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Sample records for low-latitude tec observations

  1. Impact of solar activity on the relation of vertical ExB drift over equator, low latitude electron density and TEC: Model v/s observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashora, Nirvikar

    2012-07-01

    Ionospheric models are of prime interest for applications like satellite based navigation and a near real time forecasting of grid based ionospheric delays. The physical processes that govern low latitude ionospheric variability are, at large, known, however, there remains a certain degree of uncertainty in many variables that are not measurable in each longitude sector on day-to-day basis like thermospheric neutral winds and drifts, diffusion and conductivity distribution etc. To study the day-to-day and seasonal variation of peak electron density and TEC in low latitude we used a physics based model, SAMI2, for three years 2001, 2005 and 2009 representing respectively the peak, moderate and lowest levels of solar activity in past solar cycle, besides for some geomagnetic storms. The model is run for Indian longitude sector under various controlled conditions like meridional winds and equatorial ExB drifts. The diurnal and seasonal variations of various quantities have been obtained as 2D meridional cross-section of ionosphere. There is a renewed interest in the variable nature of relation between time of maximization of equatorial ionization anomaly in terms of electron density (and TEC) and the time of maximization of ExB drift over equator. A dramatic variation is found in the time-lag between the maximization of ExB drift over equator and peak density occurrence in low latitudes (even in case of zero meridional winds). We found that single linear relation neither exists for any season nor for any year during any epoch of solar cycle. Specifically, equinoctial months exhibit greater day-to-day variability than other seasons, the reasons to be still quantified. Simulations for geomagnetic storms were separately performed. TEC observations show a direct response to penetration electric fields. The model results under disturbed ExB conditions show that the imminent enhancements in low latitude TEC are result of enhanced density due to mechanical up-lifting of F

  2. Study of Ionospheric TEC from GPS observations and comparisons with IRI and SPIM model predictions in the low latitude anomaly Indian subcontinental region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, S. K.; Gedam, S. S.; Rajaram, G.

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigates variation of the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) in the low latitude Indian sub-continental region from the GPS observations and its comparison with the global ionosphere maps (GIMs), standard international reference ionosphere (IRI 2012), and the standard plasmasphere-ionosphere model (SPIM) for the period from November 2011 to October 2012 that corresponds to the progressive phase towards the midst of the solar cycle-24. Observations during quiet period show diurnal maximum of TEC occurring around 14:00-16:00 IST, with relatively broader and longer duration of local maximum at Bangalore and behave reversely towards Delhi. The secondary maximum of TEC was markedly noticeable at Bangalore during the months of March and September, and only in the month of September at Hyderabad and Mumbai. However, the relatively higher TEC during December month than the June is ascribed to the winter anomaly which is more prevalent during the high solar activity periods. The prevailing instability in latitudes of anomaly crest during January 2012 is possibly due to the seasonal variation of lunar tidal effects, modulating the EEJ strength at the equator. The studies covered the period of a strong geomagnetic storm during 6-11 March 2012 (SYM-H: -149 nT) which resulted in positive deviation of GPS-TEC at Bangalore (↑ 20%), Hyderabad (↑ 22%), and Lucknow (↑ 94%) compared to the mean quiet days level. The relatively large deviation of TEC at Lucknow could be attributed to the poleward shifting of the anomaly crest, manifested by enhanced fountain effect at the equator. Studies confirm excellent agreement (80-85%) of GPS-TEC with IGS-GIM at Bangalore and Hyderabad with the exception of the night-time hours (Deviations >50%). However relatively larger deviation of GPS-TEC from GIM-TEC at Delhi could be due to the unavailability of IGS stations in the proximity of the position. Predictions of the SPIM model (extension of IRI up to GPS

  3. TEC Response to X-ray Solar Emissions Observed in the Equatorial and Low-latitude Brazilian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Guedes, F.; Nicoli Candido, C. M.; de Siqueira, P. M.; Paula, E. R.; Takahashi, H.; De Nardin, C. M.; Costa, J. E. R.

    2014-12-01

    Some spurious effects affecting radio communications happen when the X-ray solar flux in the interplanetary medium reaches values above a certain threshold. The magnitudes of these effects depend on the X-ray peak brightness and the duration, which drive the intensity of the ionosphere response when the associated electromagnetic wave hit the sunlit side of the Earth atmosphere. An important aspect defining the severity of damages to HF radio communications and LF navigation signals in a certain area is the local time when each event takes place. In order to improve the understanding of radio signal loss or degradation in the Brazilian sector due to solar X-ray emissions, we analyze total electron content (TEC) maps and curves at selected sites obtained by a GPS network formed by tents of dual-frequency receivers spread all over Brazilian territory. We observe ionospheric local changes during several X-ray events in the 0.1-0.8 nm range identified by GOES satellite. Considering the duration, peak brightness, and local time of the events, our goal is to understand the degree of changes suffered by the ionosphere after these solar X-ray emissions using GPS receivers, namely in the equatorial region and around the southern crest of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly.

  4. Characterization of ionospheric variability in TEC using EOF and wavelets over low-latitude GNSS stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbakuti, J. R. K. Kumar; Venkata Ratnam, D.

    2016-06-01

    Investigation of ionospheric variability is essential for improving the daily ionospheric modeling and forecasting services of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) applications. As India is a low-latitude region, more care has to be taken here to characterize the ionosphere due to irregularities and Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) conditions. Therefore, an appropriate method is required to diagnose the ionospheric variations during geomagnetic, solar and other disturbances. In this paper, the temporal ionospheric time delay variations were studied based on the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis and wavelet transforms (WT).These analyses were carried out with Total Electron Content (TEC) datasets obtained from three GNSS stations located in low-latitude regions. EOF analysis was performed on the TEC datasets, which were decomposed into a time series of orthogonal eigen values (or base functions) and associated coefficients. EOF base functions and their associated coefficients signify the hourly time variations and the day of the year variations. The results reveal that the first few EOFs represented the majority of TEC variability pertaining to the physical processes of the ionosphere. The accuracy of the EOF model was validated by the evaluation of observational TEC data with International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 models. The EOF model coefficients for each GNSS station showed a strong correlation with the IRI models and also described the correlation between the impacts of the level of geomagnetic activity on the ionosphere. The correlation coefficients for the first three EOFs were more than 0.95. The phase relationship of ionospheric TEC anomalies, with respect to the geomagnetic indices (Dst), were analyzed by wavelet transforms.

  5. Impacts of CME on the TEC at middle and low latitudes during maximum of the 24th solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migoya Orue, Yenca Olivia; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine; Radicella, Sandro; Nava, Bruno; Kashcheyev, Anton

    2015-04-01

    In this study we analyzed the impacts on the GNSS-derived Total Electron Content (TEC) of four selected CME hitting the Earth during the year 2013 at different stations of middle and low latitudes (Ebre, Rabat, Alexandria, San Fernando, M'barara, Matera and Dakar). In order to analyzed the seasonal behavior of TEC under these disturbed conditions in the mentioned stations we have selected four CME events occurred during the different seasons (January 19, March 17, July 9 and October 2) of year 2013, at a maximum of the sunspot cycle 24. At the beginning of each event there is an increase of TEC followed by a decrease. The first increase of TEC is a consequence of the Prompt Penetration of the Electric Field (PPEF). The depletion of the TEC is associated to the Disturbance Dynamo Electric Field (DDEF). In order to interpret the observations we analyzed the convection patterns at high latitudes given by the radar SUPERDARN. At low latitudes, we derived the ionospheric electric current disturbance Diono from ground magnetic variations. Diono is the sum of the DP2 (PPEF) and Ddyn (DDEF) electric current systems. Finally we found that the strength of the impact at middle and low latitudes depends on the time of the impact of the CME and the season.

  6. Statistical analysis of TEC perturbations over a low latitude region during 2009-2013 ascending solar activity phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andima, Geoffrey; Jurua, Edward; Amabayo, Emirant Bertillas; Habarulema, John Bosco

    2015-12-01

    Total Electron Content (TEC) perturbations are manifestations of ionospheric irregularities which induce fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of trans-ionospheric radio signals. TEC data derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers at Mbarara (Geogra. -0.60°N, 30.74°E and Geomag. -10.22°N, 102.36°E) and Entebbe (Geogra. 0.04°N, 32.44°E and Geomag. -9.53°N, 104.10°E) from 2009 to 2013 were used to study TEC perturbations over the low latitude region of Uganda. The results show that the frequency of occurrence of TEC perturbations of >4 TECU increased steadily from 2009 to 2013. TEC perturbations with amplitude <4 TECU occurred at all times. The likelihood of TEC perturbations exceeding 6 TECU was higher during the equinoxes than during the solstices in most of the years. Comparison of TEC perturbations with 10.7 cm solar radio flux (F10.7) data showed a weak positive correlation with this solar proxy. Wavelet analysis performed on the TEC perturbations revealed wave-like oscillations with periods typical of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID). These wave-like structures (WLS) dominated from 13:00 to 19:00 LT for most of the years analyzed. Though the WLS were observed to increase with solar activity, no seasonal pattern was recorded in their occurrence.

  7. A numerical model for low-latitude ionospheric TEC. [Total Electron Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sethia, G.; Chandra, H.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical model of total electron content (TEC) at low latitudes has been constructed from the Faraday rotation data recorded at a number of locations in India during the period Oct. 1975-July 1976 when the geostationary satellite ATS-6 was located at 35 deg E. In all, 36 coefficients for each season are required to represent the model. The model can be used for satellite tracking systems in estimating quickly the range, range rate and angular refraction errors. The present model is an improvement over the previously constructed model based on orbiting satellite data.

  8. GPS derived ionospheric TEC response to geomagnetic storm on 24 August 2005 at Indian low latitude stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    Results pertaining to the response of the low latitude ionosphere to a major geomagnetic storm that occurred on 24 August 2005 are presented. The dual frequency GPS data have been analyzed to retrieve vertical total electron content at two Indian low latitude stations (IGS stations) Hyderabad (Geographic latitude 17°20‧N, Geographic longitude 78°30‧E, Geomagnetic latitude 8.65°N) and Bangalore (Geographic latitude 12°58‧N, Geographic longitude 77°33‧E, Geomagnetic latitude 4.58°N). These results show variation of GPS derived total electron content (TEC) due to geomagnetic storm effect, local low latitude electrodynamics response to penetration of high latitude convection electric field and effect of modified fountain effect on GPS-TEC in low latitude zone.

  9. Total electron content variations observed at a low latitude GPS station in association to geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes da Costa, A.; Fonseca Junior, E.; Vilas Boas, J.

    Total electron content (TEC) has been continuously monitored since January 1997, using a GPS dual frequency receiver located at Presidente Prudente (22o 07'S, 51o 22' W). In this paper the enhancements observed in the ionspheric TEC are associated with geomagnetic field variations for six geomagnetic storms that occurred from 1997 to 2000. The events were selected according to the integrity and availability of data. The purpose of this study is to provide a better knowledge of the low-latitude behavior of TEC in association to geomagnetic storms. Quiet-time TEC values were obtained by the average of the five magnetically less disturbed days of the month. These values were subtracted from the TEC hourly averages measured during the period of the magnetic storms. Magnetic field intensity measured on the ground was used for the identification of the storm time variations and the Dst indices were also included as a reference for the latitudes considered. The results showed that moderate geomagnetic storms produce small effects in TEC, intense and super intense (Dst < ~150 nT) geomagnetic storms produce well defined and long lasting TEC enhancements. The super intense storms cause the GPS signals to loose their track and the corresponding TEC values cannot be derived.

  10. A study on chaotic behaviour of equatorial/low latitude ionosphere over Indian subcontinent, using GPS-TEC time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, K.; Ravindran, Sudha

    2010-09-01

    The deterministic chaotic behaviour of ionosphere, over Indian subcontinent falling under equatorial/low latitude region, -0.3 to 22.19°N (geomagnetic), was studied using GPS-TEC time series. The values of Lyapunov exponent are low at Thiruvananthapuram and Agatti (-0.30 and 2.38°N, geomagnetic, respectively), and thereafter increase through Bangalore and Hyderabad (4.14 and 8.54°N, geomagnetic, respectively), and attain maximum at Mumbai (10.09°N, geomagnetic), which is near/at the edge of an anomaly crest. The values of correlation dimension computed for TEC time series are in the range 3.1-3.6, which indicate that equatorial/low latitude ionosphere can be described with four variables. Entropy values estimated for TEC time series show no appreciable latitudinal variabilites. The values of non-linear prediction error exhibit a trough, around the latitude sector, 4.14-16.15°N (Geomagnetic). Based on the values of the above quantifiers, the features of chaotic behaviour of equatorial/low latitude ionosphere are briefly discussed.

  11. Simultaneous observations of ionospheric irregularities in the African low-latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Seemala, Gopi K.; Bosco Habarulema, John

    2013-05-01

    Ionospheric storms represent large global disturbances of the ionospheric F-region electron density in response to geomagnetic storms. This study investigates the ionospheric response during a minor geomagnetic storm that occurred on 13-15 September 2004. In particular, we use total electron content (TEC) measurements (rate of TEC change, ROT) to examine the presence of ionospheric irregularities over four low-latitude stations in the African sector, a region that has been less studied. Ionospheric irregularities are known to cause fading and phase fluctuation of L-band radio navigation signals such as those used by the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), and are a common feature in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere. In the present study, the storm began with a sudden commencement at approximately 20:00 UT on 13 September, while the peak of the main phase occurred on 14 September with an SYM-H index value around -59 nT. On 13 September, the storm did not appear to hinder the development of irregularities as they were observed over all the stations. In contrast, irregularities were rarely observed at two of the 4 stations under study and were absent over the other two stations on 14 September. The DSMP F15 satellite post-sunset flight over the African region observed deep density depletions on 13 September that can be associated with the presence of ionospheric plasma bubble irregularities. Furthermore, an analysis of ΔH (horizontal geomagnetic component corrected for ring current effects) shows that there was a strong positive ΔH perturbation observed in the post-sunset hours on 13 September, which suggests the presence of an eastward penetration electric field, while a negative perturbation of ΔH, which is associated with the equatorial counter-electrojet, was observed on 14 September.

  12. Validation of the IRI-2012 model with GPS-based ground observation over a low-latitude Singapore station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tan, Eng Leong; Razul, Sirajudeen Gulam; See, Chong Meng Samson; Siingh, Devendraa

    2014-12-01

    The ionospheric total electron content (TEC) in the low-latitude Singapore region (geographic latitude 01.37° N, longitude, 103.67° E, geomagnetic latitude 8.5° S) for 2010 to 2011 was retrieved using the data from global positioning system (GPS)-based measurements. The observed TEC from GPS is compared with those derived from the latest International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-2012 model with three options, IRI-Nequick (IRI-Neq), IRI-2001, and IRI-01-Corr, for topside electron density. The results showed that the IRI-Neq and IRI-01-Corr models are in good agreement with GPS-TEC values at all times, in all seasons, for the year 2010. For the year 2011, these two models showed agreement at all times with GPS-TEC only for the summer season, and for the period 11:00 to 24:00 UT hours (19:00 to 24:00 LT and 00:00 to 08:00 LT) during the winter and equinox seasons. The IRI-2012 model electron density profile showed agreement with constellation observing system for meteorology, ionosphere, and climate (COSMIC) radio occultation (RO)-based measurements around 250 to 300 km and was found to be independent of the options for topside density profiles. However, above 300 km, the IRI-2012 model electron density profile does not show agreement with COSMIC measurements. The observations (COSMIC and GPS) and IRI-2012-based data of TEC and electron density profiles were also analyzed during quiet and storm periods. The analysis showed that the IRI model does not represent the impact of storms, while observations show the impact of storms on the low-latitude ionosphere. This suggests that significant improvements in the IRI model are required for estimating behavior during storms, particularly in low-latitude regions.

  13. Role of neutral wind in the performance of artificial neural-network based TEC models at diverse longitudes in the low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, D.; Ray, S.; Paul, A.

    2015-03-01

    The equatorial ionosphere is characterized by (i) large values of total electron content (TEC) and sharp latitudinal gradients of TEC, (ii) steep temporal variation of TEC, (iii) large diurnal variation of TEC, and (iv) postsunset secondary enhancement of TEC. These features cause major limitations in the accuracy of standard ionospheric TEC models in this region. Three artificial neural-network (ANN) based models have been developed based on real-time low-latitude TEC data along 77°E, 88°E, and 121°E longitudes in the region between the magnetic equator and locations beyond the northern crest of equatorial ionization anomaly to predict the vertical TEC values. ANN models have shown more accurate predictions than other standard ionospheric TEC models like International Reference Ionosphere, Parameterized Ionospheric Model, and NeQuick. The effects of the neutral wind in the variation of TEC are significant and have been incorporated as inputs to these ANN models. The outputs with neutral wind incorporated shows better correspondence with measured TEC than the models without neutral wind inputs. The longitudinally separated models have been used to find any longitudinal differences in TEC along equatorial regions. The causes behind the longitudinal differences in TEC and its diurnal variations in these regions have been explained in terms of the geomagnetic declination and inclination angles along with the role of zonal wind.

  14. Observing the mid- and low-latitude ionosphere - global UV remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, L. J.; Kil, H.; Miller, E. S.; Comberiate, J.; Schaefer, R. K.; Zhang, Y.; GUVI Team

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the global-, meso- and small-scale structure of the ionosphere. We need more observations to reallly test whether we have correctly captured not only the physics but the parameterizations of the sub-grid scale processes in the upper atmosphere. In this talk we present results from APL UV experiments that enable us to characterize TEC on a global basis. In addition, we can determine the topside scale height, peak density and altitude of the peak. In the auroral region we obtain maps of the E-region parameters (HmE, NmE) and conductivity profiles. Global UV remote sensing of the ionosphere, especially tomographic imaging, is a technique that is now readily implemented on even small spacecraft. The sensors are small, compact and flexible. In this talk we will show results of our extended climatology of the characteristics of the mid- and low-latitude ionosphere. In particular, we have completed converting our extensive GUVI database into 3D "datacubes" of low-latitude F-region ionospheric profiles. These 3D profiles, besides giving you the familiar electron density profiles (including topside scale height) also exhibit the action of the ExB drift as the separation of the arcs and the influence of the meridional component of the neutral wind as the hemispheric assymetry and the influence of lower atmosphere forcing in the longitudinal amplitude of the ionosphere.

  15. Study of the low latitude ionospheric turbulence observed by DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Lefeuvre, F.; Parrot, M.

    Following previous works from Molchanov et al 2002a 2002b 2004a 2004b and Hobara et al 2005 data bases dedicated to the systematic analysis of the power and spectral indices of the electric field have been elaborated Two data bases are considered one for the survey mode and the other for the burst mode For the survey mode estimations of the turbulence parameters are performed from the 8 first Fourier components of the averaged power spectra 0-150 Hz frequency band A single slope power law model f - alpha is assumed A quality factor allows to test that hypothesis For the burst mode the power spectra are derived from the waveforms One and two slope models are systematically tested Results are presented and the possibility to use these data bases for correlation with seismic activity is discussed Y Hobara F Lefeuvre M Parrot and O A Molchanov Low-latitude ionospheric turbulence observed by Aureol-3 satellite Annales Geophysicae 23 1259--1270 2005 Molchanov O A Hayakawa M Afonin V V Akentieva O A and Mareev E A Possible influence of seismicity by gravity waves on ionospheric equatorial anomaly from data of IK-24 satellite 1 Search for idea of seismo-ionosphere coupling Seismo Electromagnetics Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling edited by Hayakawa M and Molchanov O A TERRAPUB Tokyo 275--285 2002a Molchanov O A Hayakawa M Afonin V V Akentieva O A Mareev E A and Trakhtengerts V Yu Possible influence of seismicity by gravity waves on ionospheric

  16. HF Doppler radar observations of low-latitude spread F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddi, C. R.; Sarma, M. S. S. R. K. N.; Niranjan, K.

    2009-06-01

    HF (5.5 MHz) Doppler radar observations of nonspread F and spread F echoes over Visakhapatnam (17.7°N, 83.3°E; dip 20°) are presented. The echoes appearing suddenly and nearly simultaneously in 16 successive range bins at 7.5 km intervals in association with spread F have been investigated. Two to five episodes of spread F activity were found to appear at intervals of 1-2 hours during individual nights. At the time of onset of spread F conditions, the Doppler velocity for each range bin changed rapidly from a negative maximum to a positive maximum followed by a gradual decrease to a steady ±10-15 m/s or to a large negative velocity and then again to a large positive. At the time of small constant velocity or velocity change from negative to positive, the spread F echoes were weak or even below the detection level of the radar. This disappearance in the higher ranges causes the decrease in range extent of spread F echoes. The positive and negative maximum velocities of spread F were in the range of +70 to -60 m/s. The maximum upward and downward velocity is not the same in all events of spread F activity. The width of the Doppler velocity spectrum for spread F echoes was found to vary with velocity. For zero velocity the width was a minimum of 50 m/s in contrast to 25 m/s for nonspread F events. These features were consistently observed for all spread F incidences. The observed results are compared with already reported HF/VHF observations and are discussed in the light of equatorial plasma dynamics during the growth phase of Rayleigh Taylor instability leading the incidence of spread F.

  17. Characterisation of GPS-TEC in the African equatorial and low latitude region and the regional evaluation of the IRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebiyi, S. J.; Adimula, I. A.; Oladipo, O. A.

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing application of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) products and services, knowledge of the Total Electron Content (TEC) variation is vital, particularly in historically under-sampled regions. The ionospheric induced-error, which is the largest and most variable error source of GNSS applications, is proportional to TEC along the satellite-receiver path. Simultaneous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from six African equatorial and low latitude stations in the southern hemisphere are used to investigate the latitudinal variation of TEC over the region during the year 2013, a year of moderate solar activity. The analysis reveals some detailed features of seasonal, month-to-month and solar activity dependence of TEC. The seasonal variation of TEC revealed that the daytime and the pre-midnight values of TEC for stations located close to the geographic equator is considerably higher in equinoxes and June solstice compared to stations farther from the equator, however, the difference is insignificant during the December solstice. The month-to-month variation of TEC shows semi-annual symmetry/asymmetry in TEC values for stations closer/farther from the equator. TEC sensitivity to solar activity shows significant seasonal and latitudinal characteristics. Generally, a relatively good correlation exists between TEC and F10.7 for stations around the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) region compared to those found at stations close to the equator. Beyond the EIA region, the correlation coefficients drop in all seasons. TEC predicted by the three topside options of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model [i.e. the NeQuick (NeQ), IRI-2001 Corrected (IRI-01 Corr) and the IRI-2001 (IRI-01) options] exhibits latitudinal and seasonal characteristics. The NeQ option performed better than the other two options at stations located within the equatorial region in most of the months and seasons. Outside the EIA region, the IRI-01 Corr

  18. GPS-TEC variations during low solar activity period (2007-2009) at Indian low latitude stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Priyadarshi, S.; Gopi Krishna, S.; Singh, A. K.

    2012-05-01

    The paper is based on the ionospheric variations in terms of vertical total electron content (VTEC) for the low solar activity period from May 2007 to April 2009 based on the analysis of dual frequency signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites recorded at ground stations Varanasi (Geographic latitude 25°16' N, Longitude 82°59' E), situated near the equatorial ionization anomaly crest and other two International GNSS Service (IGS) stations Hyderabad (Geographic latitude 17°20' N, longitude 78°30' E) and Bangalore (Geographic latitude 12°58' N, longitude 77°33' E) in India. We describe the diurnal and seasonal variations of total electron content (TEC), and the effects of a space weather related event i.e. a geomagnetic storm on TEC. The mean diurnal variation during different seasons is brought out. It is found that TEC at all the three stations is maximum during equinoctial months (March, April, September and October), and minimum during the winter months (November, December, January and February), while obtaining intermediate values during summer months (May, June, July and August). TEC shows a semi-annual variation. TEC variation during geomagnetic quiet as well as disturbed days of each month and hence for each season from May 2007 to April 2008 at Varanasi is examined and is found to be more during disturbed period compared to that in the quiet period. Monthly, seasonal and annual variability of GPS-TEC has been compared with those derived from International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-2007 with three different options of topside electron density, NeQuick, IRI01-corr and IRI 2001. A good agreement is found between the GPS-TEC and IRI model TEC at all the three stations.

  19. Imaging-based observations of low-latitude auroras during 2001-2004 at Nayoro, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hidehiko; Chino, Haruka; Sano, Yasuo; Kadokura, Akira; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Taguchi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    Color images of six low-latitude auroral events observed using color digital cameras at Nayoro (142.5° E, 44.4° N), Hokkaido, Japan, from 2001 to 2004, were analyzed to determine the events' locations and times of occurrence. Geographical azimuthal and elevation angles of the images' pixels were determined precisely by using the positions of the stars captured in the images. Horizontal regions covered by these auroral events were directly indicated by mapping the color images onto geographical maps and assuming that the emission layer's altitude is the lowest or highest value of a visible-level red aurora, as determined by the OI 630.0nm emission. The estimated geomagnetic latitudes and L values of these low-latitude auroral events were in the 39-50° range and below L < 2.5, respectively. This investigation indicates that four of the six auroral events were the same as those that were reported previously based on high-sensitivity optical observations at other sites on Hokkaido (Rikubetsu and Moshiri). Although the previous study is lacking information about the maximal brightness level of the red auroral events, the present investigation suggests that these four low-latitude auroral events reached the visible level. In addition, two new events were reported in this study. The present work provides essential information such as the morphology and appearance of visible auroras, which are extremely rare in mid- or low-latitude regions.

  20. Comparison of GPS-TEC with IRI-2012 TEC over African equatorial and low latitude regions during the period of 2012-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariku, Yekoye Asmare

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the performance of the latest version of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) model in estimating the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) variation over equatorial and low latitude East Africa regions during the period of 2012-2013. This has been conducted by comparing the ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) VTEC inferred from nine dual frequency GPS receivers installed at different regions in the continent. In this work, the diurnal, monthly and seasonal variation in the measured VTEC have been analyzed and compared with the VTEC obtained from IRI-2012 model. It is depicted that the lowest diurnal peaks of the modeled and measured VTEC values are observed in the June solstice months, whereas the highest values are observed in the equinoctial months. The variability of the diurnal GPS-VTEC is also found to be minimal nearly at 03:00 UT and maximal mostly between 09:00 and 14:00 UT. Moreover, the maximum and minimum monthly mean hourly measured VTEC values inferred from both the Arba Minch and Entebbe stations are observed in October and July, respectively. Similarly, the highest and the lowest seasonal mean hourly measured VTEC values are observed in the September equinox and in the June solstice, respectively. The model predictions generally follow the diurnal variations of the measured VTEC, with minimum value at predawn hours and maximum at noontime hours (10:00-13:00 UT). It has been shown that the model better estimates the diurnal VTEC values mostly just after midnight hours (00:00-03:00 UT). Good agreements between the modeled and measured monthly and seasonal mean hourly VTEC values obtained from Arba Minch station are also observed in the equinoctial months. But, for the Entebbe station, the modeled monthly and seasonal VTEC values are larger than the corresponding measured VTEC values by about 75% and 60%, respectively. In addition, there are large discrepancies observed between the diurnal measured and modeled

  1. A multi-technique study of the 29-31 October 2003 geomagnetic storm effect on low latitude ionosphere over Indian region with magnetometer, ionosonde, and GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Sampad Kumar; Gedam, Shirish S.; Rajaram, Girija; Sripathi, S.; Pant, Tarun Kumar; Das, Rupesh M.

    2014-12-01

    The present study demonstrates the ionospheric response to the extreme geomagnetic storms during 29-31 Oct 2003 (the Halloween storm), in the low latitude anomaly Indian region, based on multi-instrument measurements namely magnetometer, ionosonde, and GPS observations. Unlike earlier reports, we have suitably chosen the best quiet days (CQ-Days) amongst 10 international quiet days (Q-Days), on the basis of equatorial electrojet strength and pattern, that drives the distribution of plasma over the low latitude. We stress that arbitrarily selecting the Control/Q-Days may lead to erroneous interpretations and will not yield a clearer understanding of the equatorial electrodynamics. Our analysis confirms the anomalous increase in TEC at all stations on 29 Oct 2003 and suppressed TEC across anomaly crest latitudes during 30-31 Oct 2003. The sharp transition in h'F is noticed during the progressive period of the storm, though it was relatively lower at the equator. The respective foF2 remained subordinate at Trivandrum. However, we did not notice such foF2 changes at Delhi. Observations at various latitudes confirm the maximum positive deviation of TEC at mid-latitude POL2 (140 %), followed by the low latitude Jodhpur (108 %), and the rest of the stations showing relatively lower enhancements with deviations ranging between 60-90 %. However, at Ahmedabad, the lowest divergence from the mean CQ-Days, attribute the typical quiet day formation of crest at this latitude. Although the results are well agreeing with earlier reports, miniature differences is noticeable due to our way of choosing the best reference days in the analysis.

  2. Observation of energy spectrum of electron albedo in low latitude region at Hyderabad, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. D.; Bhatnagar, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    The preliminary results are presented of the measurement of the energy spectrum of low energy (5-24 MeV) albedo electrons, moving upward as well as downwards, at about 37 km (-4 mb) altitude, over Hyderabad, India, in low latitude region. The flux and energy spectrum was observed by a bi-directional, multidetector charged particle telescope which was flown in a high altitude balloon on 8th December 1984. Results based on a quick look data acquisition and analysis system are presented here.

  3. Observations of electron beams in the low-latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    ISEE 1 electron spectrometer observations are used to study the electron distribution function in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) of the magnetosphere in the sunward direction. The study included 43 examples of well-defined layers. Using three-dimensional, model-independent distribution functions of electrons observed in the boundary layer, beams of field-aligned electrons with typically 100 eV energy maximums, streaming in either one, or both, directions have been identified. The phase densities in the LLBL and at lower altitudes are similar, and the beams observed in the LLBL are identified with those observed at lower altitudes. They form an important component of the plasma electrons in the LLBL, which otherwise resembles a mixture of magnetosheath-like and magnetospheric electrons.

  4. Low-latitude Pi2 oscillations observed by polar Low Earth Orbiting satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Neethal; Vichare, Geeta; Sinha, A. K.; Rawat, Rahul

    2015-09-01

    Low-latitude Pi2 pulsations in the topside ionosphere are investigated using vector magnetic field measurements from LEO satellite, CHAMP, and underneath ground station. Substorm-associated Pi2s are initially identified using high-resolution data from Indian station Shillong, during 2007-2009, and are further classified into three subgroups of Pi2 band (6-25 mHz), based on its frequency. During nighttime, coherent in-phase oscillations are observed in the compressional component at satellite and horizontal component at underneath ground station for all the Pi2 events, irrespective of the Pi2 frequency. We observe that the identification of daytime Pi2s at CHAMP (compressional component) depends on the frequency of Pi2 oscillation; i.e., 40%, 45%, and 100% of Pi2 events observed in dayside ground station with frequency between 6-10 mHz, 10-15 mHz, and 15-25 mHz were identified at satellite, respectively. At CHAMP during daytime, the presence of a dominant power in the lower frequencies of Pi2 band, which is unique to satellite, is consistently observed and can modify the Pi2 oscillations. Pi2s having frequency >15 mHz are less affected by these background frequencies, and a clear signature of daytime Pi2s at CHAMP is possible to observe, provided that contribution from non-Pi2 frequencies at satellite from the lower end of Pi2 band is eliminated. Daytime Pi2s identified in the topside ionosphere showed coherent but mostly opposite phase oscillations with underneath ground station, and satellite-to-ground amplitude ratio is, in general, found to be less than 1. Present results indicate that a combination of fast cavity-mode oscillations and an instantaneous transmission of Pi2 electric field from high- to low-latitude ionosphere is responsible for the observation of daytime Pi2s.

  5. On the observations of unique low latitude whistler-triggered VLF/ELF emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaf, M.; Singh, K. K.; Singh, A. K.; Lalmani

    A detailed analysis of the VLF/ELF wave data obtained during a whistler campaign under All India Coordinated Program of Ionosphere Thermosphere Studies (AICPITS) at our low latitude Indian ground station Jammu (geomag. lat. = 22° 26‧ N, L = 1.17) has yielded two types of unusual and unique whistler-triggered VLF/ELF emissions. These include (1) whistler-triggered hook emissions and (2) whistler-triggered long enduring discrete chorus riser emissions in VLF/ELF frequency range during night time. Such types of whistler-triggered emissions have not been reported earlier from any of the ground observations at low latitudes. In the present study, the observed characteristics of these emissions are described and interpreted. Dispersion analysis of these emissions show that the whistlers as well as emissions have propagated along a higher geomagnetic field line path with L-values lying ∼L = 4, suggesting that these triggered emissions are to be regarded as mid-latitude emissions. These waves could have propagated along the geomagnetic field lines either in a ducted mode or in a pro-longitudinal (PL) mode. The measured intensity of the triggered emissions is almost equal to that of the source waves and does not vary throughout the period of observation on that day. It is speculated that these emissions may have been generated through a process of resonant interaction of the whistler waves with energetic electrons. Parameters related to this interaction are computed for different values of L and wave amplitude. The proposed mechanism explains some aspects of the dynamic spectra.

  6. Proton albedo spectrum observation in low latitude region at Hyderabad, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. D.; Kothari, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The flux and the energy spectrum of low energy (30-100 MeV) proton albedos, have been observed for the first time in a low latitude region, over Hyderabad, India. The preliminary results, based on the quick look data acquisition and display system are presented. A charged particle telescope, capable of distinguishing singly charged particles such as electrons, muons, protons in low energy region, records the data of both upward as well as downward moving particles. Thus spectra of splash and re-entrant albedo protons have been recorded simultaneously in a high altitude Balloon flight carried out on 8th December, 1985, over Hyderabad, India. Balloon floated at an latitude of approx. 37 km (4 mb).

  7. Ionospheric plasma bubbles observed concurrently by multi-instruments over low-latitude station Hainan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. J.; Shi, J. K.; Reinisch, B. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the ionospheric "strong range spread F" (SSF) closely correlates with the occurrence of scintillations caused by equatorial plasma bubbles. However, there is no report on concurrent observations of SSF and bubbles with in situ measurement. This paper discusses two cases of concurrent observations with a DPS4 Digisonde and a collocated scintillation monitor at the low-latitude station Hainan (19.5°N, 109.1°E), and with in situ ion density measurements made by the ROCSAT-1 satellite. Two case studies were made for 10 and 23 April 2004, respectively. In both cases, the SSF occurred before midnight and lasted more than 3.5 h. The scintillations were accompanied with strong range SF. Concurrently, the ROCSAT-1 satellite observed plasma bubbles over Hainan station. In the first case, two bubbles were observed by the satellite with east-west sizes of more than ~200 km over Hainan station. Two bubbles were also observed in the second case with east-west extensions of about 220 km and 35 km, respectively. For the first time, direct observational evidence is provided for the causal relationship between equatorial plasma bubbles with in situ measurement and the concurrent occurrence of SSF and strong scintillations.

  8. Observations of Low-Latitude Plasma Density Enhancements and their Associated Plasma Drifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, J. H.; Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Le, G.; Freudenreich, H.; Haaser, R. A.; Burrell, A. G.; Stoneback, R. A.; Coley, W. R.; Heelis, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma density structures are frequently encountered in the nighttime low-latitude ionosphere by probes on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. Of particular interest to us here are plasma density enhancements, which are typically observed +/- 15 deg away from the magnetic equator. The low inclination of the C/NOFS satellite offers an unprecedented opportunity to examine these structures and their associated electric fields and plasma velocities, including their field-aligned components, along an east-west trajectory. Among other observations, the data reveal a clear asymmetry in the velocity structure within and around these density enhancements. Previous observations have shown that the peak change in drift velocity associated with a density enhancement occurs simultaneously both perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field, while the 1results in this paper show that the peak change in parallel fl ow typically occurs 25-100 km to the east of the peak perpendicular ow. We discuss this and other aspects of the observations in relation to the characteristics of the plasma depletions formed near the magnetic equator detected by the same probes on the C/NOFS satellite and to previous observations and theories.

  9. Patterns of GPS-TEC variation over low-latitude regions (African sector) during the deep solar minimum (2008 to 2009) and solar maximum (2012 to 2013) phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariku, Yekoye Asmare

    2015-03-01

    Due to the unique geometry of the geomagnetic fields near the magnetic equator and low-latitude regions, the satellite communication system in the African sector is strongly influenced by the effects resulting from the accumulation of electrons in their ionosphere. Hence, this paper investigates the patterns of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) variation detected by the Global Positioning System (GPS) over low-latitude regions during a very low (2008 to 2009) and a high solar activity (2012 to 2013) phases. The study has been carried out by considering eight ground-based dual-frequency GPS receivers installed recently at different regions in Ethiopia. In this work, the diurnal, monthly, and seasonal variations in the GPS-VTEC have been analyzed. It has been found that the diurnal variability of VTEC has shown minimum values at around 0300 UT (0600 local time (LT)) and maximum values nearly between 1000 and 1300 UT (1300 and 1600 LT) during both the low and the high activity phases. Moreover, the maximum and minimum of monthly mean hourly VTEC values are observed in October and July, respectively, during both the low (2009) and the high solar activity (2012) phases. It has also been depicted that seasonal mean hourly VTEC values have shown maxima and minima in the March equinox and the June solstice, respectively, during both the low and the high solar activity phases.

  10. HF Doppler radar observations of sporadic E at an Indian low latitude station, Visakhapatnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, M. S. S. R. K. N.; Raghava Reddy, C.; Niranjan, K.

    2009-02-01

    5.5 MHz HF Doppler radar observations of Sporadic E over an Indian low latitude station, Visakhapatnam (17.7° N, 83.3° E and Dip 20°) with 10 s resolution showed quasi-periodic variations of the echo strength and Doppler velocity variations with periods of a few minutes to a few tens of minutes. The echo strength and Doppler velocity variations with time in different range bins of the ES echo showed variations which are some times similar and some times significantly different in successive range bins at intervals of 7.5 km. The ES echo occurs with the height of maximum echo strength in the range of 100 km to 120 km and some times at 130 km. The altitude variation of the average Doppler velocity is highly variable and the height of maximum echo strength is not the same as the height of maximum Doppler velocity. Observations of ES echoes at different times of the day are presented to bring out the differences between the day and night time ES echoes. The relationship between Radar and ES parameters derived from Ionograms is poorer than that of mid latitudes which is quite consistent with the expectations based on gradient drift instability.

  11. Recent Plasma Observations Related to Dayside Magnetic Merging and the Low-latitude Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Avanov, Levon A.; Craven, Paul D.; Mozer, Forrest S.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    We have begun an investigation of the nature of the low-latitude boundary layer in the mid-altitude cusp region using data from the Polar spacecraft. This region has been routinely sampled for about three months each year for the periods 1999-2001 and 2004-2006. The low-to-mid-energy ion instruments frequently observed dense, magnetosheath-like plasma deep (in terms of distance from the magnetopause and in invariant latitude) in the magnetosphere. One such case, taken during a period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), shows magnetosheath ions within the magnetosphere with velocity distributions resulting from two separate merging sites along the same field lines. Cold ionospheric ions were also observed counterstreaming along the field lines, evidence that these field lines were closed. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that double merging can produce closed field lines populated by solar wind plasma. Through the use of individual cases such as this and statistical studies of a broader database we seek to understand the morphology of the LLBL as it projects from the sub-solar region into the cusp. We will present preliminary results of our ongoing study.

  12. GIC due to storm sudden commencement in low-latitude high-voltage power network in China: Observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. J.; Wang, C.; Sun, T. R.; Liu, C. M.; Wang, K. R.

    2015-10-01

    The impact of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) on the power networks at middle and low latitudes has attracted attention in recent years with the increase of large-scale power networks. In this study, we report the GIC monitored at two low-latitude 500 kV substations of China during the large storm of 17 March 2015. The GIC due to the storm sudden commencement (SSC) was much higher than that during the storm main phase. This phenomenon is more likely to happen at low-latitude locations, highlighting the importance of SSC in inducing GIC in low-latitude power networks. Furthermore, we ran a global MHD model to simulate the GIC during this SSC event by using the solar wind observation as input. The model results reproduced the main features of the GIC. The study also indicated that the eastward component of the geoelectric field is dominant for low-latitude locations during the SSC events. Further, topology and electrical parameters of the power grids make significant differences in the GIC levels.

