct at a maximal rate of about 5% daily, 4 to 12 days after injection. Thereafter, the rate of gold excretion fell off until reaching a plateau after 3 weeks. At this late time, most of the colloidal gold was shown by electron microscopy to be in Kupffer cells, whereas earlier (6 days after injection) it was contained mainly in older hepatocytic lysosomes, identified by lipofuscin granules. It is concluded that, in rats, hepatocytic lysosomes empty most of their contents into bile every week or two, apparently by exocytosis.

  8. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  9. Role of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in the atherosclerosis of uremia.

    PubMed

    Drüeke, T B; Nguyen Khoa, T; Massy, Z A; Witko-Sarsat, V; Lacour, B; Descamps-Latscha, B

    2001-02-01

    Lipoprotein oxidation is involved in the genesis of atherosclerosis. In chronic renal failure (CRF), oxidative stress is enhanced because of an imbalance between pro-oxidant and antioxidant systems. Oxidative modifications of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) occur not only at the level of lipid moiety, but also of protein moiety. We have shown that oxidation of LDL by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in vitro, reflecting increased myeloperoxidase activity in vivo, leads to modifications of apoliproteins such that the latter in turn are capable of triggering macrophage nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase activation. These oxidative changes of LDL protein moiety, if shown to occur to a significant extent in uremic patients in vivo, may represent an important alternative pathway in the pathogenesis of atheromatous lesions. PMID:11168995

  10. Structural and compositional changes attending the ultracentrifugation of very low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Herbert, P N; Forte, T M; Shulman, R S; La Piana, M J; Gong, E L; Levy, R I; Fredrickson, D S; Nichols, A V

    1975-01-01

    The effects of repetitive ultracentrifugation on the physical and chemical properties of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) were investigated. VLDL recentrifuged one to seven times were characterized by chemical analyses, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The VLDL content of triglyceride was increased and the proportion of phospholipid decreased by ultracentrifugation. Recentrifugation of VLDL decreased the number of Sf-o 20-100 particles and generated particles of Sf-o greater than 400. The bulk of the material removed from VLDL by ultracentrifugation was lipoprotein having pre-beta mobility on paper electrophoresis, flotation rates of Sf-o 10-100 and a particle size of 300-400 A-O. Two ultracentrifugations separated an average of 14% of the starting VLDL protein. Characterization of the apoproteins in this material by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel chromatography, immunoprecipitation and amino acid analysis demonstrated a relatively high proportion of beta-apoprotein and relatively little C-apoproteins. PMID:167365

  11. In vitro incorporation of radiolabeled cholesteryl esters into high and low density lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Terpstra, A.H.; Nicolosi, R.J.; Herbert, P.N. )

    1989-11-01

    We have developed and validated a method for in vitro incorporation of radiolabeled cholesteryl esters into low density (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL). Radiolabeled cholesteryl esters dissolved in absolute ethanol were mixed with LDL or HDL in the presence of lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS) as a source of core lipid transfer activity. The efficiency of incorporation was dependent on: (a) the core lipid transfer activity and quantity of LPDS, (b) the mass of added radiolabeled cholesteryl esters, (c) the length of incubation, and (d) the amount of acceptor lipoprotein cholesterol. The tracer incorporation was documented by repeat density gradient ultracentrifugation, agarose gel electrophoresis, and precipitation with heparin-MnCl2. The radiolabeling conditions did not affect the following properties of the lipoproteins: (1) chemical composition, (2) electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels, (3) hydrated density, (4) distribution of apoproteins on SDS gels, (5) plasma clearance rates, and (6) immunoprecipitability of HDL apoproteins A-I and A-II. Rat HDL containing radiolabeled cholesteryl esters incorporated in vitro had plasma disappearance rates identical to HDL radiolabeled in vivo.

  12. [Consecutive formation of the functions of high-, low-density and very-low-density lipoproteins during phylogenesis. Unique algorithm of the effects of lipid-lowering drugs].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Rozhkova, T A; Aripovsky, A V

    2015-01-01

    During phylogenesis, all fatty acids (FA) were initially transported to cells by apoA-I high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in polar lipids. Later, active cellular uptake of saturated, monoenoic and unsaturated FA occurred via triglycerides (TG) in low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Active uptake of polyenoic FA (PUFA) required the following: a) PUFA re-esterified from polar phospholipids into nonpolar cholesteryl polyesters (poly-CLE), b) a novel protein, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), initiated poly-CLE transformation from HDL to LDL. CETP formed blood HDL-CETP-LDL complexes in which poly-CLE spontaneously came from polar lipids of TG in HDL to nonpolar TG in LDL. Then ligand LDLs formed and the cells actively absorbed PUFA via apoB-100 endocytosis. Some animal species (rats, mice, dogs) developed a spontaneous CETP-minus mutation followed by population death from atherosclerosis. However, there was another active CETP-independent uptake formed during phylogenesis; the cells internalized poly-CLE in HDL. Since apoA-I had no domain-ligand, another apoE/A-I ligand formed; the cells began synthesizing apoE/A-1 receptors. In cells of rabbits and primates absorbed cells PUFA consecutively: HDL-->LDL-->apoB-100 endocytosis; those of rats and dogs did HDL directly: HDL-->anoE/A-I endocytosis. In the rabbits, CETP was high, apoE in HDL was low, and the animals were sensitive to exogenous hypercholesterolemia. In the rats, CETP was low and ApoE in HDL-was high, and the animals were resistant to hypercholesterolemia. Reduced bioavailability of PUFA during their consecutive cellular uptake and develdpment of intercellular PUFA deficiency are fundamental to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26591564

  13. Immunoregulation by low density lipoproteins in man. Inhibition of mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation by interference with transferrin metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, J A; Lipsky, P E

    1984-01-01

    Human low density lipoprotein (LDL, d = 1.020-1.050 g/ml) inhibits mitogen-stimulated T lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Because both LDL and transferrin bind to specific cell surface receptors and enter cells by the similar means of receptor-mediated endocytosis, and because transferrin is necessary for lymphocyte DNA synthesis, we investigated the possibility that LDL may inhibit mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte responses by interfering with transferrin metabolism. LDL inhibited mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte [3H]thymidine incorporation in a concentration-dependent manner. The degree of inhibition was most marked in serum-free cultures, but was also observed in serum-containing cultures. The addition of transferrin not only augmented mitogen-induced lymphocyte [3H]thymidine incorporation in serum-free medium but also completely reversed the inhibitory effect of LDL in both serum-free and serum-containing media. Similar results were obtained when lymphocyte proliferation was assayed by counting the number of cells in culture. Transferrin also reversed the inhibition of lymphocyte responses caused by very low density lipoproteins and by cholesterol. The ability of transferrin to reverse the inhibitory effect of lipoproteins was specific, in that native but not denatured transferrin was effective whereas a variety of other proteins were ineffective. These results indicate that LDL inhibits mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte responses by interfering with transferrin metabolism. LDL only inhibited lymphocyte responses after a 48-h incubation if present from the initiation of the culture. By contrast, transferrin reversed inhibition when added after 24 h of the 48-h incubation. LDL did not inhibit lymphocyte responses by nonspecifically associating with transferrin. In addition, the acquisition of specific lymphocyte transferrin receptors was not blocked by LDL. Moreover, transferrin did not prevent the binding and uptake of fluorescent-labeled LDL by activated lymphocytes

  14. Generation in Human Plasma of Misfolded, Aggregation-Prone Electronegative Low Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Giulia; Balogh, Gabor; Brunelli, Roberto; Costa, Graziella; De Spirito, Marco; Lenzi, Laura; Mei, Giampiero; Ursini, Fulvio; Parasassi, Tiziana

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Human plasma contains small amounts of a low density lipoprotein in which apoprotein is misfolded. Originally identified and isolated by means of anion-exchange chromatography, this component was subsequently described as electronegative low density lipoprotein (LDL)(−), with increased concentrations associated with elevated cardiovascular disease risk. It has been recognized recently as the trigger of LDL amyloidogenesis, which produces aggregates similar to subendothelial droplets observed in vivo in early atherogenesis. Although LDL(−) has been produced in vitro through various manipulations, the mechanisms involved in its generation in vivo remain obscure. By using a more physiological model, we demonstrate spontaneous, sustained and noticeable production of LDL(−) during incubation of unprocessed human plasma at 37°C. In addition to a higher fraction of amyloidogenic LDL(−), LDL purified from incubated plasma contains an increased level of lysophospholipids and free fatty acids; analysis of LDL lipids packing shows their loosening. As a result, during plasma incubation, lipid destabilization and protein misfolding take place, and aggregation-prone particles are generated. All these phenomena can be prevented by inhibiting calcium-dependent secretory phospholipases A2. Our plasma incubation model, without removal of reaction products, effectively shows a lipid-protein interplay in LDL, where lipid destabilization after lipolysis threatens the apoprotein's structure, which misfolds and becomes aggregation-prone. PMID:19619478

  15. Preferential enrichment of large-sized very low density lipoprotein populations with transferred cholesteryl esters

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, S.

    1985-04-01

    The effect of lipid transfer proteins on the exchange and transfer of cholesteryl esters from rat plasma HDL2 to human very low (VLDL) and low density (LDL) lipoprotein populations was studied. The use of a combination of radiochemical and chemical methods allowed separate assessment of (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl ester exchange and of cholesteryl ester transfer. VLDL-I was the preferred acceptor for transferred cholesteryl esters, followed by VLDL-II and VLDL-III. LDL did not acquire cholesteryl esters. The contribution of exchange of (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl esters to total transfer was highest for LDL and decreased in reverse order along the VLDL density range. Inactivation of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and heating the HDL2 for 60 min at 56 degrees C accelerated transfer and exchange of (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl esters. Addition of lipid transfer proteins increased cholesterol esterification in all systems. The data demonstrate that large-sized, triglyceride-rich VLDL particles are preferred acceptors for transferred cholesteryl esters. It is suggested that enrichment of very low density lipoproteins with cholesteryl esters reflects the triglyceride content of the particles.

  16. Uptake and processing of remnants of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins by rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.L.; Hradek, G.T.; Hornick, C.; Renaud, G.; Windler, E.E.; Havel, R.J.

    1984-11-01

    In the rat, chylomicron remnants and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants are taken up into the liver by high affinity processes and appear to undergo degradation by lysosomes. The relationship of this catabolic process to the known pathways of uptake and degradation of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and the involvement of nonparenchymal cells are addressed in these studies. The authors have utilized both light and electron microscopic radioautography to determine whether the pathway of intracellular transport and catabolism resembles that established for LDL in hepatocytes. Radioiodinated plasma VLDL remnants and lymph chylomicron remnants were injected into femoral veins of rats and the livers were fixed by perfusion 3 to 30 minutes later. Quantitative light microscopic radioautography showed little or no accumulation of grains over Kupffer cells. Electromicroscopic radioautography confirmed these observations and, in addition, demonstrated that very few grains were associated with endothelial cells. The processing of the remnant particles closely resembled that of LDL. Following an initial association of grains with the parenchymal cell plasma membrane, frequently in regions in close proximity to clathrin-coated endocytic pits, the grains were found in endocytic vesicles just beneath the plasma membrane. By 15 minutes the grains were found over multivesicular bodies located in the Golgi-lysosome region of the cell. Thirty minutes after injection, radioautographic grains began to be associated with secondary lysosomes.

  17. Modification of low-density lipoprotein by myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants and reagent hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Malle, Ernst; Marsche, Gunther; Arnhold, Jürgen; Davies, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    Substantial evidence supports the notion that oxidative processes contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The nature of the oxidants that give rise to the elevated levels of oxidised lipids and proteins, and decreased levels of antioxidants, detected in human atherosclerotic lesions are, however, unclear, with multiple species having been invoked. Over the last few years, considerable data have been obtained in support of the hypothesis that oxidants generated by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase play a key role in oxidation reactions in the artery wall. In this article, the evidence for a role of myeloperoxidase, and oxidants generated therefrom, in the modification of low-density lipoprotein, the major source of lipids in atherosclerotic lesions, is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the reactions of the reactive species generated by this enzyme, the mechanisms and sites of damage, the role of modification of the different components of low-density lipoprotein, and the biological consequences of such oxidation on cell types present in the artery wall and in the circulation, respectively. PMID:16698314

  18. Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Harold E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or progressive loss of β-cell function. T2DM patients are at increased risk of micro- and macrovascular disease, and are often considered as representing an atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent. Interventions directed at glucose and lipid level control in T2DM patients may reduce micro- and macrovascular disease. The optimal T2DM agent is one that lowers glucose levels with limited risk for hypoglycemia, and with no clinical trial evidence of worsening CHD risk. Lipid-altering drugs should preferably reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apo B) and have evidence that the mechanism of action reduces CHD risk. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apo B and have evidence of improving CHD outcomes, and are thus first-line therapy for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In patients who do not achieve optimal lipid levels with statin therapy, or who are intolerant to statin therapy, add-on therapy or alternative therapies may be indicated. Additional available agents to treat hypercholesterolemic patients with T2DM include bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, niacin, and ezetimibe. This review discusses the use of these alternative agents to treat hypercholesterolemia in patients with T2DM, either as monotherapy or in combination with statin therapy. PMID:25045281

  19. [Oxidized low density lipoprotein induces macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress via CD36.].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shu-Tong; Sang, Hui; Yang, Na-Na; Kang, Li; Tian, Hua; Zhang, Ying; Song, Guo-Hua; Qin, Shu-Cun

    2010-10-25

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) on the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and the underlying mechanisms in ox-LDL-induced macrophage foam-forming process. RAW264.7 macrophages were cultured in DMEM medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum, and then treated with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L), anti-CD36 monoclonal antibody+ox-LDL and tunicamycin (TM), respectively. After incubation for 24 h, the cells were collected. The cellular lipid accumulation was showed by oil red O staining and the content of cellular total cholesterol was quantified by enzymatic colorimetry. The expression of glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), a molecular marker of ERS, was determined by immunocytochemistry assay. The levels of GRP94 protein, phosphorylated inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (p-IRE1) and X box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in RAW264.7 cells were detected by Western blotting. The results indicated that after incubation with ox-LDL (25, 50 and 100 mg/L) for 24 h, a large amount of lipid droplets were found in the cytoplasm, and the contents of cellular total cholesterol were increased by 2.1, 2.8 and 3.1 folds compared with the control, respectively. Anti-CD36 antibody decreased markedly the cellular lipid accumulation induced by ox-LDL at 100 mg/L. Both ox-LDL and TM, a specific ERS inducer, could up-regulate the protein expression of GRP94 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, p-IRE1 and XBP1, two key components of the unfolded protein response, were also significantly induced by the treatment with ox-LDL. The up-regulations of the three proteins induced by ox-LDL were inhibited significantly when the macrophages were pre-incubated with anti-CD36 antibody. These results suggest that ox-LDL may induce ERS in a dose-dependent way and subsequently activate the unfolded protein response signaling pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages, which is potentially mediated by scavenger receptor CD36. PMID:20945046

  20. Vitamin C protects low-density lipoprotein from homocysteine-mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Alul, Rushdi H; Wood, Michael; Longo, Joseph; Marcotte, Anthony L; Campione, Allan L; Moore, Michael K; Lynch, Sean M

    2003-04-01

    Homocysteine, an atherogenic amino acid, promotes iron-dependent oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). We investigated whether vitamin C, a physiological antioxidant, could protect LDL from homocysteine-mediated oxidation. LDL (0.2 mg of protein/ml) was incubated at 37 degrees C with homocysteine (1000 microM) and ferric iron (10-100 microM) in either the absence (control) or presence of vitamin C (5-250 microM). Under these conditions, vitamin C protected LDL from oxidation as evidenced by an increased lag time preceding lipid diene formation (> or = 5 vs. 2.5 h for control), decreased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances accumulation (< or = 19 +/- 1 nmol/mg when vitamin C > or = 10 microM vs. 32 +/- 3 nmol/mg for control, p <.01), and decreased lipoprotein anodic electrophoretic mobility. Near-maximal protection was observed at vitamin C concentrations similar to those in human blood (50-100 microM); also, some protection was observed even at low concentrations (5-10 microM). This effect resulted neither from altered iron redox chemistry nor enhanced recycling of vitamin E in LDL. Instead, similar to previous reports for copper-dependent LDL oxidation, we found that vitamin C protected LDL from homocysteine-mediated oxidation through covalent lipoprotein modification involving dehydroascorbic acid. Protection of LDL from homocysteine-mediated oxidation by vitamin C may have implications for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:12654477

  1. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection

    PubMed Central

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-01-01

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL. PMID:27087061

  2. ANALYSIS OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH VERY LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN BY HIGH PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2014-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was utilized to examine the binding of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with drugs, using R/S-propranolol as a model. These studies indicated that two mechanisms existed for the binding of R- and S-propranolol with VLDL. The first mechanism involved non-saturable partitioning of these drugs with VLDL, which probably occurred with the lipoprotein's non-polar core. This partitioning was described by overall affinity constants of 1.2 (± 0.3) × 106 M-1 for R-propranolol and 2.4 (± 0.6) × 106 M-1 for S-propranolol at pH 7.4 and 37 °C. The second mechanism occurred through saturable binding by these drugs at fixed sites on VLDL, such as represented by apolipoproteins on the surface of the lipoprotein. The association equilibrium constants for this saturable binding at 37 °C were 7.0 (± 2.3) × 104 M-1 for R-propranolol and 9.6 (± 2.2) × 104 M-1 for S-propranolol. Comparable results were obtained at 20 °C and 27 °C for the propranolol enantiomers. This work provided fundamental information on the processes involved in the binding of R- and S-propranolol to VLDL, while also illustrating how HPAC can be used to evaluate relatively complex interactions between agents such as VLDL and drugs or other solutes. PMID:25103529

  3. Low-density lipoprotein mimics blood plasma-derived exosomes and microvesicles during isolation and detection.

    PubMed

    Sódar, Barbara W; Kittel, Ágnes; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Németh, Andrea; Sperlágh, Beáta; Baranyai, Tamás; Giricz, Zoltán; Wiener, Zoltán; Turiák, Lilla; Drahos, László; Pállinger, Éva; Vékey, Károly; Ferdinandy, Péter; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-01-01

    Circulating extracellular vesicles have emerged as potential new biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. Despite the increasing interest, their isolation and purification from body fluids remains challenging. Here we studied human pre-prandial and 4 hours postprandial platelet-free blood plasma samples as well as human platelet concentrates. Using flow cytometry, we found that the majority of circulating particles within the size range of extracellular vesicles lacked common vesicular markers. We identified most of these particles as lipoproteins (predominantly low-density lipoprotein, LDL) which mimicked the characteristics of extracellular vesicles and also co-purified with them. Based on biophysical properties of LDL this finding was highly unexpected. Current state-of-the-art extracellular vesicle isolation and purification methods did not result in lipoprotein-free vesicle preparations from blood plasma or from platelet concentrates. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed an association of LDL with isolated vesicles upon in vitro mixing. This is the first study to show co-purification and in vitro association of LDL with extracellular vesicles and its interference with vesicle analysis. Our data point to the importance of careful study design and data interpretation in studies using blood-derived extracellular vesicles with special focus on potentially co-purified LDL. PMID:27087061

  4. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Chikako; Uemura, Kentaro; Kawachi, Yukako; Shiokawa, Mai; Mori, Hiroyuki; Wada, Masami; Shima, Ryoichi; Okamoto, Toru; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Chayama, Kazuaki; Wakita, Takaji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV), but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV. PMID:27152966

  5. Anti-oxidized low-density lipoprotein antibodies in myeloperoxidase–positive vasculitis patients preferentially recognize hypochlorite-modified low density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Slot, M C; Theunissen, R; van Paassen, P; Damoiseaux, J G M C; Cohen Tervaert, J W

    2007-01-01

    Many patients surviving vasculitis are prone to accelerated atherosclerosis and often have enhanced levels of antibodies to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). To measure anti-oxLDL antibodies, oxidation of LDL is achieved with copper (Cu) or malondialdehyde (MDA). Because, in vivo, LDL may be oxidized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) or its product hypochlorite, we measured anti-hypochlorite LDL antibodies in patients with vasculitis, haemodialysis patients and healthy controls. A newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect antibodies to oxLDL as modified by hypochlorite. Results are compared with data obtained by standard LDL oxidation using MDA–LDL or Cu–LDL as substrate. Results were compared between anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) patients (n = 93), haemodialysis (HD) patients (n = 59) and healthy controls (HC; n = 43). Furthermore, patients with MPO–ANCA-associated vasculitis (n = 47) were compared with patients with proteinase 3 (PR3)–ANCA associated vasculitis (n = 46). Optimal cut-off points were determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Anti-oxLDL antibodies are enhanced in AAV patients (MDA–LDL and hypochlorite–LDL) and in HD patients (hypochlorite–LDL), when compared to HC. Furthermore, patients with MPO–ANCA-associated vasculitis had higher levels of antibodies to hypochlorite–LDL than patients with PR3–ANCA-associated vasculitis. Our newly developed assay, in which hypochlorite–LDL is used as substrate, seems a more sensitive assay than traditional assays to measure oxLDL antibodies. Furthermore, our results suggest that enhanced MPO-mediated LDL oxidation occurs in patients with MPO–ANCA. PMID:17521320

  6. Effects of flow on LOX-1 and oxidized low-density lipoprotein interactions in brain endothelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoou; Xie, Lin; Greenberg, David A

    2015-12-01

    Fluid shear stress and uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) into the vessel wall both contribute to atherosclerosis, but the relationship between shear stress and ox-LDL uptake is unclear. We examined the effects of flow, induced by orbital rotation of bEnd.3 brain endothelial cell cultures for 1 wk, on ox-LDL receptor (LOX-1) protein expression, ox-LDL uptake and ox-LDL toxicity. Orbitally rotated cultures showed no changes in LOX-1 protein expression, ox-LDL uptake or ox-LDL toxicity, compared to stationary cultures. Flow alone does not modify ox-LDL/LOX-1 signaling in bEnd.3 brain endothelial cells in vitro, suggesting that susceptibility of atheroprone vascular sites to lipid accumulation is not due solely to effects of altered flow on endothelium. PMID:26462413

  7. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol versus particle number in middle school children

    PubMed Central

    Mietus-Snyder, Michele; Drews, Kimberly L.; Otvos, James D.; Willi, Steven M.; Foster, Gary D.; Jago, Russell; Buse, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To characterize lipids and lipoproteins in a diverse school-based cohort and identify features associated with discordance between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and LDL particle (LDL-P). Study design Sixth grade children enrolled in the HEALTHY trial (n=2,384; mean age 11.3 ± 0.6 yr; 54.2% female) were evaluated for standard lipids, lipoprotein particles measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, and homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Characteristics of subgroups with values of LDL-C and LDL-P discordant by >20 percentile units, an amount reasoned to be clinically significant, were compared. Results Four hundred twenty-eight (18%) of children were in the LDL-P < LDL-C subgroup and 375 (16%) in the LDL-P > LDL-C subgroup. Those with LDL-P > LDL-C had significantly higher BMI, waist circumference, HOMA-IR, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and reflected a greater Hispanic ethnic composition but fewer of black race than both the concordant (LDL-P ≅ LDL-C) and opposite discordant (LDL-P < LDL-C) subgroups. Conclusions There is as much lipoprotein cholesterol compositional heterogeneity in 6th graders as has been described in adults and a discordant atherogenic phenotype of LDL-P > LDL-C, common in obesity, is often missed when only LDL-C is considered. Conversely, many children with moderate-risk cholesterol measures (75th to 99th percentile) have a lower LDL particle burden. PMID:23415622

  8. Passage of Low-density Lipoproteins Through Bruch’s Membrane and Choroid

    PubMed Central

    Cankova, Zdravka; Huang, Jiahn-Dar; Kruth, Howard S.; Johnson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are thought to transport cholesterol, vitamins and carotenoids to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for ultimate use by the photoreceptors. However, to reach the RPE, these lipoprotein particles must cross Bruch’s membrane. We examined the reflection coefficient of Bruch’s membrane (BrM) to low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Bruch’s membrane and choroid were removed from 47 bovine eyes. Specimens were placed in a Ussing chamber and perfused with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) with (31 specimens) or without (16 specimens) fluorescent low-density lipoproteins (DiI-LDL). The hydraulic conductivity of the tissue was determined for both calf and cow eyes. In the perfusions with DiI-LDL, the fluorescence intensity emitted by DiI-LDL in the efflux was measured and the reflection coefficient of BrM/choroid preparations to DiI-LDL determined. Leakage tests were done to confirm tissue integrity. Several specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine tissue integrity before and after perfusion. Leak testing confirmed that BrM was intact both before and after perfusion. The average hydraulic conductivity of BrM/choroid perfusion of calf eyes with PBS alone was 1.42 ± 0.55 ×10−9 m/s/Pa (mean ± SD, n = 11). The average hydraulic conductivity of the cow eyes was 4.94 ± 1.48 ×10−10 m/s/Pa (n = 5), nearly a 3-fold decrease with age. While the flow rate remained constant during the PBS perfusions, it decreased as a function of time during perfusion with DiI-LDLs. Our major finding was of fluorescence in the effluent collected in all perfusions with DiI-LDLs, demonstrating passage of LDL through the tissue. The average reflection coefficient of calf BrM/choroid preparations to DiI-LDL was 0.58 ± 0.25 (n = 23); a similar distribution of reflection coefficients was seen in tissue from cow eyes (0.51 ± 0.33, n = 8). Our data suggested that the DiI-LDL was modestly hindered and/or captured by the tissue. This might explain

  9. High systemic levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: fuel to the flames in inflammatory osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    de Munter, Wouter; van der Kraan, Peter M; van den Berg, Wim B; van Lent, Peter L E M

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol plays a role in the pathology of OA. Specifically, oxidized LDL (oxLDL), which has been shown to play an essential role during development of atherosclerosis, could be involved in processes such as synovial inflammation, cartilage destruction and bone deformations. OxLDL can activate synovial cells such as macrophages, endothelial cells and synovial fibroblasts, resulting in release of growth factors, MMP and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this review article, we discuss the role of LDL and oxLDL in OA joint pathology and share our viewpoint of possible mechanisms by which these proteins could influence the development and progression of OA. The proposed theory could provide insight into the aetiopathology of OA and give rise to new potential treatments. PMID:26231344

  10. Roles of antibody against oxygenized low density lipoprotein in atherosclerosis: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Daxin; He, Shenghu

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic immune inflammatory disease. Atherosclerosis and relevant disease are threatening human life and health. Oxygenized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a molecular basis in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and able to induce inflammation, stimulate immune system and interfere with lipid metabolism in the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis. Antibody against oxLDL has been an important molecule in the immune related pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In available studies on atherosclerosis, antibody against oxLDL has been a focus, but how oxLDL acts to affect the atherosclerosis and relevant diseases, whether oxLDL is protective or detrimental, and whether oxLDL acts in different ways at different stages of atherosclerosis are still unclear. This paper focuses on the role of antibody against oxLDL in the atherosclerosis and relevant diseases, and summarizes the advances in this field, aiming to provide new clue and new methods for the therapy of atherosclerosis. PMID:26550105

  11. Long-Term Safety and Efficacy of Lowering Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol With Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Ian; Murray, Heather; Packard, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Extended follow-up of statin-based low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering trials improves the understanding of statin safety and efficacy. Examining cumulative cardiovascular events (total burden of disease) gives a better appreciation of the clinical value of statins. This article evaluates the long-term impact of therapy on mortality and cumulative morbidity in a high-risk cohort of men. Methods and Results— The West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study was a primary prevention trial in 45- to 64-year-old men with high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A total of 6595 men were randomized to receive pravastatin 40 mg once daily or placebo for an average of 4.9 years. Subsequent linkage to electronic health records permitted analysis of major incident events over 20 years. Post trial statin use was recorded for 5 years after the trial but not for the last 10 years. Men allocated to pravastatin had reduced all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.80–0.94; P=0.0007), attributable mainly to a 21% decrease in cardiovascular death (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–0.90; P=0.0004). There was no difference in noncardiovascular or cancer death rates between groups. Cumulative hospitalization event rates were lower in the statin-treated arm: by 18% for any coronary event (P=0.002), by 24% for myocardial infarction (P=0.01), and by 35% for heart failure (P=0.002). There were no significant differences between groups in hospitalization for noncardiovascular causes. Conclusion— Statin treatment for 5 years was associated with a legacy benefit, with improved survival and a substantial reduction in cardiovascular disease outcomes over a 20-year period, supporting the wider adoption of primary prevention strategies. PMID:26864092

  12. Optical Characterization of Europium Tetracycline Complex in the presence of Low Density Lipoprotein and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Silva, Flávia Rodrigues; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Neto, Antônio M. Figueiredo; Gidlund, Magnus A.; Gomes, Laércio; Junior, Nilson Dias Vieira; Courrol, Lilia Coronato

    2008-04-01

    Development of native Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) biosensors is of great importance in clinical analysis because the LDL concentration, which is the main carrier of cholesterol, in the plasma, is a fundamental parameter for the prevention and diagnosis of a number of clinical disorders such as heart disease, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The optical properties of the Europium-Tetracycline Complex (EuTc) were investigated for the solutions containing LDL in their compositions. In this paper we show an enhancement in the europium luminescence of EuTc complex in the presence of LDL. The time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experimental results of the pure EuTc sample and samples with LDL (EuTc:LDL) reveal an increase in the europium emission lifetime in the lipoprotein-doped samples with respect to the pure EuTc sample. A calibration curve, reasonably well described by a linear function between 0 and 3 mg/mL of LDL, was obtained. The obtained limit of detection was 0.23 mg/mL. Sixteen blood plasma samples all of them contend approximately 90 mg/dL of LDL were studied and the LDL concentrations were calculated with our method. The average LDL concentration obtained was 94 mg/dL. The results show that the EuTc complex can be used as a sensor to determine LDL with fast response, compact design, and reproducible results.

