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Sample records for low-dimensional semiconductor structures

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopy of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Joseph R.

    This dissertation is a survey of ultrafast time-resolved optical measurements conducted on a variety of low-dimensional semiconductor systems to further the understanding of the dynamic behavior in the following systems: ZnMnTe/ZnSe quantum dots, ZnTe/ZnMnSe quantum dots, InGaAs quantum wells, CdMnSe colloidal quantum dots, multi-shell CdSe/CdMnS/CdS colloidal nanoplatelets, and graphene and graphene-related solutions and films. Using time-resolved photoluminescence to study epitaxially-grown ZnTe and ZnMnTe quantum dots in corresponding ZnMnSe and ZnSe matrices, the location dependence of manganese ions in respect to magnetic polaron formation is shown. The structure with manganese ions located in the matrix exhibited magnetic polaron behavior consistent with previous literature, whereas the structure with the magnetic ions located within the quantum dots exhibited unconventional magnetic polaron properties. These properties, including temperature and magnetic field insensitivity, were explained through the use of a model that predicted an increased internal magnetic field due to a decreased effective volume of the magnetic polaron and a higher effective temperature due to laser heating. Magneto-time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on a system of colloidal CdMnSe quantum dots show that the magnetic polaron properties differ significantly from the epitaxially grown quantum dots. First the timescales at which the magnetic polaron forms and the polarization saturates are different by more than an order of magnitude, and second, the magnetic polaron energy exhibited step-like behavior as the strength of the externally applied magnetic field is increased. The field dependent MP formation energy that is observed experimentally is explained as due to the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling of Mn dimers within the QDs. This model is further verified by the observation of quantized behavior in the Zeeman energy splitting. Through the use of magneto

  2. Correlation of Photocatalytic Activity with Band Structure of Low-dimensional Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanke

    Photocatalytic hydrogen generation by water splitting is a promising technique to produce clean and renewable solar fuel. The development of effective semiconductor photocatalysts to obtain efficient photocatalytic activity is the key objective. However, two critical reasons prevent wide applications of semiconductor photocatalysts: low light usage efficiency and high rates of charge recombination. In this dissertation, several low-dimensional semiconductors were synthesized with hydrothermal, hydrolysis, and chemical impregnation methods. The band structures of the low-dimensional semiconductor materials were engineered to overcome the above mentioned two shortcomings. In addition, the correlation between the photocatalytic activity of the low-dimensional semiconductor materials and their band structures were studied. First, we studied the effect of oxygen vacancies on the photocatalytic activity of one-dimensional anatase TiO2 nanobelts. Given that the oxygen vacancy plays a significant role in band structure and photocatalytic performance of semiconductors, oxygen vacancies were introduced into the anatase TiO2 nanobelts during reduction in H2 at high temperature. The oxygen vacancies of the TiO2 nanobelts boosted visible-light-responsive photocatalytic activity but weakened ultraviolet-light-responsive photocatalytic activity. As oxygen vacancies are commonly introduced by dopants, these results give insight into why doping is not always beneficial to the overall photocatalytic performance despite increases in absorption. Second, we improved the photocatalytic performance of two-dimensional lanthanum titanate (La2Ti2 O7) nanosheets, which are widely studied as an efficient photocatalyst due to the unique layered crystal structure. Nitrogen was doped into the La2Ti2O7 nanosheets and then Pt nanoparticles were loaded onto the La2Ti2O7 nanosheets. Doping nitrogen narrowed the band gap of the La2Ti 2O7 nanosheets by introducing a continuum of states by the valence

  3. The Physics of Low-dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, John H.

    1997-12-01

    Low-dimensional systems have revolutionized semiconductor physics and had a tremendous impact on technology. Using simple physical explanations, with reference to examples from actual devices, this book introduces the general principles essential to low-dimensional semiconductors. The author presents a formalism that describes low-dimensional semiconductor systems, studying two key systems in detail: the two-dimensional electron gas, employed in field-effect transistors, and the quantum well, whose optical properties have multiple applications in lasers and other opto-electronic devices. The book will be invaluable to undergraduate and first-year graduate physics or electrical engineering students taking courses in low-dimensional systems or heterostructure device physics.

  4. Toward Ultrafast Spin Dynamics in Low Dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yi-Hsin

    Since the discovery of long spin relaxation times of itinerant electrons up to 100 nanoseconds and spin diffusion lengths over 100 mum in GaAs, extraordinary advances in semiconductor spintronics have been made in the past one and half decades. Incorporating spins in semiconductors requires the following essential capabilities: (i) injection of spins into semiconductors, (ii) manipulation of spins, and (iii) sensitive detection of spin coherence. The solutions to these challenges lie in a deeper understanding of spin interactions and spin relaxation in semiconductors as well as appropriate tools to probe spin dynamics. In particular, recent experiments have suggested the important role of dimensionality in spin dynamics. For example, spin-orbit interaction, the dominant source of spin relaxation in most II-VI and III-V semiconductors, has been shown to be significantly suppressed in reduced dimensions. Low-dimensional semiconductors are therefore appealing candidates for exploring spin physics and device applications. This dissertation aims at exploring spin dynamics in low dimensional semiconductor systems using time-resolved optical techniques. The time resolution allows for a direct measurement of the equilibrium and non-equilibrium carrier spins and various spin interactions in the time domain. Optical approaches are also a natural fit for probing optically active nanostructures where electric approaches can often encounter challenges. For instance, fabricating electric contacts with nanostructures is a proven challenge because of their reduced size and modified electronic structure. This dissertation is divided into three sections targeting an ultimate goal of employing optical methods to explore spin dynamics in low dimensional semiconductors. First, the time-resolved Kerr rotation technique is employed to study spin relaxation in Fe/MgO/GaAs heterostructures. The results reveal rich interactions between the GaAs electron spins, nuclear spins, and the

  5. Tailoring low-dimensional organic semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Treier, Matthias; Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Richardson, Neville V; Pignedoli, Carlo; Passerone, Daniele; Fasel, Roman

    2009-01-01

    The quest for miniaturization of organic nanostructures is fueled by their possible applications in future nanoscale electronic devices. Here we show how a range of nanostructures of reduced dimensionality of the organic semiconductor PTCDA can be realized on Au(111) by intermixing the latter with hydrogen bonding spacer molecules. The purpose of the spacers is to separate nanounits of pure PTCDA, using hydrogen bonds between the anhydride end of PTCDA and amine groups of the spacers. A highly regular array of potential quantum dots can be realized by this approach. PMID:19143501

  6. Thermoelectric Transport in Bismuth Telluride Nanoplates, Semiconductor Nanowires, and Silicide Nanocomposites: Effects of Low Dimensionality, Surface States, Interface Structures, and Crystal Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Li

    2012-02-01

    This presentation will review recent measurement results of thermoelectric properties of individual bismuth telluride nanoplates, semiconductor nanowires, and silicide nanocomposites. In experiments with these realistic nanostructured materials, a number of factors influence the transport properties. For example, unintentional doping, interface roughness and impurities can often obscure the predicted effects of the low-dimensional electronic density of states and the protected surface states, the latter of which have been suggested for bismuth telluride and other thermoelectric materials, now also referred as topological insulators. Similarly, impurities and defects as well as contact thermal resistance can play an important role in phonon transport in nanostructures, making it nontrivial to quantify the actual effects of phonon-surface scattering and other intriguing low-dimensional phonon transport phenomena. Because of these experimental complications, diverse theoretical interpretations of experimental results have appeared in the literature, and will be discussed. Moreover, the effects of twin defects and crystal complexity on thermoelectric transport in nanostructures will be examined based on measurement results of III-V and silicide nanostructures.

  7. Quantum Effects in the Thermoelectric Power Factor of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Nguyen T.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the interplay between the confinement length L and the thermal de Broglie wavelength Λ to optimize the thermoelectric power factor of semiconducting materials. An analytical formula for the power factor is derived based on the one-band model assuming nondegenerate semiconductors to describe quantum effects on the power factor of the low-dimensional semiconductors. The power factor is enhanced for one- and two-dimensional semiconductors when L is smaller than Λ of the semiconductors. In this case, the low-dimensional semiconductors having L smaller than their Λ will give a better thermoelectric performance compared to their bulk counterpart. On the other hand, when L is larger than Λ , bulk semiconductors may give a higher power factor compared to the lower dimensional ones.

  8. Quantum Effects in the Thermoelectric Power Factor of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Hung, Nguyen T; Hasdeo, Eddwi H; Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-07-15

    We theoretically investigate the interplay between the confinement length L and the thermal de Broglie wavelength Λ to optimize the thermoelectric power factor of semiconducting materials. An analytical formula for the power factor is derived based on the one-band model assuming nondegenerate semiconductors to describe quantum effects on the power factor of the low-dimensional semiconductors. The power factor is enhanced for one- and two-dimensional semiconductors when L is smaller than Λ of the semiconductors. In this case, the low-dimensional semiconductors having L smaller than their Λ will give a better thermoelectric performance compared to their bulk counterpart. On the other hand, when L is larger than Λ, bulk semiconductors may give a higher power factor compared to the lower dimensional ones. PMID:27472126

  9. Optical power of semiconductor lasers with a low-dimensional active region

    SciTech Connect

    Asryan, Levon V.; Sokolova, Zinaida N.

    2014-01-14

    A comprehensive analytical model for the operating characteristics of semiconductor lasers with a low-dimensional active region is developed. Particular emphasis is given to the effect of capture delay of both electrons and holes from a bulk optical confinement region into a quantum-confined active region and an extended set of rate equations is used. We derive a closed-form expression for the internal quantum efficiency as an explicit function of the injection current and parameters of a laser structure. Due to either electron or hole capture delay, the internal efficiency decreases with increasing injection current above the lasing threshold thus causing sublinearity of the light-current characteristic of a laser.

  10. Correlation of structural and electronic properties in a new low-dimensional form of mercury telluride.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robin; Sloan, Jeremy; Kirkland, Angus I; Meyer, Rüdiger R; Lindan, Phillip J D; Lin, Grace; Green, Malcolm L H; Vlandas, Alexis; Hutchison, John L; Harding, John

    2006-06-01

    Using high resolution electron microscopy and first principles quantum mechanical calculations we have explored the fundamental physics and chemistry of the semiconductor, HgTe grown inside single wall carbon nanotubes. This material forms a low-dimensional structure based on a repeating Hg2Te2 motif in which both atom species adopt new coordination geometries not seen in the bulk. Density-functional theory calculations confirm the stability of this structure and demonstrate conclusively that it arises solely as a consequence of constrained low dimensionality. This change is directly correlated with a modified electronic structure in which the low-dimensional form of HgTe is transformed from a bulk semimetal to a semiconductor. PMID:16803245

  11. Electron and Hole States in Low Dimensional Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Gerard

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In this thesis results from microscopic calculations for the electron and hole states in low dimensional heterostructures are presented. The basis for the calculation is the local empirical pseudopotential technique which is used to generate the bulk semiconductor bandstructure. Then an S matrix approach, which is numerically stable, is employed to propagate the solution through the layered structure. The technique is essentially a scattering approach and hence is suitable to describe the experimental situation of finite samples. The fact that a finite system is treated allows the formalism to be naturally extended to include an external E field. The calculations that have been done are for the (001) growth direction. In chapter 1 the basic concepts of semiconductor physics relevant to the material of this thesis are introduced. In Chapter 2 the theoretical technique used in this thesis, for conduction band states, is reviewed and compared and contrasted with alternative methods. The emergence of miniband states and Stark ladders in coupled GaAs/AlAs quantum well structures are dealt with in chapter 3. In Chapter 4 the bound state problem, relevant to optical properties, of the energy versus k_parallel subband dispersion of a AlGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs quantum well is examined. Chapter 5 contains the extension of the theoretical technique to incorporate the spin-orbit interaction so that heterostructure hole states can be tackled. The validity of the effective mass theory treatment of the semiconductor interface and the Luttinger model of the bulk valence band is questioned and the microscopic nature of the GaAs-AlAs interface scattering investigated. In chapter 6 hole states in GaAs/AlAs double barrier structures and coupled multiple quantum well (MQW) structures are calculated. The anomalous formation of contact interface states instead of heavy hole minibands is observed in MQW structures. In chapter 7 In

  12. Fabrication and characterization of low dimensional narrow energy gap semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyoung Ho

    In last decades, there has been a tremendous interest and a challenge to fabricate and characterize materials of nanoscale dimensions. Strong carrier confinement occurs in low dimensional systems showing different quantization regimes. These properties are being exploited for the fabrication of novel semiconductor devices. In this work, the fabrication and characterization of low dimensional narrow gap semiconductor heterostructures of 2-D InP/InAs quantum well/InP, 1-D Bi nanowires/mica and 0-D PbSe/PbEuTe quantum dot superlattice structures are presented. Stacking faults that are deleterious for the optical properties of heterostructures were observed in InP/InAs Q.W./InP (001) grown by ALE. A model for the formation of the stacking faults in InAs/InP heterostructures is proposed based on a transmission electron microscopy study. These faults were identified as Frank type faults and are believed to be responsible for the formation of tetrahedra or elongated hexahedra stacking faults. The density of stacking faults decreased as the InP cap layer thickness increased. Our investigation showed that the increase in stacking fault energy gives rise to annihilation of the faults as the cap layer thickness increases. Arrays of bismuth nanowires with diameter as small as 60 A on mica templates for the fabrication of thermoelectric devices were synthesized by a three-step process consisting of positive-ion irradiation, chemical etching and electrodeposition processes. The diameter and shape of the nanowires were controlled by the etching time. A single crystalline Bi wire with (012) in-plane orientation was observed by high resolution TEM and electron diffraction. The efficiency of electrodeposition of Bi wires was about 80%. N-doping of Bi wires by Te using electrodeposition was also demonstrated. The Te concentration was about 13 times higher than the concentration of Te in the solution. Ohmic behavior was observed across the doped Bi wires. The dot stacking arrangement

  13. Synergy between theory and experiment in structure resolution of low-dimensional oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierka, Marek

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, I review recent progress in joint theoretical and experimental studies aiming at atomic structure determination of low-dimensional metal oxides. Low-dimensional systems can be generally defined as materials of unusual structure that extend to less than three dimensions. In recent years low-dimensional systems have attracted increasing attention of physicists and chemists, and the interest is expected to rise in the near future. Two- and one-dimensional structures in form of thin oxide films or elongated oxide chains have many potential applications including model supports for heterogeneous catalysts and insulating layers in semiconductor industry. The interest in zero-dimensional gas-phase oxide clusters ranges from astrophysics to studies of elementary steps in catalysis. The key prerequisite for understanding physical and chemical properties of low-dimensional systems is a detailed knowledge of their atomic structures. However, such systems frequently present complex structures to solve. Only in a few cases experimental data can provide some information about possible arrangement of atoms, but data interpretation relies to a large extent on intuition. Therefore, in the recent years quantum chemical calculations became an indispensable tool in structure identification of low-dimensional systems, yet the accuracy of theoretical tools is often limited. The results reviewed here demonstrate that often the only way of an unambiguous atomic structure determination of low-dimensional systems are experimental studies combined with theoretical calculations. Particularly the global optimization methods such as genetic algorithm in combination with the density functional theory prove very useful in automatic structure determination of the observed surface structures and gas-phase clusters.

  14. Antitumor activity of low-dimensional alumina structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, M. S.; Fomenko, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    Nano-dimensional materials have recently attracted much attention with respect to their potential role in medicine. Physical mechanisms of interaction of nanoparticles with tumor cells will help to develop new methods for cancer disease treatment. Based on aluminum oxide phases, positively charged low-dimensional structures have different shape: agglomerates of nanosheets, nameplates, cone-shaped nanoaggregates were synthesized with the help of aluminum nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity effect of these low-dimensional structures on A549, HeLa, MDA, PyMT tumor cells was studied. It was shown that agglomerates of nanosheets were more toxic for investigating cell lines. Agglomerates of nanosheets had a medium toxic effect at a concentration of 10 mg/ml while nameplates and cone-shaped nanoaggregates were nontoxic. The toxic effect of agglomerates of nanosheets correlates with their shape, mainly the presence of multiple edges.

  15. Quantum theory of the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Wayne Heung

    This thesis examines the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems. A theory is developed to study the electron-hole generation-recombination process of type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions based on a 3 x 3 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (three-band model) and an 8 x 8 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (eight-band model). A novel electron-hole generation and recombination process, which is called activationless generation-recombination process, is predicted. It is demonstrated that the current through the type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions is governed by the activationless electron-hole generation-recombination process at the heterointerfaces, and that the current-voltage characteristics are essentially linear. A qualitative agreement between theory and experiments is observed. The numerical results of the eight-band model are compared with those of the threeband model. Based on a lattice gas model, a theory is developed to study the influence of a random potential on the ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. It is demonstrated that ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs change drastically in the presence of strong disorder. It is predicted that strong disorder promotes dissociation of excitons in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. A theory of polariton (photon dressed by phonon) spontaneous emission in a III--V semiconductor doped with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wells (QWs) is developed. For the first time, superradiant and subradiant polariton spontaneous emission phenomena in a polariton-QD (QW) coupled system are predicted when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie outside the polaritonic energy gap. It is also predicted that when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie inside the polaritonic energy gap, spontaneous emission of polariton in the polariton

  16. Low-dimensional dynamics of structured random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljadeff, Johnatan; Renfrew, David; Vegué, Marina; Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2016-02-01

    Using a generalized random recurrent neural network model, and by extending our recently developed mean-field approach [J. Aljadeff, M. Stern, and T. Sharpee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 088101 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.088101], we study the relationship between the network connectivity structure and its low-dimensional dynamics. Each connection in the network is a random number with mean 0 and variance that depends on pre- and postsynaptic neurons through a sufficiently smooth function g of their identities. We find that these networks undergo a phase transition from a silent to a chaotic state at a critical point we derive as a function of g . Above the critical point, although unit activation levels are chaotic, their autocorrelation functions are restricted to a low-dimensional subspace. This provides a direct link between the network's structure and some of its functional characteristics. We discuss example applications of the general results to neuroscience where we derive the support of the spectrum of connectivity matrices with heterogeneous and possibly correlated degree distributions, and to ecology where we study the stability of the cascade model for food web structure.

  17. Low-dimensional boron structures based on icosahedron B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, C. B.; Yu, M.; Tandy, P.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2015-10-01

    One-dimensional icosahedral boron chains and two-dimensional icosahedral boron sheets (icosahedral α, δ6, and δ4 sheets) that contain icosahedra B12 as their building units have been predicted in a computer simulation study using a state-of-the-art semi-empirical Hamiltonian. These novel low-dimensional icosahedral structures exhibit interesting bonding and electronic properties. Specifically, the three-center, two-electron bonding between icosahedra B12 of the boron bulk (rhombohedral boron) transforms into a two-center bonding in these new allotropes of boron sheets. In contrast to the previously reported stable buckled α and triangular boron monolayer sheets, these new allotropes of boron sheets form a planar network. Calculations of electronic density of states (DOS) reveal a semiconducting nature for both the icosahedral chain and the icosahedral δ6 and δ4 sheets, as well as a nearly gapless (or metallic-like) feature in the DOS for the icosahedral α sheet. The results for the energy barrier per atom between the icosahedral δ6 and α sheets (0.17 eV), the icosahedral δ6 and δ4 sheets (0.38 eV), and the icosahedral α and δ4 sheets (0.27 eV), as indicated in the respective parentheses, suggest that these new allotropes of boron sheets are relatively stable.

  18. Nanoscale control of low-dimensional spin structures in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wang; Iftikhar, Ahmed Malik; Renrong, Liang; Wen, Huang; Renkui, Zheng; Jinxing, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Due to the upcoming demands of next-generation electronic/magnetoelectronic devices with low-energy consumption, emerging correlated materials (such as superconductors, topological insulators and manganites) are one of the highly promising candidates for the applications. For the past decades, manganites have attracted great interest due to the colossal magnetoresistance effect, charge-spin-orbital ordering, and electronic phase separation. However, the incapable of deterministic control of those emerging low-dimensional spin structures at ambient condition restrict their possible applications. Therefore, the understanding and control of the dynamic behaviors of spin order parameters at nanoscale in manganites under external stimuli with low energy consumption, especially at room temperature is highly desired. In this review, we collected recent major progresses of nanoscale control of spin structures in manganites at low dimension, especially focusing on the control of their phase boundaries, domain walls as well as the topological spin structures (e.g., skyrmions). In addition, capacitor-based prototype spintronic devices are proposed by taking advantage of the above control methods in manganites. This capacitor-based structure may provide a new platform for the design of future spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB920902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61306105 and 51572278), the Information Science and Technology (TNList) Cross-discipline Foundation from Tsinghua National Laboratory, China and the Fund from the State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China.

  19. Low-dimensional transport and large thermoelectric power factors in bulk semiconductors by band engineering of highly directional electronic states.

    PubMed

    Bilc, Daniel I; Hautier, Geoffroy; Waroquiers, David; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Ghosez, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Thermoelectrics are promising for addressing energy issues but their exploitation is still hampered by low efficiencies. So far, much improvement has been achieved by reducing the thermal conductivity but less by maximizing the power factor. The latter imposes apparently conflicting requirements on the band structure: a narrow energy distribution and a low effective mass. Quantum confinement in nanostructures and the introduction of resonant states were suggested as possible solutions to this paradox, but with limited success. Here, we propose an original approach to fulfill both requirements in bulk semiconductors. It exploits the highly directional character of some orbitals to engineer the band structure and produce a type of low-dimensional transport similar to that targeted in nanostructures, while retaining isotropic properties. Using first-principle calculations, the theoretical concept is demonstrated in Fe2YZ Heusler compounds, yielding power factors 4 to 5 times larger than in classical thermoelectrics at room temperature. Our findings are totally generic and rationalize the search of alternative compounds with similar behavior. Beyond thermoelectricity, these might be relevant also in the context of electronic, superconducting, or photovoltaic applications. PMID:25884131

  20. On the current drive capability of low dimensional semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-29

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Lastly, our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  1. Polarizability evolution on natural and artificial low dimensional binary semiconductor systems: A case study of stoichiometric aluminum phosphide semiconductor clusters.

    PubMed

    Karamanis, Panaghiotis; Xenides, Demetrios; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2008-09-01

    The dependences of the static dipole polarizabilities per atom (PPAs) on the bonding and shape of selected stoichiometric aluminum phosphide clusters (ground states and higher lying species) of small and medium sizes have been comprehensively studied at Hartree-Fock and the second order Moller-Plesset perturbation levels of theory. It is shown that the nonmonotonic size variations in the mean PPAs of AlP species which maintain closed cagelike structures, frequently observed in clusters, are directly related to covalent homoatomic bonds inside each cluster's framework. Accordingly, the PPAs of clusters which are characterized by one or more bonds between the Al and P atoms are larger than the PPAs of clusters with the uniform alternating Al-P bond matrix. This is caused by the electron transfer increase from the electropositive Al to the electronegative P atom with the cluster growth. This transfer is larger for the clusters characterized by alternating Al-P bonding. The later effect explains the decrease in the PPA of AlP species which maintain closed cage-like structures, with the cluster growth. However, this picture drastically changes for artificial metastable prolate species built up by the ground states of smaller clusters. It is demonstrated that for prolate binary AlP clusters of medium size, the shape dominates against any other structural or bonding factor, forcing the PPA to increase with the cluster size. Nonetheless, as the cluster size grows, it is predicted that the PPAs of the studied prolate clusters will saturate eventually with the cluster size. Also, it is verified that the theoretical predicted polarizabilities of AlP semiconductor clusters are larger than the bulk polarizability in accord with other theoretical predictions for similar systems. Lastly, it is pointed out that major bonding or structural changes should take place in order the convergence with the bulk polarizability to be accomplished since it is revealed that the size increase

  2. Bose-Einstein condensation in low dimensional layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Patricia; Solis, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation critical temperature, among other thermodynamic properties are reported for an ideal boson gas inside layered structures created by trapping potential of the Kronig-Penney type. We start with a big box where we introduce the Kronig-Penney potential in three directions to get a honey comb of cubes of side a size and walls of variable penetrability (P=mV0ab/^2), with bosons instead of bees. We are able to reduce the dimensions of the cubes to simulate bosons inside quantum dots. The critical temperature, starting from that of an ideal boson gas inside the big box, decreases as the small cube wall impenetrability increases arriving to a tiny but different from zero when the penetrability is zero (P-->∞). We also calculate the internal energy and the specific heat, and compare them to the ones obtained for the case of the same Kronig-Penney potential in one direction (simulating layers), and two directions (nanotubes).

  3. Control of polarization and dipole moment in low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. H.; Ridha, P.; Mexis, M.; Smowton, P. M.; Blood, P.; Bozkurt, M.; Koenraad, P. M.; Patriarche, G.

    2009-11-30

    We demonstrate the control of polarization and dipole moment in semiconductor nanostructures, through nanoscale engineering of shape and composition. Rodlike nanostructures, elongated along the growth direction, are obtained by molecular beam epitaxial growth. By varying the aspect ratio and compositional contrast between the rod and the surrounding matrix, we rotate the polarization of the dominant interband transition from transverse-electric to transverse-magnetic, and modify the dipole moment producing a radical change in the voltage dependence of absorption spectra. This opens the way to the optimization of quantum dot amplifiers and electro-optical modulators.

  4. Entanglement dynamics of electron-electron scattering in low-dimensional semiconductor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Buscemi, F.; Bordone, P.; Bertoni, A.

    2006-05-15

    We perform the quantitative evaluation of the entanglement dynamics in scattering events between two indistinguishable electrons interacting via the Coulomb potential in one- and two-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. We apply a criterion based on the von Neumann entropy and the Schmidt decomposition of the global state vector suitable for systems of identical particles. From the time-dependent numerical solution of the two-particle wave function of the scattering carriers we compute their entanglement evolution for different spin configurations: two electrons with the same spin, with different spin, and singlet and triplet spin states. The procedure allows us to evaluate the mechanisms that govern entanglement creation and their connection with the characteristic physical parameters and initial conditions of the system. The cases in which the evolution of entanglement is similar to the one obtained for distinguishable particles are discussed.

  5. Automatic classification of protein structures using low-dimensional structure space mappings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein function is closely intertwined with protein structure. Discovery of meaningful structure-function relationships is of utmost importance in protein biochemistry and has led to creation of high-quality, manually curated classification databases, such as the gold-standard SCOP (Structural Classification of Proteins) database. The SCOP database and its counterparts such as CATH provide a detailed and comprehensive description of the structural and evolutionary relationships of the proteins of known structure and are widely employed in structural and computational biology. Since manual classification is both subjective and highly laborious, automated classification of novel structures is increasingly an active area of research. The design of methods for automated structure classification has been rendered even more important since the recent past, due to the explosion in number of solved structures arising out of various structural biology initiatives. In this paper we propose an approach to the problem of structure classification based on creating and tessellating low dimensional maps of the protein structure space (MPSS). Given a set of protein structures, an MPSS is a low dimensional embedding of structural similarity-based distances between the molecules. In an MPSS, a group of proteins (such as all the proteins in the PDB or sub-samplings thereof) under consideration are represented as point clouds and structural relatedness maps to spatial adjacency of the points. In this paper we present methods and results that show that MPSS can be used to create tessellations of the protein space comparable to the clade systems within SCOP. Though we have used SCOP as the gold standard, the proposed approach is equally applicable for other structural classifications. Methods In the proposed approach, we first construct MPSS using pairwise alignment distances obtained from four established structure alignment algorithms (CE, Dali, FATCAT and MATT). The low

  6. Spontaneous appearance of a low-dimensional magnetic electron system on semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Keisuke; Iwata, Jun-Ichi; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    We report on the large-scale density-functional calculations that show the emergence of the spin-polarized ground states in nanofacets self-organized on SiC (0001) surfaces. We first reveal that the nanofacet formed by bunching of single bilayer steps induces peculiar electron states localized at but extended along step edges, showing the flat-band characteristics. The electron states are of C-dangling-bond characters mixed with the back-bond character of neighboring edge Si atoms. We find that the resulting flat bands lead to the spin polarization near the step edges by H passivation of the terrace Si atoms. Interestingly, either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic chains appear along the step edges on the SiC nanofacet and the location of such magnetic chains can be controlled by manipulating the H passivation of atoms near the step edges. These findings open a possibility of the appearance of new magnetic functions on the covalent semiconductor surfaces without magnetic elements.

  7. Harnessing Sparse and Low-Dimensional Structures for Robust Clustering of Imagery Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Shankar Ramamohan

    2009-01-01

    We propose a robust framework for clustering data. In practice, data obtained from real measurement devices can be incomplete, corrupted by gross errors, or not correspond to any assumed model. We show that, by properly harnessing the intrinsic low-dimensional structure of the data, these kinds of practical problems can be dealt with in a uniform…

  8. Indentation-induced formation of low-dimensional Si structures in KOH solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuqian; Li, Ding

    2010-03-01

    Low-dimensional Si structures, including Si nanobelts and Si micropyramids, were formed on the surface of n-type silicon by microindentation and anisotropic etching in 30 wt% KOH solution at a temperature of 50 °C. The indentation was performed to create local plastic deformation and residual stresses. The residual stresses caused the formation of the Si nanobelts around the sites of indents on the surface of Si (1 1 1) and the Si micropyramids at the sites of indents on the surface of Si (1 0 0). The formation of the Si micropyramids was due to the local 'mask' created by the indentation and the residual stress around the indents. The residual hydrostatic stress at the tensile state increased the local etching rate, which resulted in a surface depression around the indents. The combination of indentation and wet etching process provides a maskless process to potentially produce low-dimensional Si structures in KOH solution at low temperatures.