  13. Spectral features of lightning-induced ion cyclotron waves at low latitudes: DEMETER observations and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyar, D. R.; Storey, L. R. O.; Chum, J.; JiříčEk, F.; NěMec, F.; Parrot, M.; Santolik, O.; Titova, E. E.

    2012-12-01

    We use a comprehensive analysis of 6-component ELF wave data from the DEMETER satellite to study proton whistlers, placing emphasis on low-latitude events originating from lightning strokes in the hemisphere opposite to the hemisphere of observation. In this case, the formation of proton whistlers does not involve mode conversion caused by a strong mode coupling at a crossover frequency, although a polarization reversal remains an important element in formation of the phenomenon. DEMETER measurements of the six electromagnetic field components in the frequency band below 1000 Hz make it possible to determine not only the dynamic spectrum, but also the wave polarization, the wave normal angle, and the normalized parallel component of the Poynting vector. This permits us to address fine features of proton whistlers, in particular, we show that the deviation of the upper cutoff frequency from the equatorial cyclotron frequency is related to the Doppler shift. Experimental study of proton whistlers is supplemented by an investigation of ion cyclotron wave propagation in a multicomponent magnetoplasma and by numerical modeling of spectrograms, both in the frame of geometrical optics.

  14. Variability of Schumann resonance parameters observed at low latitude stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, X.-Y.; Xiao, Z.; Hao, Y.-Q.; Zhang, D.-H.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the Schumann resonance (SR) parameters observed at low latitude stations in China for the first time. Variations of SR peak frequency and intensity on different timescales (from minutes to years) are analyzed in detail. Diurnal and seasonal variations are shown and the source-observer distance is calculated to confirm the contributions of lightning activity. Differences in the profiles of SR intensity between the NS and EW components are due to the effects of the source-observer distance and the relative position of the observer to the sources. Diurnal frequency variations are more complicated and cannot be directly linked with the three thunderstorm centers. Seasonal variations are clear for intensity but not for frequency. The differences in the diurnal and seasonal variations between the SR intensity and frequency show that the greatest contributor to SR intensity is global lightning activity, while the SR frequency is not affected solely by lightning, as certain other factors involving ionosphere properties may play non-negligible roles. We also emphasize that our observations do not show a distinct day-night change in the SR parameters, and that the SR intensity does not show abrupt changes across terminators. This observation is consistent with previous simulations. Finally, the response of the SR to a solar flare is discussed. The flare leads to a sudden increase of about 0.2 Hz relative to the 2σ level of the SR frequencies in the first three modes, which is in agreement with other works in the literature. This frequency enhancement is explained using theoretical calculations.

  15. MESSENGER observations of the dayside low-latitude boundary layer in Mercury's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljeblad, Elisabet; Karlsson, Tomas; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Kullen, Anita; Sundberg, T.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2015-10-01

    Observations from MErcury Surface Space ENvironment GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER)'s Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer instruments during the first orbital year have resulted in the identification of 25 magnetopause crossings in Mercury's magnetosphere with significant low-latitude boundary layers (LLBLs). Of these crossings 72% are observed dawnside and 65% for northward interplanetary magnetic field. The estimated LLBL thickness is 450 ± 56 km and increases with distance to noon. The Na+ group ion is sporadically present in 14 of the boundary layers, with an observed average number density of 22 ± 11% of the proton density. Furthermore, the average Na+ group gyroradii in the layers is 220 ± 34 km, the same order of magnitude as the LLBL thickness. Magnetic shear, plasma β and reconnection rates have been estimated for the LLBL crossings and compared to those of a control group (non-LLBL) of 61 distinct magnetopause crossings which show signs of nearly no plasma inside the magnetopause. The results indicate that reconnection is significantly slower, or even suppressed, for the LLBL crossings compared to the non-LLBL cases. Possible processes that form or impact the LLBL are discussed. Protons injected through the cusp or flank may be important for the formation of the LLBL. Furthermore, the opposite asymmetry in the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) as compared to the LLBL rules out the KHI as a dominant formation mechanism. However, the KHI and LLBL could be related to each other, either by the impact of sodium ions gyrating across the magnetopause or by the LLBL preventing the growth of KH waves on the dawnside.

  16. MESSENGER Observations of the Dayside Low-Latitude Boundary Layer in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljeblad, E. I.; Karlsson, T.; Raines, J. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Kullen, A.; Sundberg, T.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from MESSENGER's MAG and FIPS instruments during the first orbital year have resulted in the identification of 25 magnetopause crossings in Mercury's magnetosphere with significant low-latitude boundary layers (LLBLs). The large majority of these crossings are observed on the dawnside and for northward interplanetary magnetic field. The estimated LLBL thickness is 450±56 km, and increases with distance to noon. The Na+-group ion is sporadically present in 14 of the boundary layers, with an observed average number density of 22±11 % of the proton density. Furthermore, the average Na+-group gyroradii in the layers is 220±34 km, the same order of magnitude as the LLBL thickness. Magnetic shear, plasma β and reconnection rates have been estimated for the LLBL crossings, and compared to those of a control group (non-LLBL) of 61 distinct magnetopause crossings which show signs of nearly no plasma inside the magnetopause. The results indicate that reconnection is significantly slower, or even suppressed, for the LLBL crossings compared to the non-LLBL cases. Possible processes that form or impact the LLBL are discussed. Protons injected through the cusp or flank may be important for the formation of the LLBL. Furthermore, the opposite asymmetry in the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) as compared to the LLBL, rules out the KHI as a dominant formation mechanism. However, the KHI and LLBL could be related to each other, either by the impact of sodium ions gyrating across the magnetopause, or by the LLBL preventing the growth of KH waves on the dawnside.

  17. Observations of the intraseasonal oscillations over two Brazilian low latitude stations: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, A.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.; Buriti, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A comparative study of intraseasonal oscillations (ISO) in the period range 20-110 days is carried out in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) zonal wind at two low latitude stations, Cariri (7.4°S, 36.5°W) and Cachoeira Paulista (22.7°S, 45°W) located far from the convective anomaly region. Considerable seasonal and interannual variability is observed. The ISO in the MLT and lower atmosphere are found to be well correlated during winter and spring indicating a coupling of the atmospheric regions through the ISO. On the other hand, relatively less correlation during summer and fall may suggest a dominance of the in situ excitation of the ISO in the MLT relative to the lower atmospheric contribution. The correlation between the MLT and lower atmosphere is found to be a little higher at Cachoeira Paulista than Cariri. The ISO in the MLT shows good correlation between the two stations, but correlation is insignificant in the case of lower atmosphere. The ISO is most prominent in the upper troposphere, upper stratosphere and MLT. The waves responsible for communicating the ISO signature from the troposphere to the middle atmosphere in the tropics are believed to refract through mid-latitudes in course of their propagation. An evident height variation of the high amplitude ISO in the upper troposphere is observed with a clear annual oscillation at Cariri. The observed behaviors of the ISO at the present sites are discussed in the light of plausible physical mechanisms.

  18. Global, low-latitude, vertical E × B drift velocities inferred from daytime magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David; Anghel, Adela; Chau, Jorge L.; Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    2006-08-01

    Navigation and communication, Department of Defense and civilian, customers rely on accurate, low-latitude specification of ionospheric parameters, globally, that are not currently realistic on a day-to-day basis. This paper describes, demonstrates, and speculates about the data sets that are required inputs to the operational ionospheric models that will correct these deficiencies. In order to investigate quiet time, vertical E × B drift velocities at two different longitude sectors, magnetometer observations were obtained for the period between January 2001 and December 2004 from the magnetometers at Jicamarca (0.8°N dip latitude) and Piura (6.8°N dip latitude) in Peru and from Davao (1.4°S dip latitude) and Muntinlupa (6.3°N dip latitude) in the Philippine sector. We choose only geomagnetically "quiet" days, when the 3-hourly Kp value never exceeds a value of 3 over the entire day, and when the daily Ap value is less than 10. These are "binned" into three seasons, December solstice, equinox, and June solstice periods. A neural network trained for the Peruvian sector was applied to each of the days in both the Peruvian and Philippine sectors, providing ΔH-inferred vertical E × B drift velocities between 0700 and 1700 local time. For each season, the average E × B drift velocity curves are compared with the Fejer-Scherliess, climatological E × B drift velocity curves in both the Peruvian and Philippine sectors. In the Peruvian sector, the comparisons are excellent, and in the Philippine sector they are very good. We demonstrate that realistic magnetometer-inferred E × B drifts can be obtained in the Peruvian sector on a day-to-day basis and speculate that on the basis of the average, quiet day comparisons, realistic E × B drifts can be obtained on quiet days in the Philippine sector.

  19. Ionosphere TEC disturbances before strong earthquakes: observations, physics, modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgaladze, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenon of the pre-earthquake ionospheric disturbances is discussed. A number of typical TEC (Total Electron Content) relative disturbances is presented for several recent strong earthquakes occurred in different ionospheric conditions. Stable typical TEC deviations from quiet background state are observed few days before the strong seismic events in the vicinity of the earthquake epicenter and treated as ionospheric earthquake precursors. They don't move away from the source in contrast to the disturbances related with geomagnetic activity. Sunlit ionosphere approach leads to reduction of the disturbances up to their full disappearance, and effects regenerate at night. The TEC disturbances often observed in the magnetically conjugated areas as well. At low latitudes they accompany with equatorial anomaly modifications. The hypothesis about the electromagnetic channel of the pre-earthquake ionospheric disturbances' creation is discussed. The lithosphere and ionosphere are coupled by the vertical external electric currents as a result of ionization of the near-Earth air layer and vertical transport of the charged particles through the atmosphere over the fault. The external electric current densities exceeding the regular fair-weather electric currents by several orders are required to produce stable long-living seismogenic electric fields such as observed by onboard measurements of the 'Intercosmos-Bulgaria 1300' satellite over the seismic active zones. The numerical calculation results using the Upper Atmosphere Model demonstrate the ability of the external electric currents with the densities of 10-8-10-9 A/m2 to produce such electric fields. The sumulations reproduce the basic features of typical pre-earthquake TEC relative disturbances. It is shown that the plasma ExB drift under the action of the seismogenic electric field leads to the changes of the F2 region electron number density and TEC. The upward drift velocity component enhances NmF2 and TEC and

  20. Variability of the ionospheric plasma density, NmF2, and of Total Electron Content, TEC, over equatorial and low latitude region in Brazil during solar minimum activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candido, Claudia; Batista, Inez S.; Negreti, Patricia M. S.; Klausner, Virginia

    The recent solar minimum period was unusually deep and prolonged, which opened a window to observe the ionospheric behavior under unprecedented low solar activity conditions. This work is part of a multi-instrumental effort to investigate the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere over Brazilian sector during low solar activity. We present a study of the ionospheric plasma densities variations through ionosondes measurements and dual frequency GPS receivers (L1= 1275.4 MHz, L2 = 1227.6 MHz) for two equatorial stations, Sao Luis (3° S, 45º W) e Fortaleza (4° S, 39.5° W), and for a station close to the south crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly region, Cachoeira Paulista (23º S, 45º W). From ionosondes we extract the plasma critical frequency foF2 which is related to F2 region peak electron density, NmF2, by the relationship: NmF2 = 1.24 x 104 (foF2)2, and the F2 layer peak height, hmF2. From GPS receivers we used the quantity VTEC (Vertical total electron content). We analyzed the seasonal and local time variations of NmF2 and VTEC, as well as the differences between two solar minima, 2008-2009 and 1996. We observe that the ionospheric plasma densities were lower in 2008-2009 than in 1996 for both regions. In addition, we observe that the lowest plasma densities persisted longer during 2008/2009 than in 1996, especially for nighttime periods. Finally, we applied the wavelet technique to investigate the impact of some distinct time scales drivers on the ionosphere, such as the wave activity from below that seems have been better observed and appreciated during this unusual solar quiescence.

  1. Ionospheric TEC observations from TOPEX satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimer, J.A.; Ewell, V.R.; Lee, M.C.; Doherty, P.H.; Decker, D.T.; Anderson, D.N.; Klobuchar, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Variability of Total Electron Content (TEC) in the equatorial anomaly region of the ionosphere can be studied extensively using the results of measurements taken by the NASA/CNES satellite, TOPEX/Poseidon. The NASA radar altimeter (NRA) is the first space-borne dual-frequency altimeter capable of accurately measuring vertical ionospheric TEC below 1,340 km. TOPEX TEC observations have already been used to support results from an ionospheric measurement campaign that was conducted in equatorial anomaly regions of South America by Phillips Laboratory in Spring, 1994. The best agreement in TEC values is seen during intervals of longitudinal proximity of the satellites` paths. The TOPEX over-ocean data can be used as a supplement to land based measurements in applications to ionospheric research at low and middle latitudes. This study focuses on comparisons between TOPEX vertical TEC data and GPS equivalent vertical TEC measurements taken near the East and West coastal regions of South America. Also the Phillips Laboratory Global Parameterized Ionospheric Model (PIM) is utilized in an effort to estimate slant to vertical conversion errors.

  2. Observations of TEC Depletions in South and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.; Pradipta, R.

    2014-12-01

    TEC values gathered with several networks of GPS receivers, which operated in South and Central America and the Caribbean region between 2010 and 2013, have been used to investigate the characteristics and morphology of TEC depletions that develop at these locations. In South America the TEC depletions are associated with low-latitude plasma bubbles. In Central America and the Caribbean region, we found that TEC depletions that occur during magnetically active conditions (Kp > 5o), persist for very long periods and sometimes remain even during afternoon hours. During quiet magnetic conditions, TEC depletions occur around the June solstice in Central America and during the December solstice in the Southern part of South America. We have also studied possible links between mid-latitude depletions and the formation of plasma bubbles at low latitudes. In addition, TEC measurements from North America have been utilized to determine the poleward extension of the mid-latitude depletions. These depletions do not appear to be related to auroral plasma processes or to storm enhanced densities (SED). We are studying the possibility that their initiation process is associated with the disturbance dynamo or the prompt penetrating electric field that develop during storm conditions.

  3. Ionospheric studies using a low-latitude ionospheric model (LION-model) and ground-based ionosonde observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillat, V. G.; Bittencourt, J. A.; Fagundes, P. R.

    Ionospheric observations made with ionosondes of the type CADI at S a o Jos e dos Campos 23 2 o S 45 9 o W dip latitude 17 6 o S and at Palmas 10 2 S 48 2 W dip latitude 5 7 S Brazil under conditions of high and low solar activity are presented and compared with ionospheric results obtained from a realistic fully time-dependent Low-Latitude Ionosphere Model denominated LION model which simulates the dynamic behavior of the low-latitude ionosphere In the LION model the time evolution and spatial distribution of the ionospheric particle densities and velocities are computed by numerically solving the time-dependent coupled nonlinear system of continuity and momentum equations for the ions O O 2 NO N 2 and N taking into account photoionization of the atmospheric species by the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation chemical and ionic production and loss reactions and plasma transport processes including the ionospheric effects of thermospheric neutral winds plasma diffusion and electromagnetic E x B plasma drift The Earth s magnetic field is represented by a tilted centered magnetic dipole This set of coupled nonlinear equations is solved along a given magnetic field line in a frame of reference moving vertically in the magnetic meridian plane with the electromagnetic plasma drift velocity The model results reproduce adequately the main characteristics and dynamic behavior of the low-latitude ionosphere under quiet

  4. Planetary-scale variability in the low-latitude E region field-aligned irregularities: First results from Gadanki observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, D. V.; Patra, A. K.; Ratnam, M. V.; Sripathi, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present for the first time planetary-scale wave signatures in the low-latitude E region field-aligned irregularities (FAI) observed during June 2004 to May 2005 using the Gadanki mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar. We have observed a clear signature of 5-8 day variability in echo occurrence, in SNR, and also in Doppler velocity observed above 100 km. Concurrent temperature observations made using the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) on board the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetic and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite have also clearly shown the presence of 5-8 day variability similar to that of FAI. The temperature variations have been characterized with zonal wave numbers of 3 and 4 and vertical wavelength of 15-20 km. These waves are found to have increasing amplitude with increasing height and phase progressing downward, suggesting that they were of lower atmospheric origin. It is emphasized that the planetary-scale characteristics of neutral atmosphere in the FAI observations are important in understanding the vertical coupling of the low-latitude ionosphere-atmosphere system. These observations and the pertinent issues are discussed in the light of current understanding of the planetary-scale role on the FAI variability.

  5. Propagation characteristics of Pi 2 pulsations observed at high- and low-latitude MAGDAS/CPMN stations: A statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uozumi, Teiji; Abe, S.; Kitamura, K.; Tokunaga, T.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kawano, H.; Marshall, R.; Morris, R. J.; Shevtsov, B. M.; Solovyev, S. I.; McNamara, D. J.; Liou, K.; Ohtani, S.; Itonaga, M.; Yumoto, K.

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study is to understand better the propagation of Pi 2 waves in the nighttime region. We examined Pi 2 oscillations that showed high correlation between high- and low-latitude Magnetic Data Acquisition System/Circum Pan-Pacific Magnetometer Network stations (correlation coefficient: ∣γ∣ ≥ 0.75). For each horizontal component (H and D) we examined the magnetic local time (MLT) dependence of the delay time of high-latitude Pi 2 oscillations that corresponds to the highest correlation with the low-latitude Pi 2 oscillation. We found the delay time of the high-latitude H showed remarkable MLT dependence, especially in the premidnight sector: we found that in the premidnight sector the high-latitude H oscillation tends to delay from the low-latitude oscillation (<100 s). On the other hand, the delay time of the high-latitude D oscillation was not significant (˜±10 s) in the entire nighttime sector. We propose a Pi 2 propagation model to explain the observed delay time of high-correlation high-latitude H. The model quantitatively explains the trend of the event distribution. We also examined the spatial distribution of high-correlation Pi 2 events relative to the center of auroral breakups. It was found that the high-correlation Pi 2 events tend to occur away from the center of auroral breakups by more than 1.5 MLT. The present result suggests that the high-correlation H component Pi 2 oscillations at high latitude are a manifestation of forced Alfvén waves excited by fast magnetosonic waves.

  6. Low Latitude Ionosphere Measurements by the Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastes, R. W.; Anderson, D. N.; McClintock, W. E.; Aksnes, A.; Andersson, L.; Burns, A. G.; Budzien, S. A.; Codrescu, M. V.; Daniell, R. E.; Dymond, K. F.; England, S. L.; Eparvier, F. J.; Harvey, J. E.; Immel, T. J.; Krywonos, A.; Lankton, M. R.; Lumpe, J. D.; Richmond, A. D.; Rusch, D. W.; Siegmund, O. H.; Solomon, S. C.; Strickland, D. J.; Woods, T. N.

    2008-12-01

    The GOLD Mission of Opportunity will provide answers to key elements of an overarching question for Heliophysics science: what is the global-scale response of the thermosphere and ionosphere to forcing in the integrated Sun-Earth system? GOLD will perform remote-sensing measurements of the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere, using an ultraviolet imager on board a commercial, geosynchronous satellite. The resulting measurements of the electron densities in the nighttime ionosphere as well as the neutral composition and temperature in the thermosphere, when combined with current modeling capabilities, will advance our understanding of Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) forcing. GOLD will provide the first global- scale "snapshot" of temperature that can be compared with the coincident "snapshot" of composition changes to understand how these two major parameters simultaneously react to the various forcing mechanisms. GOLD will continue observing the same longitudes from the daytime into the night allowing the relationship between presunset conditions in the T-I system and the longitudinal dependence of variations in the ionosphere to be separated. One question that GOLD will address is: do vertical ion drifts, as manifested in the structure of the equatorial anomaly, affect the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities? Solar and geomagnetic forcing produces variations in the structure of the equatorial ionosphere at night (equatorial anomaly) and the occurrence of irregularities within the ionosphere. These ionospheric density variations, with scale sizes ranging from hundreds to tens of km, have profound effects on systems using radio frequencies. Irregularities at low latitudes are produced in the post-sunset ionosphere by the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability. The growth of these R-T instabilities into large-scale plasma bubbles has an optical signature and is the greatest source of ionospheric irregularities at low latitudes. Simulations of GOLD observations indicate

  7. Properties of low-latitude mantle plasma in the Earth's magnetotail: ARTEMIS observations and global MHD predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Lyons, Larry R.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-09-01

    The Earth's plasma mantle is one of the major suppliers of particles for the plasma sheet. To understand its plasma characteristics, spatial distributions, and dependencies on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, we statistically analyzed the Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) observations in the low-latitude magnetotail (~10 RE above and below the current sheet) and investigated the predictions from global Block Adaptive Tree Solar wind-Roe-Upwind Scheme MHD simulations. The mantle plasma flows tailward along magnetic field lines (~50-200 km/s) and at the same time drifts toward midnight and toward the current sheet. The mantle plasma has similar temperature (~0.05-0.2 keV) to the magnetosheath plasma but has lower density (~0.1-1 cm-3). The mantle appearance is dawn-dusk asymmetric depending mainly on the IMF By direction. The occurrence rates, density, and V|| all decrease with decreasing |Y|. This density cross-tail profile suggests that the low-latitude mantle plasma mainly comes from the magnetosheath entering through the tail magnetopause along the open field lines. Density is highly and positively correlated with V||. These observations are qualitatively consistent with the MHD results. The simulations indicate that as IMF By becomes dominant, the source locations at the magnetopause for the mantle move to lower latitudes and become dawn-dusk asymmetric, and the tail cross section also becomes distorted with the magnetopause shape elongating and the current sheet tilting significantly. Degrees of these changes also vary with the downtail distances and IMF Bz direction. The source location change leads to the dawn-dusk asymmetric mantle appearance. The tail cross-section change alters the distance from the sources to the current sheet and thus the resulting mantle density distributions just outside the plasma sheet.

  8. Geomagnetically conjugate observation of plasma bubbles and thermospheric neutral winds at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, D.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Nishioka, M.; Kubota, M.; Tsugawa, T.; Nagatsuma, T.; Komonjinda, S.; Yatini, C. Y.

    2015-03-01

    This is the first paper that reports simultaneous observations of zonal drift of plasma bubbles and the thermospheric neutral winds at geomagnetically conjugate points in both hemispheres. The plasma bubbles were observed in the 630 nm nighttime airglow images taken by using highly sensitive all-sky airglow imagers at Kototabang, Indonesia (geomagnetic latitude (MLAT): 10.0°S), and Chiang Mai, Thailand (MLAT: 8.9°N), which are nearly geomagnetically conjugate stations, for 7 h from 13 to 20 UT (from 20 to 03 LT) on 5 April 2011. The bubbles continuously propagated eastward with velocities of 100-125 m/s. The 630 nm images at Chiang Mai and those mapped to the conjugate point of Kototabang fit very well, which indicates that the observed plasma bubbles were geomagnetically connected. The eastward thermospheric neutral winds measured by two Fabry-Perot interferometers were 70-130 m/s at Kototabang and 50-90 m/s at Chiang Mai. We compared the observed plasma bubble drift velocity with the velocity calculated from the observed neutral winds and the model conductivity, to investigate the F region dynamo contribution to the bubble drift velocity. The estimated drift velocities were 60-90% of the observed velocities of the plasma bubbles, suggesting that most of the plasma bubble velocity can be explained by the F region dynamo effect.

  9. Low-latitude quasiperiodic echoes observed with the Piura VHF Radar in the E region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Jorge L.; Woodman, Ronald F.

    We present the first quasiperiodic (QP) echoes from 3-m E region field-aligned irregularities observed in the Southamerican sector, just outside the magnetic equator (7.5°N geomagnetic). These QP echoes occur only at night and between 105 and 120 km. In general, Piura QP echoes present periods close to the Brunt-Väisälä period (5 to 10 min), striations with positive slopes and altitude rates of 20-25 m s-1 (upward/northward), striations spacings of 3 to 10 km, and downward/southward Doppler velocities. These results are compared to midlatitude QP echoes from 3- and 6-m irregularities observed between 13.3°N and 46.7°N geomagnetic. We found that the general characteristics that are common to our observations and other QP observations are the nighttime occurrence and the periods close to the Brunt-Väisälä period. On the other hand, the discrepancies with some of the QP echoes observed at mid-latitudes are found in the slope and spacing of the striations, the mean phase velocities, and the mean altitude location of the E layer containing the striations.

  10. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology 5 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6 inclination angle. Due to the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as sub auroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at sub auroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST -5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  11. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology Five Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Due to the Earth s rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft s dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  12. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology 5 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6 degree inclination angle. Due to the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at sub auroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  13. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology 5 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Due to the Earth s rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft s dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that this unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  14. Equinoctial asymmetry in low latitude ionosphere as observed by SROSS-C2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Ananna; Aggarwal, Malini; Sharma, D. K.; Rai, J.

    2014-09-01

    The ionospheric plasma parameters (electron, ion temperatures and ion composition-Te, Ti, O+ and H+) measured by SROSS-C2 satellite at an average altitude of ~500 km has been investigated to study the behaviour of the ionosphere in equinoxes during half a solar cycle (year 1995-2000, F10.7 ~70-195). The region under study spans over 5-35°N geog. latitude and 65-95°E geog. longitude in the Indian sector. We found an equinoctial asymmetry in the diurnal behaviour of Te, Ti, O+ and H+ varying with increase in solar activity. The strength of equinoctial asymmetry in Te and Ti is strong during early morning and daytime and strength decreases with increase in solar activity whereas during night time no asymmetry/weaker is observed in low/high solar activity respectively. During the day time, a very strong equinoctial asymmetry in O+ is observed during solar minimum which diminishes with increase in solar activity. The similar diurnal behaviour of H+ as that of O+ is observed during low solar activity but no clear equinoctial asymmetry is observed during solar maximum, as H+ being highly dynamic. The transition height (O+/H+) is the lowest in early morning during solar minimum, which increases during local day-time. The rate of increase in transition height is different in both the equinoxes (higher in vernal than autumn) with respect to dependence on the solar activity, during daytime. Hence equinoctial asymmetry is stronger during solar minimum period than maximum, with higher/lower transition height in vernal during daytime/nighttime respectively.

  15. Far ultraviolet Observations of Jovian low latitude regions with HST/STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustin, J.; Grodent, D.; Gerard, J. C.; Dols, V.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Trafton, L. T.

    1999-09-01

    Far ultraviolet observations of the Jovian disk were made at low and mid-latitudes with FUV MAMA/STIS on board HST in January 1999 both in the imaging and spectroscopic modes. An image was obtained with the Lyalpha filter in the hydrogen bulge region for comparison with the expected Lyman-alpha brightness distribution for Ly-alpha resonance scattering. Other images in the 1200-1700 { Angstroms} region show band structures parallel to the equator with fading contrast toward the center and the limb. Spectroscopic observations were made in the 1200-1700 { Angstroms} (G140L) and 1245-1298 { Angstroms} (G140M) regions at ~ 5 { Angstroms} resolution to map the H_2 airglow and the UV absorbents along the STIS slit. Preliminary results indicate that a C_2H_2 absorption signature is clearly observed in the solar ultraviolet reflected spectrum. The ethylene absorption may be mapped to derive variations of the acetylene abundance. The H_2 FUV airglow shows both the fluorescence and the electron impact components. Its spatial variation is described and compared with the expected airglow distribution. We acknowledge funding by NASA and by the PRODEX program of the European space agency.

  16. An atlas of low latitude 6300A (01) night airglow from OGO-4 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, E. I.; Fowler, W. B.; Blamont, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The atomic oxygen emission line at 6300 A, measured in the nadir direction by a photometer on the polar orbiting satellite OGO-4, was plotted between 40 deg N and 40 deg S latitude on a series of maps for the moon-free periods between 30 August 1967 and 10 January 1968 The longitudinal and local time variations which occur during the northern fall-winter season are indicated. The northern tropical arc is more widespread while the southern arc is not present at all longitudes. The conditions under which the observations were made are described, and four airglow maps were selected to show the local time variations.

  17. Response of equatorial and low latitude ionosphere to 2015 St. Patrick's Day super geomagnetic storm: Results from a chain of ground based observations over Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samireddipalle, Sripathi; Singh, Ram; Sreekumar, Sreeba; Suneel Kumar, Buduru

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present unique results of equatorial and low latitude ionosphere response to one of the major geomagnetic storms of the current solar cycle that occurred during 17-18 March 2015 where Dst reached its minimum of -228 nT. Here we utilized data from magnetometers, chain of ionosondes located at Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; geom: 0.320N), Hyderabad (17.360N, 78.470E; geom: 8.760N) and Allahabad (25.45°N, 81.85°E; geom: 16.50N) along with multi station GPS receivers over Indian sector. The observations showed a remarkable increase of h'F to as high as ~560 km over Tirunelveli (magnetic equator) with vertical drift of ~70 m/s at 13:30 UT due to direct penetration of storm time eastward electric fields which exactly coincided with the local time of Pre-Reversal Enhancement (PRE) and caused intense ESF irregularities in ionosondes and scintillations in GPS receivers at wide latitudes. Plasma irregularities are so intense that their signatures are seen in Allahabad/Lucknow. Stormtime thermospheric meridional winds as estimated using two ionosondes suggest the equatorward surge of gravity waves with period of ~2 hrs. Suppression of anomaly crest on the subsequent day of the storm suggests the complex role of disturbance dynamo electric fields and disturbance wind effects. Our results also show an interesting feature of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) possibly associated with disturbance meridional wind surge during recovery phase. In addition, noteworthy observations are nighttime westward zonal drifts and PRE related TEC enhancements at anomaly crests during main phase and CEJ signatures during recovery phase.

  18. Ground-satellite conjugate observations of low-latitude travelling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Suzuki, Shin; Liu, Huixin; Yatini, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are studied by using three CHAMP satellite overpasses on ground-based 630-nm airglow images. The airglow images are obtained from Kototabang (KTB), Indonesia (geographic coordinates: 0.2S, 100.3E, geomagnetic latitude: 10.6S). From 7-year data from October 2002 to October 2009, April 30, 2006 (event 1), September 28, 2006 (event 2) and April 12, 2004 (event 3) are the only TID events found in both ground and satellite measurements. They show southward-moving structures in 630-nm airglow images. The events 1 and 2 are single pulse with horizontal scales of ~500-1000 km and event 3 show three wave fronts with horizontal scale sizes of 500-700 km. For events 1 and 3, the neutral density in CHAMP shows out-of-phase variations with the airglow intensity, while event 2 is in-phase. For event 1, the relation between electron density and airglow intensity is out of phase, while relationships of event 2 and 3 are unclear. These unclear relationships suggest that ionospheric plasma variation is not the cause of the TIDs. In the case if gravity waves in the thermosphere is the source of the observed TIDs, in-phase and out-of-phase relationships of neutral density and airglow intensity can be explained by different vertical wavelengths of the gravity wave. We estimate possible vertical wavelengths for those events using observed wave parameters and modeled neutral winds.

  19. Joint observations of sporadic sodium and sporadic E layers at middle and low latitude in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guotao; Wang, Jihong; Du, Lifang; Yue, Chuan; Wang, Zelong; Jiao, MS. Jing

    The sporadic sodium layers (SSL) phenomena were studied with sodium (Na) lidar at Beijing (40. 5°N,116. 0°E) and Haikou (19.5°N, 109.1°E) in China. The main parameters of SSL and Es events were statistically analyzed at both observing sites. SSL occurrence has maximum near 22:00 LT, and Es occurrence has maximum before midnight. Comparison reveals that all the average values of height and strength factor of SSL and Es at Beijing are higher than those at Haikou, as well as the average of foEs. The correlation of SSL with Es is stronger at Haikou, and the formation of SSL is obviously influenced by seasonally varied chemical and dynamical processes.

  20. The spectral properties of low latitude daytime electric fields inferred from magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolls, Michael J.; Kelley, Michael C.; Chau, Jorge L.; Veliz, Oscar; Anderson, David; Anghel, Adela

    2007-07-01

    Four years of magnetometer data from two locations in Peru, one at the equator and one off the equator, have been converted to electric fields and their frequency characteristics (fluctuation spectra) examined. In the frequency range from 0.1 to 30 cycles per hour, the average spectrum monotonically decreases. However, it deviates from a power law in the range 0.3 3 cycles per hour especially for high levels of activity. The integrated power above 0.15 cycles per hour is a strong function of K indicating that much of the fluctuations in the ionospheric equatorial field are of solar wind or magnetospheric origin. This result is in agreement with a previous power spectral study of low, middle, and high latitude fields using radars. The observed field strengths are lower than the ones observed in a previous study using balloon data at middle and high latitudes when the fields are projected to the equatorial plane. Simultaneous interplanetary electric field (IEF) data are compared to the equatorial field to determine how strong a relationship exists and to determine the amplitude and phase of their ratio as a function of frequency—an estimate of the average transfer function of the system. This function displays a bandpass-like form with a peak near 0.5 cycles per hour. This peak and evidence for a ringing of the time domain response suggests a weakly resonant system indicating some capacitance in addition to the inductance of the ring current and the resistance of the ionosphere. Case studies show that application of this function to IEF data yields good results and supports the notion that the response of the equatorial field to long-duration IEF polarities can last for many hours. Application of the function to test inputs such as pulses and triangle waves support this result. At high frequencies, we suggest that mapping of small-scale MHD turbulence is less effective than high frequency related transitions in the IEF.

  1. Long Term Observations of the low Latitude (1,1) Diurnal Migrating Tide From WINDII, HRDI and TIDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niciejewski, R.; Skinner, W.; Gell, D.; Cooper, M.; Marshall, A.; Killeen, T.; Solomon, S.; Wu, Q.; Ortland, D.; Drob, D.; Emmert, J.; Shepherd, G.; Zhang, S.; Solheim, B.

    2006-05-01

    The dominant feature in the global scale wind field in the low latitude mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region is the solar diurnal migrating tide, classically represented by the (1,1) Hough function. The meridional component of the horizontal neutral wind vector is relatively stable in this region making it possible to estimate the daily (1,1) amplitude and phase*. Observations of the MLT winds have been performed from satellite platforms by HRDI and WINDII (UARS) and by TIDI (TIMED) since September 1991 providing a unique and continuous global perspective of the classical (1,1) tide for nearly 15 years. This paper will describe new results from HRDI, WINDII, and TIDI of the daily and annual variation of the (1,1) tide. A long-term interannual variability is clear in the data sets with the amplitude of the (1,1) tide peaking near 100 m/s within a week of the March equinox in 1993, 1995, 1999, 2002, and 2004. Lesser peaks occur during intervening years as well as about two weeks following the September equinox. A secondary result that will be discussed is the correspondence between coincident (1,1) tide observations by different pairs of experiments (HRDI/WINDII) and (HRDI/TIDI). *Burrage, M. D., M. E. Hagan, W. R. Skinner, D. L. Wu, and P. B. Hays, Long-term variability in the solar diurnal tide observed by HRDI and simulated by the GSWM, Geophys. Res. Lett., 22, 2641, 1995.

  2. Observations at Low Latitudes of Magnetic Merging Signatures Within a Flux Transfer Event During a Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, M. O.; Avanov, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Flux transfer events (FTE) have been postulated to result from transient magnetic merging. If so, the ion distributions within an event should exhibit features known to result from merging. Observations of a FTE by instruments on the Polar spacecraft revealed classical merging signatures that included: 1) D-shaped, accelerated, magnetosheath ion distributions, 2) a well defined de Hoffman-Teller frame, 3) local stress balance, and 4) a P-N magnetic field signature. This FTE was observed near the magnetic equator at approx. 13 MLT under conditions of a moderately northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) (clock angle of less than 10 deg). The nature of the ion distributions and the consistency of the measured cutoff speed with that calculated from the measured local magnetic field and the derived de Hoffman-Teller speed show the ion injection to be local. Coupled with the northward IMF these results lead to the conclusion that component merging in the low latitude region was responsible for the FTE.

  3. Ulf waves in the low-latitude boundary layer and their relationship to magnetospheric pulsations: A multisatellite observation

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Sibeck, D.G.; Newell, P.T.; Spence, H.E.

    1994-01-31

    On April 30 (day 120), 1985, the magnetosphere was compressed at 0923 UT and the subsolar magnetopause remained near 7 RE geocentric for approx. 2 hours, during which the four spacecraft Spacecraft Charging At High Altitude (SCATHA), GOES 5, GOES 6, and Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) CCE were all in the magnetosphere on the morning side. SCATHA was in the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) in the second half of this period. The interplanetary magnetic field was inferred to be northward from the characteristics of precipitating particle fluxes as observed by the low-altitude satellite Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F7 and also from absence of substorms. The authors used magnetic field and particle data from this unique interval to study ULF waves in the LLBL and their relationship to magnetic pulsations in the magnetosphere. The LLBL was identified from the properties of particles, including bidirectional field-aligned electron beams at approx. 200 eV. In the boundary layer the magnetic field exhibited both a 5-10 min irregular compressional oscillation and a broadband (Delta(f)/f approx. 1) primarily transverse oscillations with a mean period of approx. 50 s and a left-hand sense of polarization about the mean field. The former can be observed by other satellites and is likely due to pressure variations in the solar wind, while the latter is likely due to a Kelvin-Helmoltz (K.-H.) instability occurring in the LLBL or on the magnetopause.

  4. Short- and Long-Timescale Thermospheric Variability as Observed from OI 630.0 nm Dayglow Emissions from Low Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallamraju, Duggirala; Das, Uma; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2011-01-01

    We carried out high-cadence (5 min) and high-spatial resolution (2deg magnetic latitude) observations of daytime OI 630.0 nm airglow emission brightness from a low-latitude station to understand the behavior of neutral dynamics in the daytime. The results indicate that the wave periodicities of 12.20 min, and 2 h exist over a wide spatial range of around 8deg-12deg magnetic latitudes. The 20.80 min periodicities in the dayglow seem to appear more often in the measurements closer to the magnetic equator and not at latitudes farther away. Further, periodicities in that range are found to be frequent in the variations of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) strength as well. We show that wave periodicities due to the neutral dynamics, at least until around 8deg magnetic latitude, are influenced by those that affect the EEJ strength variation as well. Furthermore, the average daily OI 630.0 nm emission brightness over 3 months varied in consonance with that of the sunspot numbers indicating a strong solar influence on the magnitudes of dayglow emissions.

  5. Short- and Long-Timescale Thermospheric Variability as Observed from OI 630.0 nm Dayglow Emissions from Low Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallamraju, Duggirala; Das, Uma; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2010-01-01

    We carried out high-cadence (5 min) and high-spatial resolution (2deg magnetic latitude) observations of daytime OI 630.0 nm airglow emission brightness from a low-latitude station to understand the behavior of neutral dynamics in the daytime. The results indicate that the wave periodicities of 12.20 min, and 2 h exist over a wide spatial range of around 8deg-12deg magnetic latitudes. The 20.80 min periodicities in the dayglow seem to appear more often in the measurements closer to the magnetic equator and not at latitudes farther away. Further, periodicities in that range are found to be frequent in the variations of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) strength as well. We show that wave periodicities due to the neutral dynamics, at least until around 8deg magnetic latitude, are influenced by those that affect the EEJ strength variation as well. Furthermore, the average daily OI 630.0 nm emission brightness over 3 months varied in consonance with that of the sunspot numbers indicating a strong solar influence on the magnitudes of dayglow emissions.

  6. Observations of the coupling efficiency of VLF lightning-generated whistlers into the low-latitude plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Holzworth, R. H., II; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Heelis, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The C/NOFS satellite [de La Beaujardiere, 2004] has provided a vast archive of multi-sensor data on the low-latitude ionosphere/plasmasphere since 2008. As part of the project, the VEFI payload [Pfaff et al., 2010] has recorded the 3-D electric field from DC through 16 kHz with high fidelity. The relative calibrations track between the three E-field antennas with sufficient accuracy and stability to allow retrieval of the wave polarization for a wide range of lightning-generated whistler waves [Jacobson et al., 2014]. The wave polarization in turn allows retrieval of the wavevector (within a sign ambiguity), which in turn allows an inverse-raytrace of the whistler raypath from the satellite to the ionospheric entry point. We will compare the raytrace predictions with ground-truth from the WWLLN global lightning-monitoring system [Lay et al., 2004; Rodger et al., 2005; Rodger et al., 2004]. In addition to providing location and time of lightning strokes, WWLLN provides an estimate of the radiated radio energy in the whistler passband [Hutchins et al., 2012]. Finally, the CINDI payload [Heelis et al., 2009] on C/NOFS provides ion composition at the satellite, permitting the index of refraction to be inferred. We will compare these estimates to the Poynting fluence density observed by VEFI, thereby providing a direct test of the coupling of lightning radio energy into plasmaspheric whistlers.