  13. Low Density Lipoprotein-Containing Circulating Immune Complexes: Role in Atherosclerosis and Diagnostic Value

    PubMed Central

    Sobenin, Igor A.; Salonen, Jukka T.; Zhelankin, Andrey V.; Melnichenko, Alexandra A.; Kaikkonen, Jari; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that low density lipoprotein-containing circulating immune complexes (LDL-CIC) play a role in atherogenesis and are involved in the formation of early atherosclerotic lesion. These complexes, as well as anti-LDL autoantibodies, have been found in the blood and in the atherosclerotic lesions of patients with different cardiovascular diseases, as well as in the blood of animals with experimental atherosclerosis. It can be suggested that the presence of anti-LDL antibodies in the blood is a result of immune response induced by lipoprotein modification. LDL-CIC differs from native LDL in many aspects. It has much lower sialic acid content, smaller diameter, and higher density and is more electronegative than native LDL. Fraction of LDL-CICs is fundamental to the serum atherogenicity manifested at the cellular level. LDL-CIC, unlike native LDL, is able to induce intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids, especially esterified cholesterol, in cells cultured from uninvolved human aortic intima and in macrophage cultures. After removal of LDL-CIC, the CHD patient's sera lose their atherogenic properties. Titer of LDL-CIC in blood serum significantly correlates with progression of atherosclerosis in human in vivo and has the highest diagnostic value among other measured serum lipid parameters. Elevated CIC-cholesterol might well be a possible risk factor of coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:25054132

  14. LXR-SREBP-1c-phospholipid transfer protein axis controls very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hiroaki; Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S; Liang, Guosheng

    2010-02-26

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) activate triglyceride synthesis in liver directly and indirectly by inducing sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). When administered to wild-type mice, the LXR activator T0901317 produces a mild and transient hypertriglyceridemia. Here, we show that T0901317 produces massive hypertriglyceridemia when given to mice lacking low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors (Ldlr(-/-) mice). Triglycerides ranged from 4000 to 6000 mg/dl, and the plasma turned milky. The median diameter of VLDL particles, measured by electron microscopy, increased from 43 to 112 nm, 87% exceeding 80 nm, the size of chylomicrons. Hypertriglyceridemia was prevented in Ldlr(-/-) recipient mice that lacked SREBP-1c (Ldlr(-/-);Srebp-1c(-/-) double knock-out mice). In Ldlr(-/-) mice, T0901317 increased mRNAs not only for enzymes of fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis, but also for phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which transfers phospholipids into nascent VLDL, allowing particle expansion. The PLTP increase was blunted in Ldlr(-/-);Srebp-1c(-/-) animals. When Ldlr(-/-);Srebp-1c(-/-) mice received an adenovirus encoding Pltp, the hypertriglyceridemic response to T0901317 was partially restored and the VLDL size increased. We conclude that LXR agonists activate triglyceride synthesis and Pltp transcription by activating Srebp-1c. In concert with the increase in TG synthesis, the increased PLTP permits triglyceride incorporation into abnormally large VLDL, which are removed from plasma by LDL receptors. In the absence of LDL receptors, the large VLDLs accumulate and produce massive hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:20037162

  15. Low density lipoprotein for cytotoxic drug targeting: improved activity of elliptinium derivative against B16 melanoma in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Samadi-Baboli, M.; Favre, G.; Canal, P.; Soula, G.

    1993-01-01

    Significant low density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by tumour cells led to the use of LDL as a discriminatory vehicle for the delivery of cytotoxic drugs. In the current study, the lipophilic elliptinium derivative, elliptinium-oleate (OL-NME), was incorporated into LDL to reach an incorporation level of 400 molecules per LDL particle. The OL-NME-LDL complex showed cytotoxic effects on normal human fibroblasts while the cytotoxicity was not observed on receptor-defective human fibroblasts, indicating the ability of the complex to be preferentially metabolised by the LDL receptor. In vivo metabolism of the complex was related to the LDL receptor pathway. The metabolic clearance was the same for native LDL (17.1 ml h-1) and OL-NME-LDL complex (16.2 ml h-1). LDL incorporated OL-NME enhanced the anti-tumour activity against murine B16 melanoma model; this resulted from increased efficacy for OL-NME-LDL at doses equal to free 9-OH-NME (157 vs 76 of Increase Life Span (ILS) (%) values after intraperitoneal (i.p.) drug injection on i.p. implanted tumour model and 45 vs -2 ILS (%) values after intravenous drug injection on subcutaneous implanted tumour model). These data suggest that LDL improves the potency of lipophilic cytotoxic drugs against tumours that express LDL receptor activity. PMID:8347487

  16. The biology of PCSK9 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes: new and emerging therapeutics to control low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Steve; Mayer, Gaétan

    2013-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) directly binds to the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A domain of low-density lipoprotein receptor and induces its degradation, thereby controlling circulating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 can decrease the incidence of coronary heart disease by up to 88%, owing to lifelong reduction of LDL-C. Moreover, two subjects with PCSK9 loss-of-function mutations on both alleles, resulting in a total absence of functional PCSK9, were found to have extremely low circulating LDL-C levels without other apparent abnormalities. Accordingly, PCSK9 could represent a safe and effective pharmacological target to increase clearance of LDL-C and to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Recent clinical trials using anti-PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies that block the PCSK9:low-density lipoprotein receptor interaction were shown to considerably reduce LDL-C levels by up to 65% when given alone and by up to 72% in patients already receiving statin therapy. In this review, we will discuss how major scientific breakthroughs in PCSK9 cell biology have led to the development of new and forthcoming LDL-C-lowering pharmacological agents. PMID:24115837

  17. Low density lipoprotein for delivery of a water-insoluble alkylating agent to malignant cells. In vitro and in vivo studies of a drug-lipoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Vitols, S.; Söderberg-Reid, K.; Masquelier, M.; Sjöström, B.; Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that human leukaemic cells and certain tumour tissues have a higher receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) than the corresponding normal cells or tissues. LDL has therefore been proposed as a carrier for anti-cancer agents. In the current study, a water-insoluble mitoclomine derivative (WB 4291) was incorporated into LDL. The WB 4291-LDL complex contained about 1,500 drug molecules per LDL particle and showed receptor-mediated toxicity in vitro as judged from the difference in growth inhibitory effect on normal and mutant (LDL-receptor-negative) cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. However, cellular drug uptake did not exclusively occur by the receptor pathway since mutant cells were also affected to some extent. The LDL part of the complex had the same plasma clearance and organ distribution as native LDL after i.v. injection in mice and rabbits. Therapeutic effects were observed when Balb-C mice with experimental leukaemia were treated with the complex. After i.p. administration to mice with i.p. leukaemia median survival time was prolonged 2.5-fold and 40% became long time survivors. The effect was weaker (42% increase in life span) after i.v. injections of the complex to mice with i.v. leukaemia. Images Figure 3 PMID:2245164

  18. Treatment of hyperlipidemia with a modified low density lipoprotein apheresis system with dextran sulfate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Hua; Zou, Yuan-Guo; Sun, Qi-Jun; Xi, Dai; Xing, Chang-Ying

    2007-08-01

    Many low density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis systems have been applied to patients with hyperlipidemia, but these systems usually work on the basis of complicated equipment and the cost of treatment is expensive. In order to achieve effective treatment of hyperlipidemia at a lower cost, we developed a new LDL apheresis system with dextran sulfate (LAS-DS). In this study, 50 patients with hyperlipidemia were treated 120 times with the new LAS-DS. In each treatment, 600 +/- 100 mL of plasma (equal to approximately 25% of the total plasma of patients) was collected by apheresis, and DS solution and calcium chloride solution were added into the collected plasma as LDL absorber and catalyzer, respectively. DS selectively binds LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) under the catalysis of calcium ion and the LDL-C-DS complex is removed by centrifugation. The treated plasma was transfused back into the patients and the excessive calcium in the plasma was removed by the cation exchange column integrated in the transfusion set. After treatment with our new system, the acute mean LDL-C reduction was 97% in the apheresis plasma of hyperlipidemia patients. The corresponding reduction was 55.2% and 69.4% for total cholesterol and total triglyceride. There were insignificant reductions of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and albumin. The new LDL apheresis system with DS that we developed is very simple to operate without relying on complicated equipment, and it can achieve significant clinical results at a much lower cost compared with existing systems. Based on this study we think the new system can provide a safe, effective and much cheaper means for the treatment of hyperlipidemia patients. PMID:17661829

  19. Alcohol consumption is directly associated with circulating oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Schroder, Helmut; Marrugat, Jaume; Fíto, Montserrat; Weinbrenner, Tanja; Covas, Maria-Isabel

    2006-04-15

    Findings on the association of alcohol consumption and oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is thought to play a crucial role in the generation of atherosclerotic lesion, are inconsistent. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of total alcohol consumption and type of alcoholic beverage with circulating plasma LDL oxidation. This cross-sectional study included data of circulating oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) from a subpopulation of 587 men and women enrolled in a population-based survey conducted in 2000 in Girona (Spain). Multivariate analysis was performed to describe the independent association of alcohol consumption and ox-LDL. Increasing alcohol consumption was associated with high in vivo ox-LDL levels in the present population. The consumption of 10 g of alcohol was associated with an increase of 2.40 U/L of ox-LDL (p = 0.002). Adjustment for dietary variables, leisure-time physical activity, educational level, smoking, LDL-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, glycemia, triglycerides, diabetes, body mass index, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures only slightly modified this association (p = 0.003). In this full adjusted model the consumption of 10 g of alcohol per day was associated with an increase of 2.11 U/L of ox-LDL. Consumption of wine (ml/day) was associated with increasing ox-LDL levels (p = 0.029), however, attenuated after controlling for alcohol. No significant relationship of ox-LDL with alcohol-independent consumption of wine, beer, and spirits was observed. Alcohol consumption was independently and directly associated with circulating ox-LDL in the present population. PMID:16631537

  20. Highly absorptive curcumin reduces serum atherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein levels in patients with mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Funamoto, Masafumi; Sunagawa, Yoichi; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yamakage, Hajime; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Komiyama, Maki; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Morimoto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose COPD is mainly caused by tobacco smoking and is associated with a high frequency of coronary artery disease. There is growing recognition that the inflammation in COPD is not only confined to the lungs but also involves the systemic circulation and can impact nonpulmonary organs, including blood vessels. α1-antitrypsin–low-density lipoprotein (AT-LDL) complex is an oxidatively modified LDL that accelerates atherosclerosis. Curcumin, one of the best-investigated natural products, is a powerful antioxidant. However, the effects of curcumin on AT-LDL remain unknown. We hypothesized that Theracurmin®, a highly absorptive curcumin with improved bioavailability using a drug delivery system, ameliorates the inflammatory status in subjects with mild COPD. Patients and methods This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. Subjects with stages I–II COPD according to the Japanese Respiratory Society criteria were randomly assigned to receive 90 mg Theracurmin® or placebo twice a day for 24 weeks, and changes in inflammatory parameters were evaluated. Results There were no differences between the Theracurmin® and placebo groups in terms of age, male/female ratio, or body mass index in 39 evaluable subjects. The percent changes in blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels after treatment were similar for the two groups. However, the percent change in the AT-LDL level was significantly (P=0.020) lower in the Theracurmin® group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion Theracurmin® reduced levels of atherosclerotic AT-LDL, which may lead to the prevention of future cardiovascular events in mild COPD subjects. PMID:27616885

  1. Chitin-glucan fiber effects on oxidized low-density lipoprotein: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bays, H E; Evans, J L; Maki, K C; Evans, M; Maquet, V; Cooper, R; Anderson, J W

    2013-01-01

    Background/objectives: Elevated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) may promote inflammation, and is associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease and worsening complications of diabetes mellitus. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitin-glucan (CG), alone and in combination with a potentially anti-inflammatory olive oil (OO) extract, for reducing OxLDL in subjects with borderline to high LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Subjects/methods: This 6-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of a novel, insoluble fiber derived from the Aspergillus niger mycelium, CG, evaluated 130 subjects free of diabetes mellitus with fasting LDL-C 3.37–4.92 mmol/l and glucose ⩽6.94 mmol/l. Participants were randomly assigned to receive CG (4.5 g/day; n=33), CG (1.5 g/day; n=32), CG (1.5 g/day) plus OO extract (135 mg/day; n=30), or matching placebo (n=35). Results: Administration of 4.5 g/day CG for 6 weeks significantly reduced OxLDL compared with placebo (P=0.035). At the end of study, CG was associated with lower LDL-C levels relative to placebo, although this difference was statistically significant only for the CG 1.5 g/day group (P=0.019). CG did not significantly affect high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin or F2-isoprostane levels. Adverse events did not substantively differ between treatments and placebo. Conclusions: In this 6-week study, CG (4.5 g/day) reduced OxLDL, an effect that might affect the risk for atherosclerosis. PMID:22948945

  2. Genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus, low density lipoproteins, response to pravastatin and coronary heart disease: results from PROSPER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caucasian carriers of the T allele at R46L in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) locus have been reported to have 15% lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (C) levels and 47% lower coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Our objective was to examine two PCSK9 single nucle...

  3. Effects of maximal doses of atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin on small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maximal doses of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are highly effective in lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels; however, rosuvastatin has been shown to be significantly more effective than atorvastatin in lowering LDL cholesterol and in increasing high-density lipo...

  4. Novel 1,4-diarylpiperidine-4-methylureas as anti-hyperlipidemic agents: dual effectors on acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase and low-density lipoprotein receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shigehiro; Ban, Hitoshi; Kino, Kouichi; Ioriya, Katsuhisa; Muraoka, Masami

    2009-02-15

    A family of 1,4-diarylpiperidine-4-methylureas were designed and synthesized as novel dual effectors on ACAT and LDL receptor expression. We examined SAR of the synthesized compounds focusing on substitution at the three aromatic parts of the starting compound 1 and succeeded in identifying essential substituents for inhibition of ACAT and up-regulation of hepatic LDL receptor expression. Especially, we found that compound 12f, which can easily be prepared, has biological properties comparable to those of SMP-797, a promising ACAT inhibitor. In addition, the in vitro effects of 12f on lipid metabolism were substantially superior to those of a known ACAT inhibitor, Avasimibe. PMID:19167888

  5. Low-density Lipoprotein Improves Motility and Plasma Membrane Integrity of Cryopreserved Canine Epididymal Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Prapaiwan, N; Tharasanit, T; Punjachaipornpol, S; Yamtang, D; Roongsitthichai, A; Moonarmart, W; Kaeoket, K; Manee-In, S

    2016-05-01

    Cryopreservation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa is an effective technique to conserve genetic potentials of superior dogs when it is not possible to collect ejaculated spermatozoa. Although hen egg yolk is commonly supplemented into the semen extender, active substances within the egg yolk which protect sperm against cryoinjury remain to be discovered. Among its compositions, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been reported to have a cryoprotective property for sperm cryopreservation. However, the effects of LDL on dog epididymal spermatozoa during cryopreservation have not yet been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of LDL on epididymal spermatozoa quality following cryopreservation and thawing. After routine castration of 12 dogs, caudal epididymides from individuals were separated from the testes and cut into a few pieces in a Tris-buffer. Spermatozoa recovered from each sample were examined at once for sperm quality and divided into six groups of extender: no LDL, 20% egg yolk, 4%, 8%, 16%, and 24% LDL, before cryopreservation. The sperm aliquots were then equilibrated and conventionally frozen. After thawing, sperm motility, morphology, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosome integrity were evaluated. The results revealed that 4% LDL and 20% egg yolk yielded significantly higher sperm motility (57.69% and 52.69%, respectively, p<0.05) than other LDLs. In addition, 4% LDL yielded the significantly highest plasma membrane integrity (70.54%, p<0.05). In conclusion, the supplementation of 4% LDL in Tris-glucose extender could be applied for cryopreservation of canine epididymal spermatozoa. PMID:26954170

  6. Metabolism of low-density lipoprotein free cholesterol by human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.E.; Miida, Takashi; Fielding, C.J. )

    1991-09-03

    The metabolism of cholesterol derived from ({sup 3}H) cholesterol-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in human blood plasma. LDL-derived free cholesterol first appeared in large {alpha}-migrating HDL (HDL{sub 2}) and was then transferred to small {alpha}-HDL (HDL{sub 3}) for esterification. The major part of such esters was retained within HDL of increasing size in the course of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity; the balance was recovered in LDL. Transfer of preformed cholesteryl esters within HDL contributed little to the labeled cholesteryl ester accumulating HDL{sub 2}. When cholesterol for esterification was derived instead from cell membranes, a significantly smaller proportion of this cholesteryl ester was subsequently recovered in LDL. These data suggest compartmentation of cholesteryl esters within plasma that have been formed from cell membrane or LDL free cholesterol, and the role for HDL{sub 2} as a relatively unreactive sink for LCAT-derived cholesteryl esters.

  7. Enhanced Sphingomyelinase Activity Contributes to the Apoptotic Capacity of Electronegative Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ke, Liang-Yin; Chan, Hua-Chen; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Lu, Jonathan; Marathe, Gopal K; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Chan, Hsiu-Chuan; Wang, Chung-Ya; Tung, Yi-Ching; McIntyre, Thomas M; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2016-02-11

    Sphingomyelinase (SMase) catalyzes the degradation of sphingomyelin to ceramide. In patients with metabolic syndrome or diabetes, circulating plasma ceramide levels are significantly higher than in normal individuals. Our data indicate that electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) shows SMase activity, which leads to increased ceramide levels that can produce pro-inflammatory effects and susceptibility to aggregation. According to sequence alignment and protein structure predictions, the putative catalytic site of SMase activity is in the α2 region of apoB-100. To identify specific post-translational modifications of apoB100 near the catalytic region, we performed data-independent, parallel-fragmentation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS(E)), followed by data analysis with ProteinLynx GlobalServer v2.4. Results showed that the serine of apoB100 in electronegative LDL was highly O-glycosylated, including S(1732), S(1959), S(2378), S(2408), and S(2429). These findings may support the changing of the α-helix/β-pleated sheets ratio in protein structure analysis. Further study is necessary to confirm the activation of SMase activity by electronegative LDL. PMID:26766134

  8. Aggregation and fusion of low-density lipoproteins in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gursky, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs, also known as ‘bad cholesterol’) are the major carriers of circulating cholesterol and the main causative risk factor of atherosclerosis. Plasma LDLs are 20- to 25-nm nanoparticles containing a core of cholesterol esters surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer and a single copy of apolipoprotein B (550 kDa). An early sign of atherosclerosis is the accumulation of LDL-derived lipid droplets in the arterial wall. According to the widely accepted ‘response-to-retention hypothesis’, LDL binding to the extracellular matrix proteoglycans in the arterial intima induces hydrolytic and oxidative modifications that promote LDL aggregation and fusion. This enhances LDL uptake by the arterial macrophages and triggers a cascade of pathogenic responses that culminate in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Hence, LDL aggregation, fusion, and lipid droplet formation are important early steps in atherogenesis. In vitro, a variety of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of LDL can induce these reactions and thereby provide useful models for their detailed analysis. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the in vivo and in vitro modifications of LDLs leading to their aggregation, fusion, and lipid droplet formation; outline the techniques used to study these reactions; and propose a molecular mechanism that underlies these pro-atherogenic processes. Such knowledge is essential in identifying endogenous and exogenous factors that can promote or prevent LDL aggregation and fusion in vivo and to help establish new potential therapeutic targets to decelerate or even block these pathogenic reactions. PMID:25197325

  9. Analysis of non-Newtonian effects on Low-Density Lipoprotein accumulation in an artery.

    PubMed

    Iasiello, Marcello; Vafai, Kambiz; Andreozzi, Assunta; Bianco, Nicola

    2016-06-14

    In this work, non-Newtonian effects on Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) transport across an artery are analyzed with a multi-layer model. Four rheological models (Carreau, Carreau-Yasuda, power-law and Newtonian) are used for the blood flow through the lumen. For the non-Newtonian cases, the arterial wall is modeled with a generalized momentum equation. Convection-diffusion equation is used for the LDL transport through the lumen, while Staverman-Kedem-Katchalsky, combined with porous media equations, are used for the LDL transport through the wall. Results are presented in terms of filtration velocity, Wall Shear Stresses (WSS) and concentration profiles. It is shown that non-Newtonian effects on mass transport are negligible for a healthy intramural pressure value. Non-Newtonian effects increase slightly with intramural pressure, but Newtonian assumption can still be considered reliable. Effects of arterial size are also analyzed, showing that Newtonian assumption can be considered valid for both medium and large arteries, in predicting LDL deposition. Finally, non-Newtonian effects are also analyzed for an aorta-common iliac bifurcation, showing that Newtonian assumption is valid for mass transport at low Reynolds numbers. At a high Reynolds number, it has been shown that a non-Newtonian fluid model can have more impact due to the presence of flow recirculation. PMID:27055766

  10. The Effect of Acetaminophen on Oxidative Modification of Low-Density Lipoproteins in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Özsoy, Meral Baş; Pabuçcuoğlu, Aysun

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) contributes to the pathology of atherosclerosis. Antioxidants may protect LDL against oxidative modification. Acetaminophen, a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent, has significant antioxidant properties. However, there is little evidence to suggest that acetaminophen acts as an antioxidant for LDL oxidation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effect of acetaminophen on LDL oxidation in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. The oxidative modification of LDL was identified by conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). In the cholesterol group which rabbits were fed a diet contained 1% g cholesterol for 8 weeks, TBARS contents and conjugated diene levels in the plasma and isolated LDL samples significantly increased compared with the control rabbits (p<0.05). However, in the cholesterol + acetaminophen group, the TBARS contents and conjugated diene levels were significantly lower than that of the cholesterol group (p<0.05). The results from in vitro studies also demonstrated that the LDL isolated from serum was oxidized by Cu++ ions and this oxidation reduced in the presence of acetaminophen. The reduced oxidative modification of LDL by acetaminophen may be of therapeutic value in preventing the development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:18392104

  11. Adrenal imaging with technetium-99m-labelled low density lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacsohn, J.L.; Lees, A.M.; Lees, R.S.; Strauss, H.W.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Moore, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    Evaluation of adrenal cortical function by external imaging is currently accomplished by injection of radiolabelled analogs of cholesterol. Although the adrenals do utilized exogenous cholesterol for steroid hormone synthesis, the cholesterol is delivered to the glands not as free cholesterol but through the uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDL), which are subsequently degraded within the adrenal cortical cells to provide cholesterol. Thus, we sought to assess the use of /sup 99m/Tc-labelled LDL injected into rabbits to obtain external images of the adrenal glands. Adrenal images of all nine rabbits tested were obtained within 18 to 21 hours after injection of /sup 99m/Tc-LDL. Seven of the rabbits were subjected to adrenal cortical suppression with dexamethasone and then all nine rabbits were imaged a second time. In the untreated animals, visualization of the adrenal glands was accompanied by normal serum cortisol concentrations and accumulation of radiolabel in the adrenals, whereas in the dexamethasone-treated animals, lack of visualization of the adrenal glands was correlated with low serum cortisols, and greatly decreased accumulation of the radionuclide in the adrenals. These findings demonstrate for the first time that LDL, when labelled with /sup 99m/Tc, can be used to evaluate adrenal cortical function by external imaging.

  12. Upregulation of Sestrin2 Expression Protects Against Macrophage Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hong-Juan; Shi, Ze-Ya; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Chen, San-Mei; Wang, Qing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Sestrin2 is involved in a different cellular response to stress conditions. However, the function of Sestrin2 in the cardiovascular system remains unknown. In the present study, we tested whether Sestrin2 has a beneficial effect on macrophage cell apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). We found that oxLDL induces expression of Sestrin2 in RAW264.7 cells in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. We also found that knockdown of Sestrin2 using small RNA interference promotes cell apoptosis and reactive oxygen species production induced by oxLDL. In addition, our results show that the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun pathway is activated by oxLDL. Inhibiting the activity of the JNK pathway abolishes the increase of Sestrin2 induced by oxLDL. These findings suggest that the inductive effect of Sestrin2 is mediated by the JNK/c-Jun pathway. Our results indicate that the induction of Sestrin2 acts as a compensatory response to oxLDL for survival, implying that stimulating expression of Sestrin2 might be an effective pharmacological target for the treatment of lipid-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25692450

  13. Antioxidant effects of 14 Chinese traditional medicinal herbs against human low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Charles, Albert Linton; Hsieh, Chang-Wei; Lee, Ya-Chi; Ciou, Jhih-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the antioxidant activities and inhibitory effect of 14 Chinese medicinal herbs against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) formation was evaluated. Prolongation of the lag phase of LDL oxidation depended on the concentration of the herbs. The concentration of each herb that was able to prolong the lag time by about two-fold was calculated and expressed as doubling-time concentration. The lower the doubling-time concentration, the stronger the inhibitory effect exhibited toward LDL oxidation. Among them, Chrysanthemi Flos (Chrysanthemum morifolium ramat; gān jú huā), Crataegi Fructus (Crataegus pinnatifida Bge. var. major N.E.Br.; shān zhā), and Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn.; luò shén) showed significant inhibitory effects. Correlation coefficients between doubling-time concentration and radical-scavenging activities were high; the total phenolic content was also high. In conclusion, phenolic compounds contributed not only to antioxidant activities, but also to the inhibitory effect against LDL oxidation. Chrysanthemi Flos, Crataegi Fructus, and H. sabdariffa, with lower doubling-time concentrations, could be potent phytochemical agents to reduce LDL oxidation and prevent the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26151009

  14. Tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel using low density lipoprotein-mimetic solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Youngwook; Bae, Ki Hyun; Park, Tae Gwan; Lee, Jung Hee; Park, Keunchil

    2015-04-01

    Water-insoluble anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel, present severe clinical side effects when administered to patients, primarily associated with the toxicity of reagents used to solubilize the drugs. In efforts to develop alternative formulations of water-insoluble anticancer drugs suitable for intravenous administration, we developed biocompatible anticancer therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), mimicking the structure and composition of natural particles, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), for tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel. These therapeutic nanoparticles contained water-insoluble paclitaxel in the core with tumor-targeting ligand covalently conjugated on the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified surface (targeted PtSLNs). In preclinical human cancer xenograft mouse model studies, the paclitaxel-containing tumor-targeting SLNs exhibited pronounced in vivo stability and enhanced biocompatibility. Furthermore, these SLNs had superior antitumor activity to in-class nanoparticular therapeutics in clinical use (Taxol and Genexol-PM) and yielded long-term complete responses. The in vivo targeted antitumor activities of the SLN formulations in a mouse tumor model suggest that LDL-mimetic SLN formulations can be utilized as a biocompatible, tumor-targeting platform for the delivery of various anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25686010

  15. Low density lipoprotein aged in plasma forms clusters resembling subendothelial droplets: aggregation via surface sites.