  9. Structural features of low-dimensional molecular conductors-Representatives of new hybrid polyfunctional materials: Review

    SciTech Connect

    Shibaeva, R. P. Khasanov, S. S.; Zorina, L. V.; Simonov, S. V.

    2006-12-15

    The crystal structures of the family of low-dimensional molecular conductors based on radical cation salts of different organic {pi} donors with photochromic and magnetic metal complexes as anions have been considered. This class of supramolecular systems demonstrates a large variety of structural types and a wide range of transport properties. The specificity of the structure and properties of such hybrid materials is illustrated by several examples. The crystallochemical analysis of the conductors considered indicates the possibility of purposeful control of their transport properties via changing of the charge, sizes, shape, and symmetry of the anionic block components. The specificity of the crystal structure and properties of some organic conductors shows that such systems can be used as model systems in the study of new physical phenomena related to electron correlation and effects of charge ordering.

  10. Room temperature light emission from the low-dimensional semiconductors AZrPS{sub 6} ( A = K, Rb, Cs).

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Szarko, J. M.; Yuhas, B. D.; Malliakas, C. D.; Chen, L. X.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2010-03-29

    The new semiconducting thiophosphate compounds KZrPS{sub 6}, RbZrPS{sub 6}, and CsZrPS{sub 6} exhibit red light emission at room temperature. The materials have longer photoluminescence lifetimes than most of the inorganic chalcogenide semiconductors. They can be solution processed into thin films for potential device fabrication.

  11. Low Dimensional Tools for Flow-Structure Interaction Problems: Application to Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, Ryan F.; Glauser, Mark N.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    A low dimensional tool for flow-structure interaction problems based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and modified Linear Stochastic Estimation (mLSE) has been proposed and was applied to a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) wing. The method utilizes the dynamic strain measurements from the wing to estimate the POD expansion coefficients from which an estimation of the velocity in the wake can be obtained. For this experiment the MAV wing was set at five different angles of attack, from 0 deg to 20 deg. The tunnel velocities varied from 44 to 58 ft/sec with corresponding Reynolds numbers of 46,000 to 70,000. A stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to measure the wake of the MAV wing simultaneously with the signals from the twelve dynamic strain gauges mounted on the wing. With 20 out of 2400 POD modes, a reasonable estimation of the flow flow was observed. By increasing the number of POD modes, a better estimation of the flow field will occur. Utilizing the simultaneously sampled strain gauges and flow field measurements in conjunction with mLSE, an estimation of the flow field with lower energy modes is reasonable. With these results, the methodology for estimating the wake flow field from just dynamic strain gauges is validated.

  12. Hot-carrier solar cells using low-dimensional quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Daiki; Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    We propose a high-conversion-efficiency solar cell (SC) utilizing the hot carrier (HC) population in an intermediate-band (IB) of a quantum dot superlattice (QDSL) structure. The bandgap of the host semiconductor in this device plays an important role as an energy-selective barrier for HCs in the QDSLs. According to theoretical calculation using the detailed balance model with an air mass 1.5 spectrum, the optimum IB energy is determined by a trade-off relation between the number of HCs with energy exceeding the conduction-band edge and the number of photons absorbed by the valence band-IB transition. Utilizing experimental data of HC temperature in InAs/GaAs QDSLs, the maximum conversion efficiency under maximum concentration (45 900 suns) has been demonstrated to increase by 12.6% as compared with that for a single-junction GaAs SC.

  13. Hot-carrier solar cells using low-dimensional quantum structures

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Daiki; Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi

    2014-10-27

    We propose a high-conversion-efficiency solar cell (SC) utilizing the hot carrier (HC) population in an intermediate-band (IB) of a quantum dot superlattice (QDSL) structure. The bandgap of the host semiconductor in this device plays an important role as an energy-selective barrier for HCs in the QDSLs. According to theoretical calculation using the detailed balance model with an air mass 1.5 spectrum, the optimum IB energy is determined by a trade-off relation between the number of HCs with energy exceeding the conduction-band edge and the number of photons absorbed by the valence band−IB transition. Utilizing experimental data of HC temperature in InAs/GaAs QDSLs, the maximum conversion efficiency under maximum concentration (45 900 suns) has been demonstrated to increase by 12.6% as compared with that for a single-junction GaAs SC.

  14. Metal-Semiconductor Hybrid Aerogels: Evolution of Optoelectronic Properties in a Low-Dimensional CdSe/Ag Nanoparticle Assembly.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Lamia; Esteves, Richard J Alan; Hafiz, Shopan; Özgür, Ümit; Arachchige, Indika U

    2015-10-27

    Hybrid nanomaterials composed of metal-semiconductor components exhibit unique properties in comparison to their individual counterparts, making them of great interest for optoelectronic applications. Theoretical and experimental studies suggest that interfacial interactions of individual components are of paramount importance to produce hybrid electronic states. The direct cross-linking of nanoparticles (NPs) via controlled removal of the surfactant ligands provides a route to tune interfacial interactions in a manner that has not been thoroughly investigated. Herein, we report the synthesis of CdSe/Ag heteronanostructures (aerogels) via oxidation induced self-assembly of thiol-coated NPs and the evolution of optical properties as a function of composition. Three hybrid systems were investigated, where the first and second excitonic energies of CdSe were matched with plasmonic energy of Au or Ag NPs and Ag hollow NPs. Physical characterization of the aerogels suggests the presence of an interconnected network of hexagonal CdSe and cubic Ag NPs. The optical properties of hybrids were systematically examined through UV-vis, photoluminescence (PL), and time-resolved (TR) PL spectroscopic studies that indicate the generation of alternate radiative decay pathways. A new emission (640 nm) from CdSe/Ag aerogels emerged at Ag loading as low as 0.27%, whereas absorption band tailing and PL quenching effects were observed at higher Ag and Au loading, respectively. The TRPL decay time of the new emission (∼600 ns) is markedly different from those of the band-edge (1.83 ± 0.03 ns) and trap-state (1190 ± 120 ns) emission maxima of phase pure CdSe, supporting the existence of alternate radiative relaxation pathways in sol-gel derived CdSe/Ag hybrids. PMID:26389642

  15. EMRS Spring Meeting 2014 Symposium D: Phonons and fluctuations in low dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The E-MRS 2014 Spring meeting, held from 26-30th May 2014 in Lille included the Symposium D entitled ''Phonons and Fluctuations in Low Dimensional Structures'', the first edition of its kind. The symposium was organised in response to the increasing interest in the study of phonons in the context of advances in condensed matter physics, electronics, experimental methods and theory and, in particular, the transfer of energy across atomic interfaces and the propagation of energy in the nm-scale. Steering heat by light or vice versa and examining nano-scale energy conversion (as in thermoelectricity and harvesting e.g. in biological systems) are two aspects that share the underlying science of energy processes across atomic interfaces and energy propagation in the nanoscale and or in confined systems. The nanometer scale defies several of the bulk relationships as confinement of electrons and phonons, locality and non-equilibrium become increasingly important. The propagation of phonons as energy carriers impacts not only heat transfer, but also the very concept and handling of temperature in non-equilibrium and highly localised conditions. Much of the needed progress depends on the materials studied and this symposium targeted the interface material aspects as well as the emerging concepts to advance in this field. The symposium had its origins in a series of meetings and seminars including: (1) the first Phonon Engineering Workshop, funded by Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), the then MICINN, the CNRS, VTT, and several EU projects, held in Saint Feliu de Guixols (Girona, Spain) from 24th to 27th of May 2010 with 65 participants from Europe, the USA and Japan; (2) the first Phonons and Fluctuations workshop, held in Paris on 8th and 9th November 2010, supported by French, Spanish and Finnish national projects and EU projects, attended by about 50 researchers; (3) the second Phonon and Fluctuations workshop, held in Paris on 8th and 9th

  16. Quantitative MCsn+ - SIMS for direct compositional analysis of interfaces of low-dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Purushottam

    2012-06-01

    Excellent detection sensitivity, high dynamic range and good depth resolution make the Secondary ion Mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique extremely powerful for the chemical analysis of surfaces and interfaces of condensed matter systems. However, a serious problem in SIMS analysis is its "matrix effect" that hinders the quantification of a certain species in a sample and consequently, probing the composition of surfaces or interfaces by SIMS is greatly hindered. Appropriate corrective measures are therefore, needed to calibrate the secondary ion currents into respective concentrations for accurate compositional analysis. Working in the MCs+-SIMS mode (M - element to be analyzed, Cs+ - bombarding ions) can circumvent the matrix effect. The emission process for the species M0 is decoupled from the MCs+ ion formation process, in analogy with the ion formation in secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), resulting in a drastic decrease in matrix effect in the MCs+ - SIMS mode. Although this technique has found its applicability in direct quantification, it generally suffers from a low useful yield. In such cases, detection of MCsn+ (n = 2, 3, ...) molecular ions offers a better sensitivity (even by several orders of magnitude), as the yields of such molecular ion complexes have often been found to be higher than that of MCs+ ions. Several works have been reported on the emission of MCsn + molecular ions, but a complete understanding on the formation mechanisms of these ion complexes is still lacking. However, irrespective of the formation mechanisms, MCsn +-SIMS technique in all its complexities has great relevance in the elemental analysis of materials. The talk will address on the possible formation mechanisms and potential applications of MCsn+ molecular ion complexes in the interfacial analysis of ultrathin films, metallic multilayers, semiconductor superlattices, quantum structures and also in the compositional analysis of MBE grown Si1-xGex alloys.

  17. EMRS Spring Meeting 2014 Symposium D: Phonons and fluctuations in low dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The E-MRS 2014 Spring meeting, held from 26-30th May 2014 in Lille included the Symposium D entitled ''Phonons and Fluctuations in Low Dimensional Structures'', the first edition of its kind. The symposium was organised in response to the increasing interest in the study of phonons in the context of advances in condensed matter physics, electronics, experimental methods and theory and, in particular, the transfer of energy across atomic interfaces and the propagation of energy in the nm-scale. Steering heat by light or vice versa and examining nano-scale energy conversion (as in thermoelectricity and harvesting e.g. in biological systems) are two aspects that share the underlying science of energy processes across atomic interfaces and energy propagation in the nanoscale and or in confined systems. The nanometer scale defies several of the bulk relationships as confinement of electrons and phonons, locality and non-equilibrium become increasingly important. The propagation of phonons as energy carriers impacts not only heat transfer, but also the very concept and handling of temperature in non-equilibrium and highly localised conditions. Much of the needed progress depends on the materials studied and this symposium targeted the interface material aspects as well as the emerging concepts to advance in this field. The symposium had its origins in a series of meetings and seminars including: (1) the first Phonon Engineering Workshop, funded by Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), the then MICINN, the CNRS, VTT, and several EU projects, held in Saint Feliu de Guixols (Girona, Spain) from 24th to 27th of May 2010 with 65 participants from Europe, the USA and Japan; (2) the first Phonons and Fluctuations workshop, held in Paris on 8th and 9th November 2010, supported by French, Spanish and Finnish national projects and EU projects, attended by about 50 researchers; (3) the second Phonon and Fluctuations workshop, held in Paris on 8th and 9th

  18. From 1D chain to 3D network: A theoretical study on TiO2 low dimensional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ling-ju; Zeng, Zhi; He, Tao

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a systematic study on a series of low dimensional TiO2 nanostructures under density functional theory methods. The geometries, stabilities, growth mechanism, and electronic structures of 1D chain, 2D ring, 2D ring array, and 3D network of TiO2 nanostructures are analyzed. Based on the Ti2O4 building unit, a series of 1D TiO2 nano chains and rings can be built. Furthermore, 2D ring array and 3D network nanostructures can be constructed from 1D chains and rings. Among non-periodic TiO2 chain and ring structures, one series of ring structures is found to be more stable. The geometry model of the 2D ring arrays and 3D network structures in this work has provided a theoretical understanding on the structure information in experiments. Based on these semiconductive low dimensional structures, moreover, it can help to understand and design new hierarchical TiO2 nanostructure in the future.

  19. From 1D chain to 3D network: A theoretical study on TiO{sub 2} low dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ling-ju; He, Tao; Zeng, Zhi

    2015-06-14

    We have performed a systematic study on a series of low dimensional TiO{sub 2} nanostructures under density functional theory methods. The geometries, stabilities, growth mechanism, and electronic structures of 1D chain, 2D ring, 2D ring array, and 3D network of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures are analyzed. Based on the Ti{sub 2}O{sub 4} building unit, a series of 1D TiO{sub 2} nano chains and rings can be built. Furthermore, 2D ring array and 3D network nanostructures can be constructed from 1D chains and rings. Among non-periodic TiO{sub 2} chain and ring structures, one series of ring structures is found to be more stable. The geometry model of the 2D ring arrays and 3D network structures in this work has provided a theoretical understanding on the structure information in experiments. Based on these semiconductive low dimensional structures, moreover, it can help to understand and design new hierarchical TiO{sub 2} nanostructure in the future.

  20. Semiconductor structure and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinkel, Nancy A. (Inventor); Goldstein, Bernard (Inventor); Ettenberg, Michael (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor devices such as lasers which include a substrate with a channel therein with a clad layer overlying the substrate and filling the channel exhibit irregularities such as terraces in the surface of the clad layer which are detrimental to device performance. These irregularities are substantially eliminated by forming the channel in a surface of a buffer layer greater than about 4 micrometers thick on the substrate and forming the clad layer over the buffer layer and the channel. CW lasers incorporating the principles of the invention exhibit the highest output power in a single spatial mode and maximum output power which have been observed to date.

  1. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  2. Hybrid ferromagnetic-semiconductor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Prinz, G.A. )

    1990-11-23

    Ultrahigh-vacuum growth techniques are now being used to grow single-crystal films of magnetic materials. These growth procedures, carried out in the same molecular beam epitaxy systems commonly used for the growth of semiconductor films, have yielded a variety of new materials and structures that may prove useful for integrated electronics and integrated optical device applications. Examples are given for growth on GaAs and ZnSe, including magnetic sandwiches and patterned structures. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Tailoring low-dimensional structures of bismuth on monolayer epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.-H.; Su, S. H.; Chang, S.-L.; Cheng, B.-Y.; Chen, S. W.; Chen, H.-Y.; Lin, M.-F.; Huang, J. C. A.

    2015-06-01

    To improve graphene-based multifunctional devices at nanoscale, a stepwise and controllable fabrication procedure must be elucidated. Here, a series of structural transition of bismuth (Bi) adatoms, adsorbed on monolayer epitaxial graphene (MEG), is explored at room temperature. Bi adatoms undergo a structural transition from one-dimensional (1D) linear structures to two-dimensional (2D) triangular islands and such 2D growth mode is affected by the corrugated substrate. Upon Bi deposition, a little charge transfer occurs and a characteristic peak can be observed in the tunneling spectrum, reflecting the distinctive electronic structure of the Bi adatoms. When annealed to ~500 K, 2D triangular Bi islands aggregate into Bi nanoclusters (NCs) of uniform size. A well-controlled fabrication method is thus demonstrated. The approaches adopted herein provide perspectives for fabricating and characterizing periodic networks on MEG and related systems, which are useful in realizing graphene-based electronic, energy, sensor and spintronic devices.

  4. Tailoring low-dimensional structures of bismuth on monolayer epitaxial graphene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H.-H.; Su, S. H.; Chang, S.-L.; Cheng, B.-Y.; Chen, S. W.; Chen, H.-Y.; Lin, M.-F.; Huang, J. C. A.

    2015-01-01

    To improve graphene-based multifunctional devices at nanoscale, a stepwise and controllable fabrication procedure must be elucidated. Here, a series of structural transition of bismuth (Bi) adatoms, adsorbed on monolayer epitaxial graphene (MEG), is explored at room temperature. Bi adatoms undergo a structural transition from one-dimensional (1D) linear structures to two-dimensional (2D) triangular islands and such 2D growth mode is affected by the corrugated substrate. Upon Bi deposition, a little charge transfer occurs and a characteristic peak can be observed in the tunneling spectrum, reflecting the distinctive electronic structure of the Bi adatoms. When annealed to ~500 K, 2D triangular Bi islands aggregate into Bi nanoclusters (NCs) of uniform size. A well-controlled fabrication method is thus demonstrated. The approaches adopted herein provide perspectives for fabricating and characterizing periodic networks on MEG and related systems, which are useful in realizing graphene-based electronic, energy, sensor and spintronic devices. PMID:26100604

  5. Semiconductor devices having a recessed electrode structure

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, Tomas Apostol; Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth

    2015-05-26

    An electrode structure is described in which conductive regions are recessed into a semiconductor region. Trenches may be formed in a semiconductor region, such that conductive regions can be formed in the trenches. The electrode structure may be used in semiconductor devices such as field effect transistors or diodes. Nitride-based power semiconductor devices are described including such an electrode structure, which can reduce leakage current and otherwise improve performance.

  6. Effect of low-dimensional alumina structures on viability of L 929 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fomenko, Alla N. Korovin, Matvey S. Bakina, Olga V. Kazantsev, Sergey O. Glazkova, Elena A. Svarovskaya, Natalia V. Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.

    2015-10-27

    In the study, we estimated the cytotoxicity of alumina nanoparticles differing in shape (nanofibers, nanoplates, nanosheets, agglomerates of nanosheets) and close in physicochemical properties (particle size, specific surface area, phase composition, and zeta potential). The alumina structures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) data, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cytotoxicity was estimated on fibroblast cells of the L929 line. It was found that a more adverse effect on the cells was exerted by alumina nanofibers and nanosheets. The action of nanosheets on the cells was inhibitory and was of about the same level, irrespective of the observation period. The effect of alumina nanosheet agglomerates and nanoplates on the cell proliferation was weak even at an exposure time of 72 h.

  7. Structure and dynamics in low-dimensional guest-host systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.E. . Dept. of Materials Science)

    1992-04-01

    New synthetic materials continue to be discovered at a rapid rate. Many of these can be broadly described as guest-host systems, in the sense that a range of compositions is accessible by selectively inserting heteroatoms or molecules into the interstitial sites in an otherwise pure starting material. The premier examples are layer intercalates (graphite, transition metal di- and trichalocogenides, silicate clays) and doped polymers (notably polyacetylene). With a somewhat broader definition of intercaiation, one might include the high-{Tc} cuprate superconductors (variable oxygen and alkaline earth concentrations), ion-exchanged beta-alumina and related defect oxides, and alkali metal-doped buckminsterfullerene (C{sub 60}). The interest in these material families for energy applications is directly attributable to the guest-in-a-host feature, either by exploiting guest ion mobility in electrochemical devices or by tuning/optimizing properties via control of guest concentration and sublattice structure. This document is a progress report covering the first 25 months (6/89 to 7/91) of the present 3-year period. Part IV describes the proposed research 6/1/92--5/31/95.

  8. Magnetic field-dependent electronic structures of low-dimensional organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, David E.

    Organic systems provide the opportunity to study physics in lower dimensions. Rather than interactions between atomic sites, organic systems are comprised of molecules with the general shape of flat bricks. The stacking of these bricks produces a wide variety of structures with equally diverse ground states. The tau-phase molecular conductors are comprised of the asymmetric DMEDT-TTF molecule. These donors are arranged into a grid-like pattern to create two-dimensional planes of high conductivity. Materials based on stacks of perylene (Per) donor molecules have a conductivity anisotropy which makes them effectively one-dimensional and therefore susceptible to lattice instabilities. Systematic studies of both materials are reported in this dissertation. The donor molecules of the tau-phase systems, tau-(P-(S,S)-DMEDT-TTF) 2(AuBr2)1+y and tau-(EDO-(S,S)-DMEDT-TTF) 2(AuBr2)1+y, only differ by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen yet measurements reveal vastly different results. Measurements of magnetoresistance reveal metallic character in increasing magnetic fields followed by a rapid transition to a bulk insulator, followed by a large hysteresis as the material returns to a metal as the field returns to zero. Comparison between the above mentioned systems for magnetization and pressure dependence suggest a weakly coupled lattice for the nitrogen-based material, which distorts in high fields. With transition temperatures of 8 K and 12 K for (Per)2Pt(mnt) 2 and (Per)2Au(mnt)2, respectively, readily available fields are capable of producing large changes in the low temperature, charge density wave (CDW) states of the systems. When the Au metal sites within the anion chains are replaced with Pt (S = ½), magnetism is introduced to the system. When (Per)2Pt(mnt)2 is subjected to increasing fields beyond ˜ 20 T, the conventional CDW is suppressed and a new density wave state is formed in high fields. Further measurements have been performed observing the change is the

  9. Low-dimensional optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flory, François; Escoubas, Ludovic; Le Rouzo, Judikaël; Berginc, Gerard; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to progress in material science and nanotechnologies, surfaces and thin films can now be structured at different scales. Photonics components take advantage of this possibility to fulfill still more and more complex functions. They are composed of organic and inorganic materials, dielectrics, semiconductors, and metallic materials, or a mixture of them. Multiscale and chiral structures can be used to control both spectral and spatial distributions of light together with its polarization state. The optical mode density in the near field and in the far field can then be designed in particular by combining more or less resonant structures for the optical waves, associating diffraction, interferences, and anisotropic structures like Fabry-Perot, waveguide, plasmons, and photonic crystals. Artificially nanostructured materials, often called metamaterials, exhibit new properties. Different phenomena, including optical topological insulator and structures for vortex waves transporting angular momentum of photons, are discussed and illustrated. With the development of nanometer size structures, another step is taken toward allowing control of the intimate interaction of optical waves with materials to tune their basic electronic properties and permittivity. Both optical and electronic properties are also strongly dependent on coupling effects and need a global approach.

  10. Low dimensional optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flory, F.; Escoubas, Ludovic; Le Rouzo, J.; Berginc, G.; Lee, C. C.

    2014-08-01

    Thanks to progresses in material science and nanotechnologies, surfaces and thin films can now be structured at different scales. Photonics components take benefit of this possibility to fulfill still more and more complex functions. They are composed as well of organic as inorganic materials, dielectric, semiconductor, and metallic materials, or a mixture of them. Multiscale and chiral structures can be used to control both spectral, spatial distribution of light together with its polarization state. The optical mode density in the near field and in the far field can then be designed in particular by combining more or less resonant structures for the optical waves, associating diffraction, interferences and anisotropic structures like Fabry-Perot, waveguide, plasmons, photonic crystals ... Artificially nanostructured materials often called metamaterials exhibit new properties. Different phenomena recently considered, including optical topological insulator and structures for vortex waves transporting angular momentum of photons, will be also discussed and illustrated. With the development of nanometer size structures another step is overtaken allowing the control of the intimate interaction of optical waves with materials to tune their basic electronic properties and permittivity. Both optical and electronic properties are also strongly dependent on coupling effects needing a global approach.

  11. Uniform Descriptions of Electron-IO Phonon Interaction in Structures of Multi-layer Coupling Low-dimensional Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Shi, Jun-Jie

    2005-07-01

    By using the transfer matrix method, within the framework of the dielectric continuum approximation, uniform forms for the interface optical (IO) phonon modes as well as the corresponding electron-IO phonon interaction Hamiltonians in n-layer coupling low-dimensional systems (including the coupling quantum well (CQW), coupling quantum-well wire (CQWW), and coupling quantum dot (CQD)) have been presented. Numerical calculations on the three-layer asymmetrical AlGaAs/GaAs systems are performed, and the analogous characteristics for limited frequencies of IO phonon in the three types of systems (CQW, CQWW, and CQD) when the wave-vector and the quantum number approach zero or infinity are analyzed and specified. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 60276004 and 60390073, the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, the Ministry of Education of China and the Natural Science Foundation of Guangzhou Education Bureau under Grant No. 2060

  12. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-17

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors. PMID:27313043

  13. PREFACE: Dynamics of low-dimensional systems Dynamics of low-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, M.; Miret-Artés, S.; Toennies, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    With the development of techniques for high-resolution inelastic helium atom scattering (HAS), electron scattering (EELS) and neutron spin echo spectroscopy, it has become possible, within approximately the last thirty years, to measure the dispersion curves of surface phonons in insulators, semiconductors and metals. In recent years, the advent of new experimental techniques such as 3He spin-echo spectroscopy, scanning inelastic electron tunnel spectroscopy, inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy and inelastic photoemission have extended surface phonon spectroscopy to a variety of systems. These include ultra-thin metal films, adsorbates at surface and elementary processes where surface phonons play an important role. Other important directions have been actively pursued in the past decade: the dynamics of stepped surfaces and clusters grown on metal surfaces, due to their relevance in many dynamical and chemical processes at surfaces, including heterogeneous catalysis; clusters; diffusion etc. The role of surface effects in these processes has been conjectured since the early days of surface dynamics, although only now is the availability of ab initio approaches providing those conjectures with a microscopic basis. Last but not least, the investigation of non-adiabatic effects, originating for instance from the hybridization (avoided crossing) of the surface phonons branches with the quasi 1D electron-hole excitation branch, is also a challenging new direction. Furthermore, other elementary oscillations such as surface plasmons are being actively investigated. The aforementioned experimental breakthroughs have been accompanied by advances in the theoretical study of atom-surface interaction. In particular, in the past decade first principles calculations based on density functional perturbation theory have boosted the theoretical study of the dynamics of low-dimensional systems. Phonon dispersion relations of clean surfaces, the dynamics of adsorbates, and the

  14. Method of transferring strained semiconductor structure

    DOEpatents

    Nastasi, Michael A.; Shao, Lin

    2009-12-29

    The transfer of strained semiconductor layers from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a multilayer structure on a substrate having surface contaminants. An interface that includes the contaminants is formed in between the deposited layer and the substrate. Hydrogen atoms are introduced into the structure and allowed to diffuse to the interface. Afterward, the deposited multilayer structure is bonded to a second substrate and is separated away at the interface, which results in transferring a multilayer structure from one substrate to the other substrate. The multilayer structure includes at least one strained semiconductor layer and at least one strain-induced seed layer. The strain-induced seed layer can be optionally etched away after the layer transfer.

  15. Local structure and lattice dynamics study of low dimensional materials using atomic pair distribution function and high energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chenyang

    Structure and dynamics lie at the heart of the materials science. A detailed knowledge of both subjects would be foundational in understanding the materials' properties and predicting their potential applications. However, the task becomes increasingly dicult as the particle size is reduced to the nanometer scale. For nanostructured materials their laboratory x-ray scattering patterns are overlapped and broadened, making structure determination impossible. Atomic pair distribution function technique based on either synchrotron x-ray or neutron scattering data is known as the tool of choice for probing local structures. However, to solve the "structure problem" in low-dimensional materials with PDF is still challenging. For example for 2D materials of interest in this thesis the crystallographic modeling approach often yields unphysical thermal factors along stacking direction where new chemical intuitions about their actual structures and new modeling methodology/program are needed. Beyond this, lattice dynamical investigations on nanosized particles are extremely dicult. Laboratory tools such as Raman and infra-red only probe phonons at Brillouin zone center. Although in literature there are a great number of theoretical studies of their vibrational properties based on either empirical force elds or density functional theory, various approximations made in theories make the theoretical predictions less reliable. Also, there lacks the direct experiment result to validate the theory against. In this thesis, we studied the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of technologically relevant low-dimensional materials through synchrotron based x-ray PDF and high energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HERIX) techniques. By collecting PDF data and employing advanced modeling program such as DiPy-CMI, we successfully determined the atomic structures of (i) emerging Ti3C2, Nb4C3 MXenes (transition metal carbides and/or nitrides) that are promising for energy storage

  16. Mott metal-insulator transition induced by utilizing a glasslike structural ordering in low-dimensional molecular conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Benedikt; Müller, Jens; Sasaki, Takahiko

    2014-11-01

    We utilize a glasslike structural transition in order to induce a Mott metal-insulator transition in the quasi-two-dimensional organic charge-transfer salt κ -(BEDT-TTF)2Cu [N (CN)2Br ]. In this material, the terminal ethylene groups of the BEDT-TTF molecules can adopt two different structural orientations within the crystal structure, namely eclipsed (E) and staggered (S) with the relative orientation of the outer C-C bonds being parallel and canted, respectively. These two conformations are thermally disordered at room temperature and undergo a glasslike ordering transition at Tg˜75 K. When cooling through Tg, a small fraction that depends on the cooling rate remains frozen in the S configuration, which is of slightly higher energy, corresponding to a controllable degree of structural disorder. We demonstrate that, when thermally coupled to a low-temperature heat bath, a pulsed heating current through the sample causes a very fast relaxation with cooling rates at Tg of the order of several 1000 K /min . The freezing of the structural degrees of freedom causes a decrease of the electronic bandwidth W with increasing cooling rate, and hence a Mott metal-insulator transition as the system crosses the critical ratio (W/U ) c of bandwidth to on-site Coulomb repulsion U . Due to the glassy character of the transition, the effect is persistent below Tg and can be reversibly repeated by melting the frozen configuration upon warming above Tg. Both by exploiting the characteristics of slowly changing relaxation times close to this temperature and by controlling the heating power, the materials can be fine-tuned across the Mott transition. A simple model allows for an estimate of the energy difference between the E and S state as well as the accompanying degree of frozen disorder in the population of the two orientations.