  7. Two-dimensional propagation of compressional Pi 2 in the inner magnetosphere observed at low latitudes and geosynchronous altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imajo, S.; Yumoto, K.; Uozumi, T.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Obara, T.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kawano, H.; Abe, S.; Ikeda, A.

    2012-12-01

    Propagation of compressional Pi 2 pulsations near the equatorial plane is studied using the magnetic data from low-latitude MAGDAS ground stations and geosynchronous satellite ETS-VIII. We have investigated the correlation functions (as a function of the time lag ; R({τ }) ) of the initial 5 minutes interval of compressional Pi 2s between ETS-VIII (GMLat.=-10.8o, GMLon.=217.5o) and MAGDAS/KUJ (GMLat.=26.13o, GMLon.=202.96o) for the Pi 2 events identified from 1 March through 31 May 2009. We have found 86 events with high correlation function (|R({τ })|≥0.7). For 88% of the events, the Pi 2s at KUJ were delayed from Pi 2s at ETS-VIII; the average delay time was 44 sec. For 81% of the events, the Pi 2s at KUJ were positively correlated with the Pi 2s at ETS-VIII. The observational results of the delay time and its local time dependence are consistent with fast wave propagation from the source at 10RE and LT=22-24hr estimated by the MHD wave propagation model presented in textit{Uozumi et al.} [2009]. The present results suggest that the compressional Pi 2s observed at ETS-VIII and on the ground stations are propagating fast mode waves rather than standing fast mode waves.; The time derivatives of typical example of the Pi 2 event observed at separated local time. Upper side of each plot shows the data that are plotted with a time shift of the delay time. Lower side of each plot shows the data that are plotted with no time shift. The shift directions are indicated by the horizontal arrows, and the amount of the time shift is indicated on the arrows.

  8. Observational evidence for plasma diffusion driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices at the duskside of the low latitude boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, G.; Mozer, F.; Shen, C.; Phan, T.; Parks, G. K.; McFadden, J. P.; Rème, H.; Chen, T.

    2015-12-01

    By revisiting two Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) vortex events under northward (Hasegawa et al, 2004) and southward (Yan et al, 2014) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed by Cluster and THEMIS respectively, we investigated the ion density gradient at the dusk flank magnetopause with K-H vortices, by using the technique developed by Shen et al (2012) which can calculate the spatial gradient of a physical quantity even when only three-point simultaneous measurements are available or the tetrahedron is highly distorted. With three-point simultaneous observations, two components of the ion density gradient can be calculated in the vortex plane. In the results, we find that: (1) under either northward or southward IMF, cold dense plasma was found in the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) vortices even when the IMF was southward; (2) in both events, there existed an ion density gradient as large as 0.5 cm-3/Mm for southward IMF and 2.0 cm-3/Mm for southward IMF alongside with K-H vortices in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL); (3) the dominant direction of the ion density gradient in the vortex plane pointed outward to the magnetopause when the gradient is defined as the increasing direction; (4) in both events, the ion density gradient has positive correlation with the vorticity calculated by the same technique. The ion density gradient driven by K-H vortices indicates that plasma diffusion plays an important role as the micro-physical process of plasma transport into the magnetosphere directly through the LLBL with K-H vortices.

  9. Characterization of Vertical and Horizontal Wave Features in Dayglow Emissions as Observed from a Low-latitude Station, Hyderabad, INDIA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam Laskar, Fazlul; Pallamraju, Duggirala; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Raghavarao, Ravipati; Vijaya Lakshmi, Thatiparthi; Anji Reddy, M.

    2012-07-01

    Due to the unique geomagnetic field configuration, equatorial upper atmosphere of the earth is affected by various electro-dynamical processes, such as, equatorial electrojet (EEJ), equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), equatorial spread-F (ESF), equatorial temperature and wind anomaly (ETWA). Each of these processes leave their imprint on both the neutral and ionised components of the upper atmosphere. The plasma dynamics can be investigated by radio probing methods. Investigations on the neutral dynamics, however, are possible mainly through the optical measurements. As these phenomena spread over a large spatial extent, it is extremely important to measure their variability over a large field-of-view. Here, we present the results of the wave characteristics observed over a low latitude location, Hyderabad (Geographic: 17.5° N, 78.5° E; Geomagnetic: 8.6° N, 151.8° E), which were obtained using a high spectral-resolution multi-wavelength echelle-grating spectrograph. This instrument obtains oxygen dayglow emissions at 557.7 nm, 630.0 nm, and 777.4 nm wavelengths over a large field-of-view ( of about 140 degrees) that originate from peak altitudes of around 130 km, 230 km, and 300 km, respectively. Initial results from a total of 52 days of data reveal that the dominant wave periodicities in the intensities of these emissions are different for different emission heights. Significant latitudinal dependency is seen in case of 557.7 nm and 630.0 nm. The latitudinal behavior of the emissions show the influence of both the neutral dynamics and electrodynamics of the equatorial origin. The emission variabilities are compared with the empirical and physics based models to discern the dynamical component in them in order to understand the nature of the vertical coupling of atmospheric regions. These results will be presented in light of the electrodynamic effects on them.

  10. Dawn-dusk asymmetry of the appearance of low-latitude mantle plasma in the magnetotail observed by ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    The mantle plasma sometimes appears at low latitudes in the magnetotail and at times is mixed with the plasma sheet boundary layer plasma. Because of its density is substantially higher than the lobe plasma, the low-latitude mantle provides more particles into the tail plasma sheet than do the lobes. To investigate where and when the low-latitude mantle plasma appears, we have identified its appearance using the two ARTEMIS satellites from Oct 2010 to Dec 2012 in the magnetotail from X ~ -40 to -80 Re. The mantle plasma flows tailward along magnetic field lines with speed from ~50 to 200 km/s, and at the same time drift toward midnight and toward the equator. Its density is similar to that in the plasma sheet but its temperature is about an order of magnitude lower. Its occurrence rate can be up to 50% near the flanks and it decreases with decreasing |Y| to nearly 0% at midnight. The appearance shows a clear dawn-dusk asymmetry that depends on the IMF By direction. In the region above (below) the current sheet, it appears dominantly in the post-midnight (pre-midnight) sector when IMF By is positive (negative). The occurrence rates and the dawn-dusk asymmetries are similar for both northward and southward IMF conditions. The BATS-R-US simulations for N IMF show that the magnetopause reconnection locations and the magnetopause shape in the magnetotail change significantly with the IMF clock angles. As IMF By becomes positively larger, the magnetopause reconnection site above (below) the current sheet moves toward lower latitudes to the dawn (dusk) side. Also the magnetopause shape becomes flatter with the Z distance from the magnetopause to the current sheet becomes smaller. As a result, the plasma mantles move to lower latitudes and become closer to the plasma sheet, and the appearance of the mantle plasma becomes more dawn-dusk asymmetric.

  11. Electrodynamics of ionospheric weather over low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil Ali

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic state of the ionosphere at low latitudes is largely controlled by electric fields originating from dynamo actions by atmospheric waves propagating from below and the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction from above. These electric fields cause structuring of the ionosphere in wide ranging spatial and temporal scales that impact on space-based communication and navigation systems constituting an important segment of our technology-based day-to-day lives. The largest of the ionosphere structures, the equatorial ionization anomaly, with global maximum of plasma densities can cause propagation delays on the GNSS signals. The sunset electrodynamics is responsible for the generation of plasma bubble wide spectrum irregularities that can cause scintillation or even disruptions of satellite communication/navigation signals. Driven basically by upward propagating tides, these electric fields can suffer significant modulations from perturbation winds due to gravity waves, planetary/Kelvin waves, and non-migrating tides, as recent observational and modeling results have demonstrated. The changing state of the plasma distribution arising from these highly variable electric fields constitutes an important component of the ionospheric weather disturbances. Another, often dominating, component arises from solar disturbances when coronal mass ejection (CME) interaction with the earth's magnetosphere results in energy transport to low latitudes in the form of storm time prompt penetration electric fields and thermospheric disturbance winds. As a result, drastic modifications can occur in the form of layer restructuring (Es-, F3 layers etc.), large total electron content (TEC) enhancements, equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) latitudinal expansion/contraction, anomalous polarization electric fields/vertical drifts, enhanced growth/suppression of plasma structuring, etc. A brief review of our current understanding of the ionospheric weather variations and the

  12. Modulation of total electron content by global Pc5 waves at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsova, E.; Pilipenko, V.; Fedorov, E.; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, G.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies have successfully demonstrated that the GPS-TEC technique is a powerful method to study the propagation pattern of transient disturbances in the ionosphere. This technique has turned out to be sensitive enough to detect ionospheric signatures of ULF waves as well, particularly at high latitudes. It has already been reported earlier that during the recovery phase of the strong magnetic storm on Oct. 31, 2003, intense Pc5 geomagnetic activity was accompanied with distinct pulsations of the same periodicity in the TEC data from high-latitude GPS receiving stations. The present study reveals the identical features in geomagnetic and TEC data at low-latitude stations in the Indian sector as well. However, the presented observational results on TEC modulation by global Pc5 waves at low latitudes cannot be interpreted on the basis of the Alfven mode concept. The most promising mechanism that can explain the present observations is the plasma compression by fast magnetosonic mode. Theoretical order-of-magnitude estimates of the ratio between pulsation amplitudes in TEC and geomagnetic field based on the proposed mechanism is found to be about the same as the observed values.

  13. Observations and modeling of UHF-band scintillation occurrence probability over the low-latitude region of China during the maximum activity of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Liu, Y.; Wu, J.; Xu, T.; Sheng, D.

    2015-01-01

    The climatological characteristics of UHF-band scintillations over the low-latitude region of China were investigated by analyzing the observations recorded at three stations of our regional network of satellite-beacon-based scintillation monitoring in 2013. The three stations are Hainan (geographic 20.0° N, 110.3° E; geomagnetic 10.1° N, 177.4° W, dip 28.2°), Guangzhou (geographic 23.0° N, 113.0° E; geomagnetic 13.1° N, 174.8° W, dip 33.9°) and Kunming (geographic 25.6° N, 103.7° E; geomagnetic 15.7° N, 176.4° E, dip 39.0°), located at low latitudes of China. The variations of UHF-band scintillation occurrence with latitude, time and season are presented in detail to understand the morphology and climatology of ionospheric scintillations over the low-latitude region of China. An equinoctial asymmetry in the occurrences of scintillation and an obvious difference of the onset time of scintillations between Hainan and Kunming is noted in this data set. Subsequently, the ionosonde data are utilized to study the possible causes of the asymmetry between two equinoxes. The observations suggest that the mean critical frequency (foF2) at 20:00 LT (12:00 UT) in the autumnal equinoctial months (September and October) and the vernal equinoctial months (March and April) has a similar asymmetry. The ratio of the mean foF2 between two equinoxes is proportional to the ratio between the maximum scintillation occurrence in the autumnal equinox and in the vernal equinox. Therefore, this ratio can act as a proxy for the equinoctial asymmetry in the occurrences of scintillation over the low-latitude region of China, and can be used to model the equinoctial asymmetry in our empirical climatological model of scintillation occurrence probability (CMSOP). The CMSOP can provide the predictions of the occurrences of scintillation over the low-latitude region of China and was validated in this study.

  14. Low Latitude Aurora: Index of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekli, M. R.; Aissani, D.; Chadou, I.

    2010-10-01

    Observations of aurora borealis at low latitudes are rare, and are clearly associated with high solar activity. In this paper, we analyze some details of the solar activity during the years 1769-1792. Moreover, we describe in detail three low latitude auroras. The first event was reported by ash-Shalati and observed in North Africa (1770 AD). The second and third events were reported by l'Abbé Mann and observed in Europe (1770 and 1777 AD).

  15. Low-latitude ionospheric effects on SBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, J.; Sardón, E.; Sainz, A.; Ochoa, B.; Magdaleno, S.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS) provide augmentation to Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) users in three areas: (1) broadcasting accurate corrections to GNSS satellite ephemeris, (2) providing a real-time empirical ionospheric model in the service area, and (3) providing integrity information in the form of estimates of the confidence of the ephemeris corrections and ionospheric delays. Ionospheric effects on SBAS are twofold: (a) the input data used by the SBAS will be affected by ionospheric effects, and (b) the more perturbed the ionosphere is, the more difficult it will be to provide accurate and reliable ionospheric information to the users. The ionosphere at low latitudes presents larger variability and more intense phenomena than at midlatitudes. Therefore, SBAS providing service to low-latitude regions will be more affected than those at other latitudes. From the different low-latitude ionospheric effects, this paper will focus on those having the largest impact on SBAS, which are total electron content temporal and spatial gradients, ionospheric scintillations, and depletions. This paper will present the impact of these effects on EGNOS (European Global Navigation Overlay System), the European SBAS. Although EGNOS can be considered as a midlatitude SBAS, it has to provide coverage down to rather low latitudes, so sometimes low-latitude ionospheric effects are observed in the EGNOS data. It will be shown how EGNOS performs under nominal conditions and how its performance is degraded when low-latitude ionospheric phenomena occur. Real EGNOS data affected by low-latitude ionospheric phenomena will be used.

  16. Persistent Longitudinal Variations of Plasma Density and DC Electric Fields in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Observed with Probes on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J. H.; Rowland, D. E.; Liebrecht, M. C.; Bromund, K. R.; Roddy, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Continuous measurements using in situ probes on consecutive orbits of the C/NOFS satellite reveal that the plasma density is persistently organized by longitude, in both day and night conditions and at all locations within the satellite orbit, defined by its perigee and apogee of 401 km and 867 km, respectively, and its inclination of 13 degrees. Typical variations are a factor of 2 or 3 compared to mean values. Furthermore, simultaneous observations of DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts in the low latitude ionosphere also reveal that their amplitudes are also strongly organized by longitude in a similar fashion. The drift variations with longitude are particularly pronounced in the meridional component perpendicular to the magnetic field although they are also present in the zonal component as well. The longitudes of the peak meridional drift and density values are significantly out of phase with respect to each other. Time constants for the plasma accumulation at higher altitudes with respect to the vertical drift velocity must be taken into account in order to properly interpret the detailed comparisons of the phase relationship of the plasma density and plasma velocity variations. Although for a given period corresponding to that of several days, typically one longitude region dominates the structuring of the plasma density and plasma drift data, there is also evidence for variations organized about multiple longitudes at the same time. Statistical averages will be shown that suggest a tidal “wave 4” structuring is present in both the plasma drift and plasma density data. We interpret the apparent association of the modulation of the E x B drifts with longitude as well as that of the ambient plasma density as a manifestation of tidal forces at work in the low latitude upper atmosphere. The observations demonstrate how the high duty cycle of the C/NOFS observations and its unique orbit expose fundamental processes at work in the low

  17. Persistent Longitudinal Variations of Plasma Density and DC Electric Fields in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Observed with Probes on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Liebrecht, C.; Bromund, K.; Roddy, P.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous measurements using in situ probes on consecutive orbits of the C/N0FS satellite reveal that the plasma density is persistently organized by longitude, in both day and night conditions and at all locations within the satellite orbit, defined by its perigee and apogee of 401 km and 867 km, respectively, and its inclination of 13 degrees. Typical variations are a factor of 2 or 3 compared to mean values. Furthermore, simultaneous observations of DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts in the low latitude ionosphere also reveal that their amplitudes are also strongly organized by longitude in a similar fashion. The drift variations with longitude are particularly pronounced in the meridional component perpendicular to the magnetic field although they are also present in the zonal component as well. The longitudes of the peak meridional drift and density values are significantly out of phase with respect to each other. Time constants for the plasma accumulation at higher altitudes with respect to the vertical drift velocity must be taken into account in order to properly interpret the detailed comparisons of the phase relationship of the plasma density and plasma velocity variations. Although for a given period corresponding to that of several days, typically one longitude region dominates the structuring of the plasma density and plasma drift data, there is also evidence for variations organized about multiple longitudes at the same time. Statistical averages will be shown that suggest a tidal "wave 4" structuring is present in both the plasma drift and plasma density data. We interpret the apparent association of the modulation of the E x B drifts with longitude as well as that of the ambient plasma density as a manifestation of tidal forces at work in the low latitude upper atmosphere. The observations demonstrate how the high duty cycle of the C/NOFS observations and its unique orbit expose fundamental processes at work in the low latitude

  18. Comparison of IRI-2012 with JASON-1 TEC and incoherent scatter radar observations during the 2008-2009 solar minimum period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Eun-Young; Jee, Geonhwa; Lee, Changsup

    2016-08-01

    The 2008-2009 solar minimum period was unprecedentedly deep and extended. We compare the IRI-2012 with global TEC data from JASON-1 satellite and with electron density profiles observed from incoherent scatter radars (ISRs) at middle and high latitudes for this solar minimum period. Global daily mean TECs are calculated from JASON-1 TECs to compare with the corresponding IRI TECs during the 2008-2009 period. It is found that IRI underestimates the global daily mean TEC by about 20-50%. The comparison of global TEC maps further reveals that IRI overall underestimates TEC for the whole globe except for the low-latitude region around the equatorial anomaly, regardless of season. The underestimation is particularly strong in the nighttime winter hemisphere where the ionosphere seems to almost disappear in IRI. In the daytime equatorial region, however, the overestimation of IRI is mainly due to the misrepresentation of the equatorial anomaly in IRI. Further comparison with ISR electron density profiles confirms the significant underestimation of IRI at night in the winter hemisphere.

  19. Plasma drifts and polarization electric fields associated with TID-like disturbances in the low-latitude ionosphere: C/NOFS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Song

    2016-02-01

    Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances are often observed at the magnetically conjugate points in the nighttime midlatitude ionosphere. It has been suggested that gravity waves disturb the ionosphere and induce electric fields in one hemisphere and that the electric fields are amplified by the Perkins instability and transmitted along the geomagnetic field lines to the conjugate ionosphere, creating similar disturbances there. However, direct observations of electric fields associated with traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are very few. In this study, we present low-latitude TID-like disturbances observed by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. It is found that ion velocity perturbations are generated in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the geomagnetic field within TIDs. Both the parallel and perpendicular ion velocity perturbations show an in-phase correlation with the ion density perturbations. For nighttime TIDs, the amplitude of both the parallel and meridional ion velocity perturbations increases almost linearly with the amplitude of the ion density perturbations, and the meridional ion drift is proportional to the parallel ion velocity. For daytime TIDs, the parallel ion velocity perturbation increases with the ion density perturbation, but the meridional ion velocity perturbation does not change much. The observations provide evidence that polarization electric field is generated within TIDs at low latitudes and maps along the geomagnetic field lines over a large distance.

  20. Evidence of low-latitude daytime large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances observed by high-frequency multistatic backscatter sounding system during a geomagnetically quiet period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Yang, Guobin; Chen, Gang; Hu, Yaogai; Zhang, Yuannong

    2012-06-01

    Observations from the high-frequency multistatic backscatter sounding radars on a geomagnetically quiet day (minimum Dst = -14 nT) captured the anti-equatorward propagation of daytime large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (LSTID) at the low-latitude regions. The observed LSTID was characterized approximately by a meridional propagation speed of 347 ± 78 m/s and azimuthal angle of -4.7 ± 27.6° (counterclockwise from north), with a period of 76 min and a wavelength of 1583 ± 354 km by means of maximum entropy cross-spectral analysis. Vertical phase velocity was also evaluated to be <˜42 m/s through the Doppler measurements. These results provide evidence that the low-latitude ionosphere can undergo large-scale perturbations even under geomagnetically quiet conditions. We suggest that this observed LSTID could be due to the secondary gravity waves from thermospheric body forces created from the dissipation of primary gravity waves from deep tropospheric convection.

  1. Examination of air-sea CO2 fluxes from the low-latitude coastal Eastern Pacific: Application of predictive algorithms to new VOS observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, B.; Alin, S.; Feely, R. A.; Hernandez-Ayon, M.; Letelier, R.; Strutton, P. G.; Cosca, C.

    2008-12-01

    Coastal oceans are regions of large and highly variable air-sea CO2 fluxes, leading to highly uncertain predictions of globally significant contributions to the atmospheric carbon budget. Estimates of net annual regional fluxes are often the balance between poorly-constrained, large-magnitude sinks and sources. This is the case for the Pacific coast of North America, where a recent synthesis (Chavez et al., 2007) predicted low total fluxes resulting from the near-cancellation of large, lightly-sampled fluxes of opposite sign. In particular, the low latitude coastal waters off Central America appeared to be a large source of CO2 to the atmosphere, but there was very low spatial and temporal observational coverage in these waters. Recently, new VOS data in this region has become available that has dramatically increased both spatial and temporal sampling density in this region. In previous work we developed a new remote sensing-based synthetic approach applied to the mid-latitude regions of the North American Pacific coast that gave strong predictive power and was subsequently validated by in-water measurements in the summer of 2007. We present the results of applying this predictive approach to the target study region, and the predictive relationship is then combined with seasonally resolved remote sensing data to generate annual net flux estimates and to evaluate the prediction of strong efflux from these low-latitude waters based on the sparse historical data.

  2. Regional Arctic observations of TEC gradients and scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgonics, Tibor; Høeg, Per; Benzon, Hans-Henrik

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been growing scientific interest in Arctic ionospheric properties and variations. However our understanding of the fundamental ionospheric processes present in this area is still incomplete. GNSS networks present in Greenland today make it possible to acquire near-real time observations of the state and variations of the high-latitude ionosphere. This data can be employed to obtain relevant geophysical variables and statistics. In our study GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) measurements have been complemented with amplitude scintillation indices (S4), and phase scintillation indices (σφ). The investigation of the relationship between these geophysical variables will likely lead to new ways to study the underlying physical processes and to build tools for monitoring and predicting large-scale patterns in Arctic TEC and scintillations. A number of specific ionosphere events will be presented and the underlying geophysical process will be identified and described. In particular, results will be presented where large-scale gradients in the regional TEC are compared with the growth of scintillations. The statistics of the scintillations will be investigated, with emphasis on how well the scintillations follow the Nakagami-m distribution. The spectra of both the intensities and phase will be calculated, and the corner frequency of these spectra will also be determined. These corner frequencies will be used to compute a number of important geophysical and ionospheric parameters. Furthermore, we will discuss how the spectral characteristics of the scintillations during large TEC gradients vary, and how values of the power spectra slopes change during increasing scintillations. These values will be validated against values found in prior studies. TEC and scintillation time-series and maps will also be presented over the Greenlandic region. We will show how the expansion of the auroral oval during geomagnetic storms can be detected from

  3. Low Latitude Field-aligned Irregularities Observed In The E Region With The Piura Vhf Radar: Morphology, Long-term Periodicities and Their Relationship With Sporadic E Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, J. L.; Haldoupis, C.

    Between 1991 and 1999, the Piura VHF radar (5.2S, 80.6W, 7.0N dip latitude) in northern Peru has been operated intermittently to observe coherent backscatter from 3-m E-region field-aligned irregularities. These echoes are detected by pointing the antenna beam to the north at 14 zenith angle, i.e., perpendicular to the magnetic field lines, in an area just outside the equatorial electrojet zone and far from mid latitudes. Studies of these observations have shown that the spectral and diurnal characteris- tics of backscatter are reminiscent of midlatitude E region irregularities rather than those at the equatorial electrojet. Since January 2000, "continuous" (2 minutes every 12 minutes) observations have been started in order to study in more detail the diur- nal and seasonal morphology of backscatter. In this paper, we analyze these data to study the morphology of the echoes (diurnal and seasonal) and compare it to the mor- phology of sporadic E (Es) layers observed in low latitude ionosonde stations. The results show the occurrence of the Piura E region irregularities to be in close relation with the characteristics of Es layers and their morphology. This indicates that E re- gion coherent backscatter even at very low latitudes is basically of the same nature as that observed at midlatitude, therefore it relates to plasma instabilities operating inside Es layers. In addition, we investigate the long-term (periods of days) variability seen in echo occurrence and intensity of the Piura backscatter and examine how these variations compare with similar ones measured at midlatitude, and also their possible relationship with planetary waves which are known to exist in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  4. Geomagnetically conjugate observations of ionospheric and thermospheric variations accompanied with a midnight brightness wave at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, D.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Kubota, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Nishioka, M.; Komonjinda, S.; Yatini, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    A midnight brightness wave (MBW) is the phenomenon that the OI (630-nm) airglow enhancement propagates poleward once at local midnight. In this study, we first conducted geomagnetically conjugate observations of 630nm airglow for an MBW at conjugate stations. An airglow enhancement which is considered to be an MBW was observed in the 630-nm airglow images at Kototabang, Indonesia (geomagnetic latitude (MLAT): 10.0S) at around local midnight from 1540 to 1730 UT (from 2240 to 2430 LT) on 7 February 2011. This MBW was propagating south-southwestward, which is geomagnetically poleward, with a velocity of 290 m/s. However, similar wave was not observed in the 630-nm airglow images at Chiang Mai, Thailand (MLAT: 8.9N), which is close to being conjugate point of Kototabang. This result indicates that the MBW does not have geomagnetic conjugacy. We simultaneously observed thermospheric neutral winds observed by a co-located Fabry-Perot interferometer at Kototabang. The observed meridional winds turned from northward (geomagnetically equatorward) to southward (geomagnetically poleward) just before the MBW was observed. The bottomside ionospheric heights observed by ionosondes rapidly decreased at Kototabang and slightly increased at Chiang Mai simultaneously with the MBW passage. In the presentation, we discuss the MBW generation by the observed poleward neutral winds at Kototabang, and the cause of the coinciding small height increase at Chiang Mai by the polarization electric field inside the observed MBW at Kototabang.

  5. Identifying Kinetic Plasma Wave Modes Observed in the Acceleration Regions in the Low-Latitude Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding plasma heating and transport across fluid, ion and electron scales is currently not well understood in astrophysical plasmas. We have recently identified (by determining the observational dispersion relation using multi-point spacecraft measurements) an ion-scale, large amplitude fast mode wave observed inside a fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex. The Poyinting flux of the fast mode wave packet was sufficient to produce the observed ~5 keV energy increase of ions of magnetosheath origin. In this followup work, we analyze in detail the other intervals with similar characteristics, where the cold magnetosheath population becomes significantly energized. We identify the plasma wave modes present and discuss whether their energy budget is sufficient for the observed level of energization.

  6. Statistical characteristics of VHF radar observations of low latitude E-region field-aligned irregularities over Gadanki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A. K.; Sripathi, S.; Sivakumar, V.; Rao, P. B.

    2004-11-01

    The statistical characteristics of E-region field-aligned irregularities observed with the Gadanki MST radar are presented and compared with observations made with the Piura radar at a similar magnetic latitude. Echoes are observed day and night, with the nighttime echoes being more intense and covering a greater height extent than during the day. The most probable echo occurrence times are just after sunrise (95%) and just before sunset (80%), when the echoing regions were centered around 95 and 100 km, respectively. The lowest probability of echo occurrence is found to be during noontime hours. The spectra of these echoes over Gadanki were all type 2. The mean Doppler velocities for altitudes above 105 km were upward at typically 10ms-1 during the day and downward at about 10ms-1 during the night. Spectral widths of 10-40ms-1 were found during the day and 30-60ms-1 during the night. These characteristics of E-region irregularities over Gadanki are quite similar to those found over Piura, and are remarkably different from those at either equatorial or higher latitudes.

  7. Analysis of local ionospheric variability based on SVD and MDS at low-latitude GNSS stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbakuti, J. R. K. Kumar; Devanaboyina, Venkata Ratnam; Kanchumarthi, S. Ramesh

    2016-06-01

    Investigation of ionospheric anomalies during equatorial and low latitude is of major concern for modeling and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) applications. Total electron content (TEC) varies with the ionospheric conditions, which will lead to the errors in the global positioning system (GPS) measurements. It is therefore a method that is necessary to characterize the ionospheric anomalies for satellite-based navigation systems. In this study, characterization of ionospheric variations based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) and classical multidimensional scaling (MDS) methods was studied. The yearly and daily variations are decomposed from the GPS-TEC, international reference ionosphere (IRI) 2007 and IRI 2012 models TEC over the three low-latitude GNSS stations located at Koneru Lakshmaiah University (KLU-Guntur), Hyderabad and Bangalore, respectively. From the results, it is found that there is a strong correlation between GPS-TEC and IRI models. The correlation coefficient for the first three singular values is more than 0.86. From this, it is possible to reconstruct more than 85 % of the variability contained in global GPS-derived VTEC data (for year 2013) by using only the first three modes. The semiannual variation has maximum value during March-April and September-October and has minimum value during June-July. It is observed that the annual variations have maximum value in summer and minimum value in winter, and the amplitudes decrease with increasing latitude. Further, opposite latitudinal asymmetry among annual and semiannual variations for three GNSS stations is noticed. SVD and MDS methods clearly show time-varying characteristics and the absence of the winter anomaly at low-latitude GNSS stations.

  8. Solar flare induced ionospheric D-region perturbation as observed at a low latitude station Agra, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Uma; Singh, Birbal; Singh, O. P.; Saraswat, V. K.

    2015-05-01

    The results of solar flare induced D-region perturbation studies along a short great circle path (GCP=6690 km) lying entirely in the low and equatorial latitude region are presented. We use SoftPAL receiver at Agra (Geograph. lat. 27.2°N, long. 78°E), India and monitor NWC signal ( f=19.8 kHz) transmitted from Australia. We analyze the data for the year 2011 and find that the results of amplitude and phase perturbations, time delay, zenith angle independence, and electron density variation in the lower ionosphere are consistent with those observed along similar paths at low and high latitudes. The new work includes; (i) the distribution of peak X-ray flares in the mixed solar cycle period 2011 responsible for clear and measurable sudden phase anomalies (SPAs) is different from that in minimum solar cycle period, though the cut off hardening factor is the same; (ii) the phase anomalies are evaluated in terms of X-ray fluence (J/m2); (iii) the perturbation due to X-class of flare is used to calculate the electron densities in 70-60 km height range which are found to be 60-80 % lower than those in the polar region where X-ray flare is followed by solar proton event.

  9. Ionosonde observations of F region parameters over Indian low latitude during different solar activity conditions and comparison with IRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddapati, PavanChaitanya; Patra, Amit

    2016-07-01

    In the equatorial region, the daytime F region exhibits three layers, namely F1, F2 and F3 layers. The detail characteristics of the F2 and F3 layers and their variabilities at different equatorial latitudes, however, have not been well defined. Given the fact that equatorial ionosphere is governed profoundly by dynamical and electro-dynamical forcing, electron density varies remarkably with latitude and altitude. A detailed characterization and study of the equatorial F region, thus, is necessary for improving ionospheric model, such as International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), applicable to the equatorial region. For this purpose, we have analyzed ionosonde observations from the dip equator and low magnetic latitude in the Indian sector to characterize the F2 and F3 layers in different seasons and solar activity conditions. In this paper, we present a detailed comparative analysis on the variabilities of the F2 and F3 layers as a function of local time, season and solar activity conditions. Finally, these results are compared with the IRI model parameters in an effort to evaluate the suitability of the IRI model representing the equatorial ionosphere in the Indian sector.

  10. Low-latitude field-aligned irregularities observed in the E region with the Piura VHF radar: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodman, Ronald F.; Chau, Jorge L.; Aquino, Fredy; Rodriguez, Rodolfo R.; Flores, Luis A.

    1999-07-01

    We have used the Piura VHF radar (5°12'S, 80°38'W, ˜7.5°N geomagnetic latitude, just outside the magnetic equator) in northern Peru to gather echoes from 3-m E region field-aligned irregularities. We present statistical results of these echoes: percentage of occurrence and histograms of radial velocities and spectral widths, obtained with a 15-day data set gathered in 1996. These E region echoes are confined to 95- to 120-km altitude and present spectral characteristics similar to equatorial electrojet (EEJ) echoes generated by a gradient drift instability, i.e., type 2. However, they appear mainly at nighttime and early morning (1800-0800 LT) and therefore do not present a temporal similarity to EEJ echoes. Moreover, we observe the existence of two well-defined types of echoes: (1) lower E region echoes (95-105 km) and upper E region echoes (105-120 km). Both regions show different spectral and temporal characteristics. It is difficult to determine at this point the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of the irregularities without measurements of E fields and density gradients, which we plan to do in a future experiment.

  11. Seasonal variations of nighttime D-region ionosphere in 2013 solar maximum observed from a low-latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Le Minh; Thu, Nguyen Ngoc; Ha, Tran Quoc; Nguyen-Luong, Quang

    2015-10-01

    We present the observation of tweek atmospherics with harmonics m = 1-8 during the solar maximum year, 2013, at Tay Nguyen University, Vietnam (Geog. 12.65° N, 108.02° E). The analysis of 33,690 tweeks on ten international quiet days during 2 months each season, summer (May, August), winter (February, November), and equinox (March, September), shows that tweeks occur about 51 % during summer, 22 % during winter, and 27 % during equinox. The D-region ionosphere is more sharply bounded for harmonics m = 5-6 around an altitude of 85.5 km. The environment of the D-region is more inhomogeneous during winter and equinox seasons. The mean electron density varies from 28.4-225 cm -3, which corresponds to the harmonics m = 1-8 at the mean reflection height of 81.5-87.7 km. The results reveal that the lower reference height in our work as compared to other works is due to the higher level of solar activity. The equivalent electron density profile of the nighttime D-region ionosphere using tweek method during summer, equinox, and winter seasons shows lower values of electron density by 12-58 %, 3-67 %, and 24-76 % than those obtained using the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) model.

  12. Investigation of Ionospheric response to Geomagnetic Storms over a Low Latitude Station, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimoh, Oluwaseyi E.; Yesufu, Thomas K.; Ariyibi, Emmanuel A.

    2016-05-01

    Due to several complexities associated with the equatorial ionosphere, and the significant role which the total electron content (TEC) variability plays in GPS signal transmission, there is the need to monitor irregularities in TEC during storm events. The GPS SCINDA receiver data at Ile-Ife, Nigeria, was analysed with a view to characterizing the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms on 9 March and 1 October 2012. Presently, positive storm effects, peaks in TEC which were associated with prompt penetration of electric fields and changes in neutral gas composition were observed for the storms. The maximum percentage deviation in TEC of about 120 and 45% were observed for 9 March and 1 October 2012, respectively. An obvious negative percentage TEC deviation subsequent to sudden storm commencement (SSC) was observed and besides a geomagnetic storm does not necessarily suggest a high scintillation intensity (S4) index. The present results show that magnetic storm events at low latitude regions may have an adverse effect on navigation and communication systems.

  13. Recent Plasma Observations Related to Magnetic Merging and the Low-Latitude Boundary Layer. Case Study by Polar, March 18, 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, M.; Avanov, L.; Craven, P.; Mozer, F.; Moore, T. E.

    2007-01-01

    We have begun an investigation of the nature of the low-latitude boundary layer in the mid-altitude cusp region using data from the Polar spacecraft. Magnetosheath-like plasma is frequently observed deep (in terms of distance from the magnetopause and in invariant latitude) in the magnetosphere. One such case, taken during a long period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMP) on March 18, 2006, shows injected magnetosheath ions within the magnetosphere with velocity distributions resulting from two separate merging sites along the same field lines. Cold ionospheric ions were also observed counterstreaming along the field lines, evidence that these field lines were closed. Our results support the idea of double reconnection under northward IMP on the same group of field lines can provide a source for the LLBL. However, the flow direction of the accelerated magnetosheath ions antiparallel to the local magnetic field and given location of the spacecraft suggest that these two injection sites are located northward of the spacecraft position. Observed convection velocities of the magnetic field lines are inconsistent with those expected for double post-cusp reconnection in both hemispheres. These observations favor a scenario in which a group of newly closed field lines was created by a combination of high shear merging at high latitudes in the northern hemisphere and low shear merging at lower latitudes at the dayside magnetopause.

  14. Simultaneous observation of quasi 16 day wave in the mesospheric winds and temperature over low latitudes with the SKiYMET radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Siddarth Shankar; Kumar, K. Kishore; Veena, S. B.; Ramkumar, Geetha

    2010-12-01

    The seasonal characteristics of a 16 day planetary wave simultaneously in mesospheric temperature and winds over a low-latitude station Thumba (8.5°N, 76.5°E) using meteor radar observations are discussed for the first time. Four years (2005-2008) of meteor radar winds and temperature observations are used for the present study. It is observed that the amplitude of a 16 day wave in zonal component is more than that of meridional. Further analysis shows that the westerly phase of zonal wind is more favorable for the 16 day waves. The maximum amplitude of a 16 day wave in mesospheric temperature is observed during January-February and August-September. Climatology of a 16 day wave shows the signature of semiannual oscillation (SAO) in mesospheric temperature but not in winds. The vertical amplitude structure of zonal component shows the maximum amplitude at ˜88-92 km with constant phase. It is also noticed that zonal and meridional winds are in phase, whereas the temperature leads zonal wind by 5 ± 1 days. The significance of the present study lies in showing the 16 day wave characteristics, effect of background winds, and manifestation of SAO on their variability.

  15. Low-latitude ionospheric effects of energetic electrons during a recurrent magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, A. V.; Huang, C.-M.; Matsumoto, H.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Andreeva, E. S.; Nesterov, I. A.; Tsai, L.-C.

    2014-11-01

    We study a magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at low latitudes during a moderate (corotating interaction regions/high-speed solar wind streams-driven) geomagnetic storm on 22 July 2009. Recently, it has been shown that during major (coronal mass ejection-driven) storms, quasi-trapped >30 keV electrons largely enhance below the radiation belt in the forbidden zone and produce an additional ionization in the topside ionosphere. In this work, we examine a case of the recurrent storm when the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling through the quasi-trapped electrons also may take place. Data from NOAA/Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite and Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite were used to identify the forbidden electron enhancement (FEE). We find a positive vertical gradient of the electron fluxes that indicates to the radiation belt as a source of FEE. Using global ionospheric maps, radiotomography reconstructions from beacon data and COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 radio occultation measurements, we have observed an unusually large area in the nighttime ionosphere with increased total electron content (TEC) and prominent elevation of the F layer at low latitudes that coincides with FEEs spatially and temporarily. Ionizing particles are considered as an addition source of ionization along with generally accepted mechanisms for storm time TEC increase (a positive ionospheric storm). We discuss relative contributions of the FEE and disturbance dynamo electric field in the TEC increases during the storm recovery phase.

  16. X-rays and solar proton event induced changes in the first mode Schumann resonance frequency observed at a low latitude station Agra, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Birbal; Tyagi, Rajesh; Hobara, Yasuhide; Hayakawa, Masashi

    2014-06-01

    Effects of two events of X-ray bursts followed by solar proton events (SPEs) occurred on 22 September, 2011 and 06 July, 2012 on the variation of first mode Schumann resonance (SR) frequency monitored at a low latitude station, Agra (Geograph. lat. 27.2°N, long. 78°E) India are examined. The variation of average first mode SR frequency shows a sudden increase in coincidence with the X-ray bursts and a decrease associated with the peak flux of SPE. The increases in the frequency in the two cases are 8.4% and 10.9% and corresponding decreases are 4.3% and 3.3% respectively. The increases in the frequency are interpreted in terms of growth of ionization in the upper part of D-region ionosphere due to X-ray bursts and decreases during SPE are caused by the high ionization in the lower D-region (altitude about 50-60 km) in the polar region. The variation of SR frequency is observed to be consistent with other observatories at middle and high latitudes. The effects of X-ray flares on the D-region of the ionosphere at low and equatorial latitudes are also examined by analyzing the amplitude data of VLF transmitter signal (NWC, f=19.8 kHz) monitored at Agra. The flare effect observed prior to sun-set hours shows increase of electron density above 60 km in the ionosphere.