    PubMed

    De Spirito, Marco; Brunelli, Roberto; Mei, Giampiero; Bertani, Francesca R; Ciasca, Gabriele; Greco, Giulia; Papi, Massimiliano; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Ursini, Fulvio; Parasassi, Tiziana

    2006-06-01

    In early phases of atherogenesis, droplets and vesicles accumulate in the subendothelial extracellular space of arterial intima. There is much evidence to suggest that these droplets, ranging between 100 and 400 nm, derive from modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL). In investigations of the formation mechanism of these droplets, LDL fusion was previously induced in vitro by proteolysis, lipolysis, oxidation, and vigorous shaking, but all treatments failed to reproduce the size distribution range of in vivo droplets, mostly resulting, instead, in particles with a diameter intermediate between that of one and two LDL. Our approach was meant to mimic LDL aging in plasma. LDL isolated from plasma that was incubated overnight at 37 degrees C is slightly modified in the secondary structure of its protein component and is primed to form very large aggregates according to a reaction-limited mechanism. This mechanism requires interactions between selected surface sites, whereas massive fusion is ruled out. In the frame of the general theory for colloids, the aggregation of LDL aged in plasma fulfills all the requirements of the reaction-limited mechanism, encompassing 1), exponential growth; 2), fractal structure, with the dimension of elementary constituent still consistent with a single LDL; and 3), extreme polydispersity of aggregates, with shape and dimension very close to that of droplets observed in vivo. PMID:16533854

  16. Low Density Lipoprotein Aged in Plasma Forms Clusters Resembling Subendothelial Droplets: Aggregation via Surface Sites

    PubMed Central

    De Spirito, Marco; Brunelli, Roberto; Mei, Giampiero; Bertani, Francesca R.; Ciasca, Gabriele; Greco, Giulia; Papi, Massimiliano; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Ursini, Fulvio; Parasassi, Tiziana

    2006-01-01

    In early phases of atherogenesis, droplets and vesicles accumulate in the subendothelial extracellular space of arterial intima. There is much evidence to suggest that these droplets, ranging between 100 and 400 nm, derive from modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL). In investigations of the formation mechanism of these droplets, LDL fusion was previously induced in vitro by proteolysis, lipolysis, oxidation, and vigorous shaking, but all treatments failed to reproduce the size distribution range of in vivo droplets, mostly resulting, instead, in particles with a diameter intermediate between that of one and two LDL. Our approach was meant to mimic LDL aging in plasma. LDL isolated from plasma that was incubated overnight at 37°C is slightly modified in the secondary structure of its protein component and is primed to form very large aggregates according to a reaction-limited mechanism. This mechanism requires interactions between selected surface sites, whereas massive fusion is ruled out. In the frame of the general theory for colloids, the aggregation of LDL aged in plasma fulfills all the requirements of the reaction-limited mechanism, encompassing 1), exponential growth; 2), fractal structure, with the dimension of elementary constituent still consistent with a single LDL; and 3), extreme polydispersity of aggregates, with shape and dimension very close to that of droplets observed in vivo. PMID:16533854

  17. Possible role of the Golgi apparatus in the assembly of very low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, M.J.; Lane, M.D. )

    1990-04-01

    Transit of newly synthesized triacyl(3H)-glycerol through organelles of the secretory system leading to assembly into nascent very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) or to cytoplasmic storage was investigated in chick hepatocytes. Cells in monolayer culture were pulse-labeled with (2-3H)glycerol, and after different periods of chase with unlabeled glycerol, the movement of triacyl(3H)glycerol through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi and the incorporation into nascent VLDL and cytoplasmic triacylglycerol-rich vesicles (TGRVs) were determined. Initially, newly synthesized triacyl(3H)glycerol is tightly associated with the ER. Movement from the ER of triacyl(3H)glycerol destined for cytoplasmic storage (as TGRVs) is extremely rapid and virtually complete within 8 min of chase. After 8 min of chase, triacyl(3H)glycerol lost from organelles of the secretory system was accounted for entirely as triacyl(3H)glycerol secreted as VLDL. Comparison of the rates of movement of triacyl(3H)glycerol, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein II, and apolipoprotein A-I through the ER and Golgi and of their secretion in nascent VLDL suggests that assembly of triacyglycerol with apolipoproteins occurs in the Golgi. Experiments with permeabilized hepatocytes supplemented with cytosol show that newly synthesized triacyl(3H)glycerol and (3H)phospholipid moves from the ER through the full-density range of Golgi elements and is dependent upon supplementary ATP.

  18. Low-density Lipoprotein Improves Motility and Plasma Membrane Integrity of Cryopreserved Canine Epididymal Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Prapaiwan, N.; Tharasanit, T.; Punjachaipornpol, S.; Yamtang, D.; Roongsitthichai, A.; Moonarmart, W.; Kaeoket, K.; Manee-in, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa is an effective technique to conserve genetic potentials of superior dogs when it is not possible to collect ejaculated spermatozoa. Although hen egg yolk is commonly supplemented into the semen extender, active substances within the egg yolk which protect sperm against cryoinjury remain to be discovered. Among its compositions, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been reported to have a cryoprotective property for sperm cryopreservation. However, the effects of LDL on dog epididymal spermatozoa during cryopreservation have not yet been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of LDL on epididymal spermatozoa quality following cryopreservation and thawing. After routine castration of 12 dogs, caudal epididymides from individuals were separated from the testes and cut into a few pieces in a Tris-buffer. Spermatozoa recovered from each sample were examined at once for sperm quality and divided into six groups of extender: no LDL, 20% egg yolk, 4%, 8%, 16%, and 24% LDL, before cryopreservation. The sperm aliquots were then equilibrated and conventionally frozen. After thawing, sperm motility, morphology, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosome integrity were evaluated. The results revealed that 4% LDL and 20% egg yolk yielded significantly higher sperm motility (57.69% and 52.69%, respectively, p<0.05) than other LDLs. In addition, 4% LDL yielded the significantly highest plasma membrane integrity (70.54%, p<0.05). In conclusion, the supplementation of 4% LDL in Tris-glucose extender could be applied for cryopreservation of canine epididymal spermatozoa. PMID:26954170

  19. Low-density lipoprotein transport in blood vessel walls of squirrel monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, R.G.; Yarmush, M.L.; Schnitzer, J.J.; Colton, C.K.; Smith, K.A.; Stemerman, M.B. )

    1989-08-01

    Transmural accumulations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were examined in the blood vessel walls of four squirrel monkeys. Vascular wall concentrations of LDL were measured using quantitative autoradiography after {sup 125}I-labeled LDL circulation for 30 min. Profiles of relative tissue concentration from different sections in the same region were similar to each other, and there was little animal-to-animal variation. Concentrations were highest near the luminal endothelium, lower near the medial-adventitial border, and lowest within the media. Profiles from different regions fell into three groups: (1) aortic samples had steep intimal concentration gradients and near-zero media concentrations; (2) the iliac, femoral, popliteal, and common carotid arteries had higher intimal concentrations than group 1 but had similar concentrations deep within the media; and (3) the cerebral and coronary arteries, inferior vena cava, and pulmonary artery had intimal concentrations that were similar to group 2, but the concentrations deep within the media were greater than either groups 1 or 2. Arterial bifurcation profiles from the inner wall and the outer walls were similar to each other and to profiles from the upstream and downstream areas. Out of 280 total sites examined, 15 examples of profiles with substantially increased concentrations near the luminal endothelium were found scattered throughout the cardiovascular system, demonstrating that there are focal regions throughout the cardiovascular system which have greatly increased {sup 125}I-LDL transendothelial permeability.

  20. Whole-Cell Analysis of Low-Density Lipoprotein Uptake by Macrophages Using STEM Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Jerome, W. Gray; Kübel, Christian; de Jonge, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles of heavy materials such as gold can be used as markers in quantitative electron microscopic studies of protein distributions in cells with nanometer spatial resolution. Studying nanoparticles within the context of cells is also relevant for nanotoxicological research. Here, we report a method to quantify the locations and the number of nanoparticles, and of clusters of nanoparticles inside whole eukaryotic cells in three dimensions using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Whole-mount fixed cellular samples were prepared, avoiding sectioning or slicing. The level of membrane staining was kept much lower than is common practice in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), such that the nanoparticles could be detected throughout the entire cellular thickness. Tilt-series were recorded with a limited tilt-range of 80° thereby preventing excessive beam broadening occurring at higher tilt angles. The 3D locations of the nanoparticles were nevertheless determined with high precision using computation. The obtained information differed from that obtained with conventional TEM tomography data since the nanoparticles were highlighted while only faint contrast was obtained on the cellular material. Similar as in fluorescence microscopy, a particular set of labels can be studied. This method was applied to study the fate of sequentially up-taken low-density lipoprotein (LDL) conjugated to gold nanoparticles in macrophages. Analysis of a 3D reconstruction revealed that newly up-taken LDL-gold was delivered to lysosomes containing previously up-taken LDL-gold thereby forming onion-like clusters. PMID:23383042

  1. l-Cystathionine Inhibits the Mitochondria-Mediated Macrophage Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingzhu; Du, Junbao; Chen, Siyao; Liu, Angie Dong; Holmberg, Lukas; Chen, Yonghong; Zhang, Chunyu; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the regulatory role of l-cystathionine in human macrophage apoptosis induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and its possible mechanisms. THP-1 cells were induced with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and differentiated into macrophages. Macrophages were incubated with ox-LDL after pretreatment with l-cystathionine. Superoxide anion, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening were examined. Caspase-9 activities and expression of cleaved caspase-3 were measured. The results showed that compared with control group, ox-LDL treatment significantly promoted superoxide anion generation, release of cytochrome c (cytc) from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and cell apoptosis, in addition to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential as well as increased MPTP opening. However, 0.3 and 1.0 mmol/L l-cystathionine significantly reduced superoxide anion generation, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, and markedly decreased MPTP opening in ox-LDL + l-cystathionine macrophages. Moreover, compared to ox-LDL treated-cells, release of cytc from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and apoptosis levels in l-cystathionine pretreated cells were profoundly attenuated. Taken together, our results suggested that l-cystathionine could antagonize mitochondria-mediated human macrophage apoptosis induced by ox-LDL via inhibition of cytc release and caspase activation. PMID:25514411

  2. Effect of Albizia julibrissin water extracts on low-density lipoprotein oxidization.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Katherine; McClain, Colt; Carrier, Danielle Julie; Wallace, Sunny; King, Jerry; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Clausen, Edgar

    2007-06-13

    High-value phytochemicals could be extracted from biomass prior to the current cellulosic pretreatment technologies (i.e., lime, ammonia, dilute acid, or pressurized hot water treatments) provided that the extraction is performed with a solvent that is compatible with the pretreatment. This work reports on the extraction of flavonoids from Albizia julibrissin biomass. While extracting A. julibrissin foliage with 50 degrees C water, 2.227 mg/g of hyperoside and 8.134 mg/g quercitrin were obtained, which is in the realm of what was obtained with 60% methanol. A. julibrissin foliage, flower, and whole plant extracts were tested in terms of their potential to inhibit low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidization. The highest inhibition was obtained with foliage water extracts, which were standardized at 2.5 microM of flavonoids. Also, the 2.5 microM foliage water extract resulted in a reduction from 43% to only 1% of the observed monocyte adherence. To have commercial application, A. julibrissin water extracts should be devoid of toxicity. The A. julibrissin foliage, flower, and whole plant water extracts were not toxic to Vero 76 cells. In summary, A. julibrissin biomass can be extracted with 50 degrees C water to yield an antioxidant stream, showing that it may be possible to couple extraction of valuable phytochemicals to the cellulosic pretreatment step. PMID:17497875

  3. Antioxidant effects of 14 Chinese traditional medicinal herbs against human low-density lipoprotein oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Charles, Albert Linton; Hsieh, Chang-Wei; Lee, Ya-Chi; Ciou, Jhih-Ying

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the antioxidant activities and inhibitory effect of 14 Chinese medicinal herbs against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) formation was evaluated. Prolongation of the lag phase of LDL oxidation depended on the concentration of the herbs. The concentration of each herb that was able to prolong the lag time by about two-fold was calculated and expressed as doubling-time concentration. The lower the doubling-time concentration, the stronger the inhibitory effect exhibited toward LDL oxidation. Among them, Chrysanthemi Flos (Chrysanthemum morifolium ramat; 甘菊花 gān jú huā), Crataegi Fructus (Crataegus pinnatifida Bge. var. major N.E.Br.; 山楂 shān zhā), and Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn.; 洛神 luò shén) showed significant inhibitory effects. Correlation coefficients between doubling-time concentration and radical-scavenging activities were high; the total phenolic content was also high. In conclusion, phenolic compounds contributed not only to antioxidant activities, but also to the inhibitory effect against LDL oxidation. Chrysanthemi Flos, Crataegi Fructus, and H. sabdariffa, with lower doubling-time concentrations, could be potent phytochemical agents to reduce LDL oxidation and prevent the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26151009

  4. Low-density lipoprotein-mediated delivery of docosahexaenoic acid selectively kills murine liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lacy; Mulik, Rohit S.; Wen, Xiaodong; Dilip, Archana; Corbin, Ian R.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The natural omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has recently been credited for possessing anticancer properties. Herein, we investigate the cytotoxic actions of DHA-loaded low-density lipoprotein (LDL) nanoparticles in normal and liver cancer cells. Materials & methods LDL-DHA nanoparticles were prepared and subjected to extensive biophysical characterization. The therapeutic utility of LDL-DHA nanoparticles was evaluated in normal and malignant murine hepatocyte cell lines, TIB-73 and TIB-75, respectively. Results & discussion The engineered LDL-DHA nanoparticles possessed enhanced physical and oxidative stabilities over native LDL and free DHA. Dose–response studies showed that therapeutic doses of LDL-DHA nanoparticles that completely killed TIB-75 were innocuous to TIB-73. The selective induction of lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species in the cancer cells was shown to play a central role in LDL-DHA nanoparticle-mediated cytotoxicity. Conclusion In summary, these findings indicate that LDL-DHA nanoparticles show great promise as a selective anticancer agent against hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24397600

  5. Proteome analysis of human monocytic THP-1 cells primed with oxidized low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Han; Kim, Hyun Tae; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Won Ha; Huh, Tae-Lin; Park, Yong Bok; Moon, Byung Jo; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2006-02-01

    Native low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) possess a wide variety of biological properties, and play a central role in atherogenesis. In this study, we used a proteomic analysis of human monocyte THP-1 cells induced with oxLDL or with LDL, to identify proteins potentially involved in atherosclerotic processes. Of the 2500 proteins detected, 93 were differentially expressed as a result of priming with LDL or oxLDL. The proteins were unambiguously identified by comparing the masses of their tryptic peptides with those of all known proteins using MALDI-TOF MS and the NCBI database. The largest differences in expression were observed for vimentin (94-fold increase), meningioma-expressed antigen 6 (48-fold increase), serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (40-fold increase), and beta-1,3-galactosyltransferase (15-fold increase). In contrast, the abundance of an unnamed protein product and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decreased 30-fold and 25-fold, respectively. The expression of some selected proteins was confirmed by Western blot and RT-PCR analyses. The proteins identified in this study are attractive candidates for further biomarker research. This description of the altered protein profiles induced by oxLDL in human monocytes will support functional studies of the macrophage-derived foam cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:16402358

  6. In vitro oxidative footprinting provides insight into apolipoprotein B-100 structure in low density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sourav; Cai, Yang; Tarr, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a major cholesterol carrier in human blood. Oxidations of apolipoprotein B-100 (apo B-100, LDL protein) could be pro-atherogenic and play critical roles in early stages of plaque formation in the arterial wall. The structure of apo B-100 is still poorly understood, partially due to its size (550 KDa, 4563 amino acids). To gain an insight into LDL structure, we mapped the regions of apo B-100 in human LDL which were prone to oxidation using peroxynitrite and hypochlorite as probes. In this study, LDL was incubated with various concentrations of peroxynitrite and sodium hypochlorite in bicarbonate buffer. The LDL protein apo B-100 was delipidated, denatured, alkylated and subjected to tryptic digestion. Tryptic peptides were analyzed employing liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Database search was performed against the apo B-100 database (P04114) using “SEQUEST” algorithm to identify peroxynitrite and hypochlorite mediated oxidations markers nitrotyrosine, nitrotryptophan, hydroxy-tryptophan and 3-chlorotyrosine. Several site specific oxidations were identified in apo B-100 after treatment of intact LDL particles with the oxidants. We hypothesize that these regions could be accessible to oxidant and critical for early events in atherosclerotic plaque deposition. PMID:25176030

  7. Nuclear imaging analysis of human low-density lipoprotein biodistribution in rabbits and monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, R.V.; Fleming, R.M.; Ryan, J.W.; Williams, K.A.; Stark, V.J.; Lathrop, K.A.; Harper, P.V. )

    1991-06-01

    We have evaluated the biodistribution of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) radiolabeled with 99mTc or with {sup 123}I-tyramine cellobiose in rabbits and in rhesus monkeys. Biodistribution was assessed after intravenous injection of radiolabeled LDL by quantitative analysis of scintigrams, counting of excreta, and counting of tissues at necropsy. Both rabbits and monkeys showed lower renal uptake ({sup 123}I:99mTc {approximately} 1:3, as regional percent injected activity corrected for physical decay) and excretion (1:2 to 1:4), but higher hepatic (1.5:1 to 2:1) and cardiac (1.7:1 to 4:1) uptake of {sup 123}I than of 99mTc. Adrenals were visualized in normolipemic animals with {sup 123}I-tyramine cellobiose-LDL but not with 99mTc-LDL. Hyperlipemic animals showed increased cardiac (up to six-fold) and decreased hepatic activity (by 50%-60%) of both radionuclides. We conclude that {sup 123}I-tyramine cellobiose-LDL is better suited than 99mTc-LDL for dynamic studies of LDL metabolism in vivo.

  8. Olmesartan Attenuates the Impairment of Endothelial Cells Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein through Downregulating Expression of LOX-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Ma, Genshan; Yao, Yuyu; Qian, Huidong; Li, Weizhang; Chen, Xinjun; Jiang, Wenlong; Zheng, Ruolong

    2012-01-01

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and its receptor, lectin-Like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), play important roles in the development of endothelial injuries. Olmesartan can protect endothelial cells from the impairment caused by various pathological stimulations. In the present study we investigated whether olmesartan decreased the impairment of endothelial cells induced by ox-LDL by exerting its effects on LOX-1 both in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of cultured endothelial cells of neonatal rats with ox-LDL for 24 h or infusion of ox-LDL in mice for 3 weeks led to the remarkable impairment of endothelial cells, including increased lactate dehydrogenase synthesis, phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) and expression of apoptotic genes such as B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3. Simultaneously, the cell vitality and expression of Bcl-2 gene were greatly reduced. All these effects, however, were significantly suppressed by the treatment with olmesartan. Furthermore, ox-LDL promoted up-regulation of LOX-1 expression either in cultured endothelial cells or in the aortas of mice, which was reversed with the administration of olmesartan. Our data indicated that olmesartan may attenuate the impairment of endothelial cell via down-regulation of the increased LOX-1 expression induced by ox-LDL. PMID:22408405

  9. Calcium antagonists and low density lipoproteins metabolism by human fibroblasts and by human hepatoma cell line HEP G2.

    PubMed

    Corsini, A; Granata, A; Fumagalli, R; Paoletti, R

    1986-01-01

    The effect of Ca2+ antagonists (CA) on the receptor-mediated low density lipoprotein pathway has been investigated "in vitro" in human skin fibroblasts (HSF) and in human hepatoma cell line Hep G2. The specific binding and internalization of human 125I-labeled LDL are dose-dependently increased in HSF by CA of the verapamil series (verapamil, anipamil, gallopamil, ronipamil, and diltiazem), but neither by CA of the dihydropyridine series (nifedipine, nitrendipine) nor by flunarizine. BAY K 8644, a Ca2+ agonist, elicited an opposite effect. In the presence of the tested CA, LDL degradation is either unaffected (lower concentrations) or inhibited (higher concentrations). 125I-LDL uptake is stimulated also in fibroblasts from type IIa hypercholesterolemic patients, heterozygous for defective expression of LDL receptor. The enhanced cellular uptake of 125I-LDL was prevented by cycloheximide and by alpha-amanitin. CA of the verapamil series including diltiazem retained their effect in human hepatoma cell line Hep G2, a model proposed for hepatic metabolism of LDL. Our studies show that a) CA stimulate the high affinity binding and internalization of LDL in HSF and in human hepatoma cell line Hep G2; b) this stimulation involves DNA transcription and new protein synthesis; c) this effect is specific to one subgroup of Ca2+ antagonists (the verapamil class only). PMID:3006091

  10. Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Induces Differentiation and Adhesion of Human Monocytes and the Monocytic Cell Line U937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostegard, Johan; Nilsson, Jan; Haegerstrand, Anders; Hamsten, Anders; Wigzell, Hans; Gidlund, Magnus

    1990-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for development of atherosclerosis. In experimental animals fed a high-cholesterol diet, monocytes adhere to the arterial endothelium and penetrate into the intima where they differentiate into macrophages and ingest lipids thus giving rise to fatty streaks, the earliest type of atherosclerotic plaque. Macrophages express few receptors for normal low density lipo-protein (LDL) but can take up oxidized LDL by way of a scavenger receptor. The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of oxidized LDL in recruitment of resident intimal macrophages. We found that oxidized LDL induced enhanced expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on human monocytes and U937 cells, a well-established system for studies of monocytic differentiation. Oxidized LDL also induced enhanced expression of the surface antigen LEuM3 but caused decreased expression of CD4 antigen, a pattern compatible with expression of a more differentiated macrophage-like phenotype. Oxidized LDL also initiated aggregation of monocytes and U937 cells and stimulated adhesion of U937 cells to cultured endothelial cells. The results indicate that oxidized LDL may contribute to development of atherosclerosis by inducing adhesion of monocytes to the arterial intima and by stimulating intimal monocytes to differentiate into resident macrophages.

  11. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: Oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo . E-mail: jouilo@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  12. Determining a new formula for calculating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: data mining approach

    PubMed Central

    Dansethakul, Prabhop; Thapanathamchai, Lalin; Saichanma, Sarawut; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Pidetcha, Phannee

    2015-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a risk factor of coronary heart diseases. The estimation of LDL-C (LDL-Cal) level was performed using Friedewald's equation for triglyceride (TG) level less than 400 mg/dL. Therefore, the aim of this study is to generate a new formula for LDL-Cal and validate the correlation coefficient between LDL-Cal and LDL-C directly measured (LDL-Direct). A data set of 1786 individuals receiving annual medical check-ups from the Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University, Thailand in 2008 was used in this study. Lipid profiles including total cholesterol (TC), TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-C were determined using Roche/Hitachi modular system analyzer. The estimated LDL-C was obtained using Friedewald's equation and the homogenous enzymatic method. The level of TG was divided into 6 groups (TG<200, <300, <400, <500, <600 and < 1000 mg/dL) for constructing the LDL-Cal formula. The pace regression model was used to construct the candidate formula for the LDL-Cal and determine the correlation coefficient (r) with the LDL-Direct. The candidate LDL-Cal formula was generated for 6 groups of TG levels that displayed well correlation between LDL-Cal and LDL-Direct. Interestingly, The TG level was less than 1000 mg/dL, the regression model was able to generate the equation as shown as strong r of 0.9769 with LDL-Direct. Furthermore, external data set (n = 666) with TG measurement (36-1480 mg/dL) was used to validate new formula which displayed high r of 0.971 between LDL-Cal and LDL-direct. This study explored a new formula for LDL-Cal which exhibited higher r of 0.9769 and far beyond the limitation of TG more than 1000 mg/dL and potential used for estimating LDL-C in routine clinical laboratories. PMID:26600746

  13. Comparison of two low-density lipoprotein apheresis systems in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Drouin-Chartier, Jean-Philippe; Tremblay, André J; Bergeron, Jean; Pelletier, Maude; Laflamme, Nathalie; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis (LA) is a reliable method to decrease LDL-C concentrations and remains the gold standard therapy in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of two LA systems [heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL precipitation (HELP) vs. dextran sulfate adsorption (DS) on the reduction of lipids, inflammatory markers, and adhesion molecules in a sample of genetically defined HoFH subjects (n = 9)]. Fasting blood samples were collected before and after LA. All subjects served as their own control and were first treated with the HELP system then with DS in this single sequence study. Compared with HELP, DS led to significantly greater reductions in total cholesterol (-63.3% vs. -59.9%; P = 0.05), LDL-C (-70.5% vs. -63.0%; P = 0.02), CRP (-75.3% vs. -48.8%; P < 0.0001), and TNF-α (-23.7% vs. +14.7%; P = 0.003). Reductions in the plasma levels of PCSK9 (-45.3% vs. -63.4%; P = 0.31), lipoprotein (a) (-70.6% vs. -65.0%; P = 0.30), E-selectin (-16.6% vs. -18.3%; P = 0.65), ICAM-1 (-4.0 vs. 5.6%; P = 0.56), and VCAM-1 (8.3% vs. -1.8%; P = 0.08) were not different between the two systems. For the same volume of filtered plasma (3,000 mL), however, HELP led to greater reductions in plasma apoB (-63.1% vs. -58.3%; P = 0.04), HDL-C (-20.6% vs. -6.5%; P = 0.003), and PCSK9 (-63.4% vs. -28.5%; P = 0.02) levels. These results suggest that both LA systems are effective in reducing plasma lipids and inflammatory markers in HoFH. Compared with HELP, greater reductions in lipid levels and inflammatory markers were achieved with DS, most likely because this method allows for a larger plasma volume to be filtered. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:359-367, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26011648

  14. Estimation of the low-density (beta) lipoproteins of serum in health and disease using large molecular weight dextran sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Walton, K. W.; Scott, P. J.