  17. Structure and dynamics in low-dimensional guest-host systems. Progress report, June 1, 1990--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    New synthetic materials continue to be discovered at a rapid rate. Many of these can be broadly described as guest-host systems, in the sense that a range of compositions is accessible by selectively inserting heteroatoms or molecules into the interstitial sites in an otherwise pure starting material. The premier examples are layer intercalates (graphite, transition metal di- and trichalocogenides, silicate clays) and doped polymers (notably polyacetylene). With a somewhat broader definition of intercaiation, one might include the high-{Tc} cuprate superconductors (variable oxygen and alkaline earth concentrations), ion-exchanged beta-alumina and related defect oxides, and alkali metal-doped buckminsterfullerene (C{sub 60}). The interest in these material families for energy applications is directly attributable to the guest-in-a-host feature, either by exploiting guest ion mobility in electrochemical devices or by tuning/optimizing properties via control of guest concentration and sublattice structure. This document is a progress report covering the first 25 months (6/89 to 7/91) of the present 3-year period. Part IV describes the proposed research 6/1/92--5/31/95.

  18. Light amplification in semiconductor-superconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjieh, Raja; Sabag, Evyatar; Hayat, Alex

    2016-02-01

    We study a new effect of Cooper-pair-based two-photon gain in semiconductor-superconductor structures, showing broadband enhancement of ultrafast two-photon amplification. We further show that with the superconducting enhancement, at moderately high seed intensities, the two-photon gain contribution approaches that of the one-photon gain. A full quantum-optical model of singly- and fully-stimulated two-photon emission is developed. Our results provide new insights on nonlinear light-matter interaction in the superconducting state, including the possibility of coherent control in two-photon semiconductor-superconductor devices. The theoretically-demonstrated effects can have important implications in optoelectronics and in coherent-control applications.

  19. Metallic behavior in low-dimensional honeycomb SiB crystals: A first-principles prediction of atomic structure and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Anders; de Brito Mota, F.; Rivelino, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the atomic and electronic structure of a two-dimensional monolayer of boron and silicon elements within periodic density functional theory. The proposed h-SiB sheet is a structural analog of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and exhibits a good structural stability, compared to the structure of silicene. The calculated cohesive energy of an infinite sheet of h-SiB is of 4.71 eV/atom, whereas the corresponding value for silicene is 4.09 eV/atom. However, h-SiB sheets are not able to be stacked into a three-dimensional graphitelike structure, leading to a new hexagonal phase. On the other hand, h-SiB is predicted to roll up into single-walled silicon boron nanotubes (SWSiBNTs) of which we examine the electronic properties of some zigzag and armchair tubes. The strain energy of the SWSiBNTs are four to five times lower than the strain energy of the corresponding carbon nanotubes. In contrast to more polar honeycomb monolayers, the h-SiB sheet is not semiconducting or semimetallic. It has a delocalized charge density like graphene, but the π band and the two highest occupied σ bands are only partly filled. This results in a high density of states around the Fermi level and a metallic behavior of the h-SiB sheet. Interestingly, all the low-dimensional h-SiB-based structures, including the smallest to the largest stable tubes studied here, are predicted to form metallic systems.

  20. Semiconductor structures for repeated velocity overshoot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. A., Jr.; Capasso, F.; Thornber, K. K.

    1982-12-01

    The conditions required for obtaining repeated velocity overshoot in semiconductors are discussed. Two classes of structures that provide these conditions are considered. The structures are seen as holding promise for achieving average drift velocities well in excess of the maximum steady-state velocity over distances ranging from submicron to tens of microns. In structures of the first class, the stairstep in potential is achieved by using a graded bandgap that is similar to the avalanche photodetector described by Williams et al. (1982), where the composition is graded from GaAs to Al(0.2)Ga(0.8)As. The second class of structures uses alternating planar doped charge sheets, as described by Malik et al. (1980).

  1. The structure and morphology of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kadavanich, A V

    1997-11-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals were studied using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Organically capped nanocrystals were found to have faceted shapes consistent with Wulff polyhedra after the effects of capping ligands on surface energies were taken into account. The basic shape thus derived for wurtzite (WZ) structure CdSe nanocrystals capped by tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) was a truncated hexagonal prism, elongated alone the <001> axis with (100) and (002) facets. This structure has C{sub 3v} point group symmetry. The main defect in this structure is a stacking fault (a single layer of zinc blende type stacking), which does not significantly affect the shape (does not alter the point group).

  2. Low dimensional magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjall, Jonas Alexander

    quantum Hall phases for bosons can be obtained, and the phases nu = 1/2 and nu = 2/3 have the edge spectra predicted by the chiral Luttinger liquid theory. Also, some of the traditional experimental techniques for detecting magnetic order and dynamics in solid state materials, like neutron scattering has had somewhat of a renaissance lately. In a recent experiment on CoNb2O 6, Coldea et. al. found for the first time experimental evidence of the exceptional Lie algebra E8. The emergence of this symmetry was theoretically predicted long ago for the transverse quantum Ising chain in the presence of a weak longitudinal field. We consider an accurate microscopic model of CoNb2O6 incorporating additional couplings and calculate numerically the dynamical structure function using a recently developed matrix-product-state method. The excitation spectra show bound states characteristic of the weakly broken E8 symmetry. We compare the observed bound state signatures in this model to those found in the transverse Ising chain in a longitudinal field and to experimental data. Finally, we investigate the ground state phase diagram of a related quantum spin chain, the S = 2 XXZ chain with single-ion anisotropy. The interest in this system comes mainly from connecting the highly quantum mechanical spin-1 phase diagram with the classical S = infinity phase diagram. While most of these questions where believed to have been satisfactorily answered mainly with DMRG, some recent studies have questioned some of the conclusions. We use several of the recent advances within DMRG and perform a detailed analysis of the whole phase diagram. We extend the phase diagram by considering different types of single ion anisotropies which help us to answer two important questions: First we show that one can adiabatically move from the isotropic Heisenberg point to the so-called large-D phase with a continuous change of the Hamiltonian. Second, we can tune the model into a predicted intermediate phase which

  3. Metal Insulator Semiconductor Structures on Gallium Arsenide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Sean Denis

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The compound semiconductor gallium arsenide and its associated aluminium alloys have been the subject of intensive research in recent years. These materials offer the advantage of high electron mobilities coupled with the ability to be 'barrier engineered' leading to high injection efficiencies in bipolar devices. From a technological viewpoint however these materials are difficult to work with and device realisation is a major problem. Both thermal and anodic oxidation of these materials fail to produce a dielectric of sufficient quality for device applications and as a result devices tend to be complex non planar, mesa structures. A technique is proposed whereby the electrical interface is separated from the dielectric by means of a thin layer of AlGaAs, carrier confinement in the active GaAs region being maintained by the potential barriers to holes and electrons formed by the GaAs-AlGaAs junction. The integrity of these barriers is maintained by the provision of a suitable 'capping' dielectric. The electrical characteristics of various dielectric systems on GaAs have been investigated by means of current -voltage, capacitance-voltage and electronic breakdown measurements. Transport mechanisms for leakage current through these systems are identified and the interface properties (viz Fermi level pinning etc.) assessed by means of a direct comparison between experimental capacitance-voltage curves and theoretical data obtained from classical theory. As a technique for producing a convenient, in house 'capping' dielectric with good electrical and mechanical properties, the plasma anodisation of deposited aluminium films has been investigated. The anodisation parameters have been optimised for oxidation of these films in a microwave sustained oxygen plasma to give alumina films of around 500 A. A qualitative model for the anodisation process, involving linear and parabolic growth kinetics is proposed and

  4. Semiconductor wire array structures, and solar cells and photodetectors based on such structures

    DOEpatents

    Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Petykiewicz, Jan A.

    2014-08-19

    A structure comprising an array of semiconductor structures, an infill material between the semiconductor materials, and one or more light-trapping elements is described. Photoconverters and photoelectrochemical devices based on such structure also described.

  5. Physics of low-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The physics of low-dimensional systems has developed in a remarkable way over the last decade and has accelerated over the last few years, in particular because of the discovery of the new high temperature superconductors. The new developments started more than fifteen years ago with the discovery of the unexpected quasi-one-dimensional character of the TTF-TCNQ. Since then the field of conducting quasi-one-dimensional organic system have been rapidly growing. Parallel to the experimental work there has been an important theoretical development of great conceptual importance, such as charge density waves, soliton-like excitations, fractional charges, new symmetry properties etc. A new field of fundamental importance was the discovery of the Quantum Hall Effect in 1980. This field is still expanding with new experimental and theoretical discoveries. In 1986, then, came the totally unexpected discovery of high temperature superconductivity which started an explosive development. The three areas just mentioned formed the main themes of the Symposium. They do not in any way exhaust the progress in low-dimensional physics. We should mention the recent important development with both two-dimensional and one-dimensional and even zero-dimensional structures (quantum dots). The physics of mesoscopic systems is another important area where the low dimensionality is a key feature. Because of the small format of this Symposium we could unfortunately not cover these areas.

  6. Quasibound states in semiconductor quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihani, Samir; Page, Hideaki; Beere, Harvey E.

    2010-02-01

    We present a study on quasibound states in multiple quantum well structures using a finite element model (FEM). The FEM is implemented for solving the effective mass Schrödinger equation in arbitrary layered semiconductor nanostructures with an arbitrary applied potential. The model also includes nonparabolicity effects by using an energy dependent effective mass, where the resulting nonlinear eigenvalue problem was solved using an iterative approach. We focus on quasibound/continuum states above the barrier potential and show that such states can be determined using cyclic boundary conditions. This new method enables the determination of both bound and quasibound states simultaneously, making it more efficient than other methods where different boundary conditions have to be used in extracting the relevant states. Furthermore, the new method lifted the problem of quasibound state divergence commonly seen with many other methods of calculation. Hence enabling accurate determination of dipole matrix elements involving both bound and quasibound states. Such calculations are vital in the design of intersubband optoelectronic devices and reveal the interesting properties of quasibound states above the potential barriers.

  7. PREFACE: Dynamics of low-dimensional systems Dynamics of low-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, M.; Miret-Artés, S.; Toennies, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    With the development of techniques for high-resolution inelastic helium atom scattering (HAS), electron scattering (EELS) and neutron spin echo spectroscopy, it has become possible, within approximately the last thirty years, to measure the dispersion curves of surface phonons in insulators, semiconductors and metals. In recent years, the advent of new experimental techniques such as 3He spin-echo spectroscopy, scanning inelastic electron tunnel spectroscopy, inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy and inelastic photoemission have extended surface phonon spectroscopy to a variety of systems. These include ultra-thin metal films, adsorbates at surface and elementary processes where surface phonons play an important role. Other important directions have been actively pursued in the past decade: the dynamics of stepped surfaces and clusters grown on metal surfaces, due to their relevance in many dynamical and chemical processes at surfaces, including heterogeneous catalysis; clusters; diffusion etc. The role of surface effects in these processes has been conjectured since the early days of surface dynamics, although only now is the availability of ab initio approaches providing those conjectures with a microscopic basis. Last but not least, the investigation of non-adiabatic effects, originating for instance from the hybridization (avoided crossing) of the surface phonons branches with the quasi 1D electron-hole excitation branch, is also a challenging new direction. Furthermore, other elementary oscillations such as surface plasmons are being actively investigated. The aforementioned experimental breakthroughs have been accompanied by advances in the theoretical study of atom-surface interaction. In particular, in the past decade first principles calculations based on density functional perturbation theory have boosted the theoretical study of the dynamics of low-dimensional systems. Phonon dispersion relations of clean surfaces, the dynamics of adsorbates, and the

  8. Large Lateral Photovoltaic Effect in Metal-(Oxide-) Semiconductor Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chongqi; Wang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) can be used in position-sensitive detectors to detect very small displacements due to its output of lateral photovoltage changing linearly with light spot position. In this review, we will summarize some of our recent works regarding LPE in metal-semiconductor and metal-oxide-semiconductor structures, and give a theoretical model of LPE in these two structures. PMID:22163463

  9. Low Dimensional Nanomaterials for Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinlong; Xiang, Hongjun

    Moore's Law in microelectronic technology will break down as the size of individual bits approaches the dimension of atoms; this has been called the end of the silicon road map. For this reason and also for enhancing the multifunctionality of devices, the spin degree of freedom of electron is being investigated for magnetoelectronics applications, i.e., spintronics. Spin-based devices are closely connected with the development of nanotechnology. In this chapter, recent developments of the low-dimensional nanomaterials for spintronics are reviewed. In the first section, the main concepts of spintronics including nanospintronics are briefly discussed. Experimental studies on transition-metal-doped nanowires and nanotubes are summarized in the second section. Extensive theoretical works in this field are reviewed in the third section. Finally, an outlook is given in the last section.

  10. Two-mode dynamics in different semiconductor laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scirè, Alessandro; Sorel, Marc; Colet, Pere; Tessone, Claudio Juan; Mirasso, Claudio R.; San Miguel, Maxi

    2006-04-01

    We review three two-mode models for different semiconductor laser structures: Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs), Twin-Stripe Semiconductor-Lasers (TSSL), and Semiconductor Ring Lasers (SRL). The VCSELs model and TSSL model display rich dynamic behavior when a saturable absorber is embedded in the cavity. VCSELs with saturable absorber showed polarization chaos, which found applications in encoded communications; TSSLs with saturable absorber show coherent locked states as well as chaotic behavior; and SRLs show a complex two-mode dynamics giving rise to bidirectional operation, alternate oscillations and spontaneous symmetry breaking toward quasi-unidirectional bistable solutions, with potential applications to all-optical switching.

  11. Metal oxide semiconductor structure using oxygen-terminated diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicot, G.; Maréchal, A.; Motte, R.; Muret, P.; Gheeraert, E.; Pernot, J.

    2013-06-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor structures with aluminum oxide as insulator and p-type (100) mono-crystalline diamond as semiconductor have been fabricated and investigated by capacitance versus voltage and current versus voltage measurements. The aluminum oxide dielectric was deposited using low temperature atomic layer deposition on an oxygenated diamond surface. The capacitance voltage measurements demonstrate that accumulation, depletion, and deep depletion regimes can be controlled by the bias voltage, opening the route for diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor. A band diagram is proposed and discussed.

  12. Interface Structure of MoO3 on Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robin T.; Thibau, Emmanuel S.; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-02-01

    We have systematically studied interface structure formed by vapor-phase deposition of typical transition metal oxide MoO3 on organic semiconductors. Eight organic hole transport materials have been used in this study. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to measure the evolution of the physical, chemical and electronic structure of the interfaces at various stages of MoO3 deposition on these organic semiconductor surfaces. For the interface physical structure, it is found that MoO3 diffuses into the underlying organic layer, exhibiting a trend of increasing diffusion with decreasing molecular molar mass. For the interface chemical structure, new carbon and molybdenum core-level states are observed, as a result of interfacial electron transfer from organic semiconductor to MoO3. For the interface electronic structure, energy level alignment is observed in agreement with the universal energy level alignment rule of molecules on metal oxides, despite deposition order inversion.

  13. Printable semiconductor structures and related methods of making and assembling

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang; , Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao; Ko, Heung Cho; Mack, Shawn

    2013-03-12

    The present invention provides a high yield pathway for the fabrication, transfer and assembly of high quality printable semiconductor elements having selected physical dimensions, shapes, compositions and spatial orientations. The compositions and methods of the present invention provide high precision registered transfer and integration of arrays of microsized and/or nanosized semiconductor structures onto substrates, including large area substrates and/or flexible substrates. In addition, the present invention provides methods of making printable semiconductor elements from low cost bulk materials, such as bulk silicon wafers, and smart-materials processing strategies that enable a versatile and commercially attractive printing-based fabrication platform for making a broad range of functional semiconductor devices.

  14. Printable semiconductor structures and related methods of making and assembling

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao; Ko, Heung Cho; Mack, Shawn

    2010-09-21

    The present invention provides a high yield pathway for the fabrication, transfer and assembly of high quality printable semiconductor elements having selected physical dimensions, shapes, compositions and spatial orientations. The compositions and methods of the present invention provide high precision registered transfer and integration of arrays of microsized and/or nanosized semiconductor structures onto substrates, including large area substrates and/or flexible substrates. In addition, the present invention provides methods of making printable semiconductor elements from low cost bulk materials, such as bulk silicon wafers, and smart-materials processing strategies that enable a versatile and commercially attractive printing-based fabrication platform for making a broad range of functional semiconductor devices.

  15. Printable semiconductor structures and related methods of making and assembling

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao; Ko, Heung Cho; Mack, Shawn

    2011-10-18

    The present invention provides a high yield pathway for the fabrication, transfer and assembly of high quality printable semiconductor elements having selected physical dimensions, shapes, compositions and spatial orientations. The compositions and methods of the present invention provide high precision registered transfer and integration of arrays of microsized and/or nanosized semiconductor structures onto substrates, including large area substrates and/or flexible substrates. In addition, the present invention provides methods of making printable semiconductor elements from low cost bulk materials, such as bulk silicon wafers, and smart-materials processing strategies that enable a versatile and commercially attractive printing-based fabrication platform for making a broad range of functional semiconductor devices.

  16. Structure-property relationships in semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Berding, M. A.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    It is presently noted that the atomic distribution of constituents in semiconductor alloys is never truly random, since there are always interactions giving rise to correlations whose degree and character depend on which interactions are dominant, as well as on the growth conditions. Although most of the interactions that can be expected to generate correlations have been identified, the fact that not all have been thus far treated exhaustively leaves several details unclear. A characterization of the primary effects in general terms is accordingly achieved.

  17. Local structure determination in strained-layer semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woicik, Joseph C.

    The theory of elasticity accurately describes the deformations of macroscopic bodies under the action of applied stress [1]. In this review, we examine the internal mechanisms of elasticity for strained-layer semiconductor heterostructures. In particular, we present extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements to show how the bond lengths and bond angles in semiconductor thin-alloy films change with strain when they are grown coherently on substrates with different lattice constants. The structural distortions measured by experiment are compared to valence-force field (VFF) calculations and other theoretical models. Atomic switching and interfacial strain at buried interfaces are also discussed.

  18. Screenable contact structure and method for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Bernd

    1980-08-26

    An ink composition for deposition upon the surface of a semiconductor device to provide a contact area for connection to external circuitry is disclosed, the composition comprising an ink system containing a metal powder, a binder and vehicle, and a metal frit. The ink is screened onto the semiconductor surface in the desired pattern and is heated to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal frit to become liquid. The metal frit dissolves some of the metal powder and densifies the structure by transporting the dissolved metal powder in a liquid sintering process. The sintering process typically may be carried out in any type of atmosphere. A small amount of dopant or semiconductor material may be added to the ink systems to achieve particular results if desired.

  19. Low-dimensional Te-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qisheng; Safdar, Muhammad; Wang, Zhenxing; He, Jun

    2013-07-26

    Low-dimensional Te-based nanomaterials have attracted intense attention in recent years due to their novel physical properties including surface-state effects, photoelectricity, phase changes, and thermoelectricity. The recent development of synthesis methods of low-dimensional Te-based nanostructures is reviewed, such as van der Waals expitaxial growth and template-assisted solution-phase deposition. In addition, the unique properties of these materials, such as tunable surface states, high photoresponsivity, fast phase change, and high thermoelectricity figure of merit, are reviewed. The potential applications of low-dimensional Te-based nanostructures are broad but particularly promising for nanoscale electronic and photoelectronic devices. PMID:24048978

  20. Interface Structure of MoO3 on Organic Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    White, Robin T; Thibau, Emmanuel S; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We have systematically studied interface structure formed by vapor-phase deposition of typical transition metal oxide MoO3 on organic semiconductors. Eight organic hole transport materials have been used in this study. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to measure the evolution of the physical, chemical and electronic structure of the interfaces at various stages of MoO3 deposition on these organic semiconductor surfaces. For the interface physical structure, it is found that MoO3 diffuses into the underlying organic layer, exhibiting a trend of increasing diffusion with decreasing molecular molar mass. For the interface chemical structure, new carbon and molybdenum core-level states are observed, as a result of interfacial electron transfer from organic semiconductor to MoO3. For the interface electronic structure, energy level alignment is observed in agreement with the universal energy level alignment rule of molecules on metal oxides, despite deposition order inversion. PMID:26880185

  1. Interface Structure of MoO3 on Organic Semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    White, Robin T.; Thibau, Emmanuel S.; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We have systematically studied interface structure formed by vapor-phase deposition of typical transition metal oxide MoO3 on organic semiconductors. Eight organic hole transport materials have been used in this study. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to measure the evolution of the physical, chemical and electronic structure of the interfaces at various stages of MoO3 deposition on these organic semiconductor surfaces. For the interface physical structure, it is found that MoO3 diffuses into the underlying organic layer, exhibiting a trend of increasing diffusion with decreasing molecular molar mass. For the interface chemical structure, new carbon and molybdenum core-level states are observed, as a result of interfacial electron transfer from organic semiconductor to MoO3. For the interface electronic structure, energy level alignment is observed in agreement with the universal energy level alignment rule of molecules on metal oxides, despite deposition order inversion. PMID:26880185

  2. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyanido groups. XXVIII. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of two copper(II) tetracyanidoplatinate complexes with 1,2-diaminopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Vavra, Martin; Potočňák, Ivan; Dušek, Michal; Čižmár, Erik; Ozerov, Mykhaylo; Zvyagin, Sergei A.

    2015-05-15

    Violet crystals of ([Cu(pn){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Pt(CN){sub 4}])[Pt(CN){sub 4}]·2H{sub 2}O (1, pn=1,2-diaminopropane) and blue crystals of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O (2) were prepared under hydrothermal conditions and characterized using elemental analysis, IR and UV–vis spectroscopy and by X-ray crystal structure analysis. Different number of ν(C≡N) absorption bands of these two compounds reflects their different structures. An X-ray crystal structure analysis has shown that complex 1 is of ionic character and is formed from trinuclear [Cu(pn){sub 2}–Pt(CN){sub 4}–Cu(pn){sub 2}]{sup 2+} complex cation and discrete [Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2–} anion together with two molecules of crystal water. On the other hand, complex 2 is of polymeric character and is formed by 2D networks of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sub n} composition and completed by n molecules of crystal water. Magnetic measurements show the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange interaction in complex 1 (Θ=–0.2 K), while the magnetic susceptibility of complex 2 is well described by the model of uniform S=1/2 spin chain with exchange interaction J/k{sub B}=–1.64 K. - Graphical abstract: Two complexes of different structural types from the system Cu(II) – 1,2–diaminopropane – [Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2–} have been isolated. These were characterized by IR and UV–VIS spectroscopy, X–ray crystal structure analysis together with the magnetic measurements. On one hand ([Cu(pn){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Pt(CN){sub 4}])[Pt(CN){sub 4}]∙2H{sub 2}O is of ionic character and is formed from trinuclear complex cation and discrete anion together with two molecules of crystal water. On the other hand, [Cu(pn)Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sub n}∙nH{sub 2}O is of polymeric character and is formed by 2D networks of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sub n} composition and completed by n molecules of crystal water. - Highlights: • Two complexes of different compositions from one system have been isolated. • First complex is of

  3. EDITORIAL: (Nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures (Nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanni, Alberta

    2011-06-01

    The latest impressive advancements in the epitaxial fabrication of semiconductors and in the refinement of characterization techniques have the potential to allow insight into the deep relation between materials' structural properties and their physical and chemical functionalities. Furthermore, while the comprehensive (nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures is becoming more and more necessary, a compendium of the currently available techniques is lacking. We are positive that an overview of the hurdles related to the specific methods, often leading to deceptive interpretations, will be most informative for the broad community working on semiconductors, and will help in shining some light onto a plethora of controversial reports found in the literature. From this perspective, with this special issue we address and highlight the challenges and misinterpretations related to complementary local (nanoscale) and more global experimental methods for the characterization of semiconductors. The six topical reviews and the three invited papers by leading experts in the specific fields collected in here are intended to provide the required broad overview on the possibilities of actual (nano)characterization methods, from the microscopy of single quantum structures, over the synchrotron-based absorption and diffraction of nano-objects, to the contentious detection of tiny magnetic signals by quantum interference and resonance techniques. We are grateful to all the authors for their valuable contributions. Moreover, I would like to thank the Editorial Board of the journal for supporting the realization of this special issue and for inviting me to serve as Guest Editor. We greatly appreciate the work of the reviewers, of the editorial staff of Semiconductor Science and Technology and of IOP Publishing. In particular, the efforts of Alice Malhador in coordinating this special issue are acknowledged.

  4. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyanido groups. XXVIII. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of two copper(II) tetracyanidoplatinate complexes with 1,2-diaminopropane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavra, Martin; Potočňák, Ivan; Dušek, Michal; Čižmár, Erik; Ozerov, Mykhaylo; Zvyagin, Sergei A.

    2015-05-01

    Violet crystals of {[Cu(pn)2]2[Pt(CN)4]}[Pt(CN)4]·2H2O (1, pn=1,2-diaminopropane) and blue crystals of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN)4]n·nH2O (2) were prepared under hydrothermal conditions and characterized using elemental analysis, IR and UV-vis spectroscopy and by X-ray crystal structure analysis. Different number of ν(C≡N) absorption bands of these two compounds reflects their different structures. An X-ray crystal structure analysis has shown that complex 1 is of ionic character and is formed from trinuclear [Cu(pn)2-Pt(CN)4-Cu(pn)2]2+ complex cation and discrete [Pt(CN)4]2- anion together with two molecules of crystal water. On the other hand, complex 2 is of polymeric character and is formed by 2D networks of [Cu(pn)Pt(CN)4]n composition and completed by n molecules of crystal water. Magnetic measurements show the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange interaction in complex 1 (Θ=-0.2 K), while the magnetic susceptibility of complex 2 is well described by the model of uniform S=1/2 spin chain with exchange interaction J/kB=-1.64 K.

  5. Spin Hall Effect in Doped Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Wang-Kong; Das Sarma, Sankar

    2006-03-01

    We present a microscopic theory of the extrinsic spin Hall effect based on the diagrammatic perturbation theory. Side-jump (SJ) and skew-scattering (SS) contributions are explicitly taken into account to calculate the spin Hall conductivity, and we show their effects scale as σxy^SJ/σxy^SS ˜(/τ)/ɛF, where τ being the transport relaxation time. Motivated by recent experimental work we apply our theory to n-doped and p-doped 3D and 2D GaAs structures, obtaining analytical formulas for the SJ and SS contributions. Moreover, the ratio of the spin Hall conductivity to longitudinal conductivity is found as σs/σc˜10-3-10-4, in reasonable agreement with the recent experimental results of Kato et al. [Science 306, 1910 (2004)] in n-doped 3D GaAs system.

  6. Spin Hall Effect in Doped Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Wang-Kong; Das Sarma, S.

    2006-02-01

    In this Letter we present a microscopic theory of the extrinsic spin Hall effect based on the diagrammatic perturbation theory. Side-jump and skew-scattering contributions are explicitly taken into account to calculate the spin Hall conductivity, and we show that their effects scale as σxySJ/σxySS˜(ℏ/τ)/ɛF, with τ being the transport relaxation time. Motivated by recent experimental work we apply our theory to n- and p-doped 3D and 2D GaAs structures, obtaining σs/σc˜10-3-10-4, where σs(c) is the spin Hall (charge) conductivity, which is in reasonable agreement with the recent experimental results of Kato et al. [Science 306, 1910 (2004)]SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1105514 in n-doped 3D GaAs system.

  7. Confinement and Diffusion Effects in Dynamical Nuclear Polarization in Low Dimensional Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Dan; Tifrea, Ionel

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization as it results from the hyperfine coupling between nonequilibrium electronic spins and nuclear spins in semiconductor nanostructures. The natural confinement provided by low dimensional nanostructures is responsible for an efficient nuclear spin - electron spin hyperfine coupling [1] and for a reduced value of the nuclear spin diffusion constant [2]. In the case of optical pumping, the induced nuclear spin polarization is position dependent even in the presence of nuclear spin diffusion. This effect should be measurable via optically induced nuclear magnetic resonance or time-resolved Faraday rotation experiments. We discuss the implications of our calculations for the case of GaAs quantum well structures.[4pt] [1] I. Tifrea and M. E. Flatt'e, Phys. Rev. B 84, 155319 (2011).[0pt] [2] A. Malinowski and R. T. Harley, Solid State Commun. 114, 419 (2000).

  8. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  9. Evidence of low-dimensional antiferromagnetic ordering and crystal structure in the R sub 2 BaNiO sub 5 ( R =Y,Er) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, J.; Gutierrez-Puebla, E.; Monge, M.A.; Rasines, I.; Ruriaaz-Valero, C. ); Fernandez, F.; Saez-Puche, R. ); Campa, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Crystals of {ital R}{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} ({ital R}=Y,Er) have been grown, and their structures have been established by single-crystal x-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize in the Nd{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} structure type, with one-dimensional chains of vertex-sharing NiO{sub 6} octahedra in the direction of the {bold a} axis. These octahedra show an unusual twofold distortion: The Ni-O distances to the two axial oxygen atoms are considerably shorter, 0.3 A, than those to the four equatorial oxygens, and these oxygens are distorted from the right angles of a regular octahedron to 79.0(2){degree} or 77.7(6){degree}, respectively. As a result of this, Ni-O(axial)-Ni distances are very short, 3.76 and 3.75 A for {ital R}=Y and Er, respectively. X-ray powder diffraction data and the results of magnetic measurements for both oxides are given. The structural features mentioned elucidate why Ni{sup 2+} ions in polycrystalline Y{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} behave as a monodimensional system in which they become antiferromagnetically ordered below 300 K. Besides that, the ferromagnetic interactions that operate below 40 K can be due to tridimensional interchain interactions and/or the presence of ferromagnetic impurities. The estimated Neel temperature for Y{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5}, higher than that reported for Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5}, is explained by the promotion of the superexchange Ni-O-Ni interactions along the chains of flattened NiO{sub 6} octahedra sharing corners. In Er{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} both effects are masked by the strong paramagnetic signal of Er{sup 3+}, and a maximum observed at 15.6 K for the susceptibility is attributed to tridimensional ordering of the Er{sup 3+} cations.