  17. Low-latitude ionosphere response to super geomagnetic storm of 17/18 March 2015: Results from a chain of ground-based observations over Indian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsingh; Sripathi, S.; Sreekumar, Sreeba; Banola, S.; Emperumal, K.; Tiwari, P.; Kumar, Burudu Suneel

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present unique results of equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere response to one of the major geomagnetic storms of the current solar cycle that occurred during 17-18 March 2015, where Dst reached its minimum of -228 nT. Here we utilized data from magnetometers, chain of ionosondes located at Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; geometry: 0.32°N), Hyderabad (17.36°N, 78.47°E; geometry 8.76°N), and Allahabad (25.45°N, 81.85°E; geometry 16.5°N) along with multistation GPS receivers over Indian sector. The observations showed a remarkable increase of h'F to as high as ~560 km over Tirunelveli (magnetic equator) with vertical drift of ~70 m/s at 13:30 UT due to direct penetration of storm time eastward electric fields which exactly coincided with the local time of pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) and caused intense equatorial spread F irregularities in ionosondes and scintillations in GPS receivers at wide latitudes. Plasma irregularities are so intense that their signatures are seen in Allahabad/Lucknow. Storm time thermospheric meridional winds as estimated using two ionosondes suggest the equatorward surge of gravity waves with period of ~2 h. Suppression of anomaly crest on the subsequent day of the storm suggests the complex role of disturbance dynamo electric fields and disturbance wind effects. Our results also show an interesting feature of traveling ionospheric disturbances possibly associated with disturbance meridional wind surge during recovery phase. In addition, noteworthy observations are nighttime westward zonal drifts and PRE-related total electron content enhancements at anomaly crests during main phase and counter electrojet signatures during recovery phase.

  18. Penetration of the Electric Field to Low Latitude During Stormtime PC5 Pulsations as Observed by the HF Doppler Measurements and Magnetometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Hashimoto, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tomizawa, I.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2013-12-01

    The PC5 geomagnetic pulsations often appear coherently at the high latitude afternoon sector and the dayside geomagnetic equator. The local time and latitude features characterized by the equatorial enhancement are similar to those of the storm sudden commencement (SSC) and quasi-periodic DP2 magnetic fluctuations. The equatorial PC5 has been attributed to oscillations in the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) driven by the electric field transmitted from the high latitude [Motoba et al., 2002]. The PC5 electric field has been detected by the HF Doppler (HFD) measurements at low latitude in correlation with the EEJ [Motoba et al., 2004]. The coherency between the HFD and EEJ suggests that the PC5 electric field is transmitted from the polar ionosphere to low latitude by the TM0 mode wave in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide [Kikuchi et al., 1978; Kikuchi and Araki, 1979] which explained the simultaneous onset of the preliminary reverse impulse (PRI) of SSC at high latitude and dayside geomagnetic equator. To understand the PC5 electric field in the context of the waveguide mode transmission, we made correlation analyses between the HFD and EEJ on the day- and night-sides for the series of PC5 events during the geomagnetic storms on October 29-31 2003. We found that the low latitude electric field is not well correlated with the low latitude PC5, but in excellent correlation (correlation coefficient = 0.9) with the EEJ on both the day- and night-sides. Furthermore, the electric field and EEJ on the dayside are in opposite direction to those on the nightside. We suggest that the PC5 electric field is a potential field associated with the ionospheric currents similar to the SSC and DP2, which is carried to the polar ionosphere by a pair of field-aligned currents and transmitted to low latitude by the TM0 mode waves.

  19. Observing Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances Caused by Tsunamis Using GPS TEC Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, David A.; Komjathy, Attila; Hickey, Michael; Foster, James; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following two recent seismic events: the American Samoa earthquake of September 29, 2009, and the Chile earthquake of February 27, 2010. Fluctuations in TEC correlated in time, space, and wave properties with these tsunamis were observed in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with wavelengths and periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the tsunamis in certain locations, but not in others. Where variations are observed, the typical amplitude tends to be on the order of 1% of the background TEC value. Variations with amplitudes 0.1 - 0.2 TECU are observable with periods and timing affiliated with the tsunami. These observations are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement in some locations, though there are cases when the model predicts an observable tsunami-driven signature and none is observed. These TEC variations are not always seen when a tsunami is present, but in these two events the regions where a strong ocean tsunami was observed did coincide with clear TEC observations, while a lack of clear TEC observations coincided with smaller tsunami amplitudes. There exists the potential to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for early warning systems.

  20. Accounting for observational uncertainties in the evaluation of low latitude turbulent air-sea fluxes simulated in a suite of IPSL model versions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servonnat, Jerome; Braconnot, Pascale; Gainusa-Bogdan, Alina

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent momentum and heat (sensible and latent) fluxes at the air-sea interface are key components of the whole energetic of the Earth's climate and their good representation in climate models is of prime importance. In this work, we use the methodology developed by Braconnot & Frankignoul (1993) to perform a Hotelling T2 test on spatio-temporal fields (annual cycles). This statistic provides a quantitative measure accounting for an estimate of the observational uncertainty for the evaluation of low-latitude turbulent air-sea fluxes in a suite of IPSL model versions. The spread within the observational ensemble of turbulent flux data products assembled by Gainusa-Bogdan et al (submitted) is used as an estimate of the observational uncertainty for the different turbulent fluxes. The methodology holds on a selection of a small number of dominating variability patterns (EOFs) that are common to both the model and the observations for the comparison. Consequently it focuses on the large-scale variability patterns and avoids the possibly noisy smaller scales. The results show that different versions of the IPSL couple model share common large scale model biases, but also that there the skill on sea surface temperature is not necessarily directly related to the skill in the representation of the different turbulent fluxes. Despite the large error bars on the observations the test clearly distinguish the different merits of the different model version. The analyses of the common EOF patterns and related time series provide guidance on the major differences with the observations. This work is a first attempt to use such statistic on the evaluation of the spatio-temporal variability of the turbulent fluxes, accounting for an observational uncertainty, and represents an efficient tool for systematic evaluation of simulated air-seafluxes, considering both the fluxes and the related atmospheric variables. References Braconnot, P., and C. Frankignoul (1993), Testing Model

  1. Middle- and low-latitude ionosphere response to 2015 St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, B.; Rodríguez-Zuluaga, J.; Alazo-Cuartas, K.; Kashcheyev, A.; Migoya-Orué, Y.; Radicella, S. M.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Fleury, R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a study of the St Patrick's Day storm of 2015, with its ionospheric response at middle and low latitudes. The effects of the storm in each longitudinal sector (Asian, African, American, and Pacific) are characterized using global and regional electron content. At the beginning of the storm, one or two ionospheric positive storm effects are observed depending on the longitudinal zones. After the main phase of the storm, a strong decrease in ionization is observed at all longitudes, lasting several days. The American region exhibits the most remarkable increase in vertical total electron content (vTEC), while in the Asian sector, the largest decrease in vTEC is observed. At low latitudes, using spectral analysis, we were able to separate the effects of the prompt penetration of the magnetospheric convection electric field (PPEF) and of the disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF) on the basis of ground magnetic data. Concerning the PPEF, Earth's magnetic field oscillations occur simultaneously in the Asian, African, and American sectors, during southward magnetization of the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field. Concerning the DDEF, diurnal magnetic oscillations in the horizontal component H of the Earth's magnetic field exhibit a behavior that is opposed to the regular one. These diurnal oscillations are recognized to last several days in all longitudinal sectors. The observational data obtained by all sensors used in the present paper can be interpreted on the basis of existing theoretical models.

  2. TEC variations over Europe during the solar eclipse of March 20, 2015 using GLONASS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagimuratov, Irk; Cherniak, Iurii; Krankowski, Andrzej; Zakharenkova, Irina; Yakimova, Galina; Tepenitzina, Nadezhda

    2016-07-01

    We report the features of the ionospheric TEC variations derived from the GLONASS measurements during the partial solar eclipse of March 20, 2015. Over Europe the maximal phase of the eclipse was observed around 10 UT. The eclipse took place during period when the ionosphere changed from night to day conditions. This eclipse occurred on the recovery phase of the strong geomagnetic storm of March 17, 2015. The effect of the eclipse was detected in diurnal variations of TEC over the individual GNSS stations as a trough-like variation with a gradual decrease and a succeeding increase of TEC at the time of the eclipse. The eclipse effect on the TEC distribution was observed more distinctly along individual satellite passes. Over the Kaliningrad GNSS station (54N, 20E) we registered the maximal TEC depression of about 4-6 TECU along several satellite passes. We should note that analysis of the ionospheric effects of the solar eclipse was complicated by the geomagnetic storm of March 17. The superposition of the storm and the eclipse make it difficult to separate the absolute TEC changes caused by the eclipse. At the same time the strong changes of the spatial structure of the TEC distribution were registered on the TEC maps. To analyze the spatial TEC distribution during the eclipse the TEC maps with high spatial-temporal resolution were produced. We used the GLONSS measurements derived from 150-180 stations of the dense European GNSS network. Dynamics of the ionospheric plasma density was analyzed using the mixture GLONASS-GPS TEC maps produced with 5 min sampling rate. The spatial structure of the ionosphere changed essentially during the eclipse comparing with the control days. The occurred TEC gradients were quite different comparing with previous and subsequent days. The complex pattern in the spatial-temporal TEC distribution highlights the important role of the dynamic processes in the ionosphere during the eclipse.

  3. Low Latitude Gravity Wave Variances in the MLT Derived from Saber Temperature Observation and Compared with Model Simulations of Waves Generated By Deep Tropical Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Christensen, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Equatorial regions are the scene of prolific generation of gravity waves by deep tropical convection. Waves generated by deep convection have appreciable energy at frequencies and spatial scales that are able to reach altitudes in the Middle Atmosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) and above where they may attain significant amplitudes. A portion of these waves have scales and amplitudes large enough to be detected by space borne instruments. We have analyzed temperature data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics Dynamics (TIMED) satellite for sub-tidal scale fluctuations. Filtering was applied both vertically and horizontally to extract wave variances. We have examined the variances at equatorial latitudes for the altitude region between 70 and 120 km and have have characterized them as a function of season, local time intervals, geographical location and altitude. We find large variances in locations of where convection is particularly prolific (e.g., western South Pacific) and at altitudes where wave trapping is known to be favored (e.g., the lower thermospheric duct). The locations of significant variances persist from year to year. Variances of on the order of a few tens of degrees are found. We have also performed simulations of the response to deep tropical convection with the The Aerospace Corporation Dynamical Model (ADM). This model is a time dependent, high-resolution fully compressible dynamical model that has been used to examine the MLT wave response to intense cellular convection in northern Australia. The background thermal structure for the present simulations was obtained from TIMED/SABER data averaged over low latitudes by season and local time. Our simulations give wave amplitudes that agree reasonably well with the observed amplitudes and show layering that is consistent with the observations. We will show the results of our analysis of

  4. Substorm electric fields at nightside low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K. K.; Kikuchi, T.; Tomizawa, I.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2014-12-01

    The convection electric field penetrates from the polar ionosphere to low latitude and drives the DP2 currents in the global ionosphere with an intensified equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The electric field often reverses its direction, that is, the overshielding occurs and causes the equatorial counterelectrojet (CEJ) during storm and substorms. In this paper we report that the overshielding electric field is detected by the HF Doppler sounders at low latitude on the nightside. We analyzed the Doppler frequency of the HF radio signals propagated over 120 km in Japan at frequencies of 5 and 8 MHz and compared with the equatorial EEJ/CEJ during the substorm expansion phase. We found that the overshielding electric field reaches around 2 mV/m during major substorms (AL <-1800 nT). Taking the geometrical attenuation into account, we estimate the equatorial electric field to be about 1.5 mV/m. We also found that the correlation coefficient was 0.94 between the overshielding electric field and eastward equatorial electrojet at YAP on the night side. The electric field drives the eastward electrojets in the equatorial ionosphere on the night side. It is to be noted that the overshielding electric field is observed on the nightside at low latitude during the major substorms, while the convection electric field is dominant during smaller size substorms, as the CEJ flows on the dayside. These results suggest that the overshielding electric field associated with the Region-2 field-aligned currents becomes dominant during substorms at low latitude on the nightside as well as on the dayside.

  5. Equatorial and Low-Latitudes Ionospheric Reaction to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoli Candido, C. M.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Paula, E. R.; Takahashi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons are responsible for ionizing the terrestrial atmosphere and create the ionosphere. During solar flares, a fast increase in the electron density at different altitude regions takes place due to the abrupt enhance of the X-ray and EUV fluxes reaching Earth. With these changes in the ionosphere, radio communication and navigation can be drastically affected. The magnitudes of these Space Weather events can be related to the X-ray peak brightness and duration, which drive the intensity of the ionosphere response when the associated electromagnetic wave hit the sunlit side of the Earth's atmosphere. Other aspects defining these changes in a particular region are the local time, the solar zenith angle, and the position of the flare in the solar disc for each event. In order to improve the understand of radio signal degradation and loss in the Brazilian sector due to solar abrupt electromagnetic emissions, total electron content (TEC) data obtained by a GPS network formed by tents of dual-frequency receivers spread all over Brazilian territory were analyzed. It was observed different ionospheric local changes during several X-ray events identified by GOES satellite regarding the 0.1-0.8 nm range, and some case studies were ponder for a more detailed analysis of these effects. Considering the results, we have made an estimation of the ionospheric disturbances range for a particular event with great chance to affect space based communications in the equatorial and low-latitude regions.

  6. Development of TEC fluctuations in northern and southern hemispheres on the base of GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagimuratov, Irk; Krankowski, Andrzej; Sieradzki, Rafal; Ephishov, I. I.

    GPS technique is widely used to study the global structure and dynamics of the ionosphere. In this paper GPS observations carried out at Arctic and Antarctic stations belonging to the IGS network were used to study TEC fluctuations in the high-latitude ionosphere during the ionospheric storms. Dual-frequency GPS phase measurements along individual satellite passes served as raw data. It was shown that ionospheric irregularities of a different scale were devel-oped in the auroral and polar ionosphere. It is a common phenomenon caused phase fluctuations of GPS signals. In November 2009, West Department of IZMIRAN in Kaliningrad (Russia) and University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn (Poland) established computer server for automatic monitoring of these irregularities. The rate of TEC index (ROTI) expressed in TECU/min was used as a measure of TEC fluctuations. During its operation TEC variations related to ionospheric structures of a spatial scale more than 200-300 km were detected. Large-scale ionospheric structures cause an increase in horizontal gradients and difficulties with the carrier phase ambiguity resolution in GPS positioning. In turn, the phase fluctuations can cause cycle-slip effects. At the polar stations, ionospheric structures with TEC enhanced by a factor of 3-5 relative to the background were detected, whereas TEC increased to 5-8 TECU in about 10-15 min. These structures were observed during a storm, as well as during a moderate geomagnetic activity. It can be probably attributed to the polar cap patches. In this study are presented the extended and more detailed analyses of TEC fluctuations in both the northern and southern hemispheres and compare the winter and summer events (November and July 2004 storms). A special attention is given to the features related to TEC fluctuations occur-rence in both hemispheres for conjugated GPS stations. The temporal development of both storms was rather similar. During storms the intensity of irregularities

  7. Modulation of the ionosphere by Pc5 waves observed simultaneously by GPS/TEC and EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belakhovsky, V.; Pilipenko, V.; Murr, D.; Fedorov, E.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2016-06-01

    Earlier studies demonstrated that the monitoring of the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) by global satellite navigation systems is a powerful method to study the propagation of transient disturbances in the ionosphere, induced by internal gravity waves. This technique has turned out to be sensitive enough to detect ionospheric signatures of magnetohydrodynamic waves as well. However, the effect of TEC modulation by ULF waves is not well examined as a responsible mechanism has not been firmly identified. During periods with intense Pc5 waves distinct pulsations with the same periodicity were found in the TEC data from high-latitude GPS receivers in Scandinavia. We analyze jointly responses in TEC variations and EISCAT ionospheric parameters to global Pc5 pulsations during the recovery phase of the strong magnetic storms on October 31, 2003. Comparison of periodic fluctuations of the electron density at different altitudes from EISCAT data shows that main contribution into TEC pulsations is provided by the lower ionosphere, up to ~150 km, that is the E-layer and lower F-layer. This observational fact favors the TEC modulation mechanism by field-aligned plasma transport induced by Alfven wave. Analytical estimates and numerical modeling support the effectiveness of this mechanism. Though the proposed hypothesis is basically consistent with the analyzed event, the correspondence between magnetic and ionospheric oscillations is not always perfect, so further studies need to be conducted to understand fully the TEC modulations associated with Pc5 pulsations.

  8. Statistical Characterization of Storm Enhanced Density based on GPS TEC Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coster, A. J.; Colerico, M.; Rideout, W.; Taylor, B.; Foster, J.; Rich, F.

    2005-12-01

    Storm enhanced density (SED) involves the redistribution of plasmas in the ionosphere and magnetosphere driven by disturbance electric fields. Associated with SED events are large scale gradients in the total electron density (TEC) over relatively short distances. These TEC gradients can have direct impact on navigation and communication users. For example, marine users have horizontal positioning requirements of 2-5 meters at a 95 percent confidence level for safety of navigation in inland waterways. TEC gradients observed during 2003 SED events resulted in positioning errors larger than 20 meters on differential GPS baselines as short as 200 km. Large TEC gradients associated with SED events (greater than 100 TEC units per degree) have been observed near many large airports in the Northeast and Northwest continental US. Better SED characterization has been needed to improve current ionospheric models and to further our understanding of this phenomenon. The Madrigal database at MIT Haystack Observatory now contains TEC data with an unprecedented combination of global spatial coverage and high temporal resolution. Data from more than 2000 receivers are being incorporated into the daily 2005 TEC maps. This database has allowed for long term statistical studies of the presence of SED. In this paper, we present statistics of SED plumes observed during multiple storms during the 2000-2005 time period. The location, size of gradients, and time evolution of multiple SED events has been statistically characterized using an automated gradient analysis tool. Examples of magnetically conjugate SED plumes over northern Europe and the American longitude sectors will be discussed. Inter-hemispheric comparisons of the TEC magnitude of the observed SED events at the base, as well as within the plume, will be presented. The results also include observations of magnetically conjugate sub-auroral polarization streams (SAPS) which accompany the SED events using DMSP ion drift

  9. Impact of X-class solar flares on the ionospheric Total Electron Content over low latitude stations in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Monti; Kumar, Sanjay; Guha, Anirban; De, Barin Kumar

    X-rays, UV radiation and Coronal mass emitted during solar flares can affect the Earth's ionosphere and disrupt long-range radio communications. The present study investigates the effects of solar flares on the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) with the help of global positioning system (GPS) data from low latitude stations in India located within the EIA region. Two X-class solar flares on 05th and 08th November 2013 have been selected for the present study. A significant enhancement in TEC is observed at regions around the EIA crest region during the flare and this enhancement is attributed to (a) the flare related EUV flux enhancement and consequent increased production of ionization, and (b) flare induced changes in the equatorial electrodynamics which in turn modifies ionospheric altitude profile of plasma via E × B drift mechanism. The supporting data from COSMIC electron density profile is also used to confirm the flare time enhancement.

  10. Geomorphological impacts of high-latitude storm waves on low-latitude reef islands - Observations of the December 2008 event on Nukutoa, Takuu, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithers, S. G.; Hoeke, R. K.

    2014-10-01

    Low-latitude reefs and reef islands usually experience relatively benign climatic and hydrodynamic conditions due to their location near to the equator, outside of the major storm belts, and they typically exhibit geomorphological traits that reflect the prevailing low-energy conditions. For example, algal ridges are poorly developed, reef flat boulder zones are modest or lacking, rubble banks are rare, and reef islands tend to be low and dominated by sand. Nukutoa is a low-lying triangular-shaped reef island of ~ 6 ha located on the eastern rim of Takuu atoll (4°45‧S, 157°2‧E), Papua New Guinea, approximately 300 km northeast of Bougainville. The approximately 450 residents of Takuu all live on Nukutoa. In December 2008 Takuu was struck by several days of very high water levels and waves, which washed completely over approximately 50% of Nukutoa. GPS shoreline mapping and topographic surveys of the island were undertaken in the days immediately prior to the event, and were repeated immediately after. Homes and village infrastructure were damaged during this event, which eroded around 60% of the shoreline, and deposited a sand sheet averaging around 50 mm thick over approximately 13% of the island. This event was generated by two distant storms - one located > 6000 km away near 50°N, and affected a wide area of the Western Pacific. Oral histories record at least five similar events since the 1940s. In this paper we document the geomorphic impacts of the December 2008 event and discuss the possible significance of similar events in the past, and in the future.

  11. The Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network: The Initial Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, P. H.; Valladares, C. E.; Carrano, C.

    2009-05-01

    The Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) is a distributed observatory designed to provide regional coverage in South America and high-temporal resolution measurements to diagnose the initiation and development of plasma structures and the state and dynamics of the low latitude ionosphere. It combines inexpensive GPS receivers and state-of-the-art radars such as the Vertical Incidence Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR) ionosondes and magnetometers. This paper describes the characteristics of the LISN distributed observatory and discusses the results of the first two campaigns. LISN will be comprised of nearly 70 GPS receivers with the capability to measure Total Electron Content (TEC), amplitude and phase scintillation and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs). LISN will also include 5 ionosondes able to measure nighttime E-region densities and 5 collocated magnetometers that will be placed along the same magnetic meridian. The first campaign was dedicated to detect medium-scale (~100 km) TIDs and was conducted at Huancayo, Peru in July 2008 using 3 GPS receivers spaced by 4-5 km arranged in a triangular configuration. TEC data corresponding to 3 consecutive days indicate that the TIDs phase velocity was close to 120 m/s and directed northward during the early evening hours. The second campaign was conducted in February 2009 using 3 GPS receivers installed near Ancon and coordinated with the VIPIR ionosonde running in an interferometer mode. We will discuss the implications of these new results within the frame of the current theories of plasma bubble onset.

  12. A detection algorithm for scale analysis of post-sunset low-latitude plasma depletions as observed by the Swarm constellation mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervalishvili, Guram; Stolle, Claudia; Xiong, Chao

    2016-04-01

    ESA's constellation mission Swarm was successfully launched on 22 November 2013. The three satellites achieved their final constellation on 17 April 2014 and since then Swarm-A and Swarm-C orbiting the Earth at about 470 km (flying side-by-side) and Swarm-B at about 520 km altitude. The satellites carry instruments to monitor the F-region electron density with a sampling frequency of 2 Hz. This paper will present a detection algorithm for low-latitude post-sunset plasma bubbles (depletions), which uses local minima and maxima to detect depletions directly from electron density readings from Swarm. Our analyses were performed in the magnetic latitude (MLat) and local time (MLT) coordinate system. The detection procedure also captures the amplitude of depletion, which is called depth in the following. The width of a bubble corresponds to the length the satellite is located inside a depletion. We discuss the global distribution of depth and width of plasma bubbles and its seasonal and local time dependence for all three Swarm satellites from April 2015 through September 2015. As expected, on global average the bubble occurrence rate is highest for combined equinoxes (Mar, Apr, Sep, and Oct) and smallest for June solstice (May, Jun, Jul, and Aug). MLT distribution of the bubble occurrence number shows a sharp increase at about 19 MLT and decreases towards post-midnight hours. Interestingly, there is an inverse relation between depth and width of bubbles as function of MLT. This is true for all seasons and for all Swarm satellites. The bubble depth (width) is decreasing (increasing) from post-sunset to post-midnight for December solstice (Jan, Feb, Nov, and Dec) and combined equinoxes with about the same amplitude values for bubbles depth (width). Therefore we suggest that at post midnight when the depletions are less steep the structures of the depletions is broader than early after sunset. However for June solstice the depletions are less deep and the bubble depth and

  13. The ionospheric storm effects at low latitudes and equatorial regions during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Jiawei; Liu, Libo

    2016-04-01

    Ionospheric storms manifest an extreme state of the ionosphere caused by geomagnetic storms, and the complicated ionospheric storm effects are always a research focus for the ionospheric community. The geomagnetic storm occurring on 17-20 March 2015, which is characterized by the minimum SYM-H value -233 nT, is an extremely event of space weather in the current 24th solar cycle. In this report, multiple observations including GPS total electron content (TEC), ionospheric parameters from ionosondes, and magnetometer data are used to investigate the profound ionospheric disturbances at low latitudes and equatorial regions during this geomagnetic storm. Through observation and analysis, the disturbed electric fields, which comprise penetration electric fields (PEFs) and disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEFs), are closely related to the ionospheric storm effects at low latitudes and equatorial regions during this event. The decisive role of electrodynamics at equatorial regions are focused in view of these observations to understand the complete process of the low-latitude and equatorial ionospheric response during the great geomagnetic storm.

  14. Low Latitude Plasma Blobs: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Vitaly P.; Hegai, Valery V.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed activity in the study of local plasma density enhancements in the low latitude F region ionosphere (low latitude plasma blobs). Satellite, all-sky airglow imager, and radar measurements have identified the characteristics of these blobs, and their coupling to Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). New information related to blobs has also been obtained from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. In this paper, we briefly review experimental, theoretical and modeling studies related to low latitude plasma blobs.

  15. Highly Structured Plasma Density and Associated Electric and Magnetic Field Irregularities at Sub-Auroral, Middle, and Low Latitudes in the Topside Ionosphere Observed with the DEMETER and DMSP Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Liebrecht, C; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Parrot, M.; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Detailed observations of the plasma structure and irregularities that characterize the topside ionosphere at sub-auroral, middle, and low-latitudes are gathered with probes on the DEMETER and DMSP satellites. In particular, we present DEMETER observations near 700 km altitude that reveal: (1) the electric field irregularities and density depletions at mid-latitudes are remarkably similar to those associated with equatorial spread-F at low latitudes; (2) the mid-latitude density structures contain both depletions and enhancements with scale lengths along the spacecraft trajectory that typically vary from 10's to 100's of km; (3) in some cases, ELF magnetic field irregularities are observed in association with the electric field irregularities on the walls of the plasma density structures and appear to be related to finely-structured spatial currents and/or Alfven waves; (4) during severe geomagnetic storms, broad regions of nightside plasma density structures are typically present, in some instances extending from the equator to the subauroral regions; and (5) intense, broadband electric and magnetic field irregularities are observed at sub-auroral latitudes during geomagnetic storm periods that are typically associated with the trough region. Data from successive DEMETER orbits during storm periods in both the daytime and nighttime illustrate how enhancements of both the ambient plasma density, as well as sub-auroral and mid-latitude density structures, correlate and evolve with changes in the Dst. The DEMETER data are compared with near simultaneous observations gathered by the DMSP satellites near 840 km. The observations are related to theories of sub-auroral and mid-latitude plasma density structuring during geomagnetic storms and penetration electric fields and are highly germane to understanding space weather effects regarding disruption of communication and navigation signals in the near-space environment.

  16. Seismo-Ionospheric Coupling as Intensified EIA Observed by Satellite Electron Density and GPS-TEC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, K.; Jangsoo, C.; Kim, S. G.; Jeong, K. S.; Parrot, M.; Pulinets, S. A.; Oyama, K. I.

    2014-12-01

    Examples of intensified EIA features temporally and spatially related to large earthquakes observed by satellites and GPS-TEC are introduced. The precursory, concurrent, and ex-post enhancements of EIA represented by the equatorial electron density, which are thought to be related to the M8.7 Northern Sumatra earthquake of March 2005, the M8.0 Pisco earthquake of August 2007, and the M7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008, are shown with space weather condition. Based on the case studies, statistical analysis on the ionospheric electron density data measured by the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite (DEMETER) over a period of 2005-2010 was executed in order to investigate the correlation between seismic activity and equatorial plasma density variations. To simplify the analysis, three equatorial regions with frequent earthquakes were selected and then one-dimensional time series analysis between the daily seismic activity indices and the EIA intensity indices were performed for each region with excluding the possible effects from the geomagnetic and solar activity. The statistically significant values of the lagged cross-correlation function, particularly in the region with minimal effects of longitudinal asymmetry, indicate that some of the very large earthquakes with M > 7.0 in the low latitude region can accompany observable seismo-ionospheric coupling phenomena in the form of EIA enhancements, even though the seismic activity is not the most significant driver of the equatorial ionospheric evolution. The physical mechanisms of the seismo-ionospheric coupling to explain the observation and the possibility of earthquake prediction using the EIA intensity variation are discussed.

  17. Comparison of Two IRI plasmasphere Extensions with GPS-TEC Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.; Gallagher, Dennis L.

    2006-01-01

    Comparisons of two model results with Global Positioning System GPS-TEC measurements have been carried out for different latitudinal, solar activity, magnetic activity, diurnal and seasonal conditions. The models evaluated are the Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM-2000) and the IRI extension with Russian plasmasphere model (IRI*).Data of 23 observatories providing GPS-TEC and ionosonde data have been used. It is shown that IRI* plasmasphere electron density is greater than GCPM results by an order of magnitude at 6370 km altitude (one Earth's radius) with this excess growing to 2-3 orders of magnitude towards the GPS satellite altitude of 20000 km. Another source of model and GPS-TEC differences is a way of selection of the F2 layer peak parameters driving the models either with ITU-R (former CCIR) maps or ionosonde observations. Plasmasphere amendment to IRI improves accuracy of TEC model predictions because the plasmasphere contribution to the total TEC varies from 10% by daytime under quiet magnetic conditions to more than 50% by night under stormy conditions.

  18. Latitudinal and Seasonal Investigations of Storm-Time TEC Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimula, I. A.; Oladipo, O. A.; Adebiyi, S. J.

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere responds markedly and unpredictably to varying magnetospheric energy inputs caused by solar disturbances on the geospace. Knowledge of the impact of the space weather events on the ionosphere is important to assess the environmental effect on the operations of ground- and space-based technologies. Thus, global positioning system (GPS) measurements from the international GNSS service (IGS) database were used to investigate the ionospheric response to 56 geomagnetic storm events at six different latitudes comprising the northern and southern hemispheres in the Afro-European sector. Statistical distributions of total electron content (TEC) response show that during the main phase of the storms, enhancement of TEC is more pronounced in most of the seasons, regardless of the latitude and hemisphere. However, a strong seasonal dependence appears in the TEC response during the recovery phase. Depletion of TEC is majorly observed at the high latitude stations, and its appearance at lower latitudes is seasonally dependent. In summer hemisphere, the depletion of TEC is more pronounced in nearly all the latitudinal bands. In winter hemisphere, enhancement as well as depletion of TEC is observed over the high latitude, while enhancement is majorly observed over the mid and low latitudes. In equinoxes, the storm-time TEC distribution shows a fairly consistent characteristic with the summer distribution, particularly in the northern hemisphere.

  19. Latitudinal and Seasonal Investigations of Storm-Time TEC Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimula, I. A.; Oladipo, O. A.; Adebiyi, S. J.

    2016-04-01

    The ionosphere responds markedly and unpredictably to varying magnetospheric energy inputs caused by solar disturbances on the geospace. Knowledge of the impact of the space weather events on the ionosphere is important to assess the environmental effect on the operations of ground- and space-based technologies. Thus, global positioning system (GPS) measurements from the international GNSS service (IGS) database were used to investigate the ionospheric response to 56 geomagnetic storm events at six different latitudes comprising the northern and southern hemispheres in the Afro-European sector. Statistical distributions of total electron content (TEC) response show that during the main phase of the storms, enhancement of TEC is more pronounced in most of the seasons, regardless of the latitude and hemisphere. However, a strong seasonal dependence appears in the TEC response during the recovery phase. Depletion of TEC is majorly observed at the high latitude stations, and its appearance at lower latitudes is seasonally dependent. In summer hemisphere, the depletion of TEC is more pronounced in nearly all the latitudinal bands. In winter hemisphere, enhancement as well as depletion of TEC is observed over the high latitude, while enhancement is majorly observed over the mid and low latitudes. In equinoxes, the storm-time TEC distribution shows a fairly consistent characteristic with the summer distribution, particularly in the northern hemisphere.

  20. Comparison of GPS-TEC observations over Addis Ababa with IRI-2012 model predictions during 2010-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akala, A. O.; Somoye, E. O.; Adewale, A. O.; Ojutalayo, E. W.; Karia, S. P.; Idolor, R. O.; Okoh, D.; Doherty, P. H.

    2015-10-01

    This study presents Global Positioning System-Total Electron Content (GPS-TEC) observations over Addis Ababa (Lat: 9.03°N Lon: 38.77°E Mag. lat: 0.18°N) and an evaluation of the accuracy of International Reference Ionosphere-2012 (IRI-2012) model predictions during 2010-2013. Generally, on a diurnal scale, TEC recorded minimum values at 0400-0600 LT and maximum at 1400-1600 LT. Seasonally, TEC recorded maximum values during December solstice and September equinox, and minimum during June solstice. On a year-by-year basis, 2013 recorded the highest values of TEC for both the observed and the model measurements, while 2010 recorded the lowest, implying the solar activity dependence of TEC. Furthermore, we observed discrepancies in the comparison of the GPS-TEC measurements with those derived from IRI-2012 model, after the exclusion of the contributions of plasmaspheric electron content (PEC) from the GPS-observed TEC. All the three options of IRI-2012 model overestimated TEC during early morning and post-sunset hours. Comparatively, of the three options of IRI-2012 model, NeQuick appears to be the most accurate for TEC estimation over Addis Ababa, although at a very close performance capability with the IRI01 CORR option, while IRI2001 is the least accurate.

  1. Effects of geomagnetic storm on low latitude ionospheric total electron content: A case study from Indian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Monti; Kumar, Sanjay; De, Barin Kumar; Guha, Anirban

    2015-07-01

    The effect of geomagnetic storms on low latitude ionosphere has been investigated with the help of Global Positioning System Total Electron Content (GPS-TEC) data. The investigation has been done with the aid of TEC data from the Indian equatorial region, Port Blair (PBR) and equatorial ionization anomaly region, Agartala (AGR). During the geomagnetic storms on 24th April and 15th July 2012, significant enhancement up to 150% and depression up to 72% in VTEC is observed in comparison to the normal day variation. The variations in VTEC observed from equatorial to EIA latitudes during the storm period have been explained with the help of electro-dynamic effects (prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) and disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF)) as well as mechanical effects (storm-induced equatorward neutral wind effect and thermospheric composition changes). The current study points to the fact that the electro-dynamic effect of geomagnetic storms around EIA region is more effective than at the lower latitude region. Drastic difference has been observed over equatorial region (positive storm impact) and EIA region (negative storm impact) around same longitude sector, during storm period on 24th April. This drastic change as observed in GPS-TEC on 24th April has been further confirmed by using the O/N2 ratio data from GUVI (Global Ultraviolet Imager) as well as VTEC map constructed from IGS data. The results presented in the paper are important for the application of satellite-based communication and navigational system.

  2. A study of L band scintillations during the initial phase of rising solar activity at an Indian low latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, H. J.; Karia, S. P.; Pathak, K. N.

    2013-08-01

    The ionospheric scintillation and TEC (Total Electron Content) variations are studied using GPS (Global Positioning System) measurements at an Indian low latitude station Surat (21.16°N, 72.78°E; Geomagnetic: 12.90°N, 147.35°E), situated near the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly region. The results are presented for data collected during the initial phase of current rising solar activity (low to moderate solar activity) period between January 2009 and December 2011. The results show that within a total number of 656 night-time scintillation events, 340 events are observed with TEC depletions, Rate of change of TEC (ROT) fluctuations and enhancement of Rate of change of TEC Index (ROTI). A comparison of night-time scintillation events from the considered period reveal strong correlation amongst the duration of scintillation activity in S4 index, TEC depletion, ROT fluctuations and ROTI enhancement in the year 2011, followed by the year 2010 and least in 2009. The statistical analyses of scintillation activity with enhancement of ROTI also show that about 70-96% scintillation activity took place in equinox and winter months. Moreover, from a nocturnal variation in occurrence of scintillation with (S4 ⩾ 0.2) and enhancement of ROTI with (ROTI ⩾ 0.5), a general trend of higher occurrence in pre-midnight hours of equinox and winter seasons is observed in both indices during the year 2011 and 2010, while no significant trend is observed in the year 2009. The results suggest the presence of F-region ionospheric irregularities with scale sizes of few kilometers and few hundred meters over Surat and are found to be influenced by solar and magnetic activity.

  3. DEMETER Observations of Highly Structured Plasma Density and Associated ELF Electric Field and Magnetic Field Irregularities at Middle and Low Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Liebrecht, C.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Parrot, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2008-01-01

    The DEMETER spacecraft frequently encounters structured plasma and electric field irregularities associated with equatorial spread-F. However, during severe geonagnetic storms, the spacecraft detects broader regions of density structures that extend to higher latitudes, in some instances to the sub-auroral regions. In addition to the electric field irregularities, ELF magnetic field irregularities are sometimes observed. for example, on the walls of the density structures, and appear related to finely-structured spatial currents and/or Alfven waves. The mid-latitude irregularities are compared with those of equatorial spread-F as well as wit11 intense irregularities associated with the trough region observed at sub-auroral latitudes.

  4. Hemispheric asymmetry in transition from equatorial plasma bubble to blob as deduced from 630.0 nm airglow observations at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Martinis, Carlos R.; Lühr, Hermann; Pfaff, Robert F.; Kwak, Young-Sil

    2016-01-01

    Transitions from depletions to enhancements of 630.0 nm nighttime airglow have been observed at Arecibo. Numerical simulations by Krall et al. (2009) predicted that they should occur only in one hemisphere, which has not yet been confirmed observationally. In this study we investigate the hemispheric conjugacy of the depletion-to-enhancement transition using multiple instruments. We focus on one event observed in the American longitude sector on 22 December 2014: 630.0 nm airglow depletions evolved into enhancements in the Northern Hemisphere while the evolution did not occur in the conjugate location in the Southern Hemisphere. Concurrent plasma density measured by low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites and 777.4 nm airglow images support that the depletions and enhancements of 630.0 nm nighttime airglow reflect plasma density decreases and increases (blobs), respectively. Characteristics of the airglow depletions, in the context of the LEO satellite data, further suggest that the plasma density depletion deduced from the airglow data represents equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) rather than medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances from midlatitudes. Hence, the event in this study can be interpreted as EPB-to-blob transition.

  5. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Irregularities and Plasma Instabilities in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Gathered by the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations gathered on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The talk focuses on occasions where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km as solar activity has increased. In particular, during the equinox periods of 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set: The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second result is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is near or below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field

  6. Study of daytime vertical E × B drift velocities inferred from ground-based magnetometer observations of ΔH, at low latitudes under geomagnetically disturbed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhadra Devi, P. K.; Unnikrishnan, K.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, 30 storm sudden commencement (SSC) events during the period 2001-2007 for which daytime vertical E × B drift velocities from JULIA radar, Jicamarca (geographic latitude 11.91°S, geographic longitude 283.11°E, 0.81°N dip latitude), Peru and ΔH component of geomagnetic field measured as the difference between the magnitudes of the horizontal (H) components between two magnetometers deployed at two different locations Jicamarca (geographic latitude 11.91°S, geographic longitude 283.11°E, 0.81°N dip latitude) and Piura (geographic latitude 5.21°S, geographic longitude 279.41°E, 6.81°N dip latitude), in Peru, were considered. It is observed that a positive correlation exists between peak value of daytime vertical E × B drift velocity and peak value of ΔH for the three consecutive days of SSC. A qualitative analysis made after selecting the peak values of daytime vertical E × B drift velocity and ΔH showed that 57% of the events have daytime vertical E × B drift velocity peak in the magnitude range 20-30 m/s and 63% of the events have ΔH peak in the range 80-100 nT. The maximum probable (45%) range of time of occurrence of peak value for both vertical E × B drift velocity and ΔH during the daytime hours were found to be the same, i.e., 10:00-12:00 LT. A strong positive correlation was also found to exist between the daytime vertical E × B drift velocity and ΔH for all the three consecutive days of SSC, for all the events considered. To establish a quantitative relationship between day time vertical E × B drift velocity and ΔH, linear and polynomial (order 2 and 3) regression analysis (Least Square Method (LSM)) were carried out, considering the fully disturbed day after the commencement of the storm as ‘disturbed period’ for the SSC events selected for analysis. The formulae indicating the relationship between daytime vertical E × B drift velocity and ΔH, for the ‘disturbed periods’, obtained through the regression analysis

  7. Dynamics of Low-latitude Thermosphere-Ionosphere from Coincident Observations of Zonal Neutral Winds and EPB Velocity from Brazil and Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapagain, N. P.; Makela, J. J.; Meriwether, J. W.; Fisher, D. J.; Chau, J. L.; Buriti, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Remote Equatorial Nighttime Observatory of Ionospheric Regions (RENOIR) experiment comprises a suite of instruments operating in northeastern Brazil at Cajazeiras (6.86°S, 38.56°W) and Cariri (7.38°S, 36.53°W) since 2009. This experiment consists of a wide-angle imaging system at Cajazeiras and Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPI) at each site. As part of a separate experiment, two FPIs were deployed in western Peru at Merihill (11.96°S, 76.86°W) and Nazca (14.97°S, 74.89°W) in 2010. In this presentation, we discuss the results obtained from these experiments. When operating individually, each FPI provides measurements of the zonal or meridional neutral winds in the cardinal look directions. A second mode is available, the common volume mode, in which two FPIs (in either Brazil or Peru) make coordinated and collocated measurements of both the zonal and meridional winds. Using the resultant data, we present the climatology of thermospheric neutral winds during the transition from the deep solar minimum to the impending solar maximum conditions from both the east and west coasts of South America. Furthermore, we discuss the coupling between the thermosphere and ionosphere through an analysis of coincident observations of the zonal neutral winds and the drift velocities of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs). The results show the neutral winds and EPB drift velocities agree well, illustrating that the F-region dynamo is, in general, fully developed. However, in the early evening hours, the EPB drift velocity is slower than that of the neutral winds on several occasions suggesting the F-region dynamo is not fully activated during the development phase of the EPBs.