    1964-01-01

    Studies have been made of the factors affecting the specificity of the interaction between high molecular weight dextran sulphate and low-density lipoproteins, both in pure solution and in serum. The results have been used in the development of a simple assay method for the serum concentration of low-density lipoproteins in small volumes of serum. The results obtained by this assay procedure have been found to correlate acceptably with parallel estimations of low-density lipoproteins by an ultracentrifugal technique and by paper electrophoresis. The technique has been applied to a survey of serum levels of these proteins in a normal population. The results have been compared with data in the literature. Satisfactory agreement was found between mean levels, matched for age and sex, between the dextran sulphate method and those methods based ultimately on chemical estimation of one or more components of the isolated lipoproteins. A systematic difference was observed when the dextran sulphate method was compared with estimates based on analytical ultracentrifugation or turbidimetry using amylopectin sulphate. Some indication of the range of application of the dextran sulphate method in clinical chemistry is provided. Images PMID:14227432

  15. Electronegative Low-density Lipoprotein Increases Coronary Artery Disease Risk in Uremia Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Wang, Guei-Jane; Kuo, Chin-Chi; Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Lee, An-Sean; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wang, Chun-Cheng; Shen, Ming-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Stancel, Nicole; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a recognized factor in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the general population, but its role in the development of CAD in uremia patients is unknown. L5 is the most electronegative subfraction of LDL isolated from human plasma. In this study, we examined the distribution of L5 (L5%) and its association with CAD risk in uremia patients.The LDL of 39 uremia patients on maintenance hemodialysis and 21 healthy controls was separated into 5 subfractions, L1-L5, with increasing electronegativity. We compared the distribution and composition of plasma L5 between uremia patients and controls, examined the association between plasma L5% and CAD risk in uremia patients, and studied the effects of L5 from uremia patients on endothelial function.Compared to controls, uremia patients had significantly increased L5% (P < 0.001) and L5 that was rich in apolipoprotein C3 and triglycerides. L5% was significantly higher in uremia patients with CAD (n = 10) than in those without CAD (n = 29) (P < 0.05). Independent of other major CAD risk factors, the adjusted odds ratio for CAD was 1.88 per percent increase in plasma L5% (95% CI, 1.01-3.53), with a near-linear dose-response relationship. Compared with controls, uremia patients had decreased flow-mediated vascular dilatation. In ex vivo studies with preconstricted rat thoracic aortic rings, L5 from uremia patients inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation. In cultured human endothelial cells, L5 inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and induced endothelial dysfunction.Our findings suggest that elevated plasma L5% may induce endothelial dysfunction and play an important role in the increased risk of CAD in uremia patients. PMID:26765403

  16. Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 governs Wnt-mediated osteoarthritic cartilage destruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wnt ligands bind to low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP) 5 or 6, triggering a cascade of downstream events that include β-catenin signaling. Here we explored the roles of LRP5 in interleukin 1β (IL-1β)- or Wnt-mediated osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage destruction in mice. Methods The expression levels of LRP5, type II collagen, and catabolic factors were determined in mouse articular chondrocytes, human OA cartilage, and mouse experimental OA cartilage. Experimental OA in wild-type, Lrp5 total knockout (Lrp5-/-) and chondrocyte-specific knockout (Lrp5fl/fl;Col2a1-cre) mice was caused by aging, destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), or intra-articular injection of collagenase. The role of LRP5 was confirmed in vitro by small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of Lrp5 or in Lrp5-/- cells treated with IL-1β or Wnt proteins. Results IL-1β treatment increased the expression of LRP5 (but not LRP6) via JNK and NF-κB signaling. LRP5 was upregulated in human and mouse OA cartilage, and Lrp5 deficiency in mice inhibited cartilage destruction. Treatment with IL-1β or Wnt decreased the level of Col2a1 and increased those of Mmp3 or Mmp13, whereas Lrp5 knockdown ameliorated these effects. In addition, we found that the functions of LRP5 in arthritic cartilage were subject to transcriptional activation by β-catenin. Moreover, Lrp5-/- and Lrp5fl/fl;Col2a1-cre mice exhibited decreased cartilage destruction (and related changes in gene expression) in response to experimental OA. Conclusions Our findings indicate that LRP5 (but not LRP6) plays an essential role in Wnt/β-catenin-signaling-mediated OA cartilage destruction in part by regulating the expression levels of type II collagen, MMP3, and MMP13. PMID:24479426

  17. Protection of low density lipoprotein oxidation at chemical and cellular level by the antioxidant drug dipyridamole.

    PubMed Central

    Iuliano, L.; Colavita, A. R.; Camastra, C.; Bello, V.; Quintarelli, C.; Alessandroni, M.; Piovella, F.; Violi, F.

    1996-01-01

    1. The oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to be an important factor in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Natural and synthetic antioxidants have been shown to protect LDL from oxidation and to inhibit atherosclerosis development in animals. Synthetic antioxidants are currently being tested, by they are not necessarily safe for human use. 2. We have previously reported that dipyridamole, currently used in clinical practice, is a potent scavenger of free radicals. Thus, we tested whether dipyridamole could affect LDL oxidation at chemical and cellular level. 3. Chemically induced LDL oxidation was made by Cu(II), Cu(II) plus hydrogen peroxide or peroxyl radicals generated by thermolysis of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidino propane). Dipyridamole, (1-10 microM), inhibited LDL oxidation as monitored by diene formation, evolution of hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, apoprotein modification and by the fluorescence of cis-parinaric acid. 4. The physiological relevance of the antioxidant activity was validated by experiments at the cellular level where dipyridamole inhibited endothelial cell-mediated LDL oxidation, their degradation by monocytes, and cytotoxicity. 5. In comparison with ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol and probucol, dipyridamole was the more efficient antioxidant with the following order of activity: dipyridamole > probucol > ascorbic acid > alpha-tocopherol. The present study shows that dipyridamole inhibits oxidation of LDL at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. The inhibition of LDL oxidation is unequivocally confirmed by use of three different methods of chemical oxidation, by several methods of oxidation monitoring, and the pharmacological relevance is demonstrated by the superiority of dipyridamole over the naturally occurring antioxidants, ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol and the synthetic antioxidant probucol. Images Figure 6 PMID:8968553

  18. Electronegative Low-density Lipoprotein Increases Coronary Artery Disease Risk in Uremia Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Wang, Guei-Jane; Kuo, Chin-Chi; Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Lee, An-Sean; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wang, Chun-Cheng; Shen, Ming-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Stancel, Nicole; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a recognized factor in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the general population, but its role in the development of CAD in uremia patients is unknown. L5 is the most electronegative subfraction of LDL isolated from human plasma. In this study, we examined the distribution of L5 (L5%) and its association with CAD risk in uremia patients. The LDL of 39 uremia patients on maintenance hemodialysis and 21 healthy controls was separated into 5 subfractions, L1–L5, with increasing electronegativity. We compared the distribution and composition of plasma L5 between uremia patients and controls, examined the association between plasma L5% and CAD risk in uremia patients, and studied the effects of L5 from uremia patients on endothelial function. Compared to controls, uremia patients had significantly increased L5% (P < 0.001) and L5 that was rich in apolipoprotein C3 and triglycerides. L5% was significantly higher in uremia patients with CAD (n = 10) than in those without CAD (n = 29) (P < 0.05). Independent of other major CAD risk factors, the adjusted odds ratio for CAD was 1.88 per percent increase in plasma L5% (95% CI, 1.01–3.53), with a near-linear dose–response relationship. Compared with controls, uremia patients had decreased flow-mediated vascular dilatation. In ex vivo studies with preconstricted rat thoracic aortic rings, L5 from uremia patients inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation. In cultured human endothelial cells, L5 inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and induced endothelial dysfunction. Our findings suggest that elevated plasma L5% may induce endothelial dysfunction and play an important role in the increased risk of CAD in uremia patients. PMID:26765403

  19. Imaging human atherosclerosis with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled low density lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, A.M.; Lees, R.S.; Schoen, F.J.; Isaacsohn, J.L.; Fischman, A.J.; McKusick, K.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1988-09-01

    The feasibility of localizing human atherosclerotic plaques by gamma scintillation camera external imaging with technetium-99m-labeled low density lipoproteins (99mTc-LDL) was tested in 17 patients who had atherosclerosis. Imaging demonstrated focal accumulation of radiolabel consistent with 99mTc-LDL sequestration by plaques in the carotid, iliac, or femoral vessels of four patients 8 to 21 hours after intravenous injection of the radiopharmaceutical. Focal accumulation of 99mTc-LDL also appeared in the location of coronary lesions in four patients, but this accumulation could not be distinguished with certainty from residual blood pool radioactivity. When carotid endarterectomy specimens from six patients who received 99mTc-LDL 1 day before endarterectomy were examined, the specimens had focal accumulations of radiolabel, with two to four times greater radioactivity in some regions of each specimen than in others; this occurred whether or not the lesions were detected on the gamma camera images. Lesion composition may have determined whether accumulation was quantitatively sufficient to produce an external image. Histologically, the imaged carotid specimen had abundant foam cells and macrophages and poorly organized intramural blood consistent with a plaque hemorrhage; in contrast, nonimaged endarterectomy specimens were mature, fibrocalcific plaques. We conclude that: 1) 99mTc-LDL did accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaques; 2) in some patients, the accumulation of 99mTc-LDL was sufficient for detection by gamma camera imaging; 3) the amount of LDL that accumulated appeared to depend on lesion composition; and 4) the design of new radiopharmaceuticals with reduced residual blood pool activity relative to plaque accumulation should lead to improved external imaging of atherosclerosis.

  20. The Effect of Intensified Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Reduction on Recurrent Myocardial Infarction and Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Chun; Lin, Tzu-Wen; Chiou, Kuan-Rau; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Kuo, Feng-Yu; Chiang, Cheng-Hung; Yang, Jin-Shiou; Lin, Ko-Long; Hsiao, Shin-Hung; Yeh, Tong-Chen; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Hsiao, Hsiang-Chiang; Lin, Shoa-Lin; Chiou, Chuen-Wang; Liu, Chun-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Background Lipid-lowering therapy plays an important role in preventing the recurrence of cardiovascular events in patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study aimed to assess the effect of intensified low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction on recurrent myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality in patients after AMI. Method The 562 enrolled AMI patients (84.2% male) were divided into two groups according to 3-month LDL-C decrease percentage equal to or more than 40% (n = 165) and less than 40% (n = 397). To evaluate the long-term efficacy of LDL-C reduction, the 5-year outcomes were collected, including time to the first occurrence of myocardial infarction and time to cardiovascular death. Results The baseline characteristics and complication rates were not different between the two study groups. The patients with 3-month LDL-C decrease ≥ 40% had higher baseline LDL-C and lower 3-month, 1-year, 2-year, 3-year, 4-year and 5-year LDL-C than the patients with 3-month LDL-C decrease < 40%. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, those patients with 3-month LDL-C decrease ≥ 40% had a higher rate of freedom from myocardial infarction (p = 0.006) and survival rate (p = 0.02) at 5-year follow-up. The 3-month LDL-C < 40% parameter was significantly related to cardiovascular death (HR: 9.62, 95% CI 1.18-78.62, p < 0.04). Conclusions After acute myocardial infarction, 3-month LDL-C decrease < 40% was identified to be a significant risk factor for predicting 5-year cardiovascular death. The patients with 3-month LDL-C decrease ≥ 40% had a higher rate of freedom from myocardial infarction and lower cardiovascular mortality, even though these patients had higher baseline LDL-C value. PMID:27122737

  1. Abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and oxidized low-density lipoproteins in Latino adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Justin R; Vega-López, Sonia; Djedjos, Constantine S; Shaibi, Gabriel Q

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal obesity and insulin resistance (IR) place youth at higher risk for premature cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. In adults, abdominal obesity and IR contribute to the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Whether similar mechanisms are operational in Latino adolescents is unknown. Therefore, we determined whether IR and abdominal adiposity are associated with higher oxLDL concentrations in Latino adolescents. Data from 123 Latino adolescents (16.3 ± 2.5 years; female = 74) were used for the present analysis. Participants were assessed for waist circumference, fasting serum oxLDL, and insulin sensitivity by the whole body insulin sensitivity index. In separate linear regression models adjusting for age and sex, both waist circumference and insulin sensitivity were significant predictors of oxLDL (β = 1.9; p = 0.002; R2 = 0.13, β = -1.7; p = 0.006; R2 = 0.11, respectively). When insulin sensitivity and waist circumference were included in the same model, both remained independent predictors of oxLDL (β = 1.7; p = 0.016 and, β = -1.5; p = 0.055, respectively; R2 = 0.16). These results suggest that insulin resistance and abdominal adiposity are associated with higher levels of LDL oxidation which may be a mechanism contributing to increased CVD risk in Latino adolescents. PMID:24238302

  2. Low-Density-Lipoprotein Particle Size Predicts a Poor Outcome in Patients with Atherothrombotic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tae-Jin; Cho, Hyun-Ji; Chang, Yoonkyung; Youn, Minjung; Shin, Min-Jeong; Jo, Inho; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size is considered to be one of the more important cardiovascular risk factors, and small LDL particles are known to have atherogenic potential. The aim of this study was to determine whether LDL particle size is associated with stroke severity and functional outcome in patients with atherothrombotic stroke. Methods Between January 2009 and May 2011, 248 patients with first-episode cerebral infarction who were admitted to our hospital within 7 days after symptom onset were prospectively enrolled. LDL particle size was measured using the nondenaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis assay. Stroke severity was assessed by applying the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission. Functional outcome was investigated at 3 months after the index stroke using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and poor functional outcome was defined as an mRS score of ≥3. Results The LDL particle size in the 248 patients was 25.9±0.9 nm (mean±SD). LDL particle size was inversely correlated with the degree of cerebral artery stenosis (p=0.010). Multinomial multivariate logistic analysis revealed that after adjustment for age, sex, and variables with p<0.1 in univariate analysis, LDL particle size was independently and inversely associated with stroke severity (NIHSS score ≥5; reference, NIHSS score 0-2; odds ratio=0.38, p=0.028) and poor functional outcome (odds ratio=0.44, p=0.038). Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that small LDL particles are independently correlated with stroke outcomes. LDL particle size is thus a potential biomarker for the prognosis of atherothrombotic stroke. PMID:25628741

  3. Intensive Lowering of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels for Primary Prevention of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karalis, Dean G.

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and a high concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major risk factor for CAD. Current guidelines recommend the use of statins to lower LDL-C levels for the primary prevention of CAD based on an individual's risk factor profile and baseline LDL-C level. For moderaterisk individuals, those with 2 or more major risk factors for CAD and a Framingham risk score of 10% to 20%, the recommendation is to use a statin to lower LDL-C levels to less than 130 mg/dL. However, up to 40% of individuals who develop CAD have LDL-C levels lower than this cutoff. In 2004, the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines were updated to include an LDL-C goal of less than 100 mg/dL for individuals at moderately high risk of developing CAD. The guidelines identified several risk factors that when present would favor the use of pharmacological therapy to achieve this more aggressive LDL-C goal. This review evaluates the evidence supporting an LDL-C target of less than 100 mg/dL for moderately high-risk individuals and reviews those risk factors that when present help identify patients who would benefit from achieving this lower LDL-C goal. English-language publications in MEDLINE and references from relevant articles published between January 1, 1980, and November 30, 2008, were reviewed. Main keywords searched were coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, statins, cardiac risk factors, inflammatory markers, metabolic syndrome, and coronary artery calcium. PMID:19339653

  4. Serum LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) As a Risk Factor for Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Biswas, N; Sangma, M A

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main risk factor of ischaemic stroke. Dyslipidaemia is the main cause of atherosclerosis. High levels of LDL, also called "bad" cholesterol, seem to provoke stroke. This case control study was conducted in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital during the period of January 2012 to December 2012. The study was carried out to measure the level of serum LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) of ischaemic stroke patients admitted in Medicine wards of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital and the result of this study was compared with the level of LDL cholesterol in age matched controls. Sample size was 384 which had been selected by inclusion and exclusion criteria. Out of 384 samples 192 were cases and 192 were controls. Mean age ±SD was 57.0±10.85 years in cases and 57.43±10.64 years in controls. Elderly people are the most vulnerable group for developing stroke. LDL cholesterol level was more than 130mg/dl was found 88.54% among cases and 33.85% among controls, the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Mean LDL level ±SD were 145±13.59mg/dl in cases and 125.01±10.73mg/dl in controls. Odds ratio of LDL cholesterol were 15.0979 and 95% confidence limits were 8.8396 to 25.7869 among cases and controls. This study explored study population with higher LDL cholesterol was over fifteen times more likely to developed ischaemic stroke. Early detection of high LDL cholesterol in the way to prevent ischaemic stroke and thereby reduced the morbidity and mortality of ischaemic stroke. PMID:27612886

  5. Freezing canine sperm: comparison of semen extenders containing Equex and LDL (Low Density Lipoproteins).

    PubMed

    Bencharif, Djemil; Amirat-Briand, Lamia; Garand, Annabelle; Anton, Marc; Schmitt, Eric; Desherces, Serge; Delhomme, Guy; Langlois, Marie-Laure; Barrière, Paul; Destrumelle, Sandrine; Vera-Munoz, Oscar; Tainturier, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    Chicken egg yolk is held as an excellent cryoprotective agent for freezing canine semen. Recent advances have enabled the extraction of low density lipoproteins from egg yolk, which are responsible for the cryoprotective abilities of the latter. The objective of this article was to compare 3 semen extenders for freezing canine semen: 2 containing egg yolk (Tris egg yolk and Equex STAMP) and one containing 6% LDL. After freezing and thawing 20 ejaculates from 5 different dogs, the 6% LDL extender produced 50% mobile spermatozoa, compared with 48% with the Equex extender and 27.7% with the extender containing egg yolk alone (EY). In vitro functional tests demonstrated that the integrity of the plasma membrane (hypoosmotic test) was respected in 65-66% of spermatozoa as a function of the extender; DNA integrity was respected in more than 97% of the spermatozoa. The Equex extender provided superior acrosome integrity (FITC/PSA test): 68.4% compared with 55.1% with LDL and 53.3% with egg yolk. However, the 6% LDL extender resulted in fewer spermatozoal anomalies (Spermac test), with 54.6% normal spermatozoa compared to 53.6% for Equex and 53.3% with the egg yolk. All six of the bitches inseminated artificially via the intra-uterine route (Scandinavian technique) using semen frozen in the 6% LDL extender became pregnant. The LDL extender resulted in percentages of mobile spermatozoa and movement characteristics that were as good if not better than those obtained with the reference extenders following thawing. The 6% LDL extender appears to have the same cryoprotective qualities as the reference diluent, Equex STAMP. PMID:20153943

  6. Apolipoprotein B mediates the capacity of low density lipoprotein to suppress neutrophil stimulation by particulates.

    PubMed

    Terkeltaub, R; Martin, J; Curtiss, L K; Ginsberg, M H

    1986-11-25

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) inhibits phagocytosis of certain negatively charged particulates and also inhibits subsequent cellular secretory and oxidative responses to these particulates. In the present work, we have defined the structural features of LDL involved in this activity. Starch-heptane extraction depleted greater than 95% of neutral lipids but had little effect on the capacity of LDL to inhibit monosodium urate crystal- or polystyrene latex bead-induced neutrophil chemiluminescence (CL). Liposomes containing gamma-palmitoyl-beta-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (PC) with unesterified cholesterol (PC:cholesterol = 2:1), PC and sphingomyelin (PC:sphingomyelin = 2.3:1), or PC alone lacked the capacity to inhibit urate-induced CL. However, incorporation of apoB-100 into liposomes via cholate dialysis rendered them nearly as inhibitory for urate-induced neutrophil CL as LDL on a protein weight basis. Moreover, delipidated apoB-100, containing less than 3% residual phospholipid, inhibited neutrophil responses to urate crystals or latex beads (degranulation and superoxide anion release) in a stimulus-specific manner. Modifications of the lysine residues of apoB (e.g. acetylation) reduced both the capacity of LDL to inhibit urate crystal-induced CL and to bind to urate crystals. The effects of apoB lysine residue modification were reversible, proportional to the extent of modification, and were not attributable to alteration of the net charge of apoB. Thus, the apoB-100 of LDL both mediates and shares the capacity of native LDL to inhibit certain neutrophil responses to particulates. PMID:3096995

  7. The biphasic effects of oxidized-low density lipoprotein on the vasculogenic function of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Yen; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Shih, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yi-Wen; Yeh, Jong-Shiua; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Huang, Chun-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Late-outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are stress-resistant and responsible for reparative functions in the cardiovascular system. Oxidized-LDL (oxLDL) plays a critical role in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. However, it is largely unknown what the impacts of oxLDL are on late-outgrowth EPCs. This study aimed to investigate the concentration-related effects of oxLDL on EPC functions and related angiogenesis, in vitro and in vivo. In this study, early and late-outgrowth EPCs were generated from circulating human mononuclear cells. oxLDL may regulate EPC vasculogenic function via the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1). Lower concentrations (5 μg/mL) of oxLDL can potentiate EPC tube formation in vitro and in vivo by activating eNOS mechanisms, which are mediated by p38 MAPK- and SAPK/JNK-related pathways. Higher concentrations of oxLDL (10-50 μg/mL) impaired EPC function via the activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase pathways and consequent inhibition of eNOS activity, which could be reversed by anti-oxidants (diphenylene iodonium and apocynin) and gp91phox siRNA. In conclusion, oxLDL has concentration-dependent biphasic effects on human late-outgrowth EPC tube formation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26017136

  8. Measurement of /sup 125/I-low density lipoprotein uptake in selected tissues of the squirrel monkey by quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, R.G.; Schnitzer, J.J.; Yarmush, M.L.; Colton, C.K.; Smith, K.A.

    1988-09-01

    A recently developed technique of absolute quantitative light microscopic autoradiography of /sup 125/I-labeled proteins in biologic specimens was used to measure /sup 125/I-low density lipoprotein (/sup 125/I-LDL) concentration levels in various tissues of the squirrel monkey after 30 minutes of in vivo LDL circulation. Liver and adrenal cortex exhibited high /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations, presumably because of binding to specific cell surface receptors and/or internalization in vascular beds with high permeability to LDL. High tissue concentrations of LDL were associated with the zona fasciculata and reticularis of the adrenal cortex and the interstitial cells of Leydig in the testis; significantly lower levels of /sup 125/I-LDL were observed in the adrenal medulla, the zona glomerulosa, and germinal centers of the testis. Contrary to previous reports, low /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations were observed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and in lymph nodes. In addition, multiple arterial intramural focal areas of high /sup 125/I-LDL concentrations were identified in arteries supplying the adrenal gland, lymph node, small bowel, and liver.

  9. Overloading human aortic smooth muscle cells with low density lipoprotein-cholesteryl esters reproduces features of atherosclerosis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J L; Anderson, R G; Buja, L M; Basu, S K; Brown, M S

    1977-01-01

    Human aortic smooth muscle cells accumulate only small amounts of cholesteryl esters in tissue culture, even when incubated for prolonged periods with high levels of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL). This failure to overaccumulate LDL-cholesteryl esters is due to an LDL-mediated feedback suppression of the activity of the cell surface LDL receptor, a regulatory action that limits the rate at which the cells take up LDL. This regulatory system can be bypassed by incubating smooth muscle cells with LDL that has been given a strong positive charge by covalent linkage with N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DMPA-LDL). The unregulated uptake of DMPA-LDL produces a massive deposition of cholesteryl esters in the form of inclusions within the cell. These inclusions take up lipid stains and exhibit positive birefringence with formée crosses that are typical of liquid crystals of cholesteryl esters. By electron microscopy, the cholesteryl ester inclusions appear as homogeneous gray cytoplasmic lipid droplets. The current studies demonstrate that the unregulated uptake of LDL-cholesteryl esters by human aortic smooth muscle cells can reproduce in vitro the major biochemical and morphological alterations that occur within smooth muscle cells in vivo during the process of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:193874

  10. The Biphasic Effects of Oxidized-Low Density Lipoprotein on the Vasculogenic Function of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng-Yen; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Shih, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yi-Wen; Yeh, Jong-Shiua; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Nakagami, Hironori; Morishita, Ryuichi; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Huang, Chun-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Late-outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are stress-resistant and responsible for reparative functions in the cardiovascular system. Oxidized-LDL (oxLDL) plays a critical role in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. However, it is largely unknown what the impacts of oxLDL are on late-outgrowth EPCs. This study aimed to investigate the concentration-related effects of oxLDL on EPC functions and related angiogenesis, in vitro and in vivo. In this study, early and late-outgrowth EPCs were generated from circulating human mononuclear cells. oxLDL may regulate EPC vasculogenic function via the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1). Lower concentrations (5 μg/mL) of oxLDL can potentiate EPC tube formation in vitro and in vivo by activating eNOS mechanisms, which are mediated by p38 MAPK- and SAPK/JNK-related pathways. Higher concentrations of oxLDL (10-50 μg/mL) impaired EPC function via the activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase pathways and consequent inhibition of eNOS activity, which could be reversed by anti-oxidants (diphenylene iodonium and apocynin) and gp91phox siRNA. In conclusion, oxLDL has concentration-dependent biphasic effects on human late-outgrowth EPC tube formation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26017136

  11. Berberine as a photosensitizing agent for antitumoral photodynamic therapy: Insights into its association to low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Luiza Andreazza, Nathalia; Vevert-Bizet, Christine; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève; Sureau, Franck; José Salvador, Marcos; Bonneau, Stephanie

    2016-08-20

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in Berberine, a phytochemical with multispectrum therapeutic activities, as anti-tumoral agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this context, low density lipoproteins (LDL) play a key role in the delivery of the photosensitizer in tumor cells. We correlate the physicochemical parameters of the berberine association to LDL with the influence of LDL-delivery on its accumulation in a glioma cell line and on its photo-induced activity in view of antitumor PDT. Our results evidence an important binding of 400 berberine molecules per LDL. Changes in berberine and apoprotein fluorescence suggest different fixation types, involving various LDL compartments including the vicinity of the apoprotein. The berberine association to LDL does not affect their recognition by the specific B/E receptors, of which over-expression increases the cellular uptake of LDL-preloaded berberine. Fluorescence microscopy evidences the mitochondrial labeling of the glioma model cells, with no significant modification upon LDL-delivery. Moreover, the cellular delivery of berberine by LDL increases its photocytotoxic effects on such cells. So, this research illustrates the potential of berberine as a photosensitizing agent for PDT, in particular due to their behavior towards LDL as plasma vehicles, and gives insights into its mechanisms of cell uptake. PMID:27282536

  12. Tartaric Acid-based Amphiphilic Macromolecules with Ether Linkages Exhibit Enhanced Repression of Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Dalia; Zhang, Yingue; Lewis, Daniel R.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Welsh, William J.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease initiates with the atherogenic cascade of scavenger receptor- (SR-) mediated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. Resulting foam cell formation leads to lipid-rich lesions within arteries. We designed amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) to inhibit these processes by competitively blocking oxLDL uptake via SRs, potentially arresting atherosclerotic development. In this study, we investigated the impact of replacing ester linkages with ether linkages in the AM hydrophobic domain. We hypothesized that ether linkages would impart flexibility for orientation to improve binding to SR binding pockets, enhancing anti-atherogenic activity. A series of tartaric acid-based AMs with varying hydrophobic chain lengths and conjugation chemistries were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for bioactivity. 3-D conformations of AMs in aqueous conditions may have significant effects on anti-atherogenic potency and were simulated by molecular modeling. Notably, ether-linked AMs exhibited significantly higher levels of inhibition of oxLDL uptake than their corresponding ester analogues, indicating a dominant effect of linkage flexibility on pharmacological activity. The degradation stability was also enhanced for ether-linked AMs. These studies further suggested that alkyl chain length (i.e., relative hydrophobicity), conformation (i.e., orientation), and chemical stability play a critical role in modulating oxLDL uptake, and guide the design of innovative cardiovascular therapies. PMID:25890704

  13. A phagocytosis assay for oxidized low-density lipoprotein versus immunoglobulin G-coated microbeads in human U937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vance, David T; Dufresne, Jaimie; Florentinus-Mefailoski, Angelique; Tucholska, Monika; Trimble, William; Grinstein, Sergio; Marshall, John G