  10. Photoemission Studies of Low Dimensional Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grioni, Marco

    1998-03-01

    High-resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful probe of the electronic structure and instabilities of low-dimensional metals. Quasi-2 dimensional materials, like the layered transition metal dichalcogenides, exhibit dispersing quasiparticle bands, normal Fermi liquid lineshapes, and the expected partial or total Fermi surface collapse induced by charge density wave transitions. By contrast, ARPES reveals unexpected and peculiar spectral properties in quasi 1D compounds. Quite generally, a strong suppression of spectral weight near the chemical potential (a pseudogap) is observed in the metallic state, indicative of strong correlations. This non-standard behavior is confirmed by ARPES results on typical 1D organic conductors like TTF-TCNQ and the Bechgaard salts (TMTSF)_2X (X=PF_6,ClO_4)(F. Zwick et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79), 3982 (1997). The absence of traces of the Fermi surface, and the spectral lineshapes, are incompatible with a Fermi liquid scenario, and hint to the charge-spin separation predicted by models for correlated fermions in 1D.

  11. Structural properties of bismuth-bearing semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    The structural properties of bismuth-bearing III-V semiconductor alloys are addressed. Because the Bi compounds are not known to form zincblende structures, only the anion-substituted alloys InPBi, InAsBi, and InSbBi are considered candidates as narrow-gap semiconductors. Miscibility calculations indicate that InSbBi will be the most miscible, and InPBi, with the large lattice mismatch of the constituents, will be the most difficult to mix. Calculations of the hardness of the Bi compounds indicate that, once formed, the InPBi alloy will be harder than the other Bi alloys, and substantially harder than the currently favored narrow-gap semiconductor HgCdTe. Thus, although InSbBi may be an easier material to prepare, InPBi promises to be a harder material. Growth of the Bi compounds will require high effective growth temperatures, probably attainable only through the use of nonequilibrium energy-assisted epitaxial growth techniques.

  12. Structural properties of bismuth-bearing semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.; Miller, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    The structural properties of bismuth-bearing III-V semiconductor alloys InPBi, InAsBi, and InSbBi were studied theoretically. Bond energies, bond lengths, and strain coefficients were calculated for pure AlBi, GaBi, and InBi compounds and their alloys, and predictions were made for the mixing enthalpies, miscibility gaps, and critical metastable-to-stable material transition temperatures. Miscibility calculations indicate that InSbBi will be the most miscible, and the InPBi will be the the most difficult to mix. However, calculations of the hardness of the Bi compounds indicate that, once formed, the InPBi alloy will be harder than the other Bi alloys and substantially harder than the currently favored narrow-gap semiconductor HgCdTe.

  13. Local measurement of optically induced photocurrent in semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesova, Marketa; Dobis, Pavel; Tomanek, Pavel; Uhdeova, Nadezda

    2003-07-01

    Photocurrent (PC) spectroscopic techniques have demonstrated to be helpful experimental method to investigate the local properties of bulk semiconductors, microstructures, surfaces and interfaces. We have measured locally induced PC of semiconductor quantum structures using a technique of reflection Scanning Near-field Optical Microscope (r-SNOM) in combination with Ti:Sapphire laser and tuning dye laser and with He-Ne laser. The r-SNOM employs an uncoated and/or Au-metalized single-mode fiber tip both in illumination and collection mode. Taking opportunity of the high lateral resolution of the microscope and combining it with fast micro-PL, it is possible to locate e.g. defects in a multiple quantum well grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Near-field characteristics of measured quantities are also discussed.

  14. Low Dimensionality Effects in Complex Magnetic Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Paula J. Lampen

    Complex magnetic oxides represent a unique intersection of immense technological importance and fascinating physical phenomena originating from interwoven structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. The resulting energetically close competing orders can be controllably selected through external fields. Competing interactions and disorder represent an additional opportunity to systematically manipulate the properties of pure magnetic systems, leading to frustration, glassiness, and other novel phenomena while finite sample dimension plays a similar role in systems with long-range cooperative effects or large correlation lengths. A rigorous understanding of these effects in strongly correlated oxides is key to manipulating their functionality and device performance, but remains a challenging task. In this dissertation, we examine a number of problems related to intrinsic and extrinsic low dimensionality, disorder, and competing interactions in magnetic oxides by applying a unique combination of standard magnetometry techniques and unconventional magnetocaloric effect and transverse susceptibility measurements. The influence of dimensionality and disorder on the nature and critical properties of phase transitions in manganites is illustrated in La0.7 Ca0.3MnO3, in which both size reduction to the nanoscale and chemically-controlled quenched disorder are observed to induce a progressive weakening of the first-order nature of the transition, despite acting through the distinct mechanisms of surface effects and site dilution. In the second-order material La0.8Ca0.2MnO3, a strong magnetic field is found to drive the system toward its tricritical point as competition between exchange interactions in the inhomogeneous ground state is suppressed. In the presence of large phase separation stabilized by chemical disorder and long-range strain, dimensionality has a profound effect. With the systematic reduction of particle size in microscale-phase-separated (La, Pr

  15. Band structure of core-shell semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistol, Mats-Erik; Pryor, Craig

    2009-03-01

    We present band structures of strained core-shell nanowires composed of zincblende III-V (binary) semiconductors. We consider all combinations of AlN, GaN, InN, and all combinations of AlP, GaP, AlAs, GaAs, InP, InAs, AlSb, GaSb, and InSb. We compute the γ- and X-conduction band minima as well as the valence band maximum, all as functions of the core and shell radii. The calculations were performed using continuum elasticity theory for the strain, eight-band strain-dependent k.p theory for the γ-point energies, and single band approximation for the X-point conduction minima. We identify structures with type-I, type-II and type-III band alignment, as well as systems in which one material becomes metallic due to a negative band-gap. We identify structures that may support exciton crystals with and without photoexcitation. We have also computed the effective masses, from which the confinement energy may be estimated. All the results [Pistol and Pryor, Phys. Rev. B 78, 115319] are available in graphical and tabular form at www.semiconductor.physics.uiowa.edu

  16. Simulating semiconductor structures for next-generation optical inspection technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golani, Ori; Dolev, Ido; Pond, James; Niegemann, Jens

    2016-02-01

    We present a technique for optimizing advanced optical imaging methods for nanoscale structures, such as those encountered in the inspection of cutting-edge semiconductor devices. The optimization flow is divided to two parts: simulating light-structure interaction using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and simulating the optical imaging system by means of its optical transfer function. As a case study, FDTD is used to simulate 10-nm silicon line-space and static random-access memory patterns, with irregular structural protrusions and silicon-oxide particles as defects of interest. An ultraviolet scanning-spot optical microscope is used to detect these defects, and the optimization flow is used to find the optimal imaging mode for detection.

  17. Polar semiconductor heterojunction structure energy band diagram considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shuxun; Wen, Cheng P.; Wang, Maojun; Hao, Yilong

    2016-03-01

    The unique nature of built-in electric field induced positive/negative charge pairs of polar semiconductor heterojunction structure has led to a more realistic device model for hexagonal III-nitride HEMT. In this modeling approach, the distribution of charge carriers is dictated by the electrostatic potential profile instead of Femi statistics. The proposed device model is found suitable to explain peculiar properties of GaN HEMT structures, including: (1) Discrepancy in measured conventional linear transmission line model (LTLM) sheet resistance and contactless sheet resistance of GaN HEMT with thin barrier layer. (2) Below bandgap radiation from forward biased Nickel Schottky barrier diode on GaN HEMT structure. (3) GaN HEMT barrier layer doping has negligible effect on transistor channel sheet charge density.

  18. Predefined planar structures in semiconductor surfaces patterned by NSOM lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettrichova, Ivana; Pudis, Dusan; Laurencikova, Agata; Hasenohrl, Stanislav; Novak, Jozef; Skriniarova, Jaroslava; Kovac, Jaroslav

    2013-09-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) lithography is one of optical technologies for planar structure fabrication, where exposure process is performed by optical near field produced at tip of fiber probe. Maskless exposure of defined regions is performed so that different periodic and predefined arrangement can be achieved. In this contribution, NSOM lithography is presented as effective tool for semiconductor device surface patterning. Non-contact mode of NSOM lithography was used to pattern planar predefined structures in GaAs, AlGaAs and GaP surfaces. In this way, GaAs/AlGaAs-based LED with patterned structure in the emitting surface was prepared, where patterned air holes show enhancement of radiation in comparison with the surrounding surface. Furthermore, NSOM in combination with lift-off technique was used to prepare metal-catalyst particles on GaP substrate for subsequent growth of GaP nanowires which can be used in photovoltaic applications.

  19. Transport in two-dimensional modulation-doped semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Sarma, S.; Hwang, E. H.; Kodiyalam, S.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2015-05-01

    We develop a theory for the maximum achievable mobility in modulation-doped 2D GaAs-AlGaAs semiconductor structures by considering the momentum scattering of the 2D carriers by the remote ionized dopants, which must invariably be present in order to create the 2D electron gas at the GaAs-AlGaAs interface. The minimal model, assuming first-order Born scattering by random quenched remote dopant ions as the only scattering mechanism, gives a mobility much lower (by a factor of 3 or more) than that observed experimentally in many ultrahigh-mobility modulation-doped 2D systems, establishing convincingly that the model of uncorrelated scattering by independent random remote quenched dopant ions is often unable to describe the physical system quantitively. We theoretically establish that the consideration of spatial correlations in the remote dopant distribution can enhance the mobility by (up to) several orders of magnitudes in experimental samples. The precise calculation of the carrier mobility in ultrapure modulation-doped 2D semiconductor structures thus depends crucially on the unknown spatial correlations among the dopant ions in the doping layer which may manifest sample to sample variations even for nominally identical sample parameters (i.e., density, well width, etc.), depending on the details of the modulation-doping growth conditions.

  20. Growth, structure, and optical characterization of diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Benjamin Joseph

    Nanowires combining the usually disparate areas of semiconductors and magnetism are of contemporary relevance within the context of semiconductor spintronics. This is a relatively new field of research that seeks to exploit electron spin within electronic and opto-electronic semiconductor devices. While much of the effort within semiconductor spintronics has been directed toward fundamental studies and applications of 3D, 2D and 0D systems, there has been little work to date on 1D systems. The distinctive change in the electronic density of states with changing dimensionality provides a strong motivation for developing and exploring semiconductor nanowires in which one might be able to probe and control spin-dependent phenomena within a 1D or quasi-1D environment. This thesis explores the crystal growth, structural properties and magneto-optical behavior of quasi-1D semiconductor nanowires in which we incorporate magnetism through two approaches: first, by synthesizing nanowires of the diluted magnetic semiconductor (Zn,Mn)Se, wherein the d-shell electrons of substitutional Mn ions interact with the band states of the ZnSe host lattice via sp--d exchange; second, by making hybrid core-shell nanostructures wherein a metallic ferromagnetic shell (MnAs) is epitaxially deposited on a semiconductor nanowire (GaAs). After an introductory overview of past work in the field and a description of the experimental techniques relevant to the thesis, we discuss our experimental results. The first set of experiments focuses on ZnSe and (Zn,Mn)Se nanowires grown in a single stage. The nanowires were grown on Si and GaAs substrates with a thin layer of gold evaporated onto them, which were then annealed before growth so that the gold formed nanoscale droplets. The growth yields samples covered in random arrays of nanowires growing out an an angle to the substrate, with an undergrowth of crooked nanowires and other small structures. The long thin nanowires vary in diameter, down to

  1. Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.; Neuefeind, Joerg C.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Sales, Brian C.; Honkimaeki, Veijo

    2015-01-16

    The pressure induced crystalline collapse at 14.7 GPa and polyamorphic structures of the semiconductor clathrate Sr8Ga16Ge30 are reported up to 35 GPa. In-situ total scattering measurements under pressure allow the direct microscopic inspection of the mechanisms associated with pressure induced amorphization in these systems, as well as the structure of the recovered phase. It is observed that, between 14.7 and 35 GPa the second peak in the structure factor function gradually disappears. Analysis of the radial distribution function extracted from those data indicate that this feature is associated with gradual cage collapse and breakdown of the tetrahedral structure with the consequent systematic lengthening of the nearest-neighbor framework bonds. This suggests an overall local coordination change to an even higher density amorphous form. Upon recovery from high pressure, the sample remains amorphous, and while there is some indication of the guest-host cage reforming, it doesn't seem that the tetrahedral coordination is recovered. As such, the compresion-decompression process in this systems gives rise to three distict amorphous forms.

  2. Density driven structural transformations in amorphous semiconductor clathrates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.; Neuefeind, Joerg C.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Sales, Brian C.; Honkimaeki, Veijo

    2015-01-16

    The pressure induced crystalline collapse at 14.7 GPa and polyamorphic structures of the semiconductor clathrate Sr8Ga16Ge30 are reported up to 35 GPa. In-situ total scattering measurements under pressure allow the direct microscopic inspection of the mechanisms associated with pressure induced amorphization in these systems, as well as the structure of the recovered phase. It is observed that, between 14.7 and 35 GPa the second peak in the structure factor function gradually disappears. Analysis of the radial distribution function extracted from those data indicate that this feature is associated with gradual cage collapse and breakdown of the tetrahedral structure with themore » consequent systematic lengthening of the nearest-neighbor framework bonds. This suggests an overall local coordination change to an even higher density amorphous form. Upon recovery from high pressure, the sample remains amorphous, and while there is some indication of the guest-host cage reforming, it doesn't seem that the tetrahedral coordination is recovered. As such, the compresion-decompression process in this systems gives rise to three distict amorphous forms.« less

  3. Method for making a monolithic integrated high-T.sub.c superconductor-semiconductor structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Michael J. (Inventor); de la Houssaye, Paul R. (Inventor); Garcia, Graham A. (Inventor); Russell, Stephen D. (Inventor); Clayton, Stanley R. (Inventor); Barfknecht, Andrew T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for the fabrication of active semiconductor and high-temperature perconducting devices on the same substrate to form a monolithically integrated semiconductor-superconductor (MISS) structure is disclosed. A common insulating substrate, preferably sapphire or yttria-stabilized zirconia, is used for deposition of semiconductor and high-temperature superconductor substructures. Both substructures are capable of operation at a common temperature of at least 77 K. The separate semiconductor and superconductive regions may be electrically interconnected by normal metals, refractory metal silicides, or superconductors. Circuits and devices formed in the resulting MISS structures display operating characteristics which are equivalent to those of circuits and devices prepared on separate substrates.

  4. Monolithic integrated high-T.sub.c superconductor-semiconductor structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Michael J. (Inventor); de la Houssaye, Paul R. (Inventor); Garcia, Graham A. (Inventor); Russell, Stephen D. (Inventor); Clayton, Stanley R. (Inventor); Barfknecht, Andrew T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for the fabrication of active semiconductor and high-temperature superconducting device of the same substrate to form a monolithically integrated semiconductor-superconductor (MISS) structure is disclosed. A common insulating substrate, preferably sapphire or yttria-stabilized zirconia, is used for deposition of semiconductor and high-temperature superconductor substructures. Both substructures are capable of operation at a common temperature of at least 77 K. The separate semiconductor and superconductive regions may be electrically interconnected by normal metals, refractory metal silicides, or superconductors. Circuits and devices formed in the resulting MISS structures display operating characteristics which are equivalent to those of circuits and devices prepared on separate substrates.

  5. Low dimensional modeling of wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, Nadine

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we will review the original low dimensional dynamical model of the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer [Aubry, Holmes, Lumley and Stone, Journal of Fluid Dynamics 192, 1988] and discuss its impact on the field of fluid dynamics. We will also invite a few researchers who would like to make brief comments on the influence Lumley had on their research paths. In collaboration with Philip Holmes, Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

  6. Low-dimensional chaos in turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vastano, John A.

    1989-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are being performed on two different fluid flows in an attempt to discover the mechanism underlying the transition to turbulence in each. The first system is Taylor-Couette flow; the second, two-dimensional flow over an airfoil. Both flows exhibit a gradual transition to high-dimensional turbulence through low-dimensional chaos. The hope is that the instabilities leading to chaos will be easier to relate to physical processes in this case, and that the understanding of these mechanisms can then be applied to a wider array of turbulent systems.

  7. Topological organization of (low-dimensional) chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Tufillaro, N.B.

    1992-12-01

    Recent progress toward classifying low-dimensional chaos measured from time series data is described. This classification theory assigns a template to the time series once the time series is embedded in three dimensions. The template describes the primary folding and stretching mechanisms of phase space responsible for the chaotic motion. Topological invariants of the unstable periodic orbits in the closure of the strange set are calculated from the (reconstructed) template. These topological invariants must be consistent with &ny model put forth to describe the time series data, and are useful in invalidating (or gaining confidence in) any model intended to describe the dynamical system generating the time series.

  8. Topological organization of (low-dimensional) chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Tufillaro, N.B.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress toward classifying low-dimensional chaos measured from time series data is described. This classification theory assigns a template to the time series once the time series is embedded in three dimensions. The template describes the primary folding and stretching mechanisms of phase space responsible for the chaotic motion. Topological invariants of the unstable periodic orbits in the closure of the strange set are calculated from the (reconstructed) template. These topological invariants must be consistent with ny model put forth to describe the time series data, and are useful in invalidating (or gaining confidence in) any model intended to describe the dynamical system generating the time series.

  9. Electronic Properties of Low-Dimensional Materials Under Periodic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamei, Mehdi

    In the quest for the further miniaturization of electronic devices, numerous fabrication techniques have been developed. The semiconductor industry has been able to manifest miniaturization in highly complex and ultra low-power integrated circuits and devices, transforming almost every aspect of our lives. However, we may have come very close to the end of this trend. While advanced machines and techniques may be able to overcome technological barriers, theoretical and fundamental barriers are inherent to the top-down miniaturization approach and cannot be circumvented. As a result, the need for novel and natural alternatives to replace old materials is valued now more than ever. Fortunately, there exists a large group of materials that essentially has low-dimensional (quasi-one- or quasi-two-dimensional) structures. Graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon, which has attracted a lot of attention in recent years, is a perfect example of a prime material from this group. Niobium tri-selenide (NbSe3), from a family of trichalcogenides, has a highly anisotropic structure and electrical conductivity. At sufficiently low temperatures, NbSe3 also exhibits two independent "sliding charge density waves"-- an exciting phenomenon, which could be altered by changing the overall size of the material. In NbSe3 (and Blue Bronze K0.3MoO3 which has a similar structure and electrical behavior), the effect of a periodic potential could be seen in creating a charge density wave (CDW) that is incommensurate to the underlying lattice. The required periodic potential is provided by the crystal ions when ordered in a particular way. The consequence is a peculiar non-linear conductivity behavior, as well as a unique narrow-band noise spectrum. Theoretical and experimental studies have concluded that the dynamic properties of resulting CDW are directly related to the crystal impurity density, and other pinning potentials. Therefore, reducing the overall size of the crystal could

  10. Far-Infrared and Optical Studies of Gallium Arsenide and Aluminum Gallium Arsenide Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanaway, Mark Brian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis reports far-infrared (FIR) and photoluminescence studies, performed at low temperatures (4.2K) and at magnetic fields up to 25T, of selectively and inadvertently doped bulk and low dimensional gallium arsenide (GaAs) and aluminium gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) semiconductor structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution FIR magnetospectroscopy of ultra -high mobility n-GaAs reveals a variety of shallow donor intra-impurity transitions plus spin-split higher Landau level transitions in the photoconductive response. The first observation of polarons bound to D^ - ions in bulk n-GaAs is reported. The excited state spectrum of the confined silicon donor in GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum wells (MQWs) has been examined. Narrower linewidths and more higher excited state donor transitions are noted in the present photoconductive investigation compared with previous reports. The electron recombination dynamics has been examined in silicon-doped GaAs/AlGaAs MQWs and homogeneous and sheet -doped bulk n-GaAs samples using time-resolved FIR photoconductivity. The extrinsic response of doped MQW structures suggests a potential use as a fast, sensitive detectors of FIR. FIR transmission measurements are reported for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs) of various widths in magnetic fields of up to 20T, tilted away from the normal to the QW plane by angles up to theta = 50^circ. Deviation of the cyclotron resonance field from a costheta law are interpreted using theoretical models describing Landau level/electric subband coupling. The in-plane magnetic field and excitation power dependence of the photoluminescence intensity of a GaAs/AlGaAs QW spectral feature is interpreted in terms of charge transfer in the QW, using a coupled oscillator model, and the efficiency of nonradiative electronic traps. In-plane magnetic field studies of the photoluminescence from a superlattice structure

  11. Low-dimensional Representation of Error Covariance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohn, Stephen E.; Todling, Ricardo; Marchesin, Dan

    2000-01-01

    Ensemble and reduced-rank approaches to prediction and assimilation rely on low-dimensional approximations of the estimation error covariances. Here stability properties of the forecast/analysis cycle for linear, time-independent systems are used to identify factors that cause the steady-state analysis error covariance to admit a low-dimensional representation. A useful measure of forecast/analysis cycle stability is the bound matrix, a function of the dynamics, observation operator and assimilation method. Upper and lower estimates for the steady-state analysis error covariance matrix eigenvalues are derived from the bound matrix. The estimates generalize to time-dependent systems. If much of the steady-state analysis error variance is due to a few dominant modes, the leading eigenvectors of the bound matrix approximate those of the steady-state analysis error covariance matrix. The analytical results are illustrated in two numerical examples where the Kalman filter is carried to steady state. The first example uses the dynamics of a generalized advection equation exhibiting nonmodal transient growth. Failure to observe growing modes leads to increased steady-state analysis error variances. Leading eigenvectors of the steady-state analysis error covariance matrix are well approximated by leading eigenvectors of the bound matrix. The second example uses the dynamics of a damped baroclinic wave model. The leading eigenvectors of a lowest-order approximation of the bound matrix are shown to approximate well the leading eigenvectors of the steady-state analysis error covariance matrix.

  12. Multiscale approach to the electronic structure of doped semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinai, Ofer; Hofmann, Oliver T.; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Heimel, Georg; Kronik, Leeor

    2015-02-01

    The inclusion of the global effects of semiconductor doping poses a unique challenge for first-principles simulations, because the typically low concentration of dopants renders an explicit treatment intractable. Furthermore, the width of the space-charge region (SCR) at charged surfaces often exceeds realistic supercell dimensions. Here, we present a multiscale technique that fully addresses these difficulties. It is based on the introduction of a charged sheet, mimicking the SCR-related field, along with free charge which mimics the bulk charge reservoir, such that the system is neutral overall. These augment a slab comprising "pseudoatoms" possessing a fractional nuclear charge matching the bulk doping concentration. Self-consistency is reached by imposing charge conservation and Fermi level equilibration between the bulk, treated semiclassically, and the electronic states of the slab, which are treated quantum-mechanically. The method, called CREST—the charge-reservoir electrostatic sheet technique—can be used with standard electronic structure codes. We validate CREST using a simple tight-binding model, which allows for comparison of its results with calculations encompassing the full SCR explicitly. Specifically, we show that CREST successfully predicts scenarios spanning the range from no to full Fermi level pinning. We then employ it with density functional theory, obtaining insight into the doping dependence of the electronic structures of the metallic "clean-cleaved" Si(111) surface and its semiconducting (2 ×1 ) reconstructions.

  13. Nanoscale electrodeposition of low-dimensional metal phases and clusters.

    PubMed

    Staikov, Georgi

    2016-08-01

    The present status of the problem of electrochemical formation of low-dimensional metal phases is reviewed. The progress in this field achieved in the last two decades is discussed on the basis of experimental results obtained in selected electrochemical systems with well defined single crystal substrates. The influence of crystallographic orientation and surface inhomogeneities of foreign substrates on the mechanism of formation and the atomic structure of two-dimensional (2D) metal phases in the underpotential deposition range is considered. The localized electrodeposition of metal nanoclusters on solid state surfaces applying the STM-tip as a nanoelectrode is demonstrated. PMID:27273215

  14. Plasmonically-enhanced mid-infrared photoluminescence in a metal/narrow-gap semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Pengqi; Cai, Chunfeng; Zhang, Bingpo; Liu, Bozhi; Wu, Huizhen; Bi, Gang; Si, Jianxiao

    2016-05-01

    We report the enhancement of the mid-infrared (MIR) luminescence intensity in a nanoscale metal/semiconductor structure by the coupling of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with excitons in a narrow-gap semiconductor. The SPPs are efficiently excited by the total internal reflection photons at a metal/semiconductor interface. The intense electric field induced by SPPs, in turn, greatly changes the radiative recombination rates of the excitons generated by the pumping laser and thus the MIR luminescence intensity. The finding avails the understanding of fundamental science of SPs in narrow-gap semiconductors and the development of novel MIR devices.

  15. Dangling-bond and void-like structure in amorphours semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang; Chen, Hong

    1985-12-01

    To explain the differences in properties between the chalcogenide glassy semiconductors and the tetrahedrally-bonded semiconductors, a microscopic structural model is given in this letter. Based on this model, we can not only get two-level systems, negative-U pairs, and the Urbach rule, but also account for some recent experiments.

  16. Mechanical properties of low dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Deepika

    Recent advances in low dimensional materials (LDMs) have paved the way for unprecedented technological advancements. The drive to reduce the dimensions of electronics has compelled researchers to devise newer techniques to not only synthesize novel materials, but also tailor their properties. Although micro and nanomaterials have shown phenomenal electronic properties, their mechanical robustness and a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationship are critical for their use in practical applications. However, the challenges in probing these mechanical properties dramatically increase as their dimensions shrink, rendering the commonly used techniques inadequate. This dissertation focuses on developing techniques for accurate determination of elastic modulus of LDMs and their mechanical responses under tensile and shear stresses. Fibers with micron-sized diameters continuously undergo tensile and shear deformations through many phases of their processing and applications. Significant attention has been given to their tensile response and their structure-tensile properties relations are well understood, but the same cannot be said about their shear responses or the structure-shear properties. This is partly due to the lack of appropriate instruments that are capable of performing direct shear measurements. In an attempt to fill this void, this dissertation describes the design of an inexpensive tabletop instrument, referred to as the twister, which can measure the shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of micron-sized individual fibers. An automated system applies a pre-determined twist to the fiber sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and KevlarRTM 119, were found to have G = 17 and 2.4 GPa, respectively. In addition to measuring the shear

  17. Ion mixing of III-V compound semiconductor layered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, W.; Pappert, S.A.; Zhu, B.; Clawson, A.R.; Yu, P.K.L.; Lau, S.S. ); Poker, D.B.; White, C.W. ); Schwarz, S.A. )

    1992-03-15

    Compositional disordering of III-V compound superlattice structures has received considerable attention recently due to its potential application for photonic devices. The conventional method to induce compositional disorder in a layered structure is to implant a moderate dose of impurity ions ({similar to}10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}) into the structure at room temperature, followed by a high-temperature annealing step (this process is referred to as IA here). Ion irradiation at room temperature alone does not cause any significant intermixing of layers. The subsequent high-temperature annealing step tends to restrict device processing flexibility. Ion mixing (IM) is capable of enhancing compositional disordering of layers at a rate which increases exponentially with the ion irradiation temperature. As a processing technique to planarize devices, ion mixing appears to be an attractive technology. In this work, we investigate compositional disordering in the AlGaAs/GaAs and the InGaAs/InP systems using ion mixing. We found that the ion mixing behavior of these two systems shows a thermally activated regime as well as an athermal regime, similar to that observed for metal-metal and metal-semiconductor systems. Ion mixing is observed to induce compositional disordering at significantly lower temperatures than that for the IA process. We have compared the two processes in terms of five parameters: (1) irradiation temperature, (2) dose dependence, (3) dose rate dependence, (4) annealing, and (5) ion dependence (including electrical effects and mass dependence). We found that the IM process is more efficient in utilizing the defects generated by ion irradiation to cause disordering. Both the physical mechanism of ion mixing and possible device implications will be discussed.

  18. Convection, stability, and low dimensional dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, C.R.

    1997-05-01

    Recent developments concerning the connection between notions of hydrodynamic stability{emdash}usually associated with stationary laminar flows{emdash}and dynamics, most notably turbulent fluid flows, are reviewed. Based on a technical device originally introduced by Hopf in 1941, a rigorous mathematical relationship between criteria for nonlinear energy stability and bounds on global transport by steady, unsteady, or even turbulent flows, has been established. The optimal {open_quotes}marginal stability{close_quotes} criteria for the best bound leads to a novel variational problem, and the differential operator associated with the stability condition generates an adapted basis in which turbulent flow fields may naturally be decomposed. The application and implications of Galerkin truncations in these bases to produce low dimensional dynamical systems models is discussed in the context of thermal convection in a saturated porous layer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Quantum-Ring Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Mónica; Fuster, Gonzalo; Barticevic, Zdenka

    2002-03-01

    Motivated by the interesting electronic properties exhibited by these nanorings when they are threaded by a magnetic field, we studied a new semiconductor structure formed by two coupled rings which are concentrically disposed. In order to calculate the two-ring electronic spectrum it is assumed that the in-plane electronic-potential of each ring is generated by a rotation, around the ring axis, of a one-dimensional parabolic potential centered to a distance ρ=ρo of the ring center. The potential of the two-rings system is then assumed as a superposition of a potential for each ring with their minimum at different radii and being truncated in the intersection point. In this way a potential barrier is formed in between the rings. We solve the in-plane problem by expanding the corresponding envelope function as a linear combination of solutions of isolated rings. We have made a detailed study about the influence of the characteristic confinement-parameters of each rings, and of the barrier strength, on the electronic energy spectrum of the system. A uniform magnetic field is applied along the common ring axis and we explore the effects on the Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations in the energy levels caused by the particular geometry of two coupled quantum-rings.