  8. Low latitude middle atmosphere ionization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassi, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Low latitude middle atmosphere ionization was studied with data obtained from three blunt conductivity probes and one Gerdien condenser. An investigation was conducted into the effects of various ionization sources in the 40 to 65 Km altitude range. An observed enhancement of positive ion conductivity taking place during the night can be explained by an atmsopheric effect, with cosmic rays being the only source of ionization only if the ion-ion recombination coefficient (alpha sub i) is small(10 to the -7 power cu cm/s) and varies greatly with altitude. More generally accepted values of alpha sub i ( approximately equal to 3x10 to the -7 power cu cm/s) require an additional source of ionization peaking at about 65 Km, and corresponding approximately to the integrated effect of an X-ray flux measured on a rocket flown in conjunction with the ionization measurements. The reasonable assumption of an alpha sub i which does not vary with altitude in the 50-70 Km range implies an even greater value alpha sub i and a more intense and harder X-ray spectrum.

  9. Comparison of Ionospheric TEC Derived from GPS and IRI 2012 Model during Geomagnetic Storms at Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlia, Dessi; Wu, Falin

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the variations of vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) at Manado, Indonesia (geographic coordinates : lat 1.34 ° S and long 124.82 ° E) for period 2013. The GPS measured TEC is compared with the TEC derived from the IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) 2012 model. Vertical TEC measurements obtained from dual frequency GPS receiver that is GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillations and TEC monitor). Variation of TEC validate to IRI 2012 model at Manado station has been compared with the model for three different topside of electron density namely NeQuick, IRI-01-Corr and IRI2001.There is a need to investigation on diurnal, seasonal variations, solar activity dependence of TEC and including effects of space weather related events to TEC and modeling of TEC. In this paper, diurnal and seasonal variations of VTEC and the effect of VTEC due to space weather events like Geomagnetic storms are analyzed. The result show that the TEC prediction using IRI-2001 model overestimated the GPS TEC measurements, while IRI-NeQuick and IRI-01-corr show a tendency to underestimates the observed TEC during the day time particularly in low latitude region in the maximum solar activity period (2013). The variations of VTEC during 17th March, 2013, 29th June, 2013 storms are analyzed. During 17th March,2013 storm enhancement in VTEC with Kp value 6 and Disturbance storm index (DST) -132 nT. During 29th June, 2013 storm VTEC depletion with value 7 and DST -98 nT. Significant deviations in VTEC during the main phase of the storms are observed. It is found that the response of ionospheric TEC consist of effects of both enhancement and depletions in ionospheric structures (positive and negative storm). Keywords: TEC ionosphere, GPS, GISTM, IRI 2012 model, solar activity, geomagnetic storm

  10. A comparative study of the ionospheric F-region observations in the Brazilian low latitude region and the TIMEGCM model results during the super geomagnetic storm of 20 November 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Guedes, F.; Sahai, Y.; Fagundes, P.; Crowley, G.; Lima, W.

    The TIMEGCM is a global 1st principles model of the ionosphere-thermosphere I-T system with fully coupled and interactive ionospheric and thermospheric components The model requires a specification of the high latitude electric potential distribution for each time step along with specification of the auroral particle precipitation Each of these parameters is obtained by use of the AMIE Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics technique which assimilates data from nearly 200 ground-based magnetometers several DMSP satellites and the SuperDARN radar network In this paper we compare ionospheric observations from two low-latitude ionospheric sounding stations with predictions from the TIMEGCM during the super geomagnetic storm of 20 November 2003 The super geomagnetic storm with SSC at 08 03 UT on 20 November attained vert Dst vert max 472 nT at 20 00 UT 20 11 The digital ionosondes using the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosondes CADIs are located at Palmas PAL 10 2 r S 48 2 r W dip latitude 5 5 r S a near equatorial station and S a o Jos e dos Campos SJC 23 2 r S 45 9 r W dip latitude 17 6 r S station located under the crest of equatorial ionospheric anomaly Brazil Comparisons of model predictions with ionospheric observations during intense geomagnetic disturbances are important studies related to space weather forecasting Salient features from this comparative study are presented and discussed in this paper

  11. AzTEC 1.1 mm OBSERVATIONS OF THE MBM12 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M. J.; Kim, S.; Youn, S.; Kang, Y.-W.; Yun, M. S.; Wilson, G. W.; Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D. H.; Humphrey, A.; Williams, J. P.; Austermann, J. E.; Perera, T. A.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Magnani, L.

    2012-02-10

    We present 1.1 mm observations of the dust continuum emission from the MBM12 high-latitude molecular cloud observed with the Astronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We surveyed 6.34 deg{sup 2} centered on MBM12, making this the largest area that has ever been surveyed in this region with submillimeter and millimeter telescopes. Eight secure individual sources were detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 4.4. These eight AzTEC sources can be considered to be real astronomical objects compared to the other candidates based on calculations of the false detection rate. The distribution of the detected 1.1 mm sources or compact 1.1 mm peaks is spatially anti-correlated with that of the 100 {mu}m emission and the {sup 12}CO emission. We detected the 1.1 mm dust continuum emitting sources associated with two classical T Tauri stars, LkH{alpha}262 and LkH{alpha}264. Observations of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) indicate that LkH{alpha}262 is likely to be Class II (pre-main-sequence star), but there are also indications that it could be a late Class I (protostar). A flared disk and a bipolar cavity in the models of Class I sources lead to more complicated SEDs. From the present AzTEC observations of the MBM12 region, it appears that other sources detected with AzTEC are likely to be extragalactic and located behind MBM12. Some of these have radio counterparts and their star formation rates are derived from a fit of the SEDs to the photometric evolution of galaxies in which the effects of a dusty interstellar medium have been included.

  12. Comparison of Earth-Based Longitudinal Studies and Cassini CIRS Observations of Saturn's Temperature Field: Modifications of Seasonal Forcing Models and the Discovery of Nonseasonal Low-Latitude Thermal Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, G.; Parrish, P.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Fisher, B.; Fletcher, L.; Irwin, P.; Nelson, J.; Gezari, D.; Fuse, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.

    2006-12-01

    During the sequence of observations made by Cassini CIRS from 2004 to the present, supporting observations of Saturn have been made in the same spectral region. Most of these were taken at NASA's 3-m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), but they were supplemented by observations from the 8.2-m Subaru Telescope. An examination of temperature field retrieved from form spacecraft and earth-based observations has required us to assess carefully the limitation of vertical sensitivity for the ground-based images and the calibration of both geometry and absolute radiance. Keeping those limitations in mind, the combination of the two data sets has provided evidence that is consistent with the absence of effective cloud opacity in the mid- and far-infrared. Furthermore, the full sequence of ground-based imaging stretches back as early as 1990. These observations clearly indicate the expected hemispherically antisymmetric seasonal forcing, but with relaxation times considerably shorter than the 9-year scales in both the stratosphere and upper troposphere expected from gaseous constituents alone. An important non- seasonal effect was also noted in the long-term behavior of the equator and low-latitude regions which undergo a periodic oscillation with an alternating phases of thermal waves at the equator and at latitudes 5-25 degrees poleward in both hemispheres over a period of 20 years or longer. The observed behavior is consistent with the different stratospheric temperature profiles of these regions. This phenomenon is best explained by the presence of upwelling thermal waves which are similar to the Earth's quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and Jupiter's quasi-quadrennial oscillation (QQO).

  13. Global features of ionospheric slab thickness derived from JPL TEC and COSMIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He; Liu, Libo

    2016-04-01

    The ionospheric equivalent slab thickness (EST) is the ratio of total electron content (TEC) to F2-layer peak electron density (NmF2), describing the thickness of the ionospheric profile. In this study, we retrieve EST from Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) TEC data and NmF2 retrieved from Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) ionospheric radio occultation data. The diurnal, seasonal and solar activity variations of global EST are analyzed as the excellent spatial coverage of JPL TEC and COSMIC data. During solstices, daytime EST in the summer hemisphere is larger than that in the winter hemisphere, except in some high-latitude regions; and the reverse is true for the nighttime EST. The peaks of EST often appear at 0400 local time. The pre-sunrise enhancement in EST appears in all seasons, while the post-sunset enhancement in EST is not readily observed in equinox. The dependence of EST on solar activity is very complicated. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon is found that EST is enhanced from 0° to 120° E in longitude and 30° to 75° S in latitude during nighttime, just to the east of Weddell Sea Anomaly, during equinox and southern hemisphere summer.

  14. Characteristics of GPS TEC variations in the polar cap ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Chris; Jayachandran, P. T.; MacDougall, John W.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents statistical characteristics (occurrence rate, amplitude, and frequency) of low-frequency (<100 mHz) variations in total electron content (TEC) observed in the polar cap ionosphere. TEC variations were primarily associated with mesoscale (tens to hundreds of kilometers) ionization structures and were observed by five Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers over a 6 year period (2009-2014). The altitude of ionization structures was estimated by using colocated ionosonde radars. High data rate receivers combined with broad spatial coverage of multisatellite TEC measurements provided high-resolution magnetic local time/latitude maps of TEC variation characteristics, which were examined as a function of solar cycle and season. These high-resolution maps improve upon the current observational picture of mesoscale structuring in the polar cap and provide accurate links to particular magnetospheric source regions. Occurrence of TEC variations was consistently highest in dayside regions mapping to low latitude and plasma mantle boundary layers, while largest-amplitude TEC variations were observed in dayside regions close to the polar cusp, and lower latitudes around midnight. Occurrence and amplitude of TEC variations increased significantly during the ascending phase of the solar cycle, independent of solar wind conditions, while seasonal statistics showed highest dayside occurrence and amplitude in winter months, lowest in summer, and highest nightside occurrence and amplitude around equinox. A surprising result in the frequency distributions of TEC variations was discrete frequencies of about 2 and 4 mHz, which appeared to originate from regions corresponding to the plasma mantle, immediately poleward of the polar cusp.

  15. Modelling of ionospheric irregularities during geomagnetic storms over African low latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungufeni, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    In this study, empirical models of occurrence of ionospheric irregularities over low latitude African region during geomagnetic storms have been developed. The geomagnetic storms considered consisted of Dst ≤ -50 nT. GNSS-derived ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) data over Libreville, Gabon (NKLG) (0.35° N, 9.68° E, geographic, 8.05° S, magnetic) and Malindi, Kenya (MAL2) (2.99° S, 40.19° E, geographic, 12.42° S, magnetic) during 2000 - 2014 were used. Ionospheric irregularities at scale- lengths of a few kilometers and ˜400 m were represented with the rate of change of TEC index (ROTI). The inputs for the models are the local time, solar flux index, Auroral Electrojet index, day of the year, and the Dst index, while the output is the median ROTI during these given conditions. To develop the models, the ROTI index values were binned based on the input parameters and cubic B splines were then fitted to the binned data. Developed models using data over NKLG and MAL2 were validated with independent data over stations within 510 km and 680 km radius, respectively. The models captured the enhancements and inhibitions of the occurrence of the ionospheric irregularities during the storm period. The models even emulated these patterns in the various seasons, during medium and high solar activity conditions. The correlation coefficients for the validations were statistically significant and ranged from 0.58 - 0.73, while the percentage of the variance in the observed data explained by the modelled data ranged from 34 - 53.

  16. Space Weather Studies Using the Low-Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Pacheco, E.

    2014-12-01

    LISN is an array of small instruments that operates as a real-time distributed observatory to understand the complex day-to-day variability and the extreme state of disturbance that occurs in the South American low-latitude ionosphere nearly every day after sunset. The LISN observatory aims to forecast the initiation and transport of plasma bubbles across the South American continent. The occurrence of this type of plasma structures and their embedded irregularities poses a prominent natural hazard to communication, navigation and high precision pointing systems. As commercial and military aviation is increasingly reliant on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) any interruption due to ionospheric irregularities or errors due to large density gradients constitutes a serious threat to passengers and crew. Therefore, it is important to understand the conditions and sources that contribute to the formation of these irregularities. To achieve high quality regional nowcasts and forecasts, the LISN system was designed to include a dense coverage of the South American landmass with 47 GPS receivers, 5 flux-gate magnetometers distributed on 2 base lines and 3 Vertical Incidence Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR) ionosondes deployed along the same magnetic meridian that intersects the magnetic equator at 68° W. This presentation will provide a summary of recent instrument installations and new processing techniques that have been developed under the LISN project. We will also present the results of recent efforts to detect TIDs and TEC plasma depletions on a near real-time basis. We will describe a method to estimate the zonal velocity and tilt of the plasma bubbles/depletions by combining observations of TEC depletions acquired with adjacent receivers, making it possible to predict precisely their future locations.

  17. Comparison of Two IRI Plasmasphere Extensions with GPS-TEC Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulyacva, Tamara; Gallagher, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Two plasmasphere extensions of the International Reference Ionosphere are made available for the users. It is aimed to estimate the effect of charged particles on technical devices in the Earth's environment and to define the ionosphere-plasmasphere operational conditions compatible with existing and future systems of radio communication, radio navigation and other relevant radio technologies in the ranges of medium and higher frequencies. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM-2000) of Gallagher et al. (2000) is an empirical description of thermal plasma densities in the plasmasphere, plasmapause, magnetospheric trough, and polar cap. GCPM-2000 uses the Kp index and is coupled to IRI in the transition region 500-600 km. The IZMIRAN plasmasphere model (Chasovitin et al., 1998; Gulyaeva et al., 2002) is an empirical model based on whistler and satellite observations. It presents global vertical analytical profiles of electron density smoothly fitted to IRI electron density profile at 1000 km altitude and extended towards the plasmapause (up to 36,000 km). For the smooth fitting of the two models, the shape of the IRI topside electron density profile is improved using ISIS 1, ISIS 2, and IK19 satellite inputs (Gulyaeva, 2003). The plasmasphere model depends on solar activity and magnetic activity (kp-index). The two IRI plasmasphere extensions are compared in the present study with the total electron content derived from records of Global Positioning Satellites (GPS-TEC) observations for different latitudinal, solar activity, magnetic activity, diurnal and seasonal conditions. The differences of model TEC with observed TEC in the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere are discussed.

  18. A global picture of ionospheric slab thickness derived from GIM TEC and COSMIC radio occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He; Liu, Libo; Chen, Yiding; Le, Huijun; Wan, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    The ionospheric equivalent slab thickness (EST), defined as the ratio of total electron content (TEC) to F2 layer peak electron density (NmF2), describes the thickness of the ionospheric profile. In this study, we retrieve EST from TEC data obtained from Global Ionospheric Map (GIM) and NmF2 retrieved from Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) ionospheric radio occultation data. The diurnal, seasonal, and solar activity variations of global EST are analyzed as the excellent spatial coverage of GIM and COSMIC data. During solstices, daytime EST in the summer hemisphere is larger than that in the winter hemisphere, except in some high-latitude regions, and the reverse is true for the nighttime EST. The peaks of EST often appear at 0400 local time. The presunrise enhancement in EST appears in all seasons, while the postsunset enhancement in EST is not readily observed in equinox. Both enhancements are attributed to the more remarkable electron density decay of NmF2 compared to that of TEC. The dependence of EST on solar activity is related to the inconsistent solar activity dependences of electron density at different altitudes. Furthermore, it is interesting that EST is enhanced from 0° to 120°E in longitude and 30° to 75°S in latitude during nighttime, just to the east of Weddell Sea Anomaly, during equinox and the Southern Hemisphere summer. This phenomenon is supposed to be related to the effects of geomagnetic declination-related plasma vertical drifts.

  19. Low latitude geomagnetic field line resonance: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, C.L.; Menk, F.W.; Fraser, B.J.

    1994-09-01

    The authors describe work to detect field line resonances, or the observation of Pc 3-5 geomagnetic pulsation events, at low latitude sites. These signals are extracted from ground based magnetometer arrays. The authors found one field line resonance structure in 5 weeks of data at L=1.8. At L=2.8 they were able to observe up to 4 harmonics concurrently. They compare these frequency spectra with the results of two different models of the plasma density in the lower ionosphere.

  20. On the response of the ionospheric F region over Indian low-latitude station Gadanki to the annular solar eclipse of 15 January 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhav Haridas, M. K.; Manju, G.

    2012-01-01

    The response of the ionospheric F region over Indian low-latitude regions to the annular solar eclipse of 15 January 2010 is investigated. The foF2 corresponding to an electron density increase of ˜21% at the F2 peak is seen over Gadanki (13.5°N, 79°E) during the course of the eclipse in comparison with the control day behavior. After the peak phase the foF2 shows a large decrease (˜19%) compared to the mean control day pattern. The total electron content (TEC) at Bangalore (13°N, 78°E) which is located very close to Gadanki is expected to follow a similar pattern of temporal evolution. This TEC shows reduction with respect to control day both at the peak phase (17%) and in the postpeak phase (30%). The enhanced foF2 from the start to the peak phase of the eclipse is attributed to the effect of the weakened equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). At altitude regions below 270 km, the eclipse induced cutoff of solar insolation results in chemical recombination becoming dominant and thus contributes to the decrease in columnar content in spite of foF2 increase. The post peak phase steep decrease of both foF2 and TEC is attributed to the substantial increase in the poleward meridional winds, the inhibition of the EIA, and persistent depletion in the lower-altitude electron densities. In summary, this study demonstrates the modifications in electrodynamics, recombination, and neutral dynamics acting in concert to produce the observed effects at low latitudes during an eclipse.

  1. GPS Observation of Fast-moving Continent-size Traveling TEC Pulsations at the Start of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradipta, R.; Valladares, C. E.; Doherty, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Using network of GPS receiver stations in North and South America, we have recently observed fast-moving continent-size traveling plasma disturbances in the mapped total electron content (TEC) data. These space plasma disturbances occurred at the beginning of geomagnetic storms, immediately after the storm's suddent commencement (SSC) and prior to the appearance of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) from the auroral regions. More specifically, these supersize TEC perturbations were observed when the IMF Bz was oscillating between northward and southward directions. They were found to propagate zonally westward with a propagation speed of 2-3 km/s, if projected onto an ionospheric-equivalent altitude of 350 km. Based on their general characteristics and comparison with ground-based ionosonde data, we interpret these TEC pulsations as ion drift waves in the magnetosphere/plasmasphere that propagate azimuthally inside the GPS orbit.

  2. Comparative study on the ionospheric response to minor and major sudden stratospheric events in the Brazilian equatorial and low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagundes, Paulo Roberto; Kavutarapu, Venkatesh; Gil Pillat, Valdir; Vieira, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    The Total electron Content (TEC), derivate from GPS, becomes one of the most powerful techniques to study the space-time ionospheric (F-region) electrodynamics, during the quiet and disturbed periods. The number of GPS stations in Brazil increased significantly during the last few years; currently more than 100 GPS stations are in operation over the Brazilian region. The GPS-TEC values are derived using the differential delay technique from the dual frequency measurements at L1 and L2 frequencies over the considered locations at equatorial and low latitudes. The present study investigates the ionospheric total electron content (GPS-TEC) response in the Southern Hemisphere equatorial and low latitudes, due to major and minor sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events, which took place during 2009 and 2012. During both the SSW events, the TEC values are depleted to the order of 20-30% all over the Brazil from equator to beyond Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) regions. In addition, the EIA were suppressed during the SSW events for several days. However, the TEC depletion and EIA suppression lasted for a longer period during SSW-2012 when compared with the SSW-2009; despite the SSW-2012 is considerd as a minor event.

  3. On the mutual relationship of the equatorial electrojet, TEC and scintillation in the Peruvian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadka, Sovit M.; Valladares, Cesar; Pradipta, Rezy; Pacheco, Edgardo; Condor, Percy

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the interrelationship between the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) strength, Global Positioning System (GPS)-derived total electron content (TEC), and postsunset scintillation from ground observations with the aim of finding reliable precursors of the occurrence of ionospheric irregularities. Mutual relationship studies provide a possible route to predict the occurrence of TEC fluctuation and scintillation in the ionosphere during the late afternoon and night respectively based on daytime measurement of the equatorial ionosphere. Data from ground based observations in the low latitudes of the west American longitude sector were examined during the 2008 solar minimum. We find a strong relationship exists between the noontime equatorial electrojet and GPS-derived TEC distributions during the afternoon mediated by vertical E × B drift via the fountain effect, but there is little or no relationship with postsunset ionospheric scintillation.

  4. Studies of Plasma Bubbles & Comparision of TEC Fluctuations and Scintillations at Varanasi Using GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, Shishir; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Abhay Kumar

    Ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and scintillations have been recorded continuously since January 2009 using a dual frequency GPS receiver at Varanasi, India (geographic lat. 25.30 N, long. 82.990 E). The trajectory of a GPS satellite plays an important role in observing the bubble characteristics. The GPS data with a sampling interval of 60 s were analyzed to determine TEC, the rate of change of TEC (ROT) and as well as ROTI, defined as the standard deviation of ROT. In this work we compare the S4 index of GPS scintillations with the ROTI values and there by investigated the evolution of large and small scale irregularities at scale length of few kilometers and 400 m respectively observed at low latitude station Varanasi. The effects of geomagnetic activity and geomagnetic storm on the generation of bubbles are studied using Kp index and Dst index respectively. Kew words: GPS, Plasma bubble, ROT, ROTI

  5. Performance of ionospheric maps in support of long baseline GNSS kinematic positioning at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Sreeja, V.; Aquino, M.; Cesaroni, C.; Spogli, L.; Dodson, A.; De Franceschi, G.

    2016-05-01

    Ionospheric scintillation occurs mainly at high and low latitude regions of the Earth and may impose serious degradation on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) functionality. The Brazilian territory sits on one of the most affected areas of the globe, where the ionosphere behaves very unpredictably, with strong scintillation frequently occurring in the local postsunset hours. The correlation between scintillation occurrence and sharp variations in the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) in Brazil is demonstrated in Spogli et al. (2013). The compounded effect of these associated ionospheric disturbances on long baseline GNSS kinematic positioning is studied in this paper, in particular when ionospheric maps are used to aid the positioning solution. The experiments have been conducted using data from GNSS reference stations in Brazil. The use of a regional TEC map generated under the CALIBRA (Countering GNSS high-Accuracy applications Limitations due to Ionospheric disturbances in BRAzil) project, referred to as CALIBRA TEC map (CTM), was compared to the use of the Global Ionosphere Map (GIM), provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS). Results show that the use of the CTM greatly improves the kinematic positioning solution as compared with that using the GIM, especially under disturbed ionospheric conditions. Additionally, different hypotheses were tested regarding the precision of the TEC values obtained from ionospheric maps, and its effect on the long baseline kinematic solution evaluated. Finally, this study compares two interpolation methods for ionospheric maps, namely, the Inverse Distance Weight and the Natural Neighbor.

  6. The influence of ionospheric thin shell height on TEC retrieval from GPS observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Lan; Wan, Qing-Tao; Ma, Guan-Yi; Li, Jing-Hua; Fan, Jiang-Tao

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the influence of assumed height for the thin shell ionosphere model on the Total Electron Content (TEC) derived from a small scale Global Positioning System (GPS) network. TEC and instrumental bias are determined by applying a grid-based algorithm to the data on several geomagnetically quiet days covering a 10 month period in 2006. Comparisons of TEC and instrumental bias are made among assumed heights from 250 km to 700 km with an interval of 10 km. While the TEC variations with time follow the same trend, TEC tends to increase with the height of the thin shell. The difference in TEC between heights 250 km and 700 km can be as large as ∼ 8 TECU in both daytime and nighttime. The times at which the TEC reaches its peak or valley do not vary much with the assumed heights. The instrumental biases, especially bias from the satellite, can vary irregularly with assumed height. Several satellites show a large deviation of ∼ 3 ns for heights larger than 550 km. The goodness of fit for different assumed heights is also examined. The data can be generally well-fitted for heights from 350 km to 700 km. A large deviation happens at heights lower than 350 km. Using the grid-based algorithm, there is no consensus on assumed height as related to data fitting. A thin shell height in the range 350 – 500 km can be a reasonable compromise between data fitting and peak height of the ionosphere.

  7. Mapping the East African Ionosphere Using Ground-based GPS TEC Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengist, Chalachew Kindie; Kim, Yong Ha; Yeshita, Baylie Damtie; Workayehu, Abyiot Bires

    2016-03-01

    The East African ionosphere (3°S-18°N, 32°E-50°E) was mapped using Total Electron Content (TEC) measurements from ground-based GPS receivers situated at Asmara, Mekelle, Bahir Dar, Robe, Arbaminch, and Nairobi. Assuming a thin shell ionosphere at 350 km altitude, we project the Ionospheric Pierce Point (IPP) of a slant TEC measurement with an elevation angle of >10° to its corresponding location on the map. We then infer the estimated values at any point of interest from the vertical TEC values at the projected locations by means of interpolation. The total number of projected IPPs is in the range of 24-66 at any one time. Since the distribution of the projected IPPs is irregularly spaced, we have used an inverse distance weighted interpolation method to obtain a spatial grid resolution of 1°×1° latitude and longitude, respectively. The TEC maps were generated for the year 2008, with a 2 hr temporal resolution. We note that TEC varies diurnally, with a peak in the late afternoon (at 1700 LT), due to the equatorial ionospheric anomaly. We have observed higher TEC values at low latitudes in both hemispheres compared to the magnetic equatorial region, capturing the ionospheric distribution of the equatorial anomaly. We have also confirmed the equatorial seasonal variation in the ionosphere, characterized by minimum TEC values during the solstices and maximum values during the equinoxes. We evaluate the reliability of the map, demonstrating a mean error (difference between the measured and interpolated values) range of 0.04-0.2 TECU (Total Electron Content Unit). As more measured TEC values become available in this region, the TEC map will be more reliable, thereby allowing us to study in detail the equatorial ionosphere of the African sector, where ionospheric measurements are currently very few.

  8. Scintillations and TEC gradients from Europe to Africa: a picture by the MISW project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsi, Lucilla; Spogli, Luca; Cesaroni, Claudio; Vadakke Veettil, Sreeja; Aquino, Marcio; Zin, Alberto; Wilhelm, Nicolas; Serant, Damien; Forte, Biagio; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Grzesiak, Marcin; Kos, Timoslav; von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Zurn, Martin; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Haggstrom, Ingemar

    2016-04-01

    MISW (Mitigation of space weather threats to GNSS services) is an EU/FP7 project with the purpose of tackling the research challenges associated with Space Weather effects on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System). In particular, the objective of MISW is to develop suitable algorithms capable of enabling Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (e.g. EGNOS) in the low-latitude African sector. For this purpose, MISW has created a detailed picture of extreme space weather events that occurred in the past and in the current solar cycle. Despite its weakness, the current solar cycle exhibited two superstorms that happened during the descending phase, in March and in June 2015. The latter has been studied in detail through a careful analysis of GNSS data acquired by TEC (Total Electron Content) and scintillation monitors and by IGS and regional geodetic networks located in Europe and in Africa. The investigation enabled creating the actual scenarios of TEC gradients and scintillation that occurred over a wide latitudinal extent between 21 and 30 June 2015. The investigation is based on calibrated TEC from different receivers, aiming at the estimation of east-west and north-south TEC gradients and on the integration of calibrated TEC and TEC gradients with the scintillation data. The impact of the storm on GNSS performance has also been investigated in terms of losses of lock. The results of this study highlight the importance of assessing the latitudinal and the longitudinal TEC gradients as crucial information to identify to what extent different ionospheric sectors are severely affected by scintillation. On the other hand, this study also shows evidences of how TEC gradients are not always responsible for the observed scintillation. Finally, the outcomes of the study demonstrate the complex relation between scintillation, TEC gradients and losses of GNSS satellites lock.

  9. Two-dimensional ionospheric tomography over the low-latitude Indian region: An intercomparison of ART and MART algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta Kumar; Shukla, Ashish Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Single-frequency users of a satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) rely on ionospheric models to mitigate the delay due to the ionosphere. The ionosphere is the major source of range and range rate errors for users of the Global Positioning System (GPS) who require high-accuracy positioning. The purpose of the present study is to develop a tomography model to reconstruct the total electron content (TEC) over the low-latitude Indian region which lies in the equatorial ionospheric anomaly belt. In the present study, the TEC data collected from the six TEC collection stations along a longitudinal belt of around 77 degrees are used. The main objective of the study is to find out optimum pixel size which supports a better reconstruction of the electron density and hence the TEC over the low-latitude Indian region. Performance of two reconstruction algorithms Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) and Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) is analyzed for different pixel sizes varying from 1 to 6 degrees in latitude. It is found from the analysis that the optimum pixel size is 5° × 50 km over the Indian region using both ART and MART algorithms.

  10. Global and frequent appearance of small spatial scale field-aligned currents possibly driven by the lower atmospheric phenomena as observed by the CHAMP satellite in middle and low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Kunihito; Iyemori, Toshihiko; Taira, Kento; Lühr, Hermann

    2014-12-01

    Using magnetic field data obtained by the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP), we show global and frequent appearance of small-amplitude (1 to 5 nT on the dayside) magnetic fluctuations with period around a few tens of seconds along the satellite orbit in middle and low latitudes. They are different from known phenomena, such as the Pc3 pulsations. The following characteristics are presented and discussed in this paper: (1) The magnetic fluctuations are perpendicular to the geomagnetic main field, and the amplitude of the zonal (east-west) component is larger than that of the meridional component in general. (2) As latitude becomes lower around the dip equator, the period tends to become longer. (3) The amplitudes have clear local time dependence, which is highly correlated to the ionospheric conductivities in local time (LT) 06-18. (4) The amplitude of the fluctuations shows magnetic conjugacy to a certain extent. (5) The amplitude shows no dependence on solar wind parameters nor geomagnetic activity. (6) A seasonal dependence is seen clearly. The amplitudes in the northern summer and winter are larger than those in the equinoxes. In the northern summer, the amplitudes above the Eurasian and South American continents and their conjugate areas are larger. In the northern winter, those above the eastern Pacific Ocean are larger. We suggest that the above characteristics, (1) to (6), can be attributed to the small spatial scale field-aligned currents having a lower atmospheric origin through the ionospheric dynamo process.

  11. Radar observation of Venus' terrestrial analogues using TecSAR X-band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumberg, D. G.

    2012-04-01

    Venus is shrouded in a dense CO2 atmosphere that prevents us from viewing the surface in visible light or with optronic sensors. Long wavelengths are required to 'see' through the dense atmosphere. In the early 1990s, the S-band synthetic aperture radar of the Magellan spacecraft acquired images of a variety of surface features on Venus, including morphologies attributed to wind processes. These include sand dunes, wind-sculpted hills (yardangs), and almost 6000 wind streaks. These aeolian landscapes were formed and shaped by near surface atmospheric circulation and local winds. These can serve as local markers, each providing an integrated wind direction. Since the Magellan mission, there were no missions to Venus until the Venus Express Mission of 2005 to examine the upper atmosphere. The future will probably include high-resolution SAR images of Venus. This poster will demonstrate high resolution SAR images in X-band from the TecSAR sensor launched by Israel in 2008. Observations of wind streaks, dunes and impact craters in desert areas will show the wealth of information that is extracted from high-res X-band data. Detailed images of Aurounga impact crater in Chad, Kelso dunes, California and Pisgah lava flow show immense detail of the morphologies associated with these features. These are compared with Magellan images of sites on Venus and SRL data in C and L-bands. The X-band provides extremely high resolution and resembles optical data much more than the longer wavelengths.

  12. Positive and negative GPS-TEC ionospheric storm effects during the extreme space weather event of March 2015 over the Brazilian Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagundes, Paulo Roberto; Fejer, B. G.; Kavutarapu, Venkatesh; Gil Pillat, Valdir; Cardoso, Felipe Antonio; Ribeiro, Brunno Augusto

    2016-07-01

    We studied the response of the ionosphere (F-region) in the Brazilian sector during extreme space weather event of 17 March 2015 using a large network of 102 GPS-TEC stations. It is observed that the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) was severely disturbed during the storm main and recovery phases. A wavelike oscillation with three peaks was observed in the TEC diurnal variation from equator to low latitudes during the storm main phase on 17th and 18th March, 2015. The latitudinal extent of the wavelike oscillation peaks decreased from the beginning of main phase towards the recovery phase. The first peak extended from beyond 0S to 30S, the second occurred from 6S to 25S, whereas the third diurnal peaks was confined from 13S to 25S. In addition, a strong negative phase in VTEC variations was observed during the recovery phase on March 18-19, 2015. This ionospheric negative phase was stronger at low-latitudes than in the equatorial region. Also, two latitudinal chains of GPS-TEC stations from equatorial region to low latitudes in the East and West Brazilian sectors are used to investigate the storm time behavior of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) in the East and West Brazilian sectors. We observed an anomalous behavior in EIA caused by the wavelike oscillations during the storm main phase on 17 March, and suppression of the EIA, resulting from the negative phase in VTEC, in the storm recovery phase.

  13. Response of nighttime equatorial and low latitude F-region to the geomagnetic storm of August 18, 2003, in the Brazilian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Y.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Fagundes, P. R.; Lima, W. L. C.; Otsuka, Y.; Huang, C.-S.; Espinoza, E. S.; Pi, X.; de Abreu, A. J.; Bolzan, M. J. A.; Pillat, V. G.; Abalde, J. R.; Pimenta, A. A.; Bittencourt, J. A.

    This paper presents an investigation of geomagnetic storm effects in the equatorial and low latitude F-region in the Brazilian sector during the intense geomagnetic storm on 18 August, 2003 (SSC 14:21 UT on 17/08; ΣKp = 52+; Ap = 108; ∣Dst∣ max = 168 at 1600 UT on 18/08). Simultaneous ionospheric sounding measurements from two stations, viz., Palmas (10.2°S, 48.2°W; dip latitude 5.7°S) and Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2°S, 45.9°W; dip latitude 17.6°S), Brazil, are presented for the nights of 16-17, 17-18 and 18-19 August, 2003 (quiet, disturbed and recovery phases). Both stations are equipped with the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI). Quiet and disturbed conditions of the F-region ionosphere are compared using data collected from the two stations. The relationship between magnetospheric disturbance and low-latitude ionospheric dynamics, and generation of ionospheric irregularities are discussed. On the disturbed nights (17-18 and 18-19 August), the low latitude station S. J. Campos showed strong enhancements in the F-region critical frequency (foF2), whereas the near equatorial station Palmas showed strong uplifting of the F-layer about 1 h earlier. Normally during the June solstice months (May-August) in the Brazilian sector, large-scale ionospheric irregularities in form of plasma bubbles are rarely observed. On the night of 17-18 August, ionsospheric sounding observations at Palmas showed the presence of bottomside spread-F, whereas on the night of 18-19 August, the observations at Palmas and S. J. Campos showed the presence of plasma bubbles when the storm recovery phase had just started. The complementary GPS data available from several stations in the "Rede Brasileira de Monitoramento Continuo de GPS (Brazilian Network for Continuous GPS Monitoring)" are used to obtain the vertical total electron content (VTEC) and the rate of change of TEC per minute on UT days 18 and 19 August, 2003 and presented. Also, several global ionospheric TEC maps

  14. First Digisonde 256 measurements and TEC at Tucumán and comparison with IRI predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, V. H.; Sahai, Y.; Medina, C.; de Haro, B.; Soria, F.; Gomez, E.; Padilla, P.; Perez Gomez, A.

    2003-04-01

    The Digisonde first results from Tucuman (26.9^o S, 65.4^o W) and TEC obtained by Global Positioning System (GPS) are used to compare the observations with IRI predictions. The data were registered during November-December 2002 day to day. The comparison is made for the F region parameters NmF2, hmF2 and TEC and for true height profiles as well. The analysis, based on quietest days during the data period, shows that while IRI provides realistic profiles during daytime hours, it seems to underestimate the bottomside electron density during the early morning and late afternoon hours. The F-layer peak density obtained are underestimated for most of the nighttime hours during summer months. Comparative study of TEC indicates that the IRI underestimate significantly measured TEC during daytime on this period. This discrepancy between the IRI and observations has been reported at other low latitude stations even for low solar activity. When we look to ionospheric slab thickness, discrepancy between the IRI and observations due to the discrepancy in the topside profile is minus serius than in TEC.

  15. Studies of Total Electron Content variations at low-latitude stations within the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilian, Olatunbosun

    2016-07-01

    The total electron content (TEC) is an important parameter to monitor for possible space weather impacts. The radio waves that pass through the earth's ionosphere travel more slowly than their free space velocity due to group path delay of the ionosphere. This group path delay is directly proportional to the TEC of the ionosphere. Using dual frequency GPS receiver at low latitude stations of Ile-Ife (7.52oN, 4.28oE), Addis Ababa (9.04oN, 38.77oE) and Bangalore (13.03oE, 77.57oE), all located within 0 - 15oN of the equatorial anomaly region, the measurement of ionospheric TEC for 2012 has been carried out. The data from the three stations were used to study the diurnal, monthly and seasonal variations of TEC. The diurnal variations maximize between 10:00 - 16:00UT, 08:00 - 14:00UT and 06:00 - 12:00UT for Ile-Ife, Addis Ababa and Bangalore stations respectively. The diurnal variations showed wave-like pertubation during disturbed and quiet periods at Bangalore and Addis Ababa stations. The monthly average TEC variations showed that the month of March recorded the highest TEC value of ~59TECu at about 16:00UT in Ile-Ife station, while TEC at Addis Ababa and Bangalore maximize in October with ~72TECu and 65TECu at about 11:00UT and 09:00UT respectively. Seasonal variations showed that TEC maximizes during the equinoctial months and least in summer, over the three stations. Keywords: Total Electron Content, Equatorial Ionization Anomaly, Global Positioning System co-author:E.A. Ariyibi(Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria)

  16. The solar eclipse and its associated ionospheric TEC variations over Indian stations on January 15, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, B. M.; Sunda, Surendra

    2012-02-01

    An annular solar eclipse occurred over the Indian subcontinent during the afternoon hours of January 15, 2010. This event was unique in the sense that solar activity was minimum and the eclipse period coincides with the peak ionization time at the Indian equatorial and low latitudes. The number of GPS receivers situated along the path of solar eclipse were used to investigate the response of total electron content (TEC) under the influence of this solar eclipse. These GPS receivers are part of the Indian Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) named as 'GAGAN' (GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation) program. The eight GPS stations located over the wide range of longitudes allows us to differentiate between the various factors induced due to solar eclipse over the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere. The effect of the eclipse was detected in diurnal variations of TEC at all the stations along the eclipse path. The solar eclipse has altered the ionospheric behavior along its path by inducing atmospheric gravity waves, localized counter-electrojet and attenuation of solar radiation intensity. These three factors primarily control the production, loss and transport of plasma over the equatorial and low latitudes. The localized counter-electrojet had inhibited the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in the longitude belt of 72°E-85°E. Thus, there was a negative deviation of the order of 20-40% at the equatorial anomaly stations lying in this 'inhibited EIA region'. The negative deviation of only 10-20% is observed for the stations lying outside the 'inhibited EIA region'. The pre-eclipse effect in the form of early morning enhancement of TEC associated with atmospheric gravity waves was also observed during this solar eclipse. More clear and distinctive spatial and temporal variations of TEC were detected along the individual satellite passes. It is also observed that TEC starts responding to the eclipse after 30 min from start of eclipse and the delay of the

  17. Influence of planetary scale waves on the upper atmospheric optical dayglow emissions over equatorial-low-latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, F. I.; Duggirala, P. R.; Thatiparthi, V. L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Reddy, M.; Raghavarao, R.; Pathan, B. M.; Khekale, P. V.