    2016-05-01

    The human monocyte cell line U937 was differentiated into an adherent macrophage phenotype using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to assay the phagocytosis of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) that may play a role in atherosclerosis. Microbeads were coated with the inflammatory ligand oxLDL to create a novel phagocytosis assay that models the binding of macrophages to oxLDL in the solid phase such as found in the fatty streaks of the arteries. The oxLDL was prepared with LDL from human ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma oxidized with an excess (5 mM) of the strong oxidizing agent CuSO4 and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Western blot. The binding of the oxLDL to the beads was confirmed by DilC18-oxLDL staining and confocal microscopy in addition to trypsin digestion of the microbeads for liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization, and tandem mass spectrometry. Phagocytosis of the oxLDL versus human bulk immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1)-coated microbeads was assayed over time, in the presence and absence of serum factors, by pulse chase and with enzyme inhibitor treatments. The ligand beads were then stained with specific antibodies to oxLDL versus human IgG to differentially stain external versus engulfed ligand microbeads. The phagocytosis of oxLDL and IgG ligand microbeads was abolished by the actin polymerization inhibitors cytochalasin D and latrunculin. Pharmacological inhibitors of the receptor enzymes JAK, SRC, and PLC prevented both IgG and oxLDL receptor function. In contrast, the function of the oxLDL phagocytic receptor complex was more sensitive to inhibition of PTK2, PKC, and SYK activity. PMID:26800863

  14. Uptake of low density lipoproteins by human leukemic cells in vivo: relation to plasma lipoprotein levels and possible relevance for selective chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Vitols, S; Angelin, B; Ericsson, S; Gahrton, G; Juliusson, G; Masquelier, M; Paul, C; Peterson, C; Rudling, M; Söderberg-Reid, K

    1990-01-01

    The success of cancer chemotherapy is dependent on the possibility to utilize biological differences between malignant and normal cells to selectively destroy the tumor cells. One such difference may be that of receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs). Previous studies have shown that leukemic cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia have elevated receptor-mediated uptake and degradation rates of plasma LDL in vitro compared to normal white blood and bone marrow cells, and that plasma cholesterol levels at diagnosis are inversely correlated with the LDL receptor activity of the malignant cells. An important question is whether the uptake of LDL by the leukemic cells is also increased in vivo. To evaluate the in vivo uptake of LDL, 11 adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia received an i.v. injection of [14C]-sucrose-labeled LDL. On degradation of [14C]sucrose-LDL, the radiolabeled sucrose moiety is known to remain trapped in the lysosomal compartment of the cells. After injection, radioactivity accumulated progressively for at least 12 hr in the leukemic cells. The uptake of radioactivity in vivo correlated with the rate of receptor-mediated degradation of 125I-labeled LDL by the leukemic cells assayed in vitro (r = +0.88, P less than 0.001). An inverse correlation between plasma LDL cholesterol concentrations and the in vivo cellular uptake of [14C]sucrose-LDL in whole blood (r = -0.76, P less than 0.01) indicates that the hypocholesterolemia is due to elevated LDL uptake by the leukemic cells. Postmortem biopsies from virtually all tissues were obtained from one patient, and the distribution of radioactivity revealed that the liver and bone marrow had accumulated most radioactivity; the adrenals had the highest uptake of label per gram of tissue weight. The results indicate that LDL may be used as a carrier targeting lipophilic cytotoxic drugs to leukemic cells. PMID:2320578

  15. Relationship between oxidized low-density lipoprotein antibodies and obesity in different glycemic situations

    PubMed Central

    Babakr, Abdullatif Taha; Elsheikh, Osman Mohamed; Almarzouki, Abdullah A; Assiri, Adel Mohamed; Abdalla, Badr Eldin Elsonni; Zaki, Hani Yousif; Fatani, Samir H; NourEldin, EssamEldin Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background Autoantibodies to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are controversially discussed to be either pathogenic or protective. Biochemical and anthropometric measurements correlated with increased levels of these antibodies are also controversial, especially in conditions of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study was conducted to evaluate levels of oxLDL antibodies and their correlation with obesity in different glycemic situations. Methods Two hundred and seventy-four adult males were classified into three subgroups: group 1 (n=125), comprising a control group of nondiabetic subjects; group 2 (n=77), comprising subjects with impaired glucose tolerance; and group 3 (n=72), comprising patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Body mass index was calculated, and measurement of oxLDL and oxLDL antibodies was performed. Results Higher mean concentrations of oxLDL were found in the type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance groups (143.5±21.9 U/L and 108.7±23.7 U/L, respectively). The mean value for the control group was 73.5±27.5 U/L (P<0.001). Higher mean concentrations of anti-oxLDL antibodies were observed in the type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance groups (55.7±17.8 U/L and 40.4±17.6 U/L, respectively). The mean value for the control group was 20.4±10 U/L (P<0.001). Levels of anti-oxLDL antibodies were found to be positively and significantly correlated with body mass index in the control group (r=0.46), impaired glucose tolerance (r=0.51), type 2 diabetes mellitus group (r=0.46), and in the whole study population (r=0.44; P<0.001). Conclusion Anti-oxLDL antibody levels were increased in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance and were positively correlated with obesity and body mass index. PMID:25368528

  16. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) and platelet intracellular calcium: interaction with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, V; Tommasol, R; Gaino, S; Degan, M; Cominacini, L; Davoli, A; Lechi, C; Lechi, A; Minuz, P

    1998-01-01

    The present study tested the effects of ox-low density lipoprotein (LDL) on nitric oxide (NO)-dependent decrease in agonist-stimulated [Ca2+]i. The effects of ox-LDL on platelet aggregation were also evaluated. Platelets loaded with FURA 2 AM (2 micromol/litre) were incubated with NO-donors for 2-10 min to obtain a 40-50% reduction in \\[Ca2+]i and with NO-donors plus ox-LDL (100 microg of protein/ml). Thrombin (0.03 U/ml) was used as an agonist. In some experiments 8-Br-cGMP (0.5-1 mmol/l) was used to investigate the NO-dependent intraplatelet signalling system. Slightly oxidized LDL was obtained by leaving native LDL in the light at room temperature for at least 7 days. Ox-LDL did not cause any increase in thrombin-induced [Ca2+] (control: 215.4 +/- 44.3 nmol/l, ox-LDL 223.4 +/- 35.3 nmol/l, M +/- SEM; n = 8) and platelet aggregation (control: 78.7 +/- 4.9% , ox-LDL: 78.9 +/- 4.2% , n = 12). Ox-LDL antagonized the effects of NO-donors on platelet [Ca2+]i (NO-donor: 137.4 +/- 22.1 nmol/l, NO + ox-LDL: 177.3 +/- 27.6 nmol/l, n = 11; P < 0.001) and platelet aggregation (NO-donor: 15.4 +/- 3.4% , NO + ox-LDL: 28.9 +/- 3.8%, n = 24; P < 0.001). Ox-LDL did not affect the inhibitory activities of 8-Br-cGMP on platelet aggregation (8-Br-cGMP: 22.0 +/- 8.5%, 8-Br-cGMP + ox-LDL: 19.3 +/- 7.8%, n = 5) and platelet [Ca2+]i . In conclusion, slightly oxidized LDL does not directly activate platelets and does not i affect the intracellular NO-dependent signalling system. The present results suggest that LDL reduces the antiplatelet activity of NO mainly by preventing its biological effects. PMID:16793716

  17. Interaction between SCO-spondin and low density lipoproteins from embryonic cerebrospinal fluid modulates their roles in early neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vera, América; Recabal, Antonia; Saldivia, Natalia; Stanic, Karen; Torrejón, Marcela; Montecinos, Hernán; Caprile, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    During early stages of development, encephalic vesicles are composed by a layer of neuroepithelial cells surrounding a central cavity filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (eCSF). This fluid contains several morphogens that regulate proliferation and differentiation of neuroepithelial cells. One of these neurogenic factors is SCO-spondin, a giant protein secreted to the eCSF from early stages of development. Inhibition of this protein in vivo or in vitro drastically decreases the neurodifferentiation process. Other important neurogenic factors of the eCSF are low density lipoproteins (LDL), the depletion of which generates a 60% decrease in mesencephalic explant neurodifferentiation. The presence of several LDL receptor class A (LDLrA) domains (responsible for LDL binding in other proteins) in the SCO-spondin sequence suggests a possible interaction between both molecules. This possibility was analyzed using three different experimental approaches: (1) Bioinformatics analyses of the SCO-spondin region, that contains eight LDLrA domains in tandem, and of comparisons with the LDL receptor consensus sequence; (2) Analysis of the physical interactions of both molecules through immunohistochemical colocalization in embryonic chick brains and through the immunoprecipitation of LDL with anti-SCO-spondin antibodies; and (3) Analysis of functional interactions during the neurodifferentiation process when these molecules were added to a culture medium of mesencephalic explants. The results revealed that LDL and SCO-spondin interact to form a complex that diminishes the neurogenic capacities that both molecules have separately. Our work suggests that the eCSF is an active signaling center with a complex regulation system that allows for correct brain development. PMID:26074785

  18. Z-Scan Analysis: a New Method to Determine the Oxidative State of Low-Density Lipoprotein and Its Association with Multiple Cardiometabolic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Maria Camila Pruper; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Giampaoli, Viviane; da Conceição Quintaneiro Aubin, Elisete; de Araújo Lima Barbosa, Milena Maria; Damasceno, Nágila Raquel Teixeira

    2016-04-01

    The great atherogenic potential of oxidized low-density lipoprotein has been widely described in the literature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the state of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human plasma measured by the Z-scan technique has an association with different cardiometabolic biomarkers. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein B, paraoxonase-1, and glucose were analyzed using standard commercial kits, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was estimated using the Friedewald equation. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect electronegative low-density lipoprotein. Low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein sizes were determined by Lipoprint® system. The Z-scan technique was used to measure the non-linear optical response of low-density lipoprotein solution. Principal component analysis and correlations were used respectively to resize the data from the sample and test association between the θ parameter, measured with the Z-scan technique, and the principal component. A total of 63 individuals, from both sexes, with mean age 52 years (±11), being overweight and having high levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, were enrolled in this study. A positive correlation between the θ parameter and more anti-atherogenic pattern for cardiometabolic biomarkers together with a negative correlation for an atherogenic pattern was found. Regarding the parameters related with an atherogenic low-density lipoprotein profile, the θ parameter was negatively correlated with a more atherogenic pattern. By using Z-scan measurements, we were able to find an association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein state and multiple cardiometabolic biomarkers in samples from individuals with different cardiovascular risk factors.

  19. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins. PMID:24694979

  20. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-04-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins.

  1. ApoE and the role of very low density lipoproteins in adipose tissue inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was too identify the role of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and apoE, a major apolipoprotein in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, in adipose tissue inflammation with high-fat diet induced obesity. Male apoE-/- and C57BL/6J wild-type mice fed high fat diets for 12 weeks were assessed for metab...

  2. Effects of cholestyramine on low density lipoprotein binding sites on liver membranes from rabbits with endogenous hypercholesterolemia induced by a wheat starch-casein diet.

    PubMed

    Chao, Y; Yamin, T T; Alberts, A W

    1982-04-10

    Rabbits fed a wheat starch-casein diet develop a marked hypercholesterolemia with a lipoprotein distribution similar to that of humans. Approximately 76% of the total cholesterol is carried in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) fraction (1.006 less than d less than 1.063 g/ml). Inclusion of 1% cholestyramine in the diet prevents the increase in plasma cholesterol. The cholestyramine effect is mediated through an increased fractional catabolic rate of 125I-LDL. In order to determine the potential role of hepatic LDL receptors in the removal of LDL from the plasma, binding of 125I-LDL and 125I-beta-VLDL (beta-migrating very low density lipoproteins) to hepatic membranes prepared from livers of rabbits fed the wheat starch-casein diet with or without cholestyramine supplementation was investigated. Membranes from livers of the cholestyramine-supplemented animals exhibit high levels of specific EDTA-sensitive binding of either of the 125I-labeled lipoproteins. Very little EDTA-sensitive binding occurs on liver membranes from wheat starch-casein-fed rabbits that have not been treated with cholestyramine. These results indicate that the hypercholesterolemia in rabbits associated with the wheat starch-casein diet is wholly or partially the result of a decreased number of specific hepatic LDL receptors and thus a decreased catabolism of plasma cholesterol. The response of the liver to the inclusion in the diet of the bile acid sequestrant, cholestyramine, is to maintain or increase the number of specific LDL binding sites, thus promoting catabolism of plasma cholesterol. PMID:6277940

  3. Metabolism of very low density lipoproteins--effect of sardine oil.

    PubMed

    Anil, K; Abraham, R; Kumar, G S; Sudhakaran, P R; Kurup, P A

    1992-06-01

    The effect of feeding fish oil on the metabolism of lipoproteins was studied in rats. Rats were fed diet containing 10% sardine or groundnut oil for 6 weeks. There was a significant decrease in the total cholesterol, phospholipids and triglycerides as well as the amount of the lipids associated with VLDL and LDL in serum in fish oil-fed rats. The synthesis and secretion of lipoproteins particularly apoB containing lipoproteins by primary cultures of hepatocytes from these rats were studied by 14(C)-acetate or 3(H)-leucine labelling. Primary cultures of hepatocytes derived from sardine oil-fed rats showed reduced incorporation of 3(H)-leucine into apoB containing lipoproteins secreted into the medium when compared to those fed groundnut oil, indicating a decreased synthesis and secretion of apoB. This was further confirmed by significantly lower incorporation of 14(C)-radioactivity into total and individual lipids of VLDL secreted into the medium, as well as that associated with different lipids in cell layer. The activity of lipoprotein lipase in adipose tissue and aorta was significantly higher in rats fed sardine oil which may cause an increased clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from circulation. These results indicate that the fish oil exerts hypolipidemic effect particularly by decreasing the synthesis and secretion of VLDL by liver and possibly by an increased clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from circulation. PMID:1506035

  4. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) inhibits low density lipoprotein-induced signaling in platelets.

    PubMed

    Relou, Ingrid A M; Gorter, Gertie; Ferreira, Irlando Andrade; van Rijn, Herman J M; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N

    2003-08-29

    At physiological concentrations, low density lipoprotein (LDL) increases the sensitivity of platelets to aggregation- and secretion-inducing agents without acting as an independent activator of platelet functions. LDL sensitizes platelets by inducing a transient activation of p38MAPK, a Ser/Thr kinase that is activated by the simultaneous phosphorylation of Thr180 and Tyr182 and is an upstream regulator of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). A similar transient phosphorylation of p38MAPK is induced by a peptide mimicking amino acids 3359-3369 in apoB100 called the B-site. Here we report that the transient nature of p38MAPK activation is caused by platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), a receptor with an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif. PECAM-1 activation by cross-linking induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and a fall in phosphorylated p38MAPK and cPLA2. Interestingly, LDL and the B-site peptide also induce tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1, and studies with immunoprecipitates indicate the involvement of c-Src. Inhibition of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A (okadaic acid) makes the transient p38MAPK activation by LDL and the B-site peptide persistent. Inhibition of Tyr-phosphatases (vanadate) increases Tyr-phosphorylated PECAM-1 and blocks the activation of p38MAPK. Together, these findings suggest that, following a first phase in which LDL, through its B-site, phosphorylates and thereby activates p38MAPK, a second phase is initiated in which LDL activates PECAM-1 and induces dephosphorylation of p38MAPK via activation of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A. PMID:12775720

  5. Screening, expression, and characterization of an anti-human oxidized low-density lipoprotein single-chain variable fragment.

    PubMed

    Kumano-Kuramochi, Miyuki; Fujimura, Takashi; Komba, Shiro; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Machida, Sachiko

    2016-09-01

    Increased levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) in the blood circulation are correlated with atherosclerosis. Monoclonal antibody-based detection systems have been reported for OxLDL. We identified novel single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) having affinity for human OxLDL and related ligands. We constructed an scFv library from nonimmunized human spleen mRNA. Two types (γ+κ and μ+λ) of scFv phage libraries were enriched by biopanning, and five scFv clones with affinity for OxLDL were identified. The γκ5 scFv, which showed the highest affinity for OxLDL, was cloned into pET-22b(+) and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). γκ5, expressed as an inclusion body in BL21(DE3), was refolded and purified. The specificity and sensitivity of γκ5 were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The γκ5 scFv showed affinity for OxLDL and acetylated LDL. The sensitivity of γκ5 to low concentrations (1-2 μg/mL) of OxLDL was higher than that to AcLDL and LDL. Finally, we developed a sandwich ELISA using γκ5 and CTLD14 (a lectin-like OxLDL receptor-1 ligand recognition region), which allowed specific detection of OxLDL at a level below 0.1 μg/mL. Our results indicated that the γκ5 scFv was a promising molecule for the detection of modified LDL at very low concentrations. PMID:27038672

  6. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein accelerates the destabilization of extracellular-superoxide dismutase mRNA during foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Makino, Junya; Nii, Miyuki; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    Extracellular-superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is one of the main anti-oxidative enzymes that protect cells against the damaging effects of superoxide. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of EC-SOD expression during the oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced foam cell formation of THP-1-derived macrophages. The uptake of oxLDL into THP-1-derived macrophages was increased and EC-SOD expression was decreased in a time-dependent manner by oxLDL. Furthermore, EC-SOD suppression by oxLDL was mediated by the binding to scavenger receptors, especially CD36, from the results with siRNA experience. EC-SOD expression is known to be regulated by histone acetylation and binding of the transcription factor Sp1/3 to the EC-SOD promoter region in human cell lines. However, oxLDL did not affect these processes. On the other hand, the stability of EC-SOD mRNA was decreased by oxLDL. Moreover, oxLDL promoted destabilization of ectopically expressed mRNA from EC-SOD or chimeric Cu,Zn-SOD gene with the sequence corresponding to 3'UTR of EC-SOD mRNA, whereas oxLDL had no effect on ectopic mRNA produced from EC-SOD gene lacking the sequence. These results suggested that oxLDL decreased the expression of EC-SOD, which, in turn, accelerated the destabilization of EC-SOD mRNA, leading to weaker protection against oxidative stress and atherosclerosis. PMID:25906743

  7. Low-density lipoprotein as a potential vehicle for chemotherapeutic agents and radionucleotides in the management of gynecologic neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, D.; Ohashi, M.; MacDonald, P.C.; Buchsbaum, H.J.; Simpson, E.R.

    1981-04-15

    Cholesterol metabolism was studied in cells from two established gynecologic cancer cell lines which were maintained in monolayer cultures. The cell lines were derived and established from poorly differentiated epidermoid cervical carcinoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma. The specific activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol de novo synthesis, in AC-258 cells was three times higher than that found in EC-50 cells. However, epidermoid cervical cancer cells metabolized low-density lipoprotein, the major transport vehicle for cholesterol in plasma, at a very high rate. This rate is fifteen times greater than the rate observed in fetal adrenal tissue and fifty times greater than the rate observed in nonneoplastic gynecologic tissue, each in organ culture. Both cancer cells in monolayer culture were shown to have specific receptors for LDL. These cancer cells demonstrate no defect in LDL metabolism, and lysosomal degradation of LDL was blocked by chloroquine. From the results of studies of specific binding of LDL in tissues obtained from nude mice it was demonstrated that membrane fractions prepared from EC-50 cells, after propagation in the mice, contained fifteen to thirty times more specific binding capacity for (125I)iodo-LDL than vital organs of the mouse, such as the liver, heart, lung, kidney, or brain. The results of these studies are suggestive that certain tumor cells might have a higher affinity for LDL than normal tissues and cytotoxic drugs or radionucleotides ligated to the LDL macromolecule may be utilized for the specific delivery of these agents.

  8. Low-density lipoprotein as a potential vehicle for chemotherapeutic agents and radionucleotides in the management of gynecologic neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, D.; Ohashi, M.; MacDonald, P.C.; Buchsbaum, H.J.; Simpson, E.R.

    1981-04-15

    Cholesterol metabolism was studied in cells from two established gynecologic cancer cell lines which were maintained in monolayer cultures. The cell lines were derived and established from poorly differentiated epidermoid cervical carcinoma (EC-50) and endometrial adenocarcinoma (AC-258). The specific activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol de novo synthesis, in AC-258 cells (1700 pmoles x mg-1 microsomal protein x min-1) was three times higher than that found in EC-50 cells (550 pmoles x mg-1 microsomal protein x min-1). However, epidermoid cervical cancer cells (EC-50) metabolized low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the major transport vehicle for cholesterol in plasma, at a very high rate (14,000 ng x mg-1 cell protein x 6 hours). This rate is fifteen times greater than the rate observed in fetal adrenal tissue and fifty times greater than the rate observed in nonneoplastic gynecologic tissue, each in organ culture. Both cancer cells (EC-50 and AC-258) in monolayer culture were shown to have specific receptors for LDL. These cancer cells demonstrate no defect in LDL metabolism, and lysosomal degradation of LDL was blocked by chloroquine. From the results of studies of specific binding of LDL in tissues obtained from nude mice it was demonstrated that membrane fractions prepared from EC-50 cells, after propagation in the mice, contained fifteen to thirty times more specific binding capacity for (125I)iodo-LDL than vital organs of the mouse, such as the liver, heart, lung, kidney, or brain. The results of these studies are suggestive that certain tumor cells might have a higher affinity for LDL than normal tissues and cytotoxic drugs or radionucleotides ligated to the LDL macromolecule may be utilized for the specific delivery of these agents.

  9. Regulation of Plasma Cholesterol by Lipoprotein Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael S.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1981-05-01

    The lipoprotein transport system holds the key to understanding the mechanisms by which genes, diet, and hormones interact to regulate the plasma cholesterol level in man. Crucial components of this system are lipoprotein receptors in the liver and extrahepatic tissues that mediate the uptake and degradation of cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins. The number of lipoprotein receptors, and hence the efficiency of disposal of plasma cholesterol, can be increased by cholesterol-lowering drugs. Regulation of lipoprotein receptors can be exploited pharmacologically in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in man.

  10. Hepatitis C virus G1b infection decreases the number of small low-density lipoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Chika; Nagano, Tomohisa; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Tomita, Yoichi; Sugita, Tomonori; Aida, Yuta; Itagaki, Munenori; Satoh, Kenichi; Sutoh, Satoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Tsubota, Akihito; Aizawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate how hepatitis C virus (HCV) G1b infection influences the particle number of lipoproteins. METHODS: The numbers of lipoprotein particles in fasting sera from 173 Japanese subjects, 82 with active HCV G1b infection (active HCV group) and 91 with cleared HCV infection (SVR group), were examined. Serum lipoprotein was fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography into twenty fractions. The cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in each fraction were measured using LipoSEARCH. The number of lipoprotein particles in each fraction was calculated using a newly developed algorithm, and the relationship between chronic HCV G1b infection and the lipoprotein particle number was determined by multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The median number of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles was significantly lower in the active HCV group [1182 nmol/L, interquartile range (IQR): 444 nmol/L] than in the SVR group (1363 nmol/L, IQR: 472 nmol/L, P < 0.001), as was that of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles (14168 nmol/L vs 15054 nmol/L, IQR: 4114 nmol/L vs 3385 nmol/L, P = 0.042). The number of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles was similar between the two groups. Among the four LDL sub-fractions, the number of large LDL particles was similar between the two groups. However, the numbers of medium (median: 533.0 nmol/L, IQR: 214.7 nmol/L vs median: 633.5 nmol/L, IQR: 229.6 nmol/L, P < 0.001), small (median: 190.9 nmol/L, IQR: 152.4 nmol/L vs median: 263.2 nmol/L, IQR: 159.9 nmol/L; P < 0.001), and very small LDL particles (median: 103.5 nmol/L, IQR: 66.8 nmol/L vs median: 139.3 nmol/L, IQR: 67.3 nmol/L, P < 0.001) were significantly lower in the active HCV group than in the SVR group, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated an association between HCV G1b infection and the decreased numbers of medium, small, and very small LDL particles. However, active HCV infection did not affect the number of large LDL

  11. Human Plasma Very Low-Density Lipoproteins Are Stabilized by Electrostatic Interactions and Destabilized by Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Madhumita; Gursky, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) are precursors of low-density lipoproteins (LDL, or “bad cholesterol”). Factors affecting structural integrity of VLDL are important for their metabolism. To assess the role of electrostatic interactions in VLDL stability, we determined how solvent ionic conditions affect the heat-induced VLDL remodeling. This remodeling involves VLDL fusion, rupture, and fission of apolipoprotein E-containing high-density lipoprotein-(HDL-) like particles similar to those formed during VLDL-to-LDL maturation. Circular dichroism and turbidity show that increasing sodium salt concentration in millimolar range reduces VLDL stability and its enthalpic component. Consequently, favorable electrostatic interactions stabilize VLDL. Reduction in pH from 7.4 to 6.0 reduces VLDL stability, with further destabilization detected at pH < 6, which probably results from titration of the N-terminal α-amino groups and free fatty acids. This destabilization is expected to facilitate endosomal degradation of VLDL, promote their coalescence into lipid droplets in atherosclerotic plaques, and affect their potential use as drug carriers. PMID:21773050

  12. In silico modeling of the dynamics of low density lipoprotein composition via a single plasma sample.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Martin; Pfaffelhuber, Peter; Hoffmann, Michael M; Puetz, Gerhard; Winkler, Karl

    2016-05-01

    Lipoproteins play a key role in the development of CVD, but the dynamics of lipoprotein metabolism are difficult to address experimentally. This article describes a novel two-step combined in vitro and in silico approach that enables the estimation of key reactions in lipoprotein metabolism using just one blood sample. Lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation from fasting plasma stored at 4°C. Plasma incubated at 37°C is no longer in a steady state, and changes in composition may be determined. From these changes, we estimated rates for reactions like LCAT (56.3 µM/h), β-LCAT (15.62 µM/h), and cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer protein-mediated flux of CE from HDL to IDL/VLDL (21.5 µM/h) based on data from 15 healthy individuals. In a second step, we estimated LDL's HL activity (3.19 pools/day) and, for the very first time, selective CE efflux from LDL (8.39 µM/h) by relying on the previously derived reaction rates. The estimated metabolic rates were then confirmed in an independent group (n = 10). Although measurement uncertainties do not permit us to estimate parameters in individuals, the novel approach we describe here offers the unique possibility to investigate lipoprotein dynamics in various diseases like atherosclerosis or diabetes. PMID:27015744

  13. In vitro studies of PBT Nonwoven Fabrics adsorbent for the removal of low density lipoprotein from hyperlipemia plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Hong; Yang, Chao; Zhong, Rui; Lei, Yu; Sun, Kang; Liu, Jiaxin

    2011-06-01

    Polyanion ligands such as acrylic acid (AA) and heparin were grafted on PBT Nonwoven Fabrics (PBTNF) to study their effect on the adsorption of low density lipoprotein (LDL). These modified PBTNFs were characterized by Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy. The blood compatibilities of the modified PBTNFs were examined using in vitro hemolysis rate (HR), platelet adhesion, total protein (TP) and activated partial thromboplastin time. The results showed that direct immobilized heparin could improve PBTNF-PAA's blood compatibility and decrease the adsorption capability of useful high density lipoprotein, but would possess so low bioactivity that could not further improve the absorption of LDL and TC. Since the PBTNF-PAA55-Heparin adsorbent had quite good adsorption selectivity for these proteins, it can be an excellent candidate for depletion of LDL with good blood compatibility.