  20. Investigation of Semiconductor Surface Structure by Transmission Ion Channeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, Paul Francis

    The primary thrust of this dissertation is the investigation of the composition and structure of two important surface systems on Si, and the study of how this structure evolves under the influence of ion bombardment or film growth. I have studied the initial stages of oxidation of Si immediately following removal of a surface oxide by an HF etch. I have also studied the structure of Ge deposited on clean Si(100) at low temperatures. These systems are of considerable technological interest, but were chosen because they naturally pose fundamental questions regarding physical and chemical processes at surfaces. In the study of the oxidation of Si, I have focused on the influence of the bombarding ion beam in altering the structure and composition of the surface layer. Thus, the system then provides a natural vehicle to study ion-induced chemistry. In the study of low-temperature growth of Ge, I have focused on the structure of the Ge layer and the evolution of that structure upon further deposition or upon heating. This simple system is a model one for observing strained semiconductor heteroepitaxial growth. The primary probe for these studies was transmission channeling of MeV ions. The sensitivity of this technique to correlations between the substrate and an overlayer allowed us to make the following observations. The O, Si and H bound in the thin oxide formed after an HF etch and H_2O rinse occupy preferred positions with respect to the Si matrix. Upon ion bombardment, the O further reacts with the Si (the reaction proceeds linearly with the ion fluence) and the portion of the H that is uncorrelated to the substrate is preferentially desorbed. For the case of Ge growth on Si(100)-(2 x 1) at room temperature, a substantial fraction of the Ge films is strained to occupy sites having the lattice constant of the Si substrate (pseudomorphic growth). A model for film growth is proposed in which pseudomorphic domains constitute roughly half of the Ge films up to a

  1. Exciton complexes in low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilagam, A.

    2014-08-01

    We examine the excitonic properties of layered configurations of low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDCs) using the fractional dimensional space approach. The binding energies of the exciton, trion, and biexciton in LTMDCs of varying layers are analyzed, and linked to the dimensionality parameter α, which provides insight into critical electro-optical properties (relative oscillator strength, absorption spectrum, exciton-exciton interaction) of the material systems. The usefulness of α is highlighted by its independence of the physical mechanisms underlying the confinement effects of geometrical structures. Our estimates of the binding energies of exciton complexes for the monolayer configuration of transition metal dichalcogenides suggest a non-collinear structure for the trion and a positronium-molecule-like square structure for the biexciton.

  2. Exciton complexes in low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Thilagam, A.

    2014-08-07

    We examine the excitonic properties of layered configurations of low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDCs) using the fractional dimensional space approach. The binding energies of the exciton, trion, and biexciton in LTMDCs of varying layers are analyzed, and linked to the dimensionality parameter α, which provides insight into critical electro-optical properties (relative oscillator strength, absorption spectrum, exciton-exciton interaction) of the material systems. The usefulness of α is highlighted by its independence of the physical mechanisms underlying the confinement effects of geometrical structures. Our estimates of the binding energies of exciton complexes for the monolayer configuration of transition metal dichalcogenides suggest a non-collinear structure for the trion and a positronium-molecule-like square structure for the biexciton.

  3. Tuning Surface Properties of Low Dimensional Materials via Strain Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengchun; Liu, Fuzhu; Wu, Chao; Yang, Sen

    2016-08-01

    The promising and versatile applications of low dimensional materials are largely due to their surface properties, which along with their underlying electronic structures have been well studied. However, these materials may not be directly useful for applications requiring properties other than their natal ones. In recent years, strain has been shown to be an additionally useful handle to tune the physical and chemical properties of materials by changing their geometric and electronic structures. The strategies for producing strain are summarized. Then, the electronic structure of quasi-two dimensional layered non-metallic materials (e.g., graphene, MX2, BP, Ge nanosheets) under strain are discussed. Later, the strain effects on catalytic properties of metal-catalyst loaded with strain are focused on. Both experimental and computational perspectives for dealing with strained systems are covered. Finally, an outlook on engineering surface properties utilizing strain is provided. PMID:27376498

  4. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Poncé, S. Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X.; Marini, A.; Verstraete, M.

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  5. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators.

    PubMed

    Poncé, S; Gillet, Y; Laflamme Janssen, J; Marini, A; Verstraete, M; Gonze, X

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure

  6. Growth and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors of corundum-structured alpha indium oxide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kentaro; Ito, Yoshito; Uchida, Takayuki; Fujita, Shizuo

    2015-09-01

    The growth of corundum-structured α-In2O3, showing an X-ray diffraction (0006) rocking curve full-width at half maximum of 185 arcsec and electron Hall mobility of 130 cm2 V-1 s-1, was demonstrated on a sapphire substrate with an α-Ga2O3 buffer layer. An MOSFET of α-In2O3 exhibited pinch-off characteristics and an on-off ratio of drain current of 106. The use of mist chemical vapor deposition for the insulator-semiconductor structure was advantageous for low-cost devices.

  7. Rf linearity in low dimensional nanowire mosfets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavieh, Ali

    linear Id-Vgs characteristics with a constant gm of which is independent of the choice of channel material when operated under high enough drain voltages. Unique scaling potential of nanowires in terms of body thickness, channel length, and oxide thickness makes nanowire transistors an excellent device structure of choice to operate in 1-D ballistic transport regime in the QCL. A set of guidelines is provided for material parameters and device dimensions for nanowire FETs, which meet the three criteria of i) 1-D transport ii) operation in the QCL iii) ballistic transport, and challenges and limitations of fulfilling any of the above transport conditions from materials point of view are discussed. This work also elaborates how a non-ideal device, one that approaches but does not perfectly fulfill criteria i) through iii), can be analyzed in terms of its linearity performance. In particular the potential of silicon based devices will be discussed in this context, through mixture of experiment and simulation. 1-D transport is successfully achieved in the lab. QCL is simulated through back calculation of the band movement of the transistors in on-state. Quasi-ballistic transport conditions can be achieved by cooling down the samples to 77K. Since, ballistic transport is challenging to achieve for practical channel lengths in today's leading semiconductor device technologies the effect of carrier back-scattering on RF linearity is explored through third order intercept point (IIP3) analysis. These findings show that for the devices which operate in the QCL, while 1-D sub-bands are involved in carrier transport, current linearity is directly related to the nature of the dominant scattering mechanism in the channel, and can be improved by proper choice of channel material in order to enforce a specific scattering mechanism to prevail in the channel. Usually, in semiconductors, the dominant scattering mechanism in the channel is the superposition of different mechanisms

  8. Superfluidity and Chaos in low dimensional circuits.

    PubMed

    Arwas, Geva; Vardi, Amichay; Cohen, Doron

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of superfluidity is the appearance of "vortex states" carrying a quantized metastable circulating current. Considering a unidirectional flow of particles in a ring, at first it appears that any amount of scattering will randomize the velocity, as in the Drude model, and eventually the ergodic steady state will be characterized by a vanishingly small fluctuating current. However, Landau and followers have shown that this is not always the case. If elementary excitations (e.g. phonons) have higher velocity than that of the flow, simple kinematic considerations imply metastability of the vortex state: the energy of the motion cannot dissipate into phonons. On the other hand if this Landau criterion is violated the circulating current can decay. Below we show that the standard Landau and Bogoliubov superfluidity criteria fail in low-dimensional circuits. Proper determination of the superfluidity regime-diagram must account for the crucial role of chaos, an ingredient missing from the conventional stability analysis. Accordingly, we find novel types of superfluidity, associated with irregular or chaotic or breathing vortex states. PMID:26315272

  9. Superfluidity and Chaos in low dimensional circuits

    PubMed Central

    Arwas, Geva; Vardi, Amichay; Cohen, Doron

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of superfluidity is the appearance of “vortex states” carrying a quantized metastable circulating current. Considering a unidirectional flow of particles in a ring, at first it appears that any amount of scattering will randomize the velocity, as in the Drude model, and eventually the ergodic steady state will be characterized by a vanishingly small fluctuating current. However, Landau and followers have shown that this is not always the case. If elementary excitations (e.g. phonons) have higher velocity than that of the flow, simple kinematic considerations imply metastability of the vortex state: the energy of the motion cannot dissipate into phonons. On the other hand if this Landau criterion is violated the circulating current can decay. Below we show that the standard Landau and Bogoliubov superfluidity criteria fail in low-dimensional circuits. Proper determination of the superfluidity regime-diagram must account for the crucial role of chaos, an ingredient missing from the conventional stability analysis. Accordingly, we find novel types of superfluidity, associated with irregular or chaotic or breathing vortex states. PMID:26315272

  10. Pseudopotential-based study of electron transport in low-dimensionality nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Pseudopotentials- empirical and ab initio - are now being more commonly used to study not only the atomic and electronic structure of nanometer-scale systems, but also their electronic transport properties. Here we shall give a bird-eye view of the use of density functional theory (DFT) to calibrate empirical pseudopotentials (EPs), of EPs to calculate efficiently the electronic structure of low-dimensionality systems, the most significant electronic scattering processes, and to study semiclassical and quantum electronic transport. Low-dimensionality systems considered here include thin semiconductor layers, graphene, graphene- and silicane-nanoribbons, and silicon nanowires. Regarding graphene, the high electron mobility measured in suspended graphene sheets (~ 200,000 cm2/Vs) is the result of a relatively weak carrier-phonon and the strong dielectric-screening property. However, in practical applications graphene is likely to be supported by an insulating substrate, top-gated, and possibly used in the form of narrow armchair-edge nanoribbons (aGNRs) in order to open a gap. We will discuss several scattering processes which may affect the electron transport properties in these situations. First, we shall present results of the calculation of the intrinsic electron-phonon scattering rates in suspended graphene using empirical pseudopotentials and the rigid-ion approximation, resulting in an electron mobility consistent with the experimental results. We shall then discuss the role of interfacial coupled substrate optical-phonon/graphene-plasmons in depressing the electron mobility in graphene supported by several insulators (SiO2, HfO2, Al2O3, and h-BN). We shall also discuss the role of Coulomb scattering with charged defects/impurities in gated graphene sheets and the role of the metal gate in screening this interaction. Finally, we shall review the strong effect of line edge roughness (LER) on electron transport and localization in narrow aGNRs resulting from the

  11. The structure of constitutive equations for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, G.R.; Girrens, S.P.; Bennett, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental equations that describe carrier transport in semiconductor materials are developed using the methods of continuum mixture theory and Maxwell's equations for electrodynamics. There are five basic equations that govern the behavior of current flux, electrostatic potential, electrons, and holes. The bahavior of the electrical chemical potentials are introduced and their relation to the current flux is discussed.

  12. Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Sadtler, Bryce F

    2009-05-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions ofa nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size and shape to examine the spatial organization of materials within the resulting nanocrystal heterostructures. The selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. The exchange of copper (I) (Cu+) cations in CdS nanorods occurs preferentially at the ends of the nanorods. Theoretical modeling of epitaxial attachments between different facets of CdS and Cu2S indicate that the selectivity for cation exchange at the ends of the nanorods is a result of the low formation energy of the interfaces produced. During silver (I) (Ag+) cation exchange in CdS nanorods, non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S), followed by partial phase segregation leads to significant changes in the spatial arrangement of CdS and Ag2S regions at the exchange reaction proceeds through the nanocrystal. A well-ordered striped pattern of alternating CdS and Ag2S segments is found at intermediate fractions of exchange. The forces mediating this spontaneous process are a combination of Ostwald ripening to reduce the interfacial area along with a strain-induced repulsive interaction between Ag2S segments. To elucidate why Cu+ and Ag+ cation exchange with CdS nanorods produce different morphologies, models for epitaxial attachments between various facets of CdS with Cu2S or

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Low-dimensional surface oxides in the oxidation of Rh particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittendorfer, Florian

    2010-10-01

    The oxidation of rhodium particles leads to the formation of low-dimensional nanostructures, namely ultrathin oxide films and stripes adsorbed on the metallic surface. These structures display unique electronic and structural properties, which have been studied in detail experimentally and theoretically in recent years. In this review, the state of research on low-dimensional surface oxides formed on Rh surfaces will be discussed with a special focus on the contributions derived from computational approaches. Several points elucidating the novel properties of the surface oxides will be addressed: (i) the structural relation between the surface oxides and their bulk counterparts, (ii) the electronic properties of the low-dimensional oxide films and (iii) potential catalytic and electronic applications of the surface oxides.

  14. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, K.S.

    2000-05-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  15. Surprises in low-dimensional correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiu-Hau

    In this thesis, correlation effects in low-dimensional systems were studied. In particular, we focus on two systems: a point-contact in the quantum-Hall regime under the influence of ac drive and quasi-one-dimensional ladder materials with generic interactions in weak coupling. Powerful techniques, including renormalization group, quantum field theory, operator product expansions, bosonization,...etc., were employed to extract surprising physics out of these strongly fluctuating systems. We first study the effect of an ac drive on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a tunnel junction between two fractional Quantum Hall fluids at filling nu-1 an odd integer. In a semi-classical limit, the tunneling current exhibits mode-locking, which corresponds to plateaus in the I-V curve at integer multiples of I = ef , with f the ac drive frequency. However, the full quantum model exhibits rounded plateaus centered around the quantized current values due to quantum fluctuations. The locations of these plateaus can serve as an indirect hint of fractional charges. Switching attentions to quasi-one-dimensional coupled-chain systems, we present a systematic weak-coupling renormalization group (RG) technique and find that generally broad regions of the phase space of the ladder materials are unstable to pairing, usually with approximate d-wave symmetry. The dimensional crossovers from 1D to 2D were also discussed. Carbon nanotubes as possible candidates that display such unconventional pairing and interesting physics in weak coupling were discussed. Quite surprisingly, a hidden symmetry was found in the weakly-coupled two-leg ladder. A perturbative renormalization group analysis reveals that at half-filling the model scales onto an exactly soluble SO(8) symmetric Gross-Neveu model. Integrability of the Gross-Neveu model is employed to extract the exact energies, degeneracies and quantum numbers of all the low energy excited states, which fall into degenerate SO(8

  16. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1998-01-01

    A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of low-dimensional molecular magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen

    This dissertation presents experimental results from the synthesis and structural, magnetic characterization of representative low-dimensional molecule-based magnetic materials. Most of the materials reported in this dissertation, both coordination polymers and cuprate, are obtained as the result of synthesizing and characterizing spin ladder systems; except the material studied in Chapter 2, ferricenyl(III)trisferrocenyl(II)borate, which is not related to the spin ladder project. The interest in spin ladder systems is due to the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in doped cuprates possessing ladder-like structures, and it is hoped that investigation of the magnetic behavior of ladder-like structures will help us understand the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Chapter 1 reviews fundamental knowledge of molecular magnetism, general synthetic strategies for low-dimensional coordination polymers, and a brief introduction to the current status of research on spin ladder systems. Chapter 2 presents a modified synthetic procedure of a previously known monomeric complex, ferricenyl(III)trisferrocenyl(II)borate, 1. Its magnetic properties were characterized and previous results have been disproved. Chapter 3 investigates the magnetism of [CuCl2(CH3CN)] 2, 2, a cuprate whose structure consists of isolated noninterpenetrating ladders formed by the stacking of Cu(II) dimers. This material presents an unexpected ferromagnetic interaction both within the dimeric units and between the dimers, and this behavior has been rationalized based on the effect of its terminal nonbridging ligands. In Chapter 4, the synthesis and magnetism of two ladder-like coordination polymers, [Co(NO3)2(4,4'-bipyridine) 1.5(MeCN)]n, 3, and Ni2(2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid)2(H2O)4(pyrazine), 4, are reported. Compound 3 possesses a covalent one-dimensional ladder structure in which Co(II) ions are bridged through bipyridine molecules. Compared to the materials discussed in

  18. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Pryor, Craig E.

    2010-04-15

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zinc-blende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier ab initio calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs, and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may facilitate the development of spin-based devices.

  19. Density Functional Theory of Structural and Electronic Properties of III-N Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Guerel, H. Hakan; Akinci, Oezden; Uenlue, Hilmi

    2010-11-01

    In this wok, we present the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of cubic III-N based semiconductors by using the full potential linear augmented plane-wave method plus local orbitals as implemented in the WIEN2k code. Our aim is to predict the pressure effect on structural and electronic properties of III-N binaries and ternaries. Results are given for structural properties (e.g., lattice constant, elastic constants, bulk modulus, and its pressure derivative) and electronic properties (e.g., band structure, density of states, band gaps and band widths) of GaAs, GaN, AlN, and InN binaries and GaAsN ternaries. The proposed model uses GGA exchange-correlation potential to determine band gaps of semiconductors at {Gamma}, L and X high symmetry points of Brillouin zone. The results are found in good agreement with available experimental data for structural and electronic properties of these semiconductors.

  20. Modeling of metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor structure considering the effects of interface traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Xiao Rong; Zheng, Xue Jun; Tian, Li; Zhu, Zhe

    2015-06-01

    An improved model, in which the interface traps effects are considered, is developed by combining with quantum mechanical model, dipole switching theory and silicon physics of metal-oxide-semiconductor structure to describe the electrical properties of metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) structure. Using the model, the effects of the interface traps on the surface potential (ϕSi) of the semiconductor, the low frequency (LF) capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics and memory window of MFIS structure are simulated, and the results show that the ϕSi- V and LF C-V curves are shifted toward the positive-voltage direction and the memory window become worse as the density of the interface trap states increases. This paper is expected to provide some guidance to the design and performance improvement of MFIS structure devices. In addition, the improved model can be integrated into electronic design automation (EDA) software for circuit simulation.

  1. Low-Dimensional Network Formation in Molten Sodium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Martin C.; Wilson, Mark; Alderman, Oliver L. G.; Benmore, Chris; Weber, J. K. R.; Parise, John B.; Tamalonis, Anthony; Skinner, Lawrie

    2016-01-01

    Molten carbonates are highly inviscid liquids characterized by low melting points and high solubility of rare earth elements and volatile molecules. An understanding of the structure and related properties of these intriguing liquids has been limited to date. We report the results of a study of molten sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) which combines high energy X-ray diffraction, containerless techniques and computer simulation to provide insight into the liquid structure. Total structure factors (Fx(Q)) are collected on the laser-heated carbonate spheres suspended in flowing gases of varying composition in an aerodynamic levitation furnace. The respective partial structure factor contributions to Fx(Q) are obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations treating the carbonate anions as flexible entities. The carbonate liquid structure is found to be heavily temperature-dependent. At low temperatures a low-dimensional carbonate chain network forms, at T = 1100 K for example ~55% of the C atoms form part of a chain. The mean chain lengths decrease as temperature is increased and as the chains become shorter the rotation of the carbonate anions becomes more rapid enhancing the diffusion of Na+ ions. PMID:27080401

  2. Low-Dimensional Network Formation in Molten Sodium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Martin C; Wilson, Mark; Alderman, Oliver L G; Benmore, Chris; Weber, J K R; Parise, John B; Tamalonis, Anthony; Skinner, Lawrie

    2016-01-01

    Molten carbonates are highly inviscid liquids characterized by low melting points and high solubility of rare earth elements and volatile molecules. An understanding of the structure and related properties of these intriguing liquids has been limited to date. We report the results of a study of molten sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) which combines high energy X-ray diffraction, containerless techniques and computer simulation to provide insight into the liquid structure. Total structure factors (F(x)(Q)) are collected on the laser-heated carbonate spheres suspended in flowing gases of varying composition in an aerodynamic levitation furnace. The respective partial structure factor contributions to F(x)(Q) are obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations treating the carbonate anions as flexible entities. The carbonate liquid structure is found to be heavily temperature-dependent. At low temperatures a low-dimensional carbonate chain network forms, at T = 1100 K for example ~55% of the C atoms form part of a chain. The mean chain lengths decrease as temperature is increased and as the chains become shorter the rotation of the carbonate anions becomes more rapid enhancing the diffusion of Na(+) ions. PMID:27080401

  3. Low-Dimensional Network Formation in Molten Sodium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilding, Martin C.; Wilson, Mark; Alderman, Oliver L. G.; Benmore, Chris; Weber, J. K. R.; Parise, John B.; Tamalonis, Anthony; Skinner, Lawrie

    2016-04-01

    Molten carbonates are highly inviscid liquids characterized by low melting points and high solubility of rare earth elements and volatile molecules. An understanding of the structure and related properties of these intriguing liquids has been limited to date. We report the results of a study of molten sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) which combines high energy X-ray diffraction, containerless techniques and computer simulation to provide insight into the liquid structure. Total structure factors (Fx(Q)) are collected on the laser-heated carbonate spheres suspended in flowing gases of varying composition in an aerodynamic levitation furnace. The respective partial structure factor contributions to Fx(Q) are obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations treating the carbonate anions as flexible entities. The carbonate liquid structure is found to be heavily temperature-dependent. At low temperatures a low-dimensional carbonate chain network forms, at T = 1100 K for example ~55% of the C atoms form part of a chain. The mean chain lengths decrease as temperature is increased and as the chains become shorter the rotation of the carbonate anions becomes more rapid enhancing the diffusion of Na+ ions.

  4. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-15

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.

  5. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu; Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-01

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.

  6. Theoretical discovery of stable structures of group III-V monolayers: The materials for semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuo

    2015-11-23

    Group III-V compounds are very important as the materials of semiconductor devices. Stable structures of the monolayers of group III-V binary compounds have been discovered by using first-principles calculations. The primitive unit cell of the discovered structures is a rectangle, which includes four group-III atoms and four group-V atoms. A group-III atom and its three nearest-neighbor group-V atoms are placed on the same plane; however, these connections are not the sp{sup 2} hybridization. The bond angles around the group-V atoms are less than the bond angle of sp{sup 3} hybridization. The discovered structure of GaP is an indirect transition semiconductor, while the discovered structures of GaAs, InP, and InAs are direct transition semiconductors. Therefore, the discovered structures of these compounds have the potential of the materials for semiconductor devices, for example, water splitting photocatalysts. The discovered structures may become the most stable structures of monolayers which consist of other materials.

  7. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III-V, and II-VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain-low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  8. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side.

  9. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  10. Multiple trapping on a comb structure as a model of electron transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibatov, R. T.; Morozova, E. V.

    2015-05-01

    A model of dispersive transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors has been proposed taking into account the percolation structure of a sample and joint action of several mechanisms. Topological and energy disorders have been simultaneously taken into account within the multiple trapping model on a comb structure modeling the percolation character of trajectories. The joint action of several mechanisms has been described within random walks with a mixture of waiting time distributions. Integral transport equations with fractional derivatives have been obtained for an arbitrary density of localized states. The kinetics of the transient current has been calculated within the proposed new model in order to analyze time-of-flight experiments for nanostructured semiconductors.

  11. Local Atomic Structure of Semiconductor Alloys Using Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.J.L.; Thorpe, M.F.

    2002-06-24

    We have been taking advantage of recent experimental developments, which involve utilizing diffraction data from x-rays or neutrons out to very large wave-vectors, to obtain a detailed structural characterization of semiconductor alloys. This approach allows an accurate Pair Distribution Function (PDF) to be obtained to 20A and beyond and reveals the local structure of the alloy directly. These data can be modeled explicitly to learn about local correlations and short-range order in materials. We are combining theory, modeling and experiments to study a range of materials from semiconductors to thermoelectrics and proton conductors.

  12. Electronic structure of III-V zinc-blende semiconductors from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Yin, Haitao; Cao, Ronggen; Zahid, Ferdows; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2013-06-01

    For analyzing quantum transport in semiconductor devices, accurate electronic structures are critical for quantitative predictions. Here we report theoretical analysis of electronic structures of all III-V zinc-blende semiconductor compounds. Our calculations are from density functional theory with the semilocal exchange proposed recently [Tran and Blaha, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.226401 102, 226401 (2009)], within the linear muffin tin orbital scheme. The calculated band gaps and effective masses are compared to experimental data and good quantitative agreement is obtained. Using the theoretical scheme presented here, quantum transport in nanostructures of III-V compounds can be confidently predicted.

  13. Multiple trapping on a comb structure as a model of electron transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sibatov, R. T. Morozova, E. V.

    2015-05-15

    A model of dispersive transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors has been proposed taking into account the percolation structure of a sample and joint action of several mechanisms. Topological and energy disorders have been simultaneously taken into account within the multiple trapping model on a comb structure modeling the percolation character of trajectories. The joint action of several mechanisms has been described within random walks with a mixture of waiting time distributions. Integral transport equations with fractional derivatives have been obtained for an arbitrary density of localized states. The kinetics of the transient current has been calculated within the proposed new model in order to analyze time-of-flight experiments for nanostructured semiconductors.

  14. Quasiparticle band structure of the almost-gapless transition-metal-based Heusler semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, M.; Şaşıoǧlu, E.; Galanakis, I.; Friedrich, C.; Blügel, S.

    2016-05-01

    Transition-metal-based Heusler semiconductors are promising materials for a variety of applications ranging from spintronics to thermoelectricity. Employing the G W approximation within the framework of the FLAPW method, we study the quasiparticle band structure of a number of such compounds being almost gapless semiconductors. We find that in contrast to the s p -electron based semiconductors such as Si and GaAs, in these systems, the many-body corrections have a minimal effect on the electronic band structure and the energy band gap increases by less than 0.2 eV, which makes the starting point density functional theory (DFT) a good approximation for the description of electronic and optical properties of these materials. Furthermore, the band gap can be tuned either by the variation of the lattice parameter or by the substitution of the s p -chemical element.

  15. Fundamental properties and applications of low- dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Philip

    1999-11-01

    Physics in reduced dimensions has attracted much attention during the last decades owing to the discovery of new phenomena in low-dimensional materials and their potential importance in device applications. The unique properties of these low dimensional materials have been generally understood by considering the increased role of fluctuations and singularities in physical quantities due to the reduction in available phase space. In this thesis, I have investigated the fundamental physical properties of several low dimensional materials and have presented a technological application of these materials. Magnetic flux lines in high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) can be effectively treated as 2+1 dimensional systems due to the large anisotropy of HTSCs. The microscopic structure of the magnetic flux line lattice in Bi 2Sr2CaCu2O8 + x superconducting single crystals was studied at temperatures up to 77 K by Bitter magnetic decoration technique. Analysis of structural correlations shows that the flux line lattices are in the hexatic phase for the high temperature and low field regime, and enables us to estimate the flux line lattice freezing temperature. In addition, dislocation-free decoration images containing up to 80,000 vortices, which are two orders of magnitude larger number than that of previous studies, have been obtained. Analyses of these large length new data shows that the observed flux line lattices are in the random manifold regime with a roughening exponent of 0.44 for length scales up to 80-100 lattice constants. At larger length scales, the data exhibit nonequilibrium features that persist for different cooling rates and field histories. Charge density waves in transition-metal dichalcogenides are a good example of a two dispensional electronic system. A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was used to fabricate T-phase tantalum diselenide (TaSe2) nanocrystals with sizes ranging from 7 to more than 100 nanometers within the surface layer of 2H phase

  16. Control of the crystalline structure of inkjet-printed semiconductor layers using overlap condition and surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the effects of overlap condition and surface wettability of dielectric layers on the drying process and crystalline structure of inkjet-printed semiconductor layers. 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS pentacene) was utilized to inkjet-print the semiconductor layer. Using various overlap conditions, semiconductor layers were inkjet-printed on dielectric layers with different surface wettabilities. It is observed that crystal growth and the resulting crystalline structures in inkjet-printed semiconductor layers are primarily determined by evaporation behavior, particularly the contact line movement of the drying semiconductor layers, which can be controlled via the overlap condition. With inappropriate overlap conditions, randomly oriented TIPS pentacene crystalline structures are generated in the semiconductor layer through irregular contact line recession. One-dimensionally oriented TIPS pentacene crystal structures can be obtained using the optimized overlap condition of 50% as a result of the uniform contact line movement. Relatively hydrophobic dielectric layers help to generate good crystallinity in the semiconductor layer. All-inkjet-printed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) with well-oriented TIPS pentacene crystalline structures in the semiconductor layer show a high field effect mobility of ~0.1 cm2 V-1s-1, suggesting that, when printing inkjet semiconductor layers, the overlap condition and surface wettability of the dielectric layer are important factors for generating a well-oriented crystalline structure and thereby fabricating high-performance all-inkjet-printed OTFTs.

  17. Structure-Dependent Spin Polarization in Polymorphic CdS:Y Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Xiao, Bingxin; Zhao, Rui; Ma, Yanzhang; Zhang, Mingzhe

    2016-03-01

    Searching for the polymorphic semiconductor nanocrystals would provide precise and insightful structure-spin polarization correlations and meaningful guidance for designing and synthesizing high spin-polarized spintronic materials. Herein, the high spin polarization is achieved in polymorphic CdS:Y semiconductor nanocrystals. The high-pressure polymorph of rock-salt CdS:Y nanocrystals has been recovered at ambient conditions synthesized by the wurtzite CdS:Y nanocrystals as starting material under 5.2 GPa and 300 °C conditions. The rock-salt CdS:Y polymorph displays more robust room-temperature ferromagnetism than wurtzite sample, which can reach the ferromagnetic level of conventional semiconductors doped with magnetic transition-metal ions, mainly due to the significantly enhanced spin configuration and defect states. Therefore, crystal structure directly governs the spin configuration, which determines the degree of spin polarization. This work can provide experimental and theoretical methods for designing the high spin-polarized semiconductor nanocrystals, which is important for applications in semiconductor spintronics. PMID:26905093

  18. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, O.B.; Lear, K.L.

