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Sample records for low-energy proton-induced fission

  1. Microscopic dynamical description of proton-induced fission with the constrained molecular dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonta, N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Bonasera, A.

    2015-08-01

    The microscopic description of nuclear fission still remains a topic of intense basic research. Understanding nuclear fission, apart from a theoretical point of view, is of practical importance for energy production and the transmutation of nuclear waste. In nuclear astrophysics, fission sets the upper limit to the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements via the r process. In this work we initiated a systematic study of intermediate-energy proton-induced fission using the constrained molecular dynamics (CoMD) code. The CoMD code implements an effective interaction with a nuclear matter compressibility of K =200 (soft equation of state) with several forms of the density dependence of the nucleon-nucleon symmetry potential. Moreover, a constraint is imposed in the phase-space occupation for each nucleon restoring the Pauli principle at each time step of the collision. A proper choice of the surface parameter of the effective interaction has been made to describe fission. In this work, we present results of fission calculations for proton-induced reactions on: (a) 232Th at 27 and 63 MeV; (b) 235U at 10, 30, 60, and 100 MeV; and (c) 238U at 100 and 660 MeV. The calculated observables include fission-fragment mass distributions, total fission energies, neutron multiplicities, and fission times. These observables are compared to available experimental data. We show that the microscopic CoMD code is able to describe the complicated many-body dynamics of the fission process at intermediate and high energy and give a reasonable estimate of the fission time scale. Sensitivity of the results to the density dependence of the nucleon symmetry potential (and, thus, the nuclear symmetry energy) is found. Further improvements of the code are necessary to achieve a satisfactory description of low-energy fission in which shell effects play a dominant role.

  2. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; McCurdy, M. W.; Weller, R. A.; et al

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, andmore » prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.« less

  3. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; McCurdy, M. W.; Weller, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, and prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.

  4. Most probable charge of fission products in 24 MeV proton induced fission of {sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, H.; Maruyama, M.; Tanikawa, M.; Shinozuka, T.; Fujioka, M.

    1998-01-01

    The charge distributions of fission products in 24 MeV proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U were measured by the use of an ion-guide isotope separator on line. The most probable charge (Z{sub p}) of the charge distribution was discussed in view of the charge polarization in the fission process. It was found that Z{sub p} mainly lies on the proton-rich side in the light mass region and on the proton-deficient side in the heavy mass region compared with the postulate of the unchanged charge distribution. The charge polarization was examined with respect to production Q values. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Simulation of the characteristics of low-energy proton induced single event upset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao; Xi, Kai; Liu, TianQi; Liu, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation results are reported on the single event upset (SEU) triggered by the direct ionization effect of low-energy proton. The SEU cross-sections on the 45 nm static random access memory (SRAM) were compared with previous research work, which not only validated the simulation approach used herein, but also exposed the existence of saturated cross-section and the multiple bit upsets (MBUs) when the incident energy was less than 1 MeV. Additionally, it was observed that the saturated cross-section and MBUs are involved with energy loss and critical charge. The amount of deposited charge and the distribution with respect to the critical charge as the supplemental evidence are discussed.

  6. Quantum Aspects of Low-Energy Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, W.

    2011-10-01

    A helicity representation for fission product channels with correctly defined parity is used to describe neutron induced fission with arbitrary spin density matrix in ingoing channel. Recently obtained data for ROT effect in binary fission give evidence for high accuracy of the helicity representation just at scission. A general expression for differential cross-section of (n,f)-reaction is obtained. In the framework of multilevel, many channel R-matrix theory the reduced S-matrix for JΠK effective channels rigorously derived. These channels include fission modes in natural way. Theoretical analysis of experimentally observed P-even and P-odd interference effects in low energy nuclear fission allows one to make some essential conclusions on basic mechanism of the process.

  7. Hardness Assurance for Low-Energy Proton-Induced Single-Event Effects: Final report for LDRD Project 173134

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson

    2015-08-01

    This report briefly summarizes three publications that resulted from a two-year LDRD. The three publications address a recently emerging reliability issue: namely, that low-energy protons (LEPs) can cause single-event effects (SEEs) in highly scaled microelectronics. These publications span from low to high technology readiness levels. In the first, novel experiments were used to prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for LEP-induced SEEs. In the second, a simple method was developed to calculate expected on-orbit error rates for LEP effects. This simplification was enabled by creating (and characterizing) an accelerated space-like LEP environment in the laboratory. In the third publication, this new method was applied to many memory circuits from the 20-90 nm technology nodes to study the general importance of LEP effects, in terms of their contribution to the total on-orbit SEE rate.

  8. Independent isotopic yields in 25 MeV and 50 MeV proton-induced fission of natU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, H.; Gorelov, D.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Parkkonen, J.; Peräjärvi, K.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Saastamoinen, A.; Simutkin, V.; Sonoda, T.; Weber, C.; Voss, A.; Äystö, J.

    2016-04-01

    Independent isotopic yields for elements from Zn to La in the 25 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were determined with the JYFLTRAP facility. In addition, isotopic yields for Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Zr, Pd and Xe in the 50 MeV proton-induced fission of {}^{nat}U were measured. The deduced isotopic yield distributions are compared with a Rubchenya model, the GEF model with universal parameters and the semi-empirical Wahl model. Of these, the Rubchenya model gives the best overall agreement with the obtained data. Combining the isotopic yield data with mass yield data to obtain the absolute independent yields was attempted. The result depends on the mass yield distribution.

  9. Cyclotron production of molybdenum-99 via proton-induced uranium-238 fission

    SciTech Connect

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.; Zeng, N.X.; Mirshad, I.; Castaneda, C.M.

    1996-12-31

    Technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc; 6.02 h) is the most widely used radioisotope in nuclear medicine worldwide. It is currently supplied from elutions of a {sup 99}Mo {r_arrow} {sup 99m}Tc generator and used for regional distribution or locally for institutional use. The parent {sup 99}Mo (66.02 h) radioactivities are being produced commercially in reactors using the {sup 235}U(n, fission){sup 99}Mo (preferred method) or the {sup 98}Mo(n,{gamma}){sup 99}Mo (less desirable) methods. The production of {sup 99}Mo is based on the operation of a small number of nuclear reactors, most of which have reached decommissioning age. Two new reactors to be dedicated to radioisotope production are now being planned in Canada. Accelerator-based methods for producing {sup 99}Mo and/or {sup 99m}Tc would then provide new alternatives to the current reliance on reactor-based technologies.

  10. Impact of low-energy photons on the characteristics of prompt fission γ -ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, A.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report on a new study of prompt γ -rays from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf . Photons were measured in coincidence with fission fragments by employing four different lanthanide halide scintillation detectors. Together with results from a previous work of ours, we determined characteristic parameters with high precision, such as the average γ -ray multiplicity ν¯γ=(8.29 ±0.13 ), the average energy per photon ɛγ=(0.80 ±0.02 ) MeV, and the total γ -ray energy release per fission Eγ ,tot=(6.65 ±0.10 ) MeV. The excellent agreement between the individual results obtained in all six measurements proves the good repeatability of the applied experimental technique. The impact of low-energy photons, i.e., below 500 keV, on prompt fission γ -ray spectra characteristics has been investigated as well by comparing our results with those taken with the DANCE detector system, which appears to suffer from absorption effects in the low-energy region. Correction factors for this effect were estimated, giving results comparable to ours as well as to historical ones. From this we demonstrate that the different techniques of determining the average γ -ray multiplicity, either from a properly measured and normalized spectrum or a measured multiplicity distribution, give equivalent and consistent results.

  11. Characteristics of Symmetric and Asymmetric Fission Modes as a Function of the Compound Nucleus Excitation in the Proton-Induced Fission of 233Pa, 239Np and 243Am

    SciTech Connect

    Beresova, M.; Kliman, J.; Krupa, L.; Bogatchev, A. A.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Kniajeva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Dorvaux, O.; Khlebnikov, S.; Lyapin, V.; Rubchenia, W.; Stuttge, L.; Trzaska, W.; Vakhtin, D.

    2007-05-22

    Average preequilibrium average statistical prescission and postscission neutron multiplicities as well as average {gamma}-ray multiplicity , average energy emitted by {gamma}-rays and average energy per one gamma quantum <{epsilon}{gamma}> as a function of mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments were measured in the proton-induced reactions p+232Th{yields}233Pa, p+238U{yields}239Np and p+242Pu{yields}243Am (at proton energy Ep=13, 20, 40 and 55 MeV). The fragment mass and energy distributions (MEDs) have been analyzed in terms of the multimodal fission. The decomposition of the experimental MEDs onto the MEDs of the distinct modes has been fulfilled in the framework of a method that is free from any parameterization of the distinct fission mode mass distribution shapes. The main characteristics for symmetric and asymmetric modes have been studied in their dependence on the compound nucleus composition and proton energy. The manifestation of multimodal fission in average {gamma}-ray multiplicities of fission fragments was also studied in this work.

  12. Interpretation of the low energy fission process in the framework of dinuclear system conception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. V.; Kalandarov, Sh. A.

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of the interpretation of fission of heavy nuclei as the process of formation, evolution and decay of dinuclear system is discussed. The interpretation is based on the nuclear interaction data obtained in heavy-ion nuclear physics investigations.

  13. Assessing the role of the (n, γ f) process in the low-energy fission of actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talou, Patrick; Lynn, J. E.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Couture, A.; Bouland, O.

    2016-06-01

    We review the role of the (n, γ f) process in the low-energy neutron-induced fission reaction of 239Pu. Recent measurements of the average total γ-ray energy released in this reaction were performed with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos. Significant fluctuations of this quantity in the resonance region below 100 eV can be interpreted by invoking the presence of the indirect (n, γ f) process. Modern calculations of the probability for such an event to occur are presented.

  14. Effect of transverse vibrations of fissile nuclei on the angular and spin distributions of low-energy fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.; Lyubashevsky, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that A. Bohr's classic theory of angular distributions of fragments originating from low-energy fission should be supplemented with quantum corrections based on the involvement of a superposition of a very large number of angular momenta L m in the description of the relative motion of fragments flying apart along the straight line coincidentwith the symmetry axis. It is revealed that quantum zero-point wriggling-type vibrations of the fissile system in the vicinity of its scission point are a source of these angular momenta and of high fragment spins observed experimentally.

  15. Low-Energy Fusion-Fission Dynamics of Heavy Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, Valery; Greiner, Walter

    2006-08-14

    A new approach is proposed for a unified description of strongly coupled deep-inelastic (DI) scattering, fusion, fission, and quasi-fission (QF) processes of heavy ion collisions. A unified driving-potential and a unified set of dynamic Langevin-type equations of motion are used in this approach. This makes it possible to perform a full (continuous) time analysis of the evolution of heavy nuclear systems, starting from the approaching stage, moving up to the formation of the compound nucleus or emerging into two final fragments. The calculated mass, charge, energy and angular distributions of the reaction products agree well with the corresponding experimental data for heavy and superheavy nuclear systems. Collisions of very heavy nuclei (such as 238U+248Cm) are investigated as an alternative way for production of superheavy elements. Large charge and mass transfer was found in these reactions due to the inverse (anti-symmetrizing) quasi-fission process leading to formation of surviving superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei.

  16. Neutron-fragment and Neutron-neutron Correlations in Low-energy Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestone, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    A computational method has been developed to simulate neutron emission from thermal-neutron induced fission of 235U and from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Measured pre-emission mass-yield curves, average total kinetic energies and their variances, both as functions of mass split, are used to obtain a representation of the distribution of fragment velocities. Measured average neutron multiplicities as a function of mass split and their dependence on total kinetic energy are used. Simulations can be made to reproduce measured factorial moments of neutron-multiplicity distributions with only minor empirical adjustments to some experimental inputs. The neutron-emission spectra in the rest-frame of the fragments are highly constrained by ENDF/B-VII.1 prompt-fission neutron-spectra evaluations. The n-f correlation measurements of Vorobyev et al. (2010) are consistent with predictions where all neutrons are assumed to be evaporated isotropically from the rest frame of fully accelerated fragments. Measured n-f and n-n correlations of others are a little weaker than the predictions presented here. These weaker correlations could be used to infer a weak scission-neutron source. However, the effect of neutron scattering on the experimental results must be studied in detail before moving away from a null hypothesis that all neutrons are evaporated from the fragments.

  17. Partition between the fission fragments of the excitation energy and of the neutron multiplicity at scission in low-energy fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carjan, N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Rizea, M.; Serot, O.

    2012-04-01

    The partition between the light (L) and the heavy (H) fission fragments of the excitation energy available at scission is studied in the framework of the sudden approximation, i.e., under the assumption that the neck rupture and the absorption of the neck pieces by the fragments happen infinitely fast. We are dealing with a sudden transition between two different nuclear configurations (αi→αf) and we only need to know the two sets of neutron eigenstates involved. The accent in the present work is put on the dependence of this share of energy on the mass asymmetry AL/AH of the primary fission fragments during the low-energy fission of 236U. In particular, for every fragment mass A we estimate the scission neutron multiplicity νsc, the average energy cost for their release , the primary fragments' excitation energy Esc*, and the corresponding temperature Tsc. The results are analyzed separately for each value of Ω (the projection of the angular momentum on the symmetry axis). As general trends, a decrease of Esc* (Tsc) and an increase of νsc () with increasing A were observed.

  18. Low-energy fission investigated in reactions of 750 AMeV238U-ions with Pb and Be targets. I. Nuclear charge distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, P.; Bernas, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Geissel, H.; Aumann, T.; Dessagne, Ph.; Donzaud, C.; Hanelt, E.; Heinz, A.; Hesse, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Miehe, Ch.; Münzenberg, G.; Pfützner, M.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Schwab, W.; Stéphan, C.; Sümmerer, K.; Tassan-Got, L.; Voss, B.

    1996-12-01

    Charge distributions of fragments from low energy nuclear fission are investigated in reactions of highly fissile238U projectiles at relativistic energies (750 A·MeV) with a heavy (Pb) and a light (Be) target. The fully stripped fission fragments are separated by the Fragment Separator (FRS). Their high kinetic energies in the laboratory system allow the identification of all atomic numbers by using Multiple-Sampling Ionization Chambers (MUSIC). The elemental distributions of fragments observed at larger magnetic rigidities than the238U projectiles show asymmetric break-up and odd-even effects. They indicate a low energy fission process, induced mainly by dissociation in the electro-magnetic field for the U/Pb-system, or by peripheral nuclear interactions for the U/Be-system.

  19. Investigation of GEV Proton-Induced Spallation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilscher, D.; Herbach, C.-M.; Jahnke, U.; Tishchenko, V. G.; Galin, J.; Lott, B.; Letourneau, A.; Peghaire, A.; Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Nünighoff, K.; Schaal, H.; Sterzenbach, G.; Wohlmuther, M.; Pienkowski, L.; Schröder, W. U.; Toke, J.

    2004-09-01

    A reliable modeling of GeV proton-induced spallation reactions is indispensable for the design of the spallation module and the target station of future accelerator driven hybrid reactors (ADS) or spallation neutron sources (ESS), in particular, to provide precise predictions for the neutron production, the radiation damage of materials (window), and the production of radioactivity (3H, 7Be etc.) in the target medium. Detailed experimental nuclear data are needed for sensitive validations and improvements of the models, whose predictive power is strongly dependent on the correct physical description of the three main stages of a spallation reaction: (i) the Intra-Nuclear-Cascade (INC) with the fast heating of the target nucleus, (ii) the de-excitation due to pre-equilibrium emission including the possibility of multi-fragmentation, and (iii) the statistical decay of thermally excited nuclei by evaporation of light particles and fission in the case of heavy nuclei. Key experimental data for this endeavor are absolute production cross sections and energy spectra for neutrons and light charged-particles (LCPs), emission of composite particles prior and post to the attainment of an equilibrated system, distribution of excitation energies deposited in the nuclei after the INC, and fission probabilities. Systematic measurements of such data are furthermore needed over large ranges of target nuclei and incident proton energies. Such data has been measured with the NESSI detector. An overview of new and previous results will be given.

  20. An observation of proton-induced latchup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Coss, James R.; Watson, R. K.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Pease, Ronald L.

    1992-01-01

    Proton-induced latchup in a CMOS microprocessor known to have a very low heavy-ion-induced latchup threshold LET was observed. The latchup cross section vs. proton energy for three different bias conditions is displayed. Average measures of latchup current within an 11-ms window following the onset of latchup are provided, as a function of bias and incident proton energy. These data can be interpreted in terms of the present understanding of SEE phenomena.

  1. Maruhn-Greiner Maximum of Uranium Fission for Confirmation of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions LENR via a Compound Nucleus with Double Magic Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2007-12-01

    One of the most convincing facts about LENR due to deuterons of very high concentration in host metals as palladium is the measurement of the large scale minimum of the reaction probability depending on the nucleon number A of generated elements at A = 153 where a local maximum was measured. This is similar to the fission of uranium at A = 119 where the local maximum follows from the Maruhn-Greiner theory if the splitting nuclei are excited to about MeV energy. The LENR generated elements can be documented any time after the reaction by SIMS or K-shell X-ray excitation to show the very unique distribution with the local maximum. An explanation is based on the strong Debye screening of the Maxwellian deuterons within the degenerate rigid electron background especially within the swimming electron layer at the metal surface or at interfaces. The deuterons behave like neutrals at distances of about 2 picometers. They may form clusters due to soft attraction in the range above thermal energy. Clusters of 10 pm diameter may react over long time probabilities (megaseconds) with Pd nuclei leading to a double magic number compound nucleus which splits like in fission to the A = 153 element distribution.

  2. Scaling of SEU mapping and cross section, and proton induced SEU at reduced supply voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Barak, J.; Levinson, J.; Akkerman, A.

    1999-12-01

    New experimental study of heavy ion and proton induced SEU at reduced voltage (i.e., reduced critical charge) reveals interesting results. It is shown that the heavy ion cross section and microprobe mapping scale like the threshold LET and the parameter, which is almost invariant under bias changes, is the effective charge collection depth. For studying proton induced SEU and surface-barrier-detector spectra the authors use protons with energies from 5.6 to 300 MeV. The results are analyzed in view of the processes involved in low energy deposition by protons. Detailed calculations show the importance of straggling in proton direct ionization which might be the leading process in very sensitive devices like photodiodes.

  3. Proton-induced noise in digicons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. C.; Becher, J.; Fowler, W. B.; Flemming, K.

    1981-01-01

    The Space Telescope, which carries four Digicons, will pass several times per day through a low-altitude portion of the radiation belt called the South Atlantic Anomaly. This is expected to create interference in what is otherwise anticipated to be a noise-free device. Two essential components of the Digicon, the semiconductor diode array and the UV transmitting window, generate noise when subjected to medium-energy proton radiation, a primary component of the belt. These trapped protons, having energies ranging from 2 to 400 Mev and fluences at the Digicon up to 4,000 P+/sec-sq cm, pass through both the window and the diode array, depositing energy in each. In order to evaluate the effect of these protons, engineering test models of Digicon tubes to be flown on the High Resolution Spectrograph were irradiated with low-flux monoenergetic proton beams at the University of Maryland cyclotron. Electron-hole pairs produced by the protons passing through the diodes or the surrounding bulk caused a background count rate. This is the result of holes diffusing over a distance of many diode spacings, causing counts to be triggered simultaneously in the output circuits of several adjacent diodes. Pulse-height spectra of these proton-induced counts indicate that most of the bulk-related counts overlap the single photoelectron peak. A geometrical model will be presented of the charge collection characteristics of the diode array that accounts for most of the observed effects.

  4. Systematic Study of Technetium Production by Proton-Induced Reactions on Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamere, Edward; Gilardy, Gwenaelle; Meisel, Zach; Moran, Michael; Skulski, Michael; Couder, Manoel

    2015-10-01

    Recent shortages in the world-wide supply of 99mTc have sparked interest in developing alternative production methods which do not rely on fission based 99Mo. The direct production of 99mTc from proton induced reactions on enriched 100Mo targets is one such approach. With this approach, 99mTc must be chemically extracted from the irradiated target and therefore radiopharmaceuticals will contain a mixture of all Tc-species produced from the proton bombardment. Commercial viability of cyclotron-produced 99mTc will depend on a number of factors including, production yield, radiochemical purity, and specific activity. Reactions on trace impurities in the targets has been shown to impact these factors dramatically. Precise cross-section measurements for not just the main reaction, 99mTc(p,2n), but for all Mo + p reactions that lead to Tc or Mo species are required for proper assessment of this 99mTc production technique. We will introduce a systematic study of proton-induced reactions on 92, 94-98, 100 Mo currently being performed at the University of Notre Dame. First results of 96Mo + p reactions will be presented. NRC-HQ-12-G-38-0073.

  5. Calculations of Neutron- and Proton-Induced Reactions up to 200 MeV for Target 238U

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hongwei; Zhao Zhixiang; Cai Chonghai

    2005-05-24

    The calculations of neutron- and proton-induced reaction up to 200 MeV for target 238U are performed; the calculated results are generally in good agreement with experimental data, and the physics is rational. The theoretical framework consists of the spherical optical model, intranuclear cascade mechanism for nucleon emission based on empirical formula, preequilibrium emission theory based on exciton model, evaporation model, and Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory with a width fluctuation correction. The fission widths are calculated using the Bohr-Wheeler formula.