  14. [Surface properties and size of very low and low density lipoproteins in human plasma in normal states and in hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Voziian, P A; Kholodova, Iu D; Smirnova, I P; Chobot'ko, G M

    1988-01-01

    Dimensions and density of surface charge of very low (VLDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) from hyman blood plasma under conditions of normal state and hypercholesterolemia were evaluated by means of radiation-free energy transition between fluorescent probes and potentiometric titration. Radia of VLDL constituted 13.9 +/- 0.6 nm and 20.7 +/- 1.2 nm and those of LDL--10.0 +/- 0.5 nm and 12 +/- 0.4 nm, respectively, in normal state and under the pathological conditions, while the density of surface charge of VLDL was equal to 0.5 X X 10(-2)K/m2 and 0.3.10(-2)K/m2; those of LDL--0.2.10(-2)K/m2 and 0.05.10(-2)K/m2, respectively. These alterations appear to facilitate the unspecific interaction between atherogenic lipoproteins and vascular cells in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:3369119

  15. Rapid and simple profiling of lipoproteins by polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis to determine the heterogeneity of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) including small, dense LDL.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Seo, Makoto; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Awata, Takuya; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential of polyacrylamide-gel disc electrophoresis (PAGE) for lipoprotein profiling in clinical practice. Blood samples were collected from 146 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lipid parameters were assayed by PAGE, including small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (n = 41), and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant cholesterol (n = 37). We also used a commercial kit to measure small, dense LDL (n = 41). By PAGE, we obtained the percentage of the area under the curve (AUC %) of each peaks and calculated respective AUC% x total cholesterol (AUC%xTC) values. The calculated values of LDL-AUC%xTC, small LDL-AUC%xTC, and HDL-AUC%xTC values were correlated well with values from homogeneous assay for LDL-cholesterol, small, dense LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol assays (r = 0.94, 0.81, and 0.89, respectively). PAGE combined with measurement of total cholesterol and triglycerides provides a rapid evaluation of anti- or pro-atherogenic lipoproteins and a simple profiling system for both the "quantity" and "quality" of lipoproteins, allowing a better assessment of the risk of coronary artery diseases. This article discusses several methods for simple and rapid lipid profiling and outlines some recent patents relevant to the methods. PMID:19149704

  16. Low-density lipoprotein transport through an arterial wall under hyperthermia and hypertension conditions--An analytical solution.

    PubMed

    Iasiello, Marcello; Vafai, Kambiz; Andreozzi, Assunta; Bianco, Nicola

    2016-01-25

    An analytical solution for Low-Density Lipoprotein transport through an arterial wall under hyperthermia conditions is established in this work. A four-layer model is used to characterize the arterial wall. Transport governing equations are obtained as a combination between Staverman-Kedem-Katchalsky membrane equations and volume-averaged porous media equations. Temperature and solute transport fields are coupled by means of Ludwig-Soret effect. Results are in excellent agreement with numerical and analytical literature data under isothermal conditions, and with numerical literature data for the hyperthermia case. Effects of hypertension combined with hyperthermia, are also analyzed in this work. PMID:26806687

  17. Changes of very low-density lipoprotein concentration in hepatic blood from cows with fasting-induced hepatic lipidosis

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Shin; Mizunuma, Yuko; Iwasaki, Yukari; Tharwat, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) components in hepatic blood (HB) from 5 nonlactating nonpregnant cows fasted from days 0 to 3 and subsequently refed to day 10 and, in addition, to assess those of other lipoproteins. Increased phospholipid concentrations in each lipoprotein after the start of fasting suggested their availability for the surface lipids of lipoproteins. Although the VLDL-triglyceride (TG) concentration in HB from all cows increased on day 1, the value on day 4 became similar to that on day 0. However, the concentration on day 10 was significantly increased. In all cows, the decreased ratio of the VLDL-TG concentration in HB to the non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentration in portal blood (PB) on day 4 appeared to reflect relatively decreased secretion of TG as VLDL by NEFA excessively mobilized to the liver via PB. The markedly increased ratio on day 10 was considered to contribute to the improvement of hepatic lipidosis. PMID:21197233

  18. Mechanisms responsible for hepatic very low density lipoprotein-apoB100 overproduction in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overproduction of hepatic very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)1 particles is a major abnormality of lipoprotein dysregulation in type 2 diabetes (T2D). We sought to examine the mechanisms linking systemic/hepatic inflammation associated with insulin resistance and apolipoprotein (apo) B100-containing...

  19. Endothelial NOS-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)- terminal kinase by oxidized low-density lipoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, Y. M.; Levonen, A. L.; Moellering, D.; Ramachandran, A.; Patel, R. P.; Jo, H.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to activate a number of signal transduction pathways in endothelial cells. Among these are the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), also known as stress-activated protein kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinase) determine cell survival in response to environmental stress. Interestingly, JNK signaling involves redox-sensitive mechanisms and is activated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species derived from both NADPH oxidases, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), peroxides, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The role of endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the activation of JNK in response to oxLDL has not been examined. Herein, we show that on exposure of endothelial cells to oxLDL, both ERK and JNK are activated through independent signal transduction pathways. A key role of eNOS activation through a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent mechanism leading to phosphorylation of eNOS is demonstrated for oxLDL-dependent activation of JNK. Moreover, we show that activation of ERK by oxLDL is critical in protection against the cytotoxicity of oxLDL.

  20. Interaction of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) with rabbit C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Cabana, V G; Gewurz, H; Siegel, J N

    1982-05-01

    Rabbit CRP is similar to human CRP in structure, kinetics of appearance, and binding reactivities to phosphate esters and cationic polymers. CRP in rabbit acute-phase serum migrates either with gamma or with beta, pre-beta electrophoretic mobility, and distinct gamma- and beta-migrating species can be observed simultaneously in some sera. The present study shows that beta-CRP in serum is converted to gamma mobility during isolation and purification. Normal, acute-phase, or CRP-depleted acute-phase rabbit serum restores the beta mobility of purified gamma-CRP, a conversion that does not occur in the presence of EDTA. Serum CRP fails to adsorb to DEAE-cellulose but does adsorb to CM-cellulose, from which it elutes as gamma-mobility antigen. Chelation by EDTA or flotation and removal of lipoproteins from acute phase rabbit serum produces a gamma-mobility CRP that adsorbs to the anion-exchange resin. Lipid-containing fractions from ion-exchange columns as well as VLDL (but not LDL or HDL) isolated by ultracentrifugation change the mobility of purified CRP from gamma to beta, pre-beta. These changes in mobility are not observed in the presence of EDTA or phosphocholine. In acute-phase rabbit serum with CRP of both beta and gamma mobility, the beta form has a higher m.w. and is lipid-associated, whereas the gamma form is a lower m.w., lipid-poor molecule. These results suggest that in serum the association of CRP with lipoproteins, particularly VLDL, is responsible for its beta, pre-beta electrophoretic mobility. Further studies of the association of CRP with lipoprotein in relation to lipoprotein metabolism may provide insight into the biological role of CRP. PMID:6801137

  1. Very old adults with better memory function have higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and lower triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratios: KOCOA project

    PubMed Central

    Katsumata, Yuriko; Todoriki, Hidemi; Higashiuesato, Yasushi; Yasura, Shotoku; Ohya, Yusuke; Willcox, D. Craig; Dodge, Hiroko H.

    2013-01-01

    We examined cross-sectionally which lipid profiles are associated with better cognitive function among those aged 80 and older-free of dementia (Clinical Dementia Rating ≤ 0.5), functionally independent and community-dwelling. Our cohort consisted of 193 participants from the “Keys to Optimal Cognitive Aging (KOCOA) Project”, a prospective cohort study in Okinawa, Japan. Higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and lower triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratios were associated with higher scores in memory performance after controlling for confounders. Further research is required to clarify the associations among LDL-C levels, TG/HDL-C ratios, and healthy cognitive aging. PMID:23207484

  2. Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein with hypochlorite causes transformation of the lipoprotein into a high-uptake form for macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hazell, L J; Stocker, R

    1993-02-15

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) lipid is thought to represent the initial step in a series of oxidative modification reactions that ultimately transform this lipoprotein into an atherogenic high-uptake form that can cause lipid accumulation in cells. We have studied the effects of hypochlorite, a powerful oxidant released by activated monocytes and neutrophils, on isolated LDL. Exposure of LDL to reagent hypochlorite (NaOCl) at 4 degrees C resulted in immediate and preferential oxidation of amino acid residues of apoprotein B-100, the single protein associated with LDL. Neither lipoprotein lipid nor LDL-associated antioxidants, except ubiquinol-10, represented major targets for this oxidant. Even when high concentrations of NaOCl were used, only low levels of lipid hydroperoxides could be detected with the highly sensitive h.p.l.c. post-column chemiluminescence detection method. Lysine residues of apoprotein B-100 quantitatively represented the major target, scavenging some 68% of the NaOCl added, with tryptophan and cysteine together accounting for an additional 10% of the oxidant. Concomitant with the loss of LDL's amino groups, chloramines were formed and the anionic surface charge of the lipoprotein particle increased, indicated by a 3-4-fold increase in electrophoretic mobility above that of native LDL on agarose gels. While both these changes could be initially reversed by physiological reductants such as ascorbic acid and methionine, incubation of the NaOCl-modified LDL at 37 degrees C resulted in increasing resistance of the modified lysine residues against reductive reversal. Exposure of mouse peritoneal macrophages to NaOCl-oxidized LDL resulted in increased intracellular concentrations of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters. These findings suggest that lipid-soluble antioxidants associated with LDL do not efficiently protect the lipoprotein against oxidative damage mediated by hypochlorite, and that extensive lipid oxidation is not a necessary

  3. [Possibility of New Circulating Atherosclerosis-Related Lipid Markers Measurement in Medical and Complete Medical Checkups: Small Dense Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Lipase].

    PubMed

    Sumino, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-03-01

    Small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sdLDL-C) concentrations correlate more strongly with cardiovascular disease (CVD) than other LDL-C and large LDL particle concentrations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays a central role in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism by catalyzing the hydrolysis of triglycerides in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein particles and is a useful biomarker in diagnosing Type I, Type IV, and Type V hyperlipidemia. Therefore, the measurement of circulating sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations contributes to the assessment of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers. However, the measurement of these lipids has not been fully adopted in medical and complete medical checkups. Recently, novel automated homogenous assay for measuring sdLDL-C and latex particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (LTIA) for measuring LPL have been developed, respectively. Using these new assays, sdLDL-C values showed excellent agreement with those obtained by isolation of the d = 1.044 - 1.063 g/mL plasma fraction by sequential ultracentrifugation, and LPL values measured with and without heparin injection were highly correlated with the values measured by the LPL-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These assays may be superior to the previous assays for the measurement of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations due their simplicity and reproducibility. The measurements of sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations may be useful as lipid markers in the assessment of the development and progression of atherosclerosis and the detection of pathological conditions and diseases if these markers are measured in medical and complete medical checkups. We have introduced the possibility of the novel measurement of circulating atherosclerosis-related lipid markers such as sdLDL-C and LPL in medical and complete medical checkups. Further studies are needed to clarify whether sdLDL-C and LPL concentrations are related to the development and progression of

  4. Apolipoprotein E isoform-specific effects on lipoprotein receptor processing

    PubMed Central

    Bachmeier, Corbin; Shackleton, Ben; Ojo, Joseph; Paris, Daniel; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings indicate an isoform-specific role for apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the elimination of beta-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain. ApoE is closely associated with various lipoprotein receptors, which contribute to Aβ brain removal via metabolic clearance or transit across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These receptors are subject to ectodomain shedding at the cell surface, which alters endocytic transport and mitigates Aβ elimination. To further understand the manner in which apoE influences Aβ brain clearance, these studies investigated the effect of apoE on lipoprotein receptor shedding. Consistent with prior reports, we observed an increased shedding of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1) following Aβ exposure in human brain endothelial cells. When Aβ was co-treated with each apoE isoform, there was a reduction in Aβ-induced shedding with apoE2 and apoE3, while lipoprotein receptor shedding in the presence of apoE4 remained elevated. Likewise, intracranial administration of Aβ to apoE targeted replacement mice (expressing the human apoE isoforms) resulted in an isoform-dependent effect on lipoprotein receptor shedding in the brain (apoE4>apoE3>apoE2). Moreover, these results show a strong inverse correlation with our prior work in apoE transgenic mice in which apoE4 animals showed reduced Aβ clearance across the BBB compared to apoE3 animals. Based on these results, apoE4 appears less efficient than other apoE isoforms in regulating lipoprotein receptor shedding, which may explain the differential effects of these isoforms in removing Aβ from the brain. PMID:25015123

  5. Control of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Activity in Cultured Human Fibroblasts by Very Low Density Lipoproteins of Subjects with Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Gianturco, Sandra H.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Jackson, Richard L.; Patsch, Josef R.; Sybers, Harley D.; Taunton, O. David; Yeshurun, Daniel L.; Smith, Louis C.

    1978-01-01

    Very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human normolipemic plasma, and the VLDL, the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL), and LDL from patients with Type III hyperlipoproteinemic plasma were tested for their abilities to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in cultured human fibroblasts from normal subjects and a Type III patient. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in the fibroblasts of a patient with Type III hyperlipoproteinemia appears to be normal. VLDL from normal subjects, isolated by angle head ultracentrifugation (d < 1.006) or by gel filtration on BioGel A-5m, were about 5 times less effective than LDL in suppressing HMG-CoA reductase activity, based on protein content, in agreement with previous reports with normal fibroblasts. Zonal centrifugation of normal VLDL isolated by both methods showed that the VLDL contained IDL. Normal VLDL from the angle head rotor, refractionated by the zonal method, had little, if any, ability to suppress the HMG-CoA reductase activity in either normal or Type III fibroblasts. VLDL, IDL, and LDL fractionated by zonal ultracentrifugation from Type III plasma gave half-maximum inhibition at 0.2-0.5 μg of protein/ml, indistinguishable from the suppression caused by normal LDL. Type III VLDL did not suppress HMG-CoA reductase in mutant LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. Zonally isolated VLDL obtained from one Type IV and one Type V patient gave half-maximal suppression at 5 and 0.5 μg of protein/ml, respectively. Molecular diameters and apoprotein compositions of the zonally isolated normal and Type III VLDL were similar; the major difference in composition was that Type III VLDL contained more cholesteryl esters and less triglyceride than did normal VLDL. The compositions and diameters of the Type IV and Type V VLDL were similar to normal VLDL. These findings show that the basic defect in Type III hyperlipoproteinemia is qualitatively

  6. Lovastatin stimulates human vascular smooth muscle cell expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2, a potent inhibitor of low-density lipoprotein-stimulated cell growth.

    PubMed

    Emmanuele, Luca; Ortmann, Jana; Doerflinger, Tim; Traupe, Tobias; Barton, Matthias

    2003-02-28

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) stimulate ectopic bone formation in skeletal muscle. Here we show that human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) abundantly express mRNA encoding for BMP receptor type II, BMP-2, and BMP-7 proteins. Treatment with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitor lovastatin (34 microM) increased BMP-2 gene transcription >14-fold as measured by real-time PCR analysis (P<0.05 vs. solvent control). Moreover, VSMC proliferation stimulated with native low-density lipoprotein (100 microg of protein/mL) was prevented by either human recombinant BMP-2 or BMP-7 at concentrations of 100 ng/mL (P<0.05). Both BMPs also inhibited basal cell proliferation (P<0.05). Induction of BMPs and subsequent inhibition of VSMC growth and/or induction of vascular bone formation could contribute to the mechanisms by which statins increase plaque stability in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:12593849

  7. Mechanobiology of low-density lipoprotein transport within an arterial wall--impact of hyperthermia and coupling effects.

    PubMed

    Chung, Stephen; Vafai, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hyperthermia, coupling attributes and property variations on Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) transport within a multi-layered wall while accounting for the fluid structure interaction (FSI) is analyzed in this work. To understand the potential impact of the hyperthermia process, thermo-induced attributes are incorporated, accounting for the plasma flow, mass transfer, as well as the elastic wall structure. The coupling effect of osmotic pressure, Soret and Dufour diffusion is discussed and their influence on LDL transport is examined, demonstrating that only the Soret effect needs to be accounted for. The effect of thermal expansion on changing the behavior of flow, mass transport, and elastic structure is illustrated and analyzed while incorporating the variations in the effective LDL diffusivity and consumption rate, as well as other dominating parameters. It is shown that hyperthermia results in an enhancement in LDL transport by increasing the concentration levels within the arterial wall. PMID:24183548

  8. Pathways for oxidation of low density lipoprotein by myeloperoxidase: tyrosyl radical, reactive aldehydes, hypochlorous acid and molecular chlorine.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, J W

    1997-01-01

    Many lines of evidence implicate oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease. The physiologically relevant mechanisms have not been identified, but phagocytic white cells may play an important role because macrophage-rich lesions characterize the disorder. Recent studies have shown that myeloperoxidase, a heme enzyme secreted only by phagocytes, is present in human atherosclerotic tissue. The enzyme is a potent catalyst of LDL oxidation in vitro, it co-localizes with macrophages in lesions, and it generates products that are detectable in atherosclerotic plaque. These findings suggest that myeloperoxidase may promote LDL oxidation in the artery wall. This article reviews the enzyme's ability to generate a range of oxidants, including tyrosyl radical, reactive aldehydes, hypochlorous acid and molecular chlorine. These products have the potential to damage host molecules as well as microbes, suggesting a mechanism that may contribute to atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:9259996

  9. Recyclable heparin and chitosan conjugated magnetic nanocomposites for selective removal of low-density lipoprotein from plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinghua; Hou, Yanhua; Chen, Xiuyong; Ding, Xingwei; Liu, Yun; Shen, Xinkun; Cai, Kaiyong

    2014-04-01

    A new fabrication protocol is described to obtain heparin and chitosan conjugated magnetic nanocomposite as a blood purification material for removal of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from blood plasma. The adsorbent could be easily separated with an external magnet for recyclable use since it had a magnetic core. The LDL level of plasma decreased by 67.3 % after hemoperfusion for 2 h. Moreover, the adsorbent could be recycled simply washing with NaCl solution. After eight cycles, the removal efficiency of the adsorbent was still above 50 %. The recyclable magnetic adsorbent had good blood compatibility due to the conjugation of heparin to the chitosan-coated magnetic nanocomposites. The fabricated magnetic adsorbent could be applied for LDL apheresis without side effects. PMID:24394982

  10. The inhibiting activity of areca inflorescence extracts on human low density lipoprotein oxidation induced by cupric ion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weijun; Zhang, Chunmei; Huang, Yulin; Cheng, Fangfang; Shen, Yan; Wang, Rencai; Tang, Minmin; Zheng, Yajun; Zhao, Songlin

    2012-03-01

    The oxidative modification of human low density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a significant role in atherosclerosis. In this study, the inhibiting activity of areca inflorescence extracts (AIEs) on LDL oxidation was investigated by an in vitro study with Trolox as the standard antioxidant. The kinetics of LDL oxidation, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay, ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay and copper chelation assay were also evaluated to assess the antioxidant activities of AIEs, and the results revealed that AIEs could delay the lag time and inhibit the formation of malondialdehyde in the process of LDL peroxidation induced by Cu(2+). The boiled water extract displayed the highest antioxidant activity compared with the ambient water extract and ethanol extract. The total phenolic contents and phenolic components of AIEs were also measured by high performance liquid chromatography method. Epicatechin, gallic acid and coumalic acid were the primary phenolic acids in AIEs. PMID:21942744

  11. Roles of lipoprotein receptors in the entry of hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Jingya; Imachi, Hitomi; Fukunaga, Kensaku; Yoshimoto, Takuo; Zhang, Huanxiang; Murao, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV), a plus-stranded RNA virus that can cause cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, is one of the major health problems in the world. HCV infection is considered as a multi-step complex process and correlated with abnormal metabolism of lipoprotein. In addition, virus attacks hepatocytes by the initial attaching viral envelop glycoprotein E1/E2 to receptors of lipoproteins on host cells. With the development of HCV model system, mechanisms of HCV cell entry through lipoprotein uptake and its receptor have been extensively studied in detail. Here we summarize recent knowledge about the role of lipoprotein receptors, scavenger receptor class B type I and low-density lipoprotein receptor in the entry of HCV, providing a foundation of novel targeting therapeutic tools against HCV infection. PMID:26527170

  12. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Contributes to Atherogenesis via Co-activation of Macrophages and Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Khismatullin, Damir B.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, due to its role in endothelial dysfunction and foam cell formation. Tissue-resident cells such as macrophages and mast cells release inflammatory mediators upon activation that in turn cause endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. Two of these mediators are tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, produced by macrophages, and histamine, produced by mast cells. Static and microfluidic flow experiments were conducted to determine the number of adherent monocytes on vascular endothelium activated by supernatants of oxLDL-treated macrophages and mast cells or directly by oxLDL. The expression of adhesion molecules on activated endothelial cells and the concentration of TNF-α and histamine in the supernatants were measured by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. A low dose of oxLDL (8 μg/ml), below the threshold for the clinical presentation of coronary artery disease, was sufficient to activate both macrophages and mast cells and synergistically increase monocyte-endothelium adhesion via released TNF-α and histamine. The direct exposure of endothelial cells to a much higher dose of oxLDL (80 μg/ml) had less effect on monocyte adhesion than the indirect activation via oxLDL-treated macrophages and mast cells. The results of this work indicate that the co-activation of macrophages and mast cells by oxLDL is an important mechanism for the endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis. The observed synergistic effect suggests that both macrophages and mast cells play a significant role in early stages of atherosclerosis. Allergic patients with a lipid-rich diet may be at high risk for cardiovascular events due to high concentration of low-density lipoprotein and histamine in arterial vessel walls. PMID:25811595

  13. Low density lipoprotein subclasses and response to a low-fat diet in healthy men

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, R.M.; Dreon, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    Lipid and lipoprotein response to reduced dietary fat intake was investigated in relation to differences in distribution of LDL subclasses among 105 healthy men consuming high-fat (46%) and low-fat (24%) diets in random order for six weeks each. On high-fat, 87 subjects had predominantly large, buoyant LDL as measured by gradient gel electrophoresis and confirmed by analytic ultracentrifugation (pattern A), while the remainder had primarily smaller, denser LDL (pattern B). On low-fat, 36 men changed from pattern A to B. Compared with the 51 men in the stable A group, men in the stable B group (n = 18) had a three-fold greater reduction in LDL cholesterol and significantly greater reductions in plasma apoB and mass of intermediate (LDL II) and small (LDL III) LDL subtractions measured by analytic ultracentrifugation. In both stable A and change groups, reductions in LDL-cholesterol were not accompanied by reduced plasma apoB, consistent with the observation of a shift in LDL particle mass from larger, lipid-enriched (LDL I and II) to smaller, lipid-depleted (LDL III and IV) subfractions, without significant change in particle number. Genetic and environmental factors influencing LDL subclass distributions thus may also contribute substantially to interindividual variation in response to a low-fat diet.

  14. More Than Cholesterol Transporters: Lipoprotein Receptors in CNS Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney E.; Philips, Gary T.; Herz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Members of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family have a diverse set of biological functions that transcend lipid metabolism. Lipoprotein receptors have broad effects in both the developing and adult brain and participate in synapse development, cargo trafficking, and signal transduction. In addition, several family members play key roles in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role lipoprotein receptors play in CNS function and AD pathology, with a special emphasis on amyloid-independent roles in endocytosis and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25144875

  15. Selective uptake of cholesteryl esters of low-density lipoproteins is mediated by the lipoprotein-binding site in HepG2 cells and is followed by the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters.

    PubMed Central

    Brissette, L; Charest, M C; Falstrault, L

    1996-01-01

    The study described in this paper shows that 125I-labelled low-density lipoproteins (LDL) interact with high- and low-affinity binding sites on human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. The former site is the LDL receptor and the latter is the lipoprotein-binding site (LBS). The association of 125I-labelled LDL and [3H]cholesteryl ethers-LDL with HepG2 cells revealed a 4-fold selective uptake of cholesteryl esters (CE) in a 4 h incubation period, which correlated with the depletion of CE mass in LDL. This selective uptake was not observed when the cells were incubated in the presence of a 100-fold excess of high-density lipoprotein 3, conditions where only the LDL receptor is being monitored. Also, no reduction in uptake was observed in the presence of IgG-C7, an anti-(LDL receptor) monoclonal antibody. Both findings indicate that the selective uptake occurs through the LBS and that the LBS contributes more to the entry of CE from LDL into the cell than does the LDL receptor. The fates of CE entering the cell via the LDL receptor and the LBS were also followed. To achieve this, LDL were labelled with [3H]cholesteryl oleate and the hydrolysis of [3H]cholesteryl oleate was monitored. The results indicated that 45% of the CE were hydrolysed after a 4 h incubation period, irrespective of the site of entry. Chloroquine (100 microM) was shown to inhibit hydrolysis, indicating that lysosomal enzymes were responsible for the hydrolysis of LDL-CE, whichever pathway was used. Thus our results reveal, for the first time, that the mass of CE entering the cell via the LBS is substantial and that hydrolysis of CE is by lysosomal enzyme activity. Overall, this suggests that the LBS has significant physiological importance. PMID:8836127

  16. An Immunohistochemical Analysis to Validate the Rationale behind the Enhanced Immunogenicity of D-Ribosylated Low Density Lipo-Protein

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Firoz; Khan, M. Salman; Singh, Sarika; Ahmad, Saheem

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are thought to contribute to the abnormal lipoprotein profiles and increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes and renal failure. D-ribose is one of the naturally occurring pentose monosaccharide present in all living cells and is a key component of numerous biomolecules involved in many important metabolic pathways. Formation of D-ribose derived glycated low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been previously demonstrated but no studies have been performed to assess the immune complex deposition in the kidney of rabbits immunized with glycated LDL. In this study, LDL was glycated with D-ribose, and it was further used as an immunogen for immunizing NZW female rabbits. The results showed that female rabbits immunized with D-ribose modified LDL induced antibodies as detected by direct binding and competitive ELISA. The modified LDL was found to be highly immunogenic eliciting high titer immunogen-specific antibodies, while the native forms were moderately immunogenic. The induced antibodies from modified LDL exhibited wide range of heterogeneity in recognizing various proteins and amino acids conformers. Furthermore, our histopathological results illustrated the deposits of immune complex in glomerular basement membrane in rabbits immunized with D-ribose-LDL. PMID:25393017

  17. Rapamycin Inhibits Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Uptake in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells via mTOR/NF-κB/LOX-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Xie, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein-1 (LOX-1) is the major receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) uptake in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Previously, we found that rapamycin inhibited ox-LDL accumulation in HUVECs, and this effect was related to its role in increasing the activity of autophagy-lysosome pathway. In this study, we determined whether rapamycin could also reduce ox-LDL uptake in HUVECs and investigated the underlying signaling mechanisms. Results Flow cytometry and live cell imaging showed that rapamycin reduced Dil-ox-LDL accumulation in HUVECs. Furthermore, rapamycin reduced the ox-LDL-induced increase in LOX-1 mRNA and protein levels. Western blotting showed that rapamycin inhibited mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), p70s6k and IκBα phosphorylation triggered by ox-LDL. Flow cytometry implied that mTOR, NF-κB knockdown and NF-κB inhibitors significantly reduced Dil-ox-LDL uptake. Moreover, immunofluorescent staining showed that rapamycin reduced the accumulation of p65 in the nucleus after ox-LDL treatment for 30 h. mTOR knockdown decreased LOX-1 protein production and IκBα phosphorylation induced by ox-LDL. NF-κB knockdown and NF-κB inhibitors reduced LOX-1 protein production, but did not inhibit mTOR phosphorylation stimulated by ox-LDL. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that rapamycin reduce mTOR phosphorylation and subsequently inhibit NF-κB activation and suppresses LOX-1, resulting in a reduction in ox-LDL uptake in HUVECs. PMID:26752047

  18. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygosis and low-density lipoproteins in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Petta, S; Bellia, C; Mazzola, A; Cabibi, D; Cammà, C; Caruso, A; Di Marco, V; Craxì, A; Ciaccio, M

    2012-07-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase status, homocysteine and lipoproteins levels have been associated with severity of disease and both rapid and sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We aimed to assess the association of homocysteine and MTHFR status with serum cholesterol levels and their potential links to both histological findings and virological response, in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV). A total of 119 consecutive patients were evaluated by biopsy and metabolic measurements. A total of 103 healthy blood donors were used as controls. Serum homocysteine and MTHFR C677T mutation were also evaluated. All patients underwent antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN alfa-2a plus ribavirin. HCV-RNA was assessed at baseline, week 4, week 12, at the end of therapy and after 6 months of follow-up. Mean serum values of homocysteine were higher in patients than in controls (15.8 ± 5.8 μg/L vs 12.5 ± 5.8 μg/L; P < 0.001), with a similar CC, CT and TT MTHFR distribution (23.6%, 48.7% and 27.7% in G1-CHC vs 34%, 48.5% and 17.5% in controls; P = 0.14). In genotype 1, HCV MTHFR TT homozygosis was independently linked to higher LDL (OR 1.016; CI 1.002-1.031; P = 0.03), but not to homocysteine. No association were found between homocysteine, MTHFR and histological features or both rapid virological response (RVR) and SVR. Low cholesterol (OR 0.988, 95%CI 0.975-0.999, P = 0.04) was independently linked to severe fibrosis, and high LDL was the only independent positive predictors of both RVR and SVR (OR 1.036; 95%CI 1.017-1.055; P < 0.001; and OR 1.016; 95%CI 1.001-1.031; P = 0.04 respectively). In patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C, showing higher homocysteine serum levels than controls, MTHFR C677T homozygosis, via modulating cholesterol levels, could interfere with liver fibrosis and response to antiviral therapy. PMID:22676358

  19. Receptor-mediated uptake of remnant lipoproteins by cholesterol-loaded human monocyte-macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lenten, B.J.; Fogelman, A.M.; Jackson, R.L.; Shapiro, S.; Haberland, M.E.; Edwards, P.A.