    1998-03-10

    The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g., Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3--1.6 {mu}m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation. 10 figs.

  19. Optical Properties of Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponenko, S. V.

    1998-10-01

    Low-dimensional semiconductor structures, often referred to as nanocrystals or quantum dots, exhibit fascinating behavior and have a multitude of potential applications, especially in the field of communications. This book examines in detail the optical properties of these structures, gives full coverage of theoretical and experimental results, and discusses their technological applications. The author begins by setting out the basic physics of electron states in crystals (adopting a "cluster-to-crystal" approach), and goes on to discuss the growth of nanocrystals, absorption and emission of light by nanocrystals, optical nonlinearities, interface effects, and photonic crystals. He illustrates the physical principles with references to actual devices such as novel light-emitters and optical switches. The book covers a rapidly developing, interdisciplinary field. It will be of great interest to graduate students of photonics or microelectronics, and to researchers in electrical engineering, physics, chemistry, and materials science.

  20. Characterization of low dimensional molybdenum sulfide nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho-Bragado, G. Alejandra; Elechiguerra, Jose Luis; Yacaman, Miguel Jose

    2008-03-15

    It is presented a detailed structural characterization of a nanostructured form of molybdenum disulfide. The material consists of a layer of highly textured molybdenum sulfide growing off a molybdenum dioxide core. The structure and chemical composition of the synthesized nanostructured sulfide was compared to two well-known forms of molybdenum disulfide, i.e. a commercial molybdenite sample and a poorly crystalline sulfide. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction showed that the material reported here presents crystalline nanodomains with a crystal structure corresponding to the 2H polytype of molybdenum disulfide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to demonstrate the differences between our sulfide and other materials such as amorphous MoS{sub 3}, oxysulfides and poorly crystalline MoS{sub 2}, corroborating the molybdenite-2H stacking in this form of sulfide. The material under study showed a high proportion of crystalline planes different from the basal plane.

  1. Electronic structures of interfacial states formed at polymeric semiconductor heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Shih; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Avilov, Igor; Sreearunothai, Paiboon; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Deleener, Caroline; Friend, Richard H.; Beljonne, David

    2008-06-01

    Heterojunctions between organic semiconductors are central to the operation of light-emitting and photovoltaic diodes, providing respectively for electron-hole capture and separation. However, relatively little is known about the character of electronic excitations stable at the heterojunction. We have developed molecular models to study such interfacial excited electronic excitations that form at the heterojunction between model polymer donor and polymer acceptor systems: poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB) with poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT), and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-N-(4-butylphenyl)diphenylamine) (TFB) with F8BT. We find that for stable ground-state geometries the excited state has a strong charge-transfer character. Furthermore, when partly covalent, modelled radiative lifetimes (~10-7s) and off-chain axis polarization (30∘) match observed `exciplex' emission. Additionally for the PFB:F8BT blend, geometries with fully ionic character are also found, thus accounting for the low electroluminescence efficiency of this system.

  2. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, R.; Bianchi, F.; Blumstengel, S.; Christodoulou, C.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kobin, B.; Moudgil, K.; Barlow, S.; Hecht, S.; Marder, S.R.; Henneberger, F.; Koch, N.

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach. PMID:25872919

  3. Light-induced resistive switching in silicon-based metal-insulator-semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhov, S. V.; Gorshkov, O. N.; Koryazhkina, M. N.; Antonov, I. N.; Kasatkin, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied light-induced resistive switching in metal-insulator-semiconductor structures based on silicon covered with a tunneling-thin SiO2 layer and nanometer-thick layer of antimony. The role of an insulator was played by yttria-stabilized zirconia.

  4. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, R.; Bianchi, F.; Blumstengel, S.; Christodoulou, C.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kobin, B.; Moudgil, K.; Barlow, S.; Hecht, S.; Marder, S. R.; Henneberger, F.; Koch, N.

    2015-04-01

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach.

  5. Technique for measuring the Cooper-pair velocity, density, and mass using Doppler splitting of the plasmon resonance in low-dimensional superconductor microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mishonov, T.M. )

    1994-08-01

    The creation of a Cooper-pair mass spectroscopy is suggested. The plasmons in low-dimensional superconductor structures (layers or wires in the dielectric background) are theoretically considered for this purpose. The Cooper-pair mass [ital m][sup *] (the parameter [ital m][sup *] in London electrodynamics) can be determined by measurements of the Doppler shift of the plasmon frequency when a direct current is applied through the superconductor. The plasmons with frequency [omega] lower than the superconducting gap 2[Delta] can be detected by the same far-infrared absorption technique and grating coupling used previously for investigation of two-dimensional plasmons in semiconductor microstructures and polaritons in condensed-matter physics.

  6. Semiconductor structural damage attendant to contact formation in III-V solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

    1991-01-01

    In order to keep the resistive losses in solar cells to a minimum, it is often necessary for the ohmic contacts to be heat treated to lower the metal-semiconductor contact resistivity to acceptable values. Sintering of the contacts, however can result in extensive mechanical damage of the semiconductor surface under the metallization. An investigation of the detailed mechanisms involved in the process of contact formation during heat treatment may control the structural damage incurred by the semiconductor surface to acceptable levels, while achieving the desired values of contact resistivity for the ohmic contacts. The reaction kinetics of sintered gold contacts to InP were determined. It was found that the Au-InP interaction involves three consecutive stages marked by distinct color changes observed on the surface of the Au, and that each stage is governed by a different mechanism. A detailed description of these mechanisms and options to control them are presented.

  7. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Trench gate IGBT structure with floating P region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengliang, Qian; Zehong, Li; Bo, Zhang; Zhaoji, Li

    2010-02-01

    A new trench gate IGBT structure with a floating P region is proposed, which introduces a floating P region into the trench accumulation layer controlled IGBT (TAC-IGBT). The new structure maintains a low on-state voltage drop and large forward biased safe operating area (FBSOA) of the TAC-IGBT structure while reduces the leakage current and improves the breakdown voltage. In addition, it enlarges the short circuit safe operating area (SCSOA) of the TAC-IGBT, and is simple in fabrication and design. Simulation results indicate that, for IGBT structures with a breakdown voltage of 1200 V, the leakage current of the new trench gate IGBT structure is one order of magnitude lower than the TAC-IGBT structure and the breakdown voltage is 150 V higher than the TAC-IGBT.

  8. Low-dimensional dynamics of resting-state cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Breakspear, Michael; Boonstra, Tjeerd W

    2014-05-01

    Endogenous brain activity supports spontaneous human thought and shapes perception and behavior. Connectivity-based analyses of endogenous, or resting-state, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data have revealed the existence of a small number of robust networks which have a rich spatial structure. Yet the temporal information within fMRI data is limited, motivating the complementary analysis of electrophysiological recordings such as electroencephalography (EEG). Here we provide a novel method based on multivariate time-frequency interdependence to reconstruct the principal resting-state network dynamics in human EEG data. The stability of network expression across subjects is assessed using resampling techniques. We report the presence of seven robust networks, with distinct topographic organizations and high frequency (∼ 5-45 Hz) fingerprints, nested within slow temporal sequences that build up and decay over several orders of magnitude. Interestingly, all seven networks are expressed concurrently during these slow dynamics, although there is a temporal asymmetry in the pattern of their formation and dissolution. These analyses uncover the complex temporal character of endogenous cortical fluctuations and, in particular, offer an opportunity to reconstruct the low dimensional linear subspace in which they unfold. PMID:24104726

  9. Low dimensional molecular dynamics of water inside a carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Lin, Yuan; Amberg, Gustav; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-11-01

    While carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a number of researches as the key building blocks for nanotechnology, they have also caught attentions as ideal materials that realize quasi-one-dimensional channel environment, a key system in bioscience. Such materials stimulate studies in fluid dynamics under low dimensional confinement, which is restricted and departs significantly from that in three-dimension. The current study serves to explore such atomic scale dynamics by performing a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on water confined in a CNT with a diameter of the order of 1 nm. The MD simulations have successfully probed the phase transition of a water cluster confined in a CNT to an ice-nanotube with anomalous diameter dependence. It has also been applied to investigate the possibility of transporting water through a CNT by a temperature gradient. In this study, we particularly highlight the dielectric properties of water confined inside a CNT. The confinement gives rise to strongly anisotropic dielectric relaxation, where the relaxation becomes faster and slower in the cross sectional and axial directions, respectively. The diameter dependences of the dielectric properties are discussed in connection with water dynamics and structures in quasi-one-dimension.

  10. A model for the C-V characteristics of the metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun Jie; Sun, Jing; Zheng, Xue Jun

    2009-02-01

    A model is developed to describe the characteristics of the metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor (MFIS) structure based on the dipole switching theory (DST) and the silicon physics of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure. The ferroelectric dipole distribution function is used to simulate the history-dependent electric field effect of the ferroelectric layer. Using the model, the thickness effects of the ferroelectric and insulator layers on the capacitance-voltage ( C-V) characteristic and the memory window were investigated for Pt/SBT/ZrO 2/Si and Pt/BLT/MgO/Si structures. All the simulation results show good agreement with the experimental results, indicating that the model is suitable for simulating the C-V characteristic and the memory window of MFIS structure. In addition, the mathematical description is simple and can be easily integrated into the electronic design automation (EDA) software for circuit simulation.

  11. A low dimensional approach on network characterization.

    PubMed

    Li, Benjamin Y S; Zhan, Choujun; Yeung, Lam F; Ko, King T; Yang, Genke

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, one may need to characterize a given network among a large set of base networks, and these networks are large in size and diverse in structure over the search space. In addition, the characterization algorithms are required to have low volatility and with a small circle of uncertainty. For large datasets, these algorithms are computationally intensive and inefficient. However, under the context of network mining, a major concern of some applications is speed. Hence, we are motivated to develop a fast characterization algorithm, which can be used to quickly construct a graph space for analysis purpose. Our approach is to transform a network characterization measure, commonly formulated based on similarity matrices, into simple vector form signatures. We shall show that the [Formula: see text] similarity matrix can be represented by a dyadic product of two N-dimensional signature vectors; thus the network alignment process, which is usually solved as an assignment problem, can be reduced into a simple alignment problem based on separate signature vectors. PMID:25329146

  12. Low dimensional dynamics in birdsong production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Ana; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2014-12-01

    The way in which information about behavior is represented at different levels of the motor pathway, remains among the fundamental unresolved problems of motor coding and sensorimotor integration. Insight into this matter is essential for understanding complex learned behaviors such as speech or birdsong. A major challenge in motor coding has been to identify an appropriate framework for characterizing behavior. In this work we discuss a novel approach linking biomechanics and neurophysiology to explore motor control of songbirds. We present a model of song production based on gestures that can be related to physiological parameters that the birds can control. This physical model for the vocal structures allows a reduction in the dimensionality of the behavior, being a powerful approach for studying sensorimotor integration. Our results also show how dynamical systems models can provide insight into neurophysiological analysis of vocal motor control. In particular, our work challenges the actual understanding of how the motor pathway of the songbird systems works and proposes a novel perspective to study neural coding for song production.

  13. Flexible perovskite solar cells based on the metal-insulator-semiconductor structure.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Li, Heng; Zhao, Yicheng; Zhou, Wenke; Fu, Rui; Pan, Huiyue; Zhao, Qing

    2016-09-14

    The metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is applied to perovskite solar cells, in which the traditional compact layer TiO2 is replaced by Al2O3 as the hole blocking material to realize an all-low-temperature process. Flexible devices based on this structure are also realized with excellent flexibility, which hold 85% of their initial efficiency after bending 100 times. PMID:27524362

  14. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J.

    2016-05-24

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multi layer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  15. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J

    2014-11-25

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multilayer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  16. Release strategies for making transferable semiconductor structures, devices and device components

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Meitl, Matthew; Ko, Heung Cho; Yoon, Jongseung; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J.

    2011-04-26

    Provided are methods for making a device or device component by providing a multilayer structure having a plurality of functional layers and a plurality of release layers and releasing the functional layers from the multilayer structure by separating one or more of the release layers to generate a plurality of transferable structures. The transferable structures are printed onto a device substrate or device component supported by a device substrate. The methods and systems provide means for making high-quality and low-cost photovoltaic devices, transferable semiconductor structures, (opto-)electronic devices and device components.

  17. Dynamic colloidal assembly pathways via low dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuguang; Thyagarajan, Raghuram; Ford, David M.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Here we construct a low-dimensional Smoluchowski model for electric field mediated colloidal crystallization using Brownian dynamic simulations, which were previously matched to experiments. Diffusion mapping is used to infer dimensionality and confirm the use of two order parameters, one for degree of condensation and one for global crystallinity. Free energy and diffusivity landscapes are obtained as the coefficients of a low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation to capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of microstructure evolution. The resulting low-dimensional model quantitatively captures the dynamics of different assembly pathways between fluid, polycrystal, and single crystals states, in agreement with the full N-dimensional data as characterized by first passage time distributions. Numerical solution of the low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation reveals statistical properties of the dynamic evolution of states vs. applied field amplitude and system size. The low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation and associated landscapes calculated here can serve as models for predictive control of electric field mediated assembly of colloidal ensembles into two-dimensional crystalline objects.

  18. Dynamic colloidal assembly pathways via low dimensional models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuguang; Thyagarajan, Raghuram; Ford, David M; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-28

    Here we construct a low-dimensional Smoluchowski model for electric field mediated colloidal crystallization using Brownian dynamic simulations, which were previously matched to experiments. Diffusion mapping is used to infer dimensionality and confirm the use of two order parameters, one for degree of condensation and one for global crystallinity. Free energy and diffusivity landscapes are obtained as the coefficients of a low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation to capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of microstructure evolution. The resulting low-dimensional model quantitatively captures the dynamics of different assembly pathways between fluid, polycrystal, and single crystals states, in agreement with the full N-dimensional data as characterized by first passage time distributions. Numerical solution of the low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation reveals statistical properties of the dynamic evolution of states vs. applied field amplitude and system size. The low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation and associated landscapes calculated here can serve as models for predictive control of electric field mediated assembly of colloidal ensembles into two-dimensional crystalline objects. PMID:27250328

  19. Evidence of low-dimensional chaos in magnetized plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živković, T.; Rypdal, K.

    2008-10-01

    We analyze probe data obtained from a toroidal magnetized plasma configuration suitable for studies of low-frequency gradient-driven instabilities. These instabilities give rise to field-aligned convection rolls analogous to Rayleigh-Benard cells in neutral fluids, and may theoretically develop similar routes to chaos. When using mean-field dimension analysis, we observe low dimensionality, but this could originate from either low-dimensional chaos, periodicity or quasi-periodicity. Therefore, we apply recurrence plot analysis as well as estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent. These analyses provide evidence of low-dimensional chaos, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Our results can be applied to other magnetized plasma configurations, where gradient-driven instabilities dominate the dynamics of the system.

  20. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyano groups. XVII. Crystal structure, spectroscopic, thermal and magnetic properties of [Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}] (bmen=N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine)

    SciTech Connect

    Potocnak, Ivan Vavra, Martin; Cizmar, Erik; Kajnakova, Marcela; Radvakova, Alena; Steinborn, Dirk; Zvyagin, Sergei A.; Wosnitza, Jochen; Feher, Alexander

    2009-01-15

    The synthesis, structural analysis, spectroscopic studies, susceptibility and specific-heat measurements of {l_brace}[Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (bmen=N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine) are presented. X-ray crystal-structure analysis revealed that the [Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} building blocks are combined with [Cu(bmen){sub 2}]{sup 2+} units to form a chain-like structure along the a axis. The Cu(II) atoms are hexacoordinated by four nitrogen atoms in the equatorial plane belonging to two molecules of bidentate bmen ligands with average Cu-N distance of 2.043(18) A. The axial positions are occupied by two nitrogen atoms from bridging [Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anions at a longer axial Cu-N distance of 2.490(4) A. The compound is characterized by the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J/k{sub B}=0.6 K. Despite the one-dimensional (1D) character of the structure, the analysis of the magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}] behaves as a two-dimensional (2D) square-lattice Heisenberg magnet with weak interlayer coupling. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis, structural analysis, spectroscopic studies, susceptibility and specific-heat measurements of {l_brace}[Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (bmen=N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine) are presented. X-ray crystal-structure analysis revealed that the [Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} building blocks are combined with [Cu(bmen){sub 2}]{sup 2+} units to form a chain-like structure. The compound is characterized by the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J/k{sub B}=-0.6 K. Despite the one-dimensional character of the structure, the analysis of the magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}] behaves as a two-dimensional square-lattice Heisenberg magnet with weak interlayer coupling.

  1. Observations on ion track structure in semiconductors : a phenomenological study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selva, L. E.; Wallace, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    An ion track structure model at the nanometer scale is presented. The model is based on electrostatic principles and is supported by observed experimental results conducted on power MOSFETs. The model predicts the existence of a transient induced electric field following the passage of an energetic heavy ion. There are two segments to the field (a radial and an axial component). It is the interaction of this transient electric field with the local environment that can trigger a catastrophic failure.

  2. Nonlinear Spatio-Temporal Dynamics and Chaos in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll, Eckehard

    2005-08-01

    Nonlinear transport phenomena are an increasingly important aspect of modern semiconductor research. This volume deals with complex nonlinear dynamics, pattern formation, and chaotic behavior in such systems. It bridges the gap between two well-established fields: the theory of dynamic systems and nonlinear charge transport in semiconductors. This unified approach helps reveal important electronic transport instabilities. The initial chapters lay a general framework for the theoretical description of nonlinear self-organized spatio-temporal patterns, such as current filaments, field domains, fronts, and analysis of their stability. Later chapters consider important model systems in detail: impact ionization induced impurity breakdown, Hall instabilities, superlattices, and low-dimensional structures. State-of-the-art results include chaos control, spatio-temporal chaos, multistability, pattern selection, activator-inhibitor kinetics, and global coupling, linking fundamental issues to electronic device applications. This book will be of great value to semiconductor physicists and nonlinear scientists alike.

  3. Nonlinear Spatio-Temporal Dynamics and Chaos in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll, Eckehard

    2001-02-01

    Nonlinear transport phenomena are an increasingly important aspect of modern semiconductor research. This volume deals with complex nonlinear dynamics, pattern formation, and chaotic behavior in such systems. It bridges the gap between two well-established fields: the theory of dynamic systems and nonlinear charge transport in semiconductors. This unified approach helps reveal important electronic transport instabilities. The initial chapters lay a general framework for the theoretical description of nonlinear self-organized spatio-temporal patterns, such as current filaments, field domains, fronts, and analysis of their stability. Later chapters consider important model systems in detail: impact ionization induced impurity breakdown, Hall instabilities, superlattices, and low-dimensional structures. State-of-the-art results include chaos control, spatio-temporal chaos, multistability, pattern selection, activator-inhibitor kinetics, and global coupling, linking fundamental issues to electronic device applications. This book will be of great value to semiconductor physicists and nonlinear scientists alike.

  4. Dynamics of carrier recombination in a semiconductor laser structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhioev, R. I. Kavokin, K. V.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Poletaev, N. K.

    2015-11-15

    Carrier-recombination dynamics is studied by the method of optical orientation at room temperature in the active layer of a laser diode structure. The dependence of the degree of electron-spin orientation on the excitation density is attributed to saturation of the nonradiative-recombination channel. The time of electron capture at recombination centers is determined to be τ{sub e} = 5 × 10{sup –9} s. The temperature of nonequilibrium electrons heated by a He–Ne laser is estimated.

  5. Coupling of Semiconductor Nanowires with Neurons and Their Interfacial Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Young; Shim, Sojung; Kim, Il-Soo; Oh, Hwangyou; Kim, Sunoh; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Park, Seung-Han; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2010-02-01

    We report on the compatibility of various nanowires with hippocampal neurons and the structural study of the neuron-nanowire interface. Si, Ge, SiGe, and GaN nanowires are compatible with hippocampal neurons due to their native oxide, but ZnO nanowires are toxic to neuron due to a release of Zn ion. The interfaces of fixed Si nanowire and hippocampal neuron, cross-sectional samples, were prepared by focused ion beam and observed by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the processes of neuron were adhered well on the nanowire without cleft.

  6. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyano groups. XIV. Crystal structure, spectroscopic, thermal and magnetic properties of [CuL {sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] complexes (L=ethylenediamine or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine)

    SciTech Connect

    Potocnak, Ivan . E-mail: ivan.potocnak@upjs.sk; Vavra, Martin; Cizmar, Erik; Tibenska, Katarina; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Steinborn, Dirk; Wagner, Christoph; Dusek, Michal; Fejfarova, Karla; Schmidt, Harry; Muller, Thomas; Orendac, Martin; Feher, Alexander

    2006-07-15

    Violet crystals of [Cu(en){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] and blue crystals of [Cu(dmen){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] were crystallized from the water-methanol solution containing CuCl{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O, ethylenediamine (en) or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (dmen) and K{sub 2}[Pt(China){sub 4}].3H{sub 2}O. Both compounds were characterized using elemental analysis, infrared and UV-VIS spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, specific heat measurements and thermal analysis. X-ray structure analysis revealed chain-like structure in both compounds. The covalent chains are built of Cu(II) ions linked by [Pt(China){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anions in the [111] and [101] direction, respectively. The Cu(II) atoms are hexacoordinated by four nitrogen atoms in the equatorial plane from two molecules of bidentate ligands L with average Cu-N distance of 2.022(2) and 2.049(4) A, respectively. Axial positions are occupied by two nitrogen atoms from bridging [Pt(China){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anions at longer Cu-N distance of 2.537(2) and 2.600(5) A, respectively. Both materials are characterized by the presence of weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling. Despite the one-dimensional (1D) character of the structure, the analysis of magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(en){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] behaves as two-dimensional (2D) spatially anisotropic square lattice Heisenberg magnet, while more pronounced influence of interlayer coupling is observed in [Cu(dmen){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}]. - Graphical abstract: Chain-like structure in [Cu(en){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] (R=H) and [Cu(dmen){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] (R=CH{sub 3}) compounds.

  7. First principles simulations of liquid semiconductors: Electronic, structural and dynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlevsky, Vitaliy

    We develop ab initio molecular dynamics simulation technique to examine liquid semiconductors. Our methods use quantum interatomic forces, computed within the pseudopotential-density functional method (PDFM). In our work, we study typical representatives of IV, III-V and II-VI materials: Si, Ge, GaAs and CdTe. We show that, upon melting, IV and III-V semiconductors experience semiconductor → metal transition, while more ionic II-VI compounds remain semiconductors in the melt. Metallic type conductivity of liquid IV and III-V materials results from the structural changes of the systems in the melt. In our simulations, "open" zinc-blende (diamond for Si and Ge) structures transform into a more close-packed configuration during solid → liquid transition. Their coordination number, equal to 4 in the crystalline phase, changes to ˜6 in the liquid. We demonstrate that this leads to the breaking of covalent bonds and delocalization of electrons. According to our results, the density of states function of liquid IV and III-V semiconductors has a well defined "free electron" character. For these materials, the electrical conductivity jumps by one to two orders of magnitude during melting. This is opposite to the behavior of the majority of II-VI compounds. In our work, we examine CdTe, typical II-VI semiconductor. Although the dc conductivity of CdTe increases by a factor of 40 as it melts, this material remains a semiconductor in the liquid: its electrical conductivity increases with the temperature. At variance with IV and III-V semiconductors, liquid CdTe retains its tetrahedral environment with the coordination number of ˜4. We discover that a significant number of anion-cation bonds are conserved in liquid CdTe as opposed to IV and III-V materials. This is in agreement with the small entropy change observed in the melting process of CdTe. In our simulations, we find that further heating of molten CdTe results in significant structural changes with a

  8. First-principles study of the electronic structure of organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Biller, Ariel J.; Kronik, Leeor; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2010-03-01

    Organic semiconductors are promising materials for next generation organic photovoltaics, with the characterization of their spectroscopic properties vital to improving the potential of such technologies. Here, we use density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation to explore quantitatively the electronic structure of prototypical organic semiconductor crystals and compare directly with valence-band photoemission data. For pentacene and PTCDA, computed gas-phase ionization energies and electron affinities are compared with calculated crystal-phase quasiparticle band structures, and relationships between shifts in orbital energy with change of phase and static polarization of the bulk are discussed and compared with experiment. We acknowledge DOE, NSF, BASF, and ISF for financial support, and NERSC for computational resources.

  9. The electronic structure of graphene tuned by hexagonal boron nitrogen layers: Semimetal-semiconductor transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qing-Yuan; Ma, Tai; He, Yao; Cao, Chao

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure of graphene and hexagonal boron nitrogen (G/h-BN) systems have been carefully investigated using the pseudo-potential plane-wave within density functional theory (DFT) framework. We find that the stacking geometries and interlayer distances significantly affect the electronic structure of G/h-BN systems. By studying four stacking geometries, we conclude that the monolayer G/h-BN systems should possess metallic electronic properties. The monolayer G/h-BN systems can be transited from metallicity to semiconductor by increasing h-BN layers. It reveals that the alteration of interlayer distances 2.50-3.50 Å can obtain the metal-semiconductor-semimetal variation and a tunable band gap for G/h-BN composite systems. The band dispersion along K-H direction is analogous to the band of rhombohedral graphite when the G/h-BN systems are semiconducting.

  10. Magnons in disordered nonstoichiometric low-dimensional magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Paweł; Sandratskii, Leonid M.; Buczek, Nadine; Thomas, Stefan; Vignale, Giovanni; Ernst, Arthur

    2016-08-01

    We study spin excitation spectra of one-, two-, and three-dimensional magnets featuring nonmagnetic defects at a wide range of concentrations. Taking the Heisenberg model as the starting point, we tackle the problem by both direct numerical simulations in large supercells and using a semianalytic coherent-potential approximation. We consider the properties of the excitations in both direct and reciprocal spaces. In the limits of the concentration c of the magnetic atoms tending to 0 or 1 the properties of the spin excitations are similar in all three dimensions. In the case of a low concentration of magnetic atoms the spin excitation spectra are dominated by the modes confined in the real space to single atoms or small clusters and delocalized in the reciprocal space. In the limit of c tending to 1, we obtain the spin-wave excitations delocalized in the real space and localized in the reciprocal space. However, for the intermediate concentrations the properties of the spin excitations are strongly dimensionality dependent. We pay particular attention to the formation, with increase of c , of the Lorentzian-shaped peaks in the spectral densities of the spin excitations, which can be regarded as magnon states with a finite lifetime given by the width of the peaks. In general, low-dimensional magnets are more strongly affected by the presence of nonmagnetic impurities than their bulk counterparts. The details of the electronic structure, varying with the dimensionality and the concentration, substantially influence the spin excitation spectra of real materials, as we show in the example of the FeAl alloy.

  11. Science and Technology of Semiconductor-On-Insulator Structures and Devices Operating in a Harsh Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandre, Denis; Nazarov, Alexei N.; Hemment, Peter L. F.

    This book collects the papers presented during NATO Advanced Research Workshop "Science and technology of Semiconductor on Insulator (SOI) structures and devices operating in a harsh environment" held in Kiev 26-30 April 2004. The volume contains both reviews from invited speakers and selected papers presenting major innovations in SOI materials and devices. Particular attention is paid to the reliability of SOI structures operated under harsh conditions. In the first part of the book dealing with SOI material technology, the evolution of SOI materials, achievements in the main standard technologies as Smart Cut, SIMOX, porous silicon as well as methods to create more exotic structures are described.

  12. Electronic Structure of the Organic Semiconductor Copper Tetraphenylporphyrin (CuTPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, I.; Zhang, Y; Demasi, A; Blueser, A; Piper, L; Downes, J; Matsuura, A; Hughes, G; Smith, K

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure of thin films of the organic semiconductor copper tetraphenylporphyrin (CuTPP) has been studied using synchrotron radiation-excited resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (RSXE), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The C and N partial density of states for both the valence and conduction band electronic structure has been determined, while XPS was used to provide information on the chemical composition and the oxidation states of the copper. Good agreement was found between the experimental measurements of the valence and conduction bands and the results of density functional theory calculations.

  13. Electrical properties of hybrid (ferromagnetic metal)-(layered semiconductor) Ni/p-GaSe structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtinov, A. P. Vodopyanov, V. N.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Netyaga, V. V.; Lytvyn, O. S.

    2010-02-15

    Two-barrier Ni/n-Ga2Se3/p-GaSe structures with nanoscale Ni-alloy grains caused by reactions at the 'metal-layered semiconductor' interface were formed after growing Ni layers on the p-GaSe (0001) surface. Current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics of hybrid structures were studied in the temperature range of 220-350 K. The dependence of the impedance spectra on the bias voltage was studied at various temperatures. The frequency dependences of the impedance at high frequencies (f = 10{sup 6} Hz) are discussed in terms of the phenomena of spin injection and extraction in structures with an ultrathin spin-selective Ni/n-Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} barrier and the effects of spin diffusion and relaxation in the semiconductor substrate. The room-temperature phenomena of the Coulomb blockade and negative differential capacitance were detected. These phenomena are explained based on an analysis of transport processes in a narrow region near the 'ferromagnetic metal-semiconductor' interface, where nanoscale grains are arranged.