    2012-12-01

    Systematic measurement of optical dayglow emissions at multiple wavelengths, namely, 557.7nm , 630.0nm, and 777.4nm have been carried out over a large field-of-view using a newly built Multiwavelength Imaging Spectograph using Echelle-grating (MISE) during January-February 2011 from a low latitude station, Hyderabad (Geographic: 17.5 deg. N, 78.5 deg. E; Mag.: 8.6 deg. N, 151.8 deg. E), India. Several large and small scale features are seen in all the wavelengths. In contrast to the earlier measurement of OI-630.0nm red-line emission during the high solar activity period (2001), current optical dayglow measurements during relatively low solar epoch (2011) show no similarity with that of the solar flux. However, it is noted that the variation in strength of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) seems to be similar to that of optical measurements in 2011. This is also in contrast with the measurements in 2001, where no similarity was seen between EEJ and OI-630.0nm dayglow intensity. Periodogram analysis of these two data sets (optical and EEJ) show a marked difference in the occurrence of the quasi-16-day planetary wave periods before noon and in the afternoon hours. In order to investigate the coupling of atmospheric regions, periodogram analysis of total electron content (TEC) and SABER measured mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) temperature data were carried out. Interestingly, the TEC data from Bangalore (Mag. Lat 4 deg. N) shows contrasting behaviour in terms of periodicities before noon and afternoon similar to those in optical dayglow intensities, SABER temperatures, and the strength of the EEJ while the TEC periodicities of another further away station (Ahmedabad, Mag. Lat 15 deg. N) does not show any such behaviour. It is suggested that planetary wave of periods of quasi-9-day and quasi-16-day, which are observed in MLT have their influence on the behaviour of the upper atmosphere as seen in optical, radio and magnetic measurements. These results point to

  18. Structure of the low latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sckopke, N.; Paschmann, G.; Haerendel, G.; Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Bame, S. J.; Forbes, T. G.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Observations at high temporal resolution of the frontside magnetopause and plasma boundary layer, made with the LASL/MPE fast plasma analyzer onboard the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft, revealed a complex quasiperiodic structure of some of the observed boundary layers. A cool tailward streaming boundary layer plasma was seen intermittently, with intervening periods of hot tenuous plasma which has properties similar to the magnetospheric population. While individual encounters with the boundary layer plasma last only a few minutes, the total observation time may extend over one hour or more.

  19. Analytical study of nighttime scintillations using GPS at low latitude station Bhopal

    SciTech Connect

    Maski, Kalpana; Vijay, S. K.

    2015-07-31

    Sporadically structured ionosphere (i.e. in-homogeneities in refractive index) can cause fluctuations (due to refraction effects) on the radio signal that is passing through it. These fluctuations are called ionospheric scintillations. Low latitude region is suitable for studying these scintillations. The influence of the ionosphere on the propagation of the radio wave becomes very marked with reference to communication or navigational radio system at very low frequency (VLF) to a high frequency (HF), which operate over the distances of 1000 km or more. Radio wave communication at different frequencies depends on structure of the ionosphere. With the advent of the artificial satellites, they are used as a prime mode of radio wave communication. Some natural perturbation termed as irregularities, are present in the form of electron density of the ionosphere that cause disruption in the radio and satellite communications. Therefore the study of the ionospheric irregularities is of practical importance, if one wishes to understand the upper atmosphere completely. In order to make these communications uninterrupted the knowledge of irregularities, which are present in the ionosphere are very important. These irregularities can be located and estimated with the help of Ionospheric TEC and Scintillation. Scintillation is generally confined to nighttime hours, particularly around equatorial and low latitudes.

  20. Ionospheric disturbances detected by high-resolution GPS-TEC observations after an earthquake and a tornado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugawa, Takuya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Saito, Akinori; Ishii, Mamoru; Nishioka, Michi

    Ionospheric disturbances following the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and the 2013 Moore tornado were observed by high-resolution GPS total electron content (TEC) observations using dense GPS receiver networks. After the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, concentric waves with short propagation distance propagated in the radial direction in the propagation velocity of 3,457, 783, 423 m/s for the first, second, third peak, respectively. Following these waves, concentric waves with long propagation distance appeared to propagate at the velocity of 138-288 m/s. In the vicinity of the epicenter, sudden TEC depletions and short-period oscillations with a period of approximately 4 minutes were also observed. The center of these ionospheric variations, termed the "ionospheric epicenter", corresponded to the tsunami source. Comparing to the results of a numerical simulation using non-hydrostatic compressible atmosphere-ionosphere model, the first peak of circular wave would be caused by the acoustic waves generated from the propagating Rayleigh wave. The second and third waves would be caused by atmospheric gravity waves excited in the lower ionosphere due to the acoustic wave propagations from the tsunami source. The fourth and following waves are considered to be caused by the atmospheric gravity waves induced by the wavefronts of traveling tsunami. After the EF5 tornado hit Moore, Oklahoma, USA, on 20 May 2013, clear concentric waves and short-period oscillations were observed. These concentric waves were non-dispersive waves with a horizontal wavelength of approximately 120 km and a period of approximately 13 minutes. They were observed for more than seven hours throughout North America. TEC oscillations with a period of approximately 4 minutes were also observed in the south of Moore for more than eight hours. Comparison between the GPS-TEC observations and the infrared cloud images from the GOES satellite indicates that the concentric waves and the short-period oscillations would be

  1. Low-Latitude Ethane Rain on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years. These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally. Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the "methanological" cycle on Titan. I use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a spectroscopic investigation of multiple rain-wetted areas. I compute "before-and-after" spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane, I find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. I show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, I show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form.

  2. Low-Latitude Ethane Rain on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years (Barnes, J. W. et al. 2012, Icarus, submitted). These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally (Turtle, E. P. et al. 2011, Science, 331, 1414-1417). Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the “methanological” cycle that dominates Titan's surface and atmosphere. In this study, we use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a thorough spectroscopic investigation of rain-wetted areas near Yalaing Terra, Hetpet Regio and central Adiri on Titan. We compute “before-and-after” spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain at any point in the time span of August 2009 to January 2012. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane that was calculated to match the resolution and sampling interval of VIMS (Brown, R. H. et al. 2008, Nature, 454, 607-610), we find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fortunately fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. We show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, we show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form as well. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2012. All rights reserved.

  3. Low-latitude ethane rain on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, P. A.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Baines, K. H.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R. N.; Lawrence, K. J.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years (Barnes, J. W. et al. 2012, Icarus, submitted). These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally (Turtle, E. P. et al. 2011, Science, 331, 1414-1417). Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the "methanological" cycle that dominates Titan's surface and atmosphere. In this study, we use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a thorough spectroscopic investigation of rain-wetted areas near Yalaing Terra, Hetpet Regio and central Adiri on Titan. We compute "before-and-after" spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain at any point in the time span of August 2009 to January 2012. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane that was calculated to match the resolution and sampling interval of VIMS (Brown, R. H. et al. 2008, Nature, 454, 607-610), we find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fortunately fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. We show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, we show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form as well. Funded by NASA.

  4. Inner Plasma Structure of the Low-Latitude Reconnection Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Q.-H.; Dunlop, M. W.; Lockwood, M.; Lavraud, B.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Hasegawa, H.; Yang, H. -G.; Liu, R. -Y.; Hu, H. -Q.; Zhang, B. -C.; Pu, Z. -Y.; Yang, Z. -W.; Wang, J.; Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Berchem, J.; Constantinescu, D.; Volwerk, M.; Frey, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Shen, C.; Shi, J. -K.; Sibeck, D.; Escoubet, P.; Wild, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We report a clear transition through a reconnection layer at the low-latitude magnetopause which shows a complete traversal across all reconnected field lines during northwestward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The associated plasma populations confirm details of the electron and ion mixing and the time history and acceleration through the current layer. This case has low magnetic shear with a strong guide field and the reconnection layer contains a single density depletion layer on the magnetosheath side which we suggest results from nearly field-aligned magnetosheath flows. Within the reconnection boundary layer, there are two plasma boundaries, close to the inferred separatrices on the magnetosphere and magnetosheath sides (Ssp and Ssh) and two boundaries associated with the Alfvén waves (or Rotational Discontinuities, RDsp and RDsh). The data are consistent with these being launched from the reconnection site and the plasma distributions are well ordered and suggestive of the time elapsed since reconnection of the field lines observed. In each sub-layer between the boundaries the plasma distribution is different and is centered around the current sheet, responsible for magnetosheath acceleration. We show evidence for a velocity dispersion effect in the electron anisotropy that is consistent with the time elapsed since reconnection. In addition, new evidence is presented for the occurrence of partial reflection of magnetosheath electrons at the magnetopause current layer.

  5. Low-latitude Ionospheric Heating during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klenzing, J.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Qian, L.; Haaser, R. A.; Burrell, A. G.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Simoes, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    The advent of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) represents a leap forward in our capability to measure rapidly changing transient events on the sun. SDO measurements are paired with the comprehensive low latitude measurements of the ionosphere and thermosphere provided by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite and state-of-the-art general circulation models to discuss the coupling between the terrestrial upper atmosphere and solar radiation. Here we discuss ionospheric heating as detected by the Coupled Ion-Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) instrument suite on the C/NOFS satellite during solar flares. Also discusses is the necessity of decoupling the heating due to increased EUV irradiance and that due to geomagnetic storms, which sometimes occur with flares. Increases in both the ion temperature and ion density in the subsolar topside ionosphere are detected within 77 minutes of the 23 Jan 2012 M-class flare, and the observed results are compared with the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) using the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) as an input.

  6. Low-latitude Coronal Holes during Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M.; Cranmer, S.; Kohl, J.

    Analyses of in situ observations have shown that some small coronal holes are sources of slow solar wind near solar maximum when polar coronal holes become smaller and disappear. However, not all coronal holes at solar maximum produce slow wind. The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard SOHO has been used to observe large low-latitude coronal holes during solar maximum that produced fast solar wind. UVCS observations show that large equatorial holes at solar maximum have plasma properties that seem to bridge the gap between solar minimum polar coronal holes and streamers. The ion kinetic temperatures in equatorial holes are about 2 times larger than those in a solar minimum equatorial streamer, and about a factor of 2 smaller than those in polar coronal holes above 2 R . The outflow speeds for the large equatorial holes observed by UVCS are only about 100 km s-1 , a factor of 4 smaller than those in polar holes, at 3 R . However, in situ data corresponding to these equatorial coronal holes showed asymptotic wind speeds of 600-700 km s-1 . These wind speeds are similar to those observed over polar coronal holes at solar minimum. In contrast to the polar coronal holes, the bulk of the solar wind acceleration in large equatorial coronal holes at solar maximum must occur above 3 R . Thus, the combination of spectroscopic measurements in the extended corona, where the primary solar wind acceleration occurs, and in situ measurements made in the solar wind can be used to obtain the solar wind acceleration as a function of heliocentric distance. These observations provide detailed empirical constraints for theoretical models and may be key to understanding how the various types of solar wind plasma are heated and accelerated. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-11420 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  7. Singular Plasma Disturbance in the Low-Latitude F Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sardul; Johnson, F. S.; Heelis, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here a new phenomenon characterized by unusual patterns of ion drifts inside ion density depletion regions observed by the AE-E satellite in the low-latitude F region. In about 30 depletions, vertical ion drift relative to the background was upward on the western sides, downward on the eastern sides, and zero near the middle where the density depletion was greatest. These drift characteristics are distinct from those observed in plasma bubble depletions. The structures reported here were observed on circular orbits below 300 km altitude and had density depletions of up to 2 orders of magnitude or more below the ambient ion density. The upward and downward drift excursions were up to 200 m/s relative to the background. Almost all these structures were observed over oceans or near coasts and largely between +/- 10 deg and +/- 30 deg clip latitude. The structures were observed mostly as isolated, single depletion regions with the majority of them about 250 km wide in the east-west direction. They occurred during quiet magnetic conditions with near-equal occurrence frequencies in the premidnight and postmidnight periods. The characteristic density and drift signatures indicate westward propagating disturbances in which the bottomside F layer is first lifted and then returned back to its original position, leaving the ionosphere undisturbed after the disturbance passes by. The estimated speed of these disturbances is of the order of 200 m/s. These unique solitary plasma disturbances, which we designate as singular plasma disturbances, are associated with a propagating source of E x B drift, not driven by neutral perturbations at the altitude of observation.

  8. Observations by the CUTLASS radar, HF Doppler, oblique ionospheric sounding, and TEC from GPS during a magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchensky, D. V.; Lester, M.; Kornienko, V. A.; Shagimuratov, I. I.; Stocker, A. J.; Warrington, E. M.

    2005-07-01

    Multi-diagnostic observations, covering a significant area of northwest Europe, were made during the magnetic storm interval (28 29 April 2001) that occurred during the High Rate SolarMax IGS/GPS-campaign. HF radio observations were made with vertical sounders (St. Petersburg and Sodankyla), oblique incidence sounders (OIS), on paths from Murmansk to St. Petersburg, 1050 km, and Inskip to Leicester, 170 km, Doppler sounders, on paths from Cyprus to St. Petersburg, 2800 km, and Murmansk to St. Petersburg, and a coherent scatter radar (CUTLASS, Hankasalmi, Finland). These, together with total electron content (TEC) measurements made at GPS stations from the Euref network in northwest Europe, are presented in this paper. A broad comparison of radio propagation data with ionospheric data at high and mid latitudes, under quiet and disturbed conditions, was undertaken. This analysis, together with a geophysical interpretation, allow us to better understand the nature of the ionospheric processes which occur during geomagnetic storms. The peculiarity of the storm was that it comprised of three individual substorms, the first of which appears to have been triggered by a compression of the magnetosphere. Besides the storm effects, we have also studied substorm effects in the observations separately, providing an improved understanding of the storm/substorm relationship. The main results of the investigations are the following. A narrow trough is formed some 10h after the storm onset in the TEC which is most likely a result of enhanced ionospheric convection. An enhancement in TEC some 2 3 h after the storm onset is most likely a result of heating and upwelling of the auroral ionosphere caused by enhanced currents. The so-called main effect on ionospheric propagation was observed at mid-latitudes during the first two substorms, but only during the first substorm at high latitudes. Ionospheric irregularities observed by CUTLASS were clearly related to the gradient in TEC

  9. Pc 3 pulsation eigenperiod determination at low latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Hattingh, S.K.F.; Sutcliffe, P.R. )

    1987-11-01

    A realistic method of calculating the eigenperiod of Pc 3 pulsations at low latitudes is discussed. Solution of the problem requires a magnetic field model and a model for the plasma distribution along the resonating field line. The calculated eigenperiods obtained using the dipole field model and the IGRF model are found to be similar. The inclusion of the F region O{sup +} in the plasma distribution noticeably affects the calculated eigenperiod at low latitudes. This effect decreases with increasing L value. Pulsation periods obtained from recordings made at four stations lying on a geomagnetic meridian demonstrate the importance of including O{sup +} in the plasma model if realistic periods are to be calculated at low latitudes.

  10. Comparison with IRI-PLUS and IRI-2012-TEC values of GPS-TEC values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atıcı, Ramazan; Saǧır, Selçuk

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a comparison with IRI-PLUS and IRI-2012 Total Electron Content (TEC) values of Total Electron Content (TEC) values obtained from Ankara station (39,7 N; 32,76 E) of Global Position System (GPS) of Turkey on equinox and solstice days of 2009 year. For all days, it is observed that GPS-TEC values are greater than IRI-2012-TEC values, while IRI-PLUS-TEC values are very close to GPS-TEC values. When GPS-TEC values for both equinoxes are compared, it is seen that TEC values on September equinox are greater than one on March equinox. However, it is observed that GPS-TEC values on June solstice are greater than one on December solstice. Also, the relationship between GPS-TEC values and geomagnetic indexes is investigated.

  11. Response of the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere in the Indian sector to the geomagnetic storms of January 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, Sudha; Pant, Tarun Kumar; Sridharan, R.

    2009-06-01

    The equatorial and low-latitude ionospheric response to three moderate geomagnetic storms (17, 18, and 22 January) during the period from 16 to 23 January 2005 is investigated in the context of development/inhibition of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) and the subsequent occurrence/nonoccurrence of Equatorial Spread F (ESF) irregularities on these days. The study is carried out using the Total Electron Content (TEC) measured with the GPS receivers along the ˜80°E longitude sector and the F-layer bottom height obtained from the Ionosonde located over the dip equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 77°E, dip latitude ˜0.5°N) in India. It is observed that, for the storms on days 17 and 22, the development of the anomaly was inhibited, probably due to the westward disturbance dynamo electric fields. Subsequently, the post sunset enhancement in the vertical drift of the equatorial F region was also inhibited significantly compared to the quiet day pattern and, as anticipated, no ESF was observed on these days. A large vertical drift of the equatorial F region followed by nearly simultaneous onset of weak ESF was observed on day 18. The late development of the EIA on this day could be due to the eastward prompt penetration electric field associated with the southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field. Also, strong and distinct F3 layer appeared for a short time in the morning, reappeared later in the noon time, and then quickly ascended to the topside ionosphere during the main phase of the storm on day 18.

  12. On the Connection Between Solar Activity and Low-Latitude Aurorae in the Period 1715 - 1860

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, M.; Vaquero, J. M.; Curto, J. J.

    2006-11-01

    Observations of aurorae borealis at low latitudes are very rare and are clearly associated with strong geomagnetic storms. Morphologically, they are characterized by a diffuse red colour with no rapid motions. The main aim of this paper is to analyse two hitherto ignored aurorae that were observed at two low-latitude sites, Tenerife (28°N 18°W) and Mexico City (19°N 99°W), in 1770 and 1789, respectively. These observations can give supplementary information about the level of solar activity at those times where direct solar observations were rather scarce. Studying also the behaviour of the heliosphere during this period using different proxies, we find that the open magnetic field better describes auroral occurrences. The variation over time in geomagnetic latitude at the two sites is also calculated.

  13. A comparative analysis of the model calculated and GPS-observed TEC variations before the Haiti, 2010 and Japan, 2011 earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgaladze, Alexander; Karpov, Mikhail; Zolotov, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    Model simulations of the ionosphere Total Electron Content (TEC) variations have been performed for the Haiti January 12, 2010 and Japan March 11, 2011 earthquakes. Calculations have been carried out using the global numerical Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM). The seismogenic impacts in the model have been set as lower boundary conditions for the electric potential equation. Namely, the vertical electric currents of ~ 20 nA/m2 flowing from the ionosphere to the Earth have been set at the near-epicenter area of ~ 250 by 2000 km. The simulated relative (%) TEC disturbances for both events have been compared to each other and to the corresponding GPS-observed data. The common features persisting at both observed and modeled TEC variations are: (1) the appearance of positive disturbances 20 - 40% by magnitude at night hours for 2 - 4 days before the earthquake, (2) the geomagnetic conjugation of the effects and (3) the lack of migration (movements) of the TEC deviations during their lifetime (of ~ 8 hours). Main differences between the considered events (Haiti and Japan), both modeled and observed, are most evidently pronounced in the TEC disturbances' maximum location relative to the geomagnetic equator. In case of the Haiti earthquake the strongest by magnitude TEC disturbances are located near the magnetically conjugated to the earthquake's epicenter region at the Southern hemisphere, while in case of the Japan earthquake - near the epicenter at the Northern hemisphere. We have attributed this difference to the different seasons the events have taken place in. The asymmetry of the Haiti model TEC disturbances relative to the magnetic meridian of the earthquake's epicenter is in agreement with the GPS-observed one. In case of the Japan earthquake the asymmetry of the TEC deviations relative to the magnetic meridian of the earthquake's epicenter is negligible in the observations, while in the model results it is similar to the Haiti case. In order to remove this asymmetry

  14. Suspected seismo-ionospheric coupling observed by satellite measurements and GPS TEC related to the M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake of 12 May 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, K.; Parrot, M.; Kim, S. G.; Jeong, K. S.; Chae, J. S.; Pulinets, S.; Oyama, K.-I.

    2014-12-01

    Anomalous changes in the ionospheric conditions related to the Wenchuan earthquake of 12 May 2008 are investigated using electron density (Ne) from Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) and CHAMP satellites, electric field from DEMETER, and GPS-total electron content (TEC) maps. The normalized Ne from the DEMETER satellite reveal that the previously reported TEC increments before the earthquake can be considered as fragments of the gradual equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) enhancements near the epicenter longitude that began approximately 1 month before the earthquake and reached its maximum with an exceptionally large strength index 8 days prior to the main shock. This feature is indirectly confirmed through the CHAMP Ne and GPS TEC data. Following the EIA intensity peak, disturbances in the Ne and O+ density were observed in the nightside. Based on the concurrent electric field and Ne changes, it is suggested that EIA intensification could be triggered by the E field disturbances over the epicenter.

  15. Origin of high-frequency TEC disturbances observed by GPS over the European mid-latitude region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wautelet, Gilles; Warnant, Rene

    2015-10-01

    High-frequency variability of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) can strongly affect precise positioning with GNSS. The occurrence rate as well as the amplitude of such disturbances has been extensively studied over the last decade. Mainly, one can distinguish disturbances due to space-weather events and the others, qualified as "quiet-time" as they are observed during quiet geomagnetic conditions. The latter, which represent more than 75% of the total number of disturbances over mid-latitudes, are then divided into two categories: the Winter Daytime (WD) and the Summer Nighttime (SN). The first category, representing the bulk of quiet-time disturbances, corresponds to classical Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTIDs), that are the result of the interaction of gravity waves and the ionospheric plasma. On the other hand, SN disturbances are generally understood as non-classical MSTIDs of electrical origin. The paper investigates the origin of these two types of disturbance based on GPS measurements, ionospheric soundings and wind speed data at a tropospheric level. If one cannot exclude the solar terminator as a potential source of gravity waves responsible for WD events, it is thought that the major contribution comes from the lower atmosphere. More precisely, tropospheric jetstream is considered as the favorite candidate for daytime MSTIDs. Turning to SN disturbances, our analysis reveals that they are related to spread-F phenomenon, linked to the appearance of sporadic E-layers. The related instabilities are responsible for field-aligned irregularities in the F-region, which are thought to be responsible for noise-like fluctuations of the GPS TEC observed during SN events.

  16. Comparison of equatorial GPS-TEC observations over an African station and an American station during the minimum and ascending phases of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akala, A. O.; Seemala, G. K.; Doherty, P. H.; Valladares, C. E.; Carrano, C. S.; Espinoza, J.; Oluyo, S.

    2013-11-01

    GPS-TEC data were observed at the same local time at two equatorial stations on both longitudes: Lagos (6.52° N, 3.4° E, 3.04° S magnetic latitude), Nigeria; and Pucallpa (8.38° S, 74.57° W, 4.25° N magnetic latitude), Peru during the minimum (2009, 2010) and ascending (2011) phases of solar cycle 24. These data were grouped into daily, seasonal and solar activity sets. The day-to-day variations in vertical TEC (VTEC) recorded the maximum during 14:00-16:00 LT and minimum during 04:00-06:00 LT at both longitudes. Seasonally, during solar minimum, maximum VTEC values were observed during March equinox and minimum during solstices. However, during the ascending phase of the solar activity, the maximum values were recorded during the December solstice and minimum during the June solstice. VTEC also increased with solar activity at both longitudes. On longitude by longitude comparison, the African GPS station generally recorded higher VTEC values than the American GPS station. Furthermore, harmonic analysis technique was used to extract the annual and semi-annual components of the amplitudes of the TEC series at both stations. The semi-annual variations dominated the TEC series over the African equatorial station, while the annual variations dominated those over the American equatorial station. The GPS-TEC-derived averages for non-storm days were compared with the corresponding values derived by the IRI-2007 with the NeQuick topside option. The NeQuick option of IRI-2007 showed better performance at the American sector than the African sector, but generally underestimating TEC during the early morning hours at both longitudes.

  17. TEC measurement and IRI 2012 prediction over the Indian subcontinent in the low solar activity year 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Pradip; Hazarika, Rumajyoti

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model has undergone periodic revisions in order to improve its prediction capability. However, comparison with measurements has brought out some inadequacies in the IRI, particularly with respect to diurnal and solar cycle variations at equatorial and low latitudes. The TEC measured simultaneously using NOVATEL receivers at 10 different locations over India during the low solar activity year 2005 are used to examine the predictability of the latest version of the IRI. The stations are distributed in latitude along 77°E and in longitude along 23°N and selected in order to study the latitudinal and longitudinal distribution of measured and model TEC over the Indian subcontinent. Maximum daytime (1000-1400 LT) TEC over India was observed in the month of April at Kolkata (22.5°N, 88.2°E) while minimum TEC was measured at Shimla (31.1°N, 77.1°E) in July. Measured TEC in Equinox I (March, April) was higher than that in Equinox II (September, October) at all locations. Thus equinoctial asymmetry was prevalent across the Indian latitude longitude sector during this year. In the solstices, TEC in summer (May-August) was higher than the TEC in winter (November-February) at the locations along the equatorial anomaly crest. But within the crest and equator, anomalous solsticial behaviour with higher wintertime TEC as compared to that in summer was observed. TEC predicted by the IRI 2012 (with NeQuick option, URSI coefficients) differ from measured TEC at all locations. The amount of offset between the model and measurement varies with local time and location. Minimum divergence was seen at Bhopal (23.0°N, 77.2°E) and Raipur (21.0°N, 81.5°E) The model overestimates TEC at Ahmedabad (23.0°N, 72.5°E) and Shimla and underestimates the same at Kolkata (22.5°N, 88.2°E)and Aizwal( 23.5°N, 93.0°E), Hyderabad (17.5°N, 78.5°E) and Bangalore (13.0°N, 77.5°E). It is inferred that IRI 2012 is unable to capture the temporal

  18. Recent low-latitude freeze thaw on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, David P.

    2007-07-01

    Outside polar latitudes, features corresponding to surface thaw have yet to be identified on Mars. The youthful gully landforms observed at mid-high latitude [Malin, M., Edgett, K., 2000. Science 288, 2330-2335] are the nearest candidate, but the source (and nature) of the gully carving agent remains controversial [e.g., Musselwhite, D.S., Swindle, T.D., Lunine, J.I., 2001. Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 1283-1285; Mellon, M.T., Phillips, R.J., 2001. J. Geophys. Res. 106, 1-15; Knauth, L.P., Burt, D.M., 2002. Icarus 158, 267-271; Costard, F., Forget, F., Mangold, N., Peulvast, J.P., 2002. Science 295, 110-113; Christensen, P.R., 2003. Nature 422, 45-48; Treiman, A.H., 2003. J. Geophys. Res. 108]. At higher obliquity than the present epoch, near-surface ground ice should be present globally [Mellon, M.T., Jakosky, B.M., 1995. J. Geophys. Res. 100 (E6), 11781-11799], populated by condensation of atmospheric water vapour in the top few metres of the regolith, or emplaced as dusty ice sheets reaching down towards the equator. The latitudinal restriction of these gullies to regions poleward of ±30° appears to argue against a thaw component to their formation—since ground ice is present and stable at all latitudes at high obliquity, the current (low) obliquity regime should result in ground ice thaw at low latitudes, where insolation and daytime temperatures are currently greatest, and this is not observed. A previously undescribed meltwater sequence in the Cerberus plains, at 20° N/187° E, shows that comparable, but much more continuous, and mappable melting and surface runoff have occurred in the geologically recent past at near-equatorial latitudes on Mars. Polygonal ground in the Cerberus plains is seen by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) to suffer sequential, regional-scale volatile-loss consistent with thaw of near-surface ground ice under periglacial conditions. This degradation is continuously sampled by a single MOC strip, showing an icy

  19. Change in refractivity of the atmosphere and large variation in TEC associated with some earthquakes, observed from GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karia, S. P.; Pathak, K. N.

    2011-03-01

    The present study reports the analysis of GPS based TEC for our station Surat (21.16°N, 72.78°E) located at the northern crest of equatorial anomaly region in India at times close to some earthquake events (M ⩾ 5) during the year 2009 in India and its neighbouring regions. The TEC data used in the study are obtained from GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitoring (GISTM) system. The TEC data has been analysed corresponding to 11 earthquakes in low solar activity period and quiet geomagnetic condition. We found that, out of 11 cases of earthquakes (M > 5) there were seven cases in which enhancement in TEC occurred on earthquake day and in other four cases there was depletion in TEC on earthquake day. The variation in refractivity prior to earthquake was significant for the cases in which the epicentre lied within a distance of 600 km from the receiving station. By looking into the features on temporal enhancement and depletion of TEC a prediction was made 3-2 days prior to an earthquake (on 28 October 2009 in Bhuj - India). The paper includes a brief discussion on the method of potentially identifying an impending earthquake from ionospheric data.

  20. Multifractal behaviour of the ionospheric scintillation index time series over an Indian low latitude station Surat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, H. J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2014-03-01

    The amplitude scintillation information recorded by the GSV4004B GISTM (Global Ionospheric Scintillation TEC Monitor) GPS receiver at an Indian low latitude station Surat (21.16°N, 72.78°E) for 48 months during the years 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 are utilized in the present work. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) have been carried out along with computation of q-order fluctuation function, q-order Hurst exponent, q-order mass exponent and multifractal spectrums for each monthly post-sunset S4 index time series. The non-linear dependence of mass exponent and dependence of q-order Hurst exponent on q-values reflect the existence of nonlinear interaction between different scales and multifractal structure in the system, respectively. The comparison of broadness and shape of spectra with the occurrence of scintillation activities registered in the same period reveal the existence of multifractality/complexity in the turbulent ionosphere, which is influenced by the small-scale intermittency and solar flux indices. The truncation of the spectrum is the evidence of manifestation of small-scale intermittency of the turbulent ionosphere. The higher values of the Hölder exponent α0, calculated from the spectrum, imply the irregular nature of the underlying process. The present study suggests that, MF-DFA may act as an important non-linear technique for identifying the effect of large and small-scale fluctuations in complex and turbulent ionosphere.

  1. LION: A dynamic computer model for the low-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittencourt, J. A.; Pillat, V. G.; Fagundes, P. R.; Sahai, Y.; Pimenta, A. A.

    2007-11-01

    A realistic fully time-dependent computer model, denominated LION (Low-latitude Ionospheric) model, that simulates the dynamic behavior of the low-latitude ionosphere is presented. The time evolution and spatial distribution of the ionospheric particle densities and velocities are computed by numerically solving the time-dependent, coupled, nonlinear system of continuity and momentum equations for the ions O+, O2+, NO+, N2+ and N+, taking into account photoionization of the atmospheric species by the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation, chemical and ionic production and loss reactions, and plasma transport processes, including the ionospheric effects of thermospheric neutral winds, plasma diffusion and electromagnetic E×B plasma drifts. The Earth's magnetic field is represented by a tilted centered magnetic dipole. This set of coupled nonlinear equations is solved along a given magnetic field line in a Lagrangian frame of reference moving vertically, in the magnetic meridian plane, with the electromagnetic E×B plasma drift velocity. The spatial and time distribution of the thermospheric neutral wind velocities and the pattern of the electromagnetic drifts are taken as known quantities, given through specified analytical or empirical models. The model simulation results are presented in the form of computer-generated color maps and reproduce the typical ionization distribution and time evolution normally observed in the low-latitude ionosphere, including details of the equatorial Appleton anomaly dynamics. The specific effects on the ionosphere due to changes in the thermospheric neutral winds and the electromagnetic plasma drifts can be investigated using different wind and drift models, including the important longitudinal effects associated with magnetic declination dependence and latitudinal separation between geographic and geomagnetic equators. The model runs in a normal personal computer (PC) and generates color maps illustrating the typical behavior of the

  2. Positive and negative GPS-TEC ionospheric storm effects during the extreme space weather event of March 2015 over the Brazilian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagundes, P. R.; Cardoso, F. A.; Fejer, B. G.; Venkatesh, K.; Ribeiro, B. A. G.; Pillat, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We studied the response of the ionosphere (F region) in the Brazilian sector during extreme space weather event of 17 March 2015 using a large network of 102 GPS- total electron content (TEC) stations. It is observed that the vertical total electron content (VTEC) was severely disturbed during the storm main and recovery phases. A wavelike oscillation with three peaks was observed in the TEC diurnal variation from equator to low latitudes during the storm main phase on 17-18 March 2015. The latitudinal extent of the wavelike oscillation peaks decreased from the beginning of the main phase toward the recovery phase. The first peak extended from beyond 0°S to 30°S, the second occurred from 6°S to 25°S, whereas the third diurnal peaks was confined from 13°S to 25°S. In addition, a strong negative phase in VTEC variations was observed during the recovery phase on 18-19 March 2015. This ionospheric negative phase was stronger at low latitudes than in the equatorial region. Also, two latitudinal chains of GPS-TEC stations from equatorial region to low latitudes in the east and west Brazilian sectors are used to investigate the storm time behavior of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in the east and west Brazilian sectors. We observed an anomalous behavior in EIA caused by the wavelike oscillations during the storm main phase on 17 March, and suppression of the EIA, resulting from the negative phase in VTEC, in the storm recovery phase.

  3. HF Doppler oscillations in the low-latitude ionosphere coherent with equatorial long-period geomagnetic field oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shibata, T.; Yumoto, K.

    2004-12-01

    We present observations of HF Doppler (HFD) oscillations in the low-latitude ionosphere seen during global long-period (5-15 min) geomagnetic field oscillation events, which occurred on 21 April 1993 and on 28 February 1998. In both events, daytime polar-equatorial magnetometer data on the ground indicated that the long-period geomagnetic field oscillations at the daytime dip equator were not only considerably enhanced but also highly correlated with those at afternoon high latitudes with no apparent time shift. This earlier finding [Motoba et al., 2002, 2003] strongly suggested that the long-period geomagnetic field oscillations at the daytime dip equator were produced by an extension of polar-originating ionospheric current system associated with high-latitude geomagnetic field oscillations. In the first event on 21 April 1993, the HFD measurement at the post-midnight low latitude detected frequency oscillations coherent with the geomagnetic field oscillations at the afternoon dip equator in the Pc5 range. However, there was no magnetic field change at low-latitude magnetometer stations adjacent to the reception site of the HFD. Therefore, it is reasonable to consider that the HFD oscillations are not effects of directly incoming hydromagnetic waves on the nighttime low-latitude ionosphere. In the second event on 28 February 1998, both the low-latitude HFD and equatorial magnetometer measurements were located in the post sunrise-terminator. Similar to the first event, HFD oscillations were well correlated with long-period geomagnetic field oscillations at the daytime equator, although both variations were in anti-phase. In the same local time sector the corresponding low-latitude magnetic field variations were predominant in the D component rather than the H component, suggesting that the meridional ionospheric currents originating in the polar region make a major contribution for the low-latitude magnetic field oscillations. The two case studies presented here

  4. HF Doppler oscillations in the low-latitude ionosphere coherent with equatorial long-period geomagnetic field oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, Tetsuo; Kikuchi, Takashi; Shibata, Takashi F.; Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    2004-06-01

    We present observations of HF Doppler (HFD) oscillations in the low-latitude ionosphere seen during global long-period (5˜15 min) geomagnetic field oscillation events, which occurred on 21 April 1993 and on 28 February 1998. In both events, daytime polar-equatorial magnetometer data on the ground indicated that the long-period geomagnetic field oscillations at the daytime dip equator were not only considerably enhanced but also highly correlated with those at afternoon high latitudes with no apparent time shift (within 10 s). This earlier finding [, 2002, 2003] strongly suggested that the long-period geomagnetic field oscillations at the daytime dip equator were produced by an extension of polar-originating ionospheric current system associated with high-latitude geomagnetic field oscillations. In the first event on 21 April 1993, the HFD measurement at the postmidnight low latitude detected frequency oscillations coherent with the geomagnetic field oscillations at the afternoon dip equator in the Pc5 range (˜6 min). However, there was no magnetic field change at low-latitude magnetometer stations adjacent to the reception site of the HFD. Therefore it is reasonable to consider that the HFD oscillations are not effects of directly incoming hydromagnetic waves on the nighttime low-latitude ionosphere. In the second event on 28 February 1998, both the low-latitude HFD and equatorial magnetometer measurements were located in the postsunrise terminator. Similar to the first event, HFD oscillations were well correlated with long-period geomagnetic field oscillations (˜14 min) at the daytime equator, although both variations were in antiphase. In the same local time sector the corresponding low-latitude magnetic field variations were predominant in the D component rather than the H component, suggesting that the meridional ionospheric currents originating in the polar region make a major contribution for the low-latitude magnetic field oscillations. The two case

  5. Gravity wave activity observed in the mesosphere and ionosphere on September 16th 2015 by an all-sky imager and dTEC maps over Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Gobbi, Delano; Buriti, Ricardo; Bageston, José Valentin; Medeiros, Amauri; Paulino, Igo; Cosme Alexandre Figueiredo, M.; Takahashi, Hisao; Azambuja, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    All-sky imager was used to observe the wave activity in the mesosphere and a ground network of GPS receivers were used to make detrended Total Electron Content (dTEC) maps to monitor the ionosphere. The wave activity was observed on September 16th 2015 over the southeast region in Brazil. The gravity wave characteristics and the atmospheric conditions for wave propagation will be presented and discussed. The gravity wave source was associated with strong tropospheric convection.

  6. Impact of the 15 January 2010 annular solar eclipse on the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere over the Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, S. K.; Gedam, S. S.; Rajaram, G.; Sripathi, S.; Bhaskar, A.

    2015-12-01

    The annular solar eclipse of 15 January 2010 over southern India was studied with a multi-instrument network consisting of magnetometer, ionosonde and GPS receivers. The presence of a counter electrojet (weakened or westward zonal electric field) during the eclipse and adjacent days suggests the strong gravitational tidal effect associated with the exceptional Sun-Moon-Earth alignment around the eclipse day. With a strong backup of magnetometer recordings on the day of eclipse, its adjacent days and the normal electrojet day, it is argued that the regular eastward electric field for the whole day at the equator was not just weakened, but actually was flipped for several hours by the influence of enhanced lunar tides. The effect of flipping the electric field was clearly seen in the equatorial ionosonde data and through the large array of GPS receivers that produced the total electron content (TEC) data. The main impact of flipping the electric field was poor feeding of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) due to the severely weakened fountain effect on the eclipse day, with the regular anomaly crest shifting towards the equator. The equatorial ionosonde profile was also showing an enhanced F2 region peak in spite of a reduced vertical TEC. While the plasma density depletion at the lower F region altitude over the equator was due to the temporary lack of photo-ionization, the reductions in high altitude plasma density beyond the equator were caused by the electrodynamics taking place around the eclipse. The important finding of this analysis is that the electrodynamical consequences on the low latitude ionosphere were mainly due to the combination of eclipse and lunar tides which were far more significant and influenced the EIA density rather than eclipse alone. Based on these findings, it is argued that the prevailing lunar tidal impact also needs to be taken into account while seeking to understand the electrodynamical impact of the solar eclipse on the low

  7. Simulation of low latitude ionospheric response to 2015 St. Patrick's Day super geomagnetic storm over Indian longitude sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Joshi, Lalit; Sripathi, Samireddipelle; Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    We present low latitude ionospheric response over Indian longitude to the recent super geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015, using the SAMI2 model which incorporates ionosonde derived vertical drift impacted by prompt penetration eastward electric field occurring during the evening Prereversal Enhancement (PRE) in the vertical drift. The importance of this storm is that (a) Dst reaches as low as -228 nT and (b) prompt penetration of eastward electric field coincided with evening hours PRE. The daytime vertical EXB drifts in the SAMI2 model are, however, considered based on Scherliess-Fejer model. The simulations indicate a significant enhancement in F layer height and equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in the post sunset hours on 17 March 2015 vis-a-vis quiet day. The model simulations during recovery phase, considering disturbance dynamo vertical EXB drift along with equatorward disturbance wind, indicates suppression of the daytime EIA. SAMI2 simulations considering the disturbance wind during the recovery phase suggests that equatorward wind enhances the ionospheric density in the low latitude, however, its role in the formation of the EIA depends on the polarity of the zonal electric field. Comparison of model derived total electron content (TEC) with the TEC from ground GPS receivers indicate that model does reproduce enhancement of the EIA during the main phase and suppression of the EIA during the recovery phase of the super storm. However, peculiarities pertaining to the ionospheric response to prompt penetration electric field in the Indian sector vis-a-vis earlier reports from American sector will be discussed.

  8. Orbital control of low-latitude seasonality during the Eemian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, A.; Paul, A.; Nyberg, J.; Oba, T.; Lundberg, J.; Schrag, D.; Taggart, B.