    1985-07-25

    Normal human monocyte-macrophages were cholesterol-loaded, and the rates of uptake and degradation of several lipoproteins were measured and compared to rates in control cells. Receptor activities for SVI-rabbit beta-very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL), SVI-human low density lipoprotein, and SVI-human chylomicrons were down-regulated in cholesterol-loaded cells; however, the rate of uptake and degradation of SVI-human chylomicron remnants was unchanged from control cells. Cholesterol-loaded alveolar macrophages from a Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit, which lack low density lipoprotein receptors, showed receptor down-regulation for SVI-beta-VLDL but not for SVI-human chylomicron remnants. In addition to chylomicron remnants, apo-E-phospholipid complexes competed for SVI-chylomicron remnant uptake, but apo-A-I-phospholipid complexes did not. Chylomicron remnants and beta-VLDL were equally effective in competing for SVI-beta-VLDL and SVI-chylomicron remnant uptake in cholesterol-loaded macrophages. The authors conclude: 1) specific lipoprotein receptor activity persists in cholesterol-loaded cells; 2) this receptor activity recognizes lipo-proteins (at least in part) by their apo-E content; and 3) cholesteryl ester accumulation can occur in monocyte-macrophages incubated with chylomicron remnants.

  20. Electronegative low density lipoprotein induces renal apoptosis and fibrosis: STRA6 signaling involved.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Hung; Ke, Liang-Yin; Chan, Hua-Chen; Lee, An-Sheng; Lin, Kun-Der; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Chu-Huang; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2016-08-01

    Dyslipidemia has been proven to capably develop and aggravate chronic kidney disease. We also report that electronegative LDL (L5) is the most atherogenic LDL. On the other hand, retinoic acid (RA) and RA receptor (RAR) agonist are reported to be beneficial in some kidney diseases. "Stimulated by retinoic acid 6" (STRA6), one retinol-binding protein 4 receptor, was recently identified to regulate retinoid homeostasis. Here, we observed that L5 suppressed STRA6 cascades [STRA6, cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1), RARs, retinoid X receptor α, and retinol, RA], but L5 simultaneously induced apoptosis and fibrosis (TGFβ1, Smad2, collagen 1, hydroxyproline, and trichrome) in kidneys of L5-injected mice and L5-treated renal tubular cells. These L5-induced changes of STRA6 cascades, renal apoptosis, and fibrosis were reversed in kidneys of LOX1(-/-) mice. LOX1 RNA silencing and inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38MAPK rescued the suppression of STRA6 cascades and apoptosis and fibrosis in L5-treated renal tubular cells. Furthermore, crbp1 gene transfection reversed downregulation of STRA6 cascades, apoptosis, and fibrosis in L5-treated renal tubular cells. For mimicking STRA6 deficiency, efficient silencing of STRA6 RNA was performed and was found to repress STRA6 cascades and caused apoptosis and fibrosis in L1-treated renal tubular cells. In summary, this study reveals that electronegative L5 can cause kidney apoptosis and fibrosis via the suppression of STRA6 cascades, and implicates that STRA6 signaling may be involved in dyslipidemia-mediated kidney disease. PMID:27256691

  1. Electronegative low density lipoprotein induces renal apoptosis and fibrosis: STRA6 signaling involved[S

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Hung; Ke, Liang-Yin; Chan, Hua-Chen; Lee, An-Sheng; Lin, Kun-Der; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Chu-Huang; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2016-01-01

    Dyslipidemia has been proven to capably develop and aggravate chronic kidney disease. We also report that electronegative LDL (L5) is the most atherogenic LDL. On the other hand, retinoic acid (RA) and RA receptor (RAR) agonist are reported to be beneficial in some kidney diseases. “Stimulated by retinoic acid 6” (STRA6), one retinol-binding protein 4 receptor, was recently identified to regulate retinoid homeostasis. Here, we observed that L5 suppressed STRA6 cascades [STRA6, cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1), RARs, retinoid X receptor α, and retinol, RA], but L5 simultaneously induced apoptosis and fibrosis (TGFβ1, Smad2, collagen 1, hydroxyproline, and trichrome) in kidneys of L5-injected mice and L5-treated renal tubular cells. These L5-induced changes of STRA6 cascades, renal apoptosis, and fibrosis were reversed in kidneys of LOX1−/− mice. LOX1 RNA silencing and inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38MAPK rescued the suppression of STRA6 cascades and apoptosis and fibrosis in L5-treated renal tubular cells. Furthermore, crbp1 gene transfection reversed downregulation of STRA6 cascades, apoptosis, and fibrosis in L5-treated renal tubular cells. For mimicking STRA6 deficiency, efficient silencing of STRA6 RNA was performed and was found to repress STRA6 cascades and caused apoptosis and fibrosis in L1-treated renal tubular cells. In summary, this study reveals that electronegative L5 can cause kidney apoptosis and fibrosis via the suppression of STRA6 cascades, and implicates that STRA6 signaling may be involved in dyslipidemia-mediated kidney disease. PMID:27256691

  2. Modified Low Density Lipoprotein and Lipoprotein-Containing Circulating Immune Complexes as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis and Type 1 Diabetes Macrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Melnichenko, Alexandra A.; Chistiakov, Dimitry A.

    2014-01-01

    In atherosclerosis; blood low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are subjected to multiple enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications that increase their atherogenicity and induce immunogenicity. Modified LDL are capable of inducing vascular inflammation through activation of innate immunity; thus, contributing to the progression of atherogenesis. The immunogenicity of modified LDL results in induction of self-antibodies specific to a certain type of modified LDL. The antibodies react with modified LDL forming circulating immune complexes. Circulating immune complexes exhibit prominent immunomodulatory properties that influence atherosclerotic inflammation. Compared to freely circulating modified LDL; modified LDL associated with the immune complexes have a more robust atherogenic and proinflammatory potential. Various lipid components of the immune complexes may serve not only as diagnostic but also as essential predictive markers of cardiovascular events in atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that LDL-containing immune complexes can also serve as biomarker for macrovascular disease in type 1 diabetes. PMID:25050779

  3. Macrophage Differentiation from Monocytes Is Influenced by the Lipid Oxidation Degree of Low Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jin-Won; Yang, Eun-Jeong; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, In-Hong

    2015-01-01

    LDL plays an important role in atherosclerotic plaque formation and macrophage differentiation. However, there is no report regarding the oxidation degree of LDL and macrophage differentiation. Our study has shown that the differentiation into M1 or M2 macrophages is related to the lipid oxidation level of LDL. Based on the level of lipid peroxidation, LDL is classified into high-oxidized LDL (hi-oxLDL) and low-oxidized LDL (low-oxLDL). The differentiation profiles of macrophages were determined by surface receptor expression and cytokine secretion profiles. Low-oxLDL induced CD86 expression and production of TNF-α and IL-12p40 in THP-1 cells, indicating an M1 macrophage phenotype. Hi-oxLDL induced mannose receptor expression and production of IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, which mostly match the phenotype of M2 macrophages. Further supporting evidence for an M2 polarization by hi-oxLDL was the induction of LOX-1 in THP-1 cells treated with hi-oxLDL but not with low-oxLDL. Similar results were obtained in primary human monocytes. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that the oxidation degree of LDL influences the differentiation of monocytes into M1 or M2 macrophages and determines the inflammatory fate in early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:26294848

  4. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mazière, Cécile; Salle, Valéry; Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  5. Nigerian propolis improves blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c, very low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein levels in rat models of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Oladayo, Mustafa Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: According to our previous studies, propolis of Nigerian origin showed some evidence of hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities in addition to its ability to ameliorate oxidative-stress-induced organ dysfunction. This study was carried out to determine whether an ethanolic extract of Nigerian propolis (EENP) improves glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) concentrations in rats that have alloxan diabetes. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced with alloxan (110 mg/kg). Animals were divided into 5 groups (n = 5); Group 1 was non-diabetic receiving normal saline and Group 2 was diabetic but also received only normal saline. Groups 3, 4, and 5 were diabetic receiving 200 mg/kg propolis, 300 mg/kg propolis, and 150 mg/kg metformin, respectively, for 42 days. Results: Hyperglycemia, elevated serum level of VLDL, elevated plasma level of HbA1c, and decreased levels of HDL were observed in the diabetic untreated animals. Nigerian propolis decreased blood glucose level and serum level of VLDL but elevated HDL level. These changes were significant (P < 0.05). The levels of plasma HbA1c were also reduced in the propolis-treated groups, and the reduction was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Nigerian propolis contains compounds exhibiting hypoglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and HbA1c reducing activities. PMID:27366348

  6. Hepatic targeting and hypocholesterolemic effect of lactosaminated Fab against low density lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bernini, F.; Bocan, T.M.A.; Via, D.P.; Gotto, A.M. Jr.; Smith, L.C.

    1986-03-01

    Lactosaminated Fab (lac-Fab) specific for human LDL induces plasma clearance and uptake of circulating (/sup 125/-I)-iodo-LDL in rat, a process mediated by galactose receptors of the liver. This study demonstrates that lac-Fab is a specific carrier of LDL to the liver parenchymal cells and exhibits hypocholesterolemic activity in vivo. Rats were injected with fluorescent 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine-LDL (diI-LDL) or 6 mg of LDL plus tracer amounts of (/sup 125/I)-iodo-LDL. After 10-20 min, the animals received 3-10 mg of lac-Fab. Histologic examination of the liver sections showed the uptake of diI-LDL in the parenchymal cells, as compared to diI-acetyl-LDL which was localized in sinusoidal cells. More than 85% of human LDL disappeared within 2.5 hr after lac-Fab injection, reducing plasma cholesterol from 133.0 +/- 12.6 mg/dl to 66.4 +/- 8.0 mg/dl, the basal value in the rat. In control rats, only about 20% of radioactivity and cholesterol disappeared at 2.5 hr. HDL levels were unaffected. The authors conclude that lac-Fab is a specific carrier of LDL to hepatocytes and can lower plasma LDL-cholesterol in vivo. Lac-Fab specific for other antigens may act as specific carriers of molecule or macromolecules to hepatocytes.

  7. A short-run new analytical ultracentrifugal micromethod for determining low-density lipoprotein sub-fractions using Schlieren refractometry.

    PubMed

    Bozóky, Z; Fülöp, L; Köhidai, L

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new analytical ultracentrifugal micromethod for the determination of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subclasses directly from ultracentrifugal Schlieren scans. We have used special software for the analysis of this type of single-spin density-gradient ultracentrifugation. The flotation of LDL patterns was obtained by underlayering a physiological salt solution with serum or isolated lipoprotein fractions raised to a density of 1.3 g/mL in the spinning ultracentrifugation capillary band-forming cell. The repeated analysis of Schlieren curves of the same sample from 10 to 100 microL in the 60-100 min full-speed interval time resulted in quite reproducible results. We obtained quantitative results by measuring the Schlieren areas between the sample curves and the reference baseline curve by using computerised numerical and graphic techniques. The decomposition of the integrated curve was carried out using a nonlinear regression program followed by deconvolution algorithm analysis in order to determine the parameters of the composing Gaussian subclasses. The LDL particle concentrations were calculated from the area under the integral of the Gaussian curve using a calibration data constant. The flotation range of the LDL Schlieren curves in the cell was identified with serum from which LDL had been removed by means of precipitation reagents and with centrifugation of isolated LDL aliquots. With this technique, we measured the concentration of LDL and analysed its polydispersity without the need for preceding sequential isolation of the LDL. On the basis of the Schlieren curves, the LDL samples were either physically paucidisperse, having a symmetrical peak within a narrow density range, or were polydisperse, showing an asymmetrical pattern distributed over a broader density region. The described method proved to be useful for a clear and immediate visual presentation of the concentration values of the LDL and for the identification of the

  8. A predictor of atheroma progression in patients achieving very low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Shingo; Tohyama, Shinichi; Fukui, Kazuki; Umezawa, Shigeo; Onishi, Yuko; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Michishita, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    An aggressive reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins produces regression or stabilization of coronary artery plaques. However, after achieving very low levels of LDL-C, atheroma regression is not observed in all patients. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the determinants of atheroma progression despite achieving very low levels of LDL-C. The effects of 8-month statin therapy on coronary atherosclerosis were evaluated using virtual histology intravascular ultrasound in the TRUTH study. Of these, 33 patients who achieved an on-treatment LDL-C level of <70 mg/dl were divided into 2 groups according to increase in plaque volume (progressors, n= 16) or decrease in plaque volume (regressors, n= 17) during an 8-month follow-up period. At the 8-month follow-up, serum LDL-C and apolipoprotein B levels were significantly lower in progressors than in regressors; however, significant increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI and decreases in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and oxidized LDL were observed only in regressors. The changes in the n-3 to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratios significantly differed between the 2 groups. Multivariate regression analysis showed that a decrease in the eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid/arachidonic acid ratio was a significant predictor associated with atheroma progression (β= -0.512, p= 0.004). In conclusions, n-3 to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratios affected coronary artery plaque progression and regression in patients who achieved very low levels of LDL-C during statin therapy. PMID:24224137

  9. Gold nanoparticle-conjugated anti-oxidized low-density lipoprotein antibodies for targeted lipidomics of oxidative stress biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Hinterwirth, Helmut; Stübiger, Gerald; Lindner, Wolfgang; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (OxLDLs), in particular, oxidized phosphatidylcholines (OxPCs), are known to be involved in pathophysiological processes such as cardiovascular diseases and are described as potential biomarkers, for example, for atherosclerosis. In our study, we used the specific affinity of anti-OxLDL antibodies (Abs) conjugated to gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for extraction and enrichment of OxPCs via selective trapping of OxLDLs from plasma combined with the sensitive detection by liquid chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Successful bioconjugation chemistry of Abs via a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer and protein G linkage, respectively, was controlled by measuring the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectra, size, and zeta potentials. Furthermore, the amount of Ab immobilized onto GNP via the PEG linker was determined. With the optimized immobilization chemistry, the ability and potential of the GNP-based extraction procedure was used for the determination of the dissociation constant, K(d), of the OxLDL binding to the GNP-Ab conjugate. Moreover, apparent K(d)'s were determined for individual PCs and their oxidation products using the compound-specific selected reaction monitoring mode, which allows the characterization of the Ab affinity and, thus, assessment of the potential antigenicity of (Ox)PCs bound to OxLDLs. In summary, the application of GNP-based bioanalysis for selective targeting of OxLDLs and the fast and sensitive detection by LC-MS/MS offers new possibilities for targeted lipidomics in lipoproteins as well as for oxidative stress lipid biomarker screening. PMID:23895666

  10. Effect of ETC-1002 on Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Hypercholesterolemic Patients Receiving Statin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Christie M; McKenney, James M; MacDougall, Diane E; Margulies, Janice R; Robinson, Paula L; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Lalwani, Narendra D

    2016-06-15

    ETC-1002 is an oral, once-daily medication that inhibits adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase, an enzyme upstream of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, to reduce cholesterol biosynthesis. ETC-1002 monotherapy has demonstrated significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared with placebo in phase 2 studies. The objective of this study was to compare the lipid-lowering efficacy of ETC-1002 versus placebo when added to ongoing statin therapy in patients with hypercholesterolemia. This phase 2b, multicenter, double-blind trial (NCT02072161) randomized 134 hypercholesterolemic patients (LDL-C, 115 to 220 mg/dl) on stable background statin therapy to 12 weeks of add-on treatment with ETC-1002 120 mg, ETC-1002 180 mg, or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was the percent change in calculated LDL-C from baseline to week 12. For LDL-C, the least-squares mean percent change ± standard error from baseline to week 12 was significantly greater with ETC-1002 120 mg (-17 ± 4%, p = 0.0055) and ETC-1002 180 mg (-24 ± 4%, p <0.0001) than placebo (-4 ± 4%). ETC-1002 also dose dependently reduced apolipoprotein B by 15% to 17%, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 14% to 17%, total cholesterol by 13% to 15%, and LDL particle number by 17% to 21%. All these reductions in ETC-1002-treated cohorts were significantly greater than those with placebo. Rates of adverse events (AEs), muscle-related AEs, and discontinuations for AEs with ETC-1002 were similar to placebo. In conclusion, ETC-1002 120 mg or 180 mg added to stable statin therapy significantly reduced LDL-C compared to placebo and has a similar tolerability profile. PMID:27138185

  11. Hepatic perfusate very low density lipoproteins obtained from fat-fed nonhuman primates stimulate cholesterol esterification in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soltys, P A; Gump, H; Hennessy, L; Mazzone, T; Carey, K D; McGill, H C; Getz, G S; Bates, S R

    1988-02-01

    The livers of both baboons and rhesus monkeys fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet secreted very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) that were enriched in cholesteryl ester and apoe as compared to VLDL secreted by the livers of chow-fed animals. Stimulation of macrophage cholesterol esterification by the experimental VLDL was compared to that produced by the standard beta-VLDL obtained from the plasma of a rhesus monkey fed 25% coconut oil plus 2% cholesterol. This standard beta-VLDL stimulated 7- to 10-fold more esterification than did the bovine albumin control. Hepatic VLDL from fat-fed animals stimulated esterification in J774 macrophages 50 to 150% as well as did the standard beta-VLDL, even though hepatic VLDL did not display beta electrophoretic mobility on agarose gel electrophoresis. Plasma VLDL from lard-fed baboons did not exhibit beta electrophoretic mobility but did stimulate esterification in macrophages. Baboons were divided into high and low responders based on the change in plasma cholesterol levels in response to a high fat, high cholesterol diet. Both plasma and hepatic VLDL from high responders stimulated cholesterol esterification, whereas hepatic VLDL obtained from low responders or chow-fed baboons did not stimulate cholesterol esterification in macrophages. There was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.866) between the number of apoE molecules per VLDL particle in VLDL obtained from chow-fed, lard-fed, or coconut oil-fed primates and the rate of cholesterol esterification in macrophages. Our results show that hepatic perfusate VLDL obtained from fat- and cholesterol-fed primates have compositional and functional properties usually ascribed to circulating beta-VLDL, without displaying beta mobility, and indicate that the liver may be an important source of atherogenic lipoproteins. PMID:3367088

  12. Effect of garlic supplementation on oxidized low density lipoproteins and lipid peroxidation in patients of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Veena; Jain, Sanjay

    2004-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including hypertension. Therefore, certain compounds with antioxidative capacity are believed to be protective against such diseases. Some components of garlic are known to possess antioxidative properties. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effect of short-term garlic supplementation in essential hypertensive patients (EH) on indices of oxidative stress. Twenty patients of EH as diagnosed by JNC VI criteria (Group I) and 20 age and sex-matched normotensive controls were enrolled for the study. Both groups were given garlic pearls (GP) in a dose of 250 mg per day for 2 months. Baseline samples were obtained at start of the study, i.e. 0 day, and thereafter, 2 months (follow-up). Lipids and lipoprotein subfractions, plasma-oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL), plasma and urinary concentration of 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2alpha (8-iso-PGF2alpha) as a biomarker of oxidative stress in vivo, and the total antioxidant status (TOS) of these individuals were determined. We observed a moderate hypercholesterolemia and a significantly raised blood pressure in hypertensive patients as compared to the controls. The indices of oxidative stress, i.e. plasma ox-LDL and plasma and urinary concentration of 8-iso-PGF2alpha were significantly increased in EH group. Further, hypertensive patients had a significantly low TOS as compared to the control group. With in 2 months of GP supplementation, there was a significant decline in both systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) and a significant reduction in ox-LDL and 8-iso-PGF2alpha levels in Group I patients. Further, a moderate increase in the TOS was also observed in this group as compared to their control counterparts. These findings suggest that dietary supplementation of garlic may be beneficial in reducing blood pressure and oxidative stress in hypertensive individuals. PMID:15646031

  13. A predictor of atheroma progression in patients achieving very low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Shingo; Tohyama, Shinichi; Fukui, Kazuki; Umezawa, Shigeo; Onishi, Yuko; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Michishita, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    An aggressive reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins produces regression or stabilization of coronary artery plaques. However, after achieving very low levels of LDL-C, atheroma regression is not observed in all patients. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the determinants of atheroma progression despite achieving very low levels of LDL-C. The effects of 8-month statin therapy on coronary atherosclerosis were evaluated using virtual histology intravascular ultrasound in the TRUTH study. Of these, 33 patients who achieved an on-treatment LDL-C level of <70 mg/dl were divided into 2 groups according to increase in plaque volume (progressors, n= 16) or decrease in plaque volume (regressors, n= 17) during an 8-month follow-up period. At the 8-month follow-up, serum LDL-C and apolipoprotein B levels were significantly lower in progressors than in regressors; however, significant increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI and decreases in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and oxidized LDL were observed only in regressors. The changes in the n-3 to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratios significantly differed between the 2 groups. Multivariate regression analysis showed that a decrease in the eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid/arachidonic acid ratio was a significant predictor associated with atheroma progression (β= -0.512, p= 0.004). In conclusions, n-3 to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratios affected coronary artery plaque progression and regression in patients who achieved very low levels of LDL-C during statin therapy. PMID:24224137

  14. Redox imbalance and immune functions: opposite effects of oxidized low-density lipoproteins and N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Viora, Marina; Quaranta, Maria Giovanna; Straface, Elisabetta; Vari′, Rosaria; Masella, Roberta; Malorni, Walter

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro effects of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL), ‘physiological’ pro-oxidants, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a free radical scavenger and glutathione precursor, and their combination on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell functions. We found that treatment with ox-LDL induced a significant down-regulation of proliferative response to mitogens, antigens and interleukin-2. Lipid extracts from ox-LDL were able to reproduce the same effect as the lipoprotein. On the other hand, NAC exposure induced a significant up-regulation of proliferative responses to all the stimuli used. Moreover, we showed that natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxic activity was significantly down-regulated by ox-LDL while treatment with NAC induced a significant up-regulation of NK-cell activity. Finally, we found that ox-LDL and NAC exerted opposite effects on the cytokine network, interfering both at the protein secretion level and the messenger RNA synthesis level. More importantly, when NAC was used in combination with ox-LDL the proliferative responses, NK-cell-mediated cytotoxic activity and cytokine production were restored to values comparable to controls. These data indicate that ox-LDL and NAC modulate immune functions, exerting opposite effects reflecting their pro-oxidant and antioxidant behaviours. Our results add new insights to the key role played by redox imbalance as a modulator of immune system homeostasis and suggest that an antioxidant drug such as NAC could be useful against pathologies associated with an increase in lipid peroxidation. PMID:11899429

  15. IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS OF STEREOSELECTIVE DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Sobansky, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Columns containing immobilized low density lipoprotein (LDL) were prepared for the analysis of drug interactions with this agent by high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC). R/S-Propranolol was used as a model drug for this study. The LDL columns gave reproducible binding to propranolol over 60 h of continuous use in the presence of pH 7.4, 0.067 M potassium phosphate buffer. Experiments conducted with this type of column through frontal analysis indicated that two types of interactions were occurring between R-propranolol and LDL, while only a single type of interaction was observed between S-propranolol and LDL. The first type of interaction, which was seen for both enantiomers, involved non-saturable binding; this interaction had an overall affinity (nKa) of 1.9 (± 0.1) × 105 M-1 for R-propranolol and 2.7 (± 0.2) × 105 M-1 for S-propranolol at 37 °C. The second type of interaction was observed only for R-propranolol and involved saturable binding that had an association equilibrium constant (Ka) of 5.2 (± 2.3) × 105 M-1 at 37 °C. Similar differences in binding behavior were found for the two enantiomers at 20 °C and 27 °C. This is the first known example of stereoselective binding of drugs by LDL or other lipoproteins. This work also illustrates the ability of HPAC to be used as a tool for characterizing mixed-mode interactions that involve LDL and related binding agents. PMID:22354572

  16. Mapping key regions of the RXFP2 low-density lipoprotein class-A module that are involved in signal activation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Roy C K; Bathgate, Ross A D; Bruell, Shoni; Wade, John D; Gooley, Paul R; Petrie, Emma J

    2014-07-22

    The peptide hormone INSL3 and its receptor, RXFP2, have co-evolved alongside relaxin and its receptor, RXFP1. Both RXFP1 and RXFP2 are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) containing the hallmark seven transmembrane helices in addition to a distinct ectodomain of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a single low-density lipoprotein class-A (LDLa) module at the N-terminus. RXFP1 and RXFP2 are the only mammalian GPCRs known to contain an LDLa, and its removal does not perturb primary ligand binding to the LRRs; however, signaling is abolished. This presents a general mechanism whereby ligand binding induces a conformational change in the receptor to position the LDLa to elicit a signal response. Although the LDLa interaction site has not been identified, the residues important to the action have been mapped within the RXFP1 LDLa module. In this study, we comprehensively study the RXFP2 LDLa module. We determine its structure using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and concurrently investigate the signaling of an RXFP2 with the LDLa removed (RXFP2-short), confirming that the LDLa is essential to signaling. We then replaced the LDLa with the second ligand binding module from the LDL receptor, LB2, creating the RXFP2-LB2 chimera. Unlike that in the equivalent RXFP1-LB2 chimera, signaling is rescued albeit modestly. Guided by the NMR structure, we dissected regions of the RXFP2 LDLa to identify specific residues that are important to signal activation. We determine that although the module is important to the activation of RXFP2, unlike the RXFP1 receptor, specific residues in the N-terminus of the domain are not involved in signal activation. PMID:24983702

  17. New utility of an old marker: serum low-density lipoprotein predicts histopathological response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ji-Chun; Guo, Ju-Feng; Teng, Rong-Yue; Wang, Qin-Chuan; Wang, Ji; Wei, Qun; Li, Zi-Duo; Shen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Lin-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the correlation between metabolic abnormality and gastric cancer has been extensively investigated, the question of whether metabolic parameters might influence the efficacy of chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer is still unanswered. In our present study, we investigated the relationship between serum fasting glucose, lipid levels, and histopathological response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in locally advanced gastric cancers. Patients and methods A total of 128 patients were identified from a prospectively maintained database of patients with locally advanced gastric cancer who received NAC between July 2004 and December 2012. Histopathological response after NAC was analyzed according to Becker’s tumor-regression grade. Univariate analyses and multivariable regression analyses were performed to determine the correlation between tumor size, differentiation, fasting glucose, lipid levels, and tumor histopathological response after NAC. Results Univariate analysis revealed that low-density lipoprotein level and total cholesterol, as well as tumor size and differentiation, correlated significantly with histopathological response. Low-density lipoprotein levels and tumor size were found to be independent predictors for histopathological response, according to multivariable regression analyses. Conclusion In this observational, hypothesis-generating study, serum low-density lipoprotein measurement was found to be useful in predicting chemosensitivity to locally advanced gastric cancer patients undergoing NAC. Incorporation of serum low-density lipoprotein levels into individualized treatment protocols could be considered in clinical practice. PMID:27574445

  18. Genetic variation at the SLCO1B1 gene locus and low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering response to pravastatin in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was to determine whether genetic variation at genes affecting statin metabolism or targets of statin therapy would influence low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering with pravastatin, baseline heart disease, or cardiac endpoints on trial. We examined associations of single nucleot...