  14. Low-dimensional copper(II) complexes with the trinucleating ligand 2,4,6-tris(di-2-pyridylamine)-1,3,5-triazine: synthesis, crystal structures, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Consuelo; Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Labrador, Ana; Delgado, Fernando S; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2009-07-20

    The preparation and structural characterization of three new copper(II) complexes of formula [Cu(3)(dipyatriz)(2)(H(2)O)(3)](ClO(4))(6) x 2 H(2)O (1), {[Cu(4)(dipyatriz)(2)(H(2)O)(2)(NO(3))(2)(ox)(2)](NO(3))(2) x 2 H(2)O}(n) (2), and [Cu(6)(dipyatriz)(2)(H(2)O)(9)(NO(3))(3)(ox)(3)](NO(3))(3) x 4 H(2)O (3) [dipyatriz = 2,4,6-tris(di-2-pyridylamine)-1,3,5-triazine and ox = oxalate] are reported. The structure of 1 consists of trinuclear units [Cu(3)(dipyatriz)(2)(H(2)O)(3)](6+) and uncoordinated perchlorate anions. The two dipyatriz molecules in 1 act as tris-bidentate ligands with the triazine cores being in a quasi eclipsed conformation. Each copper atom in 1 exhibits a distorted square pyramidal geometry CuN(4)O with four pyridyl-nitrogen atoms from two dipyatriz ligands building the basal plane and a water molecule occupying the axial position. The values of the intratrimer copper-copper separation are 8.0755(6) and 8.3598(8) A. Compound 2 exhibits a layered structure of copper(II) ions which are connected through bis-bidentate dipyatriz ligands and bidentate/outer monodentate oxalato groups. The copper atoms in 2 exhibit six- [Cu(1)N(4)O(2)] and five-coordination [Cu(2)N(2)O(3)]. A water molecule and three pyridyl-nitrogen atoms [Cu(1)] and two pyridyl-nitrogen plus two oxalate-oxygen atoms [Cu(2)] define the equatorial plane whereas either an oxalate-oxygen and a pyridyl-nitrogen [Cu(1)] or a nitrate-oxygen [Cu(2)] fill the axial positions. The copper-copper separation through the bridging oxalato is 5.6091(6) A whereas those across dipyatriz vary in the range 7.801(1)-9.079(1) A. The structure of compound 3 contains discrete cage-like hexacopper(II) units [Cu(6)(dipyatriz)(2)(H(2)O)(9)(NO(3))(3)(ox)(3)](3+) where two trinuclear [Cu(3)(dipyatriz)](6+) fragments are connected by three bis-bidentate oxalate ligands, the charge being balanced by three non-coordinated nitrate anions. The values of the intracage copper-copper distance are 5.112(3)-5.149(2) A (across

  15. Magnetic structure of low-dimensional LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} multiferroic according to {sup 63,65}Cu and {sup 7}Li NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sadykov, A. F. Gerashchenko, A. P.; Piskunov, Yu. V.; Ogloblichev, V. V.; Smol'nikov, A. G.; Verkhovskii, S. V.; Yakubovskii, A. Yu.; Tishchenko, E. A.; Bush, A. A.

    2012-10-15

    The complex NMR study of the magnetic structure of LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} multiferroic has been performed. It has been shown that the spin spirals in LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} are beyond the ab, bc, and ac crystallographic planes. The external magnetic field applied along the c axis of the crystal does not change the spatial orientation of spirals in Cu{sup 2+} chains. A magnetic field of H{sub 0} = 94 kOe applied along the a and b axes rotates the planes of spin spirals in chains, tending to orient the normal n of spirals along the external magnetic field. The rotation angle of the planes of the magnetic moments are maximal at H{sub 0} Double-Vertical-Line b.

  16. Low-dimensional CdS/CdTe multiple-quantum well heterostructure for optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarín-Cordero, Julio C.; Villa-Angulo, Rafael; Villa-Angulo, José R.; Villa-Angulo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The major challenge for semiconductors to achieve temperatures below 10 K by luminescence upconversion, is that at these lattice temperatures the acoustic phonon component dominates and the scattering rate becomes comparable to the band-to-band radiative transition rate. This problem can be significantly alleviated by employing quantum-confined systems, where relaxation of wave-vector conservation in the confined direction reduces material conductivity by nearly three orders of magnitude. Although previous studies have reported theoretical and experimental analyses of cooling characteristics for bulk semiconductors, the electron band-to-band transition due to photon absorption or photon emission under cooling conditions in quantum-confined semiconductor systems which exhibit quantum effects at the dimensions of several nanometers have not been completely analyzed in conventional theoretical studies. We realized a numerical investigation of optical cooling conditions for a low-dimensional CdS/CdTe multiple-quantum well heterostructure where injected carriers in the active region are quantum mechanically confined in one dimension. Effects of such quantum mechanically confined carriers on photon absorption and photoluminescence (PL) were analyzed under cooling conditions. Most importantly, the CdS/CdTe heterostructure absorption and PL spectra for cooling conditions were defined in terms of the active layer width and number of quantum wells in the complete heterostructure.

  17. Electronic structure of ferromagnetic semiconductor material on the monoclinic and rhombohedral ordered double perovskites La{sub 2}FeCoO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Fuh, Huei-Ru; Chang, Ching-Ray; Weng, Ke-Chuan; Wang, Yin-Kuo

    2015-05-07

    Double perovskite La{sub 2}FeCoO{sub 6} with monoclinic structure and rhombohedra structure show as ferromagnetic semiconductor based on density functional theory calculation. The ferromagnetic semiconductor state can be well explained by the superexchange interaction. Moreover, the ferromagnetic semiconductor state remains under the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and GGA plus onsite Coulomb interaction calculation.

  18. Low-dimensional compounds containing bioactive ligands. Part VI: Synthesis, structures, in vitro DNA binding, antimicrobial and anticancer properties of first row transition metal complexes with 5-chloro-quinolin-8-ol.

    PubMed

    Potočňák, Ivan; Vranec, Peter; Farkasová, Veronika; Sabolová, Danica; Vataščinová, Michaela; Kudláčová, Júlia; Radojević, Ivana D; Čomić, Ljiljana R; Markovic, Bojana Simovic; Volarevic, Vladislav; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Trifunović, Srećko R

    2016-01-01

    A series of new 3d metal complexes with 5-chloro-quinolin-8-ol (ClQ), [Mn(ClQ)2] (1), [Fe(ClQ)3] (2), [Co(ClQ)2(H2O)2] (3), [Ni(ClQ)2(H2O)2] (4), [Cu(ClQ)2] (5), [Zn(ClQ)2(H2O)2] (6), [Mn(ClQ)3]·DMF (7) and [Co(ClQ)3]·DMF·(EtOH)0.35 (8) (DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide), has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and TG-DTA thermal analysis. X-ray structure analysis of 7 and 8 revealed that these molecular complexes contain three chelate ClQ molecules coordinated to the central atoms in a deformed octahedral geometry and free space between the complex units is filled by solvated DMF and ethanol molecules. Antimicrobial activity of 1-6 was tested by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum microbicidal concentration against 12 strains of bacteria and 5 strains of fungi. The intensity of antimicrobial action varies depending on the group of microorganism and can be sorted: 1>ClQ>6>3/4>2>5. Complexes 1-6 exhibit high cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB, HCT-116 and A549 cancer cell lines. Among them, complex 2 is significantly more cytotoxic against MDA-MB cells than cisplatin at all tested concentrations and is not cytotoxic against control mesenchymal stem cells indicating that this complex seems to be a good candidate for future pharmacological evaluation. Interaction of 1-6 with DNA was investigated using UV-VIS spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and agarose gel electrophoresis. The binding studies indicate that 1-6 can interact with CT-DNA through intercalation; complex 2 has the highest binding affinity. Moreover, complexes 1-6 inhibit the catalytic activity of topoisomerase I. PMID:26600190

  19. Mechanical characterization of low dimensional nanomaterials and polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongsheng

    This research was aimed to characterize the mechanical properties of low dimensional nanomaterials and polymer nanocomposites, and to study the reinforcing mechanisms of nanoscale reinforcements. The nanomaterials studied were zero-dimensional nanomaterial--cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanocubes, one-dimensional nanomaterials--silver nanowires and silicon oxide (SiO2) nanowires, and two-dimensional nanomaterial--nanometer-thick montmorillonite clay platelets. The hardness and elastic moduli of solid Cu 2O nanocubes and silver nanowires were measured by directly indenting individual cubes/wires using a nanoindenter. The elastic modulus of amorphous SiO2 nanowires was measured by performing three-point bending on suspended wires with an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The elastic modulus of the nanometer-thick clay platelets was assessed by the modulus mapping technique. An array of nanoscale indents was successfully made on a nanowire. The nanowires were cut to the length as needed. The nanoindentation approach permits the direct machining of individual nanowires without complications of conventional lithography. The nanomechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-reinforced epoxy composites with varying nanotube concentrations were measured by nanoindentation/nanoscratch techniques. Hardness and elastic modulus were measured using a nanoindenter. Viscoelastic properties of the nanocomposites were measured using nanoindentation dynamic mechanical analysis tests. The SWCNT reinforcing mechanisms were further studied by both Halpin-Tsai and Mori-Tanaka theories, which were found applicable to SWCNT-reinforced, amorphous-polymer composites. The possible reinforcing mechanisms that work in polymer-SWCNT composites and reasons responsible for SWCNTs' low mechanical reinforcement were analyzed. Nanoclay-reinforced agarose nanocomposites with varying clay concentrations were structurally and mechanically characterized. Structural characterization was carried

  20. INTRODUCTION: Physics of Low-dimensional Systems: Nobel Symposium 73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundqvist, Stig

    1989-01-01

    The physics of low-dimensional systems has developed in a remarkable way over the last decade and has accelerated over the last few years, in particular because of the discovery of the new high temperature superconductors. The new developments started more than fifteen years ago with the discovery of the unexpected quasi-one-dimensional character of the TTF-TCNQ. Since then the field of conducting quasi-one-dimensional organic systems have been rapidly growing. Parallel to the experimental work there has been an important theoretical development of great conceptual importance, such as charge density waves, soliton-like excitations, fractional charges, new symmetry properties etc. A new field of fundamental importance was the discovery of the Quantum Hall Effect in 1980. This field is still expanding with new experimental and theoretical discoveries. In 1986, then, came the totally unexpected discovery of high temperature superconductivity which started an explosive development. The three areas just mentioned formed the main themes of the Symposium. They do not in any way exhaust the progress in low-dimensional physics. We should mention the recent important development with both two-dimensional and one-dimensional and even zero-dimensional structures (quantum dots). The physics of mesoscopic systems is another important area where the low dimensionality is a key feature. Because of the small format of this Symposium we could unfortunately not cover these areas. A Nobel Symposium provides an excellent opportunity to bring together a group of prominent scientists for a stimulating exchange of new ideas and results. The Nobel Symposia are very small meetings by invitation only and the number of key international participants is typically in the range 25-40. These Symposia are arranged through a special Nobel Symposium Committee after proposal from individuals. This Symposium was sponsored by the Nobel Foundation through its Nobel Symposium Fund with grants from The

  1. Theory of the electronic structure of substitutional semiconductor alloys: Analytical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, A. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    Methods of predicting the electronic structure of disordered semiconductor alloys involving mainly isoelectronic substitution are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on analytical methods of studying currently available models of alloys. An approximate equation for the localization threshold of electronic states in the Lifshitz model is considered, and the inaccuracy of this equation is estimated. The contributions of the perturbation potential of an individual impurity and of crystal-lattice distortions in the vicinity of the impurity center are analyzed on the basis of the Faddeev equations. The contributions of intrinsic impurity potentials and volume effects to the formation of the electronic structure of semiconductor alloys are esti- mated. Methods of calculating matrix elements of the perturbation potentials of isoelectronic impurities in alloys with consideration for deformation effects are considered. The procedure of calculating the compositional dependence of the band gap of multicomponent alloys is described. A comparative analysis of various methods for predicting the formation of electronic states bound at individual isoelectronic impurities in semiconductors is conducted. The theory of the energy spectrum of charged impurities in isoelectronic alloys is presented.

  2. Calculation of the electron structure of vacancies and their compensated states in III-VI semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrabova, M. A. Madatov, R. S.

    2011-08-15

    The Green's functions theory and the bond-orbital model are used as a basis for calculations of the electron structure of local defects-specifically, vacancies and their compensated states in III-VI semiconductors. The energy levels in the band gap are established, and the changes induced in the electron densities in the GaS, GaSe, and InSe semiconductors by anion and cation vacancies and their compensated states are calculated. It is established that, if a vacancy is compensated by an atom of an element from the same subgroup with the same tetrahedral coordination and if the ionic radius of the compensating atom is smaller than that of the substituted atom, the local levels formed by the vacancy completely disappear. It is shown that this mechanism of compensation of vacancies provides a means not only for recovering the parameters of the crystal, but for improving the characteristics of the crystal as well.

  3. Structurally controllable spin spatial splitter in a hybrid ferromagnet and semiconductor nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Mao-Wang Cao, Xue-Li; Huang, Xin-Hong; Jiang, Ya-Qing; Li, Shuai

    2014-05-07

    We theoretically investigate modulation of a tunable δ-potential to the lateral displacement of electrons across a magnetically modulated semiconductor nanostructure. Experimentally, this nanostructure can be produced by depositing a nanosized ferromagnetic stripe with in-plane magnetization on top of a semiconductor heterostructure, while the δ-potential can be realized by means of the atomic layer doping technique. Theoretical analysis reveals that this δ-doping can break the intrinsic symmetry in nanostructure and a considerable spin polarization in the lateral displacement will appear. Numerical calculations demonstrate that both magnitude and sign of spin polarization can be manipulated by changing the height and/or position of the δ-doping, giving rise to a structurally tunable spin spatial splitter.

  4. Long Range Modification of a Metal Surface Electronic Structure by an Organic Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingying; Dougherty, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In an organic spintronic device the interaction between electrode surface and organic semiconductor layer plays an important role in spin injection at this interface. The antiferromagnetic material Cr(001) is known to have a spin-polarized state near Fermi level that could potentially hybridize with organic molecules. Here we report our STM/STS study of electronic structure at interface between an organic semiconductor, PTCDA, and Cr(001) surface. The study shows that the surface state at Fermi level of Cr(001) can be broadened by PTCDA molecules deposited on the surface due to hybridization of PTCDA molecular orbital and conduction sp band of Cr(001). This indirect modification is not only localized at molecular adsorption sites, but also extends several nm to bare surrounding Cr(001) surface and decays with distance away from PTCDA molecules.

  5. Low-dimensional ScO2 with tunable electronic and magnetic properties: first-principles studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Tong, Chuan-Jia; Wu, Jian; Yin, Wen-Jin; Zhang, Yan-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted extensive attention due to their appealing properties for device applications. In this work, we explored the structure stability, electronic structure and magnetism of low-dimensional scandium dioxides, ScO2, by using the first-principles calculations. The results demonstrate that bulk ScO2, monolayers and nanoribbons (NRs) are thermodynamically stable, implying a high possibility of fabricating ScO2 nanocrystals in experiments. Despite the metallic characteristics of bulk ScO2, low-dimensional ScO2 possesses various electronic behaviors that can be further modulated by crystal structure and dimensionality. The results also show that the ground states of ScO2 monolayers and NRs are ferromagnetic (FM) with about 1 μ B per ScO2 formula. Our studies expand a new realm in low-dimensional TMDs, with tunable electronic and magnetic properties.

  6. Development of plenoptic infrared camera using low dimensional material based photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liangliang

    Infrared (IR) sensor has extended imaging from submicron visible spectrum to tens of microns wavelength, which has been widely used for military and civilian application. The conventional bulk semiconductor materials based IR cameras suffer from low frame rate, low resolution, temperature dependent and highly cost, while the unusual Carbon Nanotube (CNT), low dimensional material based nanotechnology has been made much progress in research and industry. The unique properties of CNT lead to investigate CNT based IR photodetectors and imaging system, resolving the sensitivity, speed and cooling difficulties in state of the art IR imagings. The reliability and stability is critical to the transition from nano science to nano engineering especially for infrared sensing. It is not only for the fundamental understanding of CNT photoresponse induced processes, but also for the development of a novel infrared sensitive material with unique optical and electrical features. In the proposed research, the sandwich-structured sensor was fabricated within two polymer layers. The substrate polyimide provided sensor with isolation to background noise, and top parylene packing blocked humid environmental factors. At the same time, the fabrication process was optimized by real time electrical detection dielectrophoresis and multiple annealing to improve fabrication yield and sensor performance. The nanoscale infrared photodetector was characterized by digital microscopy and precise linear stage in order for fully understanding it. Besides, the low noise, high gain readout system was designed together with CNT photodetector to make the nano sensor IR camera available. To explore more of infrared light, we employ compressive sensing algorithm into light field sampling, 3-D camera and compressive video sensing. The redundant of whole light field, including angular images for light field, binocular images for 3-D camera and temporal information of video streams, are extracted and

  7. The structure study of thin semiconductor and dielectric films by diffraction of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurjev, G. S.; Fainer, N. I.; Maximovskiy, E. A.; Kosinova, M. L.; Sheromov, M. A.; Rumyantsev, Yu. M.

    1998-02-01

    The structure of semiconductor and dielectric thin (100-300 nm) films was studied by diffraction of synchrotron radiation. The diffraction experiments were performed at both the station "Anomalous scattering" of the storage ring synchrotron facility VEPP-3 and DRON-4 diffractometer. The structure of CdS thin films grown on fused silica, single Si(100) and InP(100) substrates was investigated. The structure of Cu 2S thin films grown on fused silica, single Si(100) substrates and CdS/Si(100)-heterostructure was studied. The structure study was performed on Si 3N 4 films grown on GaAs(100) substrates. The structure of thin BN layers grown on single Si(100) substrates was studied. It was established that structural parameters of above-mentioned thin films coincide on the parameters of JCPDS International Centre for Diffraction Data.

  8. Unusual nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of a metal-intrinsic semiconductor-metal barrierless structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriuts, A. V.; Gurevich, Yu. G.

    2015-03-01

    A nonlinear model for the electric current in a metal-intrinsic semiconductor-metal structure without potential barriers in contacts is considered using a drift diffusion approach. An analytical solution of the continuity equations and the current-voltage characteristic for various recombination rates in the contacts are obtained. It is shown that the current-voltage characteristics of such a structure exhibit not only linear behavior, corresponding to Ohm's law, but may also possess properties of current-voltage characteristics of the rectifier diode. It is also possible current-voltage characteristics with saturation in both forward and backward directions. Physical model that explains the obtained results is proposed.

  9. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    SciTech Connect

    Schnohr, C. S.

    2015-09-15

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As, GaAs{sub x}P{sub 1−x}, or CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  10. Band-structure calculations for semiconductors within generalized-density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remediakis, I. N.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1999-02-01

    We present band-structure calculations of several semiconductors and insulators within the framework of density-functional theory in the local-density approximation (DFT/LDA), employing the correction for excited states proposed by Fritsche and co-workers. We applied the method to examine typical elemental (C,Si,Ge), compound group-IV (SiC, SiGe, GeC) and compound III-IV semiconductors (AlN, AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaN, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, InSb), and examined in detail the approximations involved in the conduction-band energy correction. This quite simple method (referred to as generalized density-functional theory), while not a substitute for more rigorous theoretical approaches such as the GW method, gives results in reasonable agreement with experiment. Thus, it makes possible the calculation of semiconductor band gaps with the computational effort of a DFT/LDA calculation, at least for systems where more elaborate methods are not readily applicable.

  11. The control of stoichiometry in Epitaxial semiconductor structures. Interfacial Chemistry: Property relations. A workshop review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the control of stoichiometry in epitaxial semiconductor structures was held on August 21-26, 1995 in the hotel Stutenhaus at Vesser in Germany. The secluded location of the workshop in the forest of Thuringia and its informal style stimulated extensive private discussions among the participants and promoted new contacts between young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe and the USA. Topics addressed by the presentations were interactions of precursors to heteroepitaxy and doping with the substrate surface, the control of interfacial properties under the conditions of heteroepitaxy for selected materials systems, methods of characterization of interfaces and native point defects in semiconductor heterostructures and an in depth evaluation of the present status of the control and characterization of the point defect chemistry for one specific semiconductor (ZnGeP2), including studies of both heterostructures and bulk single crystals. The selected examples of presentations and comments given here represent individual choices - made by the author to highlight major points of the discussions.

  12. Spatial and Temporal Low-Dimensional Models for Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses work that obtains a low-dimensional model that captures both temporal and spatial flow by constructing spatial and temporal four-mode models for two classic flow problems. The models are based on the proper orthogonal decomposition at two reference Reynolds numbers. Model predictions are made at an intermediate Reynolds number and compared with direct numerical simulation results at the new Reynolds number.

  13. Empirical low-dimensional manifolds in composition space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Pope, Stephen B.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2012-11-01

    To reduce the computational cost of turbulent combustion simulations with a detailed chemical mechanism, it is useful to find a low-dimensional manifold in composition space that can approximate the full system dynamics. Most previous low-dimensional manifolds in turbulent combustion are based on the governing conservation equations or thermochemistry and their application involves certain assumptions. On the other hand, empirical low-dimensional manifolds (ELDMs) are constructed based on samples of the compositions observed in experiments or in direct numerical simulation (DNS). Plane and curved ELDMs can be obtained using principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate adaptive spline regression (MARS), respectively. Both PCA and MARS are applied to the DNS datasets of a non-premixed CO/H2 temporally evolving jet flame (Hawkes et al., 2007) and an ethylene lifted jet flame (Yoo et al., 2011). We observe that it requires very high dimensions to represent the species mass fractions accurately by a plane ELDM, while better accuracy can be achieved by curved ELDMs with lower dimensions. In addition, the effect of differential diffusion on ELDMs is examined in large-eddy simulations with PDF modeling. This work is supported in part by the Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the DOE.

  14. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of new layered semiconductor BaGa2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhemadou, A.; Khenata, R.; Bin-Omran, S.; Murtaza, G.; Al-Douri, Y.

    2015-08-01

    We report the results of a detailed first-principles based density functional theory study of the structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of a recently synthesized layered semiconductor BaGa2P2. The optimized structural parameters are in excellent agreement with the experimental structural findings, which validates the used theoretical method. The single crystal and polycrystalline elastic constants are numerically estimated using the strain-stress method and Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximations. Predicted values of the elastic constants suggest that the considered material is mechanically stable, brittle and very soft material. The three-dimensional surface and its planar projections of Young's modulus are visualized to illustrate the elastic anisotropy. It is found that Young's modulus of BaGa2P2 show strong dependence on the crystallographic directions. Band structure calculation reveals that BaGa2P2 is a direct energy band gap semiconductor. The effective masses of electrons and holes at the minimum of the conduction band and maximum of the valence band are numerically estimated. The density of state, charge density distribution and charge transfers are calculated and analyzed to determine the chemical bonding nature. Dielectric function, refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient, reflectivity and electron-loss energy function spectra are computed for a wide photon energy range up to 20 eV. Calculated optical spectra exhibit a noticeable anisotropy.

  15. Structural semiconductor-to-semimetal phase transition in two-dimensional materials induced by electrostatic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yao; Duerloo, Karel-Alexander N.; Wauson, Kerry; Reed, Evan J.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic control of conductivity and optical properties via atomic structure changes is of technological importance in information storage. Energy consumption considerations provide a driving force towards employing thin materials in devices. Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are nearly atomically thin materials that can exist in multiple crystal structures, each with distinct electrical properties. By developing new density functional-based methods, we discover that electrostatic gating device configurations have the potential to drive structural semiconductor-to-semimetal phase transitions in some monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. Here we show that the semiconductor-to-semimetal phase transition in monolayer MoTe2 can be driven by a gate voltage of several volts with appropriate choice of dielectric. We find that the transition gate voltage can be reduced arbitrarily by alloying, for example, for MoxW1-xTe2 monolayers. Our findings identify a new physical mechanism, not existing in bulk materials, to dynamically control structural phase transitions in two-dimensional materials, enabling potential applications in phase-change electronic devices.

  16. Structural semiconductor-to-semimetal phase transition in two-dimensional materials induced by electrostatic gating.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Duerloo, Karel-Alexander N; Wauson, Kerry; Reed, Evan J

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic control of conductivity and optical properties via atomic structure changes is of technological importance in information storage. Energy consumption considerations provide a driving force towards employing thin materials in devices. Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are nearly atomically thin materials that can exist in multiple crystal structures, each with distinct electrical properties. By developing new density functional-based methods, we discover that electrostatic gating device configurations have the potential to drive structural semiconductor-to-semimetal phase transitions in some monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. Here we show that the semiconductor-to-semimetal phase transition in monolayer MoTe2 can be driven by a gate voltage of several volts with appropriate choice of dielectric. We find that the transition gate voltage can be reduced arbitrarily by alloying, for example, for Mo(x)W(1-x)Te2 monolayers. Our findings identify a new physical mechanism, not existing in bulk materials, to dynamically control structural phase transitions in two-dimensional materials, enabling potential applications in phase-change electronic devices. PMID:26868916

  17. Structural semiconductor-to-semimetal phase transition in two-dimensional materials induced by electrostatic gating

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Duerloo, Karel-Alexander N.; Wauson, Kerry; Reed, Evan J.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic control of conductivity and optical properties via atomic structure changes is of technological importance in information storage. Energy consumption considerations provide a driving force towards employing thin materials in devices. Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are nearly atomically thin materials that can exist in multiple crystal structures, each with distinct electrical properties. By developing new density functional-based methods, we discover that electrostatic gating device configurations have the potential to drive structural semiconductor-to-semimetal phase transitions in some monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. Here we show that the semiconductor-to-semimetal phase transition in monolayer MoTe2 can be driven by a gate voltage of several volts with appropriate choice of dielectric. We find that the transition gate voltage can be reduced arbitrarily by alloying, for example, for MoxW1−xTe2 monolayers. Our findings identify a new physical mechanism, not existing in bulk materials, to dynamically control structural phase transitions in two-dimensional materials, enabling potential applications in phase-change electronic devices. PMID:26868916

  18. Comparison of the coherence properties of superradiance and laser emission in semiconductor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, Petr P; Penty, R V; White, I H

    2012-12-31

    The coherence properties of a transient electron - hole state developing during superradiance emission in semiconductor laser structures have been studied experimentally using a Michelson interferometer and Young's classic double-slit configuration. The results demonstrate that, in the lasers studied, the first-order correlation function, which quantifies spatial coherence, approaches unity for superradiant emission and is 0.2 - 0.5 for laser emission. The supercoherence is due to long-range ordering upon the superradiant phase transition. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of n.g. basov)

  19. Soft x-ray spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng

    Organic semiconductors have several unique properties, different from traditional inorganic semiconductors, such as flexibility and low cost production on a large scale. Potentially, they can be used in several new optoelectronic devices, such as organic solar cells, and organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) Phthalocyanines (Pc's) are one important type of molecular organic semiconductor. The ease with which a diverse set of cations can bond to the phthalocyanine ligand leads to Pc-based thin films that display a wide variety of optical and electrical properties. In these materials, the ligand has a complex electronic structure in itself, and the introduction of metal cations adds further complexity to the states near the Fermi level (EF) due to the overlap of metal d states with carbon and nitrogen 2p states. In this thesis, the electronic structure of several Pc's has been studied by soft x-ray spectroscopies, such as x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). To avoid potential contamination and beam damage, the large area thin film samples have been prepared in situ by using organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD). The structure of samples were characterized ex situ by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The soft x-ray spectra recorded from stationary samples are found to represent the electronic structure from damaged molecules, which is caused by intense x-ray beams. Continuously translating samples during measurement overcomes this problem. Element, chemical, and symmetry specific occupied and unoccupied partial density of states (PDOS) from Pc's were observed. They show good agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Studies of potassium doping non-transition metal Pc, fluorinated metal Pc, and metal oxide Pc's show several interesting phenomena, such as variation of molecular symmetry, and charge transfer and d-d* resonant inelastic x

  20. Fabrication of Smooth Patterned Structures of Refractory Metals, Semiconductors, and Oxides via Template Stripping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The template-stripping method can yield smooth patterned films without surface contamination. However, the process is typically limited to coinage metals such as silver and gold because other materials cannot be readily stripped from silicon templates due to strong adhesion. Herein, we report a more general template-stripping method that is applicable to a larger variety of materials, including refractory metals, semiconductors, and oxides. To address the adhesion issue, we introduce a thin gold layer between the template and the deposited materials. After peeling off the combined film from the template, the gold layer can be selectively removed via wet etching to reveal a smooth patterned structure of the desired material. Further, we demonstrate template-stripped multilayer structures that have potential applications for photovoltaics and solar absorbers. An entire patterned device, which can include a transparent conductor, semiconductor absorber, and back contact, can be fabricated. Since our approach can also produce many copies of the patterned structure with high fidelity by reusing the template, a low-cost and high-throughput process in micro- and nanofabrication is provided that is useful for electronics, plasmonics, and nanophotonics. PMID:24001174

  1. Superheating Suppresses Structural Disorder in Layered BiI3 Semiconductors Grown by the Bridgman Method

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Paul M.; Sulekar, Soumitra; Yeo, Shinyoung; Baciak, James E.; Bliss, Mary; Nino, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    The susceptibility of layered structures to stacking faults is a problem in some of the more attractive semiconductor materials for ambient-temperature radiation detectors. In the work presented here, Bridgman-grown BiI3 layered single crystals are investigated to understand and eliminate this structural disorder, which reduces radiation detector performance. The use of superheating gradients has been shown to improve crystal quality in non-layered semiconductor crystals; thus the technique was here explored to improve the growth of BiI3. When investigating the homogeneity of non-superheated crystals, highly geometric void defects were found to populate the bulk of the crystals. Applying a superheating gradient to the melt prior to crystal growth improved structural quality and decreased defect density from the order of 4600 voids per cm3 to 300 voids per cm3. Corresponding moderate improvements to electronic properties also resulted from the superheat gradient method of crystal growth. Comparative measurements through infrared microscopy, etch-pit density, x-ray rocking curves, and sheet resistivity readings show that superheat gradients in BiI3 growth led to higher quality crystals.