  6. Actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement modulates proton-induced uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Nadav; Korenstein, Rafi

    2013-04-15

    Recently it has been shown that elevating proton concentration at the cell surface stimulates the formation of membrane invaginations and vesicles accompanied by an enhanced uptake of macromolecules. While the initial induction of inward membrane curvature was rationalized in terms of proton-based increase of charge asymmetry across the membrane, the mechanisms underlying vesicle formation and its scission are still unknown. In light of the critical role of actin in vesicle formation during endocytosis, the present study addresses the involvement of cytoskeletal actin in proton-induced uptake (PIU). The uptake of dextran-FITC is used as a measure for the factual fraction of inward invaginations that undergo scission from the cell's plasma membrane. Our findings show that the rate of PIU in suspended cells is constant, whereas the rate of PIU in adherent cells is gradually increased in time, saturating at the level possessed by suspended cells. This is consistent with pH induced gradual degradation of stress-fibers in adherent cells. Wortmannin and calyculin-A are able to elevate PIU by 25% in adherent cells but not in suspended cells, while cytochalasin-D, rapamycin and latrunculin-A elevate PIU both in adherent and suspended cells. However, extensive actin depolymerization by high concentrations of latrunculin-A is able to inhibit PIU. We conclude that proton-induced membrane vesiculation is restricted by the actin structural resistance to the plasma membrane bending. Nevertheless, a certain degree of cortical actin restructuring is required for the completion of the scission process. - Highlights: ► Acidification of cells' exterior enhances uptake of macromolecules by the cells. ► Disruption of actin stress fibers leads to enhancement of proton induced uptake. ► Extensive depolymerization of cellular actin attenuates proton-induced uptake.

  7. Quantum effects in low-energy photofission of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tsipenyuk, Y.M.; Ostapenko, Y.B.; Smirenkin, G.N.; Soldatov, A.S.

    1984-09-01

    The article is devoted to quantum effects in highly deformed nuclei and the related features of the fission mechanism in the low-energy photofission of heavy nuclei. The following questions are considered: the spectrum of transition states (fission channels), the symmetry of the nuclear configuration in the deformation process, the features of the passage through the barrier due to the existence in the second well of quasistationary states of fissile and nonfissile modes, the isomeric-shelf phenomenon in deep sub-barrier fission, and the relation between the fragment mass distribution and the structure of the fission barrier.

  8. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  9. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Bartl, A.; Feng, J.; Fujii, K.; Gunion, J.; Kamon, T.; Lopez, J.L.; Kao, C.

    1995-04-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, p{bar p} and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of super-particles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. The authors then comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  10. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H.; Bartl, A.

    1995-03-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, p{anti p} and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of superparticles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. They comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  11. LOW ENERGY COUNTING CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, P.M.

    1960-02-16

    A beta particle counter adapted to use an end window made of polyethylene terephthalate was designed. The extreme thinness of the film results in a correspondingly high transmission of incident low-energy beta particles by the window. As a consequence, the counting efficiency of the present counter is over 40% greater than counters using conventional mica end windows.

  12. Proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Kapustinsky, Jon; Nelson, Ron; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators. A 20 cm long LYSO crystal, a 15 cm long CeF3 crystal and four liquid scintillator based sealed quartz capillaries were irradiated by 800 MeV protons at Los Alamos up to 3.3 ×1014 p /cm2. Four 1.5 mm thick LYSO plates were irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN up to 6.9 ×1015 p /cm2. The results show an excellent radiation hardness of LYSO crystals against charged hadrons.

  13. Low energy antiproton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapisch, R.

    1992-04-01

    It was the invention of stochastic cooling by S. Van Meer that has allowed antiproton beams to become a powerful tool for the physicist. As a byproduct of the high energy proton-antiproton collider, a versatile low-energy facility, LEAR has been operating at CERN since 1984. The facility and its characteristics will be described as well as examples of its use for studying fundamental properties of the antiproton and for topics in atomic, nuclear and particle Physics.

  14. Yields of Fission Products from Various Uranium and Thorium Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, Andreas; Spejewski, Eugene H.; Mervin, Brenden T.; Jost, Cara; Carter, H Kennon; Stracener, Daniel W; Greene, John P.; Nolen, Jerry A.; Talbert, Willard L.

    2008-01-01

    Yield measurements from proton-induced fission have been performed on a number of actinide targets, both Th and U, at the on-line test facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results are discussed with a focus on the production process and physical and chemical properties of the targets.

  15. Yields of fission products from various uranium and thorium targets.

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.; Spejewski, E. H.; Mervin, B.; Jost, C.; Carter, H. K.; Stracener, D. W.; Greene, J. P.; Nolen, J. A.; Talbert, W. L.; Physics; Oak Ridge Associated Univ.; ORNL; TechSource, Inc.

    2008-10-31

    Yield measurements from proton-induced fission have been performed on a number of actinide targets, both Th and U, at the on-line test facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results are discussed with a focus on the production process and physical and chemical properties of the targets.

  16. Low-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludhova, Livia

    2016-05-01

    There exist several kinds of sources emitting neutrinos in the MeV energy range. These low-energy neutrinos from different sources can be often detected by the same multipurpose detectors. The status-of-art of the field of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, and the search for sterile neutrino with artificial neutrino sources is provided here; other neutrino sources, as for example reactor or high-energy neutrinos, are described elsewhere. For each of these three fields, the present-day motivation and open questions, as well as the latest experimental results and future perspectives are discussed.

  17. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena Xing, Lei; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  18. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm2 CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R2 > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a small animal

  19. First measurements of laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz Dufrenoy, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph.; Gremillet, L.

    2012-09-15

    We present our first results about laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence in solids. In the first part, we describe the optimization of the proton source as a function of the target thickness as well as the laser pulse duration and energy. Due to the ultra high contrast ratio of our laser beam, we succeeded in using targets ranging from the micron scale down to nanometers thickness. The two optimal thicknesses we put in evidence are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Laser pulse duration shows a small influence on proton maximum energy, whereas the latter turns out to vary almost linearly as a function of laser energy. Thanks to this optimisation work, we have been able to acquire images of the proton energy deposition in a solid scintillator.

  20. Simulation of proton-induced energy deposition in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernald, Kenneth W.; Kerns, Sherra E.

    1988-01-01

    A time-efficient simulation technique was developed for modeling the energy deposition by incident protons in modern integrated circuits. To avoid the excessive computer time required by many proton-effects simulators, a stochastic method was chosen to model the various physical effects responsible for energy deposition by incident protons. Using probability density functions to describe the nuclear reactions responsible for most proton-induced memory upsets, the simulator determines the probability of a proton hit depositing the energy necessary for circuit destabilization. This factor is combined with various circuit parameters to determine the expected error-rate in a given proton environment. An analysis of transient or dose-rate effects is also performed. A comparison to experimental energy-disposition data proves the simulator to be quite accurate for predicting the expected number of events in certain integrated circuits.

  1. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolute total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.

  2. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolutemore » total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.« less

  3. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.

    2015-05-01

    The present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. The theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolute total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene Surdutovich.

  4. Proton-Induced Collisions on Potential Prebiotic Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine

    2016-03-01

    With regard to the fascinating question of the origin of life, special interest has been devoted to potential prebiotic molecules which could drive the emergence of life. In the widely discussed hypothesis of a possible exogen apparition of life, the transport of those prebiotic species and their survival under spatial conditions is of strong interest. In particular their stability under solar radiation or in collisions with bare nucleus has to be considered. In that sense, taking account of the abundance of protons in ionized clouds of the interstellar medium, we have developed a detailed theoretical study of the charge transfer collision dynamics induced by impact of protons on a series of possible prebiotic compounds. Three main types of molecules have been considered: first of all the DNA and RNA building blocks with on a one hand the nucleobases uracil and thymine, and on the other hand the 2-deoxy-D-ribose sugar skeleton in its furanose and pyranose forms. The study has been extended to the 2-aminooxazole suggested to be a possible precursor of RNA nucleotides. The theoretical treatment involves ab-initio quantum chemistry molecular calculations followed by a semiclassical collision dynamics. Some qualitative trends may be suggested for the proton-induced damage of such prebiotic species.

  5. New experimental approaches to investigate the fission dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlliure, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-07-01

    The first ever achieved full identification of both fission fragments, in atomic and mass number, made it possible to define new observables sensitive to the fission dynamics along the fission path up to the scission point. Moreover, proton-induced fission of 208Pb at high energies offers optimal conditions for the investigation of dissipative, and transient effects, because of the high-excitation energy of the fissioning nuclei, its low angular momentum, and limited shape distortion by the reaction. In this work we show that the charge distribution of the final fission fragments can constrain the ground-to-saddle dynamics while the mass distribution is sensitive to the dynamics until the scission point.

  6. Heavy Ion and Proton Induced Single Event Transients in Linear Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, D. K.; Coss, J. R.; Miyahira, T.; Schwartz, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a display of heavy-ion and proton-induced single event transients for selected linear devices. The transient vital signs are serious; low LET threshold, high voltage amplitude and extended pulse duration (microsecs.).

  7. Singlet exciton fission photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiye; Jadhav, Priya; Reusswig, Philip D; Yost, Shane R; Thompson, Nicholas J; Congreve, Daniel N; Hontz, Eric; Van Voorhis, Troy; Baldo, Marc A

    2013-06-18

    Singlet exciton fission, a process that generates two excitons from a single photon, is perhaps the most efficient of the various multiexciton-generation processes studied to date, offering the potential to increase the efficiency of solar devices. But its unique characteristic, splitting a photogenerated singlet exciton into two dark triplet states, means that the empty absorption region between the singlet and triplet excitons must be filled by adding another material that captures low-energy photons. This has required the development of specialized device architectures. In this Account, we review work to develop devices that harness the theoretical benefits of singlet exciton fission. First, we discuss singlet fission in the archetypal material, pentacene. Pentacene-based photovoltaic devices typically show high external and internal quantum efficiencies. They have enabled researchers to characterize fission, including yield and the impact of competing loss processes, within functional devices. We review in situ probes of singlet fission that modulate the photocurrent using a magnetic field. We also summarize studies of the dissociation of triplet excitons into charge at the pentacene-buckyball (C60) donor-acceptor interface. Multiple independent measurements confirm that pentacene triplet excitons can dissociate at the C60 interface despite their relatively low energy. Because triplet excitons produced by singlet fission each have no more than half the energy of the original photoexcitation, they limit the potential open circuit voltage within a solar cell. Thus, if singlet fission is to increase the overall efficiency of a solar cell and not just double the photocurrent at the cost of halving the voltage, it is necessary to also harvest photons in the absorption gap between the singlet and triplet energies of the singlet fission material. We review two device architectures that attempt this using long-wavelength materials: a three-layer structure that uses

  8. Dynamical Aspects of Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliman, J.; Itkis, M. G.; Gmuca, Š.

    2008-11-01

    [symbol]Pu / Y. V. Pyatkov. Comparative study of the ternary particle emission in [symbol] and [symbol]Cm(SF) / S. Vermote ... [et al.] -- Structure of fission fragments and neurton rich nuclei / manifestation of average y-ray multiplicity in the fission modes of [symbol]Cf(sf) and the proton-induced fission of [symbol]Pa, [symbol]Np, and [symbol]Am / M. Berešová ... [et al.]. Yields of correlated fragment pairs and average gamma-ray multiplicities and energies in [symbol]Pb([symbol]O, f) / A. Bogachev ... [et al.]. Recent experiments at gammasphere intended to the study of [symbol]Cf spontaneous fission / A. V. Daniel ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure studies of microsecond isomers near A =100 / J. Genevey ... [et al.]. Covariant density functional theory: isospin properties of nuclei far from stability / G. A. Lalazisis. Relativistic mean-field description of light nuclei / J. Leja and Š. Gmuca. Energy nucleon spectra from reactions at intermediate energies / O. Grudzevich ... [et al.] -- Developments in experimental techniques. Analysis, processing and visualization of multidimensional data using DaqProVis system / M. Morháč ... [et al.].

  9. Flux and dose transmission through concrete of neutrons from proton induced reactions on various target elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Nandy, Maitreyee; Roy, S. N.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2004-12-01

    Simple empirical expressions for transmission of flux and dose through concrete are presented for neutrons from proton induced reactions. For this purpose the neutron emission from different targets in proton induced reactions in the energy range 25-200 MeV have been considered. The calculated effective dose outside a concrete shield shows overall good agreement with the effective dose estimated from measured neutron flux in the framework of the Moyer model. The calculated effective attenuation length shows a rising trend with incident proton energy and shield thickness.

  10. Modeling of Proton-Induced CCD Degradation in the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, D. H.; Srour, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for proton-induced degradation of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used in the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer instrument on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. A methodology is described that provides insights regarding degradation mechanism and on-orbit performance for front-illuminated and back-illuminated CCDs Proton-induced changes in charge transfer inefficiency are modeled. The observed amount of on-orbit degradation can be accounted for using a proton spectrum at the CCD location that is reduced in magnitude by a factor of approx. 1E5 compared to the spectrum incident on the spacecraft.

  11. Low Energy Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Out of a commitment to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, Ireland's Department of Education and Science has designed and constructed two low energy schools, in Tullamore, County Offaly, and Raheen, County Laois. With energy use in buildings responsible for approximately 55% of the CO[subscript 2] released into the atmosphere and a major…

  12. Accurate Fission Data for Nuclear Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solders, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyväskylä. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (1012 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons for benchmarking and to study the energy dependence of fission yields. The scientific program is extensive and is planed to start in 2013 with a measurement of isomeric yield ratios of proton induced fission in uranium. This will be followed by studies of independent yields of thermal and fast neutron induced fission of various actinides.

  13. THE MULTIELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF DRINKING WATER USING PROTON-INDUCED X-RAY EMISSION (PIXE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new, rapid, and economical method for the multielemental analysis of drinking water samples is described. The concentrations of 76 elements heavier than aluminum are determined using proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) technology. The concentration of sodium is evaluated using...

  14. The Low Energy Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan; Geer, Steve; Ellis, Malcolm; Fernandez Martinez, Enrique; Li, Tracey; Pascoli, Silvia; Mena, Olga

    2010-03-30

    We show that a low energy neutrino factory with a baseline of 1300 km and muon energy of 4.5 GeV has an excellent physics reach. The results of our optimisation studies demonstrate that such a setup can have remarkable sensitivity to theta{sub 13} and delta for sin{sup 2}(2theta{sub 13})>10{sup -4}, and to the mass hierarchy for sin{sup 2}(2theta{sub 13})>10{sup -3}. We also illustrate the power of the unique combination of golden and platinum channels accessible to the low energy neutrino factory. We have considered both a 20 kton totally active scintillating detector and a 100 kton liquid argon detector as possible detector technologies, finding that a liquid argon detector with very good background rejection can produce sensitivity to theta{sub 13} and delta with that of the International Design Study neutrino factory.

  15. Physics with low energy hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Guttierez, G.; Littenberg, L.

    1997-10-01

    The prospects for low energy hadron physics at the front end of a muon collider (FMC) are discussed. The FMC, as conceived for the purposes of this workshop, is pretty close to a classical idea of a koan factory. There is an order of magnitude advantage of the FMC front end over the AGS for K{sup {minus}} and {anti p} production below 5 GeV/c.

  16. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  17. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony; Friendlich, M.R.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Hakey, Mark C.; Dodd, Paul E.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Sierawski, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  18. Low energy p p physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amsler, C.; Crowe, K. . Inst. fuer Physik; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-02-01

    A detailed investigation of proton-antiproton interactions at low energy has become feasible with the commissioning of the LEAR facility in 1983. We shall shortly review the status of {bar p}p annihilation at rest and the physics motivations for second generation experiments with the Crystal Barrel detector. This type of detector would be adequate for the study of both Kp and {bar p}p interactions on an extracted beam of the KAON Factory. We shall conclude with a few remarks on the physics opportunities with {bar p}'s at the KAON Factory which, in our opinion, will not be covered by the present LEAR facility. 11 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Analysis of low energy electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of low energy electrons in the plasma sheet and in the auroral zone were analyzed. Data from the MIT plasma experiment on the OGO-3 satellite and from the Lockheed experiment on the OV1-18 satellite were processed and compared. The OV1-18 carried thirteen magnetic electron spectrometers designed to measure the intensity, angular, and energy distributions of the auroral electrons and protons in the energy range below 50 keV. Two computer programs were developed for reduction of the OV1-18 data. One program computed the various plasma properties at one second intervals as a function of Universal Time and pitch angle; the other program produced survey plots showing the outputs of the various detectors on the satellite as a function of time on a scale of approximately 100 seconds per cm. The OV1-18 data exhibit the high degree of variability associated with substorm controlled phenomena.

  20. Low-Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; ACE/CRIS Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic rays with energies below about 10 GeV/nucleon have been measured with high precision as a result of experiments on the HEAO, Ulysses, and ACE spacecrafts. The observations provide energy spectra, elemental abundances, and isotopic composition for elements up through Z=30. They include both stable and radioactive nuclides that are synthesized in stars or are produced by nuclear fragmentation during diffusion at high energies through interstellar medium. From these data one obtains a rather detailed picture of the origin of low-energy cosmic rays. For refractory species, the cosmic-ray source composition closely resembles that of the Sun, suggesting that cosmic rays are accelerated from a well-mixed sample of interstellar matter. A chemical fractionation process has depleted the abundances of volatile elements relative to refractories. Using various radioactive clock isotopes it has been shown that particle acceleration occurs at least 105 years after supernova nucleosynthesis and that the accelerated particles diffuse in the Galaxy for approximately 15 Myr after acceleration. Energy spectra and secondary-to-primary ratios are reasonably well accounted for by models in which particles gain the bulk of their energy in a single encounter with a strong shock. Among the large number of species that have been measured, 22Ne stands out as the only nuclide with an abundance that is clearly much different than solar. To test models proposed to account for this anomaly, the data are being analyzed for predicted smaller effects on abundances of other nuclides. In addition to providing a detailed understanding of the origin and acceleration of low-energy cosmic rays, these data are providing constraints on the chemical evolution of interstellar matter. This work was supported by NASA at Caltech (under grant NAG5-6912), JPL, NASA/GSFC, and Washington U.

  1. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  2. Low energy effective string cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E.J.; Lahiri, A.; Wands, D. )

    1994-10-15

    We give the general analytic solutions derived from the low energy string effective action for four-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models with a dilaton and antisymmetric tensor field, considering both long and short wavelength modes of the [ital H] field. The presence of a homogeneous [ital H] field significantly modifies the evolution of the scale factor and dilaton. In particular it places a lower bound on the allowed value of the dilaton. The scale factor also has a lower bound but our solutions remain singular as they all contain regions where the spacetime curvature diverges signalling a breakdown in the validity of the effective action. We extend our results to the simplest Bianchi type I metric in higher dimensions with only two scale factors. We again give the general analytic solutions for long and short wavelength modes for the [ital H] field restricted to the three-dimensional space, which produces an anisotropic expansion. In the case of [ital H] field radiation (wavelengths within the Hubble length) we obtain the usual four-dimensional radiation-dominated FRW model as the unique late time attractor.

  3. Low-Energy Sputtering Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.; Shutthanandan, V.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study is described to measure low-energy (less than 600 eV) sputtering yields of molybdenum with xenon ions using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and secondary neutral mass spectroscopy (SNMS). An ion gun was used to generate the ion beam. The ion current density at the target surface was approximately 30 (micro)A/sq cm. For RBS measurements, the sputtered material was collected on a thin aluminum strip which was mounted on a semi-circular collector plate. The target was bombarded with 200 and 500 eV xenon ions at normal incidence. The differential sputtering yields were measured using the RBS method with 1 MeV helium ions. The differential yields were fitted with a cosine fitting function and integrated with respect to the solid angle to provide the total sputtering yields. The sputtering yields obtained using the RBS method are in reasonable agreement with those measured by other researchers using different techniques. For the SNMS measurements, 150 to 600 eV xenon ions were used at 50deg angle of incidence. The SNMS spectra were converted to sputtering yields for perpendicular incidence by normalizing SNMS spectral data at 500 eV with the yield measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Sputtering yields as well as the shape of the yield-energy curve obtained in this manner are in reasonable agreement with those measured by other researchers using different techniques. Sputtering yields calculated by using two semi-spherical formulations agree reasonably well with measured data. The isotopic composition of secondary ions were measured by bombarding copper with xenon ions at energies ranging from 100 eV to 1.5 keV. The secondary ion flux was found to be enriched in heavy isotopes at low incident ion energies. The heavy isotope enrichment was observed to decrease with increasing impact energy. Beyond 700 eV, light isotopes were sputtered preferentially with the enrichment remaining nearly constant.

  4. Fission and Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Joseph H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Carter, H. K.

    2008-08-01

    . Fission-fragment spectroscopy with STEFF / A. G. Smith ... [et al.]. Gamma ray multiplicity of [symbol]Cf spontaneous fission using LiBerACE / D. L. Bleuel ... [et al.]. Excitation energy dependence of fragment mass and total kinetic energy distributions in proton-induced fission of light actinides / I. Nishinaka ... [et al.]. A dynamical calculation of multi-modal nuclear fission / T. Wada and T. Asano. Structure of fission potential energy surfaces in ten-dimensional spaces / V. V. Pashkevich, Y. K Pyatkov and A. V. Unzhakova. A possible enhancement of nuclear fission in scattering with low energy charged particles / V. Gudkov. Dynamical multi-break processes in the [symbol]Sn + [symbol]Ni system at 35 MeV/Nucleon / M. Papa and ISOSPIN-RE VERSE collaboration -- New experimental techniques. MTOF - a high resolution isobar separator for studies of exotic decays / A. Piechaczek ... [et al.]. Development of ORRUBA: a silicon array for the measurement of transfer reactions in inverse kinematics / S. D. Pain ... [et al.]. Indian national gamma array: present & future / R. K. Bhowmik. Absolute intensities of [symbol] rays emitted in the decay of [symbol]U / H. C. Griffin -- Superheavy elements theory and experiments / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.]. Study of superheavy elements at SHIP / S. Hofinann. Heaviest nuclei from [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / Yu. Ts. Oaanessian. Superheavy nuclei and giant nuclear systems / W. Greiner and V. Zagrebaev. Fission approach to alpha-decay of superheavy nuclei / D.N. Poenaru and W. Greiner. Superheavy elements in the Magic Islands / C. Samanta. Relativistic mean field studies of superheavy nuclei / A. V. Afanas jev. Understanding the synthesis of the heaviest nuclei / W. Loveland -- Mass measurements and g-factors. G factor measurements in neutron-rich [symbol]Cf fission fragments, measured using the gammasphere array / R. Orlandi ... [et al.]. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors in neutron rich nuclei produced by the

  5. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    transcutaneous power transfer and sensing of ICI during cardioversion are evidenced as key to the advancement of low-energy atrial defibrillation. PMID:26404298

  6. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Philip; Kodoth, Vivek; McEneaney, David; Rodrigues, Paola; Velasquez, Jose; Waterman, Niall; Escalona, Omar

    2015-01-01

    transcutaneous power transfer and sensing of ICI during cardioversion are evidenced as key to the advancement of low-energy atrial defibrillation. PMID:26404298

  7. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  8. Benchmarking nuclear fission theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G. F.; Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Talou, P.

    2015-05-14

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. Thus, the purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  9. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  10. First measurement of proton-induced low-momentum dielectron radiation off cold nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HADES Collaboration; Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Mishra, D.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2012-09-01

    We present data on dielectron emission in proton induced reactions on a Nb target at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy measured with HADES installed at GSI. The data represent the first high statistics measurement of proton-induced dielectron radiation from cold nuclear matter in a kinematic regime, where strong medium effects are expected. Combined with the good mass resolution of 2%, it is the first measurement sensitive to changes of the spectral functions of vector mesons, as predicted by models for hadrons at rest or small relative momenta. Comparing the e+e- invariant mass spectra to elementary p + p data, we observe for e+e- momenta Pee<0.8 GeV/c a strong modification of the shape of the spectrum, which we attribute to an additional ρ-like contribution and a decrease of ω yield. These opposite trends are tentatively interpreted as a strong coupling of the ρ meson to baryonic resonances and an absorption of the ω meson, which are two aspects of in-medium modification of vector mesons.

  11. Chirality induction and protonation-induced molecular motions in helical molecular strands.

    PubMed

    Kolomiets, Elena; Berl, Volker; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    The long oligopyridinedicarboxamide strand 9, containing 15 heterocyclic rings has been synthesized and its helical structure determined by X-ray crystallography. It was shown that the shorter analogue 6 displays induced circular dichroism and amplification of induced chirality upon dissolution in an optically active solvent, diethyl-L-tartrate. A novel class of helical foldamers was prepared, strands 14-16, based on two oligopyridine carboxamide segments linked through a L-tartaric acid derived spacer. These tartro strands display internal chirality induction as well as chirality amplification. NMR spectroscopy (on 8 and 9) and circular dichroism (on 16) studies show that the oligopyridine carboxamide strands undergo reversible unfolding/folding upon protonation. The protonation-induced unfolding has been confirmed by X-ray crystallographic determination of the molecular structure of the extended protonated heptameric form 8(+). The molecular-scale mechano-chemical motions of the protonation-induced structural switching consist of a change of the length of the molecule, from 6 angstroms (6, coiled form) to 29 angstroms (8(+), uncoiled form) for the heptamer and from 12.5 angstroms (9, coiled form, X-ray structure) to 57 angstroms (9(+), uncoiled form, from modeling) for the pentadecamer. Similar unfolding/folding motional processes take place in the L-tartro strands 15 and 16 upon protonation/deprotonation, with loss of helicity-induced circular dichroism on unfolding as shown for the protonated form 16(+). PMID:17429821

  12. From the HINDAS Project: Excitation Functions for Residual Nuclide Production by Proton-Induced Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.; Gloris, M.; Protoschill, J.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Weug, M.; Herpers, U.; Kuhnhenn, J.; Kubik, P.-W.; Schumann, D.; Synal, H.-A.; Weinreich, R.; Leya, I.; David, J.C.; Leray, S.; Duijvestijn, M.; Koning, A.; Kelic, A.; Schmidt, K.H.; Cugnon, J.

    2005-05-24

    A survey is given about efforts undertaken during the HINDAS project to investigate the energy dependence of residual nuclide production by proton-induced reactions from thresholds up to 2.6 GeV. For proton-induced reactions, our experiments aimed to further develop and complete the cross-section database that was established by our collaboration in recent years. It was extended to the heavy-target elements Ta, W, Pb, and Bi for energies up to 2.6 GeV. In addition, new measurements for the target element iron were performed up to 2.6 GeV and for natural uranium for energies from 21 MeV to 69 MeV. For the target element lead, a comprehensive set of excitation functions published recently was completed by AMS-measurements of cross sections for the production of the long-lived radionuclides Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36, and I-129 and by mass spectrometric measurements for stable and radioactive rare gas isotopes of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Comprehensive tests of the nuclear-reaction codes TALYS and INCL4+ABLA, which were developed within the HINDAS project, were performed with the new experimental results over the entire energy range.

  13. Fission meter

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Snyderman, Neal J.

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  14. SOFIA, a Next-Generation Facility for Fission Yields Measurements and Fission Study. First Results and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouin, L.; Pellereau, E.; Taieb, J.; Boutoux, G.; Béliera, G.; Chatillon, A.; Ebran, A.; Gorbinet, T.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Jurado, B.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Caamano, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Paradela, C.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J.-L.; Vargas, J.; Casarejos, E.; Heinz, A.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Nociforo, C.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rossi, D.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    Fission fragments play an important role in nuclear reactors evolution and safety. However, fragments yields are poorly known : data are essentially limited to mass yields from thermal neutron-induced fissions on a very few nuclei. SOFIA (Study On FIssion with Aladin) is an innovative experimental program on nuclear fission carried out at the GSI facility, which aims at providing isotopic yields on a broad range of fissioning systems. Relativistic secondary beams of actinides and pre-actinides are selected by the Fragment Separator (FRS) and their fission is triggered by electromagnetic interaction. The resulting excitation energy is comparable to the result of an interaction with a low-energy neutron, thus leading to useful data for reactor simulations. For the first time ever, both fission fragments are completely identified in charge and mass in a new recoil spectrometer, allowing for precise yields measurements. The yield of prompt neutrons can then be deduced, and the fission mechanism can be ascribed, providing new constraints for fission models. During the first experiment, all the technical challenges were matched : we have thus set new experimental standards in the measurements of relativistic heavy ions (time of flight, position, energy loss).This communication presents a first series of results obtained on the fission of 238U; many other fissioning systems have also been measured and are being analyzed presently. A second SOFIA experiment is planned in September 2014, and will be focused on the measurement of the fission of 236U, the analog of 235U+n.

  15. Low-Energy Neutron Scattering from Heavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Christopher Adams

    Fast neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for the 44.9-keV level in ^{238} U and the 49.4-keV level in ^{232 }Th, and the elastic scattering cross sections of ^{209}Bi and ^{232}Th have been measured using the neutron time-of-flight technique, at an incident neutron energy of 127 keV at six scattering angles from 45 ^circ to 122.5^circ . Neutrons were produced by the ^7 Li(p,n)^7Be reaction. A detector using two photomultiplier tubes in fast coincidence was built for these low-energy measurements. The detector efficiency was determined by comparison with that of a ^{235}U fission chamber. Special attention was paid to determining the efficiency near the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction threshold. The spectrum unfolding included the removal of tails on the peaks which were assumed to be exponential functions. The inelastic peaks were stripped from the elastic peaks by using the shape of the bismuth elastic peak as a standard. Corrections for neutron attenuation were computed analytically. Corrections for multiple scattering were determined using a Monte Carlo method. Results were normalized to the ^{238}U differential elastic scattering cross sections and angular distributions. The angular distributions and integrated cross sections are compared with the ENDF/B-VI evaluation cross sections and with results at similar energies from previous measurements. The use of iron neutron filters for measuring cross sections at low energies is also discussed.

  16. Single track nanodosimetry of low energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bantsar, A.; Grosswendt, B.; Pszona, S.; Kula, J.

    2009-02-01

    Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides (for instance, 125I) with a predominant energy spectrum below 3 keV are an active area of research towards the clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals. Hence, the necessity for an adequate description of the effects of radiation by low-energy electrons on nanometric biological targets seems to be unquestionable. Experimental nanodosimetry for low-energy electrons has been accomplished with a device named JET COUNTER. The present paper describes, for the first time, nanodosimetric experiments in nanometer-sized cavities of nitrogen using low energy electrons ranging from 100 eV to 2 keV.

  17. The Science of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Edmund

    2007-03-01

    The large literature describing the anomalous behavior attributed to cold fusion or low energy nuclear reactions has been critically described in a recently published book. Over 950 publications are evaluated allowing the phenomenon to be understood. A new class of nuclear reactions has been discovered that are able to generate practical energy without significant radiation or radioactivity. Edmund K Storms, The Science of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions, in press (2006). Also see: http://www.lenr-canr.org/StudentsGuide.htm .

  18. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, M S; Baba, M

    2016-08-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of (104m,104g,105g,106m,110m)Ag, (100,101)Pd, (99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102g,105)Rh and (103,97)Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed. PMID:27235887

  19. Standardization of proton-induced x-ray emission technique for analysis of thick samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Shad; Zeb, Johar; Ahad, Abdul; Ahmad, Ishfaq; Haneef, M.; Akbar, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the standardization of the proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) technique for finding the elemental composition of thick samples. For the standardization, three different samples of standard reference materials (SRMs) were analyzed using this technique and the data were compared with the already known data of these certified SRMs. These samples were selected in order to cover the maximum range of elements in the periodic table. Each sample was irradiated for three different values of collected beam charges at three different times. A proton beam of 2.57 MeV obtained using 5UDH-II Pelletron accelerator was used for excitation of x-rays from the sample. The acquired experimental data were analyzed using the GUPIXWIN software. The results show that the SRM data and the data obtained using the PIXE technique are in good agreement.

  20. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, P.; Panigrahi, N.; Rao, M.S.; Varier, K.M.; Sen, S.; Mehta, G.K.

    1982-04-01

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations.

  1. Neutron- and proton-induced reactions for analysis of bioenvironmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Spyrou, N.M.; Altaf, W.J.; Khrbish, Y.S. )

    1988-01-01

    The study of the elemental composition of bioenvironmental samples is of continuing interest in a wide variety of medical and environmental investigations, be it as environmental monitors or as indicators of the state of health and disease of an individual or a population. Nuclear activation methods play an important role in these studies as research tools and in certain cases are employed as rapid, routine analytical techniques. Although the authors have been using instrumental neutron activation analysis as the main technique for obtaining information about elemental composition and concentration, they have also developed techniques, for further or complementary analysis, in which proton-induced reactions have been exploited. Two recent studies, in which the composition of human lung tissue and the elemental concentration in plant samples were determined, have been selected as illustrations of the techniques employed.

  2. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses.

    PubMed

    Sen, P; Panigrahi, N; Rao, M S; Varier, K M; Sen, S; Mehta, G K

    1982-04-01

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations. PMID:7097204

  3. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on gold up to 65MeV.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-07-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on gold for production of (197m,197g,195m,195g, 193m,193g,192)Hg, (196m,196g(cum),195g(cum),194,191(cum))Au, (191(cum))Pt and (192)Ir were measured up to 65MeV proton energy, some of them for the first time. The new data are in acceptably good agreement with the recently published earlier experimental data in the overlapping energy region. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 (results in TENDL-2015 on-line library) and EMPIRE 3.2 code. PMID:27156194

  4. The quantum and thermodynamical characteristics of fission taking into account adiabatic and nonadiabatic modes of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.

    2007-09-15

    In the framework of the quantum theory of spontaneous and low-energy induced fission, the nature of quantum and thermodynamical properties of a fissioning system is analyzed taking into account adiabatic and nonadiabatic modes of motion for different fission stages. It is shown that, owing to the influence of the Coriolis interaction, the states of the fissile nucleus and of primary fission products are cold and strongly nonequilibrium. The important role of superfluid and pairing nucleon-nucleon correlations for binary and ternary fission is demonstrated. The mechanism of pumping of high values of relative orbital momenta and spins of fission fragments for binary and ternary fission and the nonevaporation mechanism of formation of third particles for ternary fission are investigated. The anisotropies and P-odd, P-even, and T-odd asymmetries for angular distributions of fission products are analyzed.

  5. True ternary fission of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Greiner, Walter

    2010-04-15

    True ternary fission with formation of a heavy third fragment is quite possible for superheavy nuclei because of the strong shell effects leading to a three-body clusterization with the two doubly magic tinlike cores. The simplest way to discover this phenomenon in the decay of excited superheavy nuclei is a detection of two tinlike clusters with appropriate kinematics in low-energy collisions of medium-mass nuclei with actinide targets. The three-body quasi-fission process could be even more pronounced for giant nuclear systems formed in collisions of heavy actinide nuclei. In this case a three-body clusterization might be proved experimentally by the detection of two coincident leadlike fragments in low-energy U + U collisions.

  6. Low energy aspects of circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.D.

    1990-12-01

    Performance in circular accelerators can be limited by some of the same sorts of phenomena described by Miller and Wangler in their lectures on low energy behavior in linear accelerators. In general the strength of the perturbation required to degrade performance is reduced in circular accelerators due to the repetitive nature of the orbits. For example, we shall see that space-charge can severely limit performance in circular accelerators even when operating far from the space-charge dominated regime'' as defined in linear accelerators. We will be discussing two particular aspects of low energy operation in circular accelerators -- space-charge and transition. Low energy'' is defined within the context of these phenomena. We shall see that the phenomena are really only relevant in hadron accelerators.

  7. Spontaneous fission of the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1989-04-01

    Although spontaneous fission was discovered in /sup 238/U in 1940, detailed studies of the process were first made possible in the 1960's with the availability of milligram quantities of /sup 252/Cf. The advent of solid-state detectors made it possible to perform measurements of coincident fission fragments from even very short-lived spontaneous fission activities or those available in only very small quantities. Until 1971 it was believed that the main features of the mass and kinetic-energy distributions were essentially the same as those for thermal neutron-induced fission and that all low-energy fission proceeded via asymmetric mass division with total kinetic energies which could be derived by linear extrapolation from those of lighter elements. In 1971, measurements of /sup 257/Fm showed an increase in symmetric mass division with anomalously high TKE's. Subsequent experiments showed that in /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, the most probable mass split was symmetric with very high total kinetic energy. Measurements for the heavier elements have shown symmetric mass distributions with both high and low total kinetic energies. Recent results for spontaneous fission properties of the heaviest elements are reviewed and compared with theory. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Crematorium Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Yoskowitz, Joshua; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-MeV protons from the 1.1-MV tandem Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. We measured significant concentrations of sulfur, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and iron, but essentially no mercury in the aerosol samples. The lower limit of detection for airborne mercury in this experiment was approximately 0.2 ng / m3. The PIXE analysis of the soil samples showed the presence of elements commonly found in soil (Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), but no trace of mercury. There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-Me

  9. Determination of Fluorine in Fourteen Microanalytical Geologic Reference Materials using SIMS, EPMA, and Proton Induced Gamma Ray Emission (PIGE) Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggino, S. N.; Hervig, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Fluorine (F) is a volatile constituent of magmas and hydrous minerals, and trace amounts of F are incorporated into nominally anhydrous minerals such as olivine and clinopyroxene. Microanalytical techniques are routinely used to measure trace amounts of F at both high sensitivity and high spatial resolution in glasses and crystals. However, there are few well-established F concentrations for the glass standards routinely used in microanalytical laboratories, particularly standards of low silica, basaltic composition. In this study, we determined the F content of fourteen commonly used microanalytical glass standards of basaltic, intermediate, and rhyolitic composition. To serve as calibration standards, five basaltic glasses with ~0.2 to 2.5 wt% F were synthesized and characterized. A natural tholeiite from the East Pacific Rise was mixed with variable amounts of CaF2. The mixture was heated in a 1 atmosphere furnace to 1440 °C at fO2 = NNO for 30 minutes and quenched in water. Portions of the run products were studied by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The EPMA used a 15 µm diameter defocused electron beam with a 15 kV accelerating voltage and a 25 nA primary current, a TAP crystal for detecting FKα X-rays, and Biotite 3 as the F standard. The F contents by EPMA agreed with the F added to the basalts after correction for mass loss during melting. The SIMS analyses used a primary beam of 16O- and detection of low-energy negative ions (-5 kV) at a mass resolution that resolved 18OH. Both microanalytical techniques confirmed homogeneity, and the SIMS calibration defined by EPMA shows an excellent linear trend with backgrounds of 2 ppm or less. Analyses of basaltic glass standards based on our synthesized calibration standards gave the following F contents and 2σ errors (ppm): ALV-519 = 83 ± 3; BCR-2G = 359 ± 6; BHVO-2G = 322 ± 15; GSA-1G = 10 ± 1; GSC-1G = 11 ± 1; GSD-1G = 19 ± 2; GSE-1G = 173 ± 1; KL2G (MPI

  10. Solution-processable singlet fission photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Tabachnyk, Maxim; Bayliss, Sam L; Böhm, Marcus L; Broch, Katharina; Greenham, Neil C; Friend, Richard H; Ehrler, Bruno

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate the successful incorporation of a solution-processable singlet fission material, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), into photovoltaic devices. TIPS-pentacene rapidly converts high-energy singlet excitons into pairs of triplet excitons via singlet fission, potentially doubling the photocurrent from high-energy photons. Low-energy photons are captured by small-bandgap electron-accepting lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. This is the first solution-processable singlet fission system that performs with substantial efficiency with maximum power conversion efficiencies exceeding 4.8%, and external quantum efficiencies of up to 60% in the TIPS-pentacene absorption range. With PbSe nanocrystal of suitable bandgap, its internal quantum efficiency reaches 170 ± 30%. PMID:25517654

  11. Low energy strong electroweak sector with decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, R.; Dominici, D. |; Deandrea, A.; Gatto, R.; De Curtis, S.; Grazzini, M. |

    1996-05-01

    We discuss possible symmetries of effective theories describing spinless and spin-1 bosons, mainly to concentrate on an intriguing phenomenological possibility: that of a hardly noticeable strong electroweak sector at relatively low energies. Specifically, a model with both vector and axial vector strong interacting bosons may possess a discrete symmetry imposing degeneracy of the two sets of bosons (degenerate BESS model). In such a case its effects at low energies become almost invisible and the model easily passes all low energy precision tests. The reason lies essentially in the fact that the model automatically satisfies decoupling, contrary to models with only vectors. For large mass of the degenerate spin-one bosons the model becomes identical at the classical level to the standard model taken in the limit of infinite Higgs boson mass. For these reasons we have thought it worthwhile to fully develop the model, together with its possible generalizations, and to study the expected phenomenology. For instance, just because of its invisibility at low energy, it is conceivable that degenerate BESS has low mass spin-one states and gives quite visible signals at existing or forthcoming accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Parity violation in low-energy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Savage

    2001-12-01

    Parity violation in low-energy nuclear observables is included in the pionless effective field theory. The model-independent relation between the parity-violating asymmetry in polarized np -> d gamma and the non-nucleon part of the deuteron anapole moment is discussed. The asymmetry in np -> d gamma computed with KSW power-counting, and recently criticized by Desplanques, is discussed.

  13. Low energy [bar p] physics at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, S.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The charmonium formation experiment is the only low energy [bar p] experiment at FNAL. This paper describes the performance of the Fermilab [bar p] Accumulator during fixed target run for the experiment and the planned upgrades. We also discuss the proposal for the direct CP violation search in [bar p] + p [yields] [bar [Lambda

  14. What is a low-energy house?

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, B.R.; Meier, A.K.

    1994-08-01

    Traditionally, a ``low-energy`` house has been one that used little energy for space heating. But space heating typically accounts for less than half of the energy used by new US homes, and for low heating energy homes, space heating is often the third largest end use, behind water heating and appliances, and sometimes behind cooling. Low space heat alone cannot identify a low-energy house. To better understand the determinants of a low-energy house, we collected data on housing characteristics, incremental costs, and energy measurements from energy-efficient houses around the world and in a range of climates. We compare the energy required to provide thermal comfort as well as water heating, and other appliances. We do not have a single definition of a low-energy house, but through comparisons of actual buildings, we show how different definitions and quantitative indicators fail. In comparing the energy use of whole houses, weather normalization can be important, but for cases in which heating or cooling energy is surpassed by other end uses, other normalization methods must be used.

  15. Low-energy Neutrino Astronomy in LENA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurm, M.; Bick, D.; Enqvist, T.; Hellgartner, D.; Kaiser, M.; Loo, K. K.; Lorenz, S.; Meloni, M.; Meyer, M.; Möllenberg, R.; Oberauer, L.; Soiron, M.; Smirnov, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Wonsak, B.

    LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) is a proposed next-generation neutrino detector based on 50 kilotons of liquid scintillator. The low detection threshold, good energy resolution and excellent background rejection inherent to the liquid-scintillator detectors make LENA a versatile observatory for low-energy neutrinos from astrophysical and terrestrial sources. In the framework of the European LAGUNA-LBNO design study, LENA is also considered as far detector for a very-long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to Pyhäsalmi (Finland). The present contribution gives an overview LENA's broad research program, highlighting the unique capabilities of liquid scintillator for the detection of low-energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources. In particular, it will focus on the precision measurement of the solar neutrino spectrum: The search for time modulations in the 7Be neutrino flux, the determination of the electron neutrino survival probability in the low-energy region of the 8B spectrum and the favorable detection conditions for neutrinos from the CNO fusion cycle.

  16. The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Peter

    2009-05-11

    For the Low Energy Detector of Simbol-X a new type of active pixel sensor based on the integrated amplifier DEPFET has been developed. This concept combines large area, scalable pixel size, low noise, and ultra-fast readout. Flight representative prototypes have been processed with a performance matching the Simbol-X specifications and demonstrating the technology readiness.

  17. The low energy atmospheric antiproton albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. B.; Ormes, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The flux of albedo antiprotons in the 100-1000 MeV kinetic energy range produced by the cosmic ray primaries in the atmosphere is calculated. It is shown that this is not a significant background to measurements of the low energy anti-proton cosmic ray flux.

  18. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Brune; Steven M. Grimes

    2010-01-13

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between March 1, 2006 and October 31, 2009 which were supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG52-06NA26187.

  19. Elemental analysis of renal slices by proton-induced X-ray emission.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, T; Chen, Q; Fernando, Q; Keith, R; Gandolfi, A J

    1993-01-01

    We optimized proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for tissue analysis in a toxicity-disposition study. We used cultured rabbit renal slices as the biological system to demonstrate the use of PIXE analysis. The renal slices were exposed to HgCl2, CdCl2, K2Cr2O7, or NaAsO2 alone or in a mixture. The PIXE analysis provides information on concentrations of elements above atomic number 11, and it is the only analytical technique that can determine 20-30 elements nondestructively in a single, small sample (approximately 5 mg) with detection limits of 1-5 ppm (dry weight). The renal slices are thin targets that yield X-ray emission spectra with low backgrounds and high elemental sensitivities. The nondestructive nature of PIXE and the ability to simultaneously measure uptake of multiple metals and endogenous elements are unique to this methodology. Images p302-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C Figure 7. D p307-a PMID:8275986

  20. Determination of Se in soil samples using the proton induced X-ray emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruvinel, Paulo E.; Flocchini, Robert G.

    1993-04-01

    An alternative method for the direct determination of total Se in soil samples is presented. A large number of trace elements is present in soil at concentration values in the range of part per billion and tenths of parts of million. The most common are the trace elements of Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Mo, Cd and Pb. As for biological samples many of these elements are of great importance for the nutrition of plants, while others are toxic and others have an unknown role. Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals but it is also known that in certain areas Se deficiency or toxicity has caused endemic disease to livestock and humans through the soil-plant-animal linkage. In this work the suitability of the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique as a fast and nondestructive technique useful to measure total the Se content in soil samples is demonstrated. To validate the results a comparison of data collected using the conventional atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) method was performed.

  1. Proton-induces and x-ray induced fluorescence analysis of scoliotic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B J; Kraner, H W; Jones, K W; Weiss, L S

    1980-02-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is characterized by a curvature or assymetry of the spine which may become progressively more severe, with clinical symptoms appearing just prior to, or during, puberty. The incidence for scoliosis in the age group from 12 to 14 years of age has been reported as high as 8 to 10%, with more than 80% of the cases occurring in females. Although pathologic changes exist in muscles from both sides of the spinal curvature, and no statistically significant side differences have been reported, morphologic changes suggest that the concanve side is the most affected. This paper reports our preliminary data on the elemental composition of individual muscle fibers derived from convex, concave and gluteal scoliotic muscle, and erythrocytes from scoliotic and normal patients, analyzed by proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). A new type of specimen holder was designed for this study which offers low x-ray background, minimal absorption and maintenance of a moist environment around the specimen.

  2. Fast simulation of Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography using CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. G.; Marques, A. C.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.

    2013-07-01

    A new 3D Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Tomography (PIXE-T) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T) simulation software has been developed in Java and uses NVIDIA™ Common Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) to calculate the X-ray attenuation for large detector areas. A challenge with PIXE-T is to get sufficient counts while retaining a small beam spot size. Therefore a high geometric efficiency is required. However, as the detector solid angle increases the calculations required for accurate reconstruction of the data increase substantially. To overcome this limitation, the CUDA parallel computing platform was used which enables general purpose programming of NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs) to perform computations traditionally handled by the central processing unit (CPU). For simulation performance evaluation, the results of a CPU- and a CUDA-based simulation of a phantom are presented. Furthermore, a comparison with the simulation code in the PIXE-Tomography reconstruction software DISRA (A. Sakellariou, D.N. Jamieson, G.J.F. Legge, 2001) is also shown. Compared to a CPU implementation, the CUDA based simulation is approximately 30× faster.

  3. Measurement and Simulation of the Variation in Proton-Induced Energy Deposition in Large Silicon Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Christina L.; Weller, Robert A.; Reed, Robert A.; Sierawski, Brian D.; Marshall, Paul W.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Schrimpf, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    The proton induced charge deposition in a well characterized silicon P-i-N focal plane array is analyzed with Monte Carlo based simulations. These simulations include all physical processes, together with pile up, to accurately describe the experimental data. Simulation results reveal important high energy events not easily detected through experiment due to low statistics. The effects of each physical mechanism on the device response is shown for a single proton energy as well as a full proton space flux.

  4. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. The author found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. The author shows how a conventional carbon negative ion source located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sample changing to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  5. Low energy ion loss at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, S.; Liemohn, M.; Fang, X.; Ma, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Current data observations and modeling efforts have indicated that the low-energy pick-up ions on Mars significantly contribute to the overall escape rate. Due to the lack of a dipole magnetic field, the solar wind directly interacts with the dayside upper atmosphere causing particles to be stripped away. In this study, we use a 3-D Monte Carlo test particle simulation with virtual detectors to observe low energy ions (< 50 eV) in the Mars space environment. We will present velocity space distributions that can capture the asymmetric and non-gyrotropic features of particle motion. The effect of different solar conditions will also be discussed with respect to ion fluxes at various spatial locations as well as overall loss in order to robustly describe the physical processes controlling the distribution of planetary ions and atmospheric escape.

  6. Experimental Measurement of Low Energy Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, Kate

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino interactions in the few to few tens of MeV range are of importance for several physics topics, including solar, supernova and reactor neutrinos, as well as future proposed oscillation and Standard Model test experiments. Although interaction cross-sections for some simple targets are well understood, very little experimental data exist for interactions with nuclei. This talk will discuss the motivation for measuring low energy neutrino interactions, the state of knowledge, and possible future strategies.

  7. PHYSICS WITH ULTRA-LOW ENERGY ANTIPROTONS

    SciTech Connect

    M. HOLZSCHEITER

    2001-02-01

    In this report the author describes the current status of the antiproton deceleration (AD) facility at CERN, and highlights the physics program with ultra-low energy antiproton at this installation. He also comments on future possibilities provided higher intensity antiproton beams become available at Fermilab, and review possibilities for initial experiments using direct degrading of high energy antiprotons in material has been developed and proven at CERN.

  8. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  9. Low energy Skyrmion-Skyrmion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gisiger, T.; Paranjape, M.B. )

    1994-07-15

    We study the scattering of two Skyrmions at low energy and large separation. We use the method proposed by Manton for truncating the degrees of freedom of the system from infinite to a manageable finite number. This corresponds to identifying the manifold consisting of the union of the low energy critical points of the potential along with the gradient flow curves joining these together and by positing that the dynamics is restricted here. The kinetic energy provides an induced metric on this manifold while restricting the full potential energy to the manifold defines a potential. The low energy dynamics is now constrained to these finite number of degrees of freedom. For a large separation of the two Skyrmions the manifold is parametrized by the variables of the product ansatz. We find the interaction between two Skyrmions coming from the induced metric, which was independently found by Schroers. We find that the static potential is actually negligible in comparison to this interaction. Thus to lowest order, at large separation, the dynamics reduces to geodesic motion on the manifold. We consider the scattering to first order in the interaction using the perturbative method of Lagrange and find that the dynamics in the no spin or charge exchange sector reduces to the Kepler problem.

  10. Low energy Skyrmion-Skyrmion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisiger, T.; Paranjape, M. B.

    1994-07-01

    We study the scattering of two Skyrmions at low energy and large separation. We use the method proposed by Manton for truncating the degrees of freedom of the system from infinite to a manageable finite number. This corresponds to identifying the manifold consisting of the union of the low energy critical points of the potential along with the gradient flow curves joining these together and by positing that the dynamics is restricted here. The kinetic energy provides an induced metric on this manifold while restricting the full potential energy to the manifold defines a potential. The low energy dynamics is now constrained to these finite number of degrees of freedom. For a large separation of the two Skyrmions the manifold is parametrized by the variables of the product ansatz. We find the interaction between two Skyrmions coming from the induced metric, which was independently found by Schroers. We find that the static potential is actually negligible in comparison to this interaction. Thus to lowest order, at large separation, the dynamics reduces to geodesic motion on the manifold. We consider the scattering to first order in the interaction using the perturbative method of Lagrange and find that the dynamics in the no spin or charge exchange sector reduces to the Kepler problem.

  11. Low-energy generation in nanostructured Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznicki, Zbigniew T.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2008-04-01

    Solar photon energy can be better used when totally transformed on collectable free-carriers. The conversion of one energetic photon could result in more than one free-carrier pair if a low-energy mechanism is involved. Such PV conversion represents a multistage nonlinear process and requires especially dedicated low-energy centers. A cascade-like progression is induced by the primary/fundamental/interband absorption. As shown by us previously, the corresponding structure can be realized, for example, with nanostructured Si. The experimental devices convert 400 nm photons into collectable primary and secondary free-carriers. The excess carriers can be drawn out into the external electrical circuit even in a multiinterface architecture containing a carrier collection limit. The superficial effect seems to be totally independent of the presence or not of a buried amorphized layer. This is the first simple experimental evidence for low-energy generation. The performance is inversely proportional to the incident light intensity. The thermodynamic limit of conventional photovoltaic conversion is lower than 30%, while in the case of the mechanism reported here, it can be propelled above 60%. An optimization of the effect by a suitable conditioning and annealing should be possible, opening the way to different applications, especially in the areas of nanophotovoltaics and very high efficiency solar cells.

  12. Proton-induced X-ray emission analysis - a new tool in quantitative dermatology

    SciTech Connect

    Malmqvist, K.G.; Carlsson, L.E.; Akselsson, K.R.; Forslind, B.

    1983-01-01

    Proton-Induced X-ray Emission analysis (PIXE) constitutes a method for trace element analysis characterized by multielemental capability, detection limits in the low ppm-range and size resolution down towards a micrometre. In applications where the sensitivity of the Electron-Induced X-ray Emission (EIXE) analysis is not sufficient and where a spatial resolution not better than a few micrometres is required, the PIXE technique provides a powerful tool. In this paper properties of the PIXE method are demonstrated by quantitative results from three different samples of dermatological interest. Firstly, mercury results from a longitudinal scan of a single hair strand from a mercury poisoned person are shown. With a spatial resolution of one or a few millimetres very fast scans may be performed on hair strands giving information on time and magnitude of intoxication or other exposures, as well as deficiencies. Secondly, results are given from a radial scan with a beam width of 4 micron on hair from a person exposed to high amounts of iron. The calcium, iron and zinc distributions but not the sulphur and potassium distributions show narrow peaks of concentration (less than 4 micron) about 15 micron from the surface of the hair. Further investigations have to be performed in order to interpret these data. Thirdly, the depth profiles in skin of some elements were measured with a beam width of 10 micron. The results show significant increases in sulphur, calcium and zinc concentrations and significant decreases in phosphorous and potassium concentrations at the skin surface, i.e. in the stratum corneum.

  13. RHIC low energy beam loss projections

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.

    2009-08-01

    For RHIC low-energy operations, we plan to collide Au beams with energies of E = 2:5-10 GeV/u in RHIC. Beams are injected into collision optics, and RHIC runs as a storage ring with no acceleration. At these low energies, observed beam lifetimes are minutes, with measured beam lifetimes of 3.5 min (fast) and 50 min (slow) at E=4.6 GeV/u in the March 2008 test run. With these lifetimes we can operate RHIC as a storage ring to produce reasonable integrated luminosity. This note estimates beam losses and collimator/dump energy deposition in normal injection modes of low energy operation. The main question is whether a normal injection run is feasible for an FY10 10-15 week operations run from a radiation safety perspective. A peripheral question is whether continuous injection operations is feasible from a radiation safety perspective. In continuous injection mode, we fill both rings, then continuously extract and reinject the oldest bunches that have suffered the most beam loss to increase the overall integrated luminosity. We expect to gain a factor of 2-3 in integrated luminosity from continuous injection at lowest energies if implemented[1]. Continuous injection is feasible by FY11 from an engineering perspective given enough effort, but the required extra safety controls and hardware dose risk make it unappealing for the projected luminosity improvement. Low-energy electron cooling will reduce beam losses by at least an order of magnitude vs normal low-energy operations, but low energy cooling is only feasible in the FY13 timescale and therefore beyond the scope of this note. For normal injection low energy estimates we assume the following: (1) RHIC beam total energies are E=2.5-10 GeV/u. (Continuous injection mode is probably unnecessary above total energies of E=7-8 GeV/u.); (2) RHIC operates only as a storage ring, with no acceleration; (3) 110 bunches of about 0.5-1.0 x 10{sup 9} initial bunch intensities (50-100% injection efficiency, likely conservative

  14. Neutron, Proton and Alpha Emission Spectra of Nickel Isotopes for Proton Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Kara, A.

    2012-06-01

    The fusion energy is attractive as an energy source because the fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and so fusion will not contribute to environmental problems, such as particulate pollution and excessive CO2 in the atmosphere. The fusion reaction does not produce radioactive nuclides and it is not self-sustaining, as is a fission reaction when a critical mass of fissionable material is assembled. Since the fusion reaction is easily and quickly quenched the primary sources of heat to drive such an accident are heat from radioactive decay and heat from chemical reactions. Both the magnitude and time dependence of the generation of heat from radioactive decay can be controlled by proper selection and design of materials. Nickel (Ni) is an important structural material in fusion (and also fission) reactor technologies and many other fields. So, the working out the reaction cross sections of the Ni isotopes is very important for selection of the fusion materials. In this study, 58Ni(p,xn), 58Ni(p,xp), 60Ni(p,xp), 60Ni(p,xα) and 62Ni(p,xp) reactions have been investigated using nuclear reaction models. And also the 58Ni(p,xn) reaction has been calculated through a method of offered by Tel et al. The calculated results are discussed and compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR database.

  15. Simulation of low-energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langelaar, M. H.; Breeman, M.; Mijiritskii, A. V.; Boerma, D. O.

    A new simulation program `MATCH' has been developed for a detailed analysis of low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) and recoiling data. Instead of performing the full calculation of the three-dimensional trajectories through the sample from the ion source towards the detector, incoming trajectories as well as reversed-time outgoing trajectories are calculated, separately. Finally, these trajectories are matched to obtain the yield. The program has been tested for spectra and azimuthal scans of scattering and recoiling events of various sample species in different scattering geometries.

  16. Annihilation of Low Energy Antiprotons in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, S.Yu.; Macek, J.H.

    2003-08-26

    The cross sections for annihilation of antiprotons in hydrogen are very important for designing the High-Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT). When antiprotons are trapped they undergo atomic reactions with background gases which remove them from the trap. First, antiprotons are captured into highly excited bound states by ejecting the bound electrons, then they are radiationally deexcited and, finally, they annihilate by nuclear interaction. An understanding of these process require reliable cross sections for low-energy collisions of antiprotons with atoms. We have developed a theoretical technique for accurate calculations of these cross sections.

  17. The low energy booster project status

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, G.W.

    1993-05-01

    In order to achieve the required injection momentum, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) has an accelerator chain comprised of a Linear Accelerator and three synchrotrons. The Low Energy Booster (LEB) is the first synchrotron in this chain. The LEB project has made significant progress in the development of major subsystems and conventional construction. This paper briefly reviews the performance requirements of the LEB and describes significant achievements in each of the major subsystem areas. Highlighted among these achievements are the LEB foreign collaborations with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) located in Novosibirsk, Russia.

  18. Low-energy ballistic lunar transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    A systematic method is developed that uses dynamical systems theory to model, analyze, and construct low-energy ballistic lunar transfers (BLTs). It has been found that low-energy BLTs may be produced by intersecting the stable manifold of an unstable Earth-Moon three-body orbit with the Earth. A spacecraft following such a trajectory is only required to perform a single maneuver, namely, the Trans-Lunar Injection maneuver, in order to complete the transfer. After the Trans-Lunar Injection maneuver, the spacecraft follows an entirely ballistic trajectory that asymptotically approaches and arrives at the target lunar three-body orbit. Because these orbit transfers require no orbit insertion maneuver at the three-body orbit, the transfers may be used to send spacecraft 25--40% more massive than spacecraft sent to the same orbits via conventional, direct transfers. From the targeted three-body orbits, the spacecraft may transfer to nearly any region within the Earth-Moon system, including any location on the surface of the Moon. The systematic methods developed in this research allow low-energy BLTs to be characterized by six parameters. It has been found that BLTs exist in families, where a family of BLTs consists of transfers whose parameters vary in a continuous fashion from one end of the family to the other. The families are easily identified and studied using a BLT State Space Map (BLT Map). The present research studies BLT Maps and has surveyed a wide variety of BLTs that exist in the observed families. It has been found that many types of BLTs may be constructed between 185-km low Earth parking orbits and lunar three-body orbits that require less than 3.27 km/s and fewer than 120 days of transfer time. Under certain conditions, BLTs may be constructed that require less than 3.2 km/s and fewer than 100 days of transfer time. It has been found that BLTs may implement LEO parking orbits with nearly any combination of altitude and inclination; they may depart from

  19. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  20. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  1. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions: 2007 Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivit, Steven B.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of low energy nuclear reactions, a subset of the field of condensed matter nuclear science. Condensed matter nuclear science studies nuclear effects in and/or on condensed matter, including low energy nuclear reactions, an entirely new branch of science that gained widespread attention and notoriety beginning in 1989 with the announcement of a previously unrecognized source of energy by Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons that came to be known as cold fusion. Two branches of LENR are recognized. The first includes a set of reactions like those observed by Fleischmann and Pons that use palladium and deuterium and yield excess heat and helium-4. Numerous mechanisms have been proposed to explain these reactions, however there is no consensus for, or general acceptance of, any of the theories. The claim of fusion is still considered speculative and, as such, is not an ideal term for this work. The other branch is a wide assortment of nuclear reactions that may occur with either hydrogen or deuterium. Anomalous nuclear transmutations are reported that involve light as well as heavy elements. The significant questions that face this field of research are: 1) Are LENRs a genuine nuclear reaction? 2) If so, is there a release of excess energy? 3) If there is, is the energy release cost-effective?

  2. Modulation of low-energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sari, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The relation between the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays in the solar wind and the power spectrum of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, established in recent theories, is tested directly for low energy protons (below 80 MeV). In addition, an attempt is made to determine whether the particles are scattered by magnetic field discontinuities or by fluctuations between discontinuities. Predictions of a perturbation solution of the Fokker-Planck equation are compared with observations of the cosmic ray radial gradient. It is found that at energies between 40 and 80 MeV, galactic cosmic ray protons respond to changes in the predicted diffusion coefficients (i.e., the relationship under consideration holds at these low energies). The relation between changes in the proton flux and modulation parameters is best when the contribution of discontinuities is subtracted, which means that scattering is caused by fluctuations between discontinuities. There appears to be no distinct relation between changes in the modulation parameters and changes in the intensity of 20 to 40 MeV protons.

  3. Low energy neutrinos in Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Super-Kamiokande (SK), a 50 kton water Cherenkov detector, observes 8B solar neutrinos via neutrino-electron elastic scattering. The analysis threshold was successfully lowered to 3.5 MeV (recoil electron kinetic energy) in SK-IV. To date SK has observed solar neutrinos for 18 years. An analysis regarding possible correlations between the solar neutrino flux and the 11 year solar activity cycle is shown. With large statistics, SK searches for distortions of the solar neutrino energy spectrum caused by the MSW resonance in the core of the sun. SK also searches for a day/night solar neutrino flux asymmetry induced by the matter in the Earth. The Super-Kamiokande Gd (SK-Gd) project is the upgrade of the SK detector via the addition of water-soluble gadolinium (Gd) salt. This modification will enable it to efficiently identify low energy anti-neutrinos. SK-Gd will pursue low energy physics currently inaccessible to SK due to backgrounds. The most important will be the world’s first observation of the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The main R&D program towards SK-Gd is EG ADS: a 200 ton, fully instrumented tank built in a new cavern in the Kamioka mine.

  4. Low Energy Ion-Molecule Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Farrar

    2004-05-01

    This objective of this project is to study the dynamics of the interactions of low energy ions important in combustion with small molecules in the gas phase and with liquid hydrocarbon surfaces. The first of these topics is a long-standing project in our laboratory devoted to probing the key features of potential energy surfaces that control chemical reactivity. The project provides detailed information on the utilization of specific forms of incident energy, the role of preferred reagent geometries, and the disposal of total reaction energy into product degrees of freedom. We employ crossed molecular beam methods under single collision conditions, at collision energies from below one eV to several eV, to probe potential surfaces over a broad range of distances and interaction energies. These studies allow us to test and validate dynamical models describing chemical reactivity. Measurements of energy and angular distributions of the reaction products with vibrational state resolution provide the key data for these studies. We employ the crossed beam low energy mass spectrometry methods that we have developed over the last several years.

  5. Investigation of coulomb and pairing effects using new developed empirical formulas for proton-induced reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Tel, E. Aydin, E. G.; Aydin, A.; Kaplan, A.; Boeluekdemir, M. H.; Okuducu, S.

    2010-03-15

    We have investigated Coulomb and pairing effects by using new empirical formulas including the new coefficients for (p, {alpha}) at 17.9 MeV, (p, np) at 22.3 MeV, and (p, n{alpha}) at 24.8 and 28.5 MeV energies. A new formula is obtained by adjusting Levkovskii's original asymmetry parameter formula and also Tel et al. formula for proton-induced reactions. The new coefficients by using least-squares fitting method for the reactions are determined. In addition, the findings of the present study are compared with the available experimental data.

  6. Low Energy Antiproton Experiments - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2005-10-19

    Low energy antiprotons offer excellent opportunities to study properties of fundamental forces and symmetries in nature. Experiments with them can contribute substantially to deepen our fundamental knowledge in atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Searches for new interactions can be carried out by studying discrete symmetries. Known interactions can be tested precisely and fundamental constants can be extracted from accurate measurements on free antiprotons (p-bar's) and bound two- and three-body systems such as antihydrogen (H-bar = p-bare-), the antprotonic helium ion (He++p-bar)+ and the antiprotonic atomcule (He++p-bare-) . The trapping of a single p-bar in a Penning trap, the formation and precise studies of antiprotonic helium ions and atoms and recently the production of H-bar have been among the pioneering experiments. They have led already to precise values for p-bar parameters, accurate tests of bound two- and three-body Quantum Electrodynamics (QED), tests of the CPT theorem and a better understanding of atom formation from their constituents. Future experiments promise more precise tests of the standard theory and have a robust potential to discover new physics. Precision experiments with low energy p-bar's share the need for intense particle sources and the need for time to develop novel instrumentation with all other experiments, which aim for high precision in exotic fundamental systems. The experimental programs - carried out in the past mostly at the former LEAR facility and at present at the AD facility at CERN - would benefit from intense future sources of low energy p-bar's. The highest possible p-bar fluxes should be aimed for at new facilities such as the planned FLAIR facility at GSI in order to maximize the potential of delicate precision experiments to influence model building. Examples of key p-bar experiments are discussed here and compared with other experiments in the field. Among the central issues is their potential to obtain

  7. Atomic ionization by neutrinos at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Pang

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that neutrino-electron scattering at low recoil energies provides sensitivity gain in constraining neutrinos’ magnetic moments and their possible milli-charges. However, in detectors with sub-keV thresholds, the binding effects of electrons become significant. In this talk, we present our recent works of applying ab initio calculations to germanium ionization by neutrinos at low energies. Compared with the conventional differential cross section formulae that were used to derive current experimental bounds, our results with less theoretical uncertainties set a more reliable bound on the neutrino magnetic moment and a more stringent bound on the neutrino milli-charge with current reactor antineutrino data taken from germanium detectors.

  8. Computational Study of Low Energy Nuclear Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Justin; Hira, Ajit; Brownrigg, Clifton; Pacheco, Jose

    2013-04-01

    We continue our interest in the interactions between different nuclear species with a computational study of the scattering of the low-energy nuclei of H through F atoms ( Z<=9 ) from Palladium and other metals. First, a FORTRAN computer program was developed to compute stopping cross sections and scattering angles in Pd and other metals for the small nuclear projectiles, using Monte Carlo calculation. This code allows for different angles of incidence. Next, simulations were done in the energy interval from 10 to 140kev. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant experimental data. The data are further analyzed to identify periodic trends in terms of the atomic number of the projectile. Such studies have potential applications in nuclear physics and in nuclear medicine.

  9. RHIC low energy tests and initial operations

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; Mackay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy of {radical} s = 20.8 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with some of these challenges during beam tests with gold in March 2008, including first RHIC operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n and first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n.

  10. Phenomenological implications of low energy supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, S. |; Dine, M.; Raby, S.; Thomas, S.; Wells, J.D.

    1996-07-01

    The experimental signatures for low energy supersymmetry breaking are presented. The lightest standard model superpartner is unstable and decays to its partner plus a Goldstino, G. For a supersymmetry breaking scale below a few 1,000 TeV this decay can take place within a detector, leading to very distinctive signatures. If a neutralino is the lightest standard model superpartner it decays by {chi}{sub 1}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {gamma} + G, and if kinematically accessible by {chi}{sub 1}{sup 0} {r_arrow} (Z{sup 0}, h{sup 0}, H{sup 0}, A{sup 0}) + G. These decays can give rise to displaced vertices. Alternately, if a slepton is the lightest standard model superpartner it decays by {tilde l} {r_arrow} l + G. This can be seen as a greater than minimum ionizing charged particle track, possibly with a kink to a minimum ionizing track.

  11. Low-energy neutral-atom spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, D.E.; Cohen, S.A.

    1982-04-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of a low energy neutral atom spectrometer are described. Time-of-flight analysis is used to measure the energy spectrum of charge-exchange deuterium atoms emitted from the PLT tokamak plasma in the energy range from 20 to 1000 eV. The neutral outflux is gated on a 1 ..mu..sec time scale by a slotted rotating chopper disc, supported against gravity in vacuum by magnetic levitation, and is detected by secondary electron emission from a Cu-Be plate. The energy dependent detection efficiency has been measured in particle beam experiments and on the tokamak so that the diagnostic is absolutely calibrated, allowing quantitative particle fluxes to be determined with 200 ..mu..sec time resolution. In addition to its present application as a plasma diagnostic, the instrument is capable of making a wide variety of measurements relevant to atomic and surface physics.

  12. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, W. R.; Ai, Li; Kaufmann, W. B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent π+/-p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f2=0.0756+/-0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P31 and P13 partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the Σ term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided.

  13. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.; Ai, L.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f{sup 2}=0.0756{plus_minus}0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P{sub 31} and P{sub 13} partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the {Sigma} term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with elucidating the dynamics of elementary ion-molecule reactions at collision energies near and below 1 eV. From measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the reaction products, one can infer intimathe details about the nature of collisions leading to chemical reaction, the geometries and lifetimes of intermediate complexes that govern the reaction dynamics, and the collision energy dependence of these dynamical features. The author employs crossed-beam low energy mass spectrometry technology developed over the last several years, with the focus of current research on proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of te O{sup {minus}} ion with species such as HF, H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 3}.

  15. Low energy dislocation structures in epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Merwe, Jan H.; Woltersdorf, J.; Jesser, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    The principle of minimum energy was applied to epitaxial interfaces to show the interrelationship beteen misfit, overgrowth thickness and misfit dislocation spacing. The low energy dislocation configurations were presented for selected interfacial geometries. A review of the interfacial energy calculations was made and a critical assessment of the agreement between theory and experiment was presented. Modes of misfit accommodation were presented with emphasis on the distinction between kinetic effects and equilibrium conditions. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional overgrowths were treated together with interdiffusion-modified interfaces, and several models of interfacial structure were treated including the classical and the current models. The paper is concluded by indicating areas of needed investigation into interfacial structure.

  16. Low energy consumption spintronics using multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trassin, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    We review the recent progress in the field of multiferroic magnetoelectric heterostructures. The lack of single phase multiferroic candidates exhibiting simultaneously strong and coupled magnetic and ferroelectric orders led to an increased effort into the development of artificial multiferroic heterostructures in which these orders are combined by assembling different materials. The magnetoelectric coupling emerging from the created interface between the ferroelectric and ferromagnetic layers can result in electrically tunable magnetic transition temperature, magnetic anisotropy or magnetization reversal. The full potential of low energy consumption magnetic based devices for spintronics lies in our understanding of the magnetoelectric coupling at the scale of the ferroic domains. Although the thin film synthesis progresses resulted into the complete control of ferroic domain ordering using epitaxial strain, the local observation of magnetoelectric coupling remains challenging. The ability to imprint ferroelectric domains into ferromagnets and to manipulate those solely using electric fields suggests new technological advances for spintronics such as magnetoelectric memories or memristors.

  17. Low-energy neutrino factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Bogacz, S.A.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    The design of a low-energy (4 GeV) neutrino factory (NF) is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The {pi}{sup {+-}} decay to produce muons ({mu}{sup {+-}}), which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by {approx} 1.4 x 10{sup 21} {mu}{sup +} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of {mu}{sup -} decays.

  18. Low energy high pressure miniature screw valve

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.; Spletzer, Barry L.

    2006-12-12

    A low energy high pressure screw valve having a valve body having an upper portion and a lower portion, said lower portion of said valve body defining an inlet flow passage and an outlet flow passage traversing said valve body to a valve seat, said upper portion of said valve body defining a cavity at said valve seat, a diaphragm restricting flow between said upper portion of said valve body and said lower portion, said diaphragm capable of engaging said valve seat to restrict fluid communication between said inlet passage and said outlet passage, a plunger within said cavity supporting said diaphragm, said plunger being capable of engaging said diaphragm with said valve seat at said inlet and outlet fluid passages, said plunger being in point contact with a drive screw having threads engaged with opposing threads within said upper portion of said valve body such engagement allowing motion of said drive screw within said valve body.

  19. Low energy particle signature of substorm dipolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Perez, J.D. ); Moore, T.E.; Chappell, C.R. )

    1994-02-01

    The low energy particle signature of substorm dipolarization is exhibited through a case study of RIMS data on DE-1 at [approximately]2100 MLT, ILAT = 59[degrees][approximately]65[degrees], L = 3.8 [approximately] 5.4 R[sub E], and geocentric distances 2.6[approximately]2.9 R[sub E]. A strong cross-field-line, poleward outflow that lasts for a few minutes with a velocity that reaches at least 50 km/s is correlated with substorm activity evidenced in the AE index and the MAG-1 data. All the major species (H[sup +], He[sup +], O[sup +]) are observed to have the same bulk velocity. The parallel velocities are strongly correlated with the perpendicular velocities. The parallel acceleration is shown to result from the centrifugal force of the ExB drift induced by the dipolarizing perturbation of the magnetic field. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Particle Settling in Low Energy Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Rachel; MacVean, Lissa; Tse, Ian; Mazzaro, Laura; Stacey, Mark; Variano, Evan

    2014-11-01

    Particle settling velocities can be altered by turbulence. In turbulence, dense particles may get trapped in convergent flow regions, and falling particles may be swept towards the downward side of turbulent eddies, resulting in enhanced settling velocities. The degree of velocity enhancement may depend on the Stokes number, the Rouse number, and the turbulent Reynolds number. In a homogeneous, isotropic turbulence tank, we tested the effects of particle size and type, suspended sediment concentration, and level of turbulence on the settling velocities of particles typically found in muddy estuaries. Two Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs), separated vertically, measured turbulent velocities and suspended sediment concentrations, which yield condition dependent settling velocities, via ∂/á C ñ ∂ t = -∂/∂ z (ws á C ñ + á w ' C ' ñ) . These results are pertinent to fine sediment transport in estuaries, where high concentrations of suspended material are transported and impacted by low energy turbulence.

  1. Low energy demonstration accelerator technical area 53

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) need to maintain the capability of producing tritium in support of its historic and near-term stewardship of the nation`s nuclear weapons stockpile, the agency has recently completed a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling. The resulting Record of Decision (ROD) determined that over the next three years the DOE would follow a dual-track acquisition strategy that assures tritium production for the nuclear weapon stockpile in a rapid, cost effective, and safe manner. Under this strategy the DOE will further investigate and compare two options for producing tritium: (1) purchase of an existing commercial light-water reactor or irradiation services with an option to purchase the reactor for conversion to a defense facility; and (2) design, build, and test critical components of a system for accelerator production of tritium (APT). The final decision to select the primary production option will be made by the Secretary of Energy in the October 1998 time frame. The alternative not chosen as the primary production method, if feasible, would be developed as a back-up tritium supply source. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to design, build, and test critical prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, specifically the front-end low-energy section of the accelerator, at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) would be incrementally developed and tested in five separate stages over the next seven years. The following issues were evaluated for the proposed action: utility demands, air, human health, environmental restoration, waste management, transportation, water, threatened and endangered species, wetlands, cultural resources, and environmental justice.

  2. Low energy AMS of americium and curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christl, Marcus; Dai, Xiongxin; Lachner, Johannes; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has evolved over the past years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analyses. While analyses of U and Pu isotopes have already become routine at the ETH Zurich 0.5 MV AMS system "Tandy", there is an increasing demand for highly sensitive analyses of the higher actinides such as Am and Cm for bioassay applications and beyond. In order to extend the actinide capabilities of the compact ETH Zurich AMS system and to develop new, more sensitive bioassay routines, a pilot study was carried out. The aim was to investigate and document the performance and the potential background of Am and Cm analyses with low energy AMS. Our results show that 241Am and Cm isotopes can be determined relative to a 243Am tracer if samples and AMS standards are prepared identically with regard to the matrix elements, in which the sample is dispersed. In this first test, detection limits for Cm and Am isotopes are all in the sub-femtogram range and even below 100 ag for Cm isotopes. In a systematic background study in the mass range of the Cm isotopes, two formerly unknown metastable triply charged Th molecules were found on amu(244) and amu(248). The presence of such a background is not a principal problem for AMS if the stripper pressure is increased accordingly. Based on our first results, we conclude that ultra-trace analyses of Am and Cm isotopes for bioassay are very well possible with low energy AMS.

  3. The Low Energy Effective Area of the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, D.; Drake, J. J.; Johnson, C. O.; Kashya, V.; Ratzlaff, P. W.; Wargelin, B. J.; Brinkman, A. C.; Kaastra, J. S.; vanderMeer, R.; Paerels, F. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory was successfully launched on July 23, 1999, and subsequently began an intensive calibration phase. We present the preliminary results from the in-flight calibration of the low energy response of the High Resolution Camera spectroscopic readout (HRC-S) combined with the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) aboard Chandra. These instruments comprise the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrograph (LETGS). For this calibration study, we employ a pure hydrogen non-LTE white dwarf emission model (T = 25000 K and log g = 9.0) for comparison with the Chandra observations of Sirius B. The pre-flight calibration of the LETGS effective area only covered wavelengths shortward of 44 A (E less than 277 eV). Our Sirius B analysis shows that the HRC-S quantum efficiency (QE) model assumed for longer wavelengths leads to an overestimate of the effective area by an average factor of about 1.6. We derive a correction to the low energy HRC-S QE model to match the predicted and observed Sirius B spectra over the wavelength range of 44-185 A. We make an independent test of our results by the comparison of a Chandra LETGS observation of HZ 43 with pure hydrogen model atmosphere predictions and find good agreement.

  4. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  9. A Compton-Vetoed Germanium Detector with Increased Sensitivity at Low Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Bates, C; Drury, O B; Burks, M; DiPrete, D

    2012-03-29

    The difficulty to directly detect plutonium in spent nuclear fuel due to the high Compton background of the fission products motivates the design of a Gamma detector with improved sensitivity at low energies. We have built such a detector by operating a thin high-purity Ge detector with a large scintillator Compton veto directly behind it. The Ge detector is thin to absorb just the low-energy Pu radiation of interest while minimizing Compton scattering of high energy radiation from the fission products. The subsequent scintillator is large so that forward scattered photons from the Ge detector interact in it at least once to provide an anti-coincidence veto for the Ge detector. For highest sensitivity, additional material in the line-of-sight is minimized, the radioactive sample is kept thin, and its radiation is collimated. We will discuss the instrument design, and demonstrate the feasibility of the approach with a prototype that employs two large CsI scintillator vetoes. Initial spectra of a thin Cs-137 calibration source show a background suppression of a factor of {approx}2.5 at {approx}100 keV, limited by an unexpectedly thick 4 mm dead layer in the Ge detector.

  10. Protonation induces base rotation of purine nucleotides pdGuo and pGuo.

    PubMed

    Wu, R R; He, C C; Hamlow, L A; Nei, Y-W; Berden, G; Oomens, J; Rodgers, M T

    2016-06-01

    Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectra of the protonated forms of 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate and guanosine-5'-monophosphate, [pdGuo+H](+) and [pGuo+H](+), are measured over the IR fingerprint and hydrogen-stretching regions using the FELIX free electron laser and an OPO/OPA laser system. Electronic structure calculations are performed to generate low-energy conformations of [pdGuo+H](+) and [pGuo+H](+) and determine their relative stabilities at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) levels of theory. Comparative analyses of the measured IRMPD action spectra and B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) linear IR spectra computed for the low-energy conformers are performed to determine the most favorable site of protonation and the conformers present in the experiments. These comparisons and the computed energetics find that N7 protonation is considerably preferred over O6 and N3, and the N7 protonated ground-state conformers of [pdGuo+H](+) and [pGuo+H](+) are populated in the experiments. The 2'-hydroxyl substituent does not significantly impact the stable low-energy conformers of [pdGuo+H](+)vs. those of [pGuo+H](+). The effect of the 2'-hydroxyl substituent is primarily reflected in the relative intensities of the measured IRMPD bands, as the IRMPD profiles of [pdGuo+H](+) and [pGuo+H](+) are quite similar. Comparisons to previous IRMPD spectroscopy investigations of the protonated forms of the guanine nucleosides, [dGuo+H](+) and [Guo+H](+), and deprotonated forms of the guanine nucleotides, [pdGuo-H](-) and [pGuo-H](-), provide insight into the effects of the phosphate moiety and protonation on the conformational features of the nucleobase and sugar moieties. Protonation is found to induce base rotation of the guanine residue to an anti orientation vs. the syn orientation found for the deprotonated forms of the guanine nucleotides. PMID:27197049

  11. A Germanium Detector with Optimized Compton Veto for High Sensitivity at Low Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S

    2011-11-30

    We have built a prototype germanium detector with a Compton veto that is optimized for high sensitivity in the low-energy range around {approx}100 keV. It is specifically designed to address the problem to directly detect plutonium gamma emissions in spent nuclear fuel by non-destructive assay. This is not possible with current detectors due to the large low-energy background of Compton-scattered high-energy radiation from the fission products, whose gamma flux is at least 6 to 7 orders of magnitude higher than the Pu signal. Our instrument is designed to assess the feasibility to selectively suppress the background in the low-energy region around {approx}100 keV with the strongest Pu X-ray and gamma emissions lines. It employs a thin Ge detector with a large Compton veto directly behind it to suppress the background from forward-scattered radiation by anti-coincidence vetoing. This report summarizes the design considerations and the performance of the instrument.

  12. Low-energy photon spectroscopy data in support of ASTM method development

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, D. E.; Boone, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry (C-INC) Radioassay Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been in operation since 1948 to measure fission-product and actinide activities from the U.S. weapons testing program. Since the cessation of testing in 1992, the facility has remained in continuous operation by analyzing samples for environmental, bioassay and research projects. In addition to the many gamma spectroscopy systems, two independent planar germanium detectors are employed for measurement of x-rays and low-energy gsunma rays. 'These counters were used to collect data of select isotopes to support the development of a new ASTM standard, 'Standard Practice for High-Resolution Low-Energy Photon Spectrometry of Water'. This standard is being developed by ASTM Subcommittee D19.04 as a tool for measurement of low-energy gamma-rays and x-rays fiom approximately 4 keV to 150 keV. This work describes empirical counting results obtained fkom traceable sources covering the energy range of interest. Specifically, the isotopes used were 5%i, 55Fe, Am, I, Cd, and 57C0 which provide a range of 5.9 to 136 keV. Mixed nuclide sources were also counted for the purpose of providing data for coincidence summing effects. All data is presented in hardcopy and accompanying electronic form.

  13. Novel results on low energy neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Gianpaolo

    2012-07-01

    Many progresses have been achieved in the study of low energy neutrinos from Sun and Earth. In the solar neutrinos the flux from 7Be has been measured with a total error <5% (introducing strong constraints also on the pp flux), while the day/night effect in that energy region has been determined at 1%. The 8B neutrinos have been detected with a threshold down to 3 MeV, while the solar neutrinos flux from pep reaction has been measured together with a stringent limit on CNO. These results give the experimental proof of the neutrino oscillation in vacuum and the validation of the MSW-LMA model in that region, while the day/night allows the isolation of the LMA solution by means of the solar neutrinos only, without the assumption of CPT symmetry. The evidence of the antineutrinos produced within the Earth by radioactive decays is now very robust, but more statistics is needed to clearly estimate the radiogenic contribution to the terrestrial caloric energy.

  14. Low-energy positron interactions with xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Makochekanwa, C.; Jones, A. C. L.; Caradonna, P.; Slaughter, D. S.; McEachran, R. P.; Sullivan, J. P.; Buckman, S. J.; Bellm, S.; Lohmann, B.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.; Mueller, D. W.; Stauffer, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Low-energy interactions of positrons with xenon have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental measurements were carried out using a trap-based positron beam with an energy resolution of ˜80 meV, while the theoretical calculations were carried out using the convergent close-coupling method and the relativistic optical potential approach. Absolute values of the grand total, positronium formation and grand total minus positronium formation cross sections are presented over the energy range of 1-60 eV. Elastic differential cross sections (DCS), for selected energies, are also presented both below and above the positronium formation threshold. Fine energy-step measurements of the positronium formation cross section over the energy range of 4.4-8.4 eV, and measurements of the elastic DCS at the energies of 5.33 and 6.64 eV, have been carried out to investigate the ionization threshold regions corresponding to the 2P3/2 and 2P1/2 states of the Xe+ ion. The present results are compared with both experimental and theoretical values from the literature where available.

  15. Low energy scattering with a nontrivial pion

    SciTech Connect

    Fariborz, Amir H.

    2007-12-01

    An earlier calculation in a generalized linear sigma model showed that the well-known current algebra formula for low energy pion-pion scattering held even though the massless Nambu Goldstone pion contained a small admixture of a two-quark two-antiquark field. Here we turn on the pion mass and note that the current algebra formula no longer holds exactly. We discuss this small deviation and also study the effects of a SU(3) symmetric quark mass type term on the masses and mixings of the eight SU(3) multiplets in the model. We calculate the s-wave scattering lengths, including the beyond current algebra theorem corrections due to the scalar mesons, and observe that the effect of the scalar mesons is to improve the agreement with experiment. In the process, we uncover the way in which linear sigma models give controlled corrections (due to the presence of scalar mesons) to the current algebra scattering formula. Such a feature is commonly thought to exist only in the nonlinear sigma model approach.

  16. Studies in Low-Energy Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Carl R; Grimes, Steven M

    2006-03-30

    This report presents a summary of research projects in the area of low energy nuclear reactions and structure, carried out between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2005 and supported by U.S. DOE grant number DE-FG03-03NA00074. Cross sections measured with high resolution have been subjected to an Ericson theory analysis to infer information about the nuclear level density. Other measurements were made of the spectral shape of particles produced in evaporation processes; these also yield level density information. A major project was the development of a new Hauser-Feshbach code for analyzing such spectra. Other measurements produced information on the spectra of gamma rays emitted in reactions on heavy nuclei and gave a means of refining our understanding of gamma-ray strength functions. Finally,reactions on light nuclei were studied and subjected to an R-matrix analysis. Cross sections fora network of nuclear reactions proceedingthrough a given compound nucleus shouldgreatly constrain the family of allowed parameters. Modifications to the formalism andcomputer code are also discussed.

  17. Low-energy electron collisions with biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    We report recent progress in applying the Schwinger multichannel computational method to the interactions of slow electrons with biomolecules. Calculations on constituents of DNA, including nucleobases, phosphate esters, and models of the backbone sugar, have provided insight into the nature of the low-energy shape resonances, and thereby into possible sites and mechanisms for electron attachment that may lead to strand-breaking. At the same time, more approximate calculations on larger assemblies such as nucleosides and deoxyadenosine monophosphate indicate how the resonance properties of the subunits will or will not persist in DNA itself. We are pursuing a similar strategy for another major class of biomolecules, the proteins, by beginning with fixed-nuclei studies of the constituent amino acids; here we present preliminary results for the simplest amino acid, glycine. We also describe efforts directed at an improved understanding electron collisions with alcohols, which, in addition to basic scientific interest, may prove useful in the modeling of ignition and combustion within biofuel-powered engines.

  18. Low energy CMOS for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Alkalaj, Leon

    1992-01-01

    The current focus of NASA's space flight programs reflects a new thrust towards smaller, less costly, and more frequent space missions, when compared to missions such as Galileo, Magellan, or Cassini. Recently, the concept of a microspacecraft was proposed. In this concept, a small, compact spacecraft that weighs tens of kilograms performs focused scientific objectives such as imaging. Similarly, a Mars Lander micro-rover project is under study that will allow miniature robots weighing less than seven kilograms to explore the Martian surface. To bring the microspacecraft and microrover ideas to fruition, one will have to leverage compact 3D multi-chip module-based multiprocessors (MCM) technologies. Low energy CMOS will become increasingly important because of the thermodynamic considerations in cooling compact 3D MCM implementations and also from considerations of the power budget for space applications. In this paper, we show how the operating voltage is related to the threshold voltage of the CMOS transistors for accomplishing a task in VLSI with minimal energy. We also derive expressions for the noise margins at the optimal operating point. We then look at a low voltage CMOS (LVCMOS) technology developed at Stanford University which improves the power consumption over conventional CMOS by a couple of orders of magnitude and consider the suitability of the technology for space applications by characterizing its SEU immunity.

  19. Oscillations of very low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Orlando L. G.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-06-01

    There are several new features in the production, oscillations, and detection of the atmospheric neutrinos of low energies E < or approx. 100 MeV. The flavor ratio r of muon to electron neutrino fluxes is substantially smaller than 2 and decreases with energy, a significant part of events is due to the decay of invisible muons at rest, etc. Oscillations in a two-layer medium (atmosphere-Earth) should be taken into account. We derive analytical and semianalytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities of these 'sub-sub-GeV' neutrinos. The energy spectra of the e-like events in water Cherenkov detectors are computed, and the dependence of the spectra on the 2-3 mixing angle {theta}{sub 23}, the 1-3 mixing, and the CP-violation phase are studied. We find that variations of {theta}{sub 23} in the presently allowed region change the number of e-like events by about 15%-20% as well as lead to distortion of the energy spectrum. The 1-3 mixing and CP violation can lead to {approx}10% effects. Detailed study of the sub-sub-GeV neutrinos will be possible in future megaton-scale detectors.

  20. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick-Frost, K. M.; Lynch, K. A.

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1×103/cm3to6×105/cm3, electron temperatures from 0.1to1.7eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5to8V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  1. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. C. A.; Silva, D. G. M.; Bettega, M. H. F.; da Costa, R. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Khakoo, M. A.; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand and optimize processes occurring during the ignition of plasma and its consequences in post-discharge for an internal combustion engine, especially considering the spark plug, we have produced in this work some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules in the energy range from 60 to 500 eV are reported, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Aditionally to that, measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also discussed, for impact energies of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 50, and 100 eV and for scattering angles of 5°-130°. The measurements were obtained using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons.

  2. Optimal Low Energy Earth-Moon Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesemer, Paul Ricord; Ocampo, Cesar; Cooley, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The optimality of a low-energy Earth-Moon transfer is examined for the first time using primer vector theory. An optimal control problem is formed with the following free variables: the location, time, and magnitude of the transfer insertion burn, and the transfer time. A constraint is placed on the initial state of the spacecraft to bind it to a given initial orbit around a first body, and on the final state of the spacecraft to limit its Keplerian energy with respect to a second body. Optimal transfers in the system are shown to meet certain conditions placed on the primer vector and its time derivative. A two point boundary value problem containing these necessary conditions is created for use in targeting optimal transfers. The two point boundary value problem is then applied to the ballistic lunar capture problem, and an optimal trajectory is shown. Additionally, the ballistic lunar capture trajectory is examined to determine whether one or more additional impulses may improve on the cost of the transfer.

  3. Low energy beam transport system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H- beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H- beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H- beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H- beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  4. Low energy spin excitations in chromium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Azuah, R.T.; Stirling, W.G.; Kulda, J.

    1997-12-31

    Neutron scattering experiments with full polarization analysis have been performed with a single crystal of chromium to study the low-energy spin fluctuations in the transverse spin density wave (TSDW) state. A number of remarkable results have been found. Inelastic scattering observed close to the TSDW satellite positions at (1 {+-} {delta},0,0) does not behave as expected for magnon scattering. In particular, the scattering corresponds to almost equally strong magnetization fluctuations both parallel and perpendicular to the ordered moments of the TSDW phase. As the Neel temperature is approached from below, scattering at the commensurate wavevector (1,0,0) increases in intensity as a result of critical scattering at silent satellites (1,0, {+-} {delta}) being included within the spectrometer resolution function. This effect, first observed by Sternlieb et al, does not account for all of the inelastic scattering around the (1,0,0) position, however, Rather, there are further collective excitations, apparently emanating from the TSDW satellites, which correspond to magnetic fluctuations parallel to the ordered TSDW moments. These branches have a group velocity that is close to that of (1,0,0) longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, but assigning their origin to magneto-elastic scattering raises other unanswered questions.

  5. Low energy CMOS for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Alkalaj, Leon

    The current focus of NASA's space flight programs reflects a new thrust towards smaller, less costly, and more frequent space missions, when compared to missions such as Galileo, Magellan, or Cassini. Recently, the concept of a microspacecraft was proposed. In this concept, a small, compact spacecraft that weighs tens of kilograms performs focused scientific objectives such as imaging. Similarly, a Mars Lander micro-rover project is under study that will allow miniature robots weighing less than seven kilograms to explore the Martian surface. To bring the microspacecraft and microrover ideas to fruition, one will have to leverage compact 3D multi-chip module-based multiprocessors (MCM) technologies. Low energy CMOS will become increasingly important because of the thermodynamic considerations in cooling compact 3D MCM implementations and also from considerations of the power budget for space applications. In this paper, we show how the operating voltage is related to the threshold voltage of the CMOS transistors for accomplishing a task in VLSI with minimal energy. We also derive expressions for the noise margins at the optimal operating point. We then look at a low voltage CMOS (LVCMOS) technology developed at Stanford University which improves the power consumption over conventional CMOS by a couple of orders of magnitude and consider the suitability of the technology for space applications by characterizing its SEU immunity.

  6. New Cooperative Mechanisms of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions Using Super Low-Energy External Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I. E.

    We propose a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system, nuclei + atoms + condensed matter, can occur at a smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. The cooperative processes can be induced and enhanced by low-energy external fields. The excess heat is the emission of internal energy and transmutations at LENR are the result of redistribution of inner energy of the whole system.

  7. Measurement of proton-induced target fragmentation cross sections in carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, K.; Nishio, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tsuneda, M.; Sugiura, A.; Ieki, K.

    2016-02-01

    In proton therapy, positron emitter nuclei are generated via the target nuclear fragmentation reactions between irradiated proton and nuclei constituting a human body. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed with measurement of annihilation γ-rays from the generated positron emitter nuclei. To achieve the high accuracy of proton therapy, in vivo dosimetry, i.e., evaluation of the irradiated dose during the treatment is important. To convert the measured activity distribution to irradiated dose, cross-sectional data for positron emitter production is necessary, which is currently insufficient in the treatment area. The purpose of this study is to collect cross-sectional data of 12C (p , pn)11C and 12C (p , p 2 n)10C reactions between the incident proton and carbon nuclei, which are important target nuclear fragmentation reactions, to estimate the range and exposure dose distribution in the patient's body. Using planar-type PET capable of measuring annihilation γ-rays at high positional resolution and thick polyethylene target, we measured cross-sectional data in continuous wide energy range. The cross section of 12C (p , pn)11C is in good agreement with existing experimental data. The cross section of 12C (p , p 2 n)10C is reported for the first data in the low-energy range of 67.6-10.5 MeV near the Bragg peak of proton beam.

  8. Low Energy X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Wayne R.

    1981-10-01

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d=9.95Å) crystal. To preclude higher order (n≳1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than ˜1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surfaced photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminum light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any UV generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral enegy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni Lα1,2 lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy X-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable.

  9. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  10. Low-Energy Impacts onto Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, L. M.; Colwell, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Collisions in space are vital to the formation and evolution of planetary bodies such as protoplanetary disks, planetary rings, the Kuiper belt, and the asteroid belt. Low-velocity impacts are common in planetary rings and protoplanetary disks. Saturn ring particles collide at speeds less than 1 m/s throughout most of the main rings, with more energetic collisions occurring in the dynamically stirred F ring. We are conducting a program of laboratory experiments to study low-velocity impacts of 1 to 5 m/s into regolith. We use direct measurement of ejecta mass and high resolution video tracking of ejecta particle trajectories to derive ejecta mass velocity distributions. We wish to characterize and understand the collision parameters that control the outcome of low-velocity impacts into regolith, including impact velocity, impactor mass, target size distribution, regolith depth, and target relative density, and to experimentally determine the functional dependencies of the outcomes of low-velocity collisions (ejecta mass and ejecta velocities) on the controlling parameters of the collision. Our goal is to understand the physics of ejecta production and regolith compaction in low-energy impacts and experimentally validate predictive models for dust flow and deposition. We present results from our ongoing study showing the positive correlation between impact energy and ejecta mass. Our results show that the production of ejecta mass increases as a function of impact kinetic energy. The production of mass also increases as a function of target relative density to a point of maximum ejecta production, beyond which the trend reverses.

  11. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  12. The Fission Barrier Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L. G.

    2008-04-17

    Fission excitation functions have been measured for a chain of neighboring compound nuclei from {sup 207}Po to {sup 212}Po. We present a new analysis which provides a determination of the fission barriers and ground state shell effects with nearly spectroscopic accuracy. The accuracy achieved in this analysis may lead to a future detailed exploration of the saddle mass surface and its spectroscopy.

  13. Fission Spectrum Related Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    G. Aliberti; I. Kodeli; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2007-10-01

    The paper presents a preliminary uncertainty analysis related to potential uncertainties on the fission spectrum data. Consistent results are shown for a reference fast reactor design configuration and for experimental thermal configurations. However the results obtained indicate the need for further analysis, in particular in terms of fission spectrum uncertainty data assessment.

  14. Fission gas detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  15. Fission Xenon on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Marty, B.

    2002-01-01

    Fission Xe components due to Pu-244 decay in the early history of Mars have been identified in nakhlites; as in the case of ALH84001 and Chassigny the fission gas was assimilated into indigenous solar-type Xe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Biomodal spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K. )

    1989-09-26

    Investigations of mass and kinetic-energy distributions from spontaneous fission have been extended in recent years to an isotope of element 104 and, for half-lives, to an isotope of element 108. The results have been surprising in that spontaneous fission half-lives have turned out to be much longer than expected and mass and kinetic- energy distributions were found to abruptly shift away from those of the lighter actinides, showing two modes of fission. These new developments have caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the fission process, bringing an even deeper appreciation of the role played by nuclear shell effects upon spontaneous fission properties. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Assessment of nuclear-reaction codes for proton-induced reactions on light nuclei below 250 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunn, Benjamin; Boudard, Alain; David, Jean-Christophe; Koning, Arjan J.; Leprince, Anne; Leray, Sylvie; Mancusi, Davide

    2015-07-01

    We assess the suitability of nuclear-reaction codes for the generation of accurate cross-section libraries targeted at the simulation of the transport of high-energy protons (up to 250 MeV) in the human body, or in any material containing light nuclides. To this end we present an extensive study of elastic, reaction and fragmentation cross sections for proton-induced reactions on several nuclides. We compare TALYS evaluations against experimental data and, wherever applicable, against the predictions of the INCL/ABLA07 nuclear-reaction model. The TALYS evaluations have been cast in the form of a new cross-section library, which also includes evaluated proton-proton cross sections based on the NN-OnLine tool.

  18. Comparison of the Proton-Induced Dark Current and Charge Transfer Efficiency Responses of N- and P-Channel CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Cheryl; Marshall, Paul; Wacynski, Augustyn; Polidan, Elizabeth; Johnson, Scott; Campbell, Art

    2004-01-01

    The proton-induced CTE behavior for the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) p-CCD (being developed for the Supernovae Acceleration Project (SNAP) and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) n-CCDs were compared using 55Fe, EPER and FPR techniques. CTE performance of the p-CCD is about an order of magnitude better after a 63 MeV fluence of 2.5 x 10(sup 9)/sq cm, which is equivalent to 2.5 years in the shielded HST orbit. Notched n- and p-CCDs yielded factor of two improvement in CTE performance as compared to their un-notched versions. The introduction rate of hot pixels was greater in p-CCD as compared to n-CCD, and also greater in notched than un-notched devices.

  19. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on natSm up to 65 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Hermanne, A.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    Activation cross sections for proton induced reactions on Sm are presented for the first time for natSm(p,xn)154,152m2,152m1,152g,150m,150g,149,148,147,146,145Eu, natSm(p,x)153,145Sm, natSm(p,x)151,150,149,148g,148m,146,144,143Pm and natSm(p,x)141Nd up to 65 MeV. The cross sections were measured via activation method by using a stacked-foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. The results were compared with results of the nuclear reaction codes ALICE, EMPIRE and TALYS (results taken from TENDL libraries). Integral yields of the activation products were calculated from the excitation functions.

  20. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  1. Proton induced multilevel storage capability in self-assembled indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li Qiang; Jin Wan, Chang; Qiang Zhu, Li; Wan, Qing

    2013-09-01

    Multilevel memory capability of self-assembled indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) electric-double-layer (EDL) thin-film transistors gated by nanogranular SiO2 proton conducting electrolytes is investigated. More than four distinct memory states are obtained by programming gate voltage. The observed multilevel storage behavior is mainly due to the controlled interfacial electrochemical doping of IZO channel by penetrated protons under programmed gate voltages. In addition, such IZO-based EDL transistor multilevel memory exhibits good characteristics of programming/erasing endurance and data retention. Such oxide-based EDL transistors with proton-induced multilevel memory behavior are interesting for low-cost memory and neuromorphic system applications after further properties and size optimization.

  2. Measurement of excitation functions in proton induced reactions on natural copper from their threshold to 43 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kwangsoo; Naik, Haladhara; Zaman, Muhammad; Yang, Sung-Chul; Kim, Guinyun

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the production cross-sections of the residual radionuclides from proton-induced reactions of natCu by using a stacked-foil activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique in the energy range from their respective threshold to 43 MeV at the MC-50 cyclotron of the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. The measured results were compared with the earlier reported data as well as with the theoretical values obtained from the TENDL-2013 library based on the TALYS 1.6 code. The integral yields for thick target of the investigated radio-nuclides were calculated from the measured excitation function and the stopping power of natCu.

  3. Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent lunar missions have begun to take advantage of the benefits of low-energy ballistic transfers between the Earth and the Moon rather than implementing conventional Hohmann-like lunar transfers. Both Artemis and GRAIL plan to implement low-energy lunar transfers in the next few years. This paper explores the characteristics and potential applications of many different families of low-energy ballistic lunar transfers. The transfers presented here begin from a wide variety of different orbits at the Earth and follow several different distinct pathways to the Moon. This paper characterizes these pathways to identify desirable low-energy lunar transfers for future lunar missions.

  4. Interaction between Low Energy Ions and the Complicated Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-12-01

    Low energy ions exist widely in natural world, but people pay a little attention on the interaction between low energy ions and matter, it is even more out of the question of studying on the relation of low energy ions and the complicated organism. The discovery of bioeffect induced by ion implantation has, however, opened a new branch in the field of ion beam application in life sciences. This paper reports recent advances in research on the role of low energy ions in chemical synthesis of the biomolecules and application in genetic modification.

  5. Development of a Low-energy Trigger for VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kildea, J.

    2008-12-24

    During the 2007/2008 observing season a low-energy trigger configuration was developed and tested for VERITAS. The configuration makes uses of the small ({approx}35 m) baseline between two of the VERITAS telescopes and employs a much lower discriminator threshold and tighter coincidence window compared to the standard VERITAS trigger. Five hours of Crab Nebula ON/OFF observations were obtained in low-energy mode and were used to test new low-energy analysis algorithms. We present some details of the VERITAS low-energy trigger and the associated data analysis.

  6. N3 Protonation Induces Base Rotation of 2'-Deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate and Adenosine-5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Wu, R R; He, C C; Hamlow, L A; Nei, Y-W; Berden, G; Oomens, J; Rodgers, M T

    2016-05-26

    Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments combined with theoretical calculations are performed to investigate the stable gas-phase conformations of the protonated adenine mononucleotides, [pdAdo+H](+) and [pAdo+H](+). Conformations that are present in the experiments are elucidated via comparative analyses of the experimental IRMPD spectra and the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) IR spectra predicted for the conformers optimized at this level of theory. N3 protonation is preferred as it induces base rotation, which allows a strong hydrogen bond to be formed between the excess proton of adenine and the phosphate moiety. In contrast, both N1 and N7 protonation are predicted to be >35 kJ/mol less favorable than N3 protonation. Only N3 protonated conformers are present in the experiments in measurable abundance. Both the low-energy conformers computed and the experimental IRMPD spectra of [pdAdo+H](+) and [pAdo+H](+) indicate that the 2'-hydroxyl moiety does not significantly impact the structure of the most stable conformer or the IRMPD spectral profile of [pAdo+H](+) vs that of [pdAdo+H](+). However, the 2'-hydroxyl leads to a 3-fold enhancement in the IRMPD yield of [pAdo+H](+) in the fingerprint region. Comparison of present results to those reported in a previous IRMPD study of the analogous protonated adenine nucleosides allows the effects of the phosphate moiety on the gas-phase conformations to be elucidated. PMID:27138137

  7. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Lima, M. A. P.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2013-05-01

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π* anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ* shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π* resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004), 10.1021/jp048759a]. The existence of the σ* shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998), 10.1088/0953-4075/31/11/004] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π* molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  8. Measurement of prompt fission neutron spectrum using a gamma tag double time-of-flight setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Ezekiel

    Current uncertainties in the prompt fission neutron spectrum have a significant effect of up to 4% on keff for reactor criticality and safety calculations. Therefore, a method was developed at RPI to improve the accuracy of the measurement of the prompt fission neutron spectrum. This method involves using an array of BaF2 gamma detectors to tag that a fission event has occurred, and a double time-of-flight setup to obtain the prompt fission neutron spectrum as a function of incident neutron energy. The gamma tagging method improves upon conventional fission chambers by allowing for much larger sample sizes to be utilized while not suffering from effects of discriminator level on the shape of the prompt fission neutron spectrum. A coincidence requirement on an array of 4 BaF2 gamma detectors is used to determine the timing of the fission event. Furthermore, a method is under development for the use of thin plastic scintillators for measurement of the prompt fission neutron spectrum with low energies. Measurements with spontaneous fission of . {252} Cf show good agreement with previous datasets and current evaluations as well as providing accurate data down to 50 keV with the plastic scintillator detector. Preliminary incident neutron beam analysis was performed with 238U and shows good agreement with the current evaluations demonstrating the feasibility of the gamma tagging method for in beam prompt fission neutron spectrum measurements of various isotopes.

  9. Modeling of Singlet Fission Kinetics for a Wide Range of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Shane

    2015-03-01

    Singlet exciton fission is a process that occurs in organic molecules where one high energy singlet exciton decays into two low energy triplet excitons. Over the years since its first discovery in the 1960s a number of different singlet fission materials have been discovered with a wide range of rates and yields. The mechanism for singlet fission in these materials is still not fully understood, and no method is able to accurately reproduce fission rates over a wide range of timescales. In order to gain a better understanding of the singlet fission mechanism a group of fission materials with vastly different crystal structures and fission rates were modeled. Using a first principles expression the rates were computed with constrained density functional theory with configuration interactions. The computed rates successfully predict the fission rates in the different materials studied. For the slow, weak intermolecular coupling materials singlet fission obeys Marcus theory, but for faster, larger intermolecular coupling materials the rate becomes diabatic in nature. This work alters the guidelines for tailoring molecular properties from a focus on crystal packing and intermolecular coupling to properties like solubility and energy level alignment while maintaining the high fission yield required for photovoltaic applications.

  10. Compound Nucleus Reactions in LENR, Analogy to Uranium Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George; Philberth, Karl

    2008-03-01

    The discovery of nuclear fission by Hahn and Strassmann was based on a very rare microanalytical result that could not initially indicate the very complicated details of this most important process. A similarity is discussed for the low energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) with analogies to the yield structure found in measurements of uranium fission. The LENR product distribution measured earlier in a reproducible way in experiments with thin film electrodes and a high density deuteron concentration in palladium has several striking similarities with the uranium fission fragment yield curve.ootnotetextG.H. Miley and J.A. Patterson, J. New Energy 1, 11 (1996); G.H. Miley et al, Proc ICCF6, p. 629 (1997).This comparison is specifically focussed to the Maruhn-Greiner local maximum of the distribution within the large-scale minimum when the fission nuclei are excited. Implications for uranium fission are discussed in comparison with LENR relative to the identification of fission a hypothetical compound nuclear reaction via a element ^306X126 with double magic numbers.

  11. Undergraduate Measurements For Fission Reactor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    Undergraduate students at the University of Dallas (UD) have investigated elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections on structural materials important for criticality considerations in nuclear fission processes. Neutrons scattered off of 23Na and NatFe were detected using neutron time-of-flight techniques at the University of Kentucky Low-Energy Nuclear Accelerator Facility. These measurements are part of an effort to increase the efficiency of power generation from existing fission reactors in the US and in the design of new fission systems. Students have learned the basics of how to operate the Model CN Van de Graaff generator at the laboratory, setup detectors and electronics, use data acquisition systems, and they are currently analyzing the angular dependence of the scattered neutrons for incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.80 MeV. Most students participating in the project will use the research experience as the material for their undergraduate research thesis required for all Bachelor of Science students at the University of Dallas. The first student projects on this topic were completed during the summer of 2010; an overview of student participation in this investigation and their preliminary results will be presented.

  12. Fission induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments was investigated, as well as the probability of utilizing the energy of these particles to create population inversion leading to laser action. Eventually, it is hoped that the same medium could be used for both fissioning and lasing, thus avoiding inefficiences in converting one form of energy to the other. A central problem in understanding a fission induced plasma is to obtain an accurate model of the electron behavior; some calculations are presented to this end. The calculations are simple, providing a compendium of processes for reference.

  13. Low-energy antiprotons physics and the FLAIR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmann, E.

    2015-11-01

    FLAIR, the Facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research has been proposed in 2004 as an extension of the planned FAIR facility at Darmstadt, Germany. FLAIR was not included into the modularized start version of FAIR, but the recent installation of the CRYRING storage ring at GSI Darmstadt has opened new perspectives for physics with low-energy antiprotons at FAIR.

  14. Nucleon-induced fission cross sections of heavy nuclei in the intermediate energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofiev, Alexander V.

    Fission is the most important nuclear reaction for society at large today due to its use in energy production. However, this has raised the problem of how to treat the long-lived radioactive waste from nuclear reactors. A radical solution would be to change the composition of the waste into stable or short-lived nuclides, which could be done through nuclear transmutation. Such a concept requires accelerator-driven systems to be designed, where those for transmutation are reactor hybrids. This thesis is a contribution to the knowledge base for developing transmutation systems, specifically with respect to the computational modeling of the underlying nuclear reactions, induced by the incident and secondary particles. Intermediate energy fission cross sections are one important type of such data. Moreover, they are essential for understanding the fission process itself and related nuclear interactions. The experimental part of this work was performed at the neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Fission cross sections of 238U, 209Bi, natPb, 208Pb, 197Au, natW, and 181Ta were measured for neutrons in the range En = 30-160 MeV using thin-film breakdown counters for the fission fragment detection. A model was developed for the determination of the efficiency of such detectors. A compilation of existing data on proton-induced fission cross sections for nuclei from 165Ho to 239Pu was performed. The results, which constitute the main body of information in this field, were added to the worldwide EXFOR database. The dependences of the cross sections on incident energy and target nucleus were studied, which resulted in systematics that make it possible to give estimates for unmeasured nuclides. Nucleon-induced fission cross sections were calculated using an extended version of the cascade exciton model. A comparison with the systematics and the experimental data obtained in the present work revealed significant discrepancies. A modification of the model

  15. What is a low-energy house and who cares?

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, B.R.

    1994-12-01

    Most energy analysts view low-energy houses as good things, yet differ in their expectations of what exactly a low energy house is. There are two intertwining threads to this report. The first is an evaluation of 50 buildings that have been claimed to be low-energy residences, for which monitored energy performance data have been collected. These data represent the preliminary effort in the ongoing update of the Buildings Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) data base for new residences. The second thread concerns the definition of a low-energy house. After the elements of a definition are presented, their implications for actors involved in providing housing are identified. Several more tractable definitions are applied to the houses in this compilation. The outcomes illustrate ways in which different interests are served by various definitions. Different definitions can yield very different energy rankings. No single definition of a low-energy house is universally applicable.

  16. Fission Systems for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, T.; Dorney, D. J.; Swint, Marion Shayne

    2012-01-01

    Fission systems are used extensively on earth, and 34 such systems have flown in space. The energy density of fission is over 10 million times that of chemical reactions, giving fission the potential to eliminate energy density constraints for many space missions. Potential safety and operational concerns with fission systems are well understood, and strategies exist for affordably developing such systems. By enabling a power-rich environment and highly efficient propulsion, fission systems could enable affordable, sustainable exploration of Mars.

  17. Parity violation in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-01-15

    Parity-violating effects for low-energy elastic neutron deuteron scattering are calculated for Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) and effective field theory types of weak potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation, using realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The resulting relation between physical observables and low-energy constants can be used to fix low-energy constants from experiments. Potential model dependencies of parity-violating effects are discussed.

  18. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy to Complement Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission in the Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safiq, Alexandrea; Ali, Salina; Nadarski, Benjamin; Smith, Jeremy; Yoskowitz, Josh; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael; Union College Team

    2013-10-01

    There is an active research program in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory on proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of atmospheric aerosols. PIXE is a powerful tool for the study of airborne pollution because it provides information on a broad range of elements simultaneously, has low detection limits, is nondestructive, does not require large samples, and the analysis can be performed in a short amount of time. However, PIXE provides only elemental information. We are investigating the use of Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) to complement PIXE analysis of aerosol samples by providing chemical information. In MRS, laser light is inelastically scattered from a sample and the vibrational spectrum of the scattered light is used to identify molecules and their functional groups. We are focusing on aerosol samples collected in the Adirondack Mountains that have considerable concentrations of sulfur that may contribute to acid rain. The MRS spectra collected on aerosol samples are being compared with a library of standards to try to determine the molecular structures in which the sulfur is bound. We will describe the analysis and present preliminary results. Union College Undergraduate Research Program.

  19. Nuclear Dependence of Proton-Induced Drell-Yan Dimuon Production at 120 GeV at Seaquest

    SciTech Connect

    Dannowitz, Bryan P.

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the atomic mass (A) dependence of p + A → µ+µ- + X Drell-Yan dimuons produced by 120 GeV protons is presented here. The data was taken by the SeaQuest experiment at Fermilab using a proton beam extracted from its Main Injector. Over 61,000 dimuon pairs were recorded with invariant mass 4.2 < Mγ* < 10 GeV and target parton momentum fraction 0.1 ≤ x2 ≤ 0.5 for nuclear targets 1H, 2H, C, Fe, and W . The ratio of dimuon yields per nucleon (Y ) for heavy nuclei versus 2H, RDY = 2 2 Y (A)/Y ( H) ≈ u¯(A)(x)/u¯( H)(x), is sensitive to modifications in the anti-quark sea distributions in nuclei for the case of proton-induced Drell-Yan. The data analyzed here and in the future of SeaQuest will provide tighter constraints on various models that attempt to define the anomalous behavior of nuclear modification as seen in deep inelastic lepton scattering, a phenomenon generally known as the EMC effect.

  20. New excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2016-09-01

    New excitation functions for proton induced nuclear reactions on natural titanium, nickel and copper were measured, using the stacked-foil technique and gamma spectrometry, up to 70 MeV. The experimental cross sections were measured using the Ti-nat(p,x) V-48, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-57 and Cu-nat(p,x) Zn-62,Co-56 monitor reactions recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), depending on the investigated energy range. Data have been extracted for the Ti-nat(p,x) Sc-43,44m,46,47,48, V-48, K-42,43, Ni-nat(p,x) Ni-56,57, Co-55,56,57,58, Mn-52,54, Cu-nat(p,x) Cu-61,64, Ni-57, Co-56,57,58,60, Zn-62,65, Mn-54 reactions. Our results are discussed and compared to the existing ones as well as with the TALYS code version 1.6 calculations using default models. Our experimental data are in overall good agreement with the literature. TALYS is able to reproduce, in most cases, the experimental trend. Our new experimental results allow to expand our knowledge on these excitation functions, to confirm the existing trends and to give additional values on a large energy range. This work is in line with the new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) launched by the IAEA to expand the database of monitor reactions.

  1. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y.

    2006-06-15

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  2. Development of a micro-XRF system for biological samples based on proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploykrachang, K.; Hasegawa, J.; Kondo, K.; Fukuda, H.; Oguri, Y.

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a micro-XRF system based on a proton-induced quasimonochromatic X-ray (QMXR) microbeam for in vivo measurement of biological samples. A 2.5-MeV proton beam impinged normally on a Cu foil target that was slightly thicker than the proton range. The emitted QMXR behind the Cu target was focused with a polycapillary X-ray half lens. For application to analysis of wet or aquatic samples, we prepared a QMXR beam with an incident angle of 45° with respect to the horizontal plane by using a dipole magnet in order to bend the primary proton beam downward by 45°. The focal spot size of the QMXR microbeam on a horizontal sample surface was evaluated to be 250 × 350 μm by a wire scanning method. A microscope camera with a long working distance was installed perpendicular to the sample surface to identify the analyzed position on the sample. The fluorescent radiation from the sample was collected by a Si-PIN photodiode X-ray detector. Using the setup above, we were able to successfully measure the accumulation and distribution of Co in the leaves of a free-floating aquatic plant on a dilute Co solution surface.

  3. Elemental content of anagen hairs in a normal Caucasian population studies with proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.; Li, H.K.; Malmqvist, K.G.; Wiegleb, D.

    1986-01-01

    The elemental content of anagen hair fibers in a Caucasian population of healthy females and males in the age range 10-69 years was performed to constitute a baseline for further studies of pathological conditions. Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analyses were performed on single hair fibers in triplicate from 103 individuals in order to determine sulfur, zinc, calcium, and chlorine content. The hair fibers were all anagen hairs collected from a site little influenced by genetic and hormonal influences 1.5 cm above the right ear of the probands. An area 5-8 mm from the follicle bottom was chosen for the analysis in all cases to minimize effect of hair-do contamination. The average sulfur content was 0.049 g/g and the average zinc content 170 micrograms/g. These results were not significantly influenced by chloroform/ethanol rinsing before analysis. The calcium and chlorine contents were 330 micrograms/g and 0.0033 g/g respectively. The latter data are expected to be more seriously influenced by external factors (e.g., contamination) than sulfur and zinc. No correlation between elemental concentration and sex was found for sulfur and zinc in the present material. PIXE analysis of single hair fibers yields valuable information on the elemental composition of hair fibers and can be rapidly and efficiently performed after simple mounting procedures.

  4. Bag-model quantum chromodynamics for hyperons at low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. J.; Maslow, J. N.

    1980-09-01

    In a non-perturbative bag model framework, gluon exchange which mediates quark exchange scattering in conjunction with quark interchange is shown to be the basis of the OBE interactions of hyperons at low energy.

  5. Past, present and future low energy antiproton facilities at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, W.; Belochitskii, P.; Breuker, H.; Butin, F.; Carli, C.; Eriksson, T.; Maury, S.; Oelert, W.; Pasinelli, S.; Tranquille, G.

    2014-05-01

    Low energy antiprotons are available for physics experiments at CERN since the 1980s and have been used by a large variety of experiments. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR has been constructed as a complementary use of antiprotons available at that time for high energy physics and delivered beam to experiments mainly using slow extraction. After completion of LEAR exploitation, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) was constructed (adaptation of the existing Antiproton Collector, AC) to allow for a simpler low energy antiproton scheme (only one accelerator operated with Antiprotons) with fast extraction well suited for trap experiments. The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring ELENA is a small synchrotron presently constructed to further decelerate antiprotons from the AD in a controlled manner, and to reduce emittances with the help of an electron cooler to improve the capture efficiencies of existing experiments and allow for additional ones.

  6. Radial Flux Distribution of Low-Energy Neutrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higinbotham, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to illustrate the basic principle involved in the process of moderation of fast neutrons by water, and the monitoring of the low-energy neutron flux using indium as a probe. (GA)

  7. Biological assessments for the low energy demonstration accelerator, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.

    1997-03-01

    This report discusses the biological impact to the area around the Los Alamos National Laboratory of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator. In particular the impact to the soils, water quality, vegetation, and wildlife are discussed.

  8. Beam lifetime and limitations during low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Kayran, D.; Montag, C.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Wang, G.

    2011-03-28

    The low-energy physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation at low energies. At these energies, large nonlinear magnetic field errors and large beam sizes produce low beam lifetimes. A variety of beam dynamics effects such as Intrabeam Scattering (IBS), space charge and beam-beam forces also contribute. All these effects are important to understand beam lifetime limitations in RHIC at low energies. During the low-energy RHIC physics run in May-June 2010 at beam {gamma} = 6.1 and {gamma} = 4.1, gold beam lifetimes were measured for various values of space-charge tune shifts, transverse acceptance limitation by collimators, synchrotron tunes and RF voltage. This paper summarizes our observations and initial findings.

  9. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  10. Potentials of fissioning plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.

    1979-01-01

    Successful experiments with the nuclear pumping of lasers have demonstrated that in a gaseous medium the kinetic energy of fission fragments can be converted directly into nonequilibrium optical radiation. This confirms the concept that the fissioning medium in a gas-phase nuclear reactor shows an internal structure such as a plasma in near thermal equilibrium varying up to a state of extreme nonequilibrium. During 20 years of research under NASA support major elements of the fissioning plasma reactor were demonstrated in theory and experiment, culminating in a proof-of-principle reactor test conducted at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. It is concluded that the construction of a gaseous fuel reactor power plant is within the reach of present technology.

  11. Dark current induced in large CCD arrays by proton-induced elastic reactions and single to multiple-event spallation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; McNulty, P.J.; Larson, S. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Thompson, D.A.; Miller, T.L.; Lee, T. )

    1994-12-01

    Computer simulations of the non-ionizing energy loss deposited in sensitive volumes as a result of proton-induced spallation reactions agree with analytic models for large sensitive volumes exposed to high fluence. They predict unique features for small volumes and low-fluence exposures which are observed in exposures of large arrays of CCD pixels. Calculations of the number of spallation reactions per pixel correlate with the recently reported relative frequency of switching dark-current states.

  12. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Léonie

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ , e-) . The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  13. Process for treating fission waste

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.; Wick, Oswald J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste.

  14. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  15. Design of low energy bunch compressors with space charge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, A.; Willeke, F.; Yu, L. H.; Yang, L.; Shaftan, T.; Wang, G.; Li, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore a method to manipulate low energy electron bunches in a space charge dominated regime, and we use this method to design low energy linac bunch compressors to compress electron bunches in a space charge dominated regime. In the method, we use the space charge effects instead of avoiding them; i.e., we use the space charge forces to generate the required energy chirp instead of the ordinary method which uses the rf accelerating system to generate the chirp. We redefine the concepts of the dispersion function and beta functions in a space charge dominated regime to guide the optimization. Using this method, we study the low energy (5-22 MeV) linac bunch compressor design to produce short (˜150 fs ) and small size (˜30 μ m ) bunches for the electron beam slicing project. The low energy linac bunch compressors work in a space charge dominated regime, and the bunches at the downstream of the gun have a negative energy chirp due to the space charge effects. To provide compression for the negative energy chirped bunch, we design a positive R56 dispersive section using a four-dipole chicane with several quadrupole magnets. We have designed low energy linac bunch compressors with different photocathode rf guns. For example, one linac bunch compressor with the BNL photocathode electron rf gun has achieved a low energy bunch with the 166 fs rms bunch length, 28 and 31 μ m rms beam size in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, at 5 MeV with 50 pC charge. Another example with LBNL's very-high frequency gun has achieved a low energy bunch with the 128 fs rms bunch length, 42 and 25 μ m rms beam size in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, at 22 MeV with 200 pC charge.

  16. Radiation Detection from Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.

    2004-11-17

    This report briefly describes the neutrons and gamma rays emitted in fission, briefly discusses measurement methods, briefly discusses sources and detectors relevant to detection of shielded HEU in sealand containers, and lists the measurement possibilities for the various sources. The brief descriptions are supplemented by reference.

  17. Gate-controlled proton diffusion and protonation-induced ratchet motion in the stator of the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Yasutaka; Kitao, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The proton permeation process of the stator complex MotA/B in the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli was investigated. The atomic model structure of the transmembrane part of MotA/B was constructed based on the previously published disulfide cross-linking and tryptophan scanning mutations. The dynamic permeation of hydronium/sodium ions and water molecule through the channel formed in MotA/B was observed using a steered molecular dynamics simulation. During the simulation, Leu46 of MotB acts as the gate for hydronium ion permeation, which induced the formation of water wire that may mediate the proton transfer to Asp32 on MotB. Free energy profiles for permeation were calculated by umbrella sampling. The free energy barrier for H3O+ permeation was consistent with the proton transfer rate deduced from the flagellar rotational speed and number of protons per rotation, which suggests that the gating is the rate-limiting step. Structure and dynamics of the MotA/B with nonprotonated and protonated Asp32, Val43Met, and Val43Leu mutants in MotB were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. A narrowing of the channel was observed in the mutants, which is consistent with the size-dependent ion selectivity. In MotA/B with the nonprotonated Asp32, the A3 segment in MotA maintained a kink whereas the protonation induced a straighter shape. Assuming that the cytoplasmic domain not included in the atomic model moves as a rigid body, the protonation/deprotonation of Asp32 is inferred to induce a ratchet motion of the cytoplasmic domain, which may be correlated to the motion of the flagellar rotor. PMID:26056313

  18. Gate-controlled proton diffusion and protonation-induced ratchet motion in the stator of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Yasutaka; Kitao, Akio

    2015-06-23

    The proton permeation process of the stator complex MotA/B in the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli was investigated. The atomic model structure of the transmembrane part of MotA/B was constructed based on the previously published disulfide cross-linking and tryptophan scanning mutations. The dynamic permeation of hydronium/sodium ions and water molecule through the channel formed in MotA/B was observed using a steered molecular dynamics simulation. During the simulation, Leu46 of MotB acts as the gate for hydronium ion permeation, which induced the formation of water wire that may mediate the proton transfer to Asp32 on MotB. Free energy profiles for permeation were calculated by umbrella sampling. The free energy barrier for H3O(+) permeation was consistent with the proton transfer rate deduced from the flagellar rotational speed and number of protons per rotation, which suggests that the gating is the rate-limiting step. Structure and dynamics of the MotA/B with nonprotonated and protonated Asp32, Val43Met, and Val43Leu mutants in MotB were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. A narrowing of the channel was observed in the mutants, which is consistent with the size-dependent ion selectivity. In MotA/B with the nonprotonated Asp32, the A3 segment in MotA maintained a kink whereas the protonation induced a straighter shape. Assuming that the cytoplasmic domain not included in the atomic model moves as a rigid body, the protonation/deprotonation of Asp32 is inferred to induce a ratchet motion of the cytoplasmic domain, which may be correlated to the motion of the flagellar rotor. PMID:26056313

  19. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  20. Low energy particle composition. [cosmic rays produced in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of current knowledge of low-energy cosmic ray particles produced in the solar system. It is argued that the notion that the sun alone can accelerate particles in the solar system must be abandoned in light of evidence that Jupiter and earth may be sources of observed low-energy particles. Measurements of the composition and energy spectra of low-energy particles during quiet times are examined, emphasizing the abundance of protons and helium and of anomalous N, O, and Ne. The abundance of heavy particles (B, C, N, O, Ne, Ca and Fe) of unknown origin in the earth magnetosphere is examined. Reported observations of Jovian electrons are discussed and solar particle events with anomalous compositions (He-3 rich events and Fe rich events) are treated in detail. Nuclear abundances of solar particles, emphasizing their temporal and spatial variations are considered together with the nature of nuclear reaction products in solar flares.

  1. Techniques of absolute low energy x-ray calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in pulsed plasma research, materials science, and astrophysics have required many new diagnostic instruments for use in the low energy x-ray regime. The characterization of these instruments has provided a challenge to instrument designers and provided the momentum to improve x-ray sources and dosimetry techniques. In this paper, the present state-of-the-art in low energy x-ray characterization techniques is reviewed. A summary is given of low energy x-ray generator technology and dosimetry techniques including a discussion of thin window proportional counters and ionization chambers. A review is included of the widely used x-ray data bases and a sample of ultrasoft x-ray measuring procedures, chopped x-ray source generators, phase sensitive detection of ultralow currents, and angular divergence measurements.

  2. Evolution of the Crab Nebula in a Low Energy Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2015-06-01

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼1050 erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  3. IONS (ANURADHA): Ionization states of low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Chakraborti, R.; Cowsik, R.; Durgaprasad, N.; Kajarekar, P. J.; Singh, R. K.; Vahia, M. N.; Yadav, J. S.; Dutt, N.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    IONS (ANURADHA), the experimental payload designed specifically to determine the ionization states, flux, composition, energy spectra and arrival directions of low energy (10 to 100 MeV/amu) anomalous cosmic ray ions of helium to iron in near-Earth space, had a highly successful flight and operation Spacelab-3 mission. The experiment combines the accuracy of a highly sensitive CR-39 nuclear track detector with active components included in the payload to achieve the experimental objectives. Post-flight analysis of detector calibration pieces placed within the payload indicated no measurable changes in detector response due to its exposure in spacelab environment. Nuclear tracks produced by alpha-particles, oxygen group and Fe ions in low energy anomalous cosmic rays were identified. It is calculated that the main detector has recorded high quality events of about 10,000 alpha-particles and similar number of oxygen group and heavier ions of low energy cosmic rays.

  4. Spectroscopy of Light Nuclei with Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, I.; Dell'Aquila, D.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss new results concerning the investigation of the 19F(p,α 0)16O and 10B(p,α 0)7Be reactions at low energies. Both reactions are important for the nuclear spectroscopy of the formed compound nucleus, i.e. 20Ne and 11C respectively, and play a role in nuclear astrophysics. For the 10B(p,α 0)7Be case, a comprehensive analysis of our reaction data and other scattering data points out the possible presence of an unreported state in 11C at Ex ≈ 9.36 MeV. For the 19F(p,α 0)16O case, the study of the low energy angular distributions testifies the role played by low energy resonances in the S-factor, leading to an enhanced reaction rate at stellar energies.

  5. Engaging schools in the science of low-energy buildings.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Fiona; Fleming, Paul; Dowsett, Tony; Fleming, Margaret; Cook, Malcolm; Mill, Greig

    2012-10-01

    This article explores the relationship between the previous UK government's initiative to rebuild and renew secondary schools, and the requirement for improved education for sustainable development in the UK. The documented research utilized a number of mechanisms to engage with pupils in Leicester city schools to increase their awareness, knowledge and understanding of the science and engineering associated with the design and operation of low-energy school buildings. Workshops, discussions with energy and sustainable development experts and inspirational visits to existing low-energy buildings were employed to develop an appreciation for the importance of energy efficiency and best design practice. The results demonstrate an increase in pupils' knowledge and understanding of low-energy school design and additionally a rise in those pupils who are interested in science and would consider it as a career option. PMID:23832564

  6. The problem of low energy particle measurements in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The accurate measurement of low energy (less than 100 eV) particle properties in the magnetosphere has been difficult, partly because of the low density of such particles, but more particularly because of spacecraft interference effects. Some early examples of how these phenomena have affected particle measurements on an OGO spacecraft are presented. Data obtained with the UCSD particle detectors on ATS-6 are then presented showing how some of these difficulties have been partially overcome. Future measurements of low energy particles in the magnetosphere can be improved by: (1) improving the low energy resolution of detectors; (2) building electrostatically clean spacecraft; (3) controlling spacecraft potential; and (4) using auxiliary measurements, particularly wave data.

  7. Light element production by low energy nuclei from massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Casse, M.; Ramaty, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Orion complex is a source of gamma rays attributed to the de-excitation of fast carbon and oxygen nuclei excited through interactions with ambient hydrogen and helium. This has consequences for the production and evolution of light isotopes in the Galaxy, as massive stars appear as prolific sources of C-O rich low energy nuclei. The different stages of massive star evolution are considered in relation to the acceleration of nuclei to moderate energies. It is concluded that the low energy nuclear component originating from massive stars plays a larger role than the usual Galactic cosmic rays in shaping the evolution of Li-6, Be-9, B-10 and B-11, especially in the early Galactic evolution. The enhancement of the B-11/B-10 ratio observed in meteorites and in the interstellar medium is attributed to the interaction of low energy carbon nuclei with ambient H and to a lesser degree, to neutrino spallation.

  8. Low-energy physics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J. . Physics Dept.); Kivelson, S.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the low-energy properties of high temperature superconductors are dominated by the interaction between the mobile holes and a particular class of collective modes, corresponding to local large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density. The latter are a consequence of the competition between the effects of long-range Coulomb interactions and the tendency of a low concentration of holes in an antiferromagnet to phase separate. The low-energy behavior of the system is governed by the same fixed point as the two-channel Kondo problem, which accounts for the universality'' of the properties of the cuprate superconductors. Predictions of the optical properties and the spin dynamics are compared with experiment. The pairing resonance of the two Kondo problem gives a mechanism of high temperature superconductivity with an unconventional symmetry of the order parameter.

  9. Low-energy physics of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1992-09-01

    It is argued that the low-energy properties of high temperature superconductors are dominated by the interaction between the mobile holes and a particular class of collective modes, corresponding to local large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density. The latter are a consequence of the competition between the effects of long-range Coulomb interactions and the tendency of a low concentration of holes in an antiferromagnet to phase separate. The low-energy behavior of the system is governed by the same fixed point as the two-channel Kondo problem, which accounts for the ``universality`` of the properties of the cuprate superconductors. Predictions of the optical properties and the spin dynamics are compared with experiment. The pairing resonance of the two Kondo problem gives a mechanism of high temperature superconductivity with an unconventional symmetry of the order parameter.

  10. Coulomb effects in low-energy nuclear fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Francis F.; John, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    Early versions of the Langley nuclear fragmentation code NUCFRAG (and a publicly released version called HZEFRG1) assumed straight-line trajectories throughout the interaction. As a consequence, NUCFRAG and HZEFRG1 give unrealistic cross sections for large mass removal from the projectile and target at low energies. A correction for the distortion of the trajectory by the nuclear Coulomb fields is used to derive fragmentation cross sections. A simple energy-loss term is applied to estimate the energy downshifts that greatly alter the Coulomb trajectory at low energy. The results, which are far more realistic than prior versions of the code, should provide the data base for future transport calculations. The systematic behavior of charge-removal cross sections compares favorably with results from low-energy experiments.

  11. Feasibility of Electron Cooling for Low-Energy RHIC Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.; Pozdeyev, E.; Satogata, T.

    2008-04-01

    A concrete interest in running RHIC at low energies in a range of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon total energy of a single beam has recently emerged. Providing collisions in this energy range, which in the RHIC case is termed 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram. However, luminosity projections are relatively low for the lowest energy points of interest. Luminosity improvement can be provided with electron cooling applied directly in RHIC at low energies. This report summarizes the expected luminosity improvement with electron cooling, possible technical approaches and various limitations.

  12. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  13. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  14. Techniques and methods for the low-energy neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranucci, Gioacchino

    2016-04-01

    Low-energy neutrino physics and astrophysics has been one of the most active field of particle physics research over the past two decades, achieving important and sometimes unexpected results, which have paved the way for a bright future of further exciting studies. The methods, the techniques and the technologies employed for the construction of the many experiments which acted as important players in this area of investigation have been crucial elements to reach the many accumulated physics successes. The topic covered in this review is, thus, the description of the main features of the set of methodologies at the basis of the design, construction and operation of low-energy neutrino detectors.

  15. Strong flux of low-energy neutrons produced by thunderstorms.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Antonova, V P; Chubenko, A P; Karashtin, A N; Mitko, G G; Ptitsyn, M O; Ryabov, V A; Shepetov, A L; Shlyugaev, Yu V; Vildanova, L I; Zybin, K P

    2012-03-23

    We report here for the first time about the registration of an extraordinary high flux of low-energy neutrons generated during thunderstorms. The measured neutron count rate enhancements are directly connected with thunderstorm discharges. The low-energy neutron flux value obtained in our work is a challenge for the photonuclear channel of neutron generation in thunderstorm: the estimated value of the needed high-energy γ-ray flux is about 3 orders of magnitude higher than that one observed. PMID:22540588

  16. Modelling low energy electron and positron tracks for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, A. G.; Fuss, M. C.; Roldán, A. M.; Oller, J. C.; Blanco, F.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; García, G.

    2012-11-01

    In order to incorporate the effect of low energy electrons and positron in radiation damage models, the simulation method proposed here is based on experimental and theoretical cross section data and energy loss spectra we have previously derived. After a summary of the main techniques used to obtain reliable input data, the basis of a Low Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) procedure is established. Single electron and positron tracks in liquid water are presented and the possibility of using these results to develop tools for nanodosimetry is discussed.

  17. Diffuse Galactic low energy gamma ray continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, J. G.; Ramaty, R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the origin of diffuse low-energy Galactic gamma-ray continuum down to about 30 keV. We calculate gamma-ray emission via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering by propagating an unbroken electron power law injection spectrum and employing a Galactic emmissivity model derived from COSB observations. To maintain the low energy electron population capable of producing the observed continuum via bremsstrahlung, a total power input of 4 x 10 exp 41 erg/s is required. This exceeds the total power supplied to the nuclear cosmic rays by about an order of magnitude.

  18. Low energy antiprotons from supernova exploding in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.; Mauger, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    The antiproton spectrum resulting from a supernova, which exploded inside a dense cloud, is calculated by taking into account all energy loss processes including adiabatic deceleration during the expansion phase. The influence of various energy loss processes on the evolution of the spectrum as the supernova expands is investigated. It is shown that if about 25 percent of the cosmic ray nucleons are from such sources, the observed low energy antiprotons can be explained, provided the effect of solar modulation is not very large. The possibility of obtaining enhanced low energy spectrum by this process is also examined.

  19. Ternary fission of 466, 476 184X formed in U + U collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikraj, C.; Subramanian, S.; Selvaraj, S.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the very rare process of nuclear ternary fission has been of great interest in nuclear dynamics. Based on the statistical theory of fission, we discuss here the ternary-fission mass distribution of 466, 476 184X formed in low-energy U + U collisions for different heavy third fragments at T = 1 and 2MeV. The expected ternary configurations 208 Pb + 208 Pb + 50 Ca and 204 Hg + 204 Hg + 58 Cr are obtained from the ternary fission of 466 184X at T = 2 MeV. In addition, for both the systems, various possible ternary modes are listed for different heavy third fragments. Our results clearly indicate that the favored ternary configurations have either proton and/or neutron shell closure nucleus as one of their partners.

  20. Clusterization in Ternary Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Pyatkov, Y. V.

    This lecture notes are devoted to the new kind of ternary decay of low excited heavy nuclei called by us "collinear cluster tri-partition" (CCT) due to the features of the effect observed, namely, decay partners fly away almost collinearly and at least one of them has magic nucleon composition. At the early stage of our work the process of "true ternary fission" (fission of the nucleus into three fragments of comparable masses) was considered to be undiscovered for low excited heavy nuclei. Another possible prototype—three body cluster radioactivity—was also unknown. The most close to the CCT phenomenon, at least cinematically, stands so called "polar emission", but only very light ions (up to isotopes of Be) were observed so far.

  1. SHAPED FISSIONABLE METAL BODIES

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Williamson, R.R.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A technique is presented for grooving the surface of fissionable fuel elements so that expansion can take place without damage to the interior structure of the fuel element. The fissionable body tends to develop internal stressing when it is heated internally by the operation of the nuclear reactor and at the same time is subjected to surface cooling by the circulating coolant. By producing a grooved or waffle-like surface texture, the annular lines of tension stress are disrupted at equally spaced intervals by the grooves, thereby relieving the tension stresses in the outer portions of the body while also facilitating the removal of accumulated heat from the interior portion of the fuel element.

  2. Singlet exciton fission-sensitized infrared quantum dot solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Bruno; Wilson, Mark W B; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H; Greenham, Neil C

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate an organic/inorganic hybrid photovoltaic device architecture that uses singlet exciton fission to permit the collection of two electrons per absorbed high-energy photon while simultaneously harvesting low-energy photons. In this solar cell, infrared photons are absorbed using lead sulfide (PbS) nanocrystals. Visible photons are absorbed in pentacene to create singlet excitons, which undergo rapid exciton fission to produce pairs of triplets. Crucially, we identify that these triplet excitons can be ionized at an organic/inorganic heterointerface. We report internal quantum efficiencies exceeding 50% and power conversion efficiencies approaching 1%. These findings suggest an alternative route to circumvent the Shockley-Queisser limit on the power conversion efficiency of single-junction solar cells. PMID:22257168

  3. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  4. Extended optical model for fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  5. Fission-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments, and to utilize the energy of the particles to create population inversion that would lead to laser action is investigated. An investigation was made of various laser materials which could be used for nuclear-pumped lasing. The most likely candidate for a fissioning material in the gaseous form is uranium hexafluoride - UF6, and experiments were performed to investigate materials that would be compatible with it. One of the central problems in understanding a fission-induced plasma is to obtain a model of the electron behavior, and some preliminary calculations are presented. In particular, the rates of various processes are discussed. A simple intuitive model of the electron energy distribution function is also shown. The results were useful for considering a mathematical model of a nuclear-pumped laser. Next a theoretical model of a (3)He-Ar nuclear-pumped laser is presented. The theory showed good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Range verification for eye proton therapy based on proton-induced x-ray emissions from implanted metal markers.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Vanessa; Kacperek, Andrzej; Royle, Gary; Gibson, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Metal fiducial markers are often implanted on the back of the eye before proton therapy to improve target localization and reduce patient setup errors. We aim to detect characteristic x-ray emissions from metal targets during proton therapy to verify the treatment range accuracy. Initially gold was chosen for its biocompatibility properties. Proton-induced x-ray emissions (PIXE) from a 15 mm diameter gold marker were detected at different penetration depths of a 59 MeV proton beam at the CATANA proton facility at INFN-LNS (Italy). The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to reproduce the experiment and to investigate the effect of different size markers, materials, and the response to both mono-energetic and fully modulated beams. The intensity of the emitted x-rays decreases with decreasing proton energy and thus decreases with depth. If we assume the range to be the depth at which the dose is reduced to 10% of its maximum value and we define the residual range as the distance between the marker and the range of the beam, then the minimum residual range which can be detected with 95% confidence level is the depth at which the PIXE peak is equal to 1.96 σ(bkg), which is the standard variation of the background noise. With our system and experimental setup this value is 3 mm, when 20 GyE are delivered to a gold marker of 15 mm diameter. Results from silver are more promising. Even when a 5 mm diameter silver marker is placed at a depth equal to the range, the PIXE peak is 2.1 σ(bkg). Although these quantitative results are dependent on the experimental setup used in this research study, they demonstrate that the real-time analysis of the PIXE emitted by fiducial metal markers can be used to derive beam range. Further analysis are needed to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique in a clinical setup. PMID:24786372

  7. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  8. Physics overview of the Fermilab Low Energy Antiproton Facility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-05-01

    A physics overview is presented of the Fermilab workshop to consider a possible high flux, low energy antiproton facility that would use cooled antiprotons from the accumulator ring of the Tevatron collider. Two examples illustrate the power of each a facility to produce narrow states at high rates. Physics topics to which such a facility may be applied are reviewed.

  9. Isotopic fractionation in low-energy ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponganis, K. V.; Graf, T.; Marti, K.

    1997-08-01

    The evolutions of planetary atmospheres and other solar system reservoirs have been affected by a variety of fractionating mechanisms. It has been suggested that one of these mechanisms could be low-energy ion implantation. Bernatowicz and Hagee [1987] showed that Kr and Xe implanted at low energy onto tungsten are fractionated by approximately 1% per amu, favoring the heavy isotopes; we confirm these effects. We have extended these studies to Ar and Ne, using a modified Bayard-Alpert type implanter design of cylindrical symmetry with collector potentials of -40 to -100V, and observe systematically larger mass dependent isotopic fractionation for argon and neon, >=3% per amu and >=4% per amu, respectively. These fractionations scale approximately as Δm/m for all of the noble gases measured, consistent with the findings of Bernatowicz and coworkers. Experimental data at higher energies and predictions by TRIM (Transport of Ions in Matter) code simulations indicate that sticking probabilities may depend upon the mass ratios of projectile and target. Many natural environments for low-energy ion implantation existed in the early solar nebula, such as in dusty plasmas or in the interaction of the bipolar outflow with small grains or in the wind of the early active Sun with accreting planetesimals. Low-energy ions provide viable sources for gas loading onto nebular dust grains; the result is isotopic and elemental fractionation of the projectiles.

  10. Potential for luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov A. V.

    2012-05-20

    At the Brookhaven National Laboratory, a physics program, motivated by the search of the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with heavy ions at very low beam energies corresponding to 2.5-20 GeV/n. Several physics runs were already successfully performed at these low energies. However, the luminosity is very low at lowest energies of interest (< 10 GeV/n) limited by the intra-beam scattering and space-charge, as well as by machine nonlinearities. At these low energies, electron cooling could be very effective in counteracting luminosity degradation due to the IBS, while it is less effective against other limitations. Overall potential luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation from cooling is summarized for various energies, taking into account all these limitations as well as beam lifetime measured during the low-energy RHIC runs. We also explore a possibility of further luminosity improvement under the space-charge limitation.