    2003-01-01

    We used Sr/Ca and stable isotope data from well dated and preserved corals from the northeastern Caribbean to determine the seasonal environmental conditions for four continuous years during the Eemian, the last time the Earth was in a prolonged warm phase. We determined that the seasonal range in SST during the Eemian was 25??-30?? C. This is ???1-2?? larger than at present and caused primarily by winter cooling and, only to a small degree, by summer warming. As climate modeling studies indicate, the bias towards colder winters can be explained by changes in low latitude insolation induced by altered orbital parameters, modulated by atmospheric CO2 levels that were lower than today. Milankovitch forcing at higher latitudes was probably less important.

  9. Theoretically modeling the low-latitude, ionospheric response to large geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D.; Anghel, A.; Araujo, E.; Eccles, V.; Valladares, C.; Lin, C.

    2006-10-01

    In the low-latitude, ionospheric F region, the primary transport mechanism that determines the electron and ion density distributions is the magnitude of the daytime, upward E × B drift velocity. During large geomagnetic storms, penetration of high-latitude electric fields to low latitudes can often produce daytime, vertical E × B drift velocities in excess of 50 m/s. Employing a recently developed technique, we can infer these daytime, upward E × B drift velocities from ground-based magnetometer observations at Jicamarca and Piura, Peru, as a function of local time (0700-1700 LT). We study the ionospheric response in the Peruvian longitude sector to these large upward drifts by theoretically calculating electron and ion densities as a function of altitude, latitude, and local time using the time-dependent Low-Latitude Ionospheric Sector (LLIONS) model. This is a single-sector ionosphere model capable of incorporating data-determined drivers, such as E × B drift velocities. For this study, we choose three large storms in 2003 (29 and 30 October and 20 November) when daytime E × B drift velocities approached or exceeded 50 m/s. Initial results indicate that the large, upward E × B drift velocities on 29 October produced equatorial anomaly crests in ionization at ±20° dip latitude rather than the usual ±16° dip latitude. We compare the theoretically calculated results with a variety of ground-based and satellite observations for these three periods and discuss the implications of these comparisons as they relate to the capabilities of current theoretical models and our ability to infer ionospheric drivers such as E × B drifts (Anderson et al., 2002).

  10. Low-Latitude Auroras: The Magnetic Storm of 14-15 May 1921

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, S. M.; Cliver, E. W.

    2001-01-01

    We review solar geophysical data relating to the great magnetic storm of 14-15 May 1921, with emphasis on observations of the low-latitude visual aurora. From the reports we have gathered for this event the lowest geomagnetic latitude of definite overhead aurora (coronal form) was 40 deg and the lowest geomagnetic latitude from which auroras were observed on the poleward horizon in the northern hemisphere was 30 deg. For comparison, corresponding overhead/low-latitude values of 48 deg/32 deg and 41 deg/20 deg were reported for the great auroras on 28-29 August and 1-2 September 1859, respectively. However for the 1921 event, there is a report of aurora from Apia, Samoa, in the southern hemisphere, within 13 deg of the geomagnetic equator. This report by professional observers appears to be credible, based on the aurora description and timing, but is puzzling because of the discrepancy with the lowest latitude of observation in the northern hemisphere and the great implied aurora height (approximately 2000 km, assuming overhead aurora at Auckland, New Zealand). We discuss various possibilities that might account for this observation.

  11. Recent low-latitude freeze thaw on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, David P.

    2007-07-01

    Outside polar latitudes, features corresponding to surface thaw have yet to be identified on Mars. The youthful gully landforms observed at mid-high latitude [Malin, M., Edgett, K., 2000. Science 288, 2330-2335] are the nearest candidate, but the source (and nature) of the gully carving agent remains controversial [e.g., Musselwhite, D.S., Swindle, T.D., Lunine, J.I., 2001. Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 1283-1285; Mellon, M.T., Phillips, R.J., 2001. J. Geophys. Res. 106, 1-15; Knauth, L.P., Burt, D.M., 2002. Icarus 158, 267-271; Costard, F., Forget, F., Mangold, N., Peulvast, J.P., 2002. Science 295, 110-113; Christensen, P.R., 2003. Nature 422, 45-48; Treiman, A.H., 2003. J. Geophys. Res. 108]. At higher obliquity than the present epoch, near-surface ground ice should be present globally [Mellon, M.T., Jakosky, B.M., 1995. J. Geophys. Res. 100 (E6), 11781-11799], populated by condensation of atmospheric water vapour in the top few metres of the regolith, or emplaced as dusty ice sheets reaching down towards the equator. The latitudinal restriction of these gullies to regions poleward of ±30° appears to argue against a thaw component to their formation—since ground ice is present and stable at all latitudes at high obliquity, the current (low) obliquity regime should result in ground ice thaw at low latitudes, where insolation and daytime temperatures are currently greatest, and this is not observed. A previously undescribed meltwater sequence in the Cerberus plains, at 20° N/187° E, shows that comparable, but much more continuous, and mappable melting and surface runoff have occurred in the geologically recent past at near-equatorial latitudes on Mars. Polygonal ground in the Cerberus plains is seen by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) to suffer sequential, regional-scale volatile-loss consistent with thaw of near-surface ground ice under periglacial conditions. This degradation is continuously sampled by a single MOC strip, showing an icy

  12. A high-latitude, low-latitude boundary layer model of the convection current system

    SciTech Connect

    Siscoe, G.L. ); Lotko, W.; Sonnerup, B.U.O. )

    1991-03-01

    Observations suggest that both the high- and low-latitude boundary layers contribute to magnetospheric convection, and that their contributions are linked. In the interpretation pursued here, the high-latitude boundary layer (HBL) generates the voltage while the low-latitude boundary layer (LBL) generates the current for the part of the convection electric circuit that closes through the ionosphere. This paper gives a model that joins the high- and low-latitude boundary layers consistently with the ionospheric Ohm's law. It describes an electric circuit linking both boundary layers, the region 1 Birkeland currents, and the ionospheric Pedersen closure currents. The model works by using the convection electric field that the ionosphere receives from the HBL to determine two boundary conditions to the equations that govern viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling. The result provides the needed self-consistent coupling between the two boundary layers and fully specifies the solution for the viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling equations. The solution shows that in providing the current required by the ionospheric Ohm's law, the LBL needs only a tenth of the voltage that spans the HBL. The solution also gives the latitude profiles of the ionospheric electric field, parallel currents, and parallel potential. It predicts that the plasma in the inner part of the LBL moves sunward instead of antisunward and that, as the transpolar potential decreases below about 40 kV, reverse polarity (region 0) currents appear at the poleward border of the region 1 currents. A possible problem with the model is its prediction of a thin boundary layer ({approximately}1000 km), whereas thicknesses inferred from satellite data tend to be greater.

  13. Deep LMT/AzTEC millimeter observations of ɛ Eridani and its surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez-Dagostino, M.; Bertone, E.; Cruz-Saenz de Miera, F.; Marshall, J. P.; Wilson, G. W.; Sánchez-Argüelles, D.; Hughes, D. H.; Kennedy, G.; Vega, O.; De la Luz, V.; Dent, W. R. F.; Eiroa, C.; Gómez-Ruiz, A.; Greaves, J. S.; Lizano, S.; López-Valdivia, R.; Mamajek, E.; Montaña, A.; Olmedo, M.; Rodríguez-Montoya, I.; Schloerb, F. P.; Yun, Min S.; Zavala, J. A.; Zeballos, M.

    2016-06-01

    ɛ Eridani is a nearby, young Sun-like star that hosts a ring of cool debris analogous to the solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. Early observations at (sub-)mm wavelengths gave tentative evidence of the presence of inhomogeneities in the ring, which have been ascribed to the effect of a putative low eccentricity planet, orbiting close to the ring. The existence of these structures have been recently challenged by high resolution interferometric millimeter observations. Here we present the deepest single-dish image of ɛ Eridani at millimeter wavelengths, obtained with the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano (LMT). The main goal of these LMT observations is to confirm (or refute) the presence of non-axisymmetric structure in the disk. The dusty ring is detected for the first time along its full projected elliptical shape. The radial extent of the ring is not spatially resolved and shows no evidence, to within the uncertainties, of dust density enhancements. Additional features of the 1.1 mm map are: (i) the presence of significant flux in the gap between the ring and the star, probably providing the first exo-solar evidence of Poynting-Robertson drag, (ii) an unambiguous detection of emission at the stellar position with a flux significantly above that expected from ɛ Eridani's photosphere, and (iii) the identification of numerous unresolved sources which could correspond to background dusty star-forming galaxies.

  14. Investigation of low-latitude E and valley region irregularities: Their relationship to equatorial plasma bubble bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guozhu; Ning, Baiqi; Patra, A. K.; Wan, Weixing; Hu, Lianhuan

    2011-11-01

    The low-latitude E, valley and F region 3 m scale irregularities are studied with the Sanya (18.4°N, 109.6°E, dip latitude 12.8°N) VHF coherent scatter radar. The observations show that the E region irregularities (ERIs) often weaken or disappear during the development of postsunset equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) in equinoctial months. However, the valley region irregularities (VRIs) are found to occur during the EPB development and show structures with close relation to those of EPBs. The interesting aspect is that the ERI disruption and VRI generation are simultaneously detected. In terms of the electric field coupling from the equatorial F region down to low-latitude E and valley regions, the polarization electric fields (PEFs) associated with the EPB bifurcation are suggested to play key roles in the evolution of ERIs and VRIs. It is shown that the mapping of upward and eastward PEFs generated within the equatorial west tilted bubble would inhibit the occurrence of low-latitude ERIs. However, for the east tilted bubble structure, the associated downward PEFs might map to the low-latitude valley region and play an active role for the development of 3 m scale irregularities through gradient drift instability.

  15. Winter-time dependence of the global TEC on the stratospheric temperature and solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtarov, Plamen; Pancheva, Dora

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a simple linear regression model that enables to quantify the contribution of high-latitude stratospheric temperature and solar radiation (describes by its proxy F10.7) to the variability of the low-latitude TEC during winter. The model is based on cross-correlation analysis performed on the Aura MLS temperature measurements and the global CODE TEC data for the period of time 2005-2010, i.e. at low to moderate solar activity (F10.7 changes between ~65 and ~140 solar flux units). It revealed that the temperature at altitude of ~40 km and latitude of ~60°N describes the most typical winter conditions and shows the largest negative correlation with the low-latitude TEC. This temperature namely is included in the regression model. The model results have been compared with the TEC data by calculating the standard deviation (STD). The comparison indicated that the regression model describes almost half of the real variability of the global TEC and that the contribution of the temperature (that is only a part of forcing from below) is almost half of the solar variability (i.e. external forcing related to the photo-ionization). A possible mechanism for explaining the relationship between the high-latitude stratospheric increase of the temperature and low-latitude decrease of the TEC is suggested.

  16. Potential Impacts of Wintertime Agricultural Irrigation at Low Latitudes on Global Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wey, H. W.; Lo, M. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Yu, J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of agricultural irrigation on environment has long been an important issue to investigate. Since the anthropogenic water management is able to change the surface energy budgets and the water cycle, some research has been done to assess its impacts on both regional and global climate. Note that much of the agricultural irrigation at boreal low latitudes is applied in wintertime. In this study, we use NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) to simulate the land-air interaction processes with water management and the consequent responses in atmospheric circulation and hydrological cycle. We conduct some perturbed experiments with different model complexities to clarify the corresponding effects of changes in surface energy balances and atmospheric circulation in both local and global manner. The preliminary results show that the wintertime agricultural irrigation at low latitudes is able to lower the surface Bowen ratio, and reduce the surface temperature in a continental scale through atmospheric feedbacks and to change the intensity of prevailing monsoon circulation. In addition, we observed anomalous tropical precipitation and mid-latitude climatic changes indicating tropical-extra tropical teleconnections. Based on these results, we propose that the location of heavily irrigated place is important to have impacts on remote regions which might be an important consideration on human sustainability. We also try to track the fingerprint of this potential climate forcing in observational data and to estimate its contribution relative to other anthropogenic and natural forcing in future climate projection.

  17. F region postsunset plasma structures at low latitudes deduced from the Swarm satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, Claudia; Xiong, Chao; Kervalishvili, Guram; Lühr, Hermann; Rauberg, Jan; Michaelis, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    ESA's constellation mission Swarm was successfully launched on 22 November 2013. The three satellites are orbiting the Earth at 470 km and 520 km altitude. The spacecraft carry instruments to monitor the plasma density and magnetic eld magnitude and their variations with high quality. We will present results on low latitude F region post sunset plasma irregularities (EPIs). EPIs are characterised by severe plasma density gradients and distinct magnetic field variations and cause GPS signal detection degradations. Our results show rather small scale sizes of EPIs (>44 km) in the zonal direction as well as more fragmented irregularities in the southern hemisphere where the ambient magnetic field is lower than on the northern hemisphere. From the Swarm spacecraft constellation with a zonal separation of about 150 km, we conclude that larger zonal scale sizes of irregularities exist in the early evening hours (around 1900 LT) and that the irregularities break into smaller structures later in the evening. However, we also observe examples where only one satellite detects EPIs, while the others show undisturbed ionization. We will present also such an example, and compare these observations with detections of depletions on satellites from other missions. There exist a strong link to low-latitude space weather: the plasma irregularities give rise to severe disturbances of GPS navigational signals and these can also be monitored on board the Swarm satellites simultaneously with the plasma irregularities.

  18. Simulation of the low latitude ionosphere response to disturbed winds and electric fields: Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas; Bailey, Graham; Bravo, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Modeling the ionosphere during disturbed periods is one of the most challenging tasks due to the complexity of the phenomena that affect the electric fields and the thermosphere environment as whole. It is well known that depending on the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field disturbance electric fields (undershielding or overshielding) can penetrate from high to low latitudes causing significant disturbances in the electron density distribution and in the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) development. Besides that, the large amount of energy deposited in the polar region during disturbed periods will be responsible for the generation of disturbed winds that will flow towards the equator where they produce a disturbance dynamo which also affects the EIA density distribution. The TIDs and TADs are also sources of disturbances that propagate at high velocity reaching the equator 2-3 hours after the beginning of the magnetic storm. In this work we use the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model at INPE (SUPIM-INPE), to simulate the drastic effects that were observed at the low latitude ionosphere in the Brazilian region during a very intense magnetic storm event. A few models are tested for the disturbed electric field and wind. The simulation results showed that the observations are better explained when considering a traveling waveform disturbance propagating from north to south at a velocity equal to 200 m/s.

  19. Theoretically Modeling the Ionospheric Response at Low Latitudes to the Great Storms in October, 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Anghel, A.; Eccles, V.; Valladares, C.; Chau, J.; Veliz, O.

    2004-05-01

    In the low latitude, ionospheric F region, the primary transport mechanism that determines the electron and ion density distributions is the magnitude of the daytime, upward ExB drift velocity. During the geomagnetic storms on Oct. 29 and 30, 2003, we have inferred these upward ExB drift velocities from ground-based magnetometer observations at Jicamarca and Piura, Peru as a function of local time (0700 - 1700LT). On both days these ExB drifts exceeded 80 m/sec which is about four times greater than the normal, quiet time value of 20 m/sec. We study the ionospheric response in the Peruvian longitude sector to these large upward drifts by theoretically-calculating electron and ion densities as a function of altitude, latitude and local time using the time-dependent Low-Latitude Ionospheric Sector model (LLIONS). This is a single sector ionosphere model capable of incorporating data-determined drivers. Initial results indicate that the large, upward ExB drift velocities on Oct. 29 produce equatorial anomaly crests in ionization at +/- 22° dip latitude rather than the usual +/- 16° dip latitude. We compare the theoretically-calculated results with a variety of ground-based and satellite observations for Oct. 28, 29, 30 and 31 and discuss the implications of these comparisons as they relate to the capabilities of current theoretical models and our ability to infer ionospheric drivers such as ExB drifts.

  20. Climatology of low latitude ionosphere under effect of varying solar flux during solar cycle 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashora, Nirvikar; Suresh, Sunanda

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of quiet time equatorial and low latitude total electron content (TEC) over the Indian sector using GIM data (1998-2014) is obtained. For the first time the analysis is carried filtering out the solar flare and storm effects and time series of quiet time VTEC data from three locations namely dip equator and two low latitude conjugate locations in Indian sector are obtained. It is well known that a complex interplay among drivers of equatorial electrodynamics like Solar flux, dynamo electric field and meridional winds determine the daytime ionization and distribution in equatorial ionization anomaly zone. In this study, we have critically examined the role of varying solar flux and response of low latitude ionosphere with new and standardized definitions. The results are examined and interpreted in the context of large number of previous studies. The newly found features from this study are as follows. Marked difference in nature of equinoctial asymmetry is noted between solar cycle 23 and 24. Long absence of winter anomaly both during low and high solar activity (HSA) in LL (low latitude) regions is found. Climatology of the diurnal cycle is provided in four categories using new criteria for demarcation of solar activity levels. Highest correlation (~77%) between GIM ionospheric electron content (IEC) and PI (solar EUV proxy index) is noted over equator in contrast to previous studies. The minimum positive contribution of PI in variation of IEC requires minimum of 2 years of data and if more than 7-8 years of data is used, it saturates. RMS (root mean square) width of PI can be used to define the HSA. Strong QBO (quasi biennial oscillations) in IEC is noted in tune with the one in PI over both the LL location but QBO remains surprisingly subdued over equator. The semi-annual oscillations in GIM-IEC are found to be stronger at all locations during high solar activity and weaker between 2005 and 2011, whereas, the annual oscillations are found to

  1. Continuum observations of M 51 and M 83 at 1.1 mm with AzTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, W. F.; Puerari, I.; Tilanus, R.; Israel, F. P.; Austermann, J. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Wilson, G.; Yun, M.; Scott, K. S.; Perera, T. A.; Roberts, C. M.; Hughes, D. H.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the spiral galaxies M 51 and M 83 at 20 arscec spatial resolution with the bolometer array Aztronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) on the JCMT in the 1.1 mm continuum, recovering the extended emission out to galactocentric radii of more than 12 kpc in both galaxies. The 1.1 mm-continuum fluxes are 5.6 ± 0.7 and 9.9 ± 1.4 Jy, with associated gas masses estimated at 9.4 × 109 M⊙ and 7.2 × 109 M⊙ for M 51 and M 83, respectively. In the interarm regions of both galaxies, the N(H2)/I(CO) (or X-factor) ratios exceed those in the arms by factors of ˜1.5-2. In the inner discs of both galaxies, the X-factor is about 1 × 1020 cm- 2 (K km s- 1)- 1. In the outer parts, the CO-dark molecular gas becomes more important. While the spiral density wave in M 51 appears to influence the interstellar medium and stars in a similar way, the bar potential in M 83 influences the interstellar medium and the stars differently. We confirm the result of Foyle et al. that the arms merely heighten the star formation rate (SFR) and the gas surface density in the same proportion. Our maps reveal a threshold gas surface density for an SFR increase by two or more orders of magnitude. In both galaxy centres, the molecular gas depletion time is about 1 Gyr climbing to 10-20 Gyr at radii of 6-8 kpc. This is consistent with an inside-out depletion of the molecular gas in the discs of spiral galaxies.

  2. Modelling the low-latitude boundary layer with reconnection entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, P.; Holzer, T. E.; Russell, C. T.; Wang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    We develop a one-dimensional Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL) model for northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The boundary layer in this model is uniform in the direction normal to the magnetopause, a 'plateau-type' boundary layer. The boundary layer motion is decoupled from the magnetosheath motion and driven by the plasma pressure associated with the incoming solar wind plasma near local noon, which has become entrained on closed field lines as a result of reconnection in the cusp region. Dissipation in the ionosphere at the feet of the boundary layer field lines opposes this motion. There are two physical solutions for the model. In one, the boundary layer reaches a terminal velocity in the tail as the boundary layer plasma effectively joins the solar wind flow. In the other solution, the flow is nearly stopped in the far tail. In combination with other mechanisms, this latter solution may correspond to the case in which the boundary layer plasma participates in magnetospheric convection and returns sunward. The density, velocity, and thickness as functions of distance from local noon are studied, assuming that the magnetopause hasa elliptical shape and the magnetospheric field is dipolar.

  3. Low Latitude Pulsations Associated with Different Phases of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, J.; Vankayala, R. C.; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, G.; Thomas, N.

    2014-12-01

    During geomagnetic storm lot of free energy is available in the magnetosphere and this energy can act as feeder to electromagnetic waves in different frequency bands. A classical geomagnetic storm consists mainly of four phases i.e. SSC (Sudden Storm commencement), initial Phase, main phase and recovery phase. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of electromagnetic waves in ULF (ultra low frequency) band associated with different phases of geomagnetic storms. Electromagnetic waves in ULF band (Period~ 10-100s) in the Earth's magnetosphere are generally termed as geomagnetic pulsations. A detailed statistical analysis has been performed over ten years of geomagnetic data from low latitude ground stations in Indian and Japanese sectors. The study reveals that storms in general, are accompanied with continuous pulsations of different frequency bands during different phases. In particular, the main phase of 91 % of intense storms was accompanied with pulsations in Pc5 band (frequency~ 2-7 mHz). However, the occurrence of these pulsations was less frequent during main phase of weak to moderate storms. Further, the amplitude of these pulsations increased with the intensity of storm.

  4. Observation of TEC perturbation associated with medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance and possible seeding mechanism of atmospheric gravity wave at a Brazilian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonah, O. F.; Kherani, E. A.; De Paula, E. R.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we document daytime total electron content (TEC) disturbances associated with medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs), on few chosen geomagnetically quiet days over Southern Hemisphere of Brazilian longitude sector. These disturbances are derived from TEC data obtained using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver networks. From the keograms and cross-correlation maps, the TEC disturbances are identified as the MSTIDs that are propagating equatorward-eastward, having most of their average wavelengths longer in latitude than in longitude direction. These are the important outcomes of the present study which suggest that the daytime MSTIDs over Southern Hemisphere are similar to their counterparts in the Northern Hemisphere. Another important outcome is that the occurrence characteristics of these MSTIDs and that of atmospheric gravity wave (AGW) activities in the thermosphere are found to be similar on day-to-day basis. This suggests a possible connection between them, confirming the widely accepted AGW forcing mechanism for the generation of these daytime MSTIDs. The source of this AGW is investigated using the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES) and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate satellite data. Finally, we provided evidences that AGWs are generated by convection activities from the tropospheric region.

  5. Possible precipitation of ice at low latitudes of Mars during periods of high obliquity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jakosky, B.M.; Carr, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the old cratered highlands of Mars are dissected by branching river valleys that appear to have been cut by running water1,2 yet liquid water is unstable everywhere on the martian surface. In the equatorial region, where most of the valleys are observed, even ice is unstable3,4. It has been suggested, therefore, that Mars had an early denser atmosphere with sufficient greenhouse warming to allow the existence of liquid water 5. Here, we suggest instead that during periods of very high obliquities, ice could accumulate at low latitudes as a result of sustained sublimation of ice from the poles and transport of the water vapour equatorwards. At low latitudes, the water vapour would saturate the atmosphere and condense onto the surface where it would accumulate until lower obliquities prevailed. The mechanism is efficient only at the very high obliquities that occurred before formation of Tharsis very early in the planet's history, but limited equatorial ice accumulation could also have occurred at the highest obliquities during the rest of the planet's history. Partial melting of the ice could have provided runoff to form the channels or replenish the groundwater system. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Discovery of a widespread low-latitude diurnal CO2 frost cycle on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueux, Sylvain; Kleinböhl, Armin; Hayne, Paul O.; Heavens, Nicholas G.; Kass, David M.; McCleese, Daniel J.; Schofield, John T.; Shirley, James H.

    2016-07-01

    While the detection of CO2 ice has only been reported outside the Martian polar regions at very high elevation (i.e., Elysium, Olympus Mons, and the Tharsis Montes), nighttime surface observations by the Mars Climate Sounder on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter document the widespread occurrence of atmospherically corrected ground temperatures consistent with the presence of extensive carbon dioxide frost deposits in the dusty low thermal inertia units at middle/low latitudes. Thermal infrared emissivities, interpreted in conjunction with mass balance modeling, suggest micrometer size CO2 ice crystals forming optically thin layers never exceeding a few hundreds of microns in thickness (i.e., 10-2 kg m-2) locally, which is insufficient to generate a measurable diurnal pressure cycle (<<0.1% of the Martian atmosphere). Atmospheric temperatures at middle/low latitudes are not consistent with precipitation of CO2 ice, suggesting that condensation occurs on the surface. The recurring growth and sublimation of CO2 ice on Martian dusty terrains may be an important process preventing soil induration and promoting dynamic phenomena (soil avalanching and fluidization and regolith gardening), maintaining a reservoir of micrometer size dust particles that are mobile and available for lifting. The discovery of this diurnal CO2 cycle represents an important step forward in our understanding of the way the Martian atmosphere interacts with the surface.

  7. The domination of Saturn's low-latitude ionosphere by ring 'rain'.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, J; Stallard, T S; Melin, H; Jones, G H; Cowley, S W H; Miller, S; Baines, K H; Blake, J S D

    2013-04-11

    Saturn's ionosphere is produced when the otherwise neutral atmosphere is exposed to a flow of energetic charged particles or solar radiation. At low latitudes the solar radiation should result in a weak planet-wide glow in the infrared, corresponding to the planet's uniform illumination by the Sun. The observed electron density of the low-latitude ionosphere, however, is lower and its temperature higher than predicted by models. A planet-to-ring magnetic connection has been previously suggested, in which an influx of water from the rings could explain the lower-than-expected electron densities in Saturn's atmosphere. Here we report the detection of a pattern of features, extending across a broad latitude band from 25 to 60 degrees, that is superposed on the lower-latitude background glow, with peaks in emission that map along the planet's magnetic field lines to gaps in Saturn's rings. This pattern implies the transfer of charged species derived from water from the ring-plane to the ionosphere, an influx on a global scale, flooding between 30 to 43 per cent of the surface of Saturn's upper atmosphere. This ring 'rain' is important in modulating ionospheric emissions and suppressing electron densities. PMID:23579676

  8. Ionospheric variability over Indian low latitude linked with the 2009 sudden stratospheric warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Amit; Alex, Sobhana; Samireddipalle, Sripathi; Peddapati, PavanChaitanya

    In this paper, we analyze radar observations of ExB drift and plasma irregularities, ionosonde observations of E- and F-layer parameters including spread F, and magnetic field observations made from Indian low latitudes linked with the 2009 sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event. ExB drift variations presented here are the first of their kind from the Indian sector as far as the effect of SSW is concerned. Difference of magnetic fields observed from the equator and low latitude (∆H) and ExB drift show linear relation and both show remarkably large positive values in the morning and negative values in the afternoon exhibiting semidiurnal behavior. Remarkable changing patterns in the critical frequency of F2 layer (foF2) and F3 layer (foF3) were observed after the occurrence of SSW. Large variations with quasi-16-day periodicity were observed in ∆H, foF2 and foF3. Both semidiurnal and quasi-16-day wave modulation observed after the 2009 SSW event are consistent with those reported earlier. We also noted quasi-6 day variations in ∆H and foF2 soon after the SSW commencement, not much reported before. During the counter-electrojet events linked with the SSW event, while equatorial Es (Esq) disappeared as expected, there were no blanketing Es (Esb), a finding not reported and discussed earlier. Esb was also not formed at the off-equatorial location, indicating the absence of required vertical wind shear, but E region plasma irregularities were observed by the ionosonde and radar with a close relationship between the two. Weak F region irregularities were observed in the post-midnight hours and case studies suggest the possible role of SSW related background electric field in the manifestation of post-midnight F region irregularities.

  9. Ionospheric variability over Indian low latitude linked with the 2009 sudden stratospheric warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A. K.; Pavan Chaitanya, P.; Sripathi, S.; Alex, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze radar observations of E × B drift and plasma irregularities, ionosonde observations of E and F layer parameters including spread F, and magnetic field observations made from Indian low latitudes linked with the 2009 sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event. E × B drift variations presented here are the first of their kind from the Indian sector as far as the effect of SSW is concerned. Difference of magnetic fields observed from the equator and low-latitude (∆H) and E × B drift show linear relation, and both show remarkably large positive values in the morning and negative values in the afternoon exhibiting semidiurnal behavior. Remarkable changing patterns in the critical frequency of F2 layer (foF2) and F3 layer (foF3) were observed after the occurrence of SSW. Large variations with quasi 16 day periodicity were observed in ∆H, foF2, and foF3. Both semidiurnal and quasi 16 day wave modulation observed after the 2009 SSW event are consistent with those reported earlier. We also noted quasi 6 day variations in ∆H and foF2 soon after the SSW commencement, not much reported before. During the counterelectrojet events linked with the SSW event, while equatorial Es (Esq) disappeared as expected, there were no blanketing Es (Esb), a finding not reported and discussed earlier. Esb was also not formed at the off-equatorial location, indicating the absence of required vertical wind shear, but E region plasma irregularities were observed by the ionosonde and radar with a close relationship between the two. Weak F region irregularities were observed in the postmidnight hours, and case studies suggest the possible role of SSW-related background electric field in the manifestation of postmidnight F region irregularities.

  10. Whistlers detected and analyzed by Automatic Whistler Detector (AWD) at low latitude Indian stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhay K.; Singh, S. B.; Singh, Rajesh; Gokani, Sneha A.; Singh, Ashok K.; Siingh, Devendraa; Lichtenberger, János

    2014-12-01

    Recently, at three Indian low latitude stations: Varanasi (geomag. lat. 14°55‧N, geomag. long. 153°54‧E, L: 1.078), Allahabad (geomag. lat. 16.05°N; geomag. long. 155.34°E, L: 1.081) and Lucknow (geomag. lat. 17.6°N, geomag. long. 154.5°E, L: 1.104) an Automatic Whistler Detector (AWD) has been installed in December, 2010 for detection and analysis of whistlers. This instrument automatically detects and collects statistical whistlers data for the investigation of whistlers generation and propagation. Large numbers of whistlers have been recorded at Varanasi and Allahabad during the year 2011 which is analyzed in the present study. Different types of whistlers have been recorded at Varanasi and Allahabad. The correlation between recorded whistlers and causative lightning strikes were analyzed using data provided by World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). We observed that for both the stations more than 50% of causative sferics of whistlers were observed to match closely with the times of WWLLN detected lightning strikes within the propagation times of causative tweeks. All of these lightning strikes originated from the region within 500-600 km radius circle from the conjugate point of Varanasi and Allahabad supports the ducted propagation at low latitude stations. The dispersion of the observed whistlers varies between 8 and 18 s1/2, which shows that the observed whistlers have propagated in ducted mode and whole propagation path of whistlers lies in the ionosphere. The ionospheric columnar electron contents of these observed whistlers vary between 13.21 TECU and 56.57 TECU. The ionospheric parameters derived from whistler data at Varanasi compare well with the other measurements made by other techniques.

  11. Variabilities of low latitude mesospheric and E region echoes: linked to common sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmalingam, Selvaraj; Patra, Amit; Sathishkumar, Sundararaman; Narayana Rao, D.

    2016-07-01

    Variability in dynamics of the mesospheric and E region echoes have been studied in isolation. Both echoing phenomena are directly or indirectly coupled with each other through neutral dynamics. This is especially so for the low-latitudes outside the equatorial electrojet belt, where E region plasma irregularities causing radar echoes are governed by neutral dynamics, such as tides and gravity waves. Although these regions are close to each other, no effort has been made yet to understand the dynamical coupling processes manifesting the observed variabilities in the two echoing phenomena. To investigate linkage between the two phenomena, if any, we conducted systematic observations of low latitude mesospheric and E region echoes during 2011-2012 using the Gadanki MST radar and used these in conjunction with SABER temperature, MF radar wind, and sporadic E observations. Both echoes are found to occur in the height regions where temperature observations show negative gradients. Mesospheric echoes are collocated with temperature gradient associated with mesospheric temperature inversion while the E region echoes are collocated with negative temperature gradient close to the mesopause. Observations have revealed a common signature of semi-annual variations in the occurrence of both mesospheric and ionospheric E-region - occurrences peak in the equinoxes. The E region echoes have an additional peak occurring in the summer and this occurrence is well correlated with the enhancement in the diurnal tidal amplitude. We surmise that the enhancement in the diurnal tidal amplitude is linked with non-migrating tide of tropospheric weather phenomena in summer. Intriguingly, mesospheric echoing layers display descending pattern quite similar to the E region echoes and sporadic E layer, which have been used to invoke tidal dynamics in manifesting similar morphology in both mesospheric and E region echoes. These results will be presented and the role of tidal dynamics on the

  12. Relation Between Low Latitude Pc3 Magnetic Micropulsations and Solar Wind (P6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, I. A.

    2006-11-01

    iaaamphysics@yahoo.co.in iaaphysicsamu@yahoo.com.au Geomagnetic pulsations recorded on the ground are the signatures of the integrated signals from the magnetosphere. Pc3 Geomagnetic pulsations are quasi-sinusoidal variations in the Earth’s Magnetic field in the period range 10-45 seconds. The magnitude of these pulsations ranges from fraction of a nT (nano Tesla) to several nT. These pulsations can be observed in a number of ways. However the application of ground based magnetometer arrays has proven to be one of the most successful methods of studying the spatial structure of hydromagnetic waves in the Earth’s Magnetosphere. The solar wind provides the energy for the Earth’s magnetospheric processes. Pc3-5 geomagnetic pulsations can be generated either externally or internally with respect to the magnetosphere. The Pc3 studies undertaken in the past have been confined to middle and high latitudes. The spatial and temporal variations observed in Pc3 occurrence are of vital importance because they provide evidence which can be directly related to wave generation mechanisms both inside and external to the magnetosphere. At low latitudes (L < 3) wave energy predominates in the Pc3 band and the spatial characteristics of these pulsations have received little attention in the past. An array of four low latitude induction coil magnetometers was established in south-east Australia over a longitudinal range of 17 degrees at L=1.8 to 2.7 for carrying out the study of the effect of the solar wind velocity on these pulsations. Digital dynamic spectra showing Pc3 pulsation activity over a period of about six months have been used to evaluate Pc3 pulsation occurrence. Pc3 occurrence probability at low latitudes has been found to be dominant for the solar wind velocity in the range 400-700 Km/sec. The results suggest that solar wind controls Pc3 occurrence through a mechanism in which Pc3 wave energy is convected through the magnetosheath and coupled to the standing

  13. Climatology of ionospheric scintillations and TEC trend over the Ugandan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant Bertillas; Edward, Jurua; Cilliers, Pierre J.; Habarulema, John Bosco

    2014-03-01

    This study presents results on the investigation of the diurnal, monthly and seasonal variability of Total Electron Content (TEC), phase (σΦ) and amplitude (S4) scintillation indices over Ugandan (Low latitude) region. Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) data was obtained from Makerere (0.34°N, 32.57°E) station, Uganda for two years (2011 and 2012). Data from two dual frequency GPS receivers at Mbarara (0.60°S, 30.74°E) and Entebbe (0.04°N, 32.44°E) was used to study TEC climatology during the same period of scintillation study. The results show that peak TEC values were recorded during the months of October-November, and the lowest values during the months of July-August. The diurnal peak of TEC occurs between 10:00 and 14:00 UT hours. Seasonally, the ascending and descending phases of TEC were observed during the equinoxes (March and September) and solstice (June and December), respectively. The scintillations observed during the study were classified as weak (0.1≤S4,σΦ≤0.3) and strong (0.3TEC pattern mentioned above. Amplitude scintillation was more dominant than phase scintillation during the two years of the study. Scintillation peaks occur during the months of March-April and September-October, while the least scintillations occur during the months of June-July. Therefore, the contribution of this study is filling the gap in the current documentation of amplitude scintillation without phase scintillation over the Ugandan region. The scintillations observed have been attributed to wave-like structures which have periods of about 2-3 h, in the range of that of large scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs).

  14. Investigation of low-latitude ionospheric irregularities and their relationship to equatorial plasma bubbles using Sanya VHF radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, B.; Li, G.; Hu, L.

    2011-12-01

    A VHF radar has been set up at Sanya (18.34° N, 109.62° E, geomagnetic latitude 7.04°N), China in 2009. On the basis of the E, valley and F region irregularity observations detected by the Sanya VHF radar during equinoctial months, we focus on the simultaneous observations of E region irregularities disruption and valley region irregularities generation during the presence of post-sunset F region bubble structures. We stress that both the low latitude the E region irregularities (ERI) disruption and valley region irregularities (VRI) generation are associated with the development of post-sunset equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) structures. It is suggested that the electric field coupling from the unstable equatorial F region to low-latitude E and valley region could trigger and inhibit the occurrence of irregularities, depending on the polarity of the polarization electric field associated with the bifurcation of equatorial plasma bubbles. The mapping of upward/eastward and downward/eastward electric field associated with the west-tilted and east-tilted bubble structures, may be responsible for the disruption of E region irregularities, and the generation of valley region irregularities, respectively. However, more observations from multi instruments will be required to confirm such a scenario that the multi bifurcated EPBs play crucial roles for the simultaneous occurrence of low latitude ERI disruption and VRI generation.

  15. An Investigation of the Low-Latitude Boundary Layer at Mid-Altitudes in the Cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael O.; Avanov, Levon A.

    2006-01-01

    We have begun an investigation of the nature of the low-latitude boundary layer in the mid-altitude cusp region using data from the Polar spacecraft. This region has been routinely sampled for about three months each year for the periods 1999-2001 and 2004-2006. The low-to-mid-energy ion instruments frequently observed dense, magnetosheath-like plasma deep (in terms of distance from the magnetopause and in invariant latitude) in the magnetosphere. We seek to understand the morphology of the LLBL as it projects from the sub-solar region into the cusp and determine the influences on this morphology. An initial survey of the data is ongoing and we present here an overview of our intended study and some preliminary results.

  16. Estimation of mesopause temperatures at low latitudes using the Kunming meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wen; Xue, Xianghui; Chen, Jinsong; Dou, Xiankang; Chen, Tingdi; Li, Na

    2016-03-01

    In this study, mesopause temperatures over a low-latitude station were derived by applying the temperature gradient model technique to data from a meteor radar installation located in Kunming (25.6°N, 103.8°E), China. The estimated temperatures are in good agreement with Sounding of the Atmosphere by Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) temperatures and exhibit clear seasonal and interannual variations with dominant spectral peaks at annual, semiannual, quasi 90 day, and terannual oscillations. However, the amplitudes of the temperature fluctuations and the dominant spectral peaks are larger than those from SABER. An improved method that accounts for the temperature sensitivity of the slope estimated from the meteor radar data was developed to calibrate the larger fluctuations obtained using the temperature gradient model technique. The resulting calibrated temperatures are more consistent with SABER observations, and the accuracy of the derived temperatures is significantly improved.

  17. Analysis of low latitude Noctilucent Cloud occurrences using satellite data and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. M.; Rong, P.; Hervig, M. E.; Bailey, S. M.; Gumbel, J.; Lambert, A.

    2012-12-01

    Numerous NLC sightings have occurred in recent years at latitudes as low as ~ 40N in the skies over Chicago, Illinois, Boulder, Colorado, Omaha, Nebraska, Logan, Utah, Seattle, Washington, Calar Alto, Spain and Paris, France. While no confirming evidence has come forth thus far, such sightings raise the natural question about whether there are systematic NLC increases occurring at these low latitudes. This question is investigated using observations of temperature made by the SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite over the 2002 to 2011 time period, a 7-year water vapor climatology developed from data collected by the MLS instrument on the Aura satellite for 2005 to 2011, and Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) measurements made by the OSIRIS instrument on the Odin satellite for the 2002 to 2011 period. These data are used in conjunction with a 0-D thermodynamic equilibrium model [Hervig et al., 2009] that assumes mesospheric ice is in equilibrium with available water vapor. The 0-D model has proven to be effective in reproducing variations of the observed ice mass density, ice layer centroid height [Russell et al., 2010], and daily PMC occurrence frequency on intra-seasonal scales. Inter-annual and decadal scale variations in the northern PMC season are examined in this paper. All analyses were performed on the 0.00464 hPa surface or ~ 84 km, which is the northern hemisphere mean cloud height. Both MLS 0-D and OSIRIS measured PMCs agree well with the SABER 0-D results for 2005 to 2011. Results show a statistically significant upward trend in the number of 0-D derived PMCs per season in the latitude range 40-55N for 2002 - 201l. The long-term increases in cloud number are accompanied by temperature decreases over the same time period. Analysis of temperature and cloud number anomaly data indicates that the low latitude cloud number changes are driven by temperature. Solar cycle effects have not yet been considered in this analysis.