  2. Fabrication of Nanovoid-Imbedded Bismuth Telluride with Low Dimensional System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new fabrication method for nanovoids-imbedded bismuth telluride (Bi--Te) material with low dimensional (quantum-dots, quantum-wires, or quantum-wells) structure was conceived during the development of advanced thermoelectric (TE) materials. Bismuth telluride is currently the best-known candidate material for solid-state TE cooling devices because it possesses the highest TE figure of merit at room temperature. The innovative process described here allows nanometer-scale voids to be incorporated in Bi--Te material. The final nanovoid structure such as void size, size distribution, void location, etc. can be also controlled under various process conditions.

  3. Materials Science and Technology, Volume 4, Electronic Structure and Properties of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Wolfgang

    1996-12-01

    This volume spans the field of semiconductor physics, with particular emphasis on concepts relevant to semiconductor technology. From the Contents: Lannoo: Band Theory Applied to Semiconductors. Ulbrich: Optical Properties and Charge Transport. Watkins: Intrinsic Point Defects in Semiconductors. Feichtinger: Deep Centers in Semiconductors. Gösele/Tan: Equilibria, Nonequilibria, Diffusion, and Precipitation. Alexander/Teichler: Dislocations. Thibault/Rouvière/Bourret: Grain Boundaries in Semiconductors. Ourmazd/Hull/Tung: Interfaces. Chang: The Hall Effect in Quantum Wires. Street/Winer: Material Properties of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon. Schröter/Seibt/Gilles: High-Temperature Properties of 3d Transition Elements in Silicon.

  4. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyukhin, S.; Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A.; Shpotyuk, O.; Jain, H.

    2011-04-15

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x}, As{sub x}S{sub 100-x}, Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} and Ge{sub x}S{sub 100-x} chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  5. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor (MIS) Structure with AlN Dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Mahyuddin, A.; Hassan, Z.; Cheong, K. Y.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we present the study of the structural and electrical properties of AlN/GaN thin films grown on Si (111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE) with AlN buffer layer. The performance of aluminum nitride (AlN) as insulator and aluminum (Al) contacts is presented. The thickness of GaN film and AlN insulating film as seen from SEM cross section are about 357.3 nm and 63.38 nm respectively. The presence of Ga, Al and N are confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurement. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement reveals that the samples are all wurtzite hexagonal AlN and GaN structure. The fabricated metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure was characterized using capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements.

  6. Electrical Characteristics and Interface Properties of III Nitride-Based Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mahyuddin, A.; Hassan, Z.; Yusof, Y.; Cheong, K. Y.

    2010-07-07

    In this work, III-Nitride based metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure has been studied using AlN/GaN heterostructures on Si (111) with AlN buffer layer grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The structural and electrical characteristics of the films were studied through high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD), capacitance-voltage (C-V) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The value of flat-band voltage was -0.7 V. A total fixed oxide charge density of 2.73x10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} was estimated. Terman's method was used to obtain the density of interface state in the MIS structure. The analysis showed low interface state density values of 3.66x10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}.

  7. Photoluminescence in semiconductor structures based on butyl-substituted erbium phthalocyanine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Belogorokhov, I. A. Ryabchikov, Yu. V.; Tikhonov, E. V.; Pushkarev, V. E.; Breusova, M. O.; Tomilova, L. G.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2008-03-15

    The study is concerned with the luminescence properties of ensembles of semiconductor structures containing organic phthalocyanine molecules with erbium ions as complexing agents. The photoluminescence spectra of the structures of the type of erbium monophthalocyanine, bisphthalocyanine, and triphthalocyanine are recorded. The photoluminescence peaks are detected at the wavelengths 888, 760, and 708 nm (and photon energies 1.4, 1.6, and 1.75 eV) corresponding to electronic transitions within the organic complexes. It is found that, when a metal complexing agent is introduced into the molecular structure of the ligand, the 708 nm luminescence peak becomes unobservable. It is shown that, in the bisphthalocyanine samples, the photoluminescence signal corresponding to transitions from the 4F{sub 9/2} level of erbium ions is enhanced.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and properties of low-dimensional nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xianluo

    2007-05-01

    Nanometer scale structures represent an exciting and rapidly expanding area of research. Studies on new physical/chemical properties and applications of nanomaterials and nanostructures are possible only when nanostructured materials are made available with desired size, morphology, crystal and microstructure, and composition. Thus, controlled synthesis of nanomaterials is the essential aspect of nanotechnology. This thesis describes the development of simple and versatile solution-based approaches to synthesize low-dimensional nanostructures. The first major goal of this research is to design and fabricate morphology-controlled alpha-Fe 2O3 nanoarchitectures in aqueous solution through a programmed microwave-assisted hydrothermal route, taking advantage of microwave irradiation and hydrothermal effects. Free-standing alpha-Fe2O3 nanorings are prepared by hydrolysis of FeCl3 in the presence of phosphate ions. The as-formed architecture of alpha-Fe2O 3 nanorings is an exciting new member in the family of iron oxide nanostructures. Our preliminary results demonstrate that sensors made of the alpha-Fe 2O3 nanorings exhibit high sensitivity not only for bio-sensing of hydrogen peroxide in a physiological solution but also for gas-sensing of alcohol vapor at room temperature. Moreover, monodisperse alpha-Fe 2O3 nanocrystals with continuous aspect-ratio tuning and fine shape control are achieved by controlling the experimental conditions. The as-formed alpha-Fe2O3 exhibits shape-dependent infrared optical properties. The growth process of colloidal alpha-Fe 2O3 crystals in the presence of phosphate ions is discussed. In addition, through an efficient microwave-assisted hydrothermal process, self-assembled hierarchical alpha-Fe2O3 nanoarchitectures are synthesized on a large scale. The second major goal of this research is to develop convenient microwave-hydrothermal approaches for the fabrication of carbon-based nanocomposites: (1) A one-pot solution-phase route, namely

  9. Correlation of nanoscale structure with electronic and magnetic properties in semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li

    The goal of this research is to correlate individual nanostructures with their electronic and magnetic properties. Three classes of semiconductor materials and nanostructures were investigated: nanowires, dilute magnetic semiconductors, and quantum dots. First, we fabricated electrical contact to free-standing nanowires using focused ion beam (FIB)-induced deposition and achieved ohmic contact between GaP nanowires and FIB-deposited Pt. Ion irradiation was found to change the nanowire resistance, presumably through the generation of electrical active defects. Based on the finding that ion beam induces deposition outside the direct impact area, a new fabrication method for nanowire core-shell structures was developed by creating an annular direct deposition pattern around the nanowire. We also developed a new nanowire transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample preparation method that enabled the free-standing nanowires to be individually studied in the TEM. Distribution of Pt and Si elements in the deposited layers was confirmed by x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron energy filtered imaging (elemental mapping). The indirect deposition mechanism is attributed to the interaction of secondary electrons generated from the primary ion impact area with the deposition precursor absorbed at the nanowire surface. The calculated secondary electron flux distribution matched well with the variation of deposition thickness along the nanowire length and with the pattern radius. The second part of this work employed Mn implantation in Ge with subsequent rapid thermal annealing or TEM in-situ annealing to study the correlation between structure and magnetic properties in Ge:Mn magnetic semiconductor materials. Implantation at 75°C with dual Mn doses (2.4x10 15/cm2 at 170 keV, followed by 5.6x10 15/cm2 at 60 keV) produced an amorphous Ge film containing Mn-rich clusters. Its magnetic properties indicated dispersion of ferromagnetic regions in a non-magnetic matrix

  10. Synchrotron Studies of Narrow Band and Low-Dimensional Materials. Final Report for July 1, 1990---December 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J. W.

    2003-05-13

    This report summarizes a 12-year program of various kinds of synchrotron spectroscopies directed at the electronic structures of narrow band and low-dimensional materials that display correlated electron behaviors such as metal-insulator transitions, mixed valence, superconductivity, Kondo moment quenching, heavy Fermions, and non-Fermi liquid properties.

  11. The preparation of organic infrared semiconductor phthalocyanine gadolinium (III) and its optical and structural characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Li-bin; Ji, Rong-bin; Song, Li-yuan; Chen, Xue-mei; Ma, Yu; Wang, Yi-feng; Qian, Ming; Song, Lei; Su, Hai-ying; Zhuang, Ji-sheng; Yang, Rui-yu

    2009-07-01

    In order to increase the species of organic infrared semiconductor, we synthesized organic infrared semiconductor phthalocyanine gadolinium by using o-phthalodinitrile and GdCl3 as reactants, ammonium molybdate as catalyzer. Under light and dark field modes of microscope, the translucency emerald-like powder of phthalocyanine gadolinium has been observed, the size of the small grain for the sample is around 5μm in diameter, the size of larger grain may reach to several tens of microns. The main vibrational peaks in FT-IR spectrum and Raman spectrum have been assigned. Elementary analysis shows that the experimental data of phthalocyanine gadolinium in the main agree with those of calculated data. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the sample indicates the sandwich-like structure of phthalocyanine gadolinium. The organic infrared semiconductor phthalocyanine gadolinium thin film on quartz substrate has been prepared with our synthesized powdered sample by using solution method. The characterizations of XRD and UV-Vis-NIR absorption have been carried out for the phthalocyanine gadolinium thin film on quartz substrate, XRD shows that phthalocyanine gadolinium diffractions occur at 2θ=6.851,8.290 and 8.820 degrees, the corresponding plane spacings (d) for the diffraction peaks are 12.8921, 10.6570, and 10.0176Å.The diffraction peaks locate at low diffraction angle, suggesting that the molecular size of the phthalocyanine gadolinium is big that causes the large spacing of crystal planes. The UV-Vis-NIR absorption of phthalocyanine gadolinium thin film on quartz substrate implies that within near infrared band there is a absorption in the 1.3~2.0μm wavelength range peaked at ca. 1.75μm, indicating the important potential application value of phthalocyanine gadolinium in the field of organic infrared optoelectronics.

  12. Structure-fluctuation-induced abnormal thermoelectric properties in semiconductor copper selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Huili; Shi, Xun; Kirkham, Melanie J; Wang, Hsin; Li, Qiang; Uher, Ctirad; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects and related technologies have attracted a great interest due to the world-wide energy harvesting. Thermoelectricity has usually been considered in the context of stable material phases. Here we report that the fluctuation of structures during the second-order phase transition in Cu2Se semiconductor breaks the conventional trends of thermoelectric transports in normal phases, leading to a critically phase-transition-enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit zT above unity at 400K, a three times larger value than for the normal phases. Dynamic structural transformations introduce intensive fluctuations and extreme complexity, which enhance the carrier entropy and thus the thermopower, and strongly scatter carriers and phonons as well to make their transports behave critically.

  13. Low-dimensional maps for piecewise smooth oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina; Wiercigroch, Marian

    2007-09-01

    Dynamics of the piecewise smooth nonlinear oscillators is considered, for which, general methodology of reducing multidimensional flows to low-dimensional maps is proposed. This includes a definition of piecewise smooth oscillator and creation of a global iterative map providing an exact solution. The global map is comprised of local maps, which are constructed in the smooth sub-regions of phase space. To construct this low-dimensional map, it is proposed to monitor the points of intersections of a chosen boundary between smooth subspaces by a trajectory. The dimension reduction is directly related to the dimension of the chosen boundary, and the lower its dimension is, the larger dimension reduction can be achieved. Full details are given for a drifting impact oscillator, where the five-dimensional flow is reduced to one-dimensional (1D) approximate analytical map. First an exact two-dimensional map has been formulated and analysed. A further reduction to 1D approximate map is introduced and discussed. Standard nonlinear dynamic analysis reveals a complex behaviour ranging from periodic oscillations to chaos, and co-existence of multiple attractors. Accuracy of the constructed maps is examined by comparing with the exact solutions for a wide range of the system parameters.

  14. A Low Dimensional Approximation For Competence In Bacillus Subtilis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, An; Prugel-Bennett, Adam; Dasmahapatra, Srinandan

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of a high dimensional stochastic system described by a chemical master equation (CME) depends on many parameters, rendering explicit simulation an inefficient method for exploring the properties of such models. Capturing their behaviour by low-dimensional models makes analysis of system behaviour tractable. In this paper, we present low dimensional models for the noise-induced excitable dynamics in Bacillus subtilis, whereby a key protein ComK, which drives a complex chain of reactions leading to bacterial competence, gets expressed rapidly in large quantities (competent state) before subsiding to low levels of expression (vegetative state). These rapid reactions suggest the application of an adiabatic approximation of the dynamics of the regulatory model that, however, lead to competence durations that are incorrect by a factor of 2. We apply a modified version of an iterative functional procedure that faithfully approximates the time-course of the trajectories in terms of a two-dimensional model involving proteins ComK and ComS. Furthermore, in order to describe the bimodal bivariate marginal probability distribution obtained from the Gillespie simulations of the CME, we introduce a tunable multiplicative noise term in a two-dimensional Langevin model whose stationary state is described by the time-independent solution of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation. PMID:27045827

  15. Response characteristics of a low-dimensional model neuron.

    PubMed

    Cartling, B

    1996-11-15

    It is shown that a low-dimensional model neuron with a response time constant smaller than the membrane time constant closely reproduces the activity and excitability behavior of a detailed conductance-based model of Hodgkin-Huxley type. The fast response of the activity variable also makes it possible to reduce the model to a one-dimensional model, in particular for typical conditions. As an example, the reduction to a single-variable model from a multivariable conductance-based model of a neocortical pyramidal cell with somatic input is demonstrated. The conditions for avoiding a spurious damped oscillatory response to a constant input are derived, and it is shown that a limit-cycle response cannot occur. The capability of the low-dimensional model to approximate higher-dimensional models accurately makes it useful for describing complex dynamics of nets of interconnected neurons. The simplicity of the model facilitates analytic studies, elucidations of neurocomputational mechanisms, and applications to large-scale systems. PMID:8888611

  16. Photoluminescence polarization anisotropy for studying long-range structural ordering within semiconductor multi-atomic alloys and organic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Prutskij, T.; Percino, J.; Orlova, T.; Vavilova, L.

    2013-12-04

    Long-range structural ordering within multi-component semiconductor alloys and organic crystals leads to significant optical anisotropy and, in particular, to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission. The PL emission of ternary and quaternary semiconductor alloys is polarized if there is some amount of the atomic ordering within the crystal structure. We analyze the polarization of the PL emission from the quaternary GaInAsP semiconductor alloy grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) and conclude that it could be caused by low degree atomic ordering within the crystal structure together with the thermal biaxial strain due to difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of the layer and the substrate. We also study the state of polarization of the PL from organic crystals in order to identify different features of the crystal PL spectrum.

  17. Characterizing structural overpotentials for bubble evolution on nanostructured semiconductor-electrocatalyst interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coridan, Robert H.

    Nanostructured electrocatalysts can improve the kinetics of solar-driven photocatalysis at a semiconductor-liquid junction while minimizing the effect on the energetics of that junction. A relevant example is Pt-decorated Si electrodes for hydrogen evolution from water splitting. Nanostructuring can also impair the reaction kinetics by introducing mass transport overpotentials. For reactions that evolve gas, the active surface area can be blocked by bubbles on discrete catalytic sites, possibly halting the reaction entirely. Here, we explore these issues by measuring the high-frequency dynamics of bubbles evolved from nanostructured electrocatalysts at a semiconductor-electrolyte interface. Using transmission x-ray phase contrast microscopy, we can image gas-evolving reactions as a way to directly measure the effects of adhesion, catalyst structure, and buoyancy on the reaction kinetics. From these measurements, we develop a model for electrolytic bubble evolution and transport that considers coalescence on neighboring sites, surface interactions, and the non-equilibrium shape dynamics of bubbles. This model can be used to identify favorable catalyst motifs that promote bubble clearance and mitigate their influence on reaction kinetics for water splitting applications.

  18. Electronic Structure of Hydrogen Donors in Semiconductors and Insulators Probed by Muon Spin Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Koichiro; Ito, Takashi U.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators plays a crucial role in their electric conductivity. Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts have been made to establish this hypothesis in the last decade, and the muon spin rotation technique has played a pioneering role. Positive muons implanted into such low-carrier systems often form a muonium (an analogue of hydrogen, the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Although its dynamical aspect may be different from the heavier hydrogen, the electronic structure of the muonium is expected to be identical to that of hydrogen after a small correction of the reduced mass (˜0.4%). Since the discovery of a shallow muonium in CdS, its properties have been intensively studied in many semiconductors and insulators, and then it was interpreted as a possible origin of n-type conductivity under the context of a classical shallow donor model. In this article, we will describe the principle of muonium experiments and survey recent achievements in this field.

  19. Low Dimensional Polariton Systems in Subwavelength-Grating Based Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo

    Semiconductor microcavity exciton-polaritons have recently emerged as a unique, open system for studying non-equilibrium quantum order. Macroscopic quantum phenomenon, Bose-Einstein condensation, has been realized and observed in two dimensional polariton systems utilizing the traditional distributed-Bragg-reflector based samples. Such foundational work on two-dimensional systems has inspired theoretical schemes for polariton-based quantum circuits, quantum light sources and novel quantum phases. Experimental implementation of these schemes requires the control, confinement and coupling of polariton systems, which still remain challenging in conventional microcavity structures. In this thesis, we use the sub-wavelength grating-based microcavities to demonstrate confinement and coupling for the polariton systems. We demonstrated a zero-dimensional polariton device in the sub-wavelength grating-based microcavity. Efficient confinement has been realized in such unconventional microcavity. These confinement features have also been observed in the spectroscopic characterization with discretized energy levels from the device. In addition, the polaritons are highly linear polarized, which is unique to the sub-wavelength grating based devices. The establishment of the polariton lasing/condensation was with non-linear increase of the emission intensity, line-width narrowing and continuous energy shift. Single-mode lasing of polaritons was also demonstrated for the first time. Following the work of single zero-dimensional polariton device, we demonstrated that the coupling among multiple zero-dimensional polariton quantum devices could be readily achieved, leading to de-coupled, coupled and quasi-one-dimensional polariton systems. These coupling effects were controlled and realized by design of the tethering patterns around the sub-wavelength grating based devices. Such devices enable advanced mode engineering and provide the building blocks for polariton-based quantum

  20. Electronic Level Structure and Excitation Modes in Semiconductor Superlattices and D-Parameter Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian

    1990-01-01

    The electronic level structure of a doped semiconductor superlattice such as GaAs-Al_chiGa _{1-chi}As has been calculated self-consistently in a tight-binding envelope function approximation, where inhomogeneous potentials related to depletion regions in real systems have been incorporated. Fermi-level pinning associated with depletion regions at the ends of the superlattice gives rise to surface -localized states lying in the miniband gaps and exhibiting localized eigenstates. Varying barrier transparency and doping density are shown to affect the location of these surface levels within the minigap. The application of a gate voltage across the superlattice structure produces drastic changes ill the level structure, including transitions from the extended to localized behavior in some eigenstates concurrent to shifts in their energies. We further present a theoretical study of the far-infrared response of these systems using the d-parameter formalism. The d( omega) functions, which parametrize the optical response of surfaces, provide position and coupling strengths for all possible optically active modes. d parameters have been used in the study of surfaces and the formalism is adapted here to the study of semiconductor superlattice systems. Intra- and inter-miniband plasma modes as well as single-particle-like transitions, are studied in 'bulk' and in finite-size superlattices. A series of surface modes, related to the charge depletion in the end layers of the superlattice, are distinguishable from the bulk modes. These additional modes are characterized by strong oscillations of the induced charge density near the surface layers, in contrast to the bulk modes which exhibit oscillations throughout the superlattice. The d-parameter formalism is further developed to study a quasi-zero-dimensional quantum dot system with electrons confined inside dots.

  1. Effect of the accumulation of excess Ni atoms in the crystal structure of the intermetallic semiconductor n-ZrNiSn

    SciTech Connect

    Romaka, V. A.; Rogl, P.; Romaka, V. V.; Stadnyk, Yu. V.; Hlil, E. K.; Krajovskii, V. Ya.; Horyn, A. M.

    2013-07-15

    The crystal structure, electron density distribution, and energy, kinetic, and magnetic properties of the n-ZrNiSn intermetallic semiconductor heavily doped with a Ni impurity are investigated. The effect of the accumulation of an excess number of Ni{sub 1+x} atoms in tetrahedral interstices of the crystal structure of the semiconductor is found and the donor nature of such structural defects that change the properties of the semiconductor is established. The results obtained are discussed within the Shklovskii-Efros model of a heavily doped and strongly compensated semiconductor.

  2. Structural Design Principle of Small-Molecule Organic Semiconductors for Metal-Free, Visible-Light-Promoted Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Wei; Li, Run; Gehrig, Dominik; Blom, Paul W M; Landfester, Katharina; Zhang, Kai A I

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we report on the structural design principle of small-molecule organic semiconductors as metal-free, pure organic and visible light-active photocatalysts. Two series of electron-donor and acceptor-type organic semiconductor molecules were synthesized to meet crucial requirements, such as 1) absorption range in the visible region, 2) sufficient photoredox potential, and 3) long lifetime of photogenerated excitons. The photocatalytic activity was demonstrated in the intermolecular C-H functionalization of electron-rich heteroaromates with malonate derivatives. A mechanistic study of the light-induced electron transport between the organic photocatalyst, substrate, and the sacrificial agent are described. With their tunable absorption range and defined energy-band structure, the small-molecule organic semiconductors could offer a new class of metal-free and visible light-active photocatalysts for chemical reactions. PMID:27378555

  3. Hydrocarbon dissociation on palladium studied with a hydrogen sensitive Pd-metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannetun, H.; Lundström, I.; Petersson, L.-G.

    1988-01-01

    The polycrystalline Pd surface of a hydrogen sensitive palladium-silicon dioxide-silicon [Pd-MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor)] structure has been exposed to small unsaturated hydrocarbons in the temperature range 300-500 K. Apart from the hydrogen response of the Pd-MOS structure also work function (ΔΦ) and electron energy-loss studies were performed. At 500 K the hydrocarbons dissociate completely upon adsorption and produce a surface with atomically adsorbed carbon. The Pd-MOS structure can be used to observe both the dehydrogenation of the hydrocarbon molecules and the process of carbon adsorbing on the palladium surface. The sticking coefficient at this temperature for all hydrocarbons is close to unity. Furthermore, the hydrogen sensitivity of the structure is not drastically reduced by the adsorbed carbon. If the hydrocarbon adsorption is performed at 300 K there is still, at least on the initially clean surface, a large dehydrogenation. The dissociation is, however, not at all complete and there are considerable amounts of hydrocarbon species adsorbed for each gas. The induced work function shifts due to the different hydrocarbons vary from -1.0 to -1.7 eV. The hydrogen sensitivity of the Pd-MOS structure is reduced for growing hydrocarbon coverages and disappears completely for work function shifts of -1.7 eV.

  4. Structure and stability of semiconductor tip apexes for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pou, P.; Ghasemi, S. A.; Jelinek, P.; Lenosky, T.; Goedecker, S.; Perez, R.

    2009-07-01

    The short range force between the tip and the surface atoms, that is responsible for atomic-scale contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM), is mainly controlled by the tip apex. Thus, the ability to image, manipulate and chemically identify single atoms in semiconductor surfaces is ultimately determined by the apex structure and its composition. Here we present a detailed and systematic study of the most common structures that can be expected at the apex of the Si tips used in experiments. We tackle the determination of the structure and stability of Si tips with three different approaches: (i) first principles simulations of small tip apexes; (ii) simulated annealing of a Si cluster; and (iii) a minima hopping study of large Si tips. We have probed the tip apexes by making atomic contacts between the tips and then compared force-distance curves with the experimental short range forces obtained with dynamic force spectroscopy. The main conclusion is that although there are multiple stable solutions for the atomically sharp tip apexes, they can be grouped into a few types with characteristic atomic structures and properties. We also show that the structure of the last atomic layers in a tip apex can be both crystalline and amorphous. We corroborate that the atomically sharp tips are thermodynamically stable and that the tip-surface interaction helps to produce the atomic protrusion needed to get atomic resolution.

  5. Common-path depth-filtered digital holography for high resolution imaging of buried semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkeldey, Markus; Schellenberg, Falk; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Paar, Christof; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate digital holographic microscopy (DHM) in reflection geometry for non-destructive 3D imaging of semiconductor devices. This technique provides high resolution information of the inner structure of a sample while maintaining its integrity. To illustrate the performance of the DHM, we use our setup to localize the precise spots for laser fault injection, in the security related field of side-channel attacks. While digital holographic microscopy techniques easily offer high resolution phase images of surface structures in reflection geometry, they are typically incapable to provide high quality phase images of buried structures due to the interference of reflected waves from different interfaces inside the structure. Our setup includes a sCMOS camera for image capture, arranged in a common-path interferometer to provide very high phase stability. As a proof of principle, we show sample images of the inner structure of a modern microcontroller. Finally, we compare our holographic method to classic optical beam induced current (OBIC) imaging to demonstrate its benefits.

  6. Electronic-Structure Theory of Organic Semiconductors: Charge-Transport Parameters and Metal/Organic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Li, Hong; Winget, Paul; Zhu, Lingyun; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2013-07-01

    We focus this review on the theoretical description, at the density functional theory level, of two key processes that are common to electronic devices based on organic semiconductors (such as organic light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and solar cells), namely charge transport and charge injection from electrodes. By using representative examples of current interest, our main goal is to introduce some of the reliable theoretical methodologies that can best depict these processes. We first discuss the evaluation of the microscopic parameters that determine charge-carrier transport in organic molecular crystals, i.e., electronic couplings and electron-vibration couplings. We then examine the electronic structure at interfaces between an organic layer and a metal or conducting oxide electrode, with an emphasis on the work-function modifications induced by the organic layer and on the interfacial energy-level alignments.

  7. Effects of lateral asymmetry on electronic structure of strained semiconductor nanorings in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M. M.; Tadić, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2008-11-01

    The influence of lateral asymmetry on the electronic structure and optical transitions in elliptical strained InAs nanorings is analyzed in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Two-dimensional rings are assumed to have elliptical inner and outer boundaries oriented in mutually orthogonal directions. The influence of the eccentricity of the ring on the energy levels is analyzed. For large eccentricity of the ring, we do not find any Aharonov-Bohm effect, in contrast to circular rings. Rather, the single-particle states of the electrons and the holes are localized as in two laterally coupled quantum dots formed in the lobes of the nanoring. Our work indicates that the control of shape is important for the existence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in semiconductor nanorings.

  8. Effects of lateral asymmetry on electronic structure of strained semiconductor nanorings in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Milošević, M M; Tadić, M; Peeters, F M

    2008-11-12

    The influence of lateral asymmetry on the electronic structure and optical transitions in elliptical strained InAs nanorings is analyzed in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. Two-dimensional rings are assumed to have elliptical inner and outer boundaries oriented in mutually orthogonal directions. The influence of the eccentricity of the ring on the energy levels is analyzed. For large eccentricity of the ring, we do not find any Aharonov-Bohm effect, in contrast to circular rings. Rather, the single-particle states of the electrons and the holes are localized as in two laterally coupled quantum dots formed in the lobes of the nanoring. Our work indicates that the control of shape is important for the existence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in semiconductor nanorings. PMID:21832775

  9. Low-Dimensional Chaos in an Instance of Epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babloyantz, A.; Destexhe, A.

    1986-05-01

    Using a time series obtained from the electroencephalogram recording of a human epileptic seizure, we show the existence of a chaotic attractor, the latter being the direct consequence of the deterministic nature of brain activity. This result is compared with other attractors seen in normal human brain dynamics. A sudden jump is observed between the dimensionalities of these brain attractors 4.05 ± 0.05 for deep sleep) and the very low dimensionality of the epileptic state (2.05 ± 0.09). The evaluation of the autocorrelation function and of the largest Lyapunov exponent allows us to sharpen further the main features of underlying dynamics. Possible implications in biological and medical research are briefly discussed.

  10. Low-Dimensional Chaos of High-Latitude Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi-Xiu; Li, Ke-Jun

    2007-10-01

    The chaos of high-latitude solar activity has been investigated by determining the behavior of the monthly averaged polar facula counts obtained from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) on the basis of nonlinear dynamics theories and methods. It is found that the high-latitude solar activity is also governed by a low-dimensional chaotic attractor in both the northern and southern solar hemispheres, which is the same as that of the low-latitude solar activity. However, their maximal Lyapunov exponents are different, showing different strength of chaos. The maximal Lyapunov exponent (MLE) of polar faculae in the southern solar hemisphere is about 0.0211 ± 0.0003 (month-1), which is nearly consistent with the low-latitude Wolf sunspot numbers, while the MLE in the northern one is approximately 0.0944 ± 0.0066 (month-1), which is obviously greater than the above two.