  19. Systematic review of green tea epigallocatechin gallate in reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of humans.

    PubMed

    Momose, Yuko; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Nabetani, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a systematic review of the literature for the ability of green tea epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Study subjects were limited to healthy individuals and randomized, controlled trials on human serum lipid levels, especially LDL-C, conducted. A total of 17 trials (n = 1356) met all of the inclusion criteria. According to weighted mean differences for changes from baseline with 95% confidence intervals (CI), 107-856 mg/d of EGCG for 4 to 14 weeks reduced LDL-C by -9.29 mg/dl (95% CI, -12.27 to -6.31). Sub-analysis was performed to compare the EGCG lowering effect on LDL-C between non-obese and obese subjects, EGCG dose, baseline of LDL-C levels, or BMI. We concluded that consumption of green tea EGCG resulted in a significant reduction of LDL-C at any baseline level and any dose between 107 and 856 mg/d, and the effect size was slightly dependent on the baseline lipid level of the subjects. PMID:27324590

  20. Oxidised low density lipoprotein causes human macrophage cell death through oxidant generation and inhibition of key catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Katouah, Hanadi; Chen, Alpha; Othman, Izani; Gieseg, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Oxidised low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is thought to be a significant contributor to the death of macrophage cells observed in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Using human-derived U937 cells we have examined the effect of cytotoxic oxLDL on oxidative stress and cellular catabolism. Within 3h of the addition of oxLDL, there was a rapid, concentration dependent rise in cellular reactive oxygen species followed by the loss of cellular GSH, and the enzyme activity of both glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and aconitase. The loss of these catabolic enzymes was accompanied by the loss of cellular ATP and lower lactate generation. Addition of the macrophage antioxidant 7,8-dihydroneopterin inhibited the ROS generation, glutathione loss and catabolic inactivation. NOX was shown to be activated by oxLDL addition while apocynin inhibited the loss of GSH and cell viability. The data suggests that oxLDL triggers an excess of ROS production through NOX activation, and catabolic failure through thiol oxidation resulting in cell death. PMID:26255116

  1. Single Low-Density Lipoprotein Apheresis Does Not Improve Vascular Endothelial Function in Chronically Treated Hypercholesterolemic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kevin D.; Mah, Eunice; Guo, Yi; Bruno, Richard S.; Taylor, Beth A.; Beam, Jo Ellen; Polk, Donna M.; Thompson, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate vascular endothelial function (VEF) responses to a single low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis session in hypercholesterolemic patients undergoing chronic treatment. Methods. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), plasma lipids, vitamin E (α- and γ-tocopherol), markers of oxidative/nitrative stress (malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitro-γ-tocopherol (NGT)), and regulators of NO metabolism (arginine (ARG) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)) prior to (Pre) and immediately following (Post) LDL apheresis and at 1, 3, 7, and 14 d Post in 5 hypercholesterolemic patients (52 ± 11 y). Results. Relative to Pre, total cholesterol (7.8 ± 1.5 mmol/L) and LDL-cholesterol (6.2 ± 1.2 mmol/L) were 61% and 70% lower (P < 0.01), respectively, at Post and returned to Pre levels at 14 d. Brachial FMD responses (6.9 ± 3.6%) and plasma MDA, ARG, and ADMA concentrations were unaffected by LDL apheresis. Plasma α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, and NGT concentrations were 52–69% lower at Post (P < 0.01), and α-tocopherol remained 36% lower at 1 d whereas NGT remained 41% lower at d 3. Conclusions. Acute cholesterol reduction by LDL apheresis does not alter VEF, oxidative stress, or NO homeostasis in patients treated chronically for hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26998360

  2. A Numerical Computation Model for Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Aggregation and Deposition in the Human Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Cai, Shaobiao; Ratner, Albert

    2009-11-01

    Cholesterol caused cardiovascular events are commonly seen in human lives. These events are primarily believed to be caused by the built up of particles like low-density lipoprotein (LDL). When a large number of LDL circulates in the blood, it can gradually build up in the inner walls of the arteries. A thick, hard deposit plaque can be formed together with other substances. This type of plaque may clog those arteries and cause vascular problems. Clinical evidences suggest that LDL is related to cardiovascular events and the progression of coronary heart disease is due to its aggregation and deposition. This study presents an investigation of LDL aggregation and deposition based on particulate flow. A soft-sphere based particulate computational flow model is developed to represent LDL suspending in plasma. The transport, collision and adhesion phenomena of LDL particles are simulated to examine the physics involved in aggregation and deposition. A multiple-time step discrete-element approach is presented for efficiently simulating large number of LDL particles and their interactions. The roles the quality and quantity the LDL playing in the process of aggregation and deposition are determined. The study provides a new perspective for improving the understanding of the fundamentals as related to these particle-caused cardiovascular events.

  3. Characterization of in Vitro Modified Human Very Low-Density Lipoprotein Particles and Phospholipids by Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Ning; Shu, Ting-Yu; Xie, Huai-Guang; Lai, Wei-Ting; Liao, Yi-Han; Su, Mei-Yu; Lin, You-Sian; Chen, Yen-Yi; Lin, Yi-Jyun; Chong, Chin-Pong; Liu, Mine-Yine

    2012-01-01

    A simple capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was used to characterize human very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles for four healthy donors. One major peak was observed for native, in vitro oxidized and glycated VLDL particles. The effective mobilities and peak areas of the capillary electrophoresis (CE) profiles showed good reproducibility and precision. The mobility of the oxidized VLDL peak was higher than that of the native VLDL. The mobility of the glycated VLDL peak was similar to that of the native VLDL. Phospholipids isolated from VLDL particles were analyzed by our recently developed micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with a high-salt stacking method. At absorbance 200 nm, the native VLDL phospholipids showed a major peak and a minor peak for each donor. For oxidized VLDL phospholipids, the area of the major peak reduced for three donors, possibly due to phospholipid decomposition. For glycated VLDL phospholipids, the peak mobilities were more positive than native VLDL phospholipids for two donors, possibly due to phospholipid-linked advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Very interestingly, at absorbance 234 nm, the major peak of oxidized VLDL phospholipids was resolved as two peaks for each donor, possibly due to conjugated dienes formed upon oxidation. PMID:23208377

  4. Realization of a label-free electrochemical immunosensor for detection of low density lipoprotein using NiO thin film.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-06-15

    A label-free electrochemical immunosensor, based on nickel oxide (NiO) thin film, for the detection of low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been proposed. P-type semiconducting NiO thin film was deposited by RF sputtering technique and its properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NiO thin film was utilized as an efficient matrix for the covalent immobilization of apolipoprotein B-100 antibody using EDC/NHS chemistry. The immunoelectrode, thus prepared, was studied using differential pulse voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The impedimetric response of the immunosensor exhibited a high sensitivity of 12 kΩ μM(-1) over a wide linear range (0.018-0.5 μM) of LDL. The long shelf life (18 weeks) and enhanced performance characteristics of the immunosensor demonstrate the excellent ability of the NiO matrix for quantification of LDL at commercial level. PMID:26852197

  5. Surface glycosylation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) membrane for selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lan, Ping

    2014-01-01

    A novel method of constructing a glycosylated surface on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB-co-4HB)] membrane surface for the selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was developed, which involved the photoinduced graft polymerization of acrylic acid followed by the chemical binding of carboxyl groups with glucosamine in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethyl-aminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxy-succinimide. The chemical structures of the fabricated membranes were characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Zeta potential and water contact angle measurements were performed to investigate the surface charge and wettability of the membranes, respectively. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the LDL adsorption on the plain and modified membrane surfaces. It was found that the surface glycosylation of P(3HB-co-4HB) membrane greatly enhanced the affinity interactions with LDL and the absorbed LDL could be easily desorbed with eluents, indicating a specific and reversible binding of LDL to the surface. Furthermore, the hemocompatibility of glycosylated membrane was improved as examined by platelet adhesion. The results suggest that the glycosylated P(3HB-co-4HB) membrane is promising for application in LDL apheresis therapy. PMID:25351372

  6. Oxidation of Plasmalogen, Low-Density Lipoprotein, and RAW 264.7 Cells by Photoactivatable Atomic Oxygen Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Bourdillon, Max T.; Ford, Benjamin A.; Knulty, Ashley T.; Gray, Colleen N.; Zhang, Miao; Ford, David A.; McCulla, Ryan D.

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of lipids by endogenous or environmental reactive oxygen species (ROS) generates a myriad of different lipid oxidation products that have important roles in disease pathology. The lipid oxidation products obtained in these reactions is dependent upon the identity of the reacting ROS. The photoinduced deoxygenation of various aromatic heterocyclic oxides has been suggested to generate ground state atomic oxygen (O(3P)) as an oxidant; however, very little is known about reactions between lipids and O(3P). To identify lipid oxidation products arising from the reaction of lipids with O(3P), photoactivatable precursors of O(3P) were irradiated in the presence of lysoplasmenylcholine, low-density lipoprotein, and RAW 264.7 cells under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Four different aldehyde products consistent with the oxidation of plasmalogens were observed. The four aldehydes were: tetradecanal, pentadecanal, 2-hexadecenal, and hexadecanal. Depending upon the conditions, either pentadecanal or 2-hexadecenal was the major product. Increased amounts of the aldehyde products were observed in aerobic conditions. PMID:27096146

  7. Protective effect of rosuvastatin treatment by regulating oxidized low-density lipoprotein expression in a rat model of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuiping; Zhou, Xueling; Hou, Bingzong; Tang, Bo; Li, Jian; Zhang, Baimeng

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of rosuvastatin treatment on the mechanism of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) in rats with liver fibrosis. In total, 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: 24 in the control group (A), 24 in the obstructive jaundice models group (B) and 24 in the rosuvastatin group (C). Each group was further divided into four subgroups for assessment at different time-points. The obstructive jaundice models were established and rosuvastatin was administered by gavage. Liver fibrosis indicators, Ox-LDL, malonaldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), were measured and liver pathological changes were observed at weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 after model induction. In groups B and C, the rat models were successfully established, and there were significant changes in the expression of Ox-LDL and the three liver fibrosis indicators when compared to group A (P<0.01). However, the expression of Ox-LDL and the three liver fibrosis indicators in group C were decreased compared with group B (P<0.05), while SOD increased (P<0.05) and MDA decreased (P<0.05). The three liver fibrosis indicators were different in comparison to group B (P<0.05). Thus, there appeared to be an association between the expression of Ox-LDL and liver fibrosis. Treatment with rosuvastatin could regulate the expression of Ox-LDL and improve liver fibrosis in rat models with obstructive jaundice. PMID:27588174

  8. Capsaicin protects endothelial cells and macrophage against oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced injury by direct antioxidant action.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Lin, Chin-Yin; Lee, Yi-Hsun; Chu, Shu-Chen

    2015-02-25

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory vascular disease. It is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, leukocyte activation, and the production of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Capsaicin, a biologically active compound of the red pepper and chili pepper, has several anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and hypolipidemic biological effects. However, its protective effects on foam cell formation and endothelial injury induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin, and determined the mechanism by which capsaicin rescues human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from oxLDL-mediated dysfunction. The anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin was defined by Apo B fragmentation and conjugated diene production of the copper-mediated oxidation of LDL. Capsaicin repressed ROS generation, as well as subsequent mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, cytochrome c expression, chromosome condensation, and caspase-3 activation induced by oxLDL in HUVECs. Capsaicin also protected foam cell formation in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Our results suggest that capsaicin may prevent oxLDL-induced cellular dysfunction and protect RAW 264.7 cells from LDL oxidation. PMID:25603234

  9. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Is Present in Astrocytes Surrounding Cerebral Infarcts and Stimulates Astrocyte Interleukin-6 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shie, Feng-Shiun; Neely, M. Diana; Maezawa, Izumi; Wu, Hope; Olson, Sandy J.; Jürgens, Günther; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Ischemic injury to brain is associated with both disruption of the blood-brain barrier and increased oxidative stress. Given the neurotoxicity associated with exposure to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that oxLDL may be present in parenchymal cells of cerebrum after infarction and that oxLDL may influence the pathophysiology of cerebral infarction. Our results showed that the subacute phase of cerebral infarction in patients was characterized by the appearance of oxLDL epitopes in astrocytes, but not neurons or microglia, in the perinecrotic zone. We further demonstrated that minimally oxLDL was most effectively internalized by primary cultures of rat astrocytes, and that exposure to minimal oxLDL stimulated astrocyte interleukin-6 secretion but did not alter nitric oxide production. These results demonstrate for the first time that oxLDL is present in brain parenchyma of patients with ischemic infarction and suggest a potential mechanism by which oxLDL may activate innate immunity and thereby indirectly influence neuronal survival. PMID:15039206

  10. Low density lipoprotein detection based on antibody immobilized self-assembled monolayer: investigations of kinetic and thermodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Zimple; Bandodkar, Amay Jairaj; Sumana, G; Solanki, Pratima R; Ekanayake, E M I Mala; Kaneto, Keiichi; Gupta, Vinay; Malhotra, B D

    2009-10-29

    Human plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was fabricated by immobilizing antiapolipoprotein B (AAB) onto self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (ATP). The AAB/ATP/Au immunosensor can detect LDL up to 0.252 microM (84 mg/dL) and 0.360 microM (120 mg/dL) with QCM and SPR, respectively. The SPR and QCM measurements were further utilized to study the reaction kinetics of the AAB-LDL interaction. The adsorption process involved was explored using Langmuir adsorption isotherm and Freundlich adsorption models. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in Gibb's free energy (DeltaG(ads)), change in enthalpy (DeltaH(ads)), and change in entropy (DeltaS(ads)) determined at 283, 298, and 308 K revealed that the AAB-LDL interaction is endothermic in nature and is governed by entropy. Kinetic, thermodynamic, and sticking probability studies disclosed that desorption of the water molecules from the active sites of AAB and LDL plays a key role in the interaction process and increase in temperature favors binding of LDL with the AAB/ATP/Au immunosensor. Thus, the studies were utilized to unravel the most important subprocess involved in the adsorption of LDL onto AAB-modified ATP/Au surface that may help in the fabrication of LDL immunosensors with better efficiency. PMID:19810739

  11. A review of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, treatment strategies, and its impact on cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Rishi K; Steen, Dylan L; Khan, Irfan; Giugliano, Robert P; Foody, JoAnne M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for approximately 31.4% of deaths globally in 2012. It is estimated that, from 1980 to 2000, reduction in total cholesterol accounted for a 33% decrease in coronary heart disease (CHD) deaths in the United States. In other developed countries, similar decreases in CHD deaths (ranging from 19%-46%) have been attributed to reduction in total cholesterol. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has now largely replaced total cholesterol as a risk marker and the primary treatment target for hyperlipidemia. Reduction in LDL-C levels by statin-based therapies has been demonstrated to result in a reduction in the risk of nonfatal CV events and mortality in a continuous and graded manner over a wide range of baseline risk and LDL-C levels. This article provides a review of (1) the relationship between LDL-C and CV risk from a biologic, epidemiologic, and genetic standpoint; (2) evidence-based strategies for LDL-C lowering; (3) lipid-management guidelines; (4) new strategies to further reduce CV risk through LDL-C lowering; and (5) population-level and health-system initiatives aimed at identifying, treating, and lowering lifetime LDL-C exposure. PMID:27206934

  12. Duration of Type 2 Diabetes and Very Low Density Lipoprotein Levels Are Associated with Cognitive Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yogi-Morren, Divya; Galioto, Rachel; Strandjord, Sarah Elizabeth; Kennedy, L.; Manroa, Pooja; Kirwan, John P.; Kashyap, Sangeeta; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is now recognized as an independent risk factor for accelerated cognitive decline and neurological conditions like Alzheimer's disease. Less is known about the neurocognitive function of T2D patients with comorbid metabolic syndrome, despite their elevated risk for impairment. Computerized testing in 47 adults with T2D that met criteria for NCEP metabolic syndrome revealed that cognitive impairment was prevalent, including 13% in tests of memory, 50% in attention, and 35% in executive function. Partial correlations showed that longer duration of diabetes was associated with poorer performance on tests of basic attention (r = −0.43), working memory (r = 0.43), and executive function (r = 0.42). Strong associations between very low density lipoprotein and poor cognitive function also emerged, including tests of set shifting (r = 0.47) and cognitive inhibition (r = −0.51). Findings suggest that patients with T2D that meet criteria for metabolic syndrome are at high risk for cognitive impairment. Prospective studies should look to replicate these findings and examine the possible neuroprotective effects of lipid-lowering medication in this population. PMID:25057411

  13. Protection by polyphenols of postprandial human plasma and low-density lipoprotein modification: the stomach as a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kanner, Joseph; Gorelik, Shlomit; Roman, Sirota; Kohen, Ron

    2012-09-12

    Recent studies dramatically showed that the removal of circulating modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) results in complete prevention of atherosclerosis. The gastrointestinal tract is constantly exposed to food, some of it containing oxidized compounds. Lipid oxidation in the stomach was demonstrated by ingesting heated red meat in rats. Red wine polyphenols added to the rats' meat diet prevented lipid peroxidation in the stomach and absorption of malondialdehyde (MDA) in rat plasma. In humans, postprandial plasma MDA levels rose by 3-fold after a meal of red meat cutlets. MDA derived from meat consumption caused postprandial plasma LDL modification in human. The levels of plasma MDA showed a 75% reduction by consumption of red wine polyphenols during the meat meal. Locating the main biological site of action of polyphenols in the stomach led to a revision in the understanding of how antioxidants work in vivo and may help to elucidate the mechanism involved in the protective effects of polyphenols in human health. PMID:22530973

  14. The effect of oxidized low-density lipoprotein combined with adriamycin on the proliferation of Eca-109 cell line

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify the affect on the proliferation Eca-109 cells treated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) combined with adriamycin (ADM). Methods Eca-109 cell were cultured in the presence of oxLDL/ADM, and cell proliferation tested by MTT and cell apoptosis was monitored by the proportion of apoptosis and cell cycle by flow cytomester. We simultaneously evaluated the level of associated- apoptosis Bcl-2, Bax, and Caspase-3 gene mRNA and protein. Results OxLDL were cytotoxic and activate apoptosis. OxLDL combined with ADM significant enhanced the proportion rate of apoptosis on a time and dose dependency. The expressions of the inhibiting apoptosis Bcl-2 gene mRNA and protein were down regulated, whereas, the expressions of the promoting apoptosis Bax, and Caspase-3 genes mRNA and protein were up regulation. Conclusion These results suggested that oxLDL have cytotoxicity and activate apoptosis on the Eca-109 cells. OxLDL combined with ADM have a synergistic effect on the apoptosis induced Eca-109 cells. Furthermore, oxLDL may contribute to the improvement of clinical chemotherapy of cancer need to make further investigation. PMID:21711568

  15. Effect of serum, cholesterol and low density lipoprotein on the functionality and structure of lung surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Nahak, Prasant; Nag, Kaushik; Hillier, Ashley; Devraj, Ravi; Thompson, David W; Manna, Kausik; Makino, Kimiko; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu; Panda, Amiya Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipid and protein, responsible for alveolar stability, becomes dysfunctional due to alteration of its structure and function by leaked serum materials in disease. Serum proteins, cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were studied with bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) using Langmuir films, and bilayer dispersions using Raman spectroscopy. While small amount of cholesterol (10 wt%) and LDL did not significantly affect the adsorption and surface tension lowering properties of BLES. However serum lipids, whole serum as well as higher amounts of cholesterol, and LDL dramatically altered the surface properties of BLES films, as well as gel-fluid structures formed in such films observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman-spectroscopic studies revealed that serum proteins, LDL and excess cholesterol had fluidizing effects on BLES bilayers dispersion, monitored from the changes in hydrocarbon vibrational modes during gel-fluid thermal phase transitions. This study clearly suggests that patho-physiological amounts of serum lipids (and not proteins) significantly alter the molecular arrangement of surfactant in films and bilayers, and can be used to model lung disease. PMID:25409691

  16. Effects of retinoids on differentiation, lipid metabolism, epidermal growth factor, and low-density lipoprotein binding in squamous carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ponec, M.; Weerheim, A. ); Havekes, L. ); Boonstra, J. )

    1987-08-01

    The relationship among keratinocyte differentiation capacity, lipid synthesis, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) metabolism, plasma membrane composition, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding has been studied in SCC-12F2 cells. The differentiation capacity of the cells, i.e., ionophore-induced cornified envelope formation, was inhibited by various retinoids and stimulated by hydrocortisone. Retinoids that caused a significant reduction of cornified envelope formation, i.e., retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid, caused only minor changes in lipid synthesis and plasma membrane composition. Arotinoid ethylsulfone, having a minor effect on cornified envelope formation, caused a drastic inhibition of cholesterol synthesis resulting in changes in the plasma membrane composition. Hydrocortisone stimulated cornified envelope formation but had only minor effects on lipid synthesis and plasma membrane composition. Of all retinoids tested, only arotinoid ethylsulfone caused a drastic increase in EGF binding, while hydrocortisone had no effect. These results clearly demonstrate that the plasma membrane composition is not related to keratinocyte differentiation capacity, but most likely does determine EGF binding. Furthermore, EGF binding does not determine keratinocyte differentiation capacity.

  17. Hydroxytyrosol in functional hydroxytyrosol-enriched biscuits is highly bioavailable and decreases oxidised low density lipoprotein levels in humans.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Raquel; Martínez-López, Sara; Baeza Arévalo, Gema; Amigo-Benavent, Miryam; Sarriá, Beatriz; Bravo-Clemente, Laura

    2016-08-15

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) and its derivatives in olive oil protect low-density lipoproteins (LDL) against oxidation. Biscuits could be a convenient alternative to broaden consumers' choice of HT-rich foods, although the biscuit matrix could affect HT bioavailability. We performed a crossover, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate HT bioavailability in HT-enriched biscuits (HT-B) versus non-enriched biscuits (C-B), and the effects on oxidative postprandial status. On two separate days, 13 subjects consumed 30 g of C-B or HT-B (5.25mg HT) after overnight-fasting. Blood and urine were collected at different intervals and analysed by LC-MS-QToF. After HT-B consumption, plasma metabolites peaked between 0.5 and 1h and were extensively excreted in urine. HT-sulphate and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)-sulphate were the main metabolites, followed by DOPAC and homovanillic acid (HVA). HT-glucuronide, DOPAC-glucuronide, HVA-glucuronide and HVA-sulphate were also detected. Postprandial oxidised-LDL concentrations decreased with HT-B. HT is a promising functional ingredient and, in biscuits, it is highly bioavailable and lowers postprandial oxidised-LDL levels. PMID:27006237

  18. Association of Plasma Adiponectin and Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein with Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Georgoulidou, Anastasia; Roumeliotis, Athanasios; Roumeliotis, Stefanos; Giannakopoulou, Efstathia; Papanas, Nikolaos; Passadakis, Ploumis; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G.; Vargemezis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We sought to determine the association between levels of adiponectin and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in patients with diabetic nephropathy as well as their effect on carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Methods. Adiponectin and ox-LDL were determined in 25 diabetic patients without nephropathy and 94 patients at different stages of diabetic nephropathy including subjects on hemodialysis. cIMT was measured using real-time B-mode ultrasonography. Results. Plasma adiponectin levels increased significantly with severity of diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.002), on the contrary to ox-LDL which decreased with disease severity (P < 0.001). cIMT was significantly higher at late stages of diabetic nephropathy compared with early stages (P = 0.022). Adiponectin was a significant negative predictor of ox-LDL levels (β = −5.45, P = 0.023), independently of confounding factors. There was no significant correlation between cIMT and adiponectin or ox-LDL either in the total sample population or according to disease staging. Cluster analysis showed that patients with the highest cIMT values, highest levels of adiponectin, and lowest levels of ox-LDL were included in one cluster and all assigned to stage 5 of diabetic nephropathy. Conclusions. There was no significant association between adiponectin or ox-LDL and cIMT and, therefore, other factors affecting this surrogate marker of cardiovascular disease in diabetic nephropathy should be sought. PMID:26064982

  19. Low density lipoproteins extracted from hen egg yolk by an easy method: cryoprotective effect on frozen-thawed bull semen.

    PubMed

    Moussa, M; Marinet, V; Trimeche, A; Tainturier, D; Anton, M

    2002-04-01

    Hen egg yolk is widely used as a cryoprotective agent in semen freezing extenders in order to protect the spermatozoa against cold shock. The protective action of yolk is largely presumed to be due to low density lipoproteins (LDL). In recent years, arguments concerning the presence of cryoprotective antagonists in egg yolk, have reinforced interest in the use of only the LDL extracted from egg yolk in the extenders. However, current methods of LDL purification do not support the use of LDL in commercial extenders because they offer a poor recovery rate. Consequently, we have developed an easy method to extract LDL from egg yolk. Several concentrations of purified LDL (between 2.5 and 20%, w/v) were tested in freezing extenders for bull semen, and compared with commercial extenders. Our extraction method reached 97% purity and about 67% yield, and is easily reproducible on an industrial scale. Analysis of sperm motility showed that the motility and characteristics of spermatozoa movement were improved with LDL in the extender, as compared to a commercial extender containing egg yolk. The optimum LDL concentration in the extender was 8%. In conclusion, we propose that an extender containing LDL extracted from egg yolk could be used as cryoprotective media with a better efficiency than present commercial extenders. PMID:12035979

  20. Recognition of Porphyromonas gingivalis Gingipain Epitopes by Natural IgM Binding to Malondialdehyde Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Turunen, S. Pauliina; Kummu, Outi; Harila, Kirsi; Veneskoski, Marja; Soliymani, Rabah; Baumann, Marc; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2012-01-01

    Objective Increased risk for atherosclerosis is associated with infectious diseases including periodontitis. Natural IgM antibodies recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns on bacteria, and oxidized lipid and protein epitopes on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and apoptotic cells. We aimed to identify epitopes on periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis recognized by natural IgM binding to malondialdehyde (MDA) modified LDL. Methods and Results Mouse monoclonal IgM (MDmAb) specific for MDA-LDL recognized epitopes on P. gingivalis on flow cytometry and chemiluminescence immunoassays. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with P. gingivalis induced IgM, but not IgG, immune response to MDA-LDL and apoptotic cells. Immunization of LDLR−/− mice with P. gingivalis induced IgM, but not IgG, immune response to MDA-LDL and diminished aortic lipid deposition. On Western blot MDmAb bound to P. gingivalis fragments identified as arginine-specific gingipain (Rgp) by mass spectrometry. Recombinant domains of Rgp produced in E. coli were devoid of phosphocholine epitopes but contained epitopes recognized by MDmAb and human ser