  18. Trends of ionospheric irregularities over African low latitude region during quiet geomagnetic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungufeni, Patrick; Habarulema, John Bosco; Jurua, Edward

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence patterns of ionospheric irregularities during quiet geomagnetic conditions over the African low latitude region were analysed. GNSS-derived Total Electron Content of the ionosphere data during the period 2001-2012 were used. The data were obtained from Libreville, Gabon (0.35°N, 9.68°E, geographic, 8.05°S, magnetic), Mbarara, Uganda (0.60°S, 30.74°E, geographic, 10.22°S, magnetic), and Malindi, Kenya (2.99°S, 40.19°E, geographic, 12.42°S, magnetic). The rate of change of total electron content index greater than 0.5 TECU/Min were considered as severe ionospheric irregularities. For most of the time, the strength of ionospheric irregularities in March equinox were greater than those during September equinox over East Africa and an opposite observation was made over West Africa. These asymmetries might be due to the direction of the meridional winds during equinoxes over the different stations. Severity of ionospheric irregularity reduced from west towards the east. This might have been related to the decreasing geomagnetic field strength from east towards the west. This is the first study that reveals the equinoctial asymmetry is different in the West and East African sectors. Moreover, the importance of this study lies in the fact that it has used extensive data to examine the isolated and un-explained earlier observations of equinoctial asymmetry and longitudinal variation of ionospheric irregularities over the African low latitude region.

  19. Is high obliquity a still plausible explanation for Neoproterozoic low-latitude glaciations ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levrard, B.; Laskar, J.

    2003-04-01

    The observations of enigmatic low-latitude glaciogenic sequences during the Sturtian (˜ 750-700 Ma) and the Varanger (˜ 620-570 Ma) glacial intervals of the Neopropterozo& uml;i c era remain the subject of controversial debates concerning possible scenarii. Of the many models that have been proposed to account for theses paradoxical features, the high-obliquity scenario invoked by G.E. Williams (1975) appears to be still largely considered. However, a such scenario requires a dissipative mechanism to bring back the Earth's obliquity from a value higher than 55o to the present value (˜ 23.5o) in less than 200 Ma. Williams (1993) suggested that core-mantle friction could have explained this substantial decrease. However, it was demonstrated by Néron de Surgy and Laskar (1997) and confirmed by Pais et al. (1999) that, not only it requires abnormal values of effective viscosity, but due to the conservation of the angular momentum, it is also largely conflicting with the paleorotation data. D.M Williams et al. (Nature, 1998) recently proposed that ``climate friction" could have produced this decrease in less than 100 Ma between ˜ 600 Ma and 500 Ma. We have revisited in details this mecanism (Levrard and Laskar, submitted to Geo. J. Int., 2002) for the Neoproterozoic glaciations. In response to periodic variations in the obliquity, the redistribution of ice/water mass and the isostatic adjusment to the surface loading affect the dynamical ellipticity of the Earth. Delayed responses in the mass redistribution may introduce a secular term in the obliquity evolution (Bills, 1994; Rubincam, 1995; Ito et al, 1995). We analyze the obliquity-oblateness feedback using non-linear response of ice sheets (Imbrie and Imbrie, 1980) to insolation forcing and layered models with Maxwell visco-elastic rheology. Possible increase in the non-linear response of ice sheets to insolation forcing and latitudinal changes in this forcing strongly limit the contribution of the obliquity

  20. Recent results on daytime upper atmospheric wave dynamics at low latitudes and their dependence on equatorial electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallamraju, Duggirala; Vijaya Lakshmi, Thatiparthi; Anji Reddy, M.; Karan, Deepak; Phadke, Kedar

    2016-07-01

    Investigations using optical emissions originating over large spatial extents (latitudes/longitudes) and multiple wavelengths revealed several interesting aspects of vertical and horizontal coupling in the low-latitude thermosphere during daytime. The daytime measurements were enabled by multi-wavelength high spectral resolution echelle grating spectrograph (MISE) that is operating from a low-latitude observational site, Hyderabad (Geographic: 17.5 ^{o} N, 78.5 ^{o} E; Geomagnetic: 8.6 ^{o} N, 151.8 ^{o} E), in India. MISE is capable of obtaining daytime optical emissions over a large field-of-view (140 ^{o}) at high-data cadence (around 5 min.) at oxygen emission wavelengths at 557.7 nm, 630.0 nm, and 777.4 nm that originate at 130 km, 230 km, and peak height of the F-region, respectively. Wave dynamics prevalent in multiple altitudes have been obtained during different background conditions. Based on this information various aspects of vertical coupling are investigated. It is seen that there is a preferred phase of solar activity when vertical coupling is enabled more readily. Further, the solar flux seems to affect the wave dynamics differently at different altitudes. The low-latitude electrodynamics also plays an important role in governing the neutral dynamical behaviour which is reflected in the neutral dayglow emissions at multiple wavelengths. These new results reveal greater insights into the fundamental nature of coupling between the thermospheric regions in the daytime. Some of the salient features of these results will be presented.

  1. Relations Between Traveling Convection Vortex (TCV) Signatures in Near-Cusp Ground Data, at Geosynchronous Orbit, and in Low Latitude Ground Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarena, H.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Murr, D.; Singer, H. J.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Traveling Convection Vortices (TCVs) occur as solitary localized ~2- 5 mHz transients near the ionospheric footpoint of the dayside magnetopause. Ion foreshock instabilities are now understood to drive all or nearly all TCVs; they generate localized changes in dynamic pressure at the dayside magnetospheric boundary, resulting in transient magnetic field variations that generate field-aligned currents that propagate to the high latitude ionosphere and also compressional waves that produce signatures at geosynchronous orbit and lower latitudes on the ground. In this work we extend earlier multistation event studies by means of a statistical study comparing isolated TCV events observed between 2010 and 2014 by the MACCS array (Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies) in Arctic Canada, GOES-13, and several low-latitude INTERMAGNET magnetic observatories, all in the same longitude sector. We found essentially no correlation between the amplitude of TCV events and the amplitude of magnetic field compressions (ΔB) at GOES-13 and low-latitude ground stations. Comparing TCV amplitudes to time derivatives (dB/dt) at geosynchronous orbit and low latitudes, as suggested by published approximate theoretical analyses, resulted in modest correlations. Consistent with earlier studies, the low latitude response was strongest at stations under or very near the equatorial electrojet. We also analyzed a set of sudden impulse (SI) events with bipolar high-latitude signatures; the geostationary and low latitude compressions associated with them were relatively higher than those for TCVs.

  2. Studies on ionospheric scintillation using the S4 and ROT indices over Indian low latitude station during the year 2009 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, Hemali; Pathak, Kamlesh

    The dual frequency signals from the GPS satellites recorded at an Indian low latitude station Surat (21.16(°) N, 72.78(°) E), situated near the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly have been analysed to study the ionospheric scintillation in terms of amplitude scintillation S_{4} index and Total Electron Content (TEC) for the rising phase of solar activity period from the year 2009 to 2012. In this study we described the diurnal variation of scintillation along with TEC variation, solar activity dependence and effects of a space weather related event, a geomagnetic storms on scintillation. The diurnal variation of scintillation shows co-existence of F region irregularities with a scale length of few kilometers and 400 m as apparent from TEC depletion and ROT fluctuations, which occurred simultaneously during night-time ionospheric scintillation. The number of concurrently occurred scintillation activities with S _{4} _{}> 0.2 and enhancement of ROTI (ROTI>0.5) during different years are brought out. It is found that scintillation occurred with enhancement of ROTI at Surat is at its maximum during the year 2012, 2011 and 2010 followed by a minimum during the year 2009 showing positive correlation with solar activity. Scintillation variations during the geomagnetic storms registered during the period 2011-2012 with Dst <-100 nT are analysed. Scintillation inhibition and generation found the local time dependence of ring current strength measured by the Dst index showing good agreement with Aaron’s criteria.

  3. A simplified indexing of F-region geophysical noise at low latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, S.; Lakshmi, D. R.; Reddy, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    A simple method of deriving an F-region index that can warn the prediction users at low latitudes as to the specific months when they have to be more careful in using the long term predictions is described.

  4. A new mapping technique for conversion of slant TEC to vertical TEC based on Computerized Ionospheric Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Pradip; Bhuyan, Pradip; Bhuyan, Kalyan

    The most frequently used mapping function for converting slant TEC to vertical TEC uses a single layer model with the assumption that all free electrons are concentrated in an infinitesimally thick spherical shell at the mean ionospheric height and containing the ionospheric pierce point. Spatial structures present in the ionosphere are not taken into account in such single layer models. A three dimensional mapping algorithm developed by Mannucci et al. (1999) uses three independent constant density slabs stacked vertically to model the electron density with the result of reduction in a level error of the TEC maps. We describe a new approach based on Computerized Ionospheric Tomography (CIT) to convert STEC to VTEC. The new method is independent of any assumption regarding the electron density distribution of the ionosphere. In this method, the ionosphere region of interest is divided in to pixels and TEC is represented as the sum of the integration of empirical functions within the pixels, which are intersected by the path along which TEC is measured. Using a suitable inversion algorithm, the empirical function within each pixel is retrieved from TEC data recorded simultaneously at a meridional chain of GPS receivers. The VTEC values are then easily obtained as the sum of the integration of the empirical functions within each pixel along a vertical path. The CIT method is applied for converting STEC to VTEC using GPS TEC data collected at 12 locations across India since 2003. The stations are aligned along three meridional chains. The vertical TEC values obtained from the CIT method are then compared to VTEC obtained from a single layer model. Results have shown that the CIT can be suitably adapted as a mapping technique, which takes into account the presence of spatial structures in the ionosphere. Keywords: Ionosphere (Indian equatorial and low latitude ionosphere, Vertical Total Electron Content, mapping functions, computerized ionospheric tomography)

  5. Low-Latitude Solar Wind During the Fall 1998 SOHO-Ulysses Quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poletto, G.; Suess, Steven T.; Biesecker, D.; Esser, R.; Gloeckler, G.; Zurbuchen, T.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Fall 1998 SOlar-Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) - Ulysses quadrature occurred when Ulysses was at 5.2 AU, 17.4 deg South of the equator, and off the West line of the Sun. SOHO coronal observations, at heliocentric distances of a few solar radii, showed that the line through the solar center and Ulysses crossed, over the first days of observations, a dark, weakly emitting area and through the northern edge of a streamer complex during the second half of the quadrature campaign. Ulysses in situ observations showed this transition to correspond to a decrease from higher speed wind typical of coronal hole flow to low speed wind. Physical parameters (density, temperature, flow speed) of the low latitude coronal plasma sampled over the campaign are determined using constraints from what is the same plasma measured later in situ and simulating the intensities of the Hydrogen Lyman-alpha and OVI 1032 and 1037 Angstrom lines, measured by the Ultra Violet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on SOHO. The densities, temperatures and outflow speed are compared with the same characteristic flow parameters for high-latitude fast wind streams and typical slow solar wind.

  6. Anomalous ionospheric variations prior to major earthquakes during 2015 affecting Indian low latitude station Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sumedha; Upadhayaya, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed five major earthquakes (M>6) that occurred during the year 2015, affecting Indian ionosphere, using F2 layer critical frequency (foF2) data obtained using Digisonde from a low latitude station, Delhi (28.6°N, 77.2°E, 42.4°N dip). Normal day-to-day variability occurring in ionosphere is segregated by calculating F2 layer critical frequency variations (ΔfoF2) from the normal quiet time behavior apart from calculating interquartile range. We find that ionospheric F2 region across Delhi by and large shows some significant perturbations 3-4 days prior to these earthquake events. These observed perturbations indicate towards seismo-ionospheric coupling as solar and geomagnetic indices were normally quiet and stable during the period of these events. Further, it was also observed that the effect of earthquake was prominently observed even outside the earthquake preparation zone, calculated using Dobrovolsky et al. [1979].

  7. Isotopic composition of low-latitude paleoprecipitation during the Early Cretaceous

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suarez, M.B.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Vega, F.J.; Alvarado-Ortega, J.

    2009-01-01

    likely underestimated tropical to subtropical precipitation and evaporation fluxes. The limited latitudinal constraints for earlier isotope mass balance modeling of the Albian hydrologic cycle of the Northern Hemisphere Americas resulted in extrapolated low-latitude precipitation ??18O values that were much heavier (up to 3???) than the values observed in this study. The lighter values identified in this study indicate a more pronounced rainout effect for tropical regions and quite possibly a more vigorous evaporation effect. These and additional low-latitude data are required to better constrain changes in the hydrologic cycle during the Cretaceous greenhouse period, and to reduce the uncertainties resulting from limited geographic coverage of proxy data. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  8. Determining the Current and Future Health of Low-Latitude Andean Glaciers Using an Equilibrium Line Altitude Model and Hypsometric Data from the Randolph Glacier Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, A.; MacAyeal, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Mountain glaciers have been described as the water towers of world, and for many populations in the low-latitude South American Andes, glacial runoff is vital for agricultural, industrial, and basic water needs. Previous studies of low-latitude Andean glaciers suggest a precarious future due to contemporary warming. These studies have looked at trends in freezing level heights or observations of contemporary retreat. However, regional-scale understanding of low-latitude glacial responses to present and future climate change is limited, in part due to incomplete information about the extent and elevation distribution of low-latitude glaciers. The recently published Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI) (5.0) provides the necessary information about the size and elevation distribution of low-latitude glaciers to begin such studies. We determine the contemporary equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) for low-latitude Andean glaciers in the RGI, using a numerical energy balance ablation model driven with reanalysis and gridded data products. Contemporary ELAs tend to fall around the peak of the elevation histogram, with an exception being the southern-most outer tropical glaciers whose modeled ELAs tend to be higher than the elevation histogram for that region (see below figure). Also, we use the linear tends in temperature and precipitation from the contemporary climatology to extrapolate 21stcentury climate forcings. Modeled ELAs by the middle on the century are universally predicted to rise, with outer tropical ELAs rising more than the inner tropical glaciers. These trends continue through the end of the century. Finally, we explore how climate variables and parameters in our numerical model may vary for different warming scenarios from United Nation's IPCC AR5 report. We quantify the impacts of these changes on ELAs for various climate change trajectories. These results support previous work on the precarious future of low latitude Andean glaciers, while providing a richer

  9. Simulation of low-latitude ionospheric response to 2015 St. Patrick's Day super geomagnetic storm using ionosonde-derived PRE vertical drifts over Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, L. M.; Sripathi, S.; Singh, Ram

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present low-latitude ionospheric response over Indian longitude to the recent super geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015, using the Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere (SAMI2) model which incorporates ionosonde-derived vertical drift impacted by prompt penetration eastward electric field occurring during the evening prereversal enhancement (PRE) in the vertical drift. The importance of this storm is that (1) Dst reaches as low as -228 nT and (2) prompt penetration of eastward electric field coincided with evening hours PRE. The daytime vertical E × B drifts in the SAMI2 model are, however, considered based on Scherliess-Fejer model. The simulations indicate a significant enhancement in F layer height and equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in the post sunset hours on 17 March 2015 vis-a-vis quiet day. The model simulations during recovery phase, considering disturbance dynamo vertical E × B drift along with equatorward disturbance wind, indicate suppression of the daytime EIA. SAMI2 simulations considering the disturbance wind during the recovery phase suggest that equatorward wind enhances the ionospheric density in the low latitude; however, its role in the formation of the EIA depends on the polarity of the zonal electric field. Comparison of model derived total electron content (TEC) with the TEC from ground GPS receivers indicates that model does reproduce enhancement of the EIA during the main phase and suppression of the EIA during the recovery phase of the superstorm. However, peculiarities pertaining to the ionospheric response to prompt penetration electric field in the Indian sector vis-a-vis earlier reports from American sector have been discussed.

  10. Response of nighttime equatorial and low latitude F-region to the geomagnetic storm of August 18, 2003, in the Brazilian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Y.; Univap Team

    This paper presents an investigation of geomagnetic storm effects in the equatorial and low latitude F-region in the Brazilian sector during the intense geomagnetic storm on 18 August 2003 SSC 14 21 UT on 17 08 Sigma Kp 52 Ap 108 vert Dst vert max 168 at 1600 UT on 18 08 Simultaneous ionospheric sounding measurements from two stations viz Palmas 10 2 o S 48 2 o W dip latitude 5 7 o S and S a o Jos e dos Campos 23 2 o S 45 9 o W dip latitude 17 6 o S Brazil are presented for the nights of 16-17 17-18 18-19 19-20 August 2003 quiet disturbed and recovery phases Both stations are equipped with the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde CADI Quiet and disturbed conditions of the F-region ionosphere are compared using data collected from the two stations The relationship between magnetospheric disturbance and low-latitude ionospheric dynamics and generation of ionospheric irregularities will be discussed The GPS data available from several stations in Rede Brasileira de Monitoramento Cont i nuo de GPS Brazilian Network for Continuous GPS Monitoring are used to obtain the vertical total electron content VTEC and the rate of change of TEC per minute on UT days 18 and 19 August 2003 During the disturbed nights the low latitude station S J Campos showed strong positive phase whereas the near equatorial station Palmas showed strong uplifting of the F-layer Normally during the winter months May to August in the Brazilian sector large-scale ionospheric irregularities in form of plasma

  11. Day-to-day changes in ionospheric electron content at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabas, R. S.; Bhuyan, P. K.; Tyagi, T. R.; Bhardwaj, R. K.; Lal, J. B.

    1984-06-01

    For a number of years, the ionospheric electron content (IEC) over the Indian subcontinent has been determined on the basis of the Faraday rotation of satellite radio beacon transmissions. In these determinations, use was made of the orbiting satellites BE-B and BE-C, and, for a limited period, of the geostationary satellite ATS 6. A large variability in day-to-day values of IEC was reported, and it was tried to correlate this phenomenon with magnetic activity, solar flux, or the effect of neutral winds. Tyagi (1978) observed that the day-to-day changes in IEC occur in the form of single day abnormality, and alternate day abnormality. Long-term fluctuations were found with a periodicity of about 45 days. The present investigation is concerned with a more detailed study of the observed variations. An analysis is conducted of IEC data recorded during the low phase of the solar cycle, taking into account data from six low-latitude stations covering a latitude range from approximately 15.0 deg N to 30.0 deg N.

  12. Signatures of the low-latitude Pi 2 pulsations in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamry, Essam; Mahrous, A.; Fathy, A.; Salama, N.; Yumoto, K.

    2012-06-01

    To study the activities and the physics of the Earth’s magnetosphere, several types of measurements are made with different kinds of instruments both on earth and in space. Ground based data represent the properties of the solar wind, the Earth’s magnetic field and currents in the magnetosphere. Many of the activities occurring in the magnetosphere are a result of changes in the solar wind. It has been known since the 1860s that the Earth’s magnetic field is fluctuating and during that times the fluctuations are periodical. In this study, a special type of magnetic pulsations in the Earth’s magnetic field called Pi 2 (from MAGDAS stations in Egypt) is investigated and analyzed statistically. We carried out our analysis through two different methods: (i) Fourier transformations and (ii) wavelet power spectrum. The result shows that the Pi 2 observed in the main phase of the geomagnetic storm have larger frequency than those observed in the recovery phase. These results excluded the field line resonance and the plasmapause surface as a possible generation mechanism, and suggest the cavity resonance as a possible generation mechanism of the Pi 2 pulsations at low latitude stations in Egypt.

  13. Low-latitude Pi2 pulsations during intervals of quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp≤1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.-J.; Kim, K.-H.; Jun, C.-W.; Takahashi, K.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, E.; Jin, H.; Seon, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Hwang, J.

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that Pi2 pulsations can be excited under extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp=0). However, there have been few comprehensive reports of Pi2 pulsations in such a near ground state magnetosphere. To understand the characteristics of quiet-time Pi2 pulsations, we statistically examined Pi2 events observed on the nightside between 1800 and 0600 local time at the low-latitude Bohyun (BOH, L = 1.35) station in South Korea. We chose year 2008 for analysis because geomagnetic activity was unusually low in that year. A total of 982 Pi2 events were identified when Kp≤1. About 80% of the Pi2 pulsations had a period between 110 and 300 s, which significantly differs from the conventional Pi2 period from 40 to 150 s. Comparing Pi2 periods and solar wind conditions, we found that Pi2 periods decrease with increasing solar wind speed, consistent with the result of Troitskaya (1967). The observed wave properties are discussed in terms of plasmaspheric resonance, which has been proposed for Pi2 pulsations in the inner magnetosphere. We also found that Pi2 pulsations occur quasi-periodically with a repetition period of ˜23-38 min. We will discuss what determines such a recurrence time of Pi2 pulsations under quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  14. The low-latitude boundary layer at mid-altitiudes: Relation to large-scale Birkeland currents

    SciTech Connect

    Woch, J.; Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R. ); Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J. )

    1993-10-22

    In this work the authors seek to test a projected relationship between the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and field aligned currents (FAC), or Birkeland currents. They use the procedure developed by Woch and Lundin for identifying LLBL boundaries. They look for correlations between properties of the FAC and properties of the LLBL. Their results show that in most cases the FAC observed are totally inside the region which exhibits LLBL plasma precipitation. The authors argue that within the biases to their data because of its source, and relative sensitivities, their conclusions support earlier work which argues for the LLBL acting as a source region for FAC features.

  15. Jellyfish Patch Detecting Using Low Latitude Remote Sensing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Jo, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    Jellyfish can be asexual and sexual reproduction depending on the environment, and it has excellent environmental adaptability and reproduction than other sea creatures. If the marine environment become worse, jellyfish can take advantage in the competition for survival. Marine environmental changes caused by rapid climate change, dyke construction and land reclamation will increase the amount of jellyfish and as a result can lead to a various social and economic problems. In this study, jellyfish were observed in coastal area using a low-altitude Helikite remote sensing system for the first time. Helikite is a type of helium balloon plus a kite that can get the data with optical sensors for the desired spatial resolutions by adjusting the altitudes. In addition, it has an advantage that can monitor any objects for a long time at one place as long as the electric power and helium last. In this study, we observed the jellyfish patches using a digital camera in the Chesapeake Bay and estimate populations and size of jellyfish patches through image processing. Research results suggests that we can have long-term real-time observations for not only jellyfish, but also other harmful marine creatures.

  16. Anomalous variations of tropopause height in low latitude regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramkumar, T. K.; Narayana Rao, D.

    Successful attempts have been made in early 1990s to link the possible influence of equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial-oscillation QBO on tropopause dynamics at longer period scales leading ultimately to the evolution of strong El Nino events of global economic importance Gray et al 1992 GRL JMSJ As a result of this influence it is possible that the tropopause height may be increasing instead of decreasing with latitude from the equator in tropical regions during particular phase of QBO say westerly phase over the equator In the present work we report such observations using radiosonde data obtained from fourteen different tropical 30 N to 30 S radio-sounding stations located in the wide longitudinal zone of South East Asia South Pacific and Africa in the year 2004 The daily tropopause height determined at 00 00 and 12 00 hrs GMT is averaged for each month separately The tropopause height Cold Point Tropopause CPT is determined by noting the height of minimum temperature between 12 and 20 km It is observed further that the latitude variation of tropopause height in southern Hemisphere is much less when compared to that in the Northern Hemisphere The reason for this asymmetric characteristic of tropopause about the equator may be that greater fraction of the northern hemisphere is covered with land and it is ocean in the southern hemisphere Because of large variations in topography of the land and the associated thermal conductivity it is possible that convection activities of the

  17. Variational electric fields at low latitudes and their relation to spread F and plasma irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtet, J. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Heppner, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Recordings from OGO 6 show that electric field irregularities are frequently present between + or - 35 deg geomagnetic latitude in the 2000 - 0600 local time sector. The signatures are very clear, and are easily distinguished from the normal AC background noise, and whistler and emission activity. The spectral appearance of the fields makes it meaningful to distinguish between 3 different types of irregularities: strong irregularities, weak irregularities, and weak irregularities with a rising spectrum. Strong irregularities seem most likely to occur in regions where gradients in ionization are present. Changes in plasma composition, resulting in an increase in the mean ion mass, are also often observed in the irregularity regions. Comparison with ground based ionosondes indicates a connection between strong irregularities and low latitude spread F. A good correlation is also present between strong fields and small scale fluctuations in ionization, delta N/N 1 percent. From the data it appears as if a gradient driven instability is the most likely source of the strong irregularities.

  18. Solar Cycle Effects on Equatorial Electrojet Strength and Low Latitude Ionospheric Variability (P10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenadhari, B.; Alex, S.

    2006-11-01

    veena_iig@yahoo.co.in The most obvious indicators of the activity of a solar cycle are sunspots, flares, plages, and soon. These are intimately linked to the solar magnetic fields, heliospheric processes which exhibit complex but systematic variations. The changes in geomagnetic activity, as observed in the ground magnetic records follow systematic correspondence with the solar activity conditions. Thus the transient variations in the magnetic field get modified by differing solar conditions. Also the solar cycle influences the Earth causing changes in geomagnetic activity, the magnetosphere and the ionosphere. Daily variations in the ground magnetic field are produced by different current systems in the earth’s space environment flowing in the ionosphere and magnetosphere which has a strong dependence on latitude and longitude of the location. The north-south (Horizontal) configuration of the earth’s magnetic field over the equator is responsible for the narrow band of current system over the equatorial latitudes and is called the Equatorial electrojet (EEJ) and is a primary driver for Equatorial Ionization anomaly (EIA). Equatorial electric fields and plasma drifts play the fundamental roles on the morphology of the low latitude ionosphere and strongly vary during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed periods. Quantitative study is done to illustrate the development process of EEJ and its influence on ionospheric parameters. An attempt is also made to examine and discuss the response of the equatorial electrojet parameters to the fast varying conditions of solar wind and interplanetary parameters.

  19. Insights into low-latitude cloud feedbacks from high-resolution models.

    PubMed

    Bretherton, Christopher S

    2015-11-13

    Cloud feedbacks are a leading source of uncertainty in the climate sensitivity simulated by global climate models (GCMs). Low-latitude boundary-layer and cumulus cloud regimes are particularly problematic, because they are sustained by tight interactions between clouds and unresolved turbulent circulations. Turbulence-resolving models better simulate such cloud regimes and support the GCM consensus that they contribute to positive global cloud feedbacks. Large-eddy simulations using sub-100 m grid spacings over small computational domains elucidate marine boundary-layer cloud response to greenhouse warming. Four observationally supported mechanisms contribute: 'thermodynamic' cloudiness reduction from warming of the atmosphere-ocean column, 'radiative' cloudiness reduction from CO2- and H2O-induced increase in atmospheric emissivity aloft, 'stability-induced' cloud increase from increased lower tropospheric stratification, and 'dynamical' cloudiness increase from reduced subsidence. The cloudiness reduction mechanisms typically dominate, giving positive shortwave cloud feedback. Cloud-resolving models with horizontal grid spacings of a few kilometres illuminate how cumulonimbus cloud systems affect climate feedbacks. Limited-area simulations and superparameterized GCMs show upward shift and slight reduction of cloud cover in a warmer climate, implying positive cloud feedbacks. A global cloud-resolving model suggests tropical cirrus increases in a warmer climate, producing positive longwave cloud feedback, but results are sensitive to subgrid turbulence and ice microphysics schemes. PMID:26438280

  20. Low-latitude field-aligned currents deduced by Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Kervalishvili, Guram; Rauberg, Jan

    2015-04-01

    ESA's constellation mission Swarm was successfully launched on 22 November 2013. The three satellites are orbiting the Earth at 470 km and 520 km altitude. The lower pair Swarm-A and C is flying side-by-side separated by only 1.4° in latitude. Magnetic field readings of this pair are used to determine for the first time field-aligned currents (FAC) uniquely in the ionosphere. Of particular interest for this presentation are FACs at low and equatorial latitudes. Indications for several of such current systems have been deduced from CHAMP observations. Examples to be studied are meridional and vertical currents driven by the F-region dynamo. They are expected to show opposite polarities between noon and sunset. Likewise there are FACs expected to balance the electric potential differences between the foci of the Sq current vortices in the two hemispheres, which should be most prominent during solstice seasons. Another example is the FAC associated with equatorial plasma bubbles. They are expected to flow along the walls of the electron density depleted volume. Due to the limited amount of suitable Swarm data we will focus on June solstice and September equinox 2014 for this presentation.

  1. High latitude regulation of low latitude thermocline ventilation and planktic foraminifer populations across glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Philip F.; Norris, Richard D.

    2011-11-01

    One of the earliest discoveries in palaeoceanography was the observation in 1935 that the (sub)tropical planktic foraminifer Globorotalia menardii became absent or extremely rare in the Atlantic Ocean during glacials of the late Pleistocene. Yet a mechanistic explanation for G. menardii's extraordinary biogeographic behaviour has eluded palaeoceanographers for 75 years. Here we show that modern G. menardii, along with two other species that also suffer Atlantic population collapses during glacials, track poorly ventilated waters globally in their thermocline habitats. The ventilation states of low latitude thermoclines are 'set', to a first order, by intermediate water masses originating at high latitudes. In the modern Atlantic this control on low latitude thermocline ventilation is exerted by relatively poorly ventilated, southern-sourced Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) and sub-Antarctic Mode Water (SAMW). We suggest that the glacial Atlantic foraminifer population collapses were a consequence of a low latitude thermocline that was better ventilated during glacials than it is today, in line with geochemical evidence, and driven primarily by a well-ventilated, northern-sourced intermediate water mass. A ventilation mechanism driving the glacial population collapses is further supported by our new constraints on the precise timing of these species' Atlantic proliferation during the last deglaciation — occurring in parallel with a wholesale, bipolar reorganisation of the Atlantic's thermocline-to-abyssal overturning circulation. Our findings demonstrate that a bipolar seesaw in the formation of high latitude intermediate waters has played an important role in regulating the population dynamics of thermocline-dwelling plankton at lower latitudes.

  2. Response of ionospheric electric fields at mid-low latitudes during geomagnetic sudden commencements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kasaba, Y.; Shinbori, A.; Nishimura, Y.; Kikuchi, T.; Ebihara, Y.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2014-12-01

    Geomagnetic sudden commencements (SCs) are known as one of the distinct magnetospheric disturbance phenomena triggered by solar wind disturbances. Many previous studies have focused on the generation mechanism of SCs by using in-situ observations and simulations. However, the global evolution of ionospheric electric fields has primarily been estimated from the ionospheric current. Although a few studies utilized electric field data from radar observations, the coverage is limited in time, and limited component of the electric field is obtained. In this study, we investigated the response and local time dependence of the ionospheric electric field at mid-low latitudes associated with 203 SCs occurred from 1999 to 2004 by the in-situ observation of the ROCSAT-1 spacecraft. We found that the ionospheric electric field associated with SCs instantaneously responds to geomagnetic fields regardless of spacecraft local time. Our statistical analysis also showed the instantaneous response of the electric field, which indicates the global instant transmission of the electric field from polar region. In contrast, peak times in the preliminary impulse (PI) and main impulse (MI) phases were different between the ionospheric electric field and equatorial geomagnetic field (20 sec in the PI phase). Based on a comparison to the ground-ionosphere waveguide model by Kikuchi [2014], this time lag is suggested to be due to the latitudinal difference of the ionospheric conductivity. After constructing the local time distribution of the SC amplitude, we found that the dayside feature was seen at 18-22 h even the ionospheric conductivity is lower than that at dayside. We performed a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation for an ideal SC. The result of the simulation showed that the electric potential distribution is asymmetric with respect to the noon-midnight meridian, which is similar to our observational result. It appears to result from the divergence of the Hall current under the non

  3. The Kinetic Scale Structure of the Low Latitude Boundary Layer: Initial MMS Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorelli, John; Gershman, Dan; Avanov, Levon; Pollock, Craig; Giles, Barbara; Gliese, Ulrik; Barrie, Alexander; Holland, Matthew; Salo, Chad; Dickson, Charles; Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael; Sato, Yoshifumi; Strangeway, Robert; Russell, Christopher; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Khotyainstev, Yuri; Torbert, Roy; Burch, James

    2016-04-01

    Since its launch in March of 2015, NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission has captured thousands of high resolution magnetopause crossings, routinely resolving the sub-Larmor radius structure of the magnetopause boundary layer for the first time. The primary goal of MMS is to understand the microphysics of magnetic reconnection, and it is well on its way to achieving this objective. However, MMS is also making routine measurements of the electron and ion gyroviscous and heat flux tensors with unprecedented resolution and accuracy. This opens up the possibility of directly observing the physical processes that facilitate momentum and energy transport across the magnetopause boundary layer under arbitrary conditions (e.g., magnetic field geometry and flow shear) far from the reconnection X line. Currently, our global magnetosphere fluid models (e.g., resistive or Hall MHD) do not include accurate descriptions of viscosity and heat flow, both of which are known to be critical players at the magnetopause (not just at the reconnection sites), and several groups are attempting to make progress on this difficult fluid closure problem. In this talk, we will address the fluid closure problem in the context of MMS observations of the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL), focusing on high resolution particle observations by the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI). FPI electron bulk velocities are accurate enough to compute current density in both the high density magnetosheath and low density magnetosphere and have already revealed that the LLBL has a complex parallel current structure on the proton Larmor radius scale. We discuss the relationship between these parallel currents and the Hall electric field structures predicted by kinetic models. We also present first observations of the ion and electron gyroviscous and heat flux tensors in the LLBL and discuss implications for the fluid closure problem at Earth's magnetopause.

  4. HF radar signatures of the cusp and low-latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.; Dudeney, J. R.; Greenwald, R. A.; Pinnock, M.; Newell, P. T.; Rodger, A. S.; Mattin, N.; Meng, C.-I.

    1995-01-01

    Continuous ground-based observations of ionospheric and magnetospheric regions are critical to the Geospace Environmental Modeling (GEM) program. It is therefore important to establish clear intercalibrations between different ground-based instruments and satellites in order to clearly place the ground-based observations in context with the corresponding in situ satellite measurements. HF-radars operating at high latitudes are capable of observing very large spatial regions of the ionosphere on a nearly continuous basis. In this paper we report on an intercalibration study made using the Polar Anglo-American Conjugate Radar Experiment radars located at Goose Bay, Labrador, and Halley Station, Antarctica, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. The DMSP satellite data are used to provide clear identifications of the ionospheric cusp and the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL). The radar data for eight cusp events and eight LLBL events have been examined in order to determine a radar signature of these ionospheric regions. This intercalibraion indicates that the cusp is always characterized by wide, complex Doppler power spectra, whereas the LLBL is usually found to have spectra dominated by a single component. The distribution of spectral widths in the cusp is of a generally Gaussian form with a peak at about 220 m/s. The distribution of spectral widths in the LLBL is more like an exponential distribution, with the peak of the distribution occurring at about 50 m/s. There are a few cases in the LLBL where the Doppler power spectra are strikingly similar to those observed in the cusp.

  5. TEC Revolutionizes Military Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracco, Donald C.

    1979-01-01

    Training Extension Course (TEC) system, based on individual, performance-oriented achievement, represents a revolution in Army training concepts and practices. It involves using measurable behavioral objectives, criterion-referenced testing, and validated training materials. (JOW)

  6. On the response of the equatorial and low latitude ionospheric regions in the Indian sector to the large magnetic disturbance of 29 October 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.; Pant, T. Kumar; Ravindran, S.; Sridharan, R.

    2009-06-01

    The present paper investigates the response of the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere over the Indian longitudes to the events on 29 October 2003 using ionosonde data at Trivandrum (8.5° N (0.5° N geomagnetic), 77° E) and SHAR (13.7° N (5.7° N geomagnetic), 80.2° E), ground-based magnetometer data from Trivandrum and Total Electron Content (TEC) derived from GPS data at the locations of Ahmedabad (23° N (15° N geomagnetic), 72° E), Jodhpur (26.3° N (18.3° N geomagnetic), 73° E) and Delhi (28° N (20° N geomagnetic), 77° E). Following the storm sudden commencement, the TEC at all the three stations showed an overall enhancement in association with episodes of inter-planetary electric field penetration. Interestingly, real ionospheric height profiles derived using the ionosonde data at both Trivandrum and SHAR showed significant short-term excursions and recoveries. In the post noon sector, these features are more pronounced over SHAR, an off equatorial station, than those over Trivandrum indicating the increased effects of neutral winds.

  7. Equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere-thermosphere system response to the space weather event of August 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Ravindran, Sudha; Pant, Tarun Kumar; Devasia, C. V.; Paxton, L. J.

    2009-12-01

    The response of the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere-thermosphere system to the geomagnetic storm during 23-26 August 2005 is investigated. The study is carried out using the vertical total electron content (VTEC) measured by GPS receivers along the 77-78°E longitude and the O/N2 ratio obtained from the Global Ultraviolet Imager instrument on board the TIMED satellite. The equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) shows a poleward latitudinal expansion on 24 August, probably associated with an eastward prompt-penetration electric field. The equatorial and low latitudes show an increase in VTEC during the main phase of the storm on 24 August. The prompt-penetration eastward electric field, along with an increase in the O/N2 ratio, could be responsible for this observed positive phase. The VTEC variations on 24 August also reveal the signature of a large-scale acoustic gravity wave/traveling atmospheric disturbance propagating with a horizontal velocity of ˜750 m/s. Suppression of the EIA is observed during the storm recovery phase on 25 August, which probably is associated with the westward disturbance dynamo electric field and the equatorward expansion of the neutral composition changes (O/N2 depletion).

  8. Analysis of strong ionospheric scintillation events measured by means of GPS signals at low latitudes during disturbed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, B.

    2012-08-01

    Drifting structures characterized by inhomogeneities in the spatial electron density distribution at ionospheric heights cause the scintillation of radio waves propagating through. The fractional electron density fluctuations and the corresponding scintillation levels may reach extreme values at low latitudes during high solar activity. Different levels of scintillation were observed on experimental data collected in the Asian sector at low latitudes by means of a GPS dual frequency receiver under moderate solar activity (2005). The GPS receiver used in these campaigns was particularly modified in firmware in order to record power estimates on the C/A code as well as on the carriers L1 and L2. Strong scintillation activity was recorded in the post-sunset period (saturatingS4 and SI as high as 20 dB). Spectral modifications and broadening was observed during high levels of scintillation possibly indicating refractive scattering taking place instead of diffractive scattering. A possible interpretation of those events was attempted on the basis of the refractive scattering theory developed by Uscinski (1968) and Booker and MajidiAhi (1981).

  9. On the seasonal variations of reflectivity and turbulence characteristics of low-latitude mesospheric echoes over Gadanki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, D.; Patra, A. K.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2016-06-01

    Gadanki radar observations of the low-latitude mesospheric echoes studied earlier have shown that while both occurrence rate and signal-to-noise ratio of the mesospheric echoes peak in the equinoxes turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rate and eddy diffusivity, estimated using spectral width of these echoes, peak in the summer. This seasonal difference is apparently inconsistent with the understanding that the mesospheric echoes are generated by turbulence. In this paper, we analyze Gadanki radar observations of mesospheric echoes made during 2011 and 2012 and study seasonal variations in reflectivity and TKE dissipation rate in an attempt to address the aforementioned puzzle. We show that both reflectivity and TKE dissipation rate in the mesosphere show semiannual variations peaking in the equinoxes, which are vastly different from those reported earlier. We also show that seasonal variations in reflectivity and TKE dissipation rate have a close correspondence with gravity wave activity. These results are found to be consistent with the gravity wave breaking hypothesis generating turbulence and radar echoes in the low-latitude mesosphere.

  10. Common origin of positive ionospheric storms at middle latitudes and the geomagnetic activity effect at low latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Proelss, G.W. )

    1993-04-01

    The author looks for a correlation between two different atmospheric effects. They are a positive atmospheric storm (an anomalous increase in the F2 region ionization density), observed at middle latitudes, and the geomagnetic activity effect (the anomalous changes of temperature and gas density seen in the thermosphere), observed at low latitudes. A temporal correlation is sought to test the argument that both of these effects are the result of travelling atmospheric disturbances (TAD). A TAD is a pulselike atmospheric wave thought to be generated by substorm activity, and to propagate with high velocity (600 m/s) from polar latitudes toward equatorial latitudes. The author looks at data from five separate events correlating magnetic, ionospheric, and neutral atmospheric measurements. The conclusion is that there is a positive correlation between magnetic substorm activity at high latitudes, and positive ionospheric storms at middle latitudes and geomagnetic activity at low latitudes. The time correlations are consistent with high propagation speeds between these events. The author also presents arguments which indicate that the middle latitude positive ionospheric storms are not the result of electric field